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Sample records for activation product release

  1. Products Released from Enzymically Active Cell Wall Stimulate Ethylene Production and Ripening in Preclimacteric Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Fruit.

    PubMed

    Brecht, J K; Huber, D J

    1988-12-01

    Enzymically active cell wall from ripe tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit pericarp release uronic acids through the action of wall-bound polygalacturonase. The potential involvement of products of wall hydrolysis in the induction of ethylene synthesis during tomato ripening was investigated by vacuum infiltrating preclimacteric (green) fruit with solutions containing pectin fragments enzymically released from cell wall from ripe fruit. Ripening initiation was accelerated in pectin-infiltrated fruit compared to control (buffer-infiltrated) fruit as measured by initiation of climacteric CO(2) and ethylene production and appearance of red color. The response to infiltration was maximum at a concentration of 25 micrograms pectin per fruit; higher concentrations (up to 125 micrograms per fruit) had no additional effect. When products released from isolated cell wall from ripe pericarp were separated on Bio-Gel P-2 and specific size classes infiltrated into preclimacteric fruit, ripening-promotive activity was found only in the larger (degree of polymerization >8) fragments. Products released from pectin derived from preclimacteric pericarp upon treatment with polygalacturonase from ripe pericarp did not stimulate ripening when infiltrated into preclimacteric fruit.

  2. Activation of the epithelial Na+ channel triggers prostaglandin E₂ release and production required for embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ye Chun; Guo, Jing Hui; Liu, Xinmei; Zhang, Runju; Tsang, Lai Ling; Dong, Jian Da; Chen, Hui; Yu, Mei Kuen; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xiao Hu; Fok, Kin Lam; Chung, Yiu Wa; Huang, Hefeng; Zhou, Wen Liang; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2012-07-01

    Embryo implantation remains a poorly understood process. We demonstrate here that activation of the epithelial Na⁺ channel (ENaC) in mouse endometrial epithelial cells by an embryo-released serine protease, trypsin, triggers Ca²⁺ influx that leads to prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) release, phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB and upregulation of cyclooxygenase 2, the enzyme required for prostaglandin production and implantation. We detected maximum ENaC activation, as indicated by ENaC cleavage, at the time of implantation in mice. Blocking or knocking down uterine ENaC in mice resulted in implantation failure. Furthermore, we found that uterine ENaC expression before in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment is markedly lower in women with implantation failure as compared to those with successful pregnancy. These results indicate a previously undefined role of ENaC in regulating the PGE₂ production and release required for embryo implantation, defects that may be a cause of miscarriage and low success rates in IVF.

  3. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_C Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima; Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP satellite was successfully launched January 31st 2015, and began acquiring Earth observation data following in-orbit sensor calibration. Global data products derived from the SMAP L-band microwave measurements include Level 1 calibrated and geolocated radiometric brightness temperatures, Level 23 surface soil moisture and freezethaw geophysical retrievals mapped to a fixed Earth grid, and model enhanced Level 4 data products for surface to root zone soil moisture and terrestrial carbon (CO2) fluxes. The post-launch SMAP mission CalVal Phase had two primary objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product pertaining to the validated release. The L4_C validated product release effectively replaces an earlier L4_C beta-product release (Kimball et al. 2015). The validated release described in this report incorporates a longer data record and benefits from algorithm and CalVal refinements acquired during the SMAP post-launch CalVal intensive period. The SMAP L4_C algorithms utilize a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and component carbon fluxes for vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw (FT) controls on GPP and respiration (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and

  4. Soluble microbial products (SMPs) release in activated sludge systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the characterization, production and implications of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in biological wastewater treatment. The precise definition of SMPs is open to talk about, but is currently regarded as “the pool of organic compounds that are released into solution from substrate metabolism and biomass decay”'. Some of the SMPs have been identified as humic acids, polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, antibiotics, extracellular enzymes and structural components of cells and products of energy metabolism. They adversely affect the kinetic activity, flocculating and settling properties of sludge. This review outlines some important findings with regard to biodegradability and treatability of SMPs and also the effect of process parameters on their production. As SMPs are produced during biological treatment process, their trace amounts normally remain in the effluent that defines the highest COD removal efficiency. Their presence in effluent represents a high potential risk of toxic by-product formation during chlorine disinfection. Studies have indicated that among all wastewater post-treatment processes, the adsorption by granular activated carbon combined with biologically induced degradation is the most effective method for removal of SMPs. However, it may be concludes that the knowledge regarding SMPs is still under progress and more work is required to fully understand their contribution to the treatment process. PMID:23369231

  5. Soluble microbial products (SMPs) release in activated sludge systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Azami, Hamed; Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Mehrnia, Mohammad Reza

    2012-12-18

    This review discusses the characterization, production and implications of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in biological wastewater treatment. The precise definition of SMPs is open to talk about, but is currently regarded as "the pool of organic compounds that are released into solution from substrate metabolism and biomass decay"'. Some of the SMPs have been identified as humic acids, polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, antibiotics, extracellular enzymes and structural components of cells and products of energy metabolism. They adversely affect the kinetic activity, flocculating and settling properties of sludge. This review outlines some important findings with regard to biodegradability and treatability of SMPs and also the effect of process parameters on their production. As SMPs are produced during biological treatment process, their trace amounts normally remain in the effluent that defines the highest COD removal efficiency. Their presence in effluent represents a high potential risk of toxic by-product formation during chlorine disinfection. Studies have indicated that among all wastewater post-treatment processes, the adsorption by granular activated carbon combined with biologically induced degradation is the most effective method for removal of SMPs. However, it may be concludes that the knowledge regarding SMPs is still under progress and more work is required to fully understand their contribution to the treatment process.

  6. Macelignan inhibits histamine release and inflammatory mediator production in activated rat basophilic leukemia mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Sun; Kim, Myung-Suk; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-10-01

    Type I allergy is characterized by the release of granule-associated mediators, lipid-derived substances, cytokines, and chemokines by activated mast cells. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt., we determined its ability to inhibit calcium (Ca(2+)) influx, degranulation, and inflammatory mediator production in RBL-2 H3 cells stimulated with A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macelignan inhibited Ca(2+) influx and the secretion of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, prostaglandin E(2), and leukotriene C(4); decreased mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and attenuated phosphorylation of Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results indicate the potential of macelignan as a type I allergy treatment.

  7. Survival, activity and release of antigenic excretory secretory products and microfilariae of Setaria digitata maintained in artificial media.

    PubMed

    Sundar, S T B; D'Souza, Placid E

    2015-03-01

    The survival, activity and release of excretory secretory products from Setaria digitata, the filarial worm of cattle was studied. Adult female worms were maintained in vitro in DMEM and Tyrode solution. Worms incubated in DMEM were alive and very active for 2 days. The activity was moderate for another 2 days and after the fourth day increased mortality was observed. Antigenic excretory secretory products were also released. Worms incubated in Tyrode solution were very active without any mortality up to 4 h of incubation. Copious amount of ova and microfilaria were shed by the incubated worms in a time-dependent manner.

  8. TESTING PHARMACEUTICAL RELEASE OF ACTIVE SUBSTANCES FROM MEDICINAL PRODUCTS CONTAINING ST. JOHN'S WORT.

    PubMed

    Sakowska, Joanna; Anyzewska, Małgorzata; Łozak, Anna; Kowalczuk, Anna; Jabłczyńska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the content of hypericins and flavonoids in tablets and capsules containing the extract or powdered herb of St. John's wort, in herbs for infusion and herbal infusions and to release of these compounds from tablets and capsules. HPLC method was used to determine the assay of hypericins and flavonoids in all tested products. The hypericins content was between 0.35 mg and 1.44 mg per tablet or capsule. The release of hypericins from these products in the phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 is between 30 and 60% of the determined content. The degree of hypericins release from herbs into infusions was 15% on average, which corresponds to 0.64 mg of hypericins per infusion of 4 g of herbs. The flavonoids content was between 8.79 and 36.3 mg per tablet or capsule. The release of flavonoids in the phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 is between 63 and 85% of the determined content. The degree of flavonoids release was 76% on average, which corresponds to 77.0 mg per infusion of 4 g of herbs. The test results confirmed that infusions from the St. John's wort constitute are a rich source of flavonoids. At the same time, the universally accepted opinion that aqueous infusions contain only trace amounts of hypericins was not confirmed. Infusions from Herba hyperici may also be a source of hypericins in amounts comparable with the minimum dose recommended for the treatment of mild to moderate depressive episodes.

  9. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_SM Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf Helmut; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Chen, Fan; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Crow, Wade; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John; Koster, Randal D.; Smith, E. Brent

    2016-01-01

    During the post-launch SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase there are two objectives for each science data product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithm, and 2) validate the accuracy of the science data product as specified in the science requirements and according to the Cal/Val schedule. This report provides an assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture Passive (L4_SM) product specifically for the product's public Version 2 validated release scheduled for 29 April 2016. The assessment of the Version 2 L4_SM data product includes comparisons of SMAP L4_SM soil moisture estimates with in situ soil moisture observations from core validation sites and sparse networks. The assessment further includes a global evaluation of the internal diagnostics from the ensemble-based data assimilation system that is used to generate the L4_SM product. This evaluation focuses on the statistics of the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals and the analysis increments. Together, the core validation site comparisons and the statistics of the assimilation diagnostics are considered primary validation methodologies for the L4_SM product. Comparisons against in situ measurements from regional-scale sparse networks are considered a secondary validation methodology because such in situ measurements are subject to up-scaling errors from the point-scale to the grid cell scale of the data product. Based on the limited set of core validation sites, the wide geographic range of the sparse network sites, and the global assessment of the assimilation diagnostics, the assessment presented here meets the criteria established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites for Stage 2 validation and supports the validated release of the data. An analysis of the time average surface and root zone soil moisture shows that the global pattern of arid and humid regions are captured by the L4_SM estimates. Results from the

  10. Production and release of cyclic AMP by Daphnia pulex: implications of grazing activity

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-04-01

    Daphnia pulex, a common cladoceran zooplankton species, contains tissue cAMP concentrations similar to those found in algae, bacteria, and aquatic macrophytes. Daphnia release significant quantities of cAMP into the extracellular medium. Release of algal cellular cAMP as a result of digstive degradation of algal cells may also be an important source of dissolved cAMP in lakewater.

  11. Production and release of cyclic AMP by Daphnia pulex: implications of grazing activity

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-04-01

    Daphnia pulex, a common cladoceran zooplankton species, contains tissue cAMP concentrations similar to those found in algae, bacteria, and aquatic macrophytes. Daphnia release significant quantities of cAMP into the extracellular medium. Release of algal cellular cAMP as a result of digestive degradation of algal cells may also be an important source of dissolved cAMP in lakewater.

  12. Biodegradable Ferulic Acid-containing Poly(anhydride-ester): Degradation Products with Controlled Release and Sustained Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Michelle A.; Griffin, Jeremy; Carbone-Howell, Ashley L.; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Stebbins, Nicholas D.; Di, Rong; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2013-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is an antioxidant and photoprotective agent used in biomedical and cosmetic formulations to prevent skin cancer and senescence. Although FA exhibits numerous health benefits, physicochemical instability leading to decomposition hinders its efficacy. To minimize inherent decomposition, a FA-containing biodegradable polymer was prepared via solution polymerization to chemically incorporate FA into a poly(anhydride-ester). The polymer was characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopies. The molecular weight and thermal properties were also determined. In vitro studies demonstrated that the polymer was hydrolytically degradable, thus providing controlled release of the chemically incorporated bioactive with no detectable decomposition. The polymer degradation products were found to exhibit antioxidant and antibacterial activity comparable to free FA and in vitro cell viability studies demonstrated that the polymer is non-cytotoxic towards fibroblasts. This renders the polymer a potential candidate for use as a controlled release system for skin care formulations. PMID:23327626

  13. Biodegradable ferulic acid-containing poly(anhydride-ester): degradation products with controlled release and sustained antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Michelle A; Griffin, Jeremy; Carbone-Howell, Ashley L; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Stebbins, Nicholas D; Di, Rong; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2013-03-11

    Ferulic acid (FA) is an antioxidant and photoprotective agent used in biomedical and cosmetic formulations to prevent skin cancer and senescence. Although FA exhibits numerous health benefits, physicochemical instability leading to decomposition hinders its efficacy. To minimize inherent decomposition, a FA-containing biodegradable polymer was prepared via solution polymerization to chemically incorporate FA into a poly(anhydride-ester). The polymer was characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopies. The molecular weight and thermal properties were also determined. In vitro studies demonstrated that the polymer was hydrolytically degradable, thus providing controlled release of the chemically incorporated bioactive with no detectable decomposition. The polymer degradation products were found to exhibit antioxidant and antibacterial activity comparable to that of free FA, and in vitro cell viability studies demonstrated that the polymer is noncytotoxic toward fibroblasts. This renders the polymer a potential candidate for use as a controlled release system for skin care formulations.

  14. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  15. New Ru(II) Complex for Dual Activity: Photoinduced Ligand Release and (1)O2 Production.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Lauren M; White, Jessica K; Albani, Bryan A; Kohler, Lars; Kodanko, Jeremy J; Thummel, Randolph P; Dunbar, Kim R; Turro, Claudia

    2016-03-07

    The new complex [Ru(pydppn)(biq)(py)](2+) (1) undergoes both py photodissociation in CH3CN with Φ500 =0.0070(4) and (1)O2 production with ΦΔ =0.75(7) in CH3 OH from a long-lived (3) ππ* state centered on the pydppn ligand (pydppn=3-(pyrid-2-yl)benzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine; biq = 2,2'-biquinoline; py=pyridine). This represents an order of magnitude decrease in the Φ500 compared to the previously reported model compound [Ru(tpy)(biq)(py)](2+) (3) (tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) that undergoes only ligand exchange. The effect on the quantum yields by the addition of a second deactivation pathway through the low-lying (3) ππ* state necessary for dual reactivity was investigated using ultrafast and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, revealing a significantly shorter (3) MLCT lifetime in 1 relative to that of the model complex 3. Due to the structural similarities between the two compounds, the lower values of Φ500 and ΦΔ compared to that of [Ru(pydppn)(bpy)(py)](2+) (2) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) are attributed to a competitive excited state population between the (3) LF states involved in ligand dissociation and the long-lived (3) ππ* state in 1. Complex 1 represents a model compound for dual activity that may be applied to photochemotherapy.

  16. New RuII Complex for Dual Activity: Photoinduced Ligand Release and 1O2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Lauren M.; White, Jessica K.; Albani, Bryan A.; Kohler, Lars; Kodanko, Jeremy J.; Thummel, Randolph P.

    2016-01-01

    The new complex [Ru(pydppn)(biq)(py)]2+ (1) undergoes both py photodissociation in CH3CN with Φ500=0.0070(4) and 1O2 production with ΦΔ=0.75(7) in CH3OH from a long-lived 3ππ* state centered on the pydppn ligand (pydppn=3-(pyrid-2-yl)benzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine; biq = 2,2′-biquinoline; py= pyridine). This represents an order of magnitude decrease in the Φ500 compared to the previously reported model compound [Ru(tpy)(biq)(py)]2+ (3) (tpy=2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine) that undergoes only ligand exchange. The effect on the quantum yields by the addition of a second deactivation pathway through the low-lying 3ππ* state necessary for dual reactivity was investigated using ultrafast and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, revealing a significantly shorter 3MLCT lifetime in 1 relative to that of the model complex 3. Due to the structural similarities between the two compounds, the lower values of Φ500 and ΦΔ compared to that of [Ru(pydppn)(bpy)(py)]2+ (2) (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine) are attributed to a competitive excited state population between the 3LF states involved in ligand dissociation and the long-lived 3ππ* state in 1. Complex 1 represents a model compound for dual activity that may be applied to photochemotherapy. PMID:26715085

  17. Crystal structures of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase: structural insights into activation mechanism and product release.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Javier; Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-01

    Sterol esterases are able to efficiently hydrolyze both sterol esters and triglycerides and to carry out synthesis reactions in the presence of organic solvents. Their high versatility makes them excellent candidates for biotechnological purposes. Sterol esterase from fungus Ophiostoma piceae (OPE) belongs to the family abH03.01 of the Candida rugosa lipase-like proteins. Crystal structures of OPE were solved in this study for the closed and open conformations. Enzyme activation involves a large displacement of the conserved lid, structural rearrangements of loop α16-α17, and formation of a dimer with a large opening. Three PEG molecules are placed in the active site, mimicking chains of the triglyceride substrate, demonstrating the position of the oxyanion hole and the three pockets that accommodate the sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 fatty acids chains. One of them is an internal tunnel, connecting the active center with the outer surface of the enzyme 30 Å far from the catalytic Ser220. Based on our structural and biochemical results we propose a mechanism by which a great variety of different substrates can be hydrolyzed in OPE paving the way for the construction of new variants to improve the catalytic properties of these enzymes and their biotechnological applications.

  18. Whole genome expression profiling associates activation of unfolded protein response with impaired production and release of epinephrine after recurrent hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juhye Lena; La Gamma, Edmund F.; Estabrook, Todd; Kudrick, Necla

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia can occur as a major complication of insulin replacement therapy, limiting the long-term health benefits of intense glycemic control in type 1 and advanced type 2 diabetic patients. It impairs the normal counter-regulatory hormonal and behavioral responses to glucose deprivation, a phenomenon known as hypoglycemia associated autonomic failure (HAAF). The molecular mechanisms leading to defective counter-regulation are not completely understood. We hypothesized that both neuronal (excessive cholinergic signaling between the splanchnic nerve fibers and the adrenal medulla) and humoral factors contribute to the impaired epinephrine production and release in HAAF. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism(s) mediating the blunted epinephrine responses following recurrent hypoglycemia, we utilized a global gene expression profiling approach. We characterized the transcriptomes during recurrent (defective counter-regulation model) and acute hypoglycemia (normal counter-regulation group) in the adrenal medulla of normal Sprague-Dawley rats. Based on comparison analysis of differentially expressed genes, a set of unique genes that are activated only at specific time points after recurrent hypoglycemia were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network indicated activation of the unfolded protein response. Furthermore, at least three additional pathways/interaction networks altered in the adrenal medulla following recurrent hypoglycemia were identified, which may contribute to the impaired epinephrine secretion in HAAF: greatly increased neuropeptide signaling (proenkephalin, neuropeptide Y, galanin); altered ion homeostasis (Na+, K+, Ca2+) and downregulation of genes involved in Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of secretory vesicles. Given the pleiotropic effects of the unfolded protein response in different organs, involved in maintaining glucose homeostasis, these findings uncover

  19. In vitro Effects of Selected Saponins on the Production and Release of Lysozyme Activity of Human Monocytic and Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Helal, Racha; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2011-01-01

    Lysozyme is one of the most important factors of innate immunity and a unique enzybiotic in that it exerts not only antibacterial activity, but also antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anticancer and immunomodulatory activities. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether in vitro exposure to saponins can affect the release and production of lysozyme activity in human monocytic cells THP-1, and in human epithelial cells HT-29. Lysozyme activity levels in cell culture fluids were measured using highly sensitive fluorescence-based lysozyme activity assay. Majority of the examined saponins were demonstrated to stimulate significantly the release of lysozyme activity of monocytes and epithelial cells after one hour treatment at non-toxic concentrations. On the contrary, cells treated with saponins for longer periods up to 72 hours showed tendency to decrease in the secretion and production of lysozyme activity. However, these inhibitory effects of saponins observed with long-term treatment periods were mostly associated with toxic effects of saponins to cells. The results suggested positive contribution of some saponins to lysozyme release of monocytes and epithelial cells upon short exposure. Furthermore, demonstrated ability of these saponins to enhance the release of lysozyme activity can present a new mechanism contribute to explaining important biological characteristics of saponins, including the antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory or immune-stimulating properties. PMID:21773070

  20. Depressant effects of ambroxol and erdosteine on cytokine synthesis, granule enzyme release, and free radical production in rat alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yoon Young; Song, Jin Ho; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Han, Eun Sook; Lee, Chung Soo

    2003-04-01

    The present study examined the effects of ambroxol and erdosteine, bronchial expectorants, on the cytokine synthesis, granule enzyme release, and free radical production in rat alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. Ambroxol and erdosteine significantly decreased the production of tumour necrosis factors-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6 in alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. These drugs significantly reduced the production of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide and the release of acid phosphatase and lysozyme in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages. Ambroxol and erdosteine showed no scavenging effect on superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, whereas both drugs effectively decomposed nitric oxide. The results show that ambroxol and erdosteine may inhibit the responses, including cytokine synthesis and free radical production, in rat alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. Unlike the production of reactive oxygen species, the inhibitory effect of ambroxol and erdosteine on the production of nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide-activated alveolar macrophages may be accomplished by a scavenging action on the species and inhibition of the respiratory burst.

  1. Fission product release mechanisms and pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    It is axiomatic that the severity of a nuclear reactor accident is determined by the extent of radioactivity escape which results. The main focus of site safety analyses is thus on fission product release and transport. Of all the processes involved, fission product escape from the fuel-cladding region into the primary coolant circuit is perhaps the most simple to describe; even so, it is an extremely complex function of the time/temperature history of the fuel-cladding system during an accident, since many mechanisms for release are involved. Depending upon the particular fission product species, these release mechanisms range from simple gaseous expansion processes at low temperatures to evaporation-condensation processes (aerosol formation) over molten fuel. Because of these complexities, it is convenient to subdivide the time/temperature sequence of an accident into more or less discrete phases over which specific release mechanisms dominate. Four such phases are the periods of (1) gap release, (2) meltdown release, (3) vaporization, and (4) oxidation release. This approach simplifies the problem considerably, although some loss of uniformity results. The methodology applies to BWR and PWR reactors with appropriate adaptations.

  2. Production of hybrid lipid-based particles loaded with inorganic nanoparticles and active compounds for prolonged topical release.

    PubMed

    García-González, C A; Sampaio da Sousa, A R; Argemí, A; López Periago, A; Saurina, J; Duarte, C M M; Domingo, C

    2009-12-01

    The production of particulate hybrid carriers containing a glyceryl monostearate (Lumulse GMS-K), a waxy triglyceride (Cutina HR), silanized TiO(2) and caffeine were investigated with the aim of producing sunscreens with UV-radiation protection properties. Particles were obtained using the supercritical PGSS (Particles from Gas Saturated Solutions) technique. This method takes advantages of the lower melting temperatures of the lipids obtained from the dissolution of CO(2) in the bulk mixture. Experiments were performed at 13 MPa and 345 K, according to previous melting point measurements. Blends containing Lumulse GMS-K and Cutina HR lipids (50 wt%) were loaded with silanized TiO(2) and caffeine in percentile proportions of 6 and 4 wt%, respectively. The particles produced were characterized using several analytical techniques as follows: system crystallinity was checked by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, thermal stability by thermogravimetric analysis, and morphology by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Further, the UV-shielding ability of TiO(2) after its dispersion in the lipidic matrix was assessed by solid UV-vis spectroscopy. Preliminary results indicated that caffeine-loaded solid lipid particles presented a two-step dissolution profile, with an initial burst of 60 wt% of the loaded active agent. Lipid blends loaded with TiO(2) and caffeine encompassed the UV-filter behavior of TiO(2) and the photoaging prevention properties of caffeine.

  3. Activation of mitochondrial calcium-independent phospholipase A2γ (iPLA2γ) by divalent cations mediating arachidonate release and production of downstream eicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Ho; Jenkins, Christopher M; Liu, Xinping; Guan, Shaoping; Mancuso, David J; Gross, Richard W

    2012-04-27

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A(2)γ (iPLA(2)γ) (PNPLA8) is the predominant phospholipase activity in mammalian mitochondria. However, the chemical mechanisms that regulate its activity are unknown. Here, we utilize iPLA(2)γ gain of function and loss of function genetic models to demonstrate the robust activation of iPLA(2)γ in murine myocardial mitochondria by Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ions. Calcium ion stimulated the production of 2-arachidonoyl-lysophosphatidylcholine (2-AA-LPC) from 1-palmitoyl-2-[(14)C]arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine during incubations with wild-type heart mitochondrial homogenates. Furthermore, incubation of mitochondrial homogenates from transgenic myocardium expressing iPLA(2)γ resulted in 13- and 25-fold increases in the initial rate of radiolabeled 2-AA-LPC and arachidonic acid (AA) production, respectively, in the presence of calcium ion. Mass spectrometric analysis of the products of calcium-activated hydrolysis of endogenous mitochondrial phospholipids in transgenic iPLA(2)γ mitochondria revealed the robust production of AA, 2-AA-LPC, and 2-docosahexaenoyl-LPC that was over 10-fold greater than wild-type mitochondria. The mechanism-based inhibitor (R)-(E)-6-(bromomethylene)-3-(1-naphthalenyl)-2H-tetrahydropyran-2-one (BEL) (iPLA(2)γ selective), but not its enantiomer, (S)-BEL (iPLA(2)β selective) or pyrrolidine (cytosolic PLA(2)α selective), markedly attenuated Ca(2+)-dependent fatty acid release and polyunsaturated LPC production. Moreover, Ca(2+)-induced iPLA(2)γ activation was accompanied by the production of downstream eicosanoid metabolites that were nearly completely ablated by (R)-BEL or by genetic ablation of iPLA(2)γ. Intriguingly, Ca(2+)-induced iPLA(2)γ activation was completely inhibited by long-chain acyl-CoA (IC(50) ∼20 μm) as well as by a nonhydrolyzable acyl-CoA thioether analog. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial iPLA(2)γ is activated by divalent cations and inhibited by acyl

  4. GENIE Production Release 2.10.0

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.; Andreopoulos, C.; Athar, M.; Bodek, A.; Christy, E.; Coopersmith, B.; Dennis, S.; Dytman, S.; Gallagher, H.; Geary, N.; Golan, T.; Hatcher, R.; Hoshina, K.; Liu, J.; Mahn, K.; Marshall, C.; Morrison, J.; Nirkko, M.; Nowak, J.; Perdue, G. N.; Yarba, J.

    2015-12-25

    GENIE is a neutrino Monte Carlo event generator that simulates the primary interaction of a neutrino with a nuclear target, along with the subsequent propagation of the reaction products through the nuclear medium. It additionally contains libraries for fully-featured detector geometries and for managing various types of neutrino flux. This note details recent updates to GENIE, in particular, changes introduced into the newest production release, version 2.10.0.

  5. Historical Mercury releases from commercial products: global environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Hannah M; Jacob, Daniel J; Amos, Helen M; Streets, David G; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2014-09-02

    The intentional use of mercury (Hg) in products and processes ("commercial Hg") has contributed a large and previously unquantified anthropogenic source of Hg to the global environment over the industrial era, with major implications for Hg accumulation in environmental reservoirs. We present a global inventory of commercial Hg uses and releases to the atmosphere, water, soil, and landfills from 1850 to 2010. Previous inventories of anthropogenic Hg releases have focused almost exclusively on atmospheric emissions from "byproduct" sectors (e.g., fossil fuel combustion). Cumulative anthropogenic atmospheric Hg emissions since 1850 have recently been estimated at 215 Gg (only including commercial Hg releases from chlor-alkali production, waste incineration, and mining). We find that other commercial Hg uses and nonatmospheric releases from chlor-alkali and mining result in an additional 540 Gg of Hg released to the global environment since 1850 (air: 20%; water: 30%; soil: 30%; landfills: 20%). Some of this release has been sequestered in landfills and benthic sediments, but 310 Gg actively cycles among geochemical reservoirs and contributes to elevated present-day environmental Hg concentrations. Commercial Hg use peaked in 1970 and has declined sharply since. We use our inventory of historical environmental releases to force a global biogeochemical model that includes new estimates of the global burial in ocean margin sediments. Accounting for commercial Hg releases improves model consistency with observed atmospheric concentrations and associated historical trends.

  6. ORNL fission product release tests VI-6

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Lee, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The ORNL fission product release tests investigate release and transport of the major fission products from high-burnup fuel under LWR accident conditions. The two most recent tests (VI-4 and VI-5) were conducted in hydrogen. In three previous tests in this series (VI-1, VI-2, and VI-3), which had been conducted in steam, the oxidized Zircaloy cladding remained largely intact and acted as a barrier to steam reaction with the UO{sub 2}. Test VI-6 was designed to insure significant oxidation of the UO{sub 2} fuel, which has been shown to enhance release of certain fission products, especially molybdenum and ruthenium. The BR3 fuel specimen used in test VI-6 will be heated in hydrogen to 2300 K; the Zircaloy cladding is expected to melt and runoff at {approximately}2150 K. Upon reaching the 2300 K test temperature, the test atmosphere will be changed to steam, and that temperature will be maintained for 60 min, with the three collection trains being operated for 2-, 18-, and 40-min periods. The releases of {sup 85}Kr and {sup 137}Cs will be monitored continuously throughout the test. Posttest analyses of the material collected on the three trains will provide results on the release and transport of Mo, Ru, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, and Eu as a function of time at 2300 K. Continuous monitoring of the hydrogen produced during the steam atmosphere period at high temperature will provide a measure of the oxidation rate of the cladding and fuel. Following delays in approval of the safety documentation and in decontamination of the hot cell and test apparatus, test VI-6 will be conducted in late May.

  7. Active Region Release Two CMEs

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar material can be seen blowing off the sun in this video captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on the night of Feb. 5, 2013. This active region on the sun sent out two coronal ...

  8. Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

    2012-09-10

    Measurements of several radionuclides within environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Company website following the recent tsunami-initiated catastrophe were evaluated for the purpose of identifying the source term, reconstructing the release mechanisms, and estimating the extent of the release. 136Cs/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs ratios identified Units 1-3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil close to the facility. A trend was observed between the fraction of the total core inventory released for a number of fission product isotopes and their corresponding Gibbs Free Energy of formation for the primary oxide form of the isotope, suggesting that release was dictated primarily by chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the primary containment vessels of the vented reactors. The absence of any major fractionation beyond volatilization suggested all coolant had evaporated by the time of venting. High estimates for the fraction of the total inventory released of more volatile species (Te, Cs, I) indicated the damage to fuel bundles was likely extensive, minimizing any potential containment due to physical migration of these species through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall. 238Pu/239,240Pu ratios close-in and at 30 km from the facility indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of Pu to surface soil at the source but that this contribution likely decreased rapidly with distance from the facility. The fraction of the total Pu inventory released to the environment from venting units 1 and 3 was estimated to be ~0.003% based upon Pu/Cs isotope ratios relative to the within-reactor modeled inventory prior to venting and was consistent with an independent model evaluation that considered chemical volatility based upon measured fission product release trends. Significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel

  9. Active compounds release from semisolid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Olejnik, Anna; Goscianska, Joanna; Nowak, Izabela

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to review all the aspects of the in vitro release testing (IVRT) from semisolid dosage forms. Although none of the official dissolution methods has been specified for use with semisolid dosage forms, their utility for assessing release rates of drugs from semisolid dosage forms has become a topic of considerable interest. One can expect to overcome such complexity in the future, when the official "Topical and Transdermal Drug Products-Product Performance Tests" will be published in an issue of the Pharmacopeial Forum. Many factors such as type of the dissolution medium, membrane, temperature, and speed have an influence on the mechanism and kinetics of the release testing from gels, creams, and ointments; therefore, those parameters have been widely discussed.

  10. Effects of artemisinin sustained-release granules on mixed alga growth and microcystins production and release.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Danye; Hu, Shuzhen; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-12-01

    To safely and effectively apply artemisinin sustained-release granules to control and prevent algal water-blooms, the effects of artemisinin and its sustained-release granules on freshwater alga (Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) and Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa)), as well as the production and release of microcystins (MCs) were studied. The results showed that artemisinin sustained-release granules inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa (above 95% IR) and S. obliquus (about 90% IR), with M. aeruginosa more sensitive. The artemisinin sustained-release granules had a longer inhibition effect on growth of pure algae and algal coexistence than direct artemisinin dosing. The artemisinin sustained-release granules could decrease the production and release of algal toxins due to the continued stress of artemisinin released from artemisinin sustained-release granules. There was no increase in the total amount of MC-LR in the algal cell culture medium.

  11. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  12. Energy release, beam attenuation radiation damage, gas production and accumulation of long-lived activity in Pb, Pb-Bi and Hg targets

    SciTech Connect

    Shubin, Yu.N.

    1996-06-01

    The calculation and analysis of the nuclei concentrations and long-lived residual radioactivity accumulated in Pb, Pb-Bi and Hg targets irradiated by 800 MeV, 30 mA proton beam have been performed. The dominating components to the total radioactivity of radionuclides resulting from fission and spallation reactions and radiative capture by both target nuclei and accumulated radioactive nuclei for various irradiation and cooling times were analyzed. The estimations of spectral component contributions of neutron and proton fluxes to the accumulated activity were carried out. The contributions of fission products to the targets activity and partial activities of main long-lived fission products to the targets activity and partial activities of main long-lived fission products were evaluated. The accumulation of Po isotopes due to reactions induced by secondary alpha-particles were found to be important for the Pb target as compared with two-step radiative capture. The production of Tritium in the targets and its contribution to the total targets activity was considered in detail. It is found that total activities of both targets are close to one another.

  13. Recent Release of the ASTER Global DEM Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J.; Hall, A.; Meyer, D.; Sohre, T.; Doescher, C.

    2009-12-01

    On June 29th, the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (DEM) release was announced to the public and to a very eager audience. ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) is an imaging instrument flying on Terra, a satellite launched in December 1999 as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). ASTER is a cooperative effort between NASA, Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and Japan's Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC). On June 21, NASA Headquarters along with colleagues in Japan (METI) signed a plan for distribution of this product. The global digital elevation model of Earth is available online to users everywhere at no cost from NASA's Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) located at Sioux Falls, SD. The DAAC is a joint project of NASA and the USGS and is a key component of NASA's EOSDIS. The new ASTER GDEM was created from nearly 1.3 million individual stereo-pair images acquired by the Japanese Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (Aster) instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite. The ASTER elevation model was jointly developed by NASA and METI under contract to Sensor Information Laboratory Corp., Tsukuba, Japan. On June 29, the NASA press release was picked up quickly by numerous news organizations and online sites. Response to the product was incredible! The news of the release of the product was carried on websites across the globe, this fueled a tremendous response from users. Here are a few interesting metrics about the release: - over 41,000 unique visitors to website in first week following release - top countries in order were: US (approx. 20%), Germany, U.K., Brazil, Austria, Canada, Spain, Switzerland, Japan - approximately 29,000 visitors came to the news page in the first week and about 11,000 of these users downloaded the actual press release - by the end of August, over 2 Million ASTER GDEM files had been downloaded from the Land

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of the last step of a catalytic cycle: product release from the active site of the enzyme chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Choutko, Alexandra; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-11-01

    The protein chorismate mutase MtCM from Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes one of the few pericyclic reactions known in biology: the transformation of chorismate to prephenate. Chorismate mutases have been widely studied experimentally and computationally to elucidate the transition state of the enzyme catalyzed reaction and the origin of the high catalytic rate. However, studies about substrate entry and product exit to and from the highly occluded active site of the enzyme have to our knowledge not been performed on this enzyme. Crystallographic data suggest a possible substrate entry gate, that involves a slight opening of the enzyme for the substrate to access the active site. Using multiple molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the natural dynamic process of the product exiting from the binding pocket of MtCM. We identify a dominant exit pathway, which is in agreement with the gate proposed from the available crystallographic data. Helices H2 and H4 move apart from each other which enables the product to exit from the active site. Interestingly, in almost all exit trajectories, two residues arginine 72 and arginine 134, which participate in the burying of the active site, are accompanying the product on its exit journey from the catalytic site.

  15. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 42; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Calibration and Validation for the L4_C Beta-Release Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima (Editor); Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch Cal/Val Phase of SMAP there are two objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements according to the Cal/Val timeline. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product specifically for the beta release. The beta-release version of the SMAP L4_C algorithms utilizes a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily NEE and component carbon fluxes, particularly vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (<10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape FT controls on GPP and Reco (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and underlying freeze/thaw and soil moisture constraints to these processes, 2) documenting primary connections between terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, and 3) improving understanding of terrestrial carbon sink activity in northern ecosystems.

  16. Advances in product release strategies and impact on bioprocess design.

    PubMed

    Balasundaram, Bangaru; Harrison, Sue; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2009-08-01

    Intracellular products such as recombinant insulin, which are typically produced in microbial host cells, demand a product release step to remove them from the cell. How this is performed determines the quantity of released contaminants, the particle size distribution of cell debris and the physical properties of the resultant process stream, which all impact on the performance of the downstream operations. Thus, achieving selective release of the desired product is crucial for improving the process economics. Advances in upstream processing (the bioreactor phase) have been successful in achieving high product titres, and downstream costs now typically dominate the overall manufacturing costs. Here, we review and discuss the selective release of products as a possible means of improving the efficiency of downstream processing.

  17. USGS Releases New Digital Aerial Products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) has initiated distribution of digital aerial photographic products produced by scanning or digitizing film from its historical aerial photography film archive. This archive, located in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, contains thousands of rolls of film that contain more than 8 million frames of historic aerial photographs. The largest portion of this archive consists of original film acquired by Federal agencies from the 1930s through the 1970s to produce 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic quadrangle maps. Most of this photography is reasonably large scale (USGS photography ranges from 1:8,000 to 1:80,000) to support the production of the maps. Two digital products are currently available for ordering: high-resolution scanned products and medium-resolution digitized products.

  18. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from paper and paperboard production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities engaged in paper and paperboard production may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those engaged in paper and paperboard production in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  19. Immunomodulatory Drugs Regulate HMGB1 Release from Activated Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schierbeck, Hanna; Wähämaa, Heidi; Andersson, Ulf; Harris, Helena Erlandsson

    2010-01-01

    Several HMGB1-specific antagonists have provided beneficial results in multiple models of inflammatory disease–preclinical trials including arthritis. Since no HMGB1-specific targeted therapy has yet reached the clinic, we have performed in vitro studies to investigate whether any of a selection of well-established antirheumatic drugs inhibit HMGB1 release as part of its mode of action. Freshly purified peripheral blood monocytes from healthy donors were stimulated in cultures with LPS and IFNγ to cause HMGB1 and TNF release detected in ELISPOT assays. Effects on the secretion were assessed in cultures supplemented with dexamethasone, cortisone, chloroquine, gold sodium thiomalate, methotrexate, colchicine, etanercept or anakinra. Pharmacologically relevant doses of dexamethasone, gold sodium thiomalate and chloroquine inhibited the extracellular release of HMGB1 in a dose-dependent mode. Immunostaining demonstrated that dexamethasone caused intracellular HMGB1 retention. No effects on HMGB1 secretion were observed in cultures with activated monocytes by any of the other studied agents. TNF production in LPS/IFNγ-activated monocytes was readily downregulated by dexamethasone and, to some extent, by chloroquine and etanercept. We conclude that dexamethasone, gold sodium thiomalate and chloroquine share a capacity to inhibit HMGB1 release from activated monocytes. PMID:20386869

  20. Hanford production reactor heat releases 1951--1971

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to document and detail the thermal releases from the Hanford nuclear production reactors during the period 1951 through 1971, and to put these releases in historical perspective with respect to changing Columbia River flows and temperatures. This information can also be used as a foundation for further ecological evaluations. When examining Hanford production reactor thermal releases to the Columbia River all related factors affecting the releases and the characteristics of the river should be considered. The major considerations in the present study were the characteristics of the releases themselves (primarily coolant flow rate, temperatures, discharge facilities, period of operation, and level of operation) and the characteristics of the river in that reach (primarily flow rate, temperature and mixing characteristics; the effects of dam construction were also taken into account). In addition, this study addressed ecological effects of thermal releases on aquatic species. Accordingly, this report includes discussion of the reactor cooling system, historical heat releases, thermal mixing and transport studies, hydroelectric power development, and ecologic effects of Hanford production reactor heat releases on salmon and trout. Appendix A contains reactor operating statistics, and Appendix B provide computations of heat added to the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and Richland, Washington.

  1. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-4

    SciTech Connect

    Obsorne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Nakamura, T. )

    1991-01-01

    This was the fourth in a series of high-temperature fission product release tests in a vertical test apparatus. The test specimen, a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium, had been irradiated to a burnup of 47 MWd/kg. In simulation of a severe accident in a light-water reactor, it was heated in hydrogen in a hot cell-mounted test apparatus to a maximum test temperature of 2400 K for a period of 20 min. The released fission products were collected on components designed to facilitate sampling and analysis. On-line radioactivity measurements and posttest inspection revealed that the fuel had partially collapsed at about the time the cladding melted. Based on fission product inventories measured in the fuel or calculated by ORIGEN2, analyses of test components showed total releases from the fuel of 85% for {sup 85}Kr, <1% for {sup 106}Ru, 3.9% for {sup 125}Sb, 96% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 13% for {sup 154}Eu. Large fractions of the released fission products (up to 96% of the {sup 154}Eu) were retained in the furnace. Small release fractions for several other fission products -- Rb, Br, Sr, Te, I, and Ba -- were detected also. In addition, very small amounts of fuel material -- uranium and plutonium -- were released. Total mass release from the furnace to the collection system, which included fission products, fuel material, and structural materials, was 0.40g, with 40% of this material being deposited as vapor and 60% of it being collected as aerosols. The results from this test were compared with previous tests in this series and with an in-pile test at similar conditions at Sandia National Laboratories. There was no indication that the mode of heating (fission heat vs radiant heat) significantly affected fission product release. 24 refs., 25 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. Background and Derivation of ANS-5.4 Standard Fission Product Release Model

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, Carl E.; Turnbull, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    This background report describes the technical basis for the newly proposed American Nuclear Society (ANS) 5.4 standard, Methods for Calculating the Fractional Release of Volatile Fission Products from Oxide Fuels. The proposed ANS 5.4 standard provides a methodology for determining the radioactive fission product releases from the fuel for use in assessing radiological consequences of postulated accidents that do not involve abrupt power transients. When coupled with isotopic yields, this method establishes the 'gap activity,' which is the inventory of volatile fission products that are released from the fuel rod if the cladding are breached.

  3. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  4. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-3

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Lee, H.K.; Nakamura, T.; Tong, Y.-C. )

    1990-06-01

    Test VI-3, the third in a series of high-temperature fission product release tests in the vertical test apparatus, was conducted in flowing steam. The test specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium, which had been irradiated to a burnup of 42 MWd/kg. Using an induction furnace, it was heated under simulated light-water reactor (LWR) accident conditions to two test temperatures, 20 min at 2000 K and then 20 min at 2700 K, in a hot cell-mounted test apparatus. The released fission products were collected on components designed to facilitate sampling and analysis. Posttest inspection confirmed that the cladding had been completely oxidized during the test. Only minimal fragmentation of the fuel specimen was found, however, and very little melting or fuel-cladding interaction had occurred. Based on fission product inventories measured in the fuel or calculated by ORIGEN2, analyses of test components showed total releases from the fuel of 100% for {sup 85}Kr, 5% for {sup 106}Ru, 99% for {sup 125}Sb, and 99% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs. A large fraction (27%) of the released {sup 125}Sb was retained in the furnace, but most of the released cesium (89%) escaped to the collection system. In addition, very small amounts of fuel material --- uranium and plutonium --- were released. Including fission products and fuel and structural materials, the total mass released from the furnace to the collection system was 3.17 g, 78% of which was collected on the filters. The results from this test were compared with previous tests in this series and with a commonly used model for fission product release. 25 refs., 22 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. ALKALINITY, PH, AND COPPER CORROSION BY-PRODUCT RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water i...

  6. Coalition releases declaration for healthy and productive oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    Coalition releases declaration for healthy and productive oceans A coalition of 13 countries or federal agencies participating in a new Global Partnership for Oceans (GPO) indicated its support for a “Declaration for Healthy and Productive Oceans to Help Reduce Poverty” on 16 June, just prior to the Rio+20 conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  7. Analysis of a nuclear accident: fission and activation product releases from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility as remote indicators of source identification, extent of release, and state of damaged spent nuclear fuel.

    PubMed

    Schwantes, Jon M; Orton, Christopher R; Clark, Richard A

    2012-08-21

    Researchers evaluated radionuclide measurements of environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Co. Website following the 2011 tsunami-initiated catastrophe. This effort identified Units 1 and 3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil near the facility. Radionuclide trends identified in the soils suggested that: (1) chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the vented reactors' primary containment vessels dictated the extent of release of radiation; (2) all coolant had likely evaporated by the time of venting; and (3) physical migration through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall were minimally effective at containing volatile species, suggesting damage to fuel bundles was extensive. Plutonium isotopic ratios and their distance from the source indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of plutonium to surface soil at the source, decreasing rapidly with distance from the facility. Two independent evaluations estimated the fraction of the total plutonium inventory released to the environment relative to cesium from venting Units 1 and 3 to be ∼0.002-0.004%. This study suggests significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel at the time of venting, but not as yet observed and reported within environmental samples, as potential analytes of concern for future environmental surveys around the site. The majority of the reactor inventories of isotopes of less volatile elements like Pu, Nb, and Sr were likely contained within the damaged reactors during venting.

  8. Thermal-induced conformational changes in the product release area drive the enzymatic activity of xylanases 10B: Crystal structure, conformational stability and functional characterization of the xylanase 10B from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Camila Ramos; Meza, Andreia Navarro; Hoffmam, Zaira Bruna; Silva, Junio Cota; Alvarez, Thabata Maria; Ruller, Roberto; Giesel, Guilherme Menegon; Verli, Hugo; Squina, Fabio Marcio; Prade, Rolf Alexander; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyperthermostable xylanase 10B from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1 produces exclusively xylobiose at the optimum temperature. {yields} Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests a coupling effect of temperature-induced structural changes with its enzymatic behavior. {yields} Crystallographic and molecular dynamics studies indicate that conformational changes in the product release area modulate the enzyme action mode. -- Abstract: Endo-xylanases play a key role in the depolymerization of xylan and recently, they have attracted much attention owing to their potential applications on biofuels and paper industries. In this work, we have investigated the molecular basis for the action mode of xylanases 10B at high temperatures using biochemical, biophysical and crystallographic methods. The crystal structure of xylanase 10B from hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1 (TpXyl10B) has been solved in the native state and in complex with xylobiose. The complex crystal structure showed a classical binding mode shared among other xylanases, which encompasses the -1 and -2 subsites. Interestingly, TpXyl10B displayed a temperature-dependent action mode producing xylobiose and xylotriose at 20 {sup o}C, and exclusively xylobiose at 90 {sup o}C as assessed by capillary zone electrophoresis. Moreover, circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested a coupling effect of temperature-induced structural changes with this particular enzymatic behavior. Molecular dynamics simulations supported the CD analysis suggesting that an open conformational state adopted by the catalytic loop (Trp297-Lys326) provokes significant modifications in the product release area (+1,+2 and +3 subsites), which drives the enzymatic activity to the specific release of xylobiose at high temperatures.

  9. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News releases concerning international activities. 1213.109 Section 1213.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning...

  10. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true News releases concerning international activities. 1213.109 Section 1213.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning...

  11. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News releases concerning international activities. 1213.109 Section 1213.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning...

  12. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false News releases concerning international activities. 1213.109 Section 1213.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning...

  13. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-6

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Collins, J.L.

    1994-03-01

    Test VI-6 was the sixth test in the VI series conducted in the vertical furnace. The fuel specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium. The fuel had experienced a burnup of {approximately}42 MWd/kg, with inert gas release during irradiation of {approximately}2%. The fuel specimen was heated in an induction furnace at 2300 K for 60 min, initially in hydrogen, then in a steam atmosphere. The released fission products were collected in three sequentially operated collection trains designed to facilitate sampling and analysis. The fission product inventories in the fuel were measured directly by gamma-ray spectrometry, where possible, and were calculated by ORIGEN2. Integral releases were 75% for {sup 85}Kr, 67% for {sup 129}I, 64% for {sup 125}Sb, 80% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, 14% for {sup 154}Eu, 63% for Te, 32% for Ba, 13% for Mo, and 5.8% for Sr. Of the totals released from the fuel, 43% of the Cs, 32% of the Sb, and 98% of the Eu were deposited in the outlet end of the furnace. During the heatup in hydrogen, the Zircaloy cladding melted, ran down, and reacted with some of the UO{sub 2} and fission products, especially Te and Sb. The total mass released from the furnace to the collection system, including fission products, fuel, and structural materials, was 0.57 g, almost equally divided between thermal gradient tubes and filters. The release behaviors for the most volatile elements, Kr and Cs, were in good agreement with the ORNL Diffusion Model.

  14. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-5

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Collins, J.L. )

    1991-10-01

    Test VI-5, the fifth in a series of high-temperature fission product release tests in a vertical test apparatus, was conducted in a flowing mixture of hydrogen and helium. The test specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium which had been irradiated to a burnup of {approximately}42 MWd/kg. Using a hot cell-mounted test apparatus, the fuel rod was heated in an induction furnace under simulated LWR accident conditions to two test temperatures, 2000 K for 20 min and then 2700 K for an additional 20 min. The released fission products were collected in three sequentially operated collection trains on components designed to measure fission product transport characteristics and facilitate sampling and analysis. The results from this test were compared with those obtained in previous tests in this series and with the CORSOR-M and ORNL diffusion release models for fission product release. 21 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Presence in, and release of, nanomaterials from consumer products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Westerhoff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Widespread use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in consumer products has led to concerns about their potential impact on humans and the environment. In order to fully assess the impacts and release of ENMs from consumer products, this chapter provides an overview of the types of consumer products that contain nanomaterials, the potential release mechanisms of these ENMs from consumer products, and the associated human exposure. Information from two large datasets on consumer goods associated with ENMs, namely, the U.S.-based Project for Emerging Nanotechnologies from the Woodrow Wilson International Center, and the European-based National Institute for Public Health and the Environment of Netherlands, have been summarized. These databases reveal that silver, titanium, carbon-based ENMs are the major nanomaterials associated with consumer products. The presence and potential release of silver, titanium, carbon-based, and other nanomaterials from consumer goods available in published literature are also summarized, as well as the potential human exposure scenarios of inhalation, ingestion, dermal, and combination of all means. The prospecting of nanomaterial in water and biosolids provides further evidence of ENM occurrence, which could be linked to the use of nanomaterials containing consumer goods. Finally, this overview provides guidelines on toxicity studies, which calls for further efforts to analyze the biological effects of ENMs on human beings and their exposure pathways in consumer products.

  16. 1H NMR study of the influence of mutation on the interaction of the C-terminus with the active site in heme oxygenase from Neisseria meningitidis: implications for product release.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dungeng; Ma, Li-Hua; Ogura, Hiroshi; Yang, En-Che; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; La Mar, Gerd N

    2010-07-20

    The HO from the pathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis, NmHO, possesses C-terminal His207, Arg208, and His209 residues that are undetected in crystal structures. NMR found the C-terminus ordered and interacting with the active site and shown to undergo a spontaneous cleavage of the C-terminal Arg208-His209 bond that affects the product off rate. A preliminary model for the interaction based on the wild-type (WT) NmHO complexes has been presented [Liu, Y., Ma, L.-H., Satterlee, J. D., Zhang, X., Yoshida, T., and La Mar, G. N. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 3875-3886]. Two-dimensional (1)H NMR data of resting-state, azide-inhibited substrate complexes of the three C-terminal truncation mutants (Des-His209-, Des-Arg208His209-, and Des-His207Arg208His209-NmHO) confirm the previous proposed roles for His207 and Arg208 and reveal important additional salt bridges involving the His209 carboxylate and the side chains of both Lys126 and Arg208. Deletion of His209 leads to a qualitatively retained C-terminal geometry, but with increased separation between the C-terminus and active site. Moreover, replacing vinyls with methyls on the substrate leads to a decrease in the separation between the C-terminus and the active site. The expanded model for the C-terminus reveals a less stable His207-Arg208 cis peptide bond, providing a rationalization for its spontaneous cleavage. The rate of this spontaneous cleavage is shown to correlate with the proximity of the C-terminus to the active site, suggesting that the closer interaction leads to increased strain on the already weak His207-Arg208 peptide bond. The relevance of the C-terminus structure for in vitro studies, and the physiological function of product release, is discussed.

  17. Controlled release of biologically active silver from nanosilver surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyu; Sonshine, David A; Shervani, Saira; Hurt, Robert H

    2010-11-23

    Major pathways in the antibacterial activity and eukaryotic toxicity of nanosilver involve the silver cation and its soluble complexes, which are well established thiol toxicants. Through these pathways, nanosilver behaves in analogy to a drug delivery system, in which the particle contains a concentrated inventory of an active species, the ion, which is transported to and released near biological target sites. Although the importance of silver ion in the biological response to nanosilver is widely recognized, the drug delivery paradigm has not been well developed for this system, and there is significant potential to improve nanosilver technologies through controlled release formulations. This article applies elements of the drug delivery paradigm to nanosilver dissolution and presents a systematic study of chemical concepts for controlled release. After presenting thermodynamic calculations of silver species partitioning in biological media, the rates of oxidative silver dissolution are measured for nanoparticles and macroscopic foils and used to derive unified area-based release kinetics. A variety of competing chemical approaches are demonstrated for controlling the ion release rate over 4 orders of magnitude. Release can be systematically slowed by thiol and citrate ligand binding, formation of sulfidic coatings, or the scavenging of peroxy-intermediates. Release can be accelerated by preoxidation or particle size reduction, while polymer coatings with complexation sites alter the release profile by storing and releasing inventories of surface-bound silver. Finally, the ability to tune biological activity is demonstrated through a bacterial inhibition zone assay carried out on selected formulations of controlled release nanosilver.

  18. Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Release Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) surveyed the entire sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns in 2010, achieving 5-sigma point source sensitivities per band better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic. The WISE All-Sky Data Release, conducted on March 14, 2012, incorporates all data taken during the full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 20l0,that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include: (1) an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets; (2) a Source Catalog containing positions and four-band photometry for over 563 million objects, and (3) an Explanatory Supplement. Ancillary products include a Reject Table that contains 284 million detections that were not selected for the Source Catalog because they are low signal-to-noise ratio or spurious detections of image artifacts, an archive of over 1.5 million sets of calibrated WISE Single-exposure images, and a database of 9.4 billion source extractions from those single images, and moving object tracklets identified by the NEOWISE program (Mainzer et aI. 2011). The WISE All-Sky Data Release products supersede those from the WISE Preliminary Data Release (Cutri et al. 2011). The Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the WISE data. The Supplement contains an overview of the WISE mission, facilities, and operations, a detailed description of WISE data processing algorithms, a guide to the content and formals of the image and tabular data products, and cautionary notes that describe known limitations of the All-Sky Release products. Instructions for accessing the WISE data products via the services of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive are provided. The Supplement also provides analyses of the achieved sky coverage, photometric and astrometric characteristics and completeness and reliability of the All

  19. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  20. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  1. Stagnation pressure activated fuel release mechanism for hypersonic projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Cartland, Harry E.; Hunter, John W.

    2003-01-01

    A propulsion-assisted projectile has a body, a cowl forming a combustion section and a nozzle section. The body has a fuel reservoir within a central portion of the body, and a fuel activation system located along the central axis of the body and having a portion of the fuel activation system within the fuel reservoir. The fuel activation system has a fuel release piston with a forward sealing member where the fuel release piston is adapted to be moved when the forward sealing member is impacted with an air flow, and an air-flow channel adapted to conduct ambient air during flight to the fuel release piston.

  2. Correlation between in vitro release from topical delivery vehicles and microbicidal activity of triclosan.

    PubMed

    Swart, H C; Du Preez, J L; De Villiers, M M; Lötter, A P; Liebenberg, W

    2006-01-01

    This study reports the formulation, stability, in vitro release and microbicidal activity of a cream, emulsion, foot gel, cover stick and after sun spray containing triclosan. Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent with activity against a wide range of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria that has found increasing popular use in personal care products. These products were stable for up to 3 months when stored at 5, 25, and 40 degrees C. Antimicrobial zone inhibition tests showed that that was a liner relationship, R2 > 0.92, between the release of triclosan from these products and the size of the inhibition zones. This means the in vitro/in vivo correlation for these products was good and that release studies can be used to predict the antimicrobial activity of triclosan.

  3. Production of ascorbic acid releasing biomaterials for pelvic floor repair

    PubMed Central

    Mangır, Naşide; Bullock, Anthony J.; Roman, Sabiniano; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Objective An underlying abnormality in collagen turnover is implied in the occurrence of complications and recurrences after mesh augmented pelvic floor repair surgeries. Ascorbic acid is a potent stimulant of collagen synthesis. The aim of this study is to produce ascorbic acid releasing poly-lactic acid (PLA) scaffolds and evaluate them for their effects on extracellular matrix production and the strength of the materials. Materials and methods Scaffolds which contained either l-ascorbic acid (AA) and Ascorbate-2-Phosphate (A2P) were produced with emulsion electrospinning. The release of both drugs was measured by UV spectrophotometry. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on scaffolds and cultured for 2 weeks. Cell attachment, viability and total collagen production were evaluated as well as mechanical properties. Results No significant differences were observed between AA, A2P, Vehicle and PLA scaffolds in terms of fibre diameter and pore size. The encapsulation efficiency and successful release of both AA and A2P were demonstrated. Both AA and A2P containing scaffolds were significantly more hydrophilic and stronger in both dry and wet states compared to PLA scaffolds. Fibroblasts produced more collagen on scaffolds containing either AA or A2P compared to cells grown on control scaffolds. Conclusion This study is the first to directly compare the two ascorbic acid derivatives in a tissue engineered scaffold and shows that both AA and A2P releasing electrospun PLA scaffolds increased collagen production of fibroblasts to similar extents but AA scaffolds seemed to be more hydrophilic and stronger compared to A2P scaffolds. Statement of significance Mesh augmented surgical repair of the pelvic floor currently relies on non-degradable materials which results in severe complications in some patients. There is an unmet and urgent need for better pelvic floor repair materials. Our current understanding suggests that the ideal material should be able to better

  4. Data summary report for fission product release Test VI-7

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorentz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Collins, J.L.; Webster, C.S.

    1995-05-01

    Test VI-7 was the final test in the VI series conducted in the vertical furnace. The fuel specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the Monticello boiling water reactor (BWR). The fuel had experienced a burnup of {approximately}-40 Mwd/kg U. It was heated in an induction furnace for successive 20-min periods at 2000 and 2300 K in a moist air-helium atmosphere. Integral releases were 69% for {sup 85}Kr, 52% for {sup 125}Sb, 71% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 0.04% for {sup 154}Eu. For the non-gamma-emitting species, release values for 42% for I, 4.1% for Ba, 5.3% for Mo, and 1.2% for Sr were determined. The total mass released from the furnace to the collection system, including fission products, fuel, and structural materials, was 0.89 g, with 37% being collected on the thermal gradient tubes and 63% downstream on filters. Posttest examination of the fuel specimen indicated that most of the cladding was completely oxidized to ZrO{sub 2}, but that oxidation was not quite complete at the upper end. The release behaviors for the most volatile elements, Kr and Cs, were in good agreement with the ORNL-Booth Model.

  5. PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Clemens; Bloom, Barry R.

    1973-01-01

    General methods were developed and applied to the biosynthesis and purification of products of activated lymphocytes available in minute quantities. The activity studied here was the migration inhibitory factor (MIF) produced by purified protein derivative (PPD)- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from one guinea pig or less. The methods selected yielded results in terms of two chemical parameters characteristic of the molecules involved, namely Kd on Sephadex G-75 and isoionic point, pI, on isoelectric focusing. When supernatants were fractionated on G-75 columns, there were several areas even in control supernatants which produced migration inhibition relative to medium controls. However, in PPD- and Con A-stimulated supernatants, at least one peak of MIF activity was found solely in the stimulated cultures, with a Kd of 0.15. A double-labeling technique was used to characterize the proteins of this peak. Control, unstimulated cultures were labeled with [14C]leucine and stimulated cultures were labeled with [3H]leucine. After mixing the supernatants and G-75 filtration, a major "ratiolabeled" broad peak. i.e. one with increased 3H/14C ratio, was found. When a narrow portion of this peak about Kd 0.15, containing most of the MIF activity, was subjected to analytical isoelectric focusing, all of the label was associated with proteins of lower net charge than albumin. A unique ratiolabeled peak was found in PPD- and Con A-stimulated fractions with a pI of approx. 5.3. A micropreparative isoelectric focusing technique was developed and yielded MIF activity in the same region as the major ratiolabeled peak. Further study will be required to ascertain whether the ratiolabeled protein is MIF. By following the Kd, pI, and 3H/14C labeling ratio, at least 14 products of activated lymphocytes, synthesized either de novo or in increased amounts, could be distinguished. PMID:4688317

  6. The search for active release of volcanic gases on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Alain; Villanueva, Geronimo; Mumma, Michael; Tokunaga, Alan

    2015-11-01

    The study of planetary atmospheres by means of spectroscopy is important for understanding their origin and evolution. The presence of short-lived trace gases in the martian atmosphere would imply recent production, for example, by ongoing geologic activity. On Earth, sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfur monoxide (SO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are the main sulfur-bearing gases released during volcanic outgassing. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), also released from some volcanoes on Earth (e.g., Erebus and Nyiragongo), could be formed by reactions involving SO2 or H2S inside magma chambers. We carried out the first ground-based, semi-simultaneous, multi-band and multi-species search for such gases above the Tharsis and Syrtis volcanic regions on Mars. The submillimeter search extended between 23 November 2011 and 13 May 2012 which corresponded to Mars’ mid Northern Spring and early Northern Summer seasons (Ls = 34-110°). The strong submillimeter rotational transitions of SO2, SO and H2S were targeted using the high-resolution heterodyne receiver (aka Barney) on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We reached sensitivities sufficient to detect a volcanic release on Mars that is 4% of the SO2 released continuously from Kilauea volcano in Hawaii, or 5% that of the Masaya volcano in Nicaragua. The infrared search covered OCS in its combination band (ν2+ν3) at 3.42 μm at two successive Mars years, during Mars’ late Northern Spring and mid Northern Summer seasons, spanning Ls= 43º and Ls= 147º. The targeted volcanic districts were observed during the two intervals, 14 Dec. 2011 to 6 Jan. 2012 in the first year, and 30 May 2014 to 16 June 2014 in the second year, using the high resolution infrared spectrometer (CSHELL) on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (NASA/IRTF). We will present our results and discuss their implications for current volcanic outgassing activity on the red planet. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program under NASA

  7. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. J.; Evans, Elizabeth; Valić, F.; Žuškin, Eugenija

    1973-01-01

    Nicholls, P. J., Evans, E., Valić, F., and Žuškin, E. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 142-145. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal. Extracts of dry and oiled sisal released histamine from pig and human but not from rat lung tissue. A suspension in Tyrode solution of the oil used for softening the sisal fibres had a pH of 8·1 and also released histamine from pig and human lung. The releasing activity was abolished when the pH of this suspension was adjusted to pH 7·4. As all the sisal extracts were adjusted to pH 7·4 for incubation with lung tissue, the histamine-releasing activity of sisal in vitro is unrelated to the presence of the oil. Significant (P < 0·01) mean reductions over the work shift of ventilatory capacity (PEF and FEV1·0) were recorded in all the workers exposed to airborne sisal dust. These reductions were greater in combers than in drawers and spinners. Sisal collected from combing machines possessed more histamine-releasing activity than material from drawing and spinning machines. These results indicate that histamine release by sisal may be the cause of acute ventilatory capacity changes in sisal exposure. PMID:4122162

  8. Explosive Products EOS: Adjustment for detonation speed and energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-05

    Propagating detonation waves exhibit a curvature effect in which the detonation speed decreases with increasing front curvature. The curvature effect is due to the width of the wave profile. Numerically, the wave profile depends on resolution. With coarse resolution, the wave width is too large and results in a curvature effect that is too large. Consequently, the detonation speed decreases as the cell size is increased. We propose a modification to the products equation of state (EOS) to compensate for the effect of numerical resolution; i.e., to increase the CJ pressure in order that a simulation propagates a detonation wave with a speed that is on average correct. The EOS modification also adjusts the release isentrope to correct the energy release.

  9. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor.

  10. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 40; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Assessment Report for the Beta-Release L4_SM Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase there are two objectives for each science data product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithm, and 2) validate the accuracy of the science data product as specified in the science requirements and according to the Cal/Val schedule. This report provides an assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture Passive (L4_SM) product specifically for the product's public beta release scheduled for 30 October 2015. The primary objective of the beta release is to allow users to familiarize themselves with the data product before the validated product becomes available. The beta release also allows users to conduct their own assessment of the data and to provide feedback to the L4_SM science data product team. The assessment of the L4_SM data product includes comparisons of SMAP L4_SM soil moisture estimates with in situ soil moisture observations from core validation sites and sparse networks. The assessment further includes a global evaluation of the internal diagnostics from the ensemble-based data assimilation system that is used to generate the L4_SM product. This evaluation focuses on the statistics of the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals and the analysis increments. Together, the core validation site comparisons and the statistics of the assimilation diagnostics are considered primary validation methodologies for the L4_SM product. Comparisons against in situ measurements from regional-scale sparse networks are considered a secondary validation methodology because such in situ measurements are subject to upscaling errors from the point-scale to the grid cell scale of the data product. Based on the limited set of core validation sites, the assessment presented here meets the criteria established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites for Stage 1 validation and supports the beta release of the data. The validation against

  11. Controlled Release of Biologically Active Silver from Nanosilver Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Sonshine, David A.; Shervani, Saira; Hurt, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Major pathways in the antibacterial activity and eukaryotic toxicity of nano-silver involve the silver cation and its soluble complexes, which are well established thiol toxicants. Through these pathways, nano-silver behaves in analogy to a drug delivery system, in which the particle contains a concentrated inventory of an active species, the ion, which is transported to and released near biological target sites. Although the importance of silver ion in the biological response to nano-silver is widely recognized, the drug delivery paradigm has not been well developed for this system, and there is significant potential to improve nano-silver technologies through controlled release formulations. This article applies elements of the drug delivery paradigm to nano-silver dissolution and presents a systematic study of chemical concepts for controlled release. After presenting thermodynamic calculations of silver species partitioning in biological media, the rates of oxidative silver dissolution are measured for nanoparticles and macroscopic foils and used to derive unified area-based release kinetics. A variety of competing chemical approaches are demonstrated for controlling the ion release rate over four orders of magnitude. Release can be systematically slowed by thiol and citrate ligand binding, formation of sulfidic coatings, or the scavenging of peroxy-intermediates. Release can be accelerated by pre-oxidation or particle size reduction, while polymer coatings with complexation sites alter the release profile by storing and release inventories of surface-bound silver. Finally, the ability to tune biological activity is demonstrated through bacterial inhibition zone assay carried out on selected formulations of controlled release nano-silver. PMID:20968290

  12. Release and effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on rat pineal melatonin production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, R E; Chuluyan, H E; Pereyra, E N; Cardinali, D P

    1989-06-01

    1. 3H-gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) release elicited by a depolarizing K+ stimulus or by noradrenergic transmitter was examined in rat pineals in vitro. 2. The release of 3H-GABA was detectable at a 20 mM K+ concentration in medium and increased steadily up to 80 mM K+. 3. In a Ca2+-free medium 3H-GABA release elicited by 30 mM K+, but not that elicited by 50 mM K+, became blunted. 4. Norepinephrine (NE; 10(-6)-10(-4) M) stimulated 3H-GABA release from rat pineal explants in a dose-dependent manner. 5. The activity of 10(-5) M NE on pineal GABA release was suppressed by equimolecular amounts of prazosin or phentolamine (alpha 1- and alpha 1/alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockers, respectively) and was unaffected by propranolol (beta-adrenoceptor blocker). 6. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (10(-7)-10(-5) M) and the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol (10(-5) M) mimicked the GABA releasing activity of NE, while 10(-7) M isoproterenol failed to affect it; the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine (10(-7)-10(-5) M) did not modify 3H-GABA release. 7. The addition of 10(-4) M GABA or of the GABA transaminase inhibitor gamma-acetylenic GABA or aminooxyacetic acid inhibited the melatonin content and/or release to the medium in rat pineal organotypic cultures. 8. GABA at concentrations of 10(-5) M or greater partially inhibited the NE-induced increase in melatonin production by pineal explants. 9. The depressant effect of GABA on melatonin production was inhibited by the GABA type A receptor antagonist bicuculline; bicuculline alone increased the pineal melatonin content. Baclofen, a GABA type B receptor agonist, did not affect the pineal melatonin content or release. 10. The decrease in serotonin (5-HT) content of rat pineal explants brought about by NE was not modified by GABA; GABA by itself increased 5-HT levels. 11. These results indicate that (a) GABA is released from rat pineals by a depolarizing stimulus of K+ through a mechanism which is partially Ca2

  13. Explanatory Supplement to the NEOWISE Data Release Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Mainzer, A.; Conrow, T.; Masci, F.; Bauer, J.; Dailey, J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Gelino, C.; Grillmair, C.; Wheelock, S. L.; Yan, L.; Harbut, M.; Beck, R.; Wittman, M.; Wright, E. L.; Masiero, J.; Grav, T.; Sonnett, S.; Nugent, C.; Kramer, E.; Stevenson, R.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Fabinsky, B.; Tholen, D.; Papin, M.; Fowler, J.; McCallon, H.

    2015-03-01

    's survey observations. The Explanatory Supplement to the NEOWISE Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the NEOWISE data. The Supplement contains an overview of the NEOWISE mission, facilities, and operations, a description of the contents and formats of the NEOWISE image and tabular data products, and cautionary notes that describe known limitations of the Release products. Instructions for accessing the NEOWISE data products via the services of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive are provided. Descriptions of the data processing system and algorithms used to ingest and convert raw NEOWISE images to the calibrated data products are presented, along with assessments of the sky coverage, photometric and astrometric characteristics and completeness and reliability of the NEOWISE Release data products. The NEOWISE Data Release Explanatory Supplement is an on-line document that is updated frequently to provide the most current information for users of the NEOWISE data products. The Explanatory Supplement is maintained at: http://wise2.ipac.caltech.edu/docs/release/neowise/expsup/ NEOWISE is a project of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the Planetary Science Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. ASBESTOS RELEASE DURING BUILDING DEMOLITION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) monitored block-wide building demolition and debris disposal activities at Santa Cruz and Watsonsville, California following the 1989 earthquake; an implosion demolition of a 26-story bu...

  15. Explanatory Supplement to the AllWISE Data Release Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Wright, E. L.; Conrow, T.; Fowler, J. W.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Grillmair, C.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Masci, F.; McCallon, H. L.; Wheelock, S. L.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Yan, L.; Benford, D.; Harbut, M.; Jarrett, T.; Lake, S.; Leisawitz, D.; Ressler, M. E.; Stanford, S. A.; Tsai, C. W.; Liu, F.; Helou, G.; Mainzer, A.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A.; Hoffman, D.; Marsh, K. A.; Padgett, D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Beck, R. P.; Papin, M.; Wittman, M.

    2013-11-01

    The AllWISE program builds upon the successful Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) mission by combining data from all WISE and NEOWISE (Mainzer et al. 2011) survey phases to form the most comprehensive view of the mid-infrared sky currently available. By combining the data from two complete sky coverage epochs in an advanced data processing system, AllWISE has generated new products that have enhanced photometric sensitivity and accuracy, and improved astrometric precision compared with the earlier WISE All-Sky Data Release. Exploiting the 6 month baseline between the WISE sky coverage epochs enables AllWISE to measure source motions for the first time, and to compute improved flux variability statistics. AllWISE data release products include: a Source Catalog that contains 4-band fluxes, positions, apparent motion measurements, and flux variability statistics for over 747 million objects detected at SNR>5 in the combined exposures; a Multiepoch Photometry Database containing over 42 billion time-tagged, single-exposure fluxes for each object detected on the combined exposures; and an Image Atlas of 18,240 4-band calibrated FITS images, depth-of-coverage and noise maps that cover the sky produced by coadding nearly 7.9 million single-exposure images from the cryogenic and post-cryogenic survey phases. The Explanatory Supplement to the AllWISE Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the AllWISE data. The Supplement contains detailed descriptions of the format and characteristics of the AllWISE data products, as well as a summary of cautionary notes that describe known limitations. The Supplement is an on-line document that is updated frequently to provide the most current information for users of the AllWISE data products. The Explanatory Supplement is maintained at: http://wise2.ipac.caltech.edu/docs/release/allwise/expsup/index.html AllWISE makes use of data from WISE, which is a joint project of the University of

  16. Suppression of grasshopper sound production by nitric oxide-releasing neurons of the central complex.

    PubMed

    Weinrich, Anja; Kunst, Michael; Wirmer, Andrea; Holstein, Gay R; Heinrich, Ralf

    2008-08-01

    The central complex of acridid grasshoppers integrates sensory information pertinent to reproduction-related acoustic communication. Activation of nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic GMP-signaling by injection of NO donors into the central complex of restrained Chorthippus biguttulus females suppresses muscarine-stimulated sound production. In contrast, sound production is released by aminoguanidine (AG)-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the central body, suggesting a basal release of NO that suppresses singing in this situation. Using anti-citrulline immunocytochemistry to detect recent NO production, subtypes of columnar neurons with somata located in the pars intercerebralis and tangential neurons with somata in the ventro-median protocerebrum were distinctly labeled. Their arborizations in the central body upper division overlap with expression patterns for NOS and with the site of injection where NO donors suppress sound production. Systemic application of AG increases the responsiveness of unrestrained females to male calling songs. Identical treatment with the NOS inhibitor that increased male song-stimulated sound production in females induced a marked reduction of citrulline accumulation in central complex columnar and tangential neurons. We conclude that behavioral situations that are unfavorable for sound production (like being restrained) activate NOS-expressing central body neurons to release NO and elevate the behavioral threshold for sound production in female grasshoppers.

  17. Influences of use activities and waste management on environmental releases of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Henning; Hackmann, Stephan; Zimmermann, Till; Köser, Jan; Thöming, Jorg; von Gleich, Arnim

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) offer enhanced or new functionalities and properties that are used in various products. This also entails potential environmental risks in terms of hazard and exposure. However, hazard and exposure assessment for ENM still suffer from insufficient knowledge particularly for product-related releases and environmental fate and behavior. This study therefore analyzes the multiple impacts of the product use, the properties of the matrix material, and the related waste management system (WMS) on the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) by applying nine prospective life cycle release scenarios based on reasonable assumptions. The products studied here are clothing textiles treated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), since they constitute a controversial application. Surprisingly, the results show counter-intuitive increases by a factor of 2.6 in PEC values for the air compartment in minimal AgNP release scenarios. Also, air releases can shift from washing to wearing activity; their associated release points may shift accordingly, potentially altering release hot spots. Additionally, at end-of-life, the fraction of AgNP-residues contained on exported textiles can be increased by 350% when assuming short product lifespans and globalized WMS. It becomes evident that certain combinations of use activities, matrix material characteristics, and WMS can influence the regional PEC by several orders of magnitude. Thus, in the light of the findings and expected ENM market potential, future assessments should consider these aspects to derive precautionary design alternatives and to enable prospective global and regional risk assessments.

  18. Infralimbic cortex activation and motivated arousal induce histamine release.

    PubMed

    Riveros, María Eugenia; Forray, María Inés; Torrealba, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    Appetitive behaviours occur in a state of behavioural and physiological activation that allows the optimal performance of these goal-directed behaviours. Here, we tested the hypothesis that histamine neurons under the command of the infralimbic cortex are important to provide behavioural activation. Extracellular histamine and serotonin were measured by microdialysis of the medial prefrontal cortex in behaving rats in parallel with a picrotoxin microinjection into the infralimbic cortex. The injection aroused the rats behaviourally, increased histamine release and decreased serotonin levels. Inhibition of the infralimbic cortex with muscimol produced the opposite effects on neurotransmitter release. The behavioural activation induced by motivating hungry rats with caged food was paralleled by an immediate histamine release, whereas awakening induced by tapping their microdialysis bowl increased serotonin, but not histamine levels. In conclusion, picrotoxin injection into the infralimbic cortex produces behavioural activation together with histamine release; in a similar manner, induction of an appetitive state produced histamine release, likely related to increased behavioural activation characteristic of an appetitive behaviour.

  19. Assessment of thermal gradient tube results from the HI series of fission product release tests

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, K.S.

    1985-03-01

    A thermal gradient tube was used to analyze fission product vapors released from fuel heated in the HI test series. Complete deposition profiles were obtained for Cs, I, Ag, and Sb. The cesium profiles were complex and probably were dominated by Cs-S-O compounds formed by release of sulfur from furnace ceramics. The iodine profiles were simple, indicating that more than 99.5% of the released iodine behaved as a single nonvolatile species, probably CsI. Mass transfer coefficients for this species onto platinum were estimated to be 1.9 to 5.8 cm/s. Silver was probably released in elemental form, condensed to an aerosol, and captured by filters. Antimony was released as the element and reacted rapidly with platinum (or gold) as it deposited. Antimony profiles were calculated a priori with some success. A method was developed for isolating tellurium from platinum and mixed fission products in a form suitable for neutron activation analysis. The platinum samples were completely dissolved in acid (HCl/HNO/sub 3/), and the tellurium was precipitated on selenium carrier by reduction. Finally, tellurium was loaded onto Dowex 1X-4 ion-exchange resin for activation and analysis. Tellurium recovery was approx. 88%, and the theoretical sensitivity was approx. 30 ng.

  20. Optical investigation of heat release and NOx production in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, B. H.; Patel, S.; Dunkley, P.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Two passive optical techniques are described to investigate combustion. Optical Emission Tomography (OET) is used for non-intrusive study of heat release through the detection of chemiluminescence by the hydroxyl radical that is generated in the burning process. The OET technique described here is based on a passive fibre-optic detection system, which allows spatially resolved high-frequency detection of the flame front in a combustion flame, where all fibres detect the emission signals simultaneously. The system withstands the high pressures and temperatures typically encountered in the harsh environments of gas turbine combustors and IC engines. The sensor-array is non-intrusive, low-cost, compact, simple to configure and can be quickly set up around a combustion field. The maximum acquisition rate is 2 kHz. This allows spatially resolved study of the fast phenomena in combustion. Furthermore, the production of NOx is investigated through the emission of green light as a result of adding tri-methyl-borate to a flame. In combustion, the tri-methyl-borate produces green luminescence in locations where NOx would be produced. Combining the green luminescence visualisation with OET detection of the hydroxyl radical allows monitoring of heat release and of NOx production areas, thus giving a means of studying both the burning process and the resulting NOx pollution.

  1. Nitric oxide released from activated platelets inhibits platelet recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, J E; Loscalzo, J; Barnard, M R; Alpert, C; Keaney, J F; Michelson, A D

    1997-01-01

    Vessel injury and thrombus formation are the cause of most ischemic coronary syndromes and, in this setting, activated platelets stimulate platelet recruitment to the growing thrombus. Recently, a constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been identified in human platelets. To further define the capacity of platelets to produce nitric oxide (NO), as well as to study the role of this NO in platelet recruitment, we adapted a NO-selective microelectrode for use in a standard platelet aggregometer, thereby permitting simultaneous measurement of platelet aggregation and NO production. Treatment of platelets with the NO synthase inhibitor -NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), reduced NO production by 92+/-8% in response to 5 microM ADP compared to control but increased aggregation by only 15+/-2%. In contrast, L-NAME had a more pronounced effect on platelet recruitment as evidenced by a 35+/-5% increase in the extent of aggregation, a 33+/-3% decrease in cyclic GMP content, and a 31+/-5% increase in serotonin release from a second recruitable population of platelets added to stimulated platelets at the peak of NO production. To study platelet recruitment accurately, we developed an assay that monitors two platelet populations simultaneously. Nonbiotinylated platelets were incubated with L-NAME or vehicle and activated with ADP. At peak NO production, biotinylated platelets were added. As measured by three-color flow cytometry, there was a 56+/-11% increase in the number of P selectin- positive platelets in the nonbiotinylated population treated with L-NAME as compared to control. When biotinylated platelets were added to the L-NAME-treated nonbiotinylated population, the number of P selectin positive biotinylated plate-lets increased by 180+/-32% as compared to biotinylated platelets added to the control. In summary, stimulated platelets produce NO that modestly inhibits platelet activation but markedly inhibits additional platelet recruitment. These data suggest

  2. Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

    2010-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

  3. Controlled release of isoproturon, imidacloprid, and cyromazine from alginate-bentonite-activated carbon formulations.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Herrera, F J; Gonzalez-Pradas, E; Fernandez-Pérez, M

    2006-12-27

    Different alginate-based systems of isoproturon, imidacloprid, and cyromazine have been investigated in order to obtain controlled release (CR) properties. The basic formulation [sodium alginate (1.50%), pesticide (0.30%), and water] was modified using different amounts of bentonite and activated carbon. The higher values of encapsulation efficiency corresponded to those formulations prepared with higher percentages of activated carbon, showing higher encapsulation efficiency values for isoproturon and imidacloprid than for cyromazine, which has a higher water solubility. The kinetic experiments of imidacloprid/isoproturon release in water have shown us that the release rate is higher in imidacloprid systems than in those prepared with isoproturon. Moreover, it can be deduced that the use of bentonite and/or activated carbon sorbents reduces the release rate of the isoproturon and imidacloprid in comparison with the technical product and with alginate formulation without modifying agents. The highest decrease in release rate corresponds to the formulations prepared with the highest percentage of activated carbon. The water uptake, permeability, and time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, T50, were calculated to compare the formulations. On the basis of a parameter of an empirical equation used to fit the pesticide release data, the release of isoproturon and imidacloprid from the various formulations into water is controlled by a diffusion mechanism. The sorption capacity of the sorbents and the permeability of the formulations were the most important factors modulating pesticide release. Finally, a linear correlation of the T50 values and the content of activated carbon in formulations were obtained.

  4. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from presswood and laminated wood products manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Facilities engaged in the manufacture of presswood and laminated wood products may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who manufacture presswood and laminated wood products in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  5. Modifying release characteristics from 3D printed drug-eluting products.

    PubMed

    Boetker, Johan; Water, Jorrit Jeroen; Aho, Johanna; Arnfast, Lærke; Bohr, Adam; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-07-30

    This work describes an approach to modify the release of active compound from a 3D printed model drug product geometry intended for flexible dosing and precision medication. The production of novel polylactic acid and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose based feed materials containing nitrofurantoin for 3D printing purposes is demonstrated. Nitrofurantoin, Metolose® and polylactic acid were successfully co-extruded with up to 40% Metolose® content, and subsequently 3D printed into model disk geometries (ø10mm, h=2mm). Thermal analysis with differential scanning calorimetry and solid phase identification with Raman spectroscopy showed that nitrofurantoin remained in its original solid form during both hot-melt extrusion and subsequent 3D printing. Rheological measurements of the different compositions showed that the flow properties were sensitive to the amount of undissolved particles present in the formulation. Release of nitrofurantoin from the disks was dependent on Metolose® loading, with higher accumulated release observed for higher Metolose® loads. This work shows the potential of custom-made, drug loaded feed materials for 3D printing of precision drug products with tailored drug release characteristics.

  6. Linear Free Energy Correlations for Fission Product Release from the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes, et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the source of the radionuclides to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form ln χ = -α (ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)+β were obtained between the deposited concentration and the reduction potential of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn(TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2130 K and 2220 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, 151Sm through atmospheric venting and releases during the first month following the accident were performed, and indicate large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  7. [The release of biologically active compounds from peat peloids].

    PubMed

    Babaskin, D V

    2011-01-01

    This work had the objective to study kinetics of the release of flavonoides from peat peloid compositions containing extracts of medicinal herbs in model systems.The key parameters of the process are defined. The rate of liberation of flavonoides is shown to depend on their initial concentration in the compositions being used. The influence of the flavonoide composition of the tested extracts and dimethylsulfoxide on the release of biologically active compounds contained in the starting material in the model environment is estimated. The possibility of the layer-by-layer deposition of the compositions and peat peloids in order to increase the efficacy of flavonoide release from the starting composition and to ensure more rational utilization of the extracts of medicinal plants is demonstrated.

  8. Selective release of phosphorus and nitrogen from waste activated sludge with combined thermal and alkali treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minwook; Han, Dong-Woo; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2015-08-01

    Selective release characteristics of phosphorus and nitrogen from waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated during combined thermal and alkali treatment. Alkali (0.001-1.0N NaOH) treatment and combined thermal-alkali treatment were applied to WAS for releasing total P(T-P) and total nitrogen(T-N). Combined thermal-alkali treatment released 94%, 76%, and 49% of T-P, T-N, and COD, respectively. Release rate was positively associated with NaOH concentration, while temperature gave insignificant effect. The ratio of T-N and COD to T-P that released with alkali treatment ranged 0.74-0.80 and 0.39-0.50, respectively, while combined thermal-alkali treatment gave 0.60-0.90 and 0.20-0.60, respectively. Selective release of T-P and T-N was negatively associated with NaOH. High NaOH concentration created cavities on the surface of WAS, and these cavities accelerated the release rate, but reduced selectivity. Selective release of P and N from sludge has a beneficial effect on nutrient recovery with crystallization processes and it can also enhance methane production.

  9. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  10. Mechanical stretch induces MMP-2 release and activation in lung endothelium: role of EMMPRIN.

    PubMed

    Haseneen, Nadia A; Vaday, Gayle G; Zucker, Stanley; Foda, Hussein D

    2003-03-01

    High-volume mechanical ventilation leads to ventilator-induced lung injury. This type of lung injury is accompanied by an increased release and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). To investigate the mechanism leading to the increased MMP release, we systematically studied the effect of mechanical stretch on human microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the lung. We exposed cells grown on collagen 1 BioFlex plates to sinusoidal cyclic stretch at 0.5 Hz using the Flexercell system with 17-18% elongation of cells. After 4 days of cell stretching, conditioned media and cell lysate were collected and analyzed by gelatin, casein, and reverse zymograms as well as Western blotting. RT-PCR of mRNA extracted from stretched cells was performed. Our results show that 1) cyclic stretch led to increased release and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-1; 2) the activation of MMP-2 was accompanied by an increase in membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) and inhibited by a hydroxamic acid-derived inhibitor of MMPs (Prinomastat, AG3340); and 3) the MMP-2 release and activation were preceded by an increase in production of extracellular MMP inducer (EMMPRIN). These results suggest that cyclic mechanical stretch leads to MMP-2 activation through an MT1-MMP mechanism. EMMPRIN may play an important role in the release and activation of MMPs during lung injury.

  11. Analysis of fission product release behavior during the TMI-2 accident

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, D. A.; Adams, J. P.; Anderson, J. L.; Hobbins, R. R.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of fission product release during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident has been initiated to provide an understanding of fission product behavior that is consistent with both the best estimate accident scenario and fission product results from the ongoing sample acquisition and examination efforts. ''First principles'' fission product release models are used to describe release from intact, disrupted, and molten fuel. Conclusions relating to fission product release, transport, and chemical form are drawn. 35 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Elastase and metalloproteinase activities regulate soluble complement receptor 1 release.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, S; Hess, C; Miot, S; Spertini, O; Lutz, H; Schifferli, J A

    1999-11-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) is cleaved from the surface of polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in the membrane-proximal region to yield a soluble fragment (sCR1) that contains the functional domains. The enzymes involved in this cleavage are produced by the PMN itself, since in vitro stimulation of purified PMN is followed by sCR1 release. Purified human neutrophil elastase (HNE) cleaved CR1 from erythrocytes and urinary vesicles originating from podocytes and enhanced tenfold the cleavage of CR1 from activated PMN. The largest fragment released from PMN by HNE was identical in size to CR1 shed spontaneously. The CR1 fragments cleaved from erythrocytes were functional. The shedding of sCR1 by activated PMN was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (80 +/- 10%), alpha1-antiprotease (50 +/- 5%) and elafin (60 +/- 5%). Furthermore the cleavage was blocked by the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline (70 +/- 6 %) as well as by a monoclonal antibody against human neutrophil collagenase MMP8 (40 +/- 10%). Maximal inhibition of sCR1 shedding was obtained by a combination of 1,10-phenanthroline with elafin (86 +/- 6%). These inhibitors had no effect on L-selectin shedding, indicating that the cleavage of CR1 was specific. In conclusion, elastase or elastase-like activity may be responsible for the shedding of functional sCR1 in vivo, and this activity is controlled by the local release of PMN metalloproteases and alpha1antiprotease.

  13. The Sustainable Release of Vancomycin and Its Degradation Products From Nanostructured Collagen/Hydroxyapatite Composite Layers.

    PubMed

    Suchý, Tomáš; Šupová, Monika; Klapková, Eva; Horný, Lukáš; Rýglová, Šárka; Žaloudková, Margit; Braun, Martin; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Ballay, Rastislav; Veselý, Jan; Chlup, Hynek; Denk, František

    2016-03-01

    Infections of the musculoskeletal system present a serious problem with regard to the field of orthopedic and trauma medicine. The aim of the experiment described in this study was to develop a resorbable nanostructured composite layer with the controlled elution of antibiotics. The layer is composed of collagen, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, and vancomycin hydrochloride (10 wt%). The stability of the collagen was enhanced by means of cross-linking. Four cross-linking agents were studied, namely an ethanol solution, a phosphate buffer solution of N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide, genipin, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. High performance liquid chromatography was used so as to characterize the in vitro release rates of the vancomycin and its crystalline degradation antibiotically inactive products over a 21-day period. The maximum concentration of the released active form of vancomycin (approximately 265 mg/L) exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration up to an order of 17 times without triggering the burst releasing effect. At the end of the experiment, the minimum inhibitory concentration was exceeded by up to 6 times (approximately 100 mg/L). It was determined that the modification of collagen with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles does not negatively influence the sustainable release of vancomycin. The balance of vancomycin and its degradation products was observed after 14 days of incubation.

  14. Commercial Product Activation Using RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) would be used for commercial product activation, according to a proposal. What is new here is the concept of combining RFID with activation - more specifically, using RFID for activating commercial products (principally, electronic ones) and for performing such ancillary functions as tracking individual product units on production lines, tracking shipments, and updating inventories. According to the proposal, an RFID chip would be embedded in each product. The information encoded in the chip would include a unique number for identifying the product. An RFID reader at the point of sale would record the number of the product and would write digital information to the RFID chip for either immediate activation of the product or for later interrogation and processing. To be practical, an RFID product-activation system should satisfy a number of key requirements: the system should be designed to be integrable into the inventory-tracking and the data-processing and -communication infrastructures of businesses along the entire supply chain from manufacture to retail; the system should be resistant to sophisticated hacking; activation codes should be made sufficiently complexity to minimize the probability of activating stolen products; RFID activation equipment at points of sale must be capable to two-way RF communication for the purposes of reading information from, and writing information to, embedded RFID chips; the equipment at points of sale should be easily operable by sales clerks with little or no training; the point-of-sale equipment should verify activation and provide visible and/or audible signals indicating verification or lack thereof; and, the system should be able to handle millions of products per year with minimal human intervention, among other requirements.

  15. Nanovalve-Controlled Cargo Release Activated by Plasmonic Heating

    PubMed Central

    Croissant, Jonas; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and operation of a light-operated nanovalve that controls the pore openings of mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing gold cores nanoparticles is described. The nanoparticles, consisting of 20 nm gold cores inside ~150 nm mesoporous silica spheres, were synthesized using a unique one-pot method. The nanovalves are comprised of cucurbit[6]uril rings encircling stalks that are attached to the ~2 nm pore openings. Plasmonic heating of the gold core raises the local temperature and decreases the ring-stalk binding constant, thereby unblocking the pore and releasing the cargo molecules that were preloaded inside. Bulk heating of the suspended particles to 60 °C is required to release the cargo, but no bulk temperature change was observed in the plasmonic heating release experiment. High intensity irradiation caused thermal damage to the silica particles, but low intensity illumination caused a sufficient local temperature increase to operate the valves without damaging the nanoparticles containers. These light-stimulated, thermally activated mechanized nanoparticles demonstrate a new system with potential utility for on-command drug release. PMID:22540671

  16. Drug releasing nanoplatforms activated by alternating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Damien; Sandre, Olivier; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie

    2017-02-24

    The use of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to generate non-invasively and spatially a localized heating from a magnetic nano-mediator has become very popular these last years to develop magnetic hyperthermia (MH) as a promising therapeutic modality already used in the clinics. AMF has become highly attractive this last decade over others radiations, as AMF allows a deeper penetration in the body and a less harmful ionizing effect. In addition to pure MH which induces tumor cell death through local T elevation, this AMF-generated magneto-thermal effect can also be exploited as a relevant external stimulus to trigger a drug release from drug-loaded magnetic nanocarriers, temporally and spatially. This review article is focused especially on this concept of AMF induced drug release, possibly combined with MH. The design of such magnetically responsive drug delivery nanoplatforms requires two key and complementary components: a magnetic mediator which collects and turns the magnetic energy into local heat, and a thermoresponsive carrier ensuring thermo-induced drug release, as a consequence of magnetic stimulus. A wide panel of magnetic nanomaterials/chemistries and processes are currently developed to achieve such nanoplatforms. This review article presents a broad overview about the fundamental concepts of drug releasing nanoplatforms activated by AMF, their formulations, and their efficiency in vitro and in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editors: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader.

  17. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  18. Most Plastic Products Release Estrogenic Chemicals: A Potential Health Problem That Can Be Solved

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun Z.; Yaniger, Stuart I.; Jordan, V. Craig; Klein, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chemicals having estrogenic activity (EA) reportedly cause many adverse health effects, especially at low (picomolar to nanomolar) doses in fetal and juvenile mammals. Objectives: We sought to determine whether commercially available plastic resins and products, including baby bottles and other products advertised as bisphenol A (BPA) free, release chemicals having EA. Methods: We used a roboticized MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, which is very sensitive, accurate, and repeatable, to quantify the EA of chemicals leached into saline or ethanol extracts of many types of commercially available plastic materials, some exposed to common-use stresses (microwaving, ultraviolet radiation, and/or autoclaving). Results: Almost all commercially available plastic products we sampled—independent of the type of resin, product, or retail source—leached chemicals having reliably detectable EA, including those advertised as BPA free. In some cases, BPA-free products released chemicals having more EA than did BPA-containing products. Conclusions: Many plastic products are mischaracterized as being EA free if extracted with only one solvent and not exposed to common-use stresses. However, we can identify existing compounds, or have developed, monomers, additives, or processing agents that have no detectable EA and have similar costs. Hence, our data suggest that EA-free plastic products exposed to common-use stresses and extracted by saline and ethanol solvents could be cost-effectively made on a commercial scale and thereby eliminate a potential health risk posed by most currently available plastic products that leach chemicals having EA into food products. PMID:21367689

  19. Bronchial epithelial cells release monocyte chemotactic activity in response to smoke and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, S.; Rennard, S.I.; Leikauf, G.D.; Robbins, R.A. )

    1991-08-01

    An increase in mononuclear phagocytes occurs within the airways during airway inflammation. Bronchial epithelial cells could release monocyte chemotactic activity and contribute to this increase. To test this hypothesis, bovine bronchial epithelial cells were isolated and maintained in culture. Bronchial epithelial cell culture supernatant fluids were evaluated for monocyte chemotactic activity. Epithelial cell culture supernatant fluids attracted significantly greater numbers of monocytes compared to media alone and the number of monocytes attracted increased in a time dependent manner. Endotoxin and smoke extract induced a dose and time dependent release of monocyte chemotactic activity compared with cells cultured in media (52.5 {plus minus} 2.6 (endotoxin), 30.5 {plus minus} 2.3 (smoke) vs 20.5 {plus minus} 2.2 cells/high power field (HPF) p less than 0.001). The released activity was chemotactic by checkerboard analysis. Stimulation of the epithelial cells by opsonized zymosan, calcium ionophore (A23187), and PMA also resulted in an increase in monocyte chemotactic activity (p less than 0.01). Because the release of activity was blocked by the lipoxygenase inhibitors, nordihydroguaiaretic acid and diethycarbamazine, epithelial cell monolayers were cultured with 3 microCi (3H)arachidonic acid for 24 h and then exposed to A23187, PMA, or both stimuli, for 4, 8, and 24 h. Analysis of the released 3H activity was performed with reverse-phase HPLC and revealed that the major lipoxygenase product was leukotriene B4. These data suggest that monocytes may be recruited into airways in response to chemotactic factors released by bronchial epithelial cells.

  20. Activation Cascading in Sign Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarrete, Eduardo; Peressotti, Francesca; Lerose, Luigi; Miozzo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how activation unfolds in sign production by examining whether signs that are not produced have their representations activated by semantics (cascading of activation). Deaf signers were tested with a picture-picture interference task. Participants were presented with pairs of overlapping pictures and named the green…

  1. Biological activities of thionated thyrotropin-releasing hormone analogs.

    PubMed

    Lankiewicz, L; Bowers, C Y; Reynolds, G A; Labroo, V; Cohen, L A; Vonhof, S; Sirén, A L; Spatola, A F

    1992-04-15

    Analogs of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (Glp-His-Pro-NH2, TRH) have been prepared which contain thioamide moieties in the pyroglutamic acid ring, the carboxyamide proline terminus, and in both positions (dithio). These compounds have been tested for TSH-releasing activities (in vitro and in vivo), and for binding to TRH receptors in rat pituitary and cortex. The monothionated analogs showed no significant differences in TSH-releasing potency from TRH either in vitro or in vivo. However, with two thioamide replacements the potency decreases about 50%. Significantly, in terms of receptor selectivity, thionation has resulted in differentiation between brain receptors (pituitary and cortex). The Pro psi[CSNH2] and dithio analogs were more selective (higher affinity to pituitary receptors) than the parent hormone, while the analog containing a thioamide replacement in the pyroglutamyl ring had lower affinity and was not selective. These results suggest that the subtle exchange of sulphur for oxygen can have an important impact on both receptor selectivity and affinity within a biologically active peptide.

  2. Activity release from damaged fuel during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident in the spent fuel storage pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hózer, Zoltán; Szabó, Emese; Pintér, Tamás; Varjú, Ilona Baracska; Bujtás, Tibor; Farkas, Gábor; Vajda, Nóra

    2009-07-01

    During crud removal operations the integrity of 30 fuel assemblies was lost at high temperature at the unit No. 2 of the Paks NPP. Part of the fission products was released from the damaged fuel into the coolant of the spent fuel storage pool. The gaseous fission products escaped through the chimney from the reactor hall. The volatile and non-volatile materials remained mainly in the coolant and were collected on the filters of water purification system. The activity release from damaged fuel rods during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident was estimated on the basis of coolant activity concentration measurements and chimney activity data. The typical release rate of noble gases, iodine and caesium was 1-3%. The release of non-volatile fission products and actinides was also detected.

  3. Radiation Damage and Fission Product Release in Zirconium Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Egeland, Gerald W.

    2005-08-29

    Zirconium nitride is a material of interest to the AFCI program due to some of its particular properties, such as its high melting point, strength and thermal conductivity. It is to be used as an inert matrix or diluent with a nuclear fuel based on transuranics. As such, it must sustain not only high temperatures, but also continuous irradiation from fission and decay products. This study addresses the issues of irradiation damage and fission product retention in zirconium nitride through an assessment of defects that are produced, how they react, and how predictions can be made as to the overall lifespan of the complete nuclear fuel package. Ion irradiation experiments are a standard method for producing radiation damage to a surface for observation. Cryogenic irradiations are performed to produce the maximum accumulation of defects, while elevated temperature irradiations may be used to allow defects to migrate and react to form clusters and loops. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and grazing-incidence x-ray diffractometry were used in evaluating the effects that irradiation has on the crystal structure and microstructure of the material. Other techniques were employed to evaluate physical effects, such as nanoindentation and helium release measurements. Results of the irradiations showed that, at cryogenic temperatures, ZrN withstood over 200 displacements per atom without amorphization. No significant change to the lattice or microstructure was observed. At elevated temperatures, the large amount of damage showed mobility, but did not anneal significantly. Defect clustering was possibly observed, yet the size was too small to evaluate, and bubble formation was not observed. Defects, specifically nitrogen vacancies, affect the mechanical behavior of ZrN dramatically. Current and previous work on dislocations shows a distinct change in slip plane, which is evidence of the bonding characteristics. The stacking-fault energy changes dramatically with

  4. Substrate lability and plant activity controls greenhouse gas release from Neotropical peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Hoyos, Jorge; Lomax, Barry; Turner, Ben; Wright, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Almost one third of global CO2 emissions resulting from land use change and substantial CH4 emissions originate from tropical peatlands. However, our understanding of the controls of CO2 and CH4 release from tropical peatlands are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peat lability and the activity of the vegetation on gas release using a combination of field and laboratory experiments. We demonstrated that peat lability constrained CH4 production to the surface peat under anaerobic conditions. The presence of plants shifted the C balance from a C source to a C sink with respect to CO2 while the activity of the root system strongly influenced CH4 emissions through its impact on soil O2 inputs. Both field and laboratory data suggest a coupling between the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation and the release of both CO2 and CH4 following the circadian rhythm of the dominant plant functional types. Forest clearance for agriculture resulted in elevated CH4 release, which we attribute in part to the cessation of root O2 inputs to the peat. We conclude that high emissions of CO2 and CH4 from forested tropical peatlands are likely driven by labile C inputs from the vegetation but that root O2 release may limit CH4 emissions.

  5. The Pathway of Product Release from the R State of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, K.; Kantrowitz, E

    2010-01-01

    The pathway of product release from the R state of aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase; EC 2.1.3.2, aspartate carbamoyltransferase) has been determined here by solving the crystal structure of Escherichia coli ATCase locked in the R quaternary structure by specific introduction of disulfide bonds. ATCase displays ordered substrate binding and product release, remaining in the R state until substrates are exhausted. The structure reported here represents ATCase in the R state bound to the final product molecule, phosphate. This structure has been difficult to obtain previously because the enzyme relaxes back to the T state after the substrates are exhausted. Hence, cocrystallizing the wild-type enzyme with phosphate results in a T-state structure. In this structure of the enzyme trapped in the R state with specific disulfide bonds, we observe two phosphate molecules per active site. The position of the first phosphate corresponds to the position of the phosphate of carbamoyl phosphate (CP) and the position of the phosphonate of N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate. However, the second, more weakly bound phosphate is bound in a positively charged pocket that is more accessible to the surface than the other phosphate. The second phosphate appears to be on the path that phosphate would have to take to exit the active site. Our results suggest that phosphate dissociation and CP binding can occur simultaneously and that the dissociation of phosphate may actually promote the binding of CP for more efficient catalysis.

  6. 46 CFR 160.170-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms. (a) Unless the Commandant directs otherwise, an...— (1) Institute a quality control procedure to ensure that all production release mechanisms are... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Production inspections, tests, quality control,...

  7. 46 CFR 160.133-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., tests, quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms. (a) Unless the Commandant directs.... The manufacturer must— (1) Institute a quality control procedure to ensure that all production release... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Production inspections, tests, quality control,...

  8. REEVALUATION OF WATERBORNE RELEASES OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS FROM THE MAYAK PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION INTO THE TECHA RIVER IN 1949-1951

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Shagina, N. B.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    The Mayak Production Association was the first site for the production of weapon-grade plutonium in Russia. Early operations led to the waterborne release of large amounts of radioactive materials into the small Techa River. Residents living downstream used river water for drinking and other purposes. The releases and subsequent flooding resulted in the deposition of sediments along the shoreline and on floodplain soil. Primary routes of exposure were external dose from the deposited sediments and the ingestion of 90Sr and other radionuclides. Study of the Techa River Cohort has revealed an increased incidence of leukemia and solid cancers. These epidemiologic studies are supported by extensive dose-reconstruction activities that have led to the creation of various versions of a Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS). The correctness of the TRDS has been challenged by the allegation that releases of short-lived radionuclides were much larger than those used in the TRDS. Although the dosimetry system depends more upon the measurements of 90Sr in humans and additional measurements of radionuclides and of exposure rates in the environment, a major activity has been undertaken to define more precisely the time-dependent rates of release and radionuclide composition of the releases. The major releases occurred during 1950-1951. In addition to routine releases major accidental releases occurred. The re-evaluated amount of total release is 114 PBq, about half of which was from accidents that occurred in late 1951. The composition of the radionuclides released has also been re-evaluated; this composition changed with time.

  9. Histamine release inhibitory activity of Piper nigrum leaf.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Noriko; Naruto, Shunsuke; Inaba, Kazunori; Itoh, Kimihisa; Tokunaga, Masashi; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2008-10-01

    Oral administration of a methanolic extract of Piper nigrum leaf (PN-ext, 50, 200 and 500 mg/kg) showed a potent dose-dependent inhibition of dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced cutaneous reaction at 1 h [immediate phase response (IPR)] after and 24 h [late phase response (LPR)] after DNFB challenge in mice which were passively sensitized with anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody. Ear swelling inhibitory effect of PN-ext (50, 200 and 500 mg/kg, per os (p.o.)) on very late phase response (vLPR) in the model mice was significant but weaker than that on IPR. Oral administration of PN-ext (50, 200 and 500 mg/kg for 7 d) inhibited picryl chloride (PC)-induced ear swelling in PC sensitized mice. PN-ext exhibited in vitro inhibitory effect on compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. Two lignans of PN-ext, (-)-cubebin (1) and (-)-3,4-dimethoxy-3,4-desmethylenedioxycubebin (2), were identified as major active principles having histamine release inhibitory activity.

  10. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  11. Fate of corrosion products released from stainless steel in marine sediments and seawater. Part 1. Northeast Pacific pelagic red clay

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.L.

    1982-03-01

    To provide information useful for determining the biogeochemical cycling of corrosion products in the benthic boundary layer of the deep ocean, neutron-activated stainless steel was exposed to seawater and to Northeast Pacific red clay under aerobic and non-oxygenated conditions. This report describes the trace metal geochemistry of the sediment and the chemical speciation of the corrosion products. The sediments generally consisted of reddish-brown clay at the surface grading to a dark-brown transition zone below which mottled olive-gray clay prevailed. Neutron-irradiated 347 stainless steel specimens were exposed to seawater and sediment slurry under aerobic and non-oxygenated conditions for 108 days. The presence of aerated sediment more than doubled the amount of corrosion products released compared to aerated seawater and non-oxygenated sediment treatments. The distribution of /sup 60/Co released from the stainless steel exposed to aerated seawater show that almost 70% of /sup 60/Co activity became associated with suspended particulate matter. No detectable /sup 60/Co activity was present in the soluble, readily dissolved, or inorganic or weakly complexed fractions of aerated sediment which had been used to treat neutron-activated stainless steel. Almost 50% of the /sup 60/Co activity was extracted in the combined soluble, easily dissolved, adsorbed, and organically complexed fractions from the non-oxygenated sediment treatment indicating that this much of the corrosion products may be initially released in ionic form.

  12. Product release is rate-limiting for catalytic processing by the Dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, A. E.; Pedroso, M. M.; Chappell, K. J.; Watterson, D.; Liebscher, S.; Kok, W. M.; Fairlie, D. P.; Schenk, G.; Young, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue Virus (DENV) is the most prevalent global arbovirus, yet despite an increasing burden to health care there are currently no therapeutics available to treat infection. A potential target for antiviral drugs is the two-component viral protease NS2B-NS3pro, which is essential for viral replication. Interactions between the two components have been investigated here by probing the effect on the rate of enzyme catalysis of key mutations in a mobile loop within NS2B that is located at the interface of the two components. Steady-state kinetic assays indicated that the mutations greatly affect catalytic turnover. However, single turnover and fluorescence experiments have revealed that the mutations predominantly affect product release rather than substrate binding. Fluorescence analysis also indicated that the addition of substrate triggers a near-irreversible change in the enzyme conformation that activates the catalytic centre. Based on this mechanistic insight, we propose that residues within the mobile loop of NS2B control product release and present a new target for design of potent Dengue NS2B-NS3 protease inhibitors. PMID:27897196

  13. The Release of Nanosilver from Consumer Products Used in the Home

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Troy; Cavanagh, Bridget; Hristovski, Kiril; Posner, Jonathan D.; Westerhoff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Nanosilver has become one of the most widely used nanomaterials in consumer products because of its antimicrobial properties. Public concern over the potential adverse effects of nanosilver's environmental release has prompted discussion of federal regulation. In this paper, we assess several classes of consumer products for their silver content and potential to release nanosilver into water, air, or soil. Silver was quantified in a shirt, a medical mask and cloth, toothpaste, shampoo, detergent, a towel, a toy teddy bear, and two humidifiers. Silver concentrations ranged from 1.4 to 270,000 μg Ag g product−1. Products were washed in 500 mL of tap water to assess the potential release of silver into aqueous environmental matrices (wastewater, surface water, saliva, etc.). Silver was released in quantities up to 45 μg Ag g product−1, and size fractions were both larger and smaller than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of nanoparticle silver in most products as well as in the wash water samples. Four products were subjected to a toxicity characterization leaching procedure to assess the release of silver in a landfill. The medical cloth released an amount of silver comparable to the toxicity characterization limit. This paper presents methodologies that can be used to quantify and characterize silver and other nanomaterials in consumer products. The quantities of silver in consumer products can in turn be used to estimate real-world human and environmental exposure levels. PMID:21284285

  14. Release of engineered nanomaterials from personal care products throughout their life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Arturo A.; Vosti, William; Wang, Hongtao; Lazareva, Anastasiya

    2014-07-01

    The impetus for this study was to provide release estimates that can serve to improve predictions of engineered nanomaterial (ENM) exposure for risk assessment. We determined the likely release of ENMs from personal care products (PCPs) through a consumer survey on use and disposal habits, and research on the types and quantities of ENMs in PCPs. Our estimates show that in the US zinc oxide (ZnO), with 1,800-2,100 mt yr-1, and titanium dioxide (TiO2), with 870-1,000 mt yr-1, represent 94 % of ENMs released into the environment or landfills from the use of PCPs. Around 36-43 % of ENMs from PCPs were estimated to end up in landfills, 24-36 % released to soils, 0.7-0.8 % to air, and 28-32 % to water bodies. ENMs in sunscreen represent around 81-82 % of total release, from ZnO and TiO2 as UV blockers, followed by facial moisturizer (7.5 %), foundation (5.7 %), and hair coloring products (3.1 %). Daily care products such as body wash, shampoo, and conditioner had by far the highest per capita and total use, but contributed little to the ENM release estimates as these products generally contain little or no ENMs. However, if ENMs are incorporated into these daily care products, this may substantially increase ENM release.

  15. 46 CFR 160.133-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Production inspections, tests, quality control, and... SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING..., tests, quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms. (a) Unless the Commandant...

  16. Get Up to Speed on the Latest Product Releases in the Education Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article provides brief descriptions of the latest product releases in the education market. These products include hardware, software, and resources. The following products are presented in this article, but not limited to: (1) Radius Audio Learning System(www.learningresources.com); (2) The Indigo Learning System from LearningSoft, LLC…

  17. Improving methane production and phosphorus release in anaerobic digestion of particulate saline sludge from a brackish aquaculture recirculation system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuedong; Ferreira, Rui B; Hu, Jianmei; Spanjers, Henri; van Lier, Jules B

    2014-06-01

    In this study, batch tests were conducted to examine the effects of trehalose and glycine betaine as well as potassium on the specific methanogenic activity (SMA), acid and alkaline phosphatase activity of anaerobic biomass and phosphorus release in anaerobic digestion of saline sludge from a brackish recirculation aquaculture system. The results of ANOVA and Tukey's HSD (honestly significant difference) tests showed that glycine betaine and trehalose enhanced SMA of anaerobic biomass and reactive phosphorus release from the particulate waste. Moreover, SMA tests revealed that methanogenic sludge, which was long-term acclimatized to a salinity level of 17 g/L was severely affected by the increase in salinity to values exceeding 35 g/L. Addition of compatible solutes, such as glycine betaine and trehalose, could be used to enhance the specific methane production rate and phosphorus release in anaerobic digestion from particulate organic waste produced in marine or brackish aquaculture recirculation systems.

  18. Primary system fission product release and transport: A state-of-the-art report to the committee on the safety of nuclear installations

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.L.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the status of research activities associated with fission product behavior (release and transport) under severe accident conditions within the primary systems of water-moderated and water-cooled nuclear reactors. For each of the areas of fission product release and fission product transport, the report summarizes relevant information on important phenomena, major experiments performed, relevant computer models and codes, comparisons of computer code calculations with experimental results, and general conclusions on the overall state of the art. Finally, the report provides an assessment of the overall importance and knowledge of primary system release and transport phenomena and presents major conclusions on the state of the art.

  19. Chinese plasma-derived products supply under the lot release management system in 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejun; Ye, Shengliang; Du, Xi; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Chaoming; Li, Changqing

    2013-11-01

    In 2007, the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) implemented a management system for lot release of all plasma-derived products. Since then, there have been only a few systematic studies of the blood supply, which is a concern when considering the small amount of plasma collected per capita (approximately 3 L/1000 people). As a result, there may be a threat to the safety of the available blood supply. In this study, we examined the characteristics of the supply of Chinese plasma-derived products. We investigated the reports of lot-released biological products derived from all 8 national or regional regulatory authorities in China from 2007 to 2011. The market supply characteristics of Chinese plasma-derived products were analyzed by reviewing the changes in supply varieties, the batches of lot-released plasma-derived products and the actual supply. As a result, the national regulatory authorities can more accurately develop a specific understanding of the production and quality management information provided by Chinese plasma product manufacturers. The implementation of the lot release system further ensures the clinical validity of the plasma-derived products in China and improves the safety of using plasma-derived products. This work provides an assessment of the future Chinese market supply of plasma-derived products and can function as a theoretical basis for the establishment of hemovigilance.

  20. Soluble interleukin 2 receptors are released from activated human lymphoid cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, L.A.; Kurman, C.C.; Fritz, M.E.; Biddison, W.E.; Boutin, B.; Yarchoan, R.; Nelson, D.L.

    1985-11-01

    With the use of an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay to measure soluble human interleukin 2 receptors (IL 2R), certain human T cell leukemia virus I (HTLV I)-positive T cell lines were found to spontaneously release large quantities of IL 2R into culture supernatants. This was not found with HTLV I-negative and IL 2 independent T cell lines, and only one of seven B cell-derived lines examined produced small amounts of IL 2R. In addition to this constitutive production of soluble IL 2R by certain cell lines, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could be induced to release soluble IL 2R by plant lectins, the murine monoclonal antibody OKT3, tetanus toxoid, and allogeneic cells. Such activated cells also expressed cellular IL 2R measurable in detergent solubilized cell extracts. The generation of cellular and supernatant IL 2R was: dependent on cellular activation, rapid, radioresistant (3000 rad), and inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. NaDodSO4-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of soluble IL 2R demonstrated molecules of apparent Mr = 35,000 to 40,000, and 45,000 to 50,000, respectively, somewhat smaller than the mature surface receptor on these cells. The release of soluble IL 2R appears to be a characteristic marker of T lymphocyte activation and might serve an immunoregulatory function during both normal and abnormal cell growth and differentiation.

  1. Synthesis of Mono-PEGylated Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 and Investigation of its Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Xu, Beihua; Zhou, Ziniu

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate an efficient synthetic route to the mono-PEGylated growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) and its biological activity in vivo. The commercially available key PEGylating reagent, mPEG-NHS ester, was successfully utilized to the synthesis of mono-PEGylated GHRP-2, during which the PEGylation profiles of GHRP-2 were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The product was purified by cation exchange chromatography, and its biological activity was conducted in rats. The desired mono-PEGylated GHRP-2 as the major product was readily obtained in anhydrous aprotic solvent, such as dimethyl formamide (DMF) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), when the molar ratio of mPEG-NHS ester to GHRP-2 was fixed to be 0.8:1. The products were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The evaluation of the biological activity for the products showed that the mono-PEGylated GHRP-2 gave a more stable activity than GHRP-2, suggesting that PEGylation led to the increase in the half-life of GHRP-2 in plasma without greatly impairing the biological activity. PEGylation of the GHRP-2 is a good choice for the development of the GHRP-2 applications.

  2. ATP Released by Injured Neurons Activates Schwann Cells

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Samuele; Bergamin, Elisanna; Rodella, Umberto; Duregotti, Elisa; Scorzeto, Michele; Jalink, Kees; Montecucco, Cesare; Rigoni, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Injured nerve terminals of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) can regenerate. This remarkable and complex response is governed by molecular signals that are exchanged among the cellular components of this synapse: motor axon nerve terminal (MAT), perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs), and muscle fiber. The nature of signals that govern MAT regeneration is ill-known. In the present study the spider toxin α-latrotoxin has been used as tool to investigate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuroregeneration. Indeed this neurotoxin induces an acute, specific, localized and fully reversible damage of the presynaptic nerve terminal, and its action mimics the cascade of events that leads to nerve terminal degeneration in injured patients and in many neurodegenerative conditions. Here we provide evidence of an early release by degenerating neurons of adenosine triphosphate as alarm messenger, that contributes to the activation of a series of intracellular pathways within Schwann cells that are crucial for nerve regeneration: Ca2+, cAMP, ERK1/2, and CREB. These results contribute to define the cross-talk taking place among degenerating nerve terminals and PSCs, involved in the functional recovery of the NMJ. PMID:27242443

  3. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces the Production and Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Canine Synovial Explant Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Straubinger, Alix F.; Summers, Brian A.; Erb, Hollis N.; Härter, Luc; Appel, Max J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Canine synovial membrane explants were exposed to high- or low-passage Borrelia burgdorferi for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Spirochetes received no treatment, were UV light irradiated for 16 h, or were sonicated prior to addition to synovial explant cultures. In explant tissues, mRNA levels for the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, and IL-8 were surveyed semiquantitatively by reverse transcription-PCR. Culture supernatants were examined for numbers of total and motile (i.e., viable) spirochetes, TNF-like and IL-1-like activities, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis-inducing activities, and IL-8. During exposure to synovial explant tissues, the total number of spirochetes in the supernatants decreased gradually by ∼30%, and the viability also declined. mRNAs for TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 were up-regulated in synovial explant tissues within 3 h after infection with untreated or UV light-irradiated B. burgdorferi, and mRNA levels corresponded to the results obtained with bioassays. During 24 h of coincubation, cultures challenged with untreated or UV light-irradiated spirochetes produced similar levels of TNF-like and IL-1-like activities. In contrast, explant tissues exposed to untreated B. burgdorferi generated significantly higher levels of chemotactic factors after 24 h of incubation than did explant tissues exposed to UV light-treated spirochetes. In identical samples, a specific signal for IL-8 was identified by Western blot analysis. High- and low-passage borreliae did not differ in their abilities to induce proinflammatory cytokines. No difference in cytokine induction between untreated and sonicated high-passage spirochetes was observed, suggesting that fractions of the organism can trigger the production and release of inflammatory mediators. The titration of spirochetes revealed a dose-independent cytokine response, where 103 to 107 B. burgdorferi organisms induced similar TNF

  4. Release Storage and Disposal Program Product Sampling Support

    SciTech Connect

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-07-19

    This document includes recommended capabilities and/or services to support transport, analysis, and disposition of Immobilized High-Level and Low-Activity Waste samples as requested by the US DOE-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) as specified in the Privatization Contract between DOE-ORP and BNFL Inc. In addition, an approved implementation path forward is presented which includes use of existing Hanford Site services to provide the required support capabilities.

  5. Solvent and viscosity effects on the rate-limiting product release step of glucoamylase during maltose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sierks, M R; Sico, C; Zaw, M

    1997-01-01

    Release of product from the active site is the rate-limiting step in a number of enzymatic reactions, including maltose hydrolysis by glucoamylase (GA). With GA, an enzymatic conformational change has been associated with the product release step. Solvent characteristics such as viscosity can strongly influence protein conformational changes. Here we show that the rate-limiting step of GA has a rather complex dependence on solvent characteristics. Seven different cosolvents were added to the GA/maltose reaction solution. Five of the cosolvents, all having an ethylene glycol base, resulted in an increase in activity at low concentration of cosolvent and variable decreases in activity at higher concentrations. The increase in enzyme activity was dependent on polymer length of the cosolvent; the longer the polymer, the lower the concentration needed. The maximum increase in catalytic activity at 45 degrees C (40-45%) was obtained with the three longest polymers (degree of polymerization from 200 to 8000). A further increase in activity to 60-65% was obtained at 60 degrees C. The linear relationship between ln(kcat) and (viscosity)2 obtained with all the cosolvents provides further evidence that product release is the rate-limiting step in the GA catalytic mechanism. A substantial increase in the turnover rate of GA by addition of relatively small amounts of a cosolvent has potential applications for the food industry where high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is one of the primary products produced with GA. Since maltodextrin hydrolysis by GA is by far the slowest step in the production of HFCS, increasing the catalytic rate of GA can substantially reduce the process time.

  6. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-16

    In spite of the massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Here we show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases, and we use molecular simulations to demonstrate it. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Finally, our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  7. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  8. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-16

    In spite of the massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Here we show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases, and we usemore » molecular simulations to demonstrate it. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Finally, our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.« less

  9. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release. PMID:27306967

  10. A quality-by-design study for an immediate-release tablet platform: examining the relative impact of active pharmaceutical ingredient properties, processing methods, and excipient variability on drug product quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Joseph; Langdon, Beth A; Hicks, Ian; Song, Daniel; Li, Fasheng; Kathiria, Lalji; Kane, Anil; Ranade, Gautam; Agarwal, Kam

    2014-02-01

    The impact of filler-lubricant particle size ratio variation (3.4-41.6) on the attributes of an immediate-release tablet was compared with the impacts of the manufacturing method used (direct compression or dry granulation) and drug loading (1%, 5%, and 25%), particle size (D[4,3]: 8-114 μm), and drug type (theophylline or ibuprofen). All batches were successfully manufactured, except for direct compression of 25% drug loading of 8 μm (D[4,3]) drug, which exhibited very poor flow properties. All manufactured tablets possessed adequate quality attributes: tablet weight uniformity <4% RSD, tablet potency: 94%-105%, content uniformity <6% RSD, acceptance value ≤ 15, solid fraction: 0.82-0.86, tensile strength >1 MPa, friability ≤ 0.2% weight loss, and disintegration time < 4 min. The filler-lubricant particle size ratio exhibited the greatest impact on blend and granulation particle size and granulation flow, whereas drug property variation dominated blend flow, ribbon solid fraction, and tablet quality attributes. Although statistically significant effects were observed, the results of this study suggest that the manufacturability and performance of this immediate-release tablet formulation is robust to a broad range of variation in drug properties, both within-grade and extra-grade excipient particle size variations, and the choice of manufacturing method.

  11. 77 FR 41415 - Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products Containing Oxycodone for Oral Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... such products in interstate commerce. The document was published with an incorrect Web link....

  12. Effects of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Post-Production Performance of Impatiens Wallerana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled release fertilizers (CRF) in production systems have been known to reduce environmental contamination. However, there is a lot to be explored as per its use in bedding plant production. Bedding plant growers have not adapted CRF use because there is little information about its use and ...

  13. A model for nonvolatile fission product release during reactor accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.J.; Andre, B.; Ducros, G.; Maro, D.

    1996-10-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the release kinetics of nonvolatile fission products (e.g., molybdenum, cerium, ruthenium, and barium) from uranium dioxide fuel under severe reactor accident conditions. This treatment considers the rate-controlling process of release in accordance with diffusional transport in the fuel matrix and fission product vaporization from the fuel surface into the surrounding gas atmosphere. The effect of the oxygen potential in the gas atmosphere on the chemical form and volatility of the fission product is considered. A correlation is also developed to account for the trapping effects of antimony and tellurium in the Zircaloy cladding. This model interprets the release behavior of fission products observed in Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique experiments conducted in the HEVA/VERCORS facility at high temperature in a hydrogen and steam atmosphere.

  14. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ryan C; Fees, Colby P; Holland, William L; Winger, Courtney C; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca](i)). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 min after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca](i) and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA specifically bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca](i), PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca](i) release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca](i) release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization.

  15. 14 CFR § 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News releases concerning international activities. § 1213.109 Section § 1213.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... international activities. (a) Releases of information involving NASA activities, views, programs, or...

  16. Production, detection, storage and release of spin currents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: Quantum rings connected to ballistic circuits couple strongly to external magnetic fields if the connection is not symmetric. Moreover, properly connected rings can be used to pump currents in the wires giving raise to a number of interesting new phenomena. At half filling using a time-dependent magnetic field in the plane of the ring one can pump a pure spin current, excited by the the spin–orbit interaction in the ring. Results: Such a magnetic current is even under time reversal and produces an electric field instead of the usual magnetic field. Numerical simulations show that one can use magnetizable bodies as storage units to concentrate and save the magnetization in much the same way as capacitors operating with charge currents store electric charge. The polarization obtained in this way can then be used on command to produce spin currents in a wire. These currents show interesting oscillations while the storage units exchange their polarizations. Conclusion: The magnetic production of spin currents can be a useful alternative to optical excitation and electric field methods. PMID:25821714

  17. CME Productivity of Active Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Shen, C.; Ye, P.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, R.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two kinds of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although they are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process, the productivity of them could be quiet different for various ARs. Why is an AR productive? And why is a flare-rich AR CME-poor? To answer these questions, we compared the recent super flare-rich but CME-poor AR 12192, with other four ARs; two were productive in both flares and CMEs and the other two were inert to produce any M-class or intenser flares or CMEs. By investigating the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram, we find the three productive ARs have larger magnetic flux, current and free magnetic energy than the inert ARs. Furthermore, the two ARs productive in both flares and CMEs contain higher current helicity, concentrating along both sides of the flaring neutral lines, indicating the presence of a seed magnetic structure( that is highly sheared or twisted) of a CME; they also have higher decay index in the low corona, showing weak constraint. The results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have strong current system and sufficient free energy to power flares, and more importantly whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) if there is significant sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME and (2) if the constraint of the overlying arcades is weak enough. Moreover, some productive ARs may frequently produce more than one CME. How does this happen? We do a statistical investigation of waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs ( CME ssuccessive originating from the same ARs within short intervals) from super ARs in solar cycle 23 to answer this question. The waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hours, the first component peaks at 7 hours. The correlation analysis among CME waiting times

  18. Release of neuronal HMGB1 by ethanol through decreased HDAC activity activates brain neuroimmune signaling.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian Y; Crews, Fulton T

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimmune gene induction is involved in many brain pathologies including addiction. Although increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines has been found in ethanol-treated mouse brain and rat brain slice cultures as well as in post-mortem human alcoholic brain, the mechanisms remain elusive. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is a nuclear protein that has endogenous cytokine-like activity. We previously found increased HMGB1 in post-mortem alcoholic human brain as well as in ethanol treated mice and rat brain slice cultures. The present study investigated the mechanisms for ethanol-induced release of HMGB1 and neuroimmune activation in a model of rat hippocampal-entorhinal cortex (HEC) brain slice cultures. Ethanol exposure triggered dose-dependent HMGB1 release, predominantly from neuronal cells. Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) promoted nucleocytoplasmic mobilization of HDAC1/4 and HMGB1 resulting in increased total HMGB1 and acetylated HMGB1 release. Similarly, ethanol treatment was found to induce the translocation of HDAC1/4 and HMGB1 proteins from nuclear to cytosolic fractions. Furthermore, ethanol treatment reduced HDAC1/4 mRNA and increased acetylated HMGB1 release into the media. These results suggest decreased HDAC activity may be critical in regulating acetylated HMGB1 release from neurons in response to ethanol. Ethanol and HMGB1 treatment increased mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β as well as toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Targeting HMGB1 or microglial TLR4 by using siRNAs to HMGB1 and TLR4, HMGB1 neutralizing antibody, HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin and TLR4 antagonist as well as inhibitor of microglial activation all blocked ethanol-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β. These results support the hypothesis that ethanol alters HDACs that regulate HMGB1 release and that danger signal HMGB1 as endogenous ligand for TLR4 mediates ethanol-induced brain neuroimmune signaling

  19. Environmental fate and effects of nicotine released during cigarette production.

    PubMed

    Seckar, Joel A; Stavanja, Mari S; Harp, Paul R; Yi, Yongsheng; Garner, Charles D; Doi, Jon

    2008-07-01

    A variety of test methods were used to study the gradation, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of nicotine. Studies included determination of the octanol-water partition coefficient, conversion to CO2 in soil and activated sludge, and evaluation of the effects on microbiological and algal inhibition as well as plant germination and root elongation. The partitioning of nicotine between octanol and water indicated that nicotine will not bioaccumulate regardless of the pH of the medium. The aqueous and soil-based biodegradation studies indicated that nicotine is readily biodegradable in both types of media. The microbiological inhibition and aquatic and terrestrial toxicity tests indicated that nicotine has low toxicity. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Persistence, Bioaccumulation, and Toxicity Profiler model, based on the structure of nicotine and the predictive rates of hydroxyl radical and ozone reactions, estimated an atmospheric half-life of less than 5.0 h. Using this value in the Canadian Environmental Modeling Center level III model, the half-life of nicotine was estimated as 3.0 d in water and 0.5 d in soil. This model also estimated nicotine discharge into the environment; nicotine would be expected to be found predominantly in water (93%), followed by soil (4%), air (3%), and sediment (0.4%). Using the estimated nicotine concentrations in water, soil, and sediment and the proper median effective concentrations derived from the algal growth, biomass inhibition, and buttercrunch lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed germination and root elongation studies, hazard quotients of between 10(-7) and 10(-8) were calculated, providing further support for the conclusion that the potential for nicotine toxicity to aquatic and terrestrial species in the environment is extremely low.

  20. Hot-melt co-extrusion for the production of fixed-dose combination products with a controlled release ethylcellulose matrix core.

    PubMed

    Vynckier, A-K; Dierickx, L; Saerens, L; Voorspoels, J; Gonnissen, Y; De Beer, T; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P

    2014-04-10

    In this study, hot-melt co-extrusion was evaluated as a technique for the production of fixed-dose combination products, using ethylcellulose as a core matrix former to control the release of metoprolol tartrate and a polyethylene oxide-based coat formulation to obtain immediate release of hydrochlorothiazide. By lowering the concentration of the hydrophilic additive polyethylene oxide in the plasticized ethylcellulose matrix or by lowering the drug load, the in vitro metoprolol tartrate release from the core was substantially sustained. The in vitro release of hydrochlorothiazide from the polyethylene oxide/polyethylene glycol coat was completed within 45 min for all formulations. Tensile testing of the core/coat mini-matrices revealed an adequate adhesion between the two layers. Raman mapping showed no migration of active substances. Solid state characterization indicated that the crystalline state of metoprolol tartrate was not affected by thermal processing via hot-melt extrusion, while hydrochlorothiazide was amorphous in the coat. These solid state characteristics were confirmed during the stability study. Considering the bioavailability of metoprolol tartrate after oral administration to dogs, the different co-extruded formulations offered a range of sustained release characteristics. Moreover, high metoprolol tartrate plasma concentrations were reached in dogs allowing the administered dose to be halved.

  1. Spent Nuclear Fuel project estimate of volatile fission products release from multi-canister overpacks

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.D.

    1996-08-01

    Spent N-Reactor fuel will be moved from wet pool storage to dry storage at Hanford Washington. This fuel will be sequentially loaded into a Multiple Container Overpack (MCO), moved to the cold vacuum drying station, drained, cold vacuum dried, shipped to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), staged for up to 2 years,hot vacuum dried at 300 degrees C, hot conditioned at 150 degrees C, and finally, sealed and stored for up to 75 years in the CSB.During each proposed process step, the volatile radioactive fission products released to the atmosphere were estimated.Tritium is the only volatile fission product released insignificant amounts during each process step. For an accident scenario involving interior MCO temperature of 600 degrees C for up to 8 hours, it was estimated that many volatile fission products are released.

  2. Endogenous activation of kainate receptors regulates glutamate release and network activity in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lauri, Sari E; Segerstråle, Mikael; Vesikansa, Aino; Maingret, Francois; Mulle, Christophe; Collingridge, Graham L; Isaac, John T R; Taira, Tomi

    2005-05-04

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are highly expressed throughout the neonatal brain, but their function during development is unclear. Here, we show that the maturation of the hippocampus is associated with a switch in the functional role of presynaptic KARs. In a developmental period restricted to the first postnatal week, endogenous L-glutamate tonically activates KARs at CA3 glutamatergic synapses to regulate release in an action potential-independent manner. At synapses onto pyramidal cells, KARs inhibit glutamate release via a G-protein and PKC-dependent mechanism. In contrast, at glutamatergic terminals onto CA3 interneurons, presynaptic KARs can facilitate release in a G-protein-independent mechanism. In both cell types, however, KAR activation strongly upregulates inhibitory transmission. We show that, through the interplay of these novel diverse mechanisms, KARs strongly regulate the characteristic synchronous network activity observed in the neonatal hippocampus. By virtue of this, KARs are likely to play a central role in the development of hippocampal synaptic circuits.

  3. Pluronic/gelatin composites for controlled release of actives.

    PubMed

    Tatini, Duccio; Tempesti, Paolo; Ridi, Francesca; Fratini, Emiliano; Bonini, Massimo; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the preparation and the release properties of composite materials based on Pluronic F127 and gelatin hydrogels, which could be of interest in the field of enteral nutrition or drug administration. The composites were prepared by exploiting the opposite responsivity to temperature of a 20% w/w Pluronic F127 aqueous solution (critical gelation temperature around 23 °C) and gelatin (gel-sol temperature transition around 30 °C). Pluronic domains dispersed within a gelatin matrix were obtained by injecting cold Pluronic F127 solutions inside hot gelatin solutions, while homogenizing either with a magnetic stirrer or a high-energy mechanical disperser. Calorimetry indicates that the composites retain the individual gelling properties of Pluronic and gelatin. Different releasing properties were obtained as a function of the preparation protocol, the temperature and the pH. The release profiles have been studied by a Weibull analysis that clearly points out the dominating role of gelatin at 25 °C. At 37 °C the release accounts for a combined effect from both Pluronic F127 and gelatin, showing a more sustained profile with respect to gelatin hydrogels. This behavior, together with the ability of Pluronic F127 to upload both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs and flavors, makes these innovative composite materials very good candidates as FDA-approved carriers for enteral administration.

  4. Highly Sensitive and Multiple Enzyme Activity Assay Using Reagent-release Capillary-Isoelectric Focusing with Rhodamine 110-based Substrates.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Kenji; Nogawa, Yuto; Sugawara, Kasumi; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple and highly sensitive enzyme activity assay based on reagent-release capillary-isoelectric focusing is described. Reagent-release capillaries containing a fluorescent substrate, which produces fluorescent products possessing an isoelectric point after reaction with enzymes, provides a simple procedure. This is because it allows to spontaneously inject a sample solution into the capillary by capillary action, mixing reagents, and subsequently concentrating the fluorescent products based on isoelectric focusing. Fluorescent rhodamine 110 and its monoamide derivative, which were generated as a final product and an intermediate, respectively, were then focused and separated by reagent-release capillary-isoelectric focusing. After 30 min of enzyme reactions, two focused fluorescent bands were clearly isolated along the prepared capillaries. Employing the focused band of rhodamine 110 monoamide allowed for highly sensitive detection of enzyme activity in the 10 pg mL(-1) order, while that of the conventional assay using a microplate was in the ng mL(-1) order. Furthermore, arraying reagent-release capillaries of different substrates on a chip allowed for simultaneous multi-assay of enzyme activity with good sensitivity in the pg mL(-1) order for each protein.

  5. Effects of heparin on platelet aggregation and release and thromboxane A2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, S.F.; Anderson, W.H.; Smith, J.B.; Chuang, H.Y.; Mason, R.G.

    1981-08-01

    Heparin, when added to citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP), caused potentiation of platelet aggregation and the release reaction induced by the aggregating agents adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen, and epinephrine. At low concentrations (4.7 x 10(-5) M) arachidonic acid failed to cause aggregation of platelets in citrated PRP. However, in the presence of heparin, the same concentration of arachidonic acid caused aggregation. Examination of PRP for the presence of thromboxane A2 (TxA2) by use of a bioassay revealed that heparin also stimulated release of TxA2. This finding indicated that platelets released more TxA2 when they were challenged by low concentrations of arachidonic acid in the presence of heparin than in its absence. Platelets were labeled with /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid and /sup 14/C-serotonin, and attempts were made to determine whether heparin stimulated the platelet release reaction first with subsequent increased production of TxA2, or alternatively, whether heparin stimulated TxA2 production first with subsequent enhancement of the release reaction. In view of the demonstrated simultaneous release of /sup 14/C-serotonin and /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid metabolites, it appeared that either release of /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H occurs concurrently or, even if one of these events is dependent on the other, both events take place in rapid succession. Timed sequential studies revealed that in the presence of arachidonic acid, the addition of heparin hastened the apparently simultaneous release of both /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H.

  6. Enhanced production of prostaglandins and plasminogen activator during activation of human articular chondrocytes by products of mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Meats, J E; McGuire, M K; Ebsworth, N M; Englis, D J; Russell, R G

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the way in which products of cultured human blood mononuclear cells activate human articular chondrocytes. Conditioned medium from mononuclear cells enhanced the production of prostaglandin E by cultured human chondrocytes and also stimulated fibrinolytic activity in these cultures. These two effects may be interrelated, since the increased fibrinolysis in response to products of mononuclear cells was partially inhibited by indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis. The increased fibrinolysis is probably attributable to plasminogen activator, since it was strongly dependent on the presence of plasminogen. Increased amounts of PGE and chondroitin sulphate were also released from intact fragments of cartilage exposed to medium from cultured mononuclear cells. The time course and dose dependence of these effects were studied. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid markedly enhanced production of PGE2. Ultrogel AcA54 was used to fractionate medium from cultured mononuclear cells and the chondrocyte-stimulating activity eluted with an apparent molecular weight between 12 000 and 25 000 daltons. Adherent and non-adherent mononuclear blood cells were also partially separated and conditioned medium from each was assayed for chondrocyte-stimulating factors. Both populations released factor(s) which increased the production of prostaglandin E by chondrocytes, but more activity came from the adherent mononuclear cells. The possible interrelationship between the chondrocyte activating factor studied here and others described in the literature is discussed.

  7. Formyl peptides and ATP stimulate Ca2+ and Na+ inward currents through non-selective cation channels via G-proteins in dibutyryl cyclic AMP-differentiated HL-60 cells. Involvement of Ca2+ and Na+ in the activation of beta-glucuronidase release and superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Krautwurst, D; Seifert, R; Hescheler, J; Schultz, G

    1992-12-15

    In human neutrophils, the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP) induces increases in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) with subsequent activation of beta-glucuronidase release and superoxide (O2-) production. Results from several laboratories suggest that the increase in [Ca2+]i is due to activation of non-selective cation (NSC) channels. We studied the biophysical characteristics, pharmacological modulation and functional role of NSC channels in dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP)-differentiated HL-60 cells. fMLP increased [Ca2+]i by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and influx of Ca2+ from the extracellular space. fMLP also induced Mn2+ influx. Ca2+ and Mn2+ influxes were inhibited by 1-(beta-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl)-1H-imidazole hydrochloride (SK&F 96365). Under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions, fMLP and ATP (a purinoceptor agonist) activated inward currents characterized by a linear current-voltage relationship and a reversal potential near 0 mV. NSC channels were substantially more permeable to Na+ than to Ca2+. SK&F 96365 inhibited fMLP- and ATP-stimulated currents with a half-maximal effect at about 3 microM. Pertussis toxin prevented stimulation by fMLP of NSC currents and reduced ATP-stimulated currents by about 80%. Intracellular application of the stable GDP analogue, guanosine 5'-O-[2-thio]diphosphate, completely blocked stimulation by agonists of NSC currents. In excised inside-out patches, single channel openings with an amplitude of 0.24 pA were observed in the presence of fMLP and the GTP analogue, guanosine 5'-O-[3-thio]triphosphate. The bath solution contained neither Ca2+ nor ATP. The current/voltage relationship was linear with a conductance of 4-5 pS and reversed at about 0 mV. fMLP-induced beta-glucuronidase release and O2- production were substantially reduced by replacement of extracellular CaCl2 or NaCl by ethylenebis(oxyethylenenitrilo)tetra-acetic acid and

  8. Astrocytes inhibit nitric oxide-dependent Ca(2+) dynamics in activated microglia: involvement of ATP released via pannexin 1 channels.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A; Montero, Trinidad D; von Bernhardi, Rommy

    2013-12-01

    Under inflammatory conditions, microglia exhibit increased levels of free intracellular Ca(2+) and produce high amounts of nitric oxide (NO). However, whether NO, Ca(2+) dynamics, and gliotransmitter release are reciprocally modulated is not fully understood. More importantly, the effect of astrocytes in the potentiation or suppression of such signaling is unknown. Our aim was to address if astrocytes could regulate NO-dependent Ca(2+) dynamics and ATP release in LPS-stimulated microglia. Griess assays and Fura-2AM time-lapse fluorescence images of microglia revealed that LPS produced an increased basal [Ca(2+) ]i that depended on the sequential activation of iNOS, COXs, and EP1 receptor. TGFβ1 released by astrocytes inhibited the abovementioned responses and also abolished LPS-induced ATP release by microglia. Luciferin/luciferase assays and dye uptake experiments showed that release of ATP from LPS-stimulated microglia occurred via pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels, but not connexin 43 hemichannels. Moreover, in LPS-stimulated microglia, exogenous ATP triggered activation of purinergic P2Y1 receptors resulting in Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Interestingly, TGFβ1 released by astrocytes inhibited ATP-induced Ca(2+) response in LPS-stimulated microglia to that observed in control microglia. Finally, COX/EP1 receptor signaling and activation of P2 receptors via ATP released through Panx1 channels were critical for the increased NO production in LPS-stimulated microglia. Thus, Ca(2+) dynamics depended on the inflammatory profile of microglia and could be modulated by astrocytes. The understanding of mechanisms underlying glial cell regulatory crosstalk could contribute to the development of new treatments to reduce inflammatory cytotoxicity in several brain pathologies.

  9. Relationship between membrane potential changes and superoxide-releasing capacity in resident and activated mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, S.; Johnston, R.B. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    To understand better the molecular basis for the enhanced respiratory burst of activated macrophages (M phi), the relationship between the stimulus-induced changes in membrane potential and release of superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) in mouse peritoneal M phi was investigated. Resident M phi and M phi elicited by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-M phi) or obtained from animals infected with bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG-M phi) were used. LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi showed more pronounced changes in membrane potential (depolarization) and greater release of O/sub 2//sup -/ on contact with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than did resident macrophages. The lag time between addition of stimulus and onset of release of O/sub 2//sup -/ was reduced in activated compared with resident cells. Membrane potential changes began 60 to 90 sec before release of O/sub 2//sup -/ could be detected in each cell type. The dose-response curves for triggering of membrane potential changes and O/sub 2//sup -/ release by PMA were identical. The magnitude of membrane potential changes and of O/sub 2//sup -/ release in LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi declined progressively during in vitro culture, and values on day 3 approached those in resident macrophages (deactivation). Extracellular glucose was required for effective stimulated change in membrane potential and O/sub 2//sup -/ release. These findings indicate that membrane potential changes are closely associated with O/sub 2//sup -/-releasing capacity in macrophages, and that the systems that mediate membrane potential changes and production of O/sub 2//sup -/ develop or decline concomitantly during activation or deactivation of the cells.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL RELEASE OF ASBESTOS/SUBSTITUTES FROM COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS USE AND DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the first time, the release of respirable asbestos fibers has been quantified in terms of standard mechanical forces using widely accepted methodology and specified QA/QC procedures. Both fabrication of new products from asbestos containing materials and repair or removal of ...

  11. 46 CFR 160.133-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Production inspections, tests, quality control, and... SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING..., quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms. (a) Unless the Commandant directs otherwise,...

  12. 46 CFR 160.170-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Production inspections, tests, quality control, and... SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING..., quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms. (a) Unless the Commandant directs otherwise,...

  13. 46 CFR 160.170-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Production inspections, tests, quality control, and... SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING..., quality control, and conformance of release mechanisms. (a) Unless the Commandant directs otherwise,...

  14. Phosphorylation of Complexin by PKA Regulates Activity-dependent Spontaneous Neurotransmitter Release and Structural Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Richard W.; Buhl, Lauren K.; Volfson, Dina; Tran, Adrienne; Li, Feng; Akbergenova, Yulia; Littleton, J. Troy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Synaptic plasticity is a fundamental feature of the nervous system that allows adaptation to changing behavioral environments. Most studies of synaptic plasticity have examined the regulated trafficking of postsynaptic glutamate receptors that generates alterations in synaptic transmission. Whether and how changes in the presynaptic release machinery contribute to neuronal plasticity is less clear. The SNARE complex mediates neurotransmitter release in response to presynaptic Ca++ entry. Here we show that the SNARE fusion clamp Complexin undergoes activity-dependent phosphorylation that alters the basic properties of neurotransmission in Drosophila. Retrograde signaling following stimulation activates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the Complexin C-terminus that selectively and transiently enhances spontaneous release. Enhanced spontaneous release is required for activity-dependent synaptic growth. These data indicate that SNARE-dependent fusion mechanisms can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner and highlight the key role of spontaneous neurotransmitter release as a mediator of functional and structural plasticity. PMID:26590346

  15. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  16. Activity-Dependent Adenosine Release May Be Linked to Activation of Na+-K+ ATPase: An In Vitro Rat Study

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Robert Edward; Dale, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, extracellular adenosine increases as a result of neuronal activity. The mechanisms by which this occurs are only incompletely understood. Here we investigate the hypothesis that the Na+ influxes associated with neuronal signalling activate the Na+-K+ ATPase which, by consuming ATP, generates intracellular adenosine that is then released via transporters. By measuring adenosine release directly with microelectrode biosensors, we have demonstrated that AMPA-receptor evoked adenosine release in basal forebrain and cortex depends on extracellular Na+. We have simultaneously imaged intracellular Na+ and measured adenosine release. The accumulation of intracellular Na+ during AMPA receptor activation preceded adenosine release by some 90 s. By removing extracellular Ca2+, and thus preventing indiscriminate neuronal activation, we used ouabain to test the role of the Na+-K+ ATPase in the release of adenosine. Under conditions which caused a Na+ influx, brief applications of ouabain increased the accumulation of intracellular Na+ but conversely rapidly reduced extracellular adenosine levels. In addition, ouabain greatly reduced the amount of adenosine released during application of AMPA. Our data therefore suggest that activity of the Na+-K+ ATPase is directly linked to the efflux of adenosine and could provide a universal mechanism that couples adenosine release to neuronal activity. The Na+-K+ ATPase-dependent adenosine efflux is likely to provide adenosine-mediated activity-dependent negative feedback that will be important in many diverse functional contexts including the regulation of sleep. PMID:24489921

  17. Production and release rate of (37)Ar from the UT TRIGA Mark-II research reactor.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christine; Biegalski, Steven R; Artnak, Edward J; Moll, Ethan; Haas, Derek A; Lowrey, Justin D; Aalseth, Craig E; Seifert, Allen; Mace, Emily K; Woods, Vincent T; Humble, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Air samples were taken at various locations around The University of Texas at Austin's TRIGA Mark II research reactor and analyzed to determine the concentrations of (37)Ar, (41)Ar, and (133)Xe present. The measured ratio of (37)Ar/(41)Ar and historical records of (41)Ar releases were then utilized to estimate an annual average release rate of (37)Ar from the reactor facility. Using the calculated release rate, atmospheric transport modeling was performed in order to determine the potential impact of research reactor operations on nearby treaty verification activities. Results suggest that small research reactors (∼1 MWt) do not release (37)Ar in concentrations measurable by currently proposed OSI detection equipment.

  18. Production of corticotrophin releasing hormone by the isolated hypothalamus of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, J C; Hodges, J R

    1977-01-01

    1. The ability of the rat hypothalamus to produce corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) in vitro was studied in the presence and absence of neurotransmitter substances, angiotensin and corticosterone. 2. Acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and angiotensin II increased hypothalamic CRH release and content. 3. Noradrenaline and glycine decreased the spontaneous release of CRH from the hypothalamus but neither of these substances affected hypothalamic CRH content. 4. Dopamine, GABA, adrenaline, melatonin, histamine, glutamic acid and corticosterone did not affect the basal CRH activity of the hypothalamus in vitro. 5. Noradrenaline, GABA and corticosterone reduced the acetylcholine- and 5-HT-induced increases in the release of CRH from the hypothalamus. The rises in CRH content induced by acetylcholine and 5-HT were also reduced by noradrenaline and GABA but increased by corticosterone. 6. The physiological significance of the results and the potential value of the technique are discussed. PMID:304104

  19. [Release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Fei; Huang, Qi-Fei; Zhang, Xia; Yang, Yu; Wang, Qi

    2009-05-15

    Clinker was produced by Simulating cement calcination test, and concrete samples were also prepared according to national standard GB/T 17671-1999. Long-term cumulative release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln was researched through leaching test which refers to EA NEN 7371 and EA NEN 7375, and one-dimensional diffusion model which is on the base of Fick diffusion law. The results show that availabilities of heavy metals are lower than the total amounts in concrete. The diffusion coefficients of heavy metals are different (Cr > As > Ni > Cd). During 30 years service, the cumulative release amounts of Cr, As, Ni and Cd are 4.43 mg/kg, 0.46 mg/kg, 1.50 mg/kg and 0.02 mg/kg, respectively, and the ratios of release which is the division of cumulative release amount and availability are 27.0%, 18.0%, 3.0% and 0.2%, respectively. The most important influence factor of cumulative release amount of heavy metal is the diffusion coefficient, and it is correlative to cumulative release amount. The diffusion coefficient of Cr and As should be controlled exactly in the processing of input the cement-kiln.

  20. Scientific and Regulatory Considerations in Solid Oral Modified Release Drug Product Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Sander, Sanna; Duan, John; Rosencrance, Susan; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Yu, Lawrence; Seo, Paul; Rege, Bhagwant

    2016-11-01

    This review presents scientific and regulatory considerations for the development of solid oral modified release (MR) drug products. It includes a rationale for patient-focused development based on Quality-by-Design (QbD) principles. Product and process understanding of MR products includes identification and risk-based evaluation of critical material attributes (CMAs), critical process parameters (CPPs), and their impact on critical quality attributes (CQAs) that affect the clinical performance. The use of various biopharmaceutics tools that link the CQAs to a predictable and reproducible clinical performance for patient benefit is emphasized. Product and process understanding lead to a more comprehensive control strategy that can maintain product quality through the shelf life and the lifecycle of the drug product. The overall goal is to develop MR products that consistently meet the clinical objectives while mitigating the risks to patients by reducing the probability and increasing the detectability of CQA failures.

  1. NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget: First Results From The Release 4 GEWEX Integrated Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stackhouse, Paul; Cox, Stephen; Gupta, Shashi; Mikovitz, J. Colleen; zhang, taiping

    2016-04-01

    The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces shortwave and longwave surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes for the 1983-near present time period. Spatial resolution is 1 degree. The current release 3 (available at gewex-srb.larc.nasa.gov) uses the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) DX product for pixel level radiance and cloud information. This product is subsampled to 30 km. ISCCP is currently recalibrating and recomputing their entire data series, to be released as the H product, at 10km resolution. The ninefold increase in pixel number should help improve the RMS of the existing products and allow for future higher resolution SRB gridded product (e.g. 0.5 degree). In addition to the input data improvements, several important algorithm improvements have been made. Most notable has been the adaptation of Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) from CERES to improve the initial calculation of shortwave TOA fluxes, from which the surface flux calculations follow. Other key input improvements include a detailed aerosol history using the Max Planck Institut Aerosol Climatology (MAC), temperature and moisture profiles from HIRS, and new topography, surface type, and snow/ice. Here we present results for the improved GEWEX Shortwave and Longwave algorithm (GSW and GLW) with new ISCCP data, the various other improved input data sets and the incorporation of many additional internal SRB model improvements. As of the time of abstract submission, results from 2007 have been produced with ISCCP H availability the limiting factor. More SRB data will be produced as ISCCP reprocessing continues. The SRB data produced will be released as part of the Release 4.0 Integrated Product, recognizing the interdependence of the radiative fluxes with other GEWEX products providing estimates of the Earth's global water and energy cycle (I.e., ISCCP, SeaFlux, LandFlux, NVAP, etc.).

  2. Activation and regulation of arachidonic acid release in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid release in rabbit neutrophils can be enhanced by the addition of chemotactic fMet-Leu-Phe, platelet-activating factor, PAF, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Over 80% of the release ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid comes from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The release is dose-dependent and increases with increasing concentration of the stimulus. The A23187-induced release increases with increasing time of the stimulation. ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid release, but not the rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium, is inhibited in pertussis toxin-treated neutrophils stimulated with PAF. The ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid released by A23187 is potentiated while that release by fMET-Leu-Phe or PAF is inhibited in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA, treated rabbit neutrophils. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H-7, has no effect on the potentiation by PMA of the A23187-induced release, it prevents the inhibition by PMA of the release produced by PAF or fMet-Leu-Phe. In addition, PMA increases arachidonic acid release in H-7-treated cells stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 increases the level of diacylglycerol in neutrophils stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, R59022 potentiates ({sup 3}H) arachidonic acid release produced by fMet-Leu-Phe. This potentiation is not inhibited by H-7, in fact, it is increased in H-7-treated neutrophils.

  3. Alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein is contained in bovine neutrophil granules and released after activation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mizanur M D; Miranda-Ribera, Alba; Lecchi, Cristina; Bronzo, Valerio; Sartorelli, Paola; Franciosi, Federica; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2008-09-15

    The present study was designed to investigate the capability of bovine neutrophil granulocytes to produce the minor acute phase protein alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP, Orososmucoid). Bovine neutrophils contain a high MW (50-60kDa) AGP isoform (PMN-AGP), as determined by Western blotting and confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The presence of AGP in bovine neutrophils has been confirmed by fluorescence immunocytometry. In addition, bovine neutrophils contain also a 42-45kDa isoform, which has the same MW as plasma-, liver-delivered, AGP. cDNA sequence of plasma- and PMN-AGP revealed that (i) the two proteins are products of the same gene; (ii) the differences in molecular weight are due do different post-translational modifications. This result was confirmed by deglycosylation of the two glycoforms. Exocytosis studies showed that isolated neutrophils exposed to several challengers, including Zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), which mimic the inflammatory activation, released PMN-AGP as early as 15min. AGP's mRNA is physiologically expressed by mature resting neutrophils. Real-time PCR on LPS, ZAS and PMA challenged cells revealed that the level of expression apparently does not increase after inflammatory activation. Collectively, the findings reported in this paper proved that PMN-AGP: (i) is a hyperglycosylated glycoform of plasma AGP, (ii) is stored in granules, and (iii) is released by neutrophils in response to activation. Due to its anti-inflammatory activity, PMN-AGP may work as a fine tuning of the neutrophils functions in the inflammatory focus, i.e. it can reduce the damages caused by an excess of inflammatory response.

  4. Esomeprazole immediate release tablets: Gastric mucosa ex vivo permeation, absorption and antisecretory activity in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Camillo; Flammini, Lisa; Vivo, Valentina; Colombo, Paolo; Colombo, Gaia; Elviri, Lisa; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Buttini, Francesca; Bettini, Ruggero; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rossi, Alessandra

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this work was to study the esomeprazole activity on the control of gastric secretion after administration of a novel immediate release tablet. The ex vivo permeation of esomeprazole across porcine gastric mucosa from immediate release tablets, containing sodium carbonate or magnesium oxide as alkalinizing agents, was firstly assessed. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies in conscious rats following the administration of immediate release tablets with sodium carbonate, in comparison with delayed-release tablets having the same formula, were also conducted. The results showed an important effect of sodium carbonate and magnesium oxide on the drug release, on the ex vivo trans-mucosal transport and the stability in acid environment. In particular, the presence of sodium carbonate in esomeprazole tablet formulation provided the maximum increase of the drug in vitro transport across the mucosa. Then, the absorption and the antisecretory activity of this proton pump inhibitor orally administered in rats as immediate release tablets containing Na2CO3, was superior but not significantly different compared to delayed-release tablets having the same formula. In the adopted animal model, an activity of esomeprazole from immediate release alkaline formulation was seen also in presence of partial gastric absorption allowing inhibition of proton pumps reached via systemic circulation. This esomeprazole immediate release formulation could be used for the on-demand treatment of acid-related disorders such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

  5. Rabeprazole sodium delayed-release multiparticulates: Effect of enteric coating layers on product performance.

    PubMed

    Tirpude, Rakesh N; Puranik, Prashant K

    2011-07-01

    Rabeprazole sodium is one of the most effective proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) used in antiulcer therapy. Like most other PPIs, owing to its acid-labile nature, the drug is formulated as enteric-coated dosage form. Conventional means of producing delayed release multiparticulate dosage forms of PPIs require large quantities of enteric polymer coatings. In the present study, in order to better evaluate the effect of polymeric coating on product performance, the pellet core structure and composition was kept constant. Four different enteric-coating formulations and designs were evaluated. Enteric-coated drug multiparticulates prepared with single polymeric coatings (acrylic or cellulosic) were compared with two different polymeric layer coatings to evaluate the effectiveness of latter coatings in more effectively producing a better rabeprazole sodium delayed-release pellet product. The pH-dependent, enteric acrylic, and cellulosic polymers were used either alone, in combination, or applied one over the other to impart delayed-release properties to the core drug pellets. It was demonstrated that dual delayed-release coating with two different enteric polymers-an inner acrylic coating followed by an outer cellulosic coating-yields the best product that provides all the desired physicochemical and drug dissolution characteristics.

  6. Morphine treatment during juvenile isolation increases social activity and opioid peptides release in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Van den Berg, C L; Kitchen, I; Gerrits, M A; Spruijt, B M; Van Ree, J M

    1999-05-29

    The consequences of juvenile isolation and morphine treatment on general activity, social activity and endogenous opioid release during a social interaction test were investigated in the adult rat. Rats were either isolated or socially housed during weeks 4 and 5 of age and treated daily during this isolation period subcutaneously with either saline or morphine. Directly after a social interaction test at 10 weeks of age, rats were injected with [3H]-diprenorphine and subsequently prepared for in vivo autoradiography. The autoradiographic technique was used to visualise neuroanatomical changes in opioid receptor occupancy, probably reflecting changes in opioid peptide release, as a result of social activity. Juvenile isolation increased general activity during the social interaction test, an effect which was accompanied by a reduction of opioid receptor occupancy in many brain areas, suggesting an increased opioid peptide release as a consequence of socially-induced general activity. Morphine treatment in isolated rats caused an increase in adult social activity and enhanced opioid peptide release in some cortical regions and the ventral tegmental area as compared to saline treated rats. Both social activity and opioid receptor occupancy were unaffected by morphine treatment in non-isolated rats. The present study underscores the role of opioid systems in adult social behaviors as a consequence of juvenile isolation. The results suggest a relationship between social activity and opioid peptide release during social contact. Increased social activity seems to be accompanied by elevated opioid peptide release in distinct brain areas after morphine treatment during juvenile isolation.

  7. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This report documents comparisons between post-irradiation examination measurements and model predictions of silver (Ag), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) release from selected tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program that occurred from December 2006 to November 2009 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact) but it can be assessed at the particle level by adjusting the diffusivity in the fuel matrix to very high values. Furthermore, the diffusivity of each layer can be individually set to a high value (typically 10-6 m2/s) to simulate a failed layer with no capability of fission product retention. In this study, the comparison to PIE focused on fission product release and because of the lack of failure in the irradiation, the probability of particle failure was not calculated. During the AGR-1 irradiation campaign, the fuel kernel produced and released fission products, which migrated through the successive

  8. Studies on the Release of Renin by Direct and Reflex Activation of Renal Sympathetic Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents data on release of renin during direct and indirect stimulation of renal nerves. Conclusions show that renin release is influenced by change in activity of carotid and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor systems, and excitation of discrete areas of brain and hypothalamus by changes in renal sympathetic nerve. (Author/SA)

  9. Impact of biodiversity loss on production in complex marine food webs mitigated by prey-release

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Tak; Farnsworth, Keith D.; Reid, David G.; Rossberg, Axel G.

    2015-01-01

    Public concern over biodiversity loss is often rationalized as a threat to ecosystem functioning, but biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) relations are hard to empirically quantify at large scales. We use a realistic marine food-web model, resolving species over five trophic levels, to study how total fish production changes with species richness. This complex model predicts that BEF relations, on average, follow simple Michaelis–Menten curves when species are randomly deleted. These are shaped mainly by release of fish from predation, rather than the release from competition expected from simpler communities. Ordering species deletions by decreasing body mass or trophic level, representing ‘fishing down the food web’, accentuates prey-release effects and results in unimodal relationships. In contrast, simultaneous unselective harvesting diminishes these effects and produces an almost linear BEF relation, with maximum multispecies fisheries yield at ≈40% of initial species richness. These findings have important implications for the valuation of marine biodiversity. PMID:25799523

  10. Impact of biodiversity loss on production in complex marine food webs mitigated by prey-release.

    PubMed

    Fung, Tak; Farnsworth, Keith D; Reid, David G; Rossberg, Axel G

    2015-03-23

    Public concern over biodiversity loss is often rationalized as a threat to ecosystem functioning, but biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) relations are hard to empirically quantify at large scales. We use a realistic marine food-web model, resolving species over five trophic levels, to study how total fish production changes with species richness. This complex model predicts that BEF relations, on average, follow simple Michaelis-Menten curves when species are randomly deleted. These are shaped mainly by release of fish from predation, rather than the release from competition expected from simpler communities. Ordering species deletions by decreasing body mass or trophic level, representing 'fishing down the food web', accentuates prey-release effects and results in unimodal relationships. In contrast, simultaneous unselective harvesting diminishes these effects and produces an almost linear BEF relation, with maximum multispecies fisheries yield at ≈40% of initial species richness. These findings have important implications for the valuation of marine biodiversity.

  11. Fission Product Release from Molten U/Al Alloy Fuel: A Vapor Transpiration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Whitkop, P.G.

    2001-06-26

    This report describes the application of a vapor transportation model to fission product release data obtained for uranium/aluminum alloy fuel during early Oak Ridge fuel melt experiments. The Oak Ridge data validates the vapor transpiration model and suggests that iodine and cesium are released from the molten fuel surface in elemental form while tellurium and ruthenium are released as oxides. Cesium iodide is postulated to form in the vapor phase outside of the fuel matrix. Kinetic data indicates that cesium iodide can form from Cs atoms and diatomic iodine in the vapor phase. Temperatures lower than those capable of melting fuel are necessary in order to maintain a sufficient I2 concentration. At temperatures near the fuel melting point, cesium can react with iodine atoms to form CsI only on solid surfaces such as aerosols.

  12. Activated V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells trigger granulocyte functions via MCP-2 release.

    PubMed

    Agrati, Chiara; Cimini, Eleonora; Sacchi, Alessandra; Bordoni, Veronica; Gioia, Cristiana; Casetti, Rita; Turchi, Federica; Tripodi, Marco; Martini, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells display a broad antimicrobial activity by directly killing infected cells and by inducing an effective adaptive immune response. The activation of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells by aminobisphosphonate drugs such as zoledronic acid (ZOL) results in a massive release of cytokines and chemokines that may induce a bystander activation of other immune cells. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of soluble factors released by ZOL-activated Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells to induce granulocyte activation. We showed that soluble factors released by ZOL-stimulated Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells activate granulocytes by inducing their chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and alpha-defensins release. Proteomic analysis allowed us to identify a number of cytokines and chemokines specifically released by activated Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells. Moreover, MCP-2 depletion by neutralizing Ab revealed a critical role of this chemokine in induction of granulocyte alpha-defensins release. Altogether, these data show a Vgamma9Vdelta2-mediated activation of granulocytes through a bystander mechanism, and confirm the wide ability of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T-lymphocytes in orchestrating the immune response. In conclusion, an immune modulating strategy targeting Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells may represent a key switch to induce an effective and well-coordinated immune response, and can be proposed as a way to strengthen the immune competence during infectious diseases.

  13. Enzymatic production by tissue extracts of a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with calcium-releasing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Tich, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    This research investigated the occurrence and characterization of the metabolite in mammalian tissues. In all mammalian tissues tested, including rabbit liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain, the factor to convert NAD into its active metabolite was present. The conversion exhibited many characteristics of an enzymatic process such as temperature sensitivity, concentration dependence and protease sensitivity. Production of the NAD metabolite occurred within a time frame of 15-45 minutes at 37{degree}C, depending upon the particular preparation. The metabolite was isolated using high performance liquid chromatography from all mammalian tissues. This purified metabolite was then tested for its effectiveness in releasing intracellular calcium in an intact cell by microinjecting it into unfertilized sea urchin eggs. These eggs undergo a massive morphological change upon fertilization which is dependent upon the release of calcium from inside the cell. Upon injection of the NAD metabolite into unfertilized eggs, this same morphological change was observed showing indirectly that the metabolite released intracellular calcium from an intact, viable cell. In addition, radioactive studies using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} loaded into permeabilized hepatocytes, indicated in preliminary studies that the NAD metabolite could also release calcium from intracellular stores of mammalian cells.

  14. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2016-04-07

    Safety tests were conducted on fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800 °C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during 15 of these safety tests. Comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination results of the safety tests were conducted on two types of AGR-1 compacts: compacts containing only intact particles and compacts containing one or more particles whose SiC layers failed during safety testing. In both cases, PARFUME globally over-predicted the experimental release fractions by several orders of magnitude: more than three (intact) and two (failed SiC) orders of magnitude for silver, more than three and up to two orders of magnitude for strontium, and up to two and more than one orders of magnitude for krypton. The release of cesium from intact particles was also largely over-predicted (by up to five orders of magnitude) but its release from particles with failed SiC was only over-predicted by a factor of about 3. These over-predictions can be largely attributed to an over-estimation of the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles. The integral release nature of the data makes it difficult to estimate the individual over-estimations in the kernel or each coating layer. Nevertheless, a tentative assessment of correction factors to these diffusivities was performed to enable a better match between the modeling predictions and the safety testing results. The method could only be successfully applied to silver and cesium. In the case of strontium, correction factors could not be assessed because

  15. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    DOE PAGES

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; ...

    2016-04-07

    Safety tests were conducted on fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800 °C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during 15 of these safety tests. Comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination results of the safety tests were conducted on two types of AGR-1 compacts: compactsmore » containing only intact particles and compacts containing one or more particles whose SiC layers failed during safety testing. In both cases, PARFUME globally over-predicted the experimental release fractions by several orders of magnitude: more than three (intact) and two (failed SiC) orders of magnitude for silver, more than three and up to two orders of magnitude for strontium, and up to two and more than one orders of magnitude for krypton. The release of cesium from intact particles was also largely over-predicted (by up to five orders of magnitude) but its release from particles with failed SiC was only over-predicted by a factor of about 3. These over-predictions can be largely attributed to an over-estimation of the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles. The integral release nature of the data makes it difficult to estimate the individual over-estimations in the kernel or each coating layer. Nevertheless, a tentative assessment of correction factors to these diffusivities was performed to enable a better match between the modeling predictions and the safety testing results. The method could only be successfully applied to silver and cesium. In the case of strontium, correction factors could not be assessed

  16. Ferulic acid release and 4-vinylguaiacol formation during brewing and fermentation: indications for feruloyl esterase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Coghe, Stefan; Benoot, Koen; Delvaux, Filip; Vanderhaegen, Bart; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2004-02-11

    The release of ferulic acid and the subsequent thermal or enzymatic decarboxylation to 4-vinylguaiacol are inherent to the beer production process. Phenolic, medicinal, or clove-like flavors originating from 4-vinylguaiacol frequently occur in beer made with wheat or wheat malt. To evaluate the release of ferulic acid and the transformation to 4-vinylguaiacol, beer was brewed with different proportions of barley malt, wheat, and wheat malt. Ferulic acid as well as 4-vinylguaiacol levels were determined by HPLC at several stages of the beer production process. During brewing, ferulic acid was released at the initial mashing phase, whereas moderate levels of 4-vinylguaiacol were formed by wort boiling. Higher levels of the phenolic flavor compound were produced during fermentations with brewery yeast strains of the Pof(+) phenotype. In beer made with barley malt, ferulic acid was mainly released during the brewing process. Conversely, 60-90% of ferulic acid in wheat or wheat malt beer was hydrolyzed during fermentation, causing higher 4-vinylguaiacol levels in these beers. As cereal enzymes are most likely inactivated during wort boiling, the additional release of ferulic acid during fermentation suggests the activity of feruloyl esterases produced by brewer's yeast.

  17. Mass production of genetically modified Aedes aegypti for field releases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Danilo O; Nimmo, Derric; Naish, Neil; McKemey, Andrew R; Gray, Pam; Wilke, André B B; Marrelli, Mauro T; Virginio, Jair F; Alphey, Luke; Capurro, Margareth L

    2014-01-04

    New techniques and methods are being sought to try to win the battle against mosquitoes. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the development of new and innovative methods of mosquito control based around the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)(1-3). A control method known as RIDL (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal)(4), is based around SIT, but uses genetic methods to remove the need for radiation-sterilization(5-8). A RIDL strain of Ae. aegypti was successfully tested in the field in Grand Cayman(9,10); further field use is planned or in progress in other countries around the world. Mass rearing of insects has been established in several insect species and to levels of billions a week. However, in mosquitoes, rearing has generally been performed on a much smaller scale, with most large scale rearing being performed in the 1970s and 80s. For a RIDL program it is desirable to release as few females as possible as they bite and transmit disease. In a mass rearing program there are several stages to produce the males to be released: egg production, rearing eggs until pupation, and then sorting males from females before release. These males are then used for a RIDL control program, released as either pupae or adults(11,12). To suppress a mosquito population using RIDL a large number of high quality male adults need to be reared(13,14). The following describes the methods for the mass rearing of OX513A, a RIDL strain of Ae. aegypti (8), for release and covers the techniques required for the production of eggs and mass rearing RIDL males for a control program.

  18. Newly Released TRMM Version 7 Products, Other Precipitation Datasets and Data Services at NASA GES DISC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, D.; Teng, W. L.; Trivedi, Bhagirath; Kempler, S.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is home of global precipitation product archives, in particular, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) products. TRMM is a joint U.S.-Japan satellite mission to monitor tropical and subtropical (40 S - 40 N) precipitation and to estimate its associated latent heating. The TRMM satellite provides the first detailed and comprehensive dataset on the four dimensional distribution of rainfall and latent heating over vastly undersampled tropical and subtropical oceans and continents. The TRMM satellite was launched on November 27, 1997. TRMM data products are archived at and distributed by GES DISC. The newly released TRMM Version 7 consists of several changes including new parameters, new products, meta data, data structures, etc. For example, hydrometeor profiles in 2A12 now have 28 layers (14 in V6). New parameters have been added to several popular Level-3 products, such as, 3B42, 3B43. Version 2.2 of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) dataset has been added to the TRMM Online Visualization and Analysis System (TOVAS; URL: http://disc2.nascom.nasa.gov/Giovanni/tovas/), allowing online analysis and visualization without downloading data and software. The GPCP dataset extends back to 1979. Version 3 of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) monitoring product has been updated in TOVAS as well. The product provides global gauge-based monthly rainfall along with number of gauges per grid. The dataset begins in January 1986. To facilitate data and information access and support precipitation research and applications, we have developed a Precipitation Data and Information Services Center (PDISC; URL: http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/precipitation). In addition to TRMM, PDISC provides current and past observational precipitation data. Users can access precipitation data archives consisting of both remote sensing and in-situ observations. Users can use these data

  19. Airborne manufactured nano-objects released from commercially available spray products: temporal and spatial influences.

    PubMed

    Bekker, Cindy; Brouwer, Derk H; van Duuren-Stuurman, Birgit; Tuinman, Ilse L; Tromp, Peter; Fransman, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the dispersion of manufactured nano-objects (MNOs) through the air, both in time and space, during the use of two commercially available nano-spray products and comparable products without MNOs. The main objective was to identify whether personal exposure can occur at a greater distance than the immediate proximity of the source (>1 m from the source), that is, in the "far field" (bystanders), or at a period after the emission occurred (re-entry). The spray experiments were conducted in an experimental room with well-controlled environmental and ventilation conditions (19.5 m(3)). The concentration of MNOs was investigated by measuring real-time size distribution, number, and active surface area concentration. For off-line analysis of the particles in the air, samples for scanning/transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis were collected. The release of MNOs was measured at ∼30 and 290 cm from the source ("near field" and "far field", respectively). For all four spray products, the maximum number and surface area concentrations in the "near field" exceeded the maximum concentrations reached in the "far field". At 2 min after the emission occurred, the concentration in both the "near field" and "far field" reached a comparable steady-state level above background level. These steady-state concentrations remained elevated above background concentration throughout the entire measurement period (12 min). The results of the real-time measurement devices mainly reflect the liquid aerosols emitted by the spray process itself rather than only the MNO, which hampers the interpretation of the results. However, the combination of the off-line analysis and the results of the real-time devices indicates that after the use of nano-spray products, personal exposure to MNOs can occur not only in the near field, but also at a greater distance than the immediate proximity of the source and at a period after emission occurred.

  20. Diffusion modeling of fission product release during depressurized core conduction cooldown conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    A simple model for diffusion through the silicon carbide layer of TRISO particles is applied to the data for accident condition testing of fuel spheres for the High-Temperature Reactor program of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Categorization of sphere release of {sup 137}Cs based on fast neutron fluence permits predictions of release with an accuracy comparable to that of the US/FRG accident condition fuel performance model. Calculations are also performed for {sup 85}Kr, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 110m}Ag. Diffusion of cesium through SiC suggests that models of fuel failure should consider fuel performance during repeated accident condition thermal cycling. Microstructural considerations in models in fission product release are discussed. The neutron-induced segregation of silicon within the SiC structure is postulated as a mechanism for enhanced fission product release during accident conditions. An oxygen-enhanced SiC decomposition mechanism is also discussed. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Importance of viability and attachment to an ascites tumor in the release of plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Q.; Zhou, M.; Subbarao, V.; Ts'ao, C.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor plasminogen activator (PA) has been alleged to play a role in the growth and metastasis of tumors. Before such a role can be realized, PA first must be released from tumor cells. Having determined intra- and extracellular PA and PA-inhibitor activities in an experimental pancreatic ascites tumor grown in hamsters, the release of PA from these cells was investigated. No PA activity was detected in the suspension medium of freshly isolated tumor cells; inclusion of plasminogen, fibrinogen, or collagen in the medium yielded similar negative results. On the other hand, PA activity was demonstrated to be released in a time-dependent manner from these tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots. Plasminogen activator activity also was not found in the suspension medium of frozen-thawed tumor cells, despite the fact that most of them had breaks on their cell membrane. Unlike freshly isolated tumor cells, PA was not released from frozen-thawed cells embedded in fibrin clots. Full PA activity was demonstrated in frozen-thawed cells treated with Triton X-100, however. Frozen-thawed cells exhibited signs of severe damage, and more than 80% of them failed to exclude trypan blue. Obviously PA is released from viable tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots but not suspended in artificial medium. The PA-release mechanism, not PA itself, is destroyed in cells rendered nonviable by freeze thawing. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1902626

  2. Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

    2005-08-02

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  3. EPA Releases Draft Assessment on the Potential Impacts to Drinking Water Resources from Hydraulic Fracturing Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON-The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is releasing a draft assessment today on the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing activities on drinking water resources in the United States. The assessment, done at the request of Congress, shows

  4. EPA Releases Technical Guides to Support Vapor Intrusion Assessment and Mitigation Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON -- Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released two technical guides to support assessment and mitigation activities at sites where vapor intrusion is an actual or potential concern.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide release kinetics into saliva from different whitening products: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva; da Mata, António Duarte Sola Pereira; Silveira, João Miguel Lourenço; Marques, Joana Rita Oliveira Faria; Amaral, João Pedro de Almeida Rato; Guilherme, Nuno Filipe Rito Parada Marques

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare salivary hydrogen peroxide (HP) release kinetics and potential toxicity of systemic exposure of four different whitening products. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a Portuguese dental faculty clinic. Two hundred forty volunteers were randomized to eight intervention groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive active or placebo applications of one of four different products: Opalescence 10% PF™ (OPL), Vivastyle® 10%™ (VS10%), Vivadent Paint On Plus™ (PO+), and Trés White Supreme™ (TWS). Saliva collection was obtained by established methods at different times. The HP salivary content was determined by a photometric method. Salivary HP variations, total amount of salivary HP, and counts of subjects above the safe daily HP dose were the main outcome measures. All whitening systems significantly released HP to the saliva when compared to placebo, and all showed different release kinetics. The adaptable tray system (TWS) presented a risk increase of 37% [20-54%, 95% confidence interval] when compared to the other systems. The use of an adaptable tray whitening system with higher concentration of HP increases the toxicity potential.

  6. Antarctic stratospheric chemistry of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and ice - Release of active chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.; Tso, Tai-Ly; Molina, Luisa T.; Wang, Frank C.-Y.

    1987-01-01

    The reaction rate between atmospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is greatly enhanced in the presence of ice particles; HCl dissolves readily into ice, and the collisional reaction probability for ClONO2 on the surface of ice with HCl in the mole fraction range from about 0.003 to 0.010 is in the range from about 0.05 to 0.1 for temperatures near 200 K. Chlorine is released into the gas phase on a time scale of at most a few milliseconds, whereas nitric acid (HNO3), the other product, remains in the condensed phase. This reaction could play an important role in explaining the observed depletion of ozone over Antarctica; it releases photolytically active chlorine from its most abundant reservoir species, and it promotes the formation of HNO3 and thus removes nitrogen dioxide from the gas phase. Hence it establishes the necessary conditions for the efficient catalytic destruction of ozone by halogenated free radicals.

  7. Activity-dependent dendritic release of BDNF and biological consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kuczewski, Nicola; Porcher, Christophe; Lessmann, Volkmar; Medina, Igor; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    Network construction and reorganization is modulated by the level and pattern of synaptic activity generated in the nervous system. During the past decades, neurotrophins, and in particular brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), have emerged as attractive candidates for linking synaptic activity and brain plasticity. Thus, neurotrophin expression and secretion are under the control of activity-dependent mechanisms and, besides their classical role in supporting neuronal survival neurotrophins, modulate nearly all key steps of network construction from neuronal migration to experience-dependent refinement of local connections. In this paper, we provide an overview of recent findings showing that BDNF can serve as a target-derived messenger for activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and development at the single cell level. PMID:19156544

  8. Physiological activities of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules: Ca ira.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, P K

    2007-04-01

    In this issue of British Journal of Pharmacology, Megías and colleagues demonstrate how preincubation of human colonic Caco-2 cells with CORM-2, a carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CO-RM), reduces the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 caused by proinflammatory cytokines. A role for IL-6 in the regulation of metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 expression by CORM-2 is described. However, it is the demonstration that CORM-2 inhibits MMP-7 or matrilysin expression, which is most intriguing as this small MMP has been implicated in carcinogenesis. Thus, CO-RMs appear to now possess chemoprotective properties and, in this particular case, may influence inflammation-induced colon carcinogenesis via modulation of nuclear factors participating in the transcription of genes implicated in the development of intestinal inflammation and cancer. This report opens yet another door for research involving these exciting molecules and it is now clear that further discoveries of the beneficial properties of CO-RMs will go on.

  9. Release of Oxidized Bromine Species From Diatoms: Implication for the Polar Troposphere and Oceanic Polyhalomethane Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, S. L.; Hill, V. L.

    2006-12-01

    Marine and ice diatoms are known producers of polybromomethanes. These trace gases produced from ice algae have been implicated as a source of photochemically active bromine involved in polar surface ozone depletion events. A more dominant source of reactive bromine, however, has been attributed to the reaction on ice particles and in sea spray aerosols of atmospherically derived HOBr with bromide and chloride to produce the dihalogens Br2 and BrCl. We have measured the release of oxidized bromine species (Brox = HOBr, Br2, Br3-1) from polar and temperate diatoms. The highest rates were measured from Porosira glaciales (CCMP 651). Release rates are range from 0.84 to 180 fmoles bromine/hour/cell depending on the species or an approximate maximum of 950 nmoles bromine/mg chl a/hr (P. glaciales). The flux from the diatoms is 0.1 to 7.5 nmoles bromine/cm2 diatom surface/hr. This release occurs from an extracellular bromoperoxidase when a suitable organic substrate is absent. At 0.84 mM bromide (average seawater concentration), the optimal pH for Brox release is 6.5, which is the putative pH of the apoplastic space, and the optimal H2O2 concentration is 250 nM. Based on these results, it is estimated that the amount of bromine released from ice algae as Brox is 10 to 200 times greater than the release of bromine as bromoform from ice algae. The Brox so produced could participate in the abiotic formation of dihalogens in sea ice. Also, Brox released from diatoms may react with specific components of DOC, if present, to indirectly produce polybromomethanes both in sea ice and seawater. The amount of polyhalomethanes produced is not only dependent on the algal species present but also on the composition of DOC.

  10. Platelet-Rich Plasma: The Choice of Activation Method Affects the Release of Bioactive Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Carola; Mariani, Erminia; Pratelli, Loredana; Merli, Giulia; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) is a low-cost procedure to deliver high concentrations of autologous growth factors (GFs). Platelet activation is a crucial step that might influence the availability of bioactive molecules and therefore tissue healing. Activation of PRP from ten voluntary healthy males was performed by adding 10% of CaCl2, 10% of autologous thrombin, 10% of a mixture of CaCl2 + thrombin, and 10% of collagen type I. Blood derivatives were incubated for 15 and 30 minutes and 1, 2, and 24 hours and samples were evaluated for the release of VEGF, TGF-β1, PDGF-AB, IL-1β, and TNF-α. PRP activated with CaCl2, thrombin, and CaCl2/thrombin formed clots detected from the 15-minute evaluation, whereas in collagen-type-I-activated samples no clot formation was noticed. Collagen type I produced an overall lower GF release. Thrombin, CaCl2/thrombin, and collagen type I activated PRPs showed an immediate release of PDGF and TGF-β1 that remained stable over time, whereas VEGF showed an increasing trend from 15 minutes up to 24 hours. CaCl2 induced a progressive release of GFs from 15 minutes and increasing up to 24 hours. The method chosen to activate PRP influences both its physical form and the releasate in terms of GF amount and release kinetic. PMID:27672658

  11. Release 2 data products from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Limb Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Philippe Q.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen R.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Larsen, Jack C.; Fleig, Albert; Kahn, Daniel; Zhu, Tong; Chen, Zhong; Gorkavyi, Nick; Warner, Jeremy; Linda, Michael; Chen, Hong G.; Kowitt, Mark; Haken, Michael; Hall, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) was launched on board the NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite in October 2011. OMPS-LP is a limb-scattering hyperspectral sensor that provides ozone profiling capability at 1.8 km vertical resolution from cloud top to 60 km altitude. The use of three parallel slits allows global coverage in approximately four days. We have recently completed a full reprocessing of all LP data products, designated as Release 2, that improves the accuracy and quality of these products. Level 1 gridded radiance (L1G) changes include intra-orbit and seasonal correction of variations in wavelength registration, revised static and intra-orbit tangent height adjustments, and simplified pixel selection from multiple images. Ozone profile retrieval changes include removal of the explicit aerosol correction, exclusion of channels contaminated by stratospheric OH emission, a revised instrument noise characterization, improved synthetic solar spectrum, improved pressure and temperature ancillary data, and a revised ozone climatology. Release 2 data products also include aerosol extinction coefficient profiles derived with the prelaunch retrieval algorithm. Our evaluation of OMPS LP Release 2 data quality is good. Zonal average ozone profile comparisons with Aura MLS data typically show good agreement, within 5-10% over the altitude range 20-50 km between 60°S and 60°N. The aerosol profiles agree well with concurrent satellite measurements such as CALIPSO and OSIRIS, and clearly detect exceptional events such as volcanic eruptions and the Chelyabinsk bolide in February 2013.

  12. Release 2 data products from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Limb Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Q. Philippe; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen R.; Deland, Matthew T.; Larsen, Jack C.; Fleig, Albert; Kahn, Daniel; Zhu, Tong; Chen, Zhong; Gorkavyi, Nick; Warner, Jeremy; Linda, Mike; Chen, Hong; Kowitt, Mark; Haken, Michael; Hall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) was launched on board the NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite in October 2011. OMPS-LP is a limb-scattering hyperspectral sensor that provides ozone profiling capability at 1.5 km vertical resolution from cloud top to 60 km altitude. The use of three parallel slits allows global coverage in approximately four days. We have recently completed a full reprocessing of all LP data products, designated as Release 2, that improves the accuracy and quality of these products. Level 1 gridded radiance (L1G) changes include intra-orbit and seasonal correction of variations in wavelength registration, revised static and intra-orbit tangent height adjustments, and simplified pixel selection from multiple images. Ozone profile retrieval changes include removal of the explicit aerosol correction, exclusion of channels contaminated by stratospheric OH emission, a revised instrument noise characterization, improved synthetic solar spectrum, improved pressure and temperature ancillary data, and a revised ozone climatology. Release 2 data products also include aerosol extinction coefficient profiles derived with the prelaunch retrieval algorithm. Our evaluation of OMPS LP Release 2 data quality is good. Zonal average ozone profile comparisons with Aura MLS data typically show good agreement, within 5-10% over the altitude range 20-50 km between 60 deg S and 60 deg N. The aerosol profiles agree well with concurrent satellite measurements such as CALIPSO and OSIRIS, and clearly detect exceptional events such as volcanic eruptions and the Chelyabinsk bolide in February 2013.

  13. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Y. H.; Kim, W.; Park, K. U.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) according to different activation protocols. Methods Two manual preparation procedures (single-spin (SS) at 900 g for five minutes; double-spin (DS) at 900 g for five minutes and then 1500 g for 15 minutes) were performed for each of 14 healthy subjects. Both preparations were tested for platelet activation by one of three activation protocols: no activation, activation with calcium (Ca) only, or calcium with a low dose (50 IU per 1 ml PRP) of thrombin. Each preparation was divided into four aliquots and incubated for one hour, 24 hours, 72 hours, and seven days. The cytokine-release kinetics were evaluated by assessing PDGF, TGF, VEGF, FGF, IL-1, and MMP-9 concentrations with bead-based sandwich immunoassay. Results The concentration of cytokine released from PRP varied over time and was influenced by various activation protocols. Ca-only activation had a significant effect on the DS PRPs (where the VEGF, FGF, and IL-1 concentrations were sustained) while Ca/thrombin activation had effects on both SS and DS PRPs (where the PDGF and VEGF concentrations were sustained and the TGF and FGF concentrations were short). The IL-1 content showed a significant increase with Ca-only or Ca/thrombin activation while these activations did not increase the MMP-9 concentration. Conclusion The SS and DS methods differed in their effect on cytokine release, and this effect varied among the cytokines analysed. In addition, low dose of thrombin/calcium activation increased the overall cytokine release of the PRP preparations over seven days, relative to that with a calcium-only supplement or non-activation. Cite this article: Professor J. H. Oh. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:37–45. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000540 PMID:26862077

  14. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration.

  15. Evaluation of USP apparatus 3 for dissolution testing of immediate-release products.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lawrence X; Wang, Jin T; Hussain, Ajaz S

    2002-01-01

    We sought to evaluate whether U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus 3 can be used as an alternative to USP apparatus 2 for dissolution testing of immediate-release (IR) dosage forms. Highly soluble drugs, metoprolol and ranitidine, and poorly soluble drugs, acyclovir and furosemide, were chosen as model drugs. The dissolution profiles of both innovator and generic IR products were determined using USP apparatus 2 at 50 rpm and apparatus 3 at 5, 15, and 25 dips per minute (dpm). The dissolution profiles from USP apparatus 3 were compared to those from USP apparatus 2 using the f(2) similarity test. The dissolution profile from USP apparatus 3 generally depends on the agitation rate, with a faster agitation rate producing a faster dissolution rate. It was found that USP apparatus 3 at the extreme low end of the possible agitation range, such as 5 dpm, gave hydrodynamic conditions equivalent to USP apparatus 2 at 50 rpm. With appropriate agitation rate, USP apparatus 3 can produce similar dissolution profiles to USP apparatus 2 or distinguish dissolution characteristics for the IR products of metoprolol, ranitidine, and acyclovir. Incomplete dissolution was observed for the furosemide tablets using USP apparatus 3. Although it is primarily designed for the release testing of extended-release products, USP apparatus 3 may be used for the dissolution testing of IR products of highly soluble drugs, such as metoprolol and ranitidine, and some IR products of poorly soluble drugs, such as acyclovir. USP apparatus 3 offers the advantages of avoiding cone formation and mimicking the changes in physiochemical conditions and mechanical forces experienced by products in the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release: activation of type 1 ryanodine receptor by endogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1.

  17. Estimation of (41)Ar activity concentration and release rate from the TRIGA Mark-II research reactor.

    PubMed

    Hoq, M Ajijul; Soner, M A Malek; Rahman, A; Salam, M A; Islam, S M A

    2016-03-01

    The BAEC TRIGA research reactor (BTRR) is the only nuclear reactor in Bangladesh. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Regulatory Authority (BAERA) regulations require that nuclear reactor licensees undertake all reasonable precautions to protect the environment and the health and safety of persons, including identifying, controlling and monitoring the release of nuclear substances to the environment. The primary activation product of interest in terms of airborne release from the reactor is (41)Ar. (41)Ar is a noble gas readily released from the reactor stacks and most has not decayed by the time it moves offsite with normal wind speed. Initially (41)Ar is produced from irradiation of dissolved air in the primary water which eventually transfers into the air in the reactor bay. In this study, the airborne radioisotope (41)Ar generation concentration, ground level concentration and release rate from the BTRR bay region are evaluated theoretically during the normal reactor operation condition by several governing equations. This theoretical calculation eventually minimizes the doubt about radiological safety to determine the radiation level for (41)Ar activity whether it is below the permissible limit or not. Results show that the estimated activity for (41)Ar is well below the maximum permissible concentration limit set by the regulatory body, which is an assurance for the reactor operating personnel and general public. Thus the analysis performed within this paper is so much effective in the sense of ensuring radiological safety for working personnel and the environment.

  18. Studies on the mechanism of natural killer cytotoxicity. III. Activation of NK cells by interferon augments the lytic activity of released natural killer cytotoxic factors (NKCF).

    PubMed

    Wright, S C; Bonavida, B

    1983-06-01

    The mechanism by which interferon (IFN) pretreatment of effector cells augments natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) was examined by determining whether IFN has any effect on the production of natural killer cytotoxic factors (NKCF). NKCF are released into the supernatant of co-cultures of murine spleen cells and YAC-1 stimulator cells, and their lytic activity is measured against YAC-1 target cells. It was demonstrated that pretreatment of effector cells with murine fibroblast IFN or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (pIC) resulted in the release of NKCF with augmented lytic activity. Evidence indicated that the IFN-induced augmentation of NKCF activity required protein synthesis during the IFN pretreatment period, because concurrent pretreatment with both IFN and cycloheximide abrogated the IFN effect. Protein synthesis, however, is not required for the production of base levels of NKCF because emetine pretreatment of normal spleen cells did not result in a decrease in NKCF production. Furthermore, substantial levels of NKCF activity could be detected in freeze-thaw lysates of freshly isolated spleen cells. Cell populations enriched for NK effector cells, such as nylon wool-nonadherent nude mouse spleen cells, produced lysates with high levels of NKCF activity, whereas lysates of CBA thymocytes were devoid of NKCF activity. Pretreatment of spleen cells with either IFN or pIC resulted in an augmentation of the NKCF activity present in their cell lysates. Taken altogether, these findings suggest that freshly isolated NK cells contain preformed pools of NKCF. Pretreatment of these cells with IFN causes de novo synthesis of additional NKCF and/or activation of preexisting NKCF. According to our model for the mechanism of NK CMC, target cell lysis is ultimately the result of transfer of NKCF from the effector cell to the target cell. The evidence presented here suggests that the IFN-induced augmentation of NK activity could be accounted for by an

  19. Evidence of arsenic release promoted by disinfection by-products within drinking-water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Botsaris, George; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Kalyvas, Harris; Costa, Costas N

    2014-02-15

    Changes in disinfectant type could trigger a cascade of reactions releasing pipe-anchored metals/metalloids into finished water. However, the effect of pre-formed disinfection by-products on the release of sorbed contaminants (arsenic-As in particular) from drinking water distribution system pipe scales remains unexplored. A bench-scale study using a factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the independent and interaction effects of trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (HAA) on arsenic (As) release from either scales-only or scale-biofilm conglomerates (SBC) both anchored on asbestos/cement pipe coupons. A model biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was allowed to grow on select pipe coupons prior experimentation. Either TTHM or HAA individual dosing did not promote As release from either scales only or SBC, detecting <6 μg AsL(-1) in finished water. In the case of scales-only coupons, the combination of the highest spike level of TTHM and HAA significantly (p<0.001) increased dissolved and total As concentrations to levels up to 16 and 95 μg L(-1), respectively. Similar treatments in the presence of biofilm (SBC) resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in dissolved and total recoverable As up to 20 and 47 μg L(-1), respectively, exceeding the regulatory As limit. Whether or not, our laboratory-based results truly represent mechanisms operating in disinfected finished water in pipe networks remains to be investigated in the field.

  20. Tablet splitting: Product quality assessment of metoprolol succinate extended release tablets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Zidan, Ahmed; Tawakkul, Mobin; Sayeed, Vilayat A; Khan, Mansoor

    2010-11-30

    Metoprolol succinate extended release tablets comprise a multiple unit system containing metoprolol succinate in a multitude of controlled release pellets. Each pellet acts as a separate drug delivery unit and is designed to deliver metoprolol continuously over the dosage interval. Despite the flexibility that controlled release pellets may offer, segregation is one of the challenges that commonly occur during tableting for such drug delivery system. Since all commercial metoprolol succinate extended release tablets are scored, they are deemed suitable for splitting. The present study was aimed at utilizing an innovative technology to determine the dose uniformity for split tablets. Four marketed drug products consisting of innovator and generics were evaluated for effect of splitting on weight, assay and content uniformity. Novel analytical tool such as near infrared (NIR) chemical imaging was used to visualize the distribution of metoprolol succinate and functional excipients on the surfaces of the marketed tablets. The non-homogeneous distribution of directly compressed metoprolol succinate beads on the surface of the tablets as well as the split intersection explained the large variation in the split tablets' weight and content uniformity results. The obtained results indicated the usefulness of NIR chemical imaging to determine the need for content uniformity studies for certain split tablets.

  1. Use of natural gums and cellulose derivatives in production of sustained release metoprolol tablets.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Tavakoli, Nasser; Eram, S Ali

    2006-01-01

    Metoprolol tartrate sustained-release tablets (100 mg) were prepared using xanthan/guar gums and also hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) carboxymethyl-Cellulose (CMC) polymers by direct compression method. Physical characteristics of the tablets and water uptake in addition to their dissolution profiles were compared with standard (Lopressor SR) tablets. Dissolution test was performed in the phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) and the samples were analyzed spectrophotometerically in 275.7 nm. Dissolution studies showed that formulations containing 100 and 80% of HPMC, 100% of guar, and 20% of xanthan followed the Higuchi model, while those containing 60 and 40% HPMC and 100 and 80% xanthan followed a zero-order model. The tablets with 40% xanthen followed a Hixon-Crowell model. In cellulose derivatives the highest MDT and dissolution efficiency until 8 hr (DE8%) belonged to tablets with 40% HPMC, increasing the amount of CMC decreased the drug release rate, and formulations containing 60 and 40% of HPMC had the USP dissolution standards. While, in the gum formulations, the highest mean dissolution time and the lowest DE(8)% belonged to tablets with 100% xanthan, increasing the xanthan decreased the release rate of metoprolol, and formulations containing 80 and 100% xanthan had the USP dissolution standards. Results showed that natural gums are suitable for production of sustained-release tablets of metoprolol.

  2. Rapid structural alterations of the active zone lead to sustained changes in neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Matz, Jacob; Gilyan, Andrew; Kolar, Annette; McCarvill, Terrence; Krueger, Stefan R

    2010-05-11

    The likelihood with which an action potential elicits neurotransmitter release, the release probability (p(r)), is an important component of synaptic strength. Regulatory mechanisms controlling several steps of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis may affect p(r), yet their relative importance in determining p(r) and eliciting temporal changes in neurotransmitter release at individual synapses is largely unknown. We have investigated whether the size of the active zone cytomatrix is a major determinant of p(r) and whether changes in its size lead to corresponding alterations in neurotransmitter release. We have used a fluorescent sensor of SV exocytosis, synaptophysin-pHluorin, to measure p(r) at individual synapses with high accuracy and employed a fluorescently labeled cytomatrix protein, Bassoon, to quantify the amount of active zone cytomatrix present at these synapses. We find that, for synapses made by a visually identified presynaptic neuron, p(r) is indeed strongly correlated with the amount of active zone cytomatrix present at the presynaptic specialization. Intriguingly, active zone cytomatrices are frequently subject to synapse-specific changes in size on a time scale of minutes. These spontaneous alterations in active zone size are associated with corresponding changes in neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that the size of the active zone cytomatrix has a large influence on the reliability of synaptic transmission. Furthermore, they implicate mechanisms leading to rapid structural alterations at active zones in synapse-specific forms of plasticity.

  3. Investigation of the Fission Product Release From Molten Pools Under Oxidizing Conditions With the Code RELOS

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhietpass, Ingo D.; Unger, Hermann; Wagner, Hermann-Josef; Koch, Marco K.

    2006-07-01

    With the purpose of modeling and calculating the core behavior during severe accidents in nuclear power plants system codes are under development worldwide. Modeling of radionuclide release and transport in the case of beyond design basis accidents is an integrated feature of the deterministic safety analysis of nuclear power plants. Following a hypothetical, uncontrolled temperature escalation in the core of light water reactors, significant parts of the core structures may degrade and melt down under formation of molten pools, leading to an accumulation of large amounts of radioactive materials. The possible release of radionuclides from the molten pool provides a potential contribution to the aerosol source term in the late phase of core degradation accidents. The relevance of the amount of transferred oxygen from the gas atmosphere into the molten pool on the specification of a radionuclide and its release depends strongly on the initial oxygen inventory. Particularly for a low oxygen potential in the melt as it is the case for stratification when a metallic phase forms the upper layer and, respectively, when the oxidation has proceeded so far so that zirconium was completely oxidized, a significant influence of atmospheric oxygen on the specification and the release of some radionuclides has to be anticipated. The code RELOS (Release of Low Volatile Fission Products from Molten Surfaces) is under development at the Department of Energy Systems and Energy Economics (formerly Department of Nuclear and New Energy Systems) of the Ruhr-University Bochum. It is based on a mechanistic model to describe the diffusive and convective transport of fission products from the surface of a molten pool into a cooler gas atmosphere. This paper presents the code RELOS, i. e. the features and abilities of the latest code version V2.3 and the new model improvements of V2.4 and the calculated results evaluating the implemented models which deal with the oxygen transfer from the

  4. Source Term Estimates of Radioxenon Released from the BaTek Medical Isotope Production Facility Using External Measured Air Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Cameron, Ian M.; Dumais, Johannes R.; Imardjoko, Yudi; Marsoem, Pujadi; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Stoehlker, Ulrich; Widodo, Susilo; Woods, Vincent T.

    2015-10-01

    Abstract Batan Teknologi (BaTek) operates an isotope production facility in Serpong, Indonesia that supplies 99mTc for use in medical procedures. Atmospheric releases of Xe-133 in the production process at BaTek are known to influence the measurements taken at the closest stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). The purpose of the IMS is to detect evidence of nuclear explosions, including atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The xenon isotopes released from BaTek are the same as those produced in a nuclear explosion, but the isotopic ratios are different. Knowledge of the magnitude of releases from the isotope production facility helps inform analysts trying to decide whether a specific measurement result came from a nuclear explosion. A stack monitor deployed at BaTek in 2013 measured releases to the atmosphere for several isotopes. The facility operates on a weekly cycle, and the stack data for June 15-21, 2013 show a release of 1.84E13 Bq of Xe-133. Concentrations of Xe-133 in the air are available at the same time from a xenon sampler located 14 km from BaTek. An optimization process using atmospheric transport modeling and the sampler air concentrations produced a release estimate of 1.88E13 Bq. The same optimization process yielded a release estimate of 1.70E13 Bq for a different week in 2012. The stack release value and the two optimized estimates are all within 10 percent of each other. Weekly release estimates of 1.8E13 Bq and a 40 percent facility operation rate yields a rough annual release estimate of 3.7E13 Bq of Xe-133. This value is consistent with previously published estimates of annual releases for this facility, which are based on measurements at three IMS stations. These multiple lines of evidence cross-validate the stack release estimates and the release estimates from atmospheric samplers.

  5. Activation of the succinate receptor GPR91 in macula densa cells causes renin release.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Sarah Laurin; Toma, Ildikó; Kang, Jung Julie; Meer, Elliott James; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2009-05-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells of the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA) are salt sensors and generate paracrine signals that control renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, and release of the prohypertensive hormone renin. We hypothesized that the recently identified succinate receptor GPR91 is present in MD cells and regulates renin release. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified GPR91 in the apical plasma membrane of MD cells. Treatment of MD cells with succinate activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and induced the synthesis and release of prostaglandin E(2), a potent vasodilator and classic paracrine mediator of renin release. Using microperfused JGA and real-time confocal fluorescence imaging of quinacrine-labeled renin granules, we detected significant renin release in response to tubular succinate (EC(50) 350 microM). Genetic deletion of GPR91 (GPR91(-/-) mice) or pharmacologic inhibition of MAPK or COX-2 blocked succinate-induced renin release. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes caused GPR91-dependent upregulation of renal cortical phospho-p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, COX-2, and renin content. Salt depletion for 1 wk increased plasma renin activity seven-fold in wild-type mice but only 3.4-fold in GPR91(-/-) mice. In summary, MD cells can sense alterations in local tissue metabolism via accumulation of tubular succinate and GPR91 signaling, which involves the activation of MAPKs, COX-2, and the release of prostaglandin E(2). This mechanism may be integral in the regulation of renin release and activation of the renin-angiotensin system in health and disease.

  6. Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor Mediates Bradykinin Stimulated Tissue Plasminogen Activator Release In Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Ayaz M.; Murrow, Jonathan R.; Ozkor, Muhiddin A.; Kavtaradze, Nino; Lin, Ji; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, W. Craig; Manatunga, Amita; Hayek, Salim; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Bradykinin stimulates tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) release from human endothelium. Although bradykinin stimulates both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) release, the role of EDHF in t-PA release remains unexplored. This study sought to determine the mechanisms of bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release in the forearm vasculature of healthy human subjects. Methods In 33 healthy subjects (age 40.3±1.9 years) forearm blood flow (FBF) and t-PA release were measured at rest, and after intra-arterial infusions of bradykinin (400ng/min) and sodium nitroprusside (3.2 mg/min). Measurements were repeated after intra-arterial infusion of TEA (1 μmol/min), fluconazole (0.4 μmol.min-1.L-1), and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 8 μmol/min) to block nitric oxide, and their combination in separate studies. Results Bradykinin significantly increased net t-PA release across the forearm (P<0.0001). Fluconazole attenuated both bradykinin-mediated vasodilation (-23.3±2.7% FBF, P<0.0001) and t-PA release (from 50.9±9.0 to 21.3±8.9 ng/min/100ml, P=0.02). TEA attenuated FBF (-14.7±3.2%, P=0.002) and abolished bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release (from 22.9+5.7 to - 0.8±3.6 ng/min/100ml, P=0.0002). L-NMMA attenuated FBF (P<0.0001), but did not inhibit bradykinin-induced t-PA release (P=NS). Conclusion Bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release is partly due to cytochrome P450-derived epoxides, and is inhibited by K+ca channel blockade. Thus, bradykinin stimulates both EDHF-dependent vasodilation and t-PA release. PMID:24925526

  7. RADIOLOGICAL RELEASES DUE TO AIR AND SILICA DUST ACTIVATION IN EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Tang

    2003-05-07

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the quantity and significance of annual Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface normal radiological releases due to neutron activation of air and silica dust in emplacement drifts. This calculation includes the following items: (1) Calculate activation of ventilation airflow through emplacement drifts to quantify radioactive gaseous releases; and (2) Calculate the bounding potential activated silica dust concentration and releases. The sources of silica dust may arise from air supply to emplacement drifts as well as host rock around emplacement drifts. For this calculation, the source of dust is conservatively assumed to be the host rock (Assumption 3.6), which is subject to long-term neutron exposure resulting in saturated radioactivity. The scope of this calculation is limited to releases from activated air and silica dust only, excluding natural radioactive releases such as radon or releases from defective waste packages (breached or contaminated). This work supports the repository ventilation system design and Preclosure Safety Analysis. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package (CRWMS M&O [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management and Operation Contractor] 1999a, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE [U.S. Department of Energy] 2003). The performance of the calculation and development of this document are carried out in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculation and Analyses'' and LP-3.30Q-BSC, ''Hazards Analysis System''.

  8. Glycoconjugates Influence Caspase Release and Minimize Production of Lactate Dehydrogenase upon Pathogen Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Many pathogens stimulate cell death of immune cells while promoting survival of pathogens. Early cell death is characterized by the release of mediators, namely Caspases (Cas). Infections caused by pathogens can be eradicated if immune cells could resist cell death and kill pathogens upon exposure. In this research, we studied whether glycoconjugates (GCs) influence Cas release and cytotoxicity upon pathogen damage. GC1 and GC3 constituted samples studied principally. Bacterial spores were used as a pathogen model. GC effects were determined "prior to," "during," and "following" pathogen exposure throughout phagocytosis. Cytotoxic damage was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) production. Our data show that GC3 was more effective than GC1 during phagocytosis. GC3 controls Cas release under all three exposure conditions. Minimum production of LDH was noticed in the "following" exposure condition compared to the "prior to" and "during" exposure conditions for GC1 and GC3. The present study provided the selection method of GC ligands bearing anti-cytotoxic and anti-apoptotic properties.

  9. Species production and heat release rates in two-layered natural gas fires

    SciTech Connect

    Zukoski, E.E.; Morehart, J.H.; Kubota, T.; Toner, S.J. )

    1991-02-01

    A fire burning in an enclosure with restricted ventilation will result in the accumulation of a layer of warm products of combustion mixed with entrained air adjacent to the ceiling. For many conditions, the depth of this layer will extend to occupy a significant fraction of the volume of the room. Eventually, the interface between this vitiated ceiling layer and the uncontaminated environment below will position itself so that a large portion of the combustion processes occur in this vitiated layer. A description is given of experimental work concerning the rates of formation of product species and heat release in a turbulent, buoyant natural gas diffusion flame burning in this two-layered configuration. The enclosure was modeled by placing a hood above a burner so that it accumulated the plume gases, and the unsteady development of the ceiling layer was modeled by the direct addition of air into the upper portion of the hood. Measurements of the composition of these gases allowed the computation of stoichiometries and heat release rates. These investigations showed that the species produced in the flame depend primarily on the stoichiometry of the gases present in the ceiling layer and weakly on the temperature of the layer, but are independent of the fuel pair ratio of the mass transported into the layer by the plume. Heat release rates in the fires were compared to a theoretical limit based on a stoichiometric reaction of fuel and air with excess components left unchanged by the combustion.

  10. The HST Frontier Fields: Science Data Pipeline, Products, and First Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Avila, R. J.; Hammer, D.; Mack, J.; Ogaz, S.; Anderson, J.; Barker, E. A.; Hilbert, B.; Gonzaga, S.; Grogin, N. A.; Fruchter, A. S.; Lotz, J.; Lucas, R. A.; Mountain, M.; Sokol, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first data release of the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program, a new Director's Discretionary program to carry out ultra-deep observations of six lensing clusters and parallel deep blank fields, probing the most distant galaxies currently observable. During the three-year program, each cluster is being observed for 140 orbits over two epochs, probing to 29th magnitude. We present here the first epoch of the cluster Abell 2744, observed to 70 orbits on the main cluster with WFC3/IR (in F105W, F125W, F140W and F160W) and on the parallel field with ACS (in F435W, F606W, F814W). We present the design of the pipeline for the data processing and calibration, including a new approach to ACS self-calibration. We discuss the various data products that we are distributing as high-level science products through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) at STScI, including distortion-corrected "drizzled" mosaics in all the filters, released throughout the course of the observations, as well as the final full-depth mosaics and related products. We deliver these high-level science products to the community on a rapid timescale to enable the widest scientific use of these data, as well as ensuring a public legacy dataset of the highest possible quality that is of lasting value to the entire community.

  11. Diacylglycerols Activate Mitochondrial Cationic Channel(s) and Release Sequestered Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Grigoriev, Sergey; Dejean, Laurent M.; Kinnally, Kathleen W.; Liu, Xibao; Ambudkar, Indu S.; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria contribute to cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis through several uptake and release pathways. Here we report that 1,2-sn-diacylglycerols (DAGs) induce Ca2+ release from Ca2+-loaded mammalian mitochondria. Release is not mediated by the uniporter or the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, nor is it attributed to putative catabolites. DAGs-induced Ca2+ efflux is biphasic. Initial release is rapid and transient, insensitive to permeability transition inhibitors, and not accompanied by mitochondrial swelling. Following initial rapid release of Ca2+ and relatively slowreuptake, a secondary progressive release of Ca2+ occurs, associated with swelling, and mitigated by permeability transition inhibitors. The initial peak of DAGs-induced Ca2+ efflux is abolished by La3+ (1mM) and potentiated by protein kinase C inhibitors. Phorbol esters, 1,3-diacylglycerols and 1-monoacylglycerols do not induce mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux. Ca2+-loaded mitoplasts devoid of outer mitochondrial membrane also exhibit DAGsinduced Ca2+ release, indicating that this mechanism resides at the inner mitochondrial membrane. Patch clamping brainmitoplasts reveal DAGs-induced slightly cation-selective channel activity that is insensitive to bongkrekic acid and abolished by La3+. The presence of a second messenger-sensitive Ca2+ release mechanism in mitochondria could have an important impact on intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:16167179

  12. Drosophila factor 2, an RNA polymerase II transcript release factor, has DNA-dependent ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z; Price, D

    1997-12-12

    Drosophila factor 2 has been identified as a component of negative transcription elongation factor (N-TEF) that causes the release of RNA polymerase II transcripts in an ATP-dependent manner (Xie, Z. and Price D. H. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 11043-11046). We show here that the transcript release activity of factor 2 requires ATP or dATP and that adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPgammaS), adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP), or other NTPs do not support the activity. Factor 2 demonstrated a strong DNA-dependent ATPase activity that correlated with its transcript release activity. At 20 microg/ml DNA, the ATPase activity of factor 2 had an apparent Km(ATP) of 28 microM and an estimated Kcat of 140 min-1. Factor 2 caused the release of nascent transcripts associated with elongation complexes generated by RNA polymerase II on a dC-tailed template. Therefore, no other protein cofactors are required for the transcript release activity of factor 2. Using the dC-tailed template assay, it was found that renaturation of the template was required for factor 2 function.

  13. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    Safety tests were conducted on fourteen fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800°C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during the safety tests, and the predicted values were compared with experimental results. Preliminary comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination (PIE) results of the safety tests show different trends in the prediction of the fractional release depending on the species, and it leads to different conclusions regarding the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles: • For silver, the diffusivity in silicon carbide (SiC) might be over-estimated by a factor of at least 102 to 103 at 1600°C and 1700°C, and at least 10 to 102 at 1800°C. The diffusivity of silver in uranium oxy-carbide (UCO) might also be over-estimated, but the available data are insufficient to allow definitive conclusions to be drawn. • For cesium, the diffusivity in UCO might be over-estimated by a factor of at least 102 to 103 at 1600°C, 105 at 1700°C, and 103 at 1800°C. The diffusivity of cesium in SiC might also over-estimated, by a factor of 10 at 1600°C and 103 at 1700°C, based upon the comparisons between calculated and measured release fractions from intact particles. There is no available estimate at 1800°C since all the compacts heated up at 1800°C contain particles with failed SiC layers whose release dominates the release from intact particles. • For strontium, the diffusivity in SiC might be over-estimated by a factor of 10 to 102 at 1600 and 1700°C, and 102 to 103 at 1800°C. These

  14. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-10-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2-C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2-C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2-C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment.

  15. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-10-05

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2-C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2-C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2-C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment.

  16. Activation and propagation of Ca(2+) release during excitation-contraction coupling in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kockskämper, J; Sheehan, K A; Bare, D J; Lipsius, S L; Mignery, G A; Blatter, L A

    2001-11-01

    Fast two-dimensional confocal microscopy and the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-4 were used to study excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in cat atrial myocytes which lack transverse tubules and contain both subsarcolemmal junctional (j-SR) and central nonjunctional (nj-SR) sarcoplasmic reticulum. Action potentials elicited by field stimulation induced transient increases of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) that were highly inhomogeneous. Increases started at distinct subsarcolemmal release sites spaced approximately 2 microm apart. The amplitude and the latency of Ca(2+) release from these sites varied from beat to beat. Subsarcolemmal release fused to build a peripheral ring of elevated [Ca(2+)](i), which actively propagated to the center of the cells via Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Resting myocytes exhibited spontaneous Ca(2+) release events, including Ca(2+) sparks and local (microscopic) or global (macroscopic) [Ca(2+)](i) waves. The microscopic [Ca(2+)](i) waves propagated in a saltatory fashion along the sarcolemma ("coupled" Ca(2+) sparks) revealing the sequential activation of Ca(2+) release sites of the j-SR. Moreover, during global [Ca(2+)](i) waves, Ca(2+) release was evident from individual nj-SR sites. Ca(2+) release sites were arranged in a regular three-dimensional grid as deduced from the functional data and shown by immunostaining of ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release channels. The longitudinal and transverse distances between individual Ca(2+) release sites were both approximately 2 microm. Furthermore, electron microscopy revealed a continuous sarcotubular network and one peripheral coupling of j-SR with the sarcolemma per sarcomere. The results demonstrate directly that, in cat atrial myocytes, the action potential-induced whole-cell [Ca(2+)](i) transient is the spatio-temporal summation of Ca(2+) release from subsarcolemmal and central sites. First, j-SR sites are activated in a stochastic fashion by the opening of voltage

  17. Aroma Precursors in Grapes and Wine: Flavor Release during Wine Production and Consumption.

    PubMed

    Parker, Mango; Capone, Dimitra L; Francis, I Leigh; Herderich, Markus J

    2017-03-08

    Pioneering investigations into precursors of fruity and floral flavors established the importance of terpenoid and C13-norisoprenoid glycosides to the flavor of aromatic wines. Nowadays flavor precursors in grapes and wine are known to be structurally diverse, encompassing glycosides, amino acid conjugates, odorless volatiles, hydroxycinnamic acids, and many others. Flavor precursors mainly originate in the grape berry but also from oak or other materials involved in winemaking. Flavors are released from precursors during crushing and subsequent production steps by enzymatic and nonenzymatic transformations, via microbial glycosidases, esterases, C-S lyases, and decarboxylases, and through acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and chemical rearrangements. Flavors can also be liberated from glycosides and amino acid conjugates by oral microbiota. Hence, it is increasingly likely that flavor precursors contribute to retronasal aroma formation through in-mouth release during consumption, prompting a shift in focus from identifying aroma precursors in grapes to understanding aroma precursors present in bottled wine.

  18. Radioactive Fission Product Release from Defective Light Water Reactor Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Konyashov, Vadim V.; Krasnov, Alexander M.

    2002-04-15

    Results are provided of the experimental investigation of radioactive fission product (RFP) release, i.e., krypton, xenon, and iodine radionuclides from fuel elements with initial defects during long-term (3 to 5 yr) irradiation under low linear power (5 to 12 kW/m) and during special experiments in the VK-50 vessel-type boiling water reactor.The calculation model for the RFP release from the fuel-to-cladding gap of the defective fuel element into coolant was developed. It takes into account the convective transport in the fuel-to-cladding gap and RFP sorption on the internal cladding surface and is in good agreement with the available experimental data. An approximate analytical solution of the transport equation is given. The calculation dependencies of the RFP release coefficients on the main parameters such as defect size, fuel-to-cladding gap, temperature of the internal cladding surface, and radioactive decay constant were analyzed.It is shown that the change of the RFP release from the fuel elements with the initial defects during long-term irradiation is, mainly, caused by fuel swelling followed by reduction of the fuel-to-cladding gap and the fuel temperature. The calculation model for the RFP release from defective fuel elements applicable to light water reactors (LWRs) was developed. It takes into account the change of the defective fuel element parameters during long-term irradiation. The calculation error according to the program does not exceed 30% over all the linear power change range of the LWR fuel elements (from 5 to 26 kW/m)

  19. Inhibitory effects of compounds from Phyllanthus amarus on nitric oxide production, lymphocyte proliferation, and cytokine release from phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yuandani; Jantan, Ibrahim; Ilangkovan, Menaga; Husain, Khairana; Chan, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Standardized extract of Phyllanthus amarus has previously been shown to have a strong inhibitory effect on phagocytic activity of human neutrophils. The current study was carried out to evaluate the effects of constituents of the extract of P. amarus on nitric oxide (NO) production as well as lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine release from phagocytes. Three compounds, ethyl 8-hydroxy-8-methyl-tridecanoate, 7β,19α dihydroxy-urs-12-ene, and 1,7,8-trihydroxy-2-naphtaldehyde, together with seven known compounds were isolated from the whole plant of P. amarus. The isolated compounds and reference standards, ie, gallic acid, ellagic acid, corilagin, and geraniin, which were quantitatively analyzed in the extracts, were evaluated for their effects on immune cells. Among the compounds tested, the lignans, especially phyltetralin and phyllanthin, showed strong inhibition on lymphocyte proliferation with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 1.07 μM and 1.82 μM, respectively. Ethyl 8-hydroxy-8-methyl-tridecanoate and 1,7,8-trihydroxy-2-naphtaldehyde exhibited strong inhibition on nitric oxide production with IC50 values of 0.91 μM and 1.07 μM, respectively. Of all the compounds, corilagin was the strongest inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-α release with an IC50 value of 7.39 μM, whereas geraniin depicted the strongest inhibitory activity on interleukin-1β release with an IC50 value of 16.41 μM. The compounds constituting the extract of P. amarus were able to inhibit the innate immune response of phagocytes at different steps. PMID:27354767

  20. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  1. Heat changes during transient tension responses to small releases in active frog muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, S H; Ford, L E

    1988-01-01

    Tension and heat production were measured in frog sartorius muscles in response to small shortening ramps (releases) at high and moderate speed. Transient tension responses to fast releases (0.1 to 0.4 mm in 1 or 4 ms) were similar to the tension transients length-clamped single fibers. Tension time courses during releases at 25 mm/s were like fiber responses calculated from the first two phases of the step responses (Ford et al., 1977). We conclude that similar crossbridge transitions produce tension transients observed in whole muscles and single fibers. Heat was absorbed during rapid tension recovery after fast releases and during the later part of releases at 25 mm/s. Variation of heat absorption with release size was compared with that of crossbridge movement predicted by the Huxley-Simmons hypothesis of force generation (Huxley and Simmons, 1971). Agreement between the two supports the conclusion that heat is absorbed by the crossbridge transitions responsible for rapid tension recovery after release. The results indicate that the entropy change of these transitions is positive. PMID:3265639

  2. Implementation of a Thermodynamic Solver within a Computer Program for Calculating Fission-Product Release Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Duncan Henry

    During some postulated accidents at nuclear power stations, fuel cooling may be impaired. In such cases, the fuel heats up and the subsequent increased fission-gas release from the fuel to the gap may result in fuel sheath failure. After fuel sheath failure, the barrier between the coolant and the fuel pellets is lost or impaired, gases and vapours from the fuel-to-sheath gap and other open voids in the fuel pellets can be vented. Gases and steam from the coolant can enter the broken fuel sheath and interact with the fuel pellet surfaces and the fission-product inclusion on the fuel surface (including material at the surface of the fuel matrix). The chemistry of this interaction is an important mechanism to model in order to assess fission-product releases from fuel. Starting in 1995, the computer program SOURCE 2.0 was developed by the Canadian nuclear industry to model fission-product release from fuel during such accidents. SOURCE 2.0 has employed an early thermochemical model of irradiated uranium dioxide fuel developed at the Royal Military College of Canada. To overcome the limitations of computers of that time, the implementation of the RMC model employed lookup tables to pre-calculated equilibrium conditions. In the intervening years, the RMC model has been improved, the power of computers has increased significantly, and thermodynamic subroutine libraries have become available. This thesis is the result of extensive work based on these three factors. A prototype computer program (referred to as SC11) has been developed that uses a thermodynamic subroutine library to calculate thermodynamic equilibria using Gibbs energy minimization. The Gibbs energy minimization requires the system temperature (T) and pressure (P), and the inventory of chemical elements (n) in the system. In order to calculate the inventory of chemical elements in the fuel, the list of nuclides and nuclear isomers modelled in SC11 had to be expanded from the list used by SOURCE 2.0. A

  3. Suppression of Active-Region CME Production by the Presence of Other Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser; Khazanov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    From the SOHO mission s data base of MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning solar cycle 23, we have obtained a set of 40,000 magnetograms of 1,300 active regions, tracking each active region across the 30 degree central solar disk. Each active region magnetogram is cropped from the full-disk magnetogram by an automated code. The cadence is 96 minutes. From each active-region magnetogram, we have measured two whole-active-region magnetic quantities: (1) the magnetic size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux), and (2) a gauge of the active region s free magnetic energy (part of the free energy is released in the production of a flare and/or CME eruption). From NOAA Flare/CME catalogs, we have obtained the event (Flare/CME/SEP event) production history of each active region. Using all these data, we find that for each type of eruptive event, an active region s expected rate of event production increases as a power law of our gauge of active-region free magnetic energy. We have also found that, among active regions having nearly the same free energy, the rate of the CME production is less when there are many other active regions on the disk than when there are few or none, but there is no significant discernible suppression of the rate of flare production. This indicates that the presence of other active regions somehow tends to inhibit an active region s flare-producing magnetic explosions from becoming CMEs, contrary to the expectation from the breakout model for the production of CMEs.

  4. [Hydro-colloidal dressings which release hydro-active silver].

    PubMed

    Serra, N; Torres, O G; Romo, M I; Llovera, J M; Vigil-Escalera, L J; Soto, M A; González-Parra, S

    2005-02-01

    The study presented is a multicentric, prospective, open and comparative study designed with the objective of evaluating the performance of an antibacterial hydrocolloid dressing with hydroactivated silver (Comfeel Plata), when used to activate the healing process in wounds with high bacterial load, clinical signs of infection or malodour. Additionally, once the wound bed was appropriately prepared, a comparison in terms of efficacy was made between, on the one hand, continued treatment with the antibacterial hydrocolloid dressing, and, on the other hand, continued treatment with other dressings specifically designed for the proliferative phase of healing. Included into this study were 43 patients with chronic ulcers who were divided into two parallel treatment groups: In one group, Comfeel Plata (Coloplast AIS) was used until complete wound healing or for a maximum of 10-12 weeks, and in the second group Comfeel Plata (Coloplast A/S) was used until a clean wound bed was obtained and until the wound showed signs of positive evolution, at which moment the treatment was continued until complete healing or for a maximum of 10-12 weeks with dressings without silver designed especially for the proliferative phase of healing [Alione, Comfeel or Biatain (Coloplast AIS)]. The results obtained from the various study parameters indicate that the use of Comfeel Plata in the treatment of infected or colonized wounds prepares the wound bed and facilitates more rapid healing, and that the use of Comfeel Plata effectively reduces pain and malodour. The results indicate that once a clean wound bed is obtained, the use of a dressing without silver specifically for the proliferative phase will facilitate healing.

  5. 75 FR 75573 - Standards Governing the Release of a Suspicious Activity Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ...). Although SARs fall within the definition of ``non-public OCC information,'' the release of a SAR is... activity related to money laundering, terrorist financing, or other criminal activity.\\6\\ SARs generally... longstanding commitment to protect the confidentiality of SARs, section 21.11(k) also provides that...

  6. Use of bentonite and activated carbon in controlled release formulations of carbofuran.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, M; Villafranca-Sánchez, M; Flores-Céspedes, F; Garrido-Herrera, F J; Pérez-García, S

    2005-08-24

    Controlled release systems (CRS), unlike the conventional formulations, facilitate a gradual and controlled discharge of the pesticides, reducing the losses by evaporation and leaching and minimizing pesticide pollution. In this study, carbofuran-an insecticide-nematicide identified as a groundwater pollutant-was incorporated in alginate-based granules to obtain controlled release properties. The effect on carbofuran release rate caused by the incorporation of bentonite, activated carbon, and different mixtures of both sorbents in alginate basic formulation was studied by immersion of the granules in water. The water uptake, sorption capacity of the sorbent, permeability, and time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, T(50), were calculated by the comparison of the preparations. T(50) values were higher for those formulations containing bentonite and/or activated carbon (T(50) values range from 14.76 h for the alginate formulation containing only bentonite as the sorbent to 29.5 weeks for the alginate formulation containing only activated carbon as the sorbent) than for the preparation without these sorbents (11.72 h). On the basis of a parameter of an empirical equation used to fit the insecticide-nematicide release data, it appears that the release of carbofuran from the various formulations into water is controlled by a diffusion mechanism. The sorption capacity of the sorbents for carbofuran was the most important factor modulating carbofuran release. In addition, it was observed that there is a linear correlation of the T(50) values and the content of activated carbon in dry granules.

  7. Mechanistic approach for nitride fuel evolution and fission product release under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgodvorov, A. P.; Ozrin, V. D.

    2017-01-01

    A model for describing uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuel pellet burning was developed. Except fission products generating, the model includes impurities of oxygen and carbon. Nitrogen behaviour in nitride fuel was analysed and the nitrogen chemical potential in solid solution with uranium-plutonium nitride was constructed. The chemical program module was tested with the help of thermodynamic equilibrium phase distribution calculation. Results were compared with analogous data in literature, quite good agreement was achieved, especially for uranium sesquinitride, metallic species and some oxides. Calculation of a process of nitride fuel burning was also conducted. Used mechanistic approaches for fission product evolution give the opportunity to find fission gas release fractions and also volumes of intergranular secondary phases. Calculations present that the most massive secondary phases are the oxide and metallic phases. Oxide phase contain approximately 1 % wt of substance over all time of burning with slightly increasing of content. Metallic phase has considerable rising of mass and by the last stage of burning it contains about 0.6 % wt of substance. Intermetallic phase has less increasing rate than metallic phase and include from 0.1 to 0.2 % wt over all time of burning. The highest element fractions of released gaseous fission products correspond to caesium and iodide.

  8. Influence of motor activities on the release of transmitter quanta from motor nerve terminals in mice.

    PubMed

    Taquahashi, Y; Yonezawa, K; Nishimura, M

    1999-05-01

    We investigated the effects of motor activities on transmitter release in mouse nerve-muscle preparations of the diaphragm muscle (DPH), extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL), and soleus muscle (SOL). Mice were divided into a control group, a motor-restricted (RST) group, and a motor-compelled (CMP) group. The quantal content (m) of endplate potentials was measured intracellularly. In DPH the motor activity was unaffected. In the CMP group the m value of the EDL group increased with increases in the cooperativity of Ca2+ in transmitter release. Compared with the CMP group, the SOL of the RST group had a smaller m value with increases in the cooperativity of Ca2+ in transmitter release. These results suggest that motor activities can influence neuromuscular activity specific to different systems, however, the motor compulsion specifically activated the function of EDL and the motor restriction activated the function of SOL, and these effects might lead to altered activity of the release of transmitter quanta in motor nerve terminals of mice.

  9. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Data Products, Quality, and Initial Public Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    As a spectroscopic imaging survey, MaNGA presents a host of technical challenges ranging from spectrophotometic calibration to image reconstruction. I will present an overview of the MaNGA data reduction pipeline (DRP) and the algorithms used to process the MaNGA data. Additionally, I will describe the format and quality of the MaNGA data products, and the means by which the first year of survey data will be made publicly available in SDSS Data Release 13 (DR-13).

  10. Activity-dependent modulation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurone activity by acute oestradiol.

    PubMed

    Romanò, Nicola; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-10-01

    Oestradiol (E₂) exerts potent feedback actions upon gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones and part of this feedback action may occur through the rapid action of E₂. Using a transgenic GnRH-Pericam mouse line that allows real-time intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca²⁺](i)) to be monitored in adult GnRH neurones in a brain slice preparation, we examined the acute effects of 100 pM-100 nM E₂ on [Ca²⁺](i) transients in spontaneously active GnRH neurones. Approximately 30% of GnRH neurones exhibit spontaneous [Ca²⁺](i) transients at a frequency greater than two transients/15 min in adult female mice. In these cells, treatment with an incremental 1, 10, 100 nM E₂ protocol or 100 pM E₂ alone resulted in the suppression or complete cessation of [Ca²⁺](i) transients in 15 of 18 (83%) GnRH neurones. This effect was mimicked by E₂ bound to albumin, suggesting a membrane site of action, and was maintained in oestrogen receptor β knockout mice, indicating that this receptor is not essential for the rapid suppression of [Ca²⁺](i) transients. These findings contrast with those GnRH neurones exhibiting very few or no [Ca²⁺](i) transients (< 2 transients/15 min) that exhibit the opposite response of being activated by acute E₂. A series of dual calcium-cell-attached electrical recordings showed that [Ca²⁺](i) transients were associated with GnRH neurone burst firing and that E₂ suppression or activation of [Ca²⁺](i) transients was mirrored by a depression or initiation of burst firing. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the acute actions of E₂ on GnRH neurones are critically dependent upon their pattern of burst firing.

  11. Shockwaves induce osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells through ATP release and activation of P2X7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dahui; Junger, Wolfgang G; Yuan, Changji; Zhang, Wenyan; Bao, Yi; Qin, Daming; Wang, Chengxue; Tan, Lei; Qi, Baochang; Zhu, Dong; Zhang, Xizheng; Yu, Tiecheng

    2013-06-01

    Shockwave treatment promotes bone healing of nonunion fractures. In this study, we investigated whether this effect could be due to adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) release-induced differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into osteoprogenitor cells. Cultured bone marrow-derived hMSCs were subjected to shockwave treatment and ATP release was assessed. Osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of hMSCs were evaluated by examining alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin production, and calcium nodule formation. Expression of P2X7 receptors and c-fos and c-jun mRNA was determined with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. P2X7-siRNA, apyrase, P2 receptor antagonists, and p38 MAPK inhibitors were used to evaluate the roles of ATP release, P2X7 receptors, and p38 MAPK signaling in shockwave-induced osteogenic hMSCs differentiation. Shockwave treatment released significant amounts (≈ 7 μM) of ATP from hMSCs. Shockwaves and exogenous ATP induced c-fos and c-jun mRNA transcription, p38 MAPK activation, and hMSC differentiation. Removal of ATP with apyrase, targeting of P2X7 receptors with P2X7-siRNA or selective antagonists, or blockade of p38 MAPK with SB203580 prevented osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Our findings indicate that shockwaves release cellular ATP that activates P2X7 receptors and downstream signaling events that caused osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. We conclude that shockwave therapy promotes bone healing through P2X7 receptor signaling, which contributes to hMSC differentiation.

  12. Spray-dried powders improve the controlled release of antifungal tioconazole-loaded polymeric nanocapsules compared to with lyophilized products.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Roseane Fagundes; Motta, Mariana Heldt; Härter, Andréia Pisching Garcia; Flores, Fernanda Cramer; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver; Schaffazick, Scheila Rezende; de Bona da Silva, Cristiane

    2016-02-01

    This work aimed to obtain solid formulations from polymeric nanocapsules and nanoemulsions containing tioconazole, a broad spectrum antifungal drug. Two dehydration methods were used: spray-drying and freeze drying, using lactose as adjuvant (10%, w/v). The liquid formulations had a mean particle size around 206 nm and 182 nm for nanocapsules and nanoemulsions, respectively, and an adequate polydispersity index. Tioconazole content was close to the theoretical amount (1.0 mg/mL). After drying, the content ranged between 98 and 102%with a mean nanometric size of the dried products after redispersion. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the particles are rounded, sphere-shaped for the dried products obtained by spray-drying, and shapeless and irregular shapes for those obtained by freeze-drying. In the microbiological evaluation, all dried products remained active against the yeast Candida albicans when compared to the original systems. The dried products obtained by spray-drying from nanocapsules presented better control of the tioconazole release when compared to the freeze-drying products.

  13. Comparative occupational exposures to formaldehyde released from inhaled wood product dusts versus that in vapor form.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nathalie H; Brunet, Robert C; Carrier, Gaétan

    2003-05-01

    Particle boards and other wood boards are usually made with formaldehyde-based resins. Woodworkers are thus exposed to formaldehyde in vapor form as well as from airborne dust once it enters their respiratory tract. These workers remain exposed to formaldehyde released from the dust still present in their upper respiratory tract, even after their work shift. In assessing the risk associated with formaldehyde exposure, one needs to consider the relative importance of these two sources of exposure. This study proposes two kinetic models to estimate and compare the exposures. For various exposure scenarios, one model predicts the amount of formaldehyde absorbed from the ambient vapor form and the other predicts the amount absorbed by the respiratory tract upon its release from wood product dust. Model parameters are determined using data from published studies. Based on a daily work shift of 8 hr, with a dust concentration in air of 5 mg/m(3) and a formaldehyde concentration bound to dust of 9 microg/mg, model simulations predict that the amount of absorbed formaldehyde released from wood dust is approximately 1/100 of the amount absorbed from the ambient vapor form at a concentration level of 0.38 mg/m(3) (0.3 ppm). Since the formaldehyde concentration in wood dust used above is much higher than usually observed while the dust and vapor form formaldehyde concentrations are of the order of acceptable upper values, these results indicate that the formaldehyde exposure from wood dust is comparatively negligible.

  14. Production and Release of Selenomethionine and Related Organic Selenium Species by Microorganisms in Natural and Industrial Waters.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Kelly L; Wallschläger, Dirk

    2016-06-21

    Laboratory algal cultures exposed to selenate were shown to produce and release selenomethionine, selenomethionine oxide, and several other organic selenium metabolites. Released discrete organic selenium species accounted for 1.6-13.1% of the selenium remaining in the media after culture death, with 1.3-6.1% of the added selenate recovered as organic metabolites. Analysis of water from an industrially impacted river collected immediately after the death of massive annual algal blooms showed that no selenomethionine or selenomethionine oxide was present. However, other discrete organic selenium species, including a cyclic oxidation product of selenomethionine, were observed, indicating the previous presence of selenomethionine. Industrial biological treatment systems designed for remediation of selenium-contaminated waters were shown to increase both the concentration of organic selenium species in the effluent, relative to influent water, and the fraction of organic selenium to up to 8.7% of the total selenium in the effluent, from less than 1.1% in the influent. Production and emission of selenomethionine, selenomethionine oxide, and other discrete organic selenium species were observed. These findings are discussed in the context of potentially increased selenium bioavailability caused by microbial activity in aquatic environments and biological treatment systems, despite overall reductions in total selenium concentration.

  15. Developmental changes in hypothalamic Kiss1 expression during activation of the pulsatile release of luteinising hormone in maturing ewe lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onset of puberty is characterized by a marked increase in the frequency of release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The KISS1 gene plays a critical role in pubertal development and its product, kisspeptin, stimulates GnRH and LH release. In the study reported h...

  16. Release and Skin Permeation of Scopolamine From Thin Polymer Films in Relation to Thermodynamic Activity.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Anders; Lee, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    The object was to demonstrate if the diffusional flux of the drug out of a drug-in-adhesive-type matrix and its subsequent permeation through an excised skin membrane is a linear function of the drug's thermodynamic activity in the thin polymer film. The thermodynamic activity, ap(*), is defined here as the degree of saturation of the drug in the polymer. Both release and release/permeation of scopolamine base from 3 different poylacrylate pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) were measured. The values for ap(*) were calculated using previous published saturation solubilities, wp(s), of the drug in the PSAs. Different rates of release and release/permeation were determined between the 3 PSAs. These differences could be accounted for quantitatively by correlating with ap(*) rather than the concentration of the drug in the polymer films. At similar values for ap(*) the same release or release/permeation rates from the different polymers were measured. The differences could not be related to cross-linking or presence of ionizable groups of the polymers that should influence diffusivity.

  17. Zinc polycarboxylate dental cement for the controlled release of an active organic substance: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Naseem; Edwards, Mark; Nicholson, John W

    2010-04-01

    The potential of employing zinc polycarboxylate dental cement as a controlled release material has been studied. Benzalkonium chloride was used as the active ingredient, and incorporated at concentrations of 1, 2 and 3% by mass within the cement. At these levels, there was no observable effect on the speed of setting. Release was followed using an ion-selective electrode to determine changes in chloride ion concentration with time. This technique showed that the additive was released when the cured cement was placed in water, with release occurring by a diffusion mechanism for the first 3 h, but continuing beyond that for up to 1 week. Diffusion coefficients were in the range 5.62 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 1% concentration) to 10.90 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 3% concentration). Up to 3% of the total loading of benzalkonium chloride was released from the zinc polycarboxylate after a week, which is similar to that found in previous studies with glass-ionomer cement. It is concluded that zinc polycarboxylate cement is capable of acting as a useful material for the controlled release of active organic compounds.

  18. Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and Xe-133 data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of Xe-133 from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8×1014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 1.2×1016 to 2.5×1016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 6.1×1013 to 3.6×1014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases.

  19. Enhancement of RNA Polymerase Activity by a Factor Released by Auxin from Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, James W.; Cherry, Joe H.; Morré, D. James; Lembi, Carole A.

    1972-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques for solubilization of RNA polymerase from soybean chromatin and isolation of plasma membrane fractions from plants we can show the presence of a transcriptional factor specifically released from the membranes by auxin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The nonauxin, 3,5-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, does not release the factor, but subsequent exposure of the membranes to auxin results in its release. Factor activity could not be demonstrated in fractions devoid of plasma membranes. The presence of a regulatory factor for RNA polymerase associated with plant plasma membrane and specifically released by auxin provides a mechanism whereby both rapid growth responses and delayed nuclear changes could be derived from a common auxin receptor site associated with plasma membrane. Images PMID:4508307

  20. Greenhouse production of Impatiens wallerana using a controlled-release fertiliser produces quality finished plants with enhanced garden performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management during production can greatly influence post-production quality of plants. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of controlled release fertilizer (CRF) applied at the time of plug planting on the garden performance (post-production) of impatiens (Impatiens wal...

  1. 27 CFR 41.85 - Release from customs custody of imported tobacco products or cigarette papers or tubes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... custody of imported tobacco products or cigarette papers or tubes. 41.85 Section 41.85 Alcohol, Tobacco...) TOBACCO IMPORTATION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, Imported Into or Returned to the United States Release...

  2. Effects of environmental factors on the molluscicidal activities of slow-release hexabutyldistannoxane and copper sulfate*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, K. Y.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the molluscicidal activities of slow-release hexabutyldistannoxane (TBTO) and copper sulfate under various environmental conditions. Organic materials such as mud and weeds reduced the molluscicidal efficacy of both chemicals. TBTO can be considered a good long-lasting molluscicide but, because of uncertainty as to its general toxic effects, it should not be used in field trials. The molluscicidal activity of slow-release copper sulfate was short-lived in plain lake water and was nil in the presence of mud or weeds at the concentration used. PMID:1088355

  3. Release and Activity of Bound beta-Amylase in a Germinating Barley Grain.

    PubMed

    Sopanen, T; Laurière, C

    1989-01-01

    In resting grains of Triumph barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Triumph) about 40% of the beta-amylase could be extracted with a saline solution, the remaining 60% being in a bound form. During seedling growth (20 degrees C), the bound form was released mainly between days 1 and 3. When a preparation containing bound beta-amylase was incubated with an extract made of endosperms separated from germinating grains, release of bound beta-amylase took place and could be studied in vitro. The release was almost completely prevented by leupeptin and antipain, specific inhibitors of a group of SH-proteinases, but it was not inhibited by pepstatin A or EDTA, which inhibit some other barley proteinases. It is thus very likely that in a whole grain, at least the bulk of the bound beta-amylase is released by the proteolytic action of one or several SH-proteinases. When the bound beta-amylase was released by papain, its molecular weight was about 5000 daltons smaller than that of beta-amylase released by dithiothreitol. This indicates that the release is due to removal of a sequence of beta-amylase itself. A similar decrease in size took place during seedling growth. Bound beta-amylase showed some activity against native starch and it hydrolyzed maltotetraose at a rate that was about 70% of the rate the same amount of bound beta-amylase gave after release. Bound beta-amylase is thus not inactive and it is likely that the slower rate of hydrolysis is due to steric hindrances which prevent substrates from reaching the active site.

  4. Overview of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center's Urban Research and Development Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Sugiyama, G.; Nasstrom, J.

    2007-12-01

    Administration (NOAA), U.S. Navy, and U.S. Air Force, as well as an in-house mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. NARAC provides an easy-to-use Geographical Information System (GIS) for display of plume predictions with affected population counts and detailed maps, and the ability to export plume predictions to other standard GIS capabilities. Data collection and product distribution is provided through a variety of communication methods, including dial-up, satellite, and wired and wireless networks. Ongoing research and development activities will be highlighted. The NARAC scientific support team is developing urban parameterizations for use in a regional dispersion model (see companion paper by Delle Monache). Modifications to the numerical weather prediction model WRF to account for characteristics of urban dynamics are also in progress, as is boundary-layer turbulence model development for simulations with resolutions greater than 1km. The NARAC building-resolving computational fluid dynamics capability, FEM3MP, enjoys ongoing development activities such as the expansion of its ability to model releases of dense gases. Other research activities include sensor-data fusion, such as the reconstruction of unknown source terms from sparse and disparate observations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. The Department of Homeland Security sponsored the production of this material under the Department of Energy contract for the management and operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. UCRL-PROC-234355

  5. Suomi NPP VIIRS active fire product status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellicott, E. A.; Csiszar, I. A.; Schroeder, W.; Giglio, L.; Wind, B.; Justice, C. O.

    2012-12-01

    We provide an overview of the evaluation and development of the Active Fires product derived from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite during the first year of on-orbit data. Results from the initial evaluation of the standard SNPP Active Fires product, generated by the SNPP Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), supported the stabilization of the VIIRS Sensor Data Record (SDR) product. This activity focused in particular on the processing of the dual-gain 4 micron VIIRS M13 radiometric measurements into 750m aggregated data, which are fundamental for active fire detection. Following the VIIRS SDR product's Beta maturity status in April 2012, correlative analysis between VIIRS and near-simultaneous fire detections from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Earth Observing System Aqua satellite confirmed the expected relative detection rates driven primarily by sensor differences. The VIIRS Active Fires Product Development and Validation Team also developed a science code that is based on the latest MODIS Collection 6 algorithm and provides a full spatially explicit fire mask to replace the sparse array output of fire locations from a MODIS Collection 4 equivalent algorithm in the current IDPS product. The Algorithm Development Library (ADL) was used to support the planning for the transition of the science code into IDPS operations in the future. Product evaluation and user outreach was facilitated by a product website that provided end user access to fire data in user-friendly format over North America as well as examples of VIIRS-MODIS comparisons. The VIIRS fire team also developed an experimental product based on 375m VIIRS Imagery band measurements and provided high quality imagery of major fire events in US. By August 2012 the IDPS product achieved Beta maturity, with some known and documented shortfalls related to the processing of

  6. Mitochondrial DNA is released by shock and activates neutrophils via p38 map kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Hauser, Carl J

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial DNA (bDNA) can activate an innate-immune stimulatory "danger" response via toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is unique among endogenous molecules in that mitochondria evolved from prokaryotic ancestors. Thus, mtDNA retains molecular motifs similar to bDNA. It is unknown, however, whether mtDNA is released by shock or is capable of eliciting immune responses like bDNA. We hypothesized shock-injured tissues might release mtDNA and that mtDNA might act as a danger-associated molecular pattern (or "alarmin") that can activate neutrophils (PMNs) and contribute to systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Standardized trauma/hemorrhagic shock caused circulation of mtDNA as well as nuclear DNA. Human PMNs were incubated in vitro with purified mtDNA or nuclear DNA, with or without pretreatment by chloroquine (an inhibitor of endosomal receptors like TLR9). Neutrophil activation was assessed as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 8 and MMP-9 release as well as p38 and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Mitochondrial DNA induced PMN MMP-8/MMP-9 release and p38 phosphorylation but did not activate p44/42. Responses were inhibited by chloroquine. Nuclear DNA did not induce PMN activation. Intravenous injection of disrupted mitochondria (mitochondrial debris) into rats induced p38 MAPK activation and IL-6 and TNF-alpha accumulation in the liver. In summary, mtDNA is released into the circulation by shock. Mitochondrial DNA activates PMN p38 MAPK, probably via TLR9, inducing an inflammatory phenotype. Mitochondrial DNA may act as a danger-associated molecular pattern or alarmin after shock, contributing to the initiation of systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

  7. Effect of a controlled-release albendazole capsule on parasitism and productivity of sheep.

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Krupicer, I; Legény, J; Juris, P; Veselý, L

    1991-11-01

    The efficacy of intraruminal albendazole (ABZ) capsules (Profitril-Captec) and the effect of treatment on productivity were studied in 300 ewes infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and the trematode Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Coprological tests revealed that treated animals remained negative for 10 weeks after the administration of capsules. Contamination of pasture with nematode larvae was significantly reduced during the whole experiment. Necropsy of 14 animals (seven treated and seven untreated) showed 96.9-99.2% efficacy against the nematodes Nematodirus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp. and Trichuris ovis, while efficacy was 88.5% against D. dendriticum. During the 6 month pasture season (May-October 1989), treated ewes produced on average 2.56 kg cheese and 0.6 kg wool per ewe more than untreated controls. Our study confirms the reliability of the ABZ slow-release capsules over 90 days and the positive effect of treatment on nematode contamination of pasture and ewe productivity.

  8. Price to be paid for two-metal catalysis: magnesium ions that accelerate chemistry unavoidably limit product release from a protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Douglas M; Bao, Zhao-Qin; O'Brien, Patrick; Brooks, Charles L; Young, Matthew A

    2012-09-19

    Incorporation of divalent metal ions into an active site is a fundamental catalytic tool used by diverse enzymes. Divalent cations are used by protein kinases to both stabilize ATP binding and accelerate chemistry. Kinetic analysis establishes that Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) requires simultaneous binding of two Mg(2+) ions for catalysis of phosphoryl transfer. This tool, however, comes with a price: the rate-acceleration effects are opposed by an unavoidable rate-limiting consequence of the use of two Mg(2+) ions by CDK2. The essential metal ions stabilize ADP product binding and limit the overall rate of the reaction. We demonstrate that product release is rate limiting for activated CDK2 and evaluate the effects of the two catalytically essential Mg(2+) ions on the stability of the ADP product within the active site. We present two new crystal structures of CDK2 bound to ADP showing how the phosphate groups can be coordinated by either one or two Mg(2+) ions, with the occupancy of one site in a weaker equilibrium. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that ADP phosphate mobility is more restricted when ADP is coordinated by two Mg(2+) ions compared to one. The structural similarity between the rigid ADP·2Mg product and the cooperatively assembled transition state provides a mechanistic rational for the rate-limiting ADP release that is observed. We demonstrate that although the simultaneous binding of two Mg(2+) ions is essential for efficient phosphoryl transfer, the presence of both Mg(2+) ions in the active site also cooperatively increases ADP affinity and opposes its release. Evolution of protein kinases must have involved careful tuning of the affinity for the second Mg(2+) ion in order to balance the needs to stabilize the chemical transition state and allow timely product release. The link between Mg(2+) site affinity and activity presents a chemical handle that may be used by regulatory factors as well as explain some mutational effects.

  9. Release of VOCs and particles during use of nanofilm spray products.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Asger W; Jensen, Keld A; Janfelt, Christian; Lauritsen, Frants R; Clausen, Per A; Wolkoff, Peder

    2009-10-15

    Here, we present emission data on VOCs and particles emitted during simulated use of four commercial nanofilm spray products (NFPs) used for making easy-to-clean or self-cleaning surfaces on floors, ceramic tiles, and windows. The aim was to characterize the emitted VOCs and to provide specific source strength data for VOCs and particles released to the airduring use of the products. Containers with NFP were mounted on a spray-stand inside a closed stainless steel chamber with no air exchange. NFPs were sprayed in amounts corresponding to 1 m2 surface toward a target plate at a distance of 35 cm. Released VOCs were measured by a combination of air sampling on Tenax TA adsorbent followed by thermal desorption GC/MS and GC/FID analysis and real time measurements using a miniature membrane inlet mass spectrometer. Particles were measured using a fast mobility particle sizer and an aerosol particle sizer. A number of VOCs were identified, including small alcohols, ketones and ethers, chlorinated acetones, a perfluorinated silane, limonene, and cyclic siloxanes. The number of generated particles was on the order of 3 x 10(8) to 2 x 10(10) particles/m3 per g sprayed NFP and were dominated by nanosize particles.

  10. Anhydrous ammonia thefts and releases associated with illicit methamphetamine production--16 states, January 2000-June 2004.

    PubMed

    2005-04-15

    Anhydrous ammonia, a colorless gas with a pungent, suffocating fumes, is used primarily as an agricultural fertilizer and industrial refrigerant. Anhydrous ammonia is also a key ingredient for illicit methamphetamine (meth) production in makeshift laboratories. Exposure to anhydrous ammonia can be immediately dangerous to life or health. Anhydrous ammonia generally is not available for sale to the public; states require a license for purchase. Because of this, many illicit meth producers (i.e., "cookers") resort to stealing anhydrous ammonia. If released into the environment, anhydrous ammonia can cause acute injuries to emergency responders, the public, and the cookers themselves. In addition, when handled improperly, anhydrous ammonia can be explosive and deadly. This report describes examples of anhydrous ammonia thefts associated with illicit meth production, summarizes ammonia theft events reported to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and suggests injury prevention recommendations, such as installing valve locks or fencing on unattended tanks and donning appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when responding to releases.

  11. Fission product release and survivability of UN-kernel LWR TRISO fuel

    SciTech Connect

    T. M. Besmann; M. K. Ferber; H.-T. Lin; B. P. Collin

    2014-05-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from fission product recoil calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 um diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated within a TRISO particle undergoing burnup. Creep and swelling of the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by computing the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers from internal pressure and thermomechanics of the layers. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.

  12. CRH stimulates POMC activity and corticosterone production in dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Zbytek, Blazej; Semak, Igor; Sweatman, Trevor; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2005-05-01

    It has been previously documented that human skin cells including epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts produce and process proopiomelanocortin (POMC), corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), and express functional CRH receptors type-1 (CRH-R1). The skin also has corticosteroidogenic activity, suggesting a functional connection between these elements. In the current study, we found that human dermal fibroblasts (but not normal epidermal keratinocytes) respond to CRH with stimulation of cAMP, with POMC gene and protein expression, and ACTH production and release. Furthermore, CRH and ACTH stimulate production of corticosterone in fibroblasts, with ACTH being more potent. Although cortisol-immunoreactivity accumulation/production in fibroblasts has been detected by ELISA, it appears to be constitutive (not affected by CRH or ACTH). These effects are absent in keratinocytes. Therefore, we propose that fibroblasts but not keratinocytes display a functional CRH-POMC-corticosteroid axis organized similarly to the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, it diverges from the HPA organization in its distal step, where CRH and ACTH stimulate production of corticosterone, instead of cortisol.

  13. Implementation of a new gamma spectrometer on the MERARG loop: Application to the volatile fission products release measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, S.; Gleizes, B.; Pontillon, Y.; Hanus, E.; Ducros, G.; Roure, C.

    2015-07-01

    The MERARG facility initially aims at the annealing of irradiated fuel samples to study the gaseous fission products release kinetics. In order to complete the evaluation of the source term potentially released during accidental situation, the MERARG experimental circuit has been enhanced with a new gamma spectrometer. This one is directly sighting the fuel and is devoted to the fission products release kinetics. Because of the specificities of the fuel measurements, it has been dimensioned and designed to match the specific requirements. The acquisition chain and the collimation system have been optimized for this purpose and a first set of two experiments have shown the good functioning of this new spectrometry facility. (authors)

  14. Activity-dependent, homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release from auditory nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ngodup, Tenzin; Goetz, Jack A.; McGuire, Brian C.; Sun, Wei; Lauer, Amanda M.; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Information processing in the brain requires reliable synaptic transmission. High reliability at specialized auditory nerve synapses in the cochlear nucleus results from many release sites (N), high probability of neurotransmitter release (Pr), and large quantal size (Q). However, high Pr also causes auditory nerve synapses to depress strongly when activated at normal rates for a prolonged period, which reduces fidelity. We studied how synapses are influenced by prolonged activity by exposing mice to constant, nondamaging noise and found that auditory nerve synapses changed to facilitating, reflecting low Pr. For mice returned to quiet, synapses recovered to normal depression, suggesting that these changes are a homeostatic response to activity. Two additional properties, Q and average excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitude, were unaffected by noise rearing, suggesting that the number of release sites (N) must increase to compensate for decreased Pr. These changes in N and Pr were confirmed physiologically using the integration method. Furthermore, consistent with increased N, endbulbs in noise-reared animals had larger VGlut1-positive puncta, larger profiles in electron micrographs, and more release sites per profile. In current-clamp recordings, noise-reared BCs had greater spike fidelity even during high rates of synaptic activity. Thus, auditory nerve synapses regulate excitability through an activity-dependent, homeostatic mechanism, which could have major effects on all downstream processing. Our results also suggest that noise-exposed bushy cells would remain hyperexcitable for a period after returning to normal quiet conditions, which could have perceptual consequences. PMID:25944933

  15. The immunoregulator soluble TACI is released by ADAM10 and reflects B-cell activation in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Franziska S.; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Laurent, Sarah A.; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Berer, Kerstin; Wendlinger, Simone A.; Krumbholz, Markus; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Dreyling, Martin; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Alexander, Tobias; Hiepe, Falk; Kümpfel, Tania; Crawford, Howard C.; Wekerle, Hartmut; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Meinl, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    BAFF and APRIL, which control B-cell homeostasis, are therapeutic targets in autoimmune diseases. TACI-Fc (atacicept), a soluble fusion protein containing the extracellular domain of the BAFF-APRIL-receptor TACI, was applied in clinical trials. However disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) unexpectedly increased, whereas in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) atacicept was beneficial. Here, we show that an endogenous soluble form of TACI exists in vivo. TACI proteolysis involved shedding by ADAM10 releasing sTACI from activated B cells. The membrane-bound stub was subsequently cleaved by γ-secretase reducing ligand-independent signaling of the remaining C-terminal fragment. The shed ectodomain assembled ligand-independently in a homotypic way. It functioned as a decoy receptor inhibiting BAFF- and APRIL-mediated B-cell survival and NFκB-activation. We determined sTACI levels in autoimmune diseases with established hyper-activation of the BAFF-APRIL system. sTACI levels were elevated both in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the brain-restricted autoimmune disease MS correlating with intrathecal IgG production, as well as in the serum of the systemic autoimmune disease SLE correlating with disease activity. Together, we show that TACI is sequentially processed by ADAM10 and γ-secretase. The released sTACI is an immunoregulator that shares decoy functions with atacicept. Itreflectssystemic and compartmentalized B-cell accumulation and activation. PMID:25505277

  16. Stimulation of phrenic nerve activity by an acetylcholine releasing drug: 4-aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Folgering, H; Rutten, J; Agoston, S

    1979-03-16

    The effect of the acetylcholine releaser 4-aminopyridine on ventilation was studied by recording and quantifying the efferent phrenic nerve activity in 40 paralysed and vagotomized cats; with arterial Po2, PCO2 and pH kept constant. 4-Aminopyridine, given intravenously or in the vertebral artery, stimulates the phrenic nerve activity in a dose dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of 4-aminopyridine on the phrenic nerve activity could be abolished completely by administration of high doses of atropine. We conclude that 4-aminopyridine, which is used clinically for the reversal of a neuromuscular block, stimulates the phrenic nerve activity. Since the role of cholinergic mechanisms in the central chemoreception has been well established, the effect on the phrenic nerve activity is most probably by an increased release of acetylcholine at the site of the central chemoreceptors.

  17. Controlling the release of active compounds from the inorganic carrier halloysite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tescione, F.; Buonocore, G. G.; Stanzione, M.; Oliviero, M.; Lavorgna, M.

    2014-05-01

    Halloysite (HNTs), a natural material characterized by a nanotube structure, has been used as an inorganic carrier of active compounds in several applications from medicine to anticorrosion coatings. In this present work, vanillin (VAN) used as a antimicrobial model, has been encapsulated within HNTs for exploiting its applicability in the active food packaging sector. The molecule release rate has been controlled by crosslinking at the tube ends the loaded vanillin with copper ions, thus producing a stopper network. The vanillin-loaded HNTs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The antimicrobial release kinetics from the loaded nanoparticles (VAN/HNTs) in water was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the vanillin crosslinked with cupper ions is a feasible method to tailor the release rate of antimicrobial model from HTNs nanoparticles.

  18. Controlling the release of active compounds from the inorganic carrier halloysite

    SciTech Connect

    Tescione, F.; Buonocore, G. G.; Stanzione, M.; Oliviero, M.; Lavorgna, M.

    2014-05-15

    Halloysite (HNTs), a natural material characterized by a nanotube structure, has been used as an inorganic carrier of active compounds in several applications from medicine to anticorrosion coatings. In this present work, vanillin (VAN) used as a antimicrobial model, has been encapsulated within HNTs for exploiting its applicability in the active food packaging sector. The molecule release rate has been controlled by crosslinking at the tube ends the loaded vanillin with copper ions, thus producing a stopper network. The vanillin-loaded HNTs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The antimicrobial release kinetics from the loaded nanoparticles (VAN/HNTs) in water was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the vanillin crosslinked with cupper ions is a feasible method to tailor the release rate of antimicrobial model from HTNs nanoparticles.

  19. Controlled release and antibacterial activity of tetracycline hydrochloride-loaded bacterial cellulose composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shuxia; Wu, Jimin; Huang, Min; Min, Huihua; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-07-10

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is widely used in biomedical applications. In this study, we prepared an antibiotic drug tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH)-loaded bacterial cellulose (BC) composite membranes, and evaluated the drug release, antibacterial activity and biocompatibility. The structure and morphology of the fabricated BC-TCH composite membranes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The TCH release results show that the incorporation of BC matrix to load TCH is able to control the release. In vitro antibacterial assay demonstrate that the developed BC-TCH composites displayed excellent antibacterial activity solely associated with the loaded TCH drug. More importantly, the BC-TCH composite membranes display good biocompatibility. These characteristics of BC-TCH composite membranes indicate that they may successfully serve as wound dressings and other medical biomaterials.

  20. Cell-Demanded VEGF Release via Nanocapsules Elicits Different Receptor Activation Dynamics and Enhanced Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Suwei; Segura, Tatiana

    2016-06-01

    Although the delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with extended release profiles has consistently shown beneficial therapeutic effects compared with bolus delivery, [Martino, M. M., F. Tortelli, M. Mochizuki, S. Traub, D. Ben-David, G. A. Kuhn, R. Muller, E. Livne, S. A. Eming, and J. A. Hubbell. Sci. Transl. Med. 3(100):100ra189, 2011; Martino, M. M., P. S. Briquez, A. Ranga, M. P. Lutolf, and J. A. Hubbell. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 110(12):4563-4568, 2013; Amiram, M., K. M. Luginbuhl, X. Li, M. N. Feinglos, and A. Chilkoti. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 110(8):2792-2797, 2013] it remains unclear if the reason is solely due to the physical availability and the reduced degradation of the protein. Here we studied the activation of VEGF receptor 2 (VR-2) by sustained released VEGF compared with bolus delivered VEGF to unveil that sustained delivery system alters the dynamics of receptor activation and affects the actions of cells between sprouting and proliferation. We utilized a protein nanocapsule delivery strategy that releases VEGF as mediated by extracellular proteases. These protein nanocapsules were synthesized through an aqueous assembly of a nanogel-peptide shell around the protein, leading to one to two proteins encapsulated per nanocapsule. Receptor activation studies revealed differential dynamics of receptor activation for slowly released VEGF compared with bolus delivered VEGF. As expected sustained released VEGF via nanocapsules resulted in enhanced vascular sprouting in vitro and in vivo. These studies demonstrate the physical presentation of VEGF, in this case of a slow release with time, can affect its molecular mechanism of actions and cause alterations in cellular responses and therapeutic outcomes.

  1. Activation of glutamate transport evokes rapid glutamine release from perisynaptic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Uwechue, Nneka M; Marx, Mari-Carmen; Chevy, Quentin; Billups, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of astrocytes by neuronal activity and the subsequent release of neuromodulators is thought to be an important regulator of synaptic communication. In this study we show that astrocytes juxtaposed to the glutamatergic calyx of Held synapse in the rat medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) are stimulated by the activation of glutamate transporters and consequently release glutamine on a very rapid timescale. MNTB principal neurones express electrogenic system A glutamine transporters, and were exploited as glutamine sensors in this study. By simultaneous whole-cell voltage clamping astrocytes and neighbouring MNTB neurones in brainstem slices, we show that application of the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) substrate d-aspartate stimulates astrocytes to rapidly release glutamine, which is detected by nearby MNTB neurones. This release is significantly reduced by the toxins l-methionine sulfoximine and fluoroacetate, which reduce glutamine concentrations specifically in glial cells. Similarly, glutamine release was also inhibited by localised inactivation of EAATs in individual astrocytes, using internal dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or dissipating the driving force by modifying the patch-pipette solution. These results demonstrate that astrocytes adjacent to glutamatergic synapses can release glutamine in a temporally precise, controlled manner in response to glial glutamate transporter activation. Since glutamine can be used by neurones as a precursor for glutamate and GABA synthesis, this represents a potential feedback mechanism by which astrocytes can respond to synaptic activation and react in a way that sustains or enhances further communication. This would therefore represent an additional manifestation of the tripartite relationship between synapses and astrocytes. PMID:22411007

  2. Activity of phospholipase C and release of prostaglandin F2 alpha by endometrial tissue from ovariectomized ewes receiving progesterone and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Raw, R E; Silvia, W J

    1991-03-01

    Progesterone and estradiol interact to regulate secretion of prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha from the ovine endometrium in response to oxytocin. Two experiments were conducted to determine if these effects were due to changes in activity of phospholipase C or in the second messenger responsive pathways that regulate production of PGF2 alpha. In both experiments, ovariectomized ewes were assigned to one of four treatment groups (control, estradiol, progesterone, progesterone and estradiol). Steroids were administered, in vivo, to mimic the changes that occur during the estrous cycle. On Day 16 of steroid treatment, endometrial tissue was collected and incubated, in vitro, to measure activity of phospholipase C and release of PGF2 alpha. Treatment with progesterone, in vivo, enhanced basal and oxytocin-induced activity of phospholipase C and release of PGF2 alpha, in vitro. Estradiol suppressed oxytocin-induced activity of phospholipase C, both in the presence and absence of progesterone. In contrast to its effects on phospholipase C, estradiol inhibited basal and oxytocin-induced release of PGF2 alpha when administered alone, but not when administered with progesterone. Steroids had similar effects on the release of PGF2 alpha induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and A23187. It was concluded that progesterone and estradiol regulate endometrial release of PGF2 alpha by affecting both the activity of phospholipase C and its associated second messenger responsive pathways that may regulate production of PGF2 alpha.

  3. Health Effects of Cut Gas Lines and Other Petroleum Product Release Incidents - Seven States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ayana R

    2015-06-12

    Large mass casualty gas explosions and catastrophic oil spills are widely reported and receive considerable regulatory attention. Smaller, less catastrophic petroleum product releases are less likely to receive publicity, although study of these incidents might help focus and prioritize prevention efforts. To describe the causes and health impacts of petroleum product release incidents (including gas explosions and oil spills), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) analyzed 2010-2012 data from the National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP). A total of 1,369 petroleum product release incidents were reported from seven states, resulting in 512 injuries and 36 deaths. Approximately one fourth of the incidents were associated with utilities, and approximately one fifth were associated with private vehicles or residences. Approximately 10% of petroleum product releases resulted from inadvertent damage to utility lines. Understanding the characteristics of acute petroleum product releases can aid the public and utility workers in the development of preventive strategies and reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with such releases.

  4. Prostacyclin release and receptor activation: differential control of human pulmonary venous and arterial tone

    PubMed Central

    Norel, Xavier; Walch, Laurence; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Montpreville, Vincent de; Brink, Charles

    2004-01-01

    In human pulmonary vascular preparations, precontracted arteries were more sensitive to the relaxant effect of acetylcholine (ACh) than veins (pD2 values: 7.25±0.08 (n=23) and 5.92±0.09 (n=25), respectively). Therefore, the role of prostacyclin (PGI2) was explored to examine whether this mediator may be responsible for the difference in relaxation. In the presence of the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin (INDO), the ACh relaxations were reduced in arteries but not in veins. On the contrary, an inhibitor (L-NOARG) of the nitric oxide synthase blocked preferentially the relaxation in veins. A greater release of 6-keto-PGF1α, the stable metabolite of PGI2, was observed in arterial preparations than in venous preparations when stimulated with either ACh or arachidonic acid (AA). Exogenous PGI2 produced a reduced relaxant effect in the precontracted vein when compared with the artery. In the presence of the EP1-receptor antagonist AH6809, the PGI2 relaxation of veins was similar to arteries. In veins, AA (0.1 mM) produced a biphasic response, namely, a contraction peak (0.4–0.5 g) followed by a relaxation. These contractions in venous preparations were abolished either in the absence of endothelium or in the presence of INDO or an EP1-receptor antagonist (AH6809, SC19220). In the arterial preparations AA induced only relaxations. In both vascular preparations, COX-1 but not the COX-2 protein was detected in microsomal preparations derived from homogenized tissues or freshly isolated endothelial cells. The differential vasorelaxations induced by ACh may be explained, in part, by a more pronounced production and release of PGI2 in human pulmonary arteries than in the veins. In addition, while PGI2 induced relaxation by activation of IP-receptors in both types of vessels, a PGI2 constrictor effect was responsible for masking the relaxation in the veins by activation of the EP1-receptor. PMID:15172959

  5. Active food packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymers: study of the release kinetics of ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Otero-Pazos, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bernaldo de Quirós, Ana; Sendón, Raquel; Benito-Peña, Elena; González-Vallejo, Victoria; Moreno-Bondi, M Cruz; Angulo, Immaculada; Paseiro-Losada, Perfecto

    2014-11-19

    A novel active packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was developed for the controlled release of ferulic acid. The release kinetics of ferulic acid from the active system to food simulants (10, 20, and 50% ethanol (v/v), 3% acetic acid (w/v), and vegetable oil), substitutes (95% ethanol (v/v) and isooctane), and real food samples at different temperatures were studied. The key parameters of the diffusion process were calculated by using a mathematical modeling based on Fick's second law. The ferulic acid release was affected by the temperature as well as the percentage of ethanol of the simulant. The fastest release occurred in 95% ethanol (v/v) at 20 °C. The diffusion coefficients (D) obtained ranged between 1.8 × 10(-11) and 4.2 × 10(-9) cm(2)/s. A very good correlation between experimental and estimated data was obtained, and consequently the model could be used to predict the release of ferulic acid into food simulants and real food samples.

  6. Structural Evidence for a Sequential Release Mechanism for Activation of Heterotrimeric G Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Neeraj; Menon, Santosh T.; Chauhan, Radha; Sachdev, Pallavi; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2010-01-12

    Heptahelical G-protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors couple to heterotrimeric G proteins to relay extracellular signals to intracellular signaling networks, but the molecular mechanism underlying guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) release by the G protein {alpha}-subunit is not well understood. Amino acid substitutions in the conserved {alpha}5 helix of Gi, which extends from the C-terminal region to the nucleotide-binding pocket, cause dramatic increases in basal (receptor-independent) GDP release rates. For example, mutant G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A shows an 18-fold increase in basal GDP release rate and, when expressed in culture, it causes a significant decrease in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. The crystal structure of G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A {center_dot} GDP shows substantial conformational rearrangement of the switch I region and additional striking alterations of side chains lining the catalytic pocket that disrupt the Mg{sup +2} coordination sphere and dislodge bound Mg{sup +2}. We propose a 'sequential release' mechanism whereby a transient conformational change in the {alpha}5 helix alters switch I to induce GDP release. Interestingly, this mechanistic model for heterotrimeric G protein activation is similar to that suggested for the activation of the plant small G protein Rop4 by RopGEF8.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide-releasing NSAIDs attenuate neuroinflammation induced by microglial and astrocytic activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; Sparatore, Anna; Del Soldato, Piero; McGeer, Edith; McGeer, Patrick L

    2010-01-01

    Endogenously generated hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) may have multiple functions in brain. It has been shown that H(2)S attenuates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia. Here we demonstrate a neuroprotective effect of NaSH and three H(2)S-releasing compounds, ADT-OH, S-diclofenac, and S-aspirin. When activated by LPS and gamma-interferon, human microglia and THP-1 cells release materials that are toxic to human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. These phenomena also occur with gamma-interferon-stimulated human astroglia and U118 cells. When these cell types are pretreated with aspirin, diclofenac, NASH, or ADT-OH, the supernatants are significantly less toxic. When they are treated with the NSAID-H(2)S hybrid molecules S-diclofenac and S-aspirin, which are here referred to as S-NSAIDs, there is a significant enhancement of the protection. The effect is concentration and incubation time dependent. Such pretreatment also reduces the release of the proinflammatory mediators TNFalpha, IL-6, and nitric oxide. The H(2)S-releasing compounds are without effect when applied directly to SH-SY5Y cells. These data suggest that hybrid H(2)S releasing compounds have significant antiinflammatory properties and may be candidates for treating neurodegenerative disorders that have a prominent neuroinflammatory component such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

  8. Relationship between impulsivity, prefrontal anticipatory activation, and striatal dopamine release during rewarded task performance.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Barbara J; Heitzeg, Mary M; Zald, David; Cummiford, Chelsea; Love, Tiffany; Zucker, Robert A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2014-09-30

    Impulsivity, and in particular the negative urgency aspect of this trait, is associated with poor inhibitory control when experiencing negative emotion. Individual differences in aspects of impulsivity have been correlated with striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability and function. This multi-modal pilot study used both positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate dopaminergic and neural activity, respectively, using modified versions of the monetary incentive delay task. Twelve healthy female subjects underwent both scans and completed the NEO Personality Inventory Revised to assess Impulsiveness (IMP). We examined the relationship between nucleus accumbens (NAcc) dopaminergic incentive/reward release, measured as a change in D2/D3 binding potential between neutral and incentive/reward conditions with [(11)C]raclopride PET, and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation elicited during the anticipation of rewards, measured with fMRI. Left NAcc incentive/reward dopaminergic release correlated with anticipatory reward activation within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), left angular gyrus, mammillary bodies, and left superior frontal cortex. Activation in the mPFC negatively correlated with IMP and mediated the relationship between IMP and incentive/reward dopaminergic release in left NAcc. The mPFC, with a regulatory role in learning and valuation, may influence dopamine incentive/reward release.

  9. Boiling enriches the linear polysulfides and the hydrogen sulfide-releasing activity of garlic.

    PubMed

    Tocmo, Restituto; Wu, Yuchen; Liang, Dong; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Huang, Dejian

    2017-04-15

    Garlic is rich in polysulfides, and some of them can be H2S donors. This study was conducted to explore the effect of cooking on garlic's organopolysulfides and H2S-releasing activity. Garlic bulbs were crushed and boiled for a period ranging from 3 to 30min and the solvent extracts were analyzed by GC-MS/FID and HPLC. A cell-based assay was used to measure the H2S-releasing activity of the extracts. Results showed that the amounts of allyl polysulfides increased in crushed garlic boiled for 6-10min; however, prolonging the thermal treatment to 20 or 30min decreased their concentrations. Data of the H2S-releasing activity, expressed as diallyl trisulfide equivalents (DATS-E), parallel this trend, being significantly higher at 6 and 10min boiling. Our results showed enhancement of H2S-releasing activity upon moderate boiling, suggesting that shorter cooking time may maximize its health benefits as a dietary source of natural H2S donors.

  10. Medical-grade silicone induces release of proinflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells without activating T cells.

    PubMed

    Miro-Mur, Francesc; Hindié, Mathilde; Kandhaya-Pillai, Renuka; Tobajas, Vanessa; Schwartz, Simo; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume

    2009-08-01

    For more than 40 years, silicone implants had been employed in aesthetic, cosmetic medicine, and plastic surgery. Although adverse reactions produced by these products are rare, cases of immuno-mediated reactions have been reported. To evaluate the aspects of immuno-reactivity to medical-grade silicone dermal filler, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 39 individuals were studied. PBMC used include individuals with silicone injection-related delayed adverse reactions, with silicone injections, and healthy control. Silicone induced production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in all three groups. Notably, elevated production of IL-6 was observed in nonstimulated PBMC and also the percentage of CD4(+)CD69(+) T cells was higher in PHA-stimulated PBMC from individuals with silicone injection-related adverse reactions when compared with other two groups. However, IFN-gamma was not released in silicone-stimulated or silicone+LPS-stimulated PBMC from any group and no production of IL-2 was measured indicating no proliferative response of PBMC. Subsequently, no CD4(+)CD69(+) T cells were observed in these conditions. Finally, the inflammatory response in silicone-stimulated cultures of monocyte-derived macrophages with autologous lymphocytes is lesser than that observed in PBMC. In conclusion, silicone induces a release of proinflammatory cytokines but does not act as a polyclonal activator of CD4(+) T cells. Thus, silicone is mounting an immune response in individuals with silicone-related adverse effects but is not silicone antigen-dependent.

  11. Release probability of hippocampal glutamatergic terminals scales with the size of the active zone

    PubMed Central

    Holderith, Noemi; Lorincz, Andrea; Katona, Gergely; Rózsa, Balázs; Kulik, Akos; Watanabe, Masahiko; Nusser, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Cortical synapses display remarkable structural, molecular and functional heterogeneity. Our knowledge regarding the relationship between the ultrastructural and functional parameters is still fragmented. Here we asked how the release probability and presynaptic [Ca2+] transients relate to the ultrastructure of rat hippocampal glutamatergic axon terminals. Two-photon Ca2+ imaging-derived optical quantal analysis and correlated electron microscopic reconstructions revealed a tight correlation between the release probability and the active zone area. The peak amplitude of [Ca2+] transients in single boutons also positively correlated with the active zone area. Freeze-fracture immunogold labeling revealed that the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunit Cav2.1 and the presynaptic protein Rim1/2 are confined to the active zone and their numbers scale linearly with the active zone area. Gold particles for Cav2.1 showed a nonrandom distribution within the active zones. Our results demonstrate that the number of several active zone proteins, including presynaptic Ca2+ channels, docked vesicles and the release probability scales linearly with the active zone area. PMID:22683683

  12. Effect of prolactin-release inhibition on milk production and mammary gland involution at drying-off in cows.

    PubMed

    Ollier, S; Zhao, X; Lacasse, P

    2013-01-01

    The end of each lactation is a challenging period for high-yielding cows as they are often dried off while still producing significant quantities of milk and, consequently, are highly susceptible to new intramammary infections. Once involution is complete, the mammary gland becomes much more resistant to infection. Therefore, it is critically important to develop strategies aimed at reducing milk production before drying-off and to accelerate mammary gland involution. This study assessed the effect of inhibition of the lactogenic signal driven by prolactin (PRL) on milk production and concentrations of involution markers in mammary secretions. Sixteen Holstein cows in late lactation were assigned to treatments based on milk yield, somatic cell count, and parity. Of those cows, 8 received twice-daily intramuscular injections (2 mg per injection) of quinagolide, a specific inhibitor of PRL release, from 4 d before drying-off to 3 d after (Quin). The other 8 cows received injections of the solvent (water, control). Blood and milk (mammary secretion) samples were collected on the last 5 d before and on d 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 after the last milking. Additionally, on the day preceding the first injection and on the following day, several blood samples were collected around milking time. Quinagolide reduced basal serum PRL concentrations on all injection days as well as PRL released in blood during milking. The PRL inhibitor decreased milk production before drying-off, which averaged, over the last 3 d of lactation, 19.3 and 15.5 kg/d for the control and Quin cows, respectively. Quinagolide had no significant effect on milk citrate:lactoferrin and Na:K ratios, which decreased and increased, respectively, during the first 2 wk of the dry period. Nevertheless, the increases in the number of somatic cells and bovine serum albumin concentration during early involution were greater and matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity tended to be greater in mammary secretions of the Quin

  13. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  14. Effect of phytoplankton-released organic matter on the production and properties of the primary marine aerosol (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, E.; Coe, H.; Green, D.; de Leeuw, G.; McFiggans, G.

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of the biogenic matter exuded by marine biota on the production and properties of the submicron primary sea-spray, based on the laboratory simulation of marine aerosol formation from seawater enriched with organic matter released by laboratory-grown algal cultures. Primary aerosol formation by bubble bursting was reproduced by using a plunging water jet generation system. Particle production experiments with seawater enriched in marine exudate <0.2 μm at organic carbon concentrations (OC) representative of biologically active oceanic waters were conducted and compared with blanks performed with artificial seawater devoid of marine organics. An increase in the production of particles <100 nm and a shift of the size distribution toward smaller sizes were observed with increasing amounts of diatomaceous exudate in the source seawater. A novel sub-micrometric size-resolved parameterisation for deriving primary particle fluxes as a function of the seawater diatomaceous OC concentration was inferred from the production experiments. Estimations of the relationship between Chl-a biomass and seawater OC concentration indicated that effects on particle fluxes due to biological activity are likely to occur in diatom blooms with Chl-a diatom biomass >0.35-2 mg/m3 (OC>175 µM), depending on the primary organic production conditions in the algal bloom. Analysis of the hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the organics-enriched primary aerosol indicated both a suppression of the water uptake and the CCN activity with increasing amount of organic exudate in the source seawater. The increase in the CCN number likely to occur in algal bloom areas due to the potential increase in particle production would therefore be counteracted by the reduction of the particle CCN activity induced by the incorporation of organic matter. Calculations of the primary particle composition using a mixing rule yielded organic mass fractions in

  15. Overview of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center's urban research and development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Sugiyama, G A; Nasstrom, J

    2007-09-05

    Administration (NOAA), U.S. Navy, and U.S. Air Force, as well as an in-house mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. NARAC provides an easy-to-use Geographical Information System (GIS) for display of plume predictions with affected population counts and detailed maps, and the ability to export plume predictions to other standard GIS capabilities. Data collection and product distribution is provided through a variety of communication methods, including dial-up, satellite, and wired and wireless networks. Ongoing research and development activities will be highlighted. The NARAC scientific support team is developing urban parameterizations for use in a regional dispersion model (see companion paper by Delle Monache). Modifications to the numerical weather prediction model WRF to account for characteristics of urban dynamics are also in progress, as is boundary-layer turbulence model development for simulations with resolutions greater than 1km. The NARAC building-resolving computational fluid dynamics capability, FEM3MP, enjoys ongoing development activities such as the expansion of its ability to model releases of dense gases. Other research activities include sensor-data fusion, such as the reconstruction of unknown source terms from sparse and disparate observations.

  16. Botulinum toxin B in the sensory afferent: transmitter release, spinal activation, and pain behavior.

    PubMed

    Marino, Marc J; Terashima, Tetsuji; Steinauer, Joanne J; Eddinger, Kelly A; Yaksh, Tony L; Xu, Qinghao

    2014-04-01

    We addressed the hypothesis that intraplantar botulinum toxin B (rimabotulinumtoxin B: BoNT-B) has an early local effect upon peripheral afferent terminal releasing function and, over time, will be transported to the central terminals of the primary afferent. Once in the terminals it will cleave synaptic protein, block spinal afferent transmitter release, and thereby prevent spinal nociceptive excitation and behavior. In mice, C57Bl/6 males, intraplantar BoNT-B (1 U) given unilaterally into the hind paw had no effect upon survival or motor function, but ipsilaterally decreased: (1) intraplantar formalin-evoked flinching; (2) intraplantar capsaicin-evoked plasma extravasation in the hind paw measured by Evans blue in the paw; (3) intraplantar formalin-evoked dorsal horn substance P (SP) release (neurokinin 1 [NK1] receptor internalization); (4) intraplantar formalin-evoked dorsal horn neuronal activation (c-fos); (5) ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion (DRG) vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP); (6) ipsilateral SP release otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal capsaicin; (7) ipsilateral activation of c-fos otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal SP. These results indicate that BoNT-B, after unilateral intraplantar delivery, is taken up by the peripheral terminal, is locally active (blocking plasma extravasation), is transported to the ipsilateral DRG to cleave VAMP, and is acting presynaptically to block release from the spinal peptidergic terminal. The observations following intrathecal SP offer evidence for a possible transsynaptic effect of intraplantar BoNT. These results provide robust evidence that peripheral BoNT-B can alter peripheral and central terminal release from a nociceptor and attenuate downstream nociceptive processing via a presynaptic effect, with further evidence suggesting a possible postsynaptic effect.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) during synaptic activation results from the release of a stimulatory and in inhibitory agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Bencherif, M.; Rubio, R.; Berne, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    PI has been implicated in the process of synaptic transmission and is increased by agonists. It has been suggested that PI is involved in cellular Ca/sup + +/ mobilization and the process represents a series of hydrolytic reactions with inositol as the final product. Hence, the rate of release of /sup 3/H-inositol (/sup 3/H-Ins) from prelabelled inositol phospholipids can be used as an index of PI. In the /sup 3/H-inositol prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglia, they studied the effect of synaptic activity on PI. PI did not change during orthodromic stimulation (20 Hz, 5 min). However, upon cessation of the stimulation, PI increased rapidly and remained elevated for at least 30 min. This increase in PI was reduced by suffusing the ganglia with either acetylcholine or adenosine. In the presence of atropine (5 ..mu..M), orthodromic stimulation increased PI. They hypothesized that synaptic activation releases a long-lasting stimulatory agonist and a short-lived inhibitory (Ach/adenosine) agonist(s) affecting PI. To test this idea, 2 sympathetic ganglia were used. One was prelabelled with /sup 3/H-inositol and the other was not. The two ganglia were placed together in a 5 ..mu..l drop of Ringers solution containing atropine. Orthodromic stimuli were applied to the non-labelled ganglion and elicited release of /sup 3/H-Ins from the non-stimulated ganglion.

  18. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection.

  19. Biologically active proteins from natural product extracts.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, B R

    2001-10-01

    The term "biologically active proteins" is almost redundant. All proteins produced by living creatures are, by their very nature, biologically active to some extent in their homologous species. In this review, a subset of these proteins will be discussed that are biologically active in heterologous systems. The isolation and characterization of novel proteins from natural product extracts including those derived from microorganisms, plants, insects, terrestrial vertebrates, and marine organisms will be reviewed and grouped into several distinct classes based on their biological activity and their structure.

  20. Fission Product Release and Survivability of UN-Kernel LWR TRISO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M; Ferber, Mattison K; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2014-01-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from range calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 m diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated with a TRISO particle as a function of fluence. Creep and swelling of the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by measuring the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers as a function of fluence. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.

  1. Carbon dioxide absorption and release properties of pyrolysis products of dolomite calcined in vacuum atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Kuzuya, Toshihiro; Hirai, Shinji; Li, Jihua; Li, Te

    2014-01-01

    The decomposition of dolomite into CaO and MgO was performed at 1073 K in vacuum and at 1273 K in an Ar atmosphere. The dolomite calcined in vacuum was found to have a higher specific surface area and a higher micropore volume when compared to the dolomite calcined in the Ar atmosphere. These pyrolysis products of dolomite were reacted with CO2 at 673 K for 21.6 ks. On the absorption of CO2, the formation of CaCO3 was observed. The degree of absorption of the dolomite calcined in vacuum was determined to be above 50%, which was higher than the degree of absorption of the dolomite calcined in the Ar atmosphere. The CO2 absorption and release procedures were repeated three times for the dolomite calcined in vacuum. The specific surface area and micropore volume of calcined dolomite decreased with successive repetitions of the CO2 absorption and release cycles leading to a decrease in the degree of absorption of CO2.

  2. Production of bromoform and dibromomethane by Giant Kelp: Factors affecting release and comparison to anthropogenic bromine sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; North, W.J.; Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    Macrocystis pyrifera (Giant Kelp), a dominant macroalgal species in southern California, produced 171 ng per g fresh wt (gfwt) per day of CHBr3 and 48 ng gfwt-1 d-1 of CH2Br2 during laboratory incubations of whole blades. Comparable rates were measured during in situ incubations of intact fronds. Release of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 by M. pyrifera was affected by light and algal photosynthetic activity, suggesting that environmental factors influencing kelp physiology can affect halomethane release to the atmosphere. Data from H2O2 additions suggest that brominated methane production during darkness is limited by bromide oxidant supply. A bromine budget constructed for a region of southern California indicated that bromine emitted from the use of CH3Br as a fumigant (1 x 108 g Br yr-1) dominates macroalgal sources (3 x 106 g Br yr-1). Global projections, however, suggest that combined emissions of marine algae (including microalgae) contribute substantial amounts of bromine to the global cycle, perhaps on the same order of magnitude as anthropogenic sources.

  3. Fission product partitioning in aerosol release from simulated spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lemma, F. G.; Colle, J. Y.; Rasmussen, G.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2015-10-01

    Aerosols created by the vaporization of simulated spent nuclear fuel (simfuel) were produced by laser heating techniques and characterised by a wide range of post-analyses. In particular attention has been focused on determining the fission product behaviour in the aerosols, in order to improve the evaluation of the source term and consequently the risk associated with release from spent fuel sabotage or accidents. Different simulated spent fuels were tested with burn-up up to 8 at. %. The results from the aerosol characterisation were compared with studies of the vaporization process by Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry and thermochemical equilibrium calculations. These studies permit an understanding of the aerosol gaseous precursors and the gaseous reactions taking place during the aerosol formation process.

  4. Release of asbestos fibers from weathered and corroded asbestos cement products

    SciTech Connect

    Spurny, K.R.

    1989-02-01

    The controversy on whether weathered and corroded asbestos cement products are emitting biologically significant asbestos fiber concentrations in ambient air has not been resolved. Nor is it known if the weathered and corroded asbestos cement products release asbestos fibers which have the same carcinogenic potency as standard chrysotile. The purpose of this research project was to develop a method for sampling and measuring asbestos fiber emissions from solid planar surfaces (i.e., roofs and facades) consisting of asbestos cement products and to develop methods for studying the physical and chemical changes and the carcinogenic potency of the emitted fibers. Using this method asbestos fiber emissions in ambient air have been measured in the FRG during 1984/1986. The emissions of asbestos fibers longer than 5 microns were in the range 10(6) to 10(8) fibers/m2.hr. The ambient air concentrations of these asbestos fibers were for the most part less than 10(3) fibers/m3. It was shown that the emitted asbestos fibers were chemically changed and it was shown with animal experiments that their carcinogenic potency did not differ from the carcinogenicity of standard chrysotile fibers.

  5. Maximum reasonable radioxenon releases from medical isotope production facilities and their effect on monitoring nuclear explosions.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, Theodore W; Kephart, Rosara; Eslinger, Paul W; Friese, Judah I; Miley, Harry S; Saey, Paul R J

    2013-01-01

    Fission gases such as (133)Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by fission production of (99)Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere (Stocki et al., 2005; Saey, 2009). These releases pose a potential future problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. This study concludes that an emission of 5 × 10(9) Bq/day from a medical isotope production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be an achievable limit for large isotope producers.

  6. [Effects of allelochemical EMA from reed on the production and release of cyanotoxins in Microcystis aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Men, Yu-jie; Hu, Hong-ying

    2007-09-01

    The growth inhibition of ethyl-2-methylacetoacetate (EMA) isolated from common reed (Phragmites australis Trin. or Phragmites communis Trin.) on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806 was investigated and the intracellular and extracellular concentration of cyanotoxin (MC-LR) after treatment of EMA were tested. The experimental results indicated that EMA has significant inhibitory effect on the growth of M. aeruginosa PCC7806, and the value of EC(50,7d) was 2.0 mg x L(-1). However, the inhibition declined with the cultivation time. During the whole cultivation period, EMA showed no significant effect on the release of MC-LR from cells to the culture. After 7 days, the amount of intracellular MC-LR per cell unit increased with the increasing of EMA concentration. The amount of MC-LR per cell unit was 25 ng x (10(6) cells)(-1) after the treatment with 1.5 mg x L(-1) EMA, which was increased by 39% compared with the control. The total MC-LR production (including intracellular and extracellular MC-LR) first slightly increased and then decreased significantly with the increase of EMA concentration. After the treatment with 3 mg x L(-1) EMA, the total MC-LR production was 28 microg x L(-1) (only half of that in the control). After 16 days, EMA showed no significant effect on both the amount of MC-LR per cell and the total MC-LR production.

  7. PFOS and PFC releases and associated pollution from a PFC production plant in Minnesota (USA).

    PubMed

    Oliaei, Fardin; Kriens, Don; Weber, Roland; Watson, Alan

    2013-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and PFOS-related substances have been listed as persistent organic pollutants in the Stockholm Convention. From August 2012, Parties to the Convention needed to address the use, storage, and disposal of PFOS-including production sites and sites where PFOS wastes have been deposited-in their national implementation plans. The paper describes the pollution in Minnesota (USA) caused by the 3M Company at one of the largest per/polyfluorinated chemical (PFC) production facilities. From early 1950s until the end of 2002, when 3M terminated PFOS and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) production, PFOS, PFOA, and other PFC production wastes were disposed around the plant and in local disposal sites. Discharges from the site and releases from deposits caused widespread contamination of ground and surface waters including local drinking water wells. Fish in the river downstream were contaminated with PFOS to levels that led to fish consumption advisories. Human exposures resulted from ingesting contaminated drinking water, requiring installation of water treatment facilities and alternate water supplies. The critical evaluation of the assessments done revealed a range of gaps in particular of human exposure where relevant exposure pathways including the entire exposure via food have not been taken into consideration. Currently, the exposure assessment of vulnerable groups such as children or Hmong minorities is inadequate and needs to be improved/validated by epidemiological studies. The assessment methodology described for this site may serve-with highlighted improvements-as a model for assessment of other PFOS/PFC production sites in the Stockholm Convention implementation.

  8. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Melissa A.; Woods, Catherine A.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Lee, Christian R.; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P.; Jones, Kymry T.; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate–putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices. PMID:26503322

  9. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Woods, Catherine A; Patel, Jyoti C; Lee, Christian R; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P; Jones, Kymry T; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E A; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2015-10-27

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices.

  10. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  11. Role of temperature, chlorine, and organic matter in copper corrosion by-product release in soft water.

    PubMed

    Boulay, N; Edwards, M

    2001-03-01

    Soft, low alkalinity drinking waters tend to cause relatively high copper corrosion by-product release in plumbing systems. Long-term tests (6-8 months) in a synthetic, microbially stable soft tap water confirmed that lower pHs and higher temperatures increased copper release to water. Soluble copper release increased at lower temperature and lower pH. Low levels of free chlorine (0.7 mg/L) slightly increased copper release at pH 9.5, in marked contrast to the dramatic reductions in copper release that have been observed in soft waters in which Type III pitting corrosion is occurring. Gum xanthan and sodium alginate produced a microbially unstable water that reduced the pH and DO during stagnation in pipes--these indirect effects far outweighed their possible role in chelation or other modes of direct attack on copper surfaces.

  12. Ciprofloxacin Controlled-Solid Lipid Nanoparticles: Characterization, In Vitro Release, and Antibacterial Activity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to formulate ciprofloxacin (CIP) in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) in an attempt to develop a controlled drug delivery system. An ultrasonic melt-emulsification method was used for preparing CIP-loaded SLNs. Key findings included that SLNs were successfully produced with average particle sizes ranging from 165 to 320 nm and polydispersity index in the range of 0.18–0.33. High entrapment efficiency values were reported in all formulations. The atomic force scanning microscopic images showed spherical shape with the size range closer to those found by the particle size analyzer. CIP release exhibited controlled-release behavior with various lipids. Ciprofloxacin solid lipid nanoparticles formula containing stearic acid (CIPSTE) displayed the strongest burst effect and the most rapid release rate. The release data revealed a better fit to the Higuchi diffusion model. After storing the CIPSTE formula at room temperature for 120 days, no significant difference in particle size and zeta potential was found. CIP-loaded SLNs exhibited superior antibacterial activity. Incorporation of CIP into SLNs leads to controlled release and a superior antibacterial effect of CIP. PMID:28194408

  13. Fouling-release and chemical activity effects of a siloxane-based material on tunicates.

    PubMed

    Filip, Natalia; Pustam, Amanda; Ells, Veronica; Grosicki, Kathleen M T; Yang, Jin; Oguejiofor, Ikenna; Bishop, Cory D; DeMont, M Edwin; Smith-Palmer, Truis; Wyeth, Russell C

    2016-05-01

    The antifouling performance of a siloxane-based elastomeric impression material (EIM) was compared to that of two silicone fouling-release coatings, Intersleek 757 and RTV-11. In field immersion trials, the EIM caused the greatest reduction in fouling by the solitary tunicate Ciona intestinalis and caused the longest delay in the progression of fouling by two species of colonial tunicate. However, in pseudobarnacle adhesion tests, the EIM had higher attachment strengths. Further laboratory analyses showed that the EIM leached alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) that were toxic to C. intestinalis larvae. The EIM thus showed the longest duration of chemical activity measured to date for a siloxane-based coating (4 months), supporting investigations of fouling-release coatings that release targeted biocides. However, due to potential widespread effects of APEs, the current EIM formulation should not be considered as an environmentally-safe antifoulant. Thus, the data also emphasize consideration of both immediate and long-term effects of potentially toxic constituents released from fouling-release coatings.

  14. [Effect of nano-TiO2 on the release and activation of mercury in sediment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Yang; Li, Chu-Xian; Wang, Ding-Yong; Zhou, Xiong; Sun, Rong-Guo; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Liang

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effects of nano-TiO2 on mercury release and activation in sediment, flooding simulation experiments were conducted. The impacts of nano-TiO2 on total mercury and methylmercury concentrations in overlying water were analyzed. And the influences of nano-TiO2 on the migration and transformation of mercury were discussed based on changes of mercury speciation in sediment. The results indicated that nano-TiO2 promoted the release of mercury in sediment, leading to more mercury released into the water. Compared with the control, 4 g x kg(-1) TiO2 nanoparticles increased the total mercury by 91.32%, when the concentration of total mercury in overlying water was the highest. Release of mercury in soil was increased by approximately 10% finally. The main reason may be that the dissolution of oxidation state mercury was improved by nano-TiO2. It indicated that the risk of mercury contamination in water may increase. Moreover, under the experimental conditions, nano-TiO2 may reduce the formation of methylmercury in sediment in the short-term, but no significant effects in the long-term. Generally, the effects of nano-TiO2 on the release and transformation of mercury in sediment showed concentration dependence. Thus, with increasing nano-TiO2 content in sediment or soil, its impact on the geochemical cycle of mercury may increase.

  15. Magnetic field activated lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles for stimuli-responsive drug release

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seong Deok; Sartor, Marta; Hu, Che-Ming Jack; Zhang, Weizhou; Zhang, Liangfang; Jin, Sungho

    2014-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles (SRNPs) offer the potential of enhancing the therapeutic efficacy and minimizing the side-effects of chemotherapeutics by controllably releasing the encapsulated drug at the target site. Currently controlled drug release through external activation remains a major challenge during the delivery of therapeutic agents. Here we report a lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticle system containing magnetic beads for stimuli-responsive drug release using a remote radio frequency (RF) magnetic field. These hybrid nanoparticles show long-term stability in terms of particle size and polydispersity index in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Controllable loading of camptothecin (CPT) and Fe3O4 in the hybrid nanoparticles was demonstrated. RF-controlled drug release from these nanoparticles was observed. In addition, cellular uptake of the SRNPs into MT2 mouse breast cancer cells was examined. Using CPT as a model anticancer drug the nanoparticles showed a significant reduction in MT2 mouse breast cancer cell growth in vitro in the presence of a remote RF field. The ease of preparation, stability, and controllable drug release are the strengths of the platform and provide the opportunity to improve cancer chemotherapy. PMID:23149252

  16. In Vivo Release Kinetics and Antibacterial Activity of Novel Polyphenols-Enriched Chewing Gums.

    PubMed

    Ferrazzano, Gianmaria Fabrizio; Cantile, Tiziana; Coda, Marco; Alcidi, Brunella; Sangianantoni, Giancarla; Ingenito, Aniello; Di Stasio, Michele; Volpe, Maria Grazia

    2016-08-02

    Chewing gums may be particularly effective means for delivering and maintaining bioactive molecules, included in the gum formulation, able to have an anti-cariogenic effect. The purposes of this study were: to develop novel chewing gums containing quercetin (Qt); to evaluate their release using in vivo trial; finally, to test their in vivo antibacterial effect against oral Streptococcus mutans strains. A preliminary study was performed to produce new gums, enriched with the polyphenol quercetin. Then, a first in vivo experimental study was assessed to test the percentages of Qt released in the saliva of young volunteers. Moreover, a second clinical trial was performed to analyze the antibacterial capability of these enriched chewing gums against S. mutans strains after 14 days of daily consumption. The release analysis showed that a more effective release of Qt occurs in the first minutes of chewing, and it does not change saliva pH values. Moreover, Qt included in gums demonstrates an effective antibacterial activity, showing a reduction of the concentration of S. mutans strains in saliva samples, especially after 7 days. Qt included in experimental chewing gums could be efficiently released into the oral cavity and could promote an effective anti-caries concentration in volunteer's saliva, without changing salivary pH values.

  17. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release.

  18. Metformin Uniquely Prevents Thrombosis by Inhibiting Platelet Activation and mtDNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Guang; Wei, Zeliang; Ji, Chengjie; Zheng, Huajie; Gu, Jun; Ma, Limei; Huang, Wenfang; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Zhang, Rui; Qin, Chaoyi; Wen, Li; Xing, Zhihua; Cao, Yu; Xia, Qing; Lu, Yanrong; Li, Ke; Niu, Hai; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis and its complications are the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes. Metformin, a first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes, is the only drug demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. However, whether metformin can effectively prevent thrombosis and its potential mechanism of action is unknown. Here we show, metformin prevents both venous and arterial thrombosis with no significant prolonged bleeding time by inhibiting platelet activation and extracellular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release. Specifically, metformin inhibits mitochondrial complex I and thereby protects mitochondrial function, reduces activated platelet-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen species overload and associated membrane damage. In mitochondrial function assays designed to detect amounts of extracellular mtDNA, we found that metformin prevents mtDNA release. This study also demonstrated that mtDNA induces platelet activation through a DC-SIGN dependent pathway. Metformin exemplifies a promising new class of antiplatelet agents that are highly effective at inhibiting platelet activation by decreasing the release of free mtDNA, which induces platelet activation in a DC-SIGN-dependent manner. This study has established a novel therapeutic strategy and molecular target for thrombotic diseases, especially for thrombotic complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27805009

  19. Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Using TRMM Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Olson, W. S.; Meneghini, R.; Yang, S.; Simpson, J.; Kummerow, C.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents the first attempt to use TRMM rainfall information to estimate the four dimensional latent heating structure over the global tropics for February 1998. The mean latent heating profiles over six oceanic regions (TOGA COARE IFA, Central Pacific, S. Pacific Convergence Zone, East Pacific, Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean) and three continental regions (S. America, Central Africa and Australia) are estimated and studied. The heating profiles obtained from the results of diagnostic budget studies over a broad range of geographic locations are used to provide comparisons and indirect validation for the heating algorithm estimated heating profiles. Three different latent heating algorithms, the Goddard Convective-Stratiform (CSH) heating, the Goddard Profiling (GPROF) heating, and the Hydrometeor heating (HH) are used and their results are intercompared. The horizontal distribution or patterns of latent heat release from the three different heating retrieval methods are quite similar. They all can identify the areas of major convective activity (i.e., a well defined ITCZ in the Pacific, a distinct SPCZ) in the global tropics. The magnitude of their estimated latent heating release is also not in bad agreement with each other and with those determined from diagnostic budget studies. However, the major difference among these three heating retrieval algorithms is the altitude of the maximum heating level. The CSH algorithm estimated heating profiles only show one maximum heating level, and the level varies between convective activity from various geographic locations. These features are in good agreement with diagnostic budget studies. By contrast, two maximum heating levels were found using the GPROF heating and HH algorithms. The latent heating profiles estimated from all three methods can not show cooling between active convective events. We also examined the impact of different TMI (Multi-channel Passive Microwave Sensor) and PR (Precipitation Radar

  20. IMPACT OF OIL PRODUCTION RELEASES ON SOME SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES AT THE OSPER SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface and soil core samples were collected at two field sites in an old oil production area near Skiatook Lake in Oklahoma. The soil samples were analyzed for nitrates, organic matter, total petroleum hydrocarbons, conductivity, chlorides and dehydrogenase activity. Low level...

  1. NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform persistent activity requires calcium release from intracellular stores in prefrontal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-Jun; Goldman-Rakic, Patricia S

    2006-02-01

    Various normal and pathological forms of synchronized population activity are generated by recurrent excitation among pyramidal neurons in the neocortex. However, the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying this activity remain poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the cellular properties of synchronized epileptiform activity in the prefrontal cortex with particular emphasis on a potential role of intracellular calcium stores. We find that the zero-magnesium-induced synchronized activity is blocked by inhibition of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, phospholipase C (PLC), the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, and the ryanodine receptor. This same activity is, however, not affected by application of metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR) agonists, nor by introduction of an mGluR antagonist. These results suggest that persistent synchronized activity in vitro is dependent upon calcium release from internal calcium stores through the activation of PLC-IP3 receptor pathway. Our findings also raise the possibility that intracellular calcium release may be involved in the generation of pathologic synchronized activity in epilepsy in vivo and in physiological forms of synchronized cortical activity.

  2. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  3. Regulation of cytokine production by soluble CD23: costimulation of interferon gamma secretion and triggering of tumor necrosis factor alpha release

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Soluble CD23 (sCD23) has multiple IgE-independent biological activities. In the present study, we examined the regulatory effect of sCD23 on cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We show that sCD23 enhances by about 80-fold the interleukin 2 (IL-2)-induced interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production and by about 10-fold the response to IL-12. This potentiating activity is time and dose dependent and is not associated with a significant effect on DNA synthesis. The sCD23 costimulatory activity for IFN-gamma synthesis is drastically reduced in monocyte-depleted PBMC, suggesting that monocytes may be the target for sCD23. This hypothesis was supported by the following observations. First, sCD23 alone is a potent inducer of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production by PBMC and this effect disappears after monocyte depletion. The triggering of TNF-alpha release is specifically inhibited by neutralizing anti-CD23 monoclonal antibody (mAb). In addition, IL-2 and IL-12 synergize with sCD23 to induce TNF-alpha production. Second, sCD23 triggers the release of other inflammatory mediators such as IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6. Finally, TNF-alpha production in response to IL-2 and sCD23 precedes IFN-gamma and IFN-gamma secretion is significantly inhibited by anti-TNF-alpha mAb, indicating that the sCD23 costimulatory signal for IFN-gamma production may be partially mediated by TNF-alpha release. It is proposed that sCD23 is a proinflammatory cytokine that, in addition, may play an important role in the control of the immune response via the enhancement of IFN-gamma production. PMID:8064221

  4. Airborne engineered nanomaterials in the workplace-a review of release and worker exposure during nanomaterial production and handling processes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yaobo; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A J; Van Tongeren, Martie; Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez; Tuinman, Ilse; Chen, Rui; Alvarez, Iñigo Larraza; Mikolajczyk, Urszula; Nickel, Carmen; Meyer, Jessica; Kaminski, Heinz; Wohlleben, Wendel; Stahlmecke, Burkhard; Clavaguera, Simon; Riediker, Michael

    2017-01-15

    For exposure and risk assessment in occupational settings involving engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), it is important to understand the mechanisms of release and how they are influenced by the ENM, the matrix material, and process characteristics. This review summarizes studies providing ENM release information in occupational settings, during different industrial activities and using various nanomaterials. It also assesses the contextual information - such as the amounts of materials handled, protective measures, and measurement strategies - to understand which release scenarios can result in exposure. High-energy processes such as synthesis, spraying, and machining were associated with the release of large numbers of predominantly small-sized particles. Low-energy processes, including laboratory handling, cleaning, and industrial bagging activities, usually resulted in slight or moderate releases of relatively large agglomerates. The present analysis suggests that process-based release potential can be ranked, thus helping to prioritize release assessments, which is useful for tiered exposure assessment approaches and for guiding the implementation of workplace safety strategies. The contextual information provided in the literature was often insufficient to directly link release to exposure. The studies that did allow an analysis suggested that significant worker exposure might mainly occur when engineering safeguards and personal protection strategies were not carried out as recommended.

  5. Estimates of radioxenon released from Southern Hemisphere medical isotope production facilities using measured air concentrations and atmospheric transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Paul W; Friese, Judah I; Lowrey, Justin D; McIntyre, Justin I; Miley, Harry S; Schrom, Brian T

    2014-09-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and (133)Xe data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of (133)Xe from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8 × 10(14) Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 2.2 × 10(16) to 2.4 × 10(16) Bq, estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 9.2 × 10(13) to 3.7 × 10(14) Bq and estimates for the facility in Argentina range from 4.5 × 10(12) to 9.5 × 10(12) Bq.

  6. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  7. Purification and identification of amylases released by the human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis that are active towards glycogen.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ronald W; Brittingham, Andrew; Wilson, Wayne A

    The parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection trichomoniasis. In the laboratory, T. vaginalis is typically cultured in a serum-containing medium with maltose or glucose as the carbon source. The nature of the carbohydrates used by the organism in the environment of its host is unclear. However, the vagina contains substantial amounts of glycogen, which is believed to provide a growth substrate for the vaginal microbiota. We have shown previously that T. vaginalis releases glucosidases that are active towards glycogen into its environment. Here we purify and identifying these glucosidases. Using ammonium sulfate precipitation and precipitation with ethanol/glycogen, we purified glucosidase activity from conditioned growth medium, achieving over 300-fold enrichment. Maltose was released when glycogen was incubated with the glucosidase preparation, indicating that a β-amylase was present. However, after prolonged incubation, small quantities of larger products including maltotriose were obtained. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry showed that the glucosidase preparation contained three proteins, the major component being a putative β-amylase encoded by the TVAG_080000 open reading frame. Lesser amounts of two putative α-amylases, encoded by the TVAG_178580 and TVAG_205920 open reading frames, were also present. We cloned and expressed the TVAG_080000 open reading frame and found that the recombinant protein was capable of digesting glycogen, releasing exclusively maltose. We conclude that T. vaginalis releases a variety of amylases into its growth environment and is well equipped to utilize the glycogen found in the vagina as a source of essential carbohydrates.

  8. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-01-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2–C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2–C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2–C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment. PMID:27703168

  9. Spontaneous release of GABA activates GABAB receptors and controls network activity in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    McLean, H A; Caillard, O; Khazipov, R; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaiarsa, J L

    1996-08-01

    giant glutamatergic potentials were observed in simultaneously recorded CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons. CGP 35348 (0.5 mM) progressively increased the duration of these bicuculline-induced glutamatergic bursts leading to the simultaneous appearance of ictal discharges in both pyramidal cells and interneurons. 6. These results suggest that in the neonatal CA3 hippocampal region, when synchronous giant polysynaptic GABAergic PSPs are present (i.e., under basal, control conditions), spontaneously released GABA reaches a critical level and activates GABAB receptors on both pyramidal cells and interneurons thus regulating the level of glutamatergic and GABAergic activity in the CA3 neuronal network.

  10. Dissimilar mechanisms of cytochrome c release induced by octyl glucoside-activated BAX and by BAX activated with truncated BID.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsyregma; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Antonsson, Bruno; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we compared alkali-resistant BAX insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane, mitochondrial remodeling, mitochondrial membrane potential changes, and cytochrome c (Cyt c) release from isolated brain mitochondria triggered by recombinant BAX oligomerized with 1% octyl glucoside (BAX(oligo)) and by a combination of monomeric BAX (BAX(mono)) and caspase 8-cleaved C-terminal fragment of recombinant BID (truncated BID, t(c)BID). We also examined whether the effects induced by BAX(oligo) or by BAX(mono) activated with t(c)BID depended on induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition. The results obtained in this study revealed that t(c)BID plus BAX(mono) produced BAX insertion and Cyt c release without overt changes in mitochondrial morphology. On the contrary, treatment of mitochondria with BAX(oligo) resulted in BAX insertion and Cyt c release, which were accompanied by gross distortion of mitochondrial morphology. The effects of BAX(oligo) could be at least partially suppressed by mitochondrial depolarization. The effects of t(c)BID plus BAX(mono) were insensitive to depolarization. BAX(oligo) produced similar BAX insertion, mitochondrial remodeling, and Cyt c release in KCl- and in N-methyl-D-glucamine-based incubation media indicating a non-essential role for K+ influx into mitochondria in these processes. A combination of cyclosporin A and ADP, inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition, attenuated Cyt c release, mitochondrial remodeling, and depolarization induced by BAX(oligo), but failed to influence the effects produced by t(c)BID plus BAX(mono). Thus, our results suggest a significant difference in the mechanisms of the outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and Cyt c release induced by detergent-oligomerized BAX(oligo) and by BAX activated with t(c)BID.

  11. Coincident postsynaptic activity gates presynaptic dopamine release to induce plasticity in Drosophila mushroom bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kohei; Suzuki, Ema; Naganos, Shintaro; Ofusa, Kyoko; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Saitoe, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous stimulation of the antennal lobes (ALs) and the ascending fibers of the ventral nerve cord (AFV), two sensory inputs to the mushroom bodies (MBs), induces long-term enhancement (LTE) of subsequent AL-evoked MB responses. LTE induction requires activation of at least three signaling pathways to the MBs, mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), NMDA receptors (NRs), and D1 dopamine receptors (D1Rs). Here, we demonstrate that inputs from the AL are transmitted to the MBs through nAChRs, and inputs from the AFV are transmitted by NRs. Dopamine signaling occurs downstream of both nAChR and NR activation, and requires simultaneous stimulation of both pathways. Dopamine release requires the activity of the rutabaga adenylyl cyclase in postsynaptic MB neurons, and release is restricted to MB neurons that receive coincident stimulation. Our results indicate that postsynaptic activity can gate presynaptic dopamine release to regulate plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21076.001 PMID:28117664

  12. Synaptic GABA release prevents GABA transporter type-1 reversal during excessive network activity

    PubMed Central

    Savtchenko, Leonid; Megalogeni, Maria; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Walker, Matthew C.; Pavlov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    GABA transporters control extracellular GABA, which regulates the key aspects of neuronal and network behaviour. A prevailing view is that modest neuronal depolarization results in GABA transporter type-1 (GAT-1) reversal causing non-vesicular GABA release into the extracellular space during intense network activity. This has important implications for GABA uptake-targeting therapies. Here we combined a realistic kinetic model of GAT-1 with experimental measurements of tonic GABAA receptor currents in ex vivo hippocampal slices to examine GAT-1 operation under varying network conditions. Our simulations predict that synaptic GABA release during network activity robustly prevents GAT-1 reversal. We test this in the 0 Mg2+ model of epileptiform discharges using slices from healthy and chronically epileptic rats and find that epileptiform activity is associated with increased synaptic GABA release and is not accompanied by GAT-1 reversal. We conclude that sustained efflux of GABA through GAT-1 is unlikely to occur during physiological or pathological network activity. PMID:25798861

  13. Particulate matter initiates inflammatory cytokine release by activation of capsaicin and acid receptors in a human bronchial epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, B; Oortgiesen, M; Carter, J D; Devlin, R B

    1999-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that human bronchial epithelial cells (i.e., BEAS-2B) release pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-6 and TNFalpha) in a receptor-mediated fashion in response to the neuropeptides, substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), and the prototype botanical irritant capsaicin. In the present experiments, we examined the relevance of these receptors to particulate matter (PM)-associated cellular inflammation. BEAS-2B cells, exposed to residual oil fly ash particles (ROFA), responded with an immediate (<30 s) increase in intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i), increases of key inflammatory cytokine transcripts (i.e., IL-6, IL-8, TNFalpha) within 2 h exposure, and subsequent release of IL-6 and IL-8 cytokine protein after 4 h exposure. Pretreatment of BEAS-2B cells with pharmacological antagonists selective for the SP or CGRP receptors reduced the ROFA-stimulated IL-6 cytokine production by approximately 25 and 50%, respectively. However, pretreatment of these cells with capsazepine (CPZ), an antagonist for capsaicin (i.e., vanilloid) receptors, inhibited the immediate increases in [Ca2+]i, diminished transcript (i.e., IL-6, IL-8, TNFalpha) levels and reduced IL-6 cytokine release to control levels. BEAS-2B cells exposed to ROFA in calcium-free media failed to demonstrate increases of [Ca2+]i and showed reduced levels of cytokine transcript (i.e., IL-6, IL-8, TNFalpha) and IL-6 release, suggesting that ROFA-stimulated cytokine formation was partially dependent on extracellular calcium sources. A final set of experiments compared the inflammatory properties of the soluble and acidic insoluble components of ROFA. BEAS-2B cells, exposed to ROFA or ROFA that had been filtered through a 0.2-micrometer pore filter, produced equivocal IL-6. BEAS-2B cells exposed to pH 5.0 media for 15 min released moderate amounts of IL-6, 4 h later. This cytokine release could be blocked by amiloride, a pH receptor antagonist, but not by CPZ. BEAS-2B

  14. Essential requirement of cytochrome c release for caspase activation by procaspase-activating compound defined by cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Seervi, M; Joseph, J; Sobhan, P K; Bhavya, B C; Santhoshkumar, T R

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c (cyt. c) release and caspase activation are often impaired in tumors with Bcl-2 overexpression or Bax and Bak-defective status. Direct triggering of cell death downstream of Bax and Bak is an attractive strategy to kill such cancers. Small molecule compounds capable of direct caspase activation appear to be the best mode for killing such tumors. However, there is no precise model to screen such compounds. The currently employed cell-free systems possess the inherent drawback of lacking cellular contents and organelles that operate in integrating cell death signaling. We have developed highly refined cell-based approaches to validate direct caspase activation in cancer cells. Using this approach, we show that PAC-1 (first procaspase-activating compound), the first direct activator of procaspases identified in a cell-free system, in fact requires mitochondrial cyt. c release for triggering caspase activation similar to other antitumor agents. It can induce significant caspase activation and cell death in the absence of Bax and Bak, and in cells overexpressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. This study for the first time defines precise criteria for the validation of direct caspase-activating compounds using specialized cellular models that is expected to accelerate the discovery of potential direct caspase activators. PMID:21900958

  15. Investigation on the need of multiple dose bioequivalence studies for prolonged-release generic products.

    PubMed

    García-Arieta, Alfredo; Morales-Alcelay, Susana; Herranz, Marta; de la Torre-Alvarado, José María; Blázquez-Pérez, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Ma Luisa; Alvarez, Covadonga

    2012-02-28

    In the European Union multiple dose bioequivalence studies are required for the approval of generic prolonged-release products, but they are not required by the US-FDA. In order to investigate if the multiple dose bioequivalence studies are necessary, the bioequivalence studies assessed in the Spanish Agency for Medicines and Health Care Products in the last 10 years were searched to find all reasons for rejection and identify those cases where the multiple dose study had failed to show bioequivalence and the single dose study had shown bioequivalence. In these latter cases, the plasma concentration at the end of the dosing interval (C(τ)) in the single dose study was assessed to investigate its sensitivity to predict non-bioequivalence in the steady state. The search identified six cases where the non-equivalence in the multiple dose study was not detected by the corresponding single dose study. C(τ) was not able to detect the difference in five cases and in general it was more variable than conventional metrics. In conclusion, the multiple dose bioequivalence study is necessary to ensure therapeutic equivalence and the use of C(τ) would be counterproductive, increasing the sample size of the studies without enough sensitivity to detect differences in the steady state.

  16. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  17. A Conserved Hydrophobic Core in Gαi1 Regulates G Protein Activation and Release from Activated Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, T M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2016-09-09

    G protein-coupled receptor-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation is a major mode of signal transduction in the cell. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix of Gαi1, especially the hydrophobic interactions in this region, plays a key role during nucleotide release and G protein activation. To further investigate the effect of this hydrophobic core, we disrupted it in Gαi1 by inserting 4 alanine amino acids into the α5 helix between residues Gln(333) and Phe(334) (Ins4A). This extends the length of the α5 helix without disturbing the β6-α5 loop interactions. This mutant has high basal nucleotide exchange activity yet no receptor-mediated activation of nucleotide exchange. By using structural approaches, we show that this mutant loses critical hydrophobic interactions, leading to significant rearrangements of side chain residues His(57), Phe(189), Phe(191), and Phe(336); it also disturbs the rotation of the α5 helix and the π-π interaction between His(57) and Phe(189) In addition, the insertion mutant abolishes G protein release from the activated receptor after nucleotide binding. Our biochemical and computational data indicate that the interactions between α5, α1, and β2-β3 are not only vital for GDP release during G protein activation, but they are also necessary for proper GTP binding (or GDP rebinding). Thus, our studies suggest that this hydrophobic interface is critical for accurate rearrangement of the α5 helix for G protein release from the receptor after GTP binding.

  18. Insulin-releasing and insulin-like activity of Agaricus campestris (mushroom).

    PubMed

    Gray, A M; Flatt, P R

    1998-05-01

    Agaricus campestris (mushroom) has been documented as a traditional treatment for diabetes. Here the administration of mushroom in the diet (62.5 g/kg) and drinking water (2.5 g/l) countered the hyperglycaemia of streptozotocin-diabetic mice. An aqueous extract of mushroom (1 mg/ml) stimulated 2-deoxyglucose transport (2.0-fold), glucose oxidation (1.5-fold) and incorporation of glucose into glycogen (1.8-fold) in mouse abdominal muscle. In acute 20 min tests, 0.25-1 mg/ml aqueous extract of mushroom evoked a stepwise 3.5- to 4.6-fold stimulation of insulin secretion from the BRIN-BD11 pancreatic B-cell line. This effect was abolished by 0.5 mM diazoxide and prior exposure to extract did not affect subsequent stimulation of insulin secretion by 10 mM L-alanine, thereby negating a detrimental effect on cell viability. The effect of extract was potentiated by 16.7 mM glucose, L-alanine (10 mM) and IBMX (1 mM), and a depolarising concentration of KCl (25 mM) did not augment the insulin-releasing activity of mushroom. Activity of the extract was found to be heat stable, acetone soluble and unaltered by exposure to alkali, but decreased with exposure to acid. Dialysis to remove components with molecular mass < 2000 Da caused a 40% reduction in activity. Sequential extraction with solvents revealed insulin-releasing activity to be greatest in polar fractions. Lack of haemagglutinin activity with extract activity indicated that activity was unlikely to be due to a lectin-mediated event. These results demonstrate the presence of antihyperglycaemic, insulin-releasing and insulin-like activity in A. campestris.

  19. Photothermally activated drug release from liposomes coupled to hollow gold nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Natalie; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2011-03-01

    Liposomes show great promise as intravenous drug delivery vehicles, but it is difficult to combine stability in the circulation, extended drug retention and rapid, targeted release at the site of interest. Accessorizing conventional and multicompartment liposomes with photo-activated hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) provides a convenient method to initiate drug release with spatial and temporal control. HGN efficiently absorb near infrared (NIR) light and rapidly convert the absorbed optical energy into heat. Femto- to nano-second NIR light pulses cause the HGNs to rapidly heat, creating large temperature gradients between the HGNs and surrounding fluid. The formation and collapse of unstable vapor bubbles transiently rupture liposome and other bilayer membranes to trigger contents release. Near-complete contents release occurs when the nanoshells are encapsulated within the liposome or tethered to the outer surface of the liposome, with no chemical damage to the contents. Release is achieved by focusing the laser beam at the target, eliminating the need for highly specific targeting ligands or antibodies. Although HGN heating can be intense, the overall energy input is small causing minimal heating of the surroundings. To ensure that drugs are retained within the liposomes until delivery in a physiological environment, we have made novel multicompartment carriers called vesosomes, which consist of an outer lipid bilayer shell that encloses and protects the drug-carrying liposomes. The second bilayer increases the serum half-life of ciprofloxacin from <10 minutes in liposomes to 6 hours in vesosomes and alters the release kinetics. The enhanced drug retention is due to the outer membrane preventing enzymes and proteins in the blood from breaking down the drug-carrying interior compartments.

  20. Inflammation and activity augment brain-derived neurotrophic factor peripheral release.

    PubMed

    Qiao, L Y; Shen, S; Liu, M; Xia, C; Kay, J C; Zhang, Q L

    2016-03-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release to nerve terminals in the central nervous system is crucial in synaptic transmission and neuronal plasticity. However, BDNF release peripherally from primary afferent neurons has not been investigated. In the present study, we show that BDNF is synthesized by primary afferent neurons located in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rat, and releases to spinal nerve terminals in response to depolarization or visceral inflammation. In two-compartmented culture that separates DRG neuronal cell bodies and spinal nerve terminals, application of 50mM K(+) to either the nerve terminal or the cell body evokes BDNF release to the terminal compartment. Inflammatory stimulation of the visceral organ (e.g. the urinary bladder) also facilitates an increase in spontaneous BDNF release from the primary afferent neurons to the axonal terminals. In the inflamed viscera, we show that BDNF immunoreactivity is increased in nerve fibers that are immuno-positive to the neuronal marker PGP9.5. Both BDNF and pro-BDNF levels are increased, however, pro-BDNF immunoreactivity is not expressed in PGP9.5-positive nerve-fiber-like structures. Determination of receptor profiles in the inflamed bladder demonstrates that BDNF high affinity receptor TrkB and general receptor p75 expression levels are elevated, with an increased level of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation/activity. These results suggest a possibility of pro-proliferative effect in the inflamed bladder. Consistently we show that the proliferation marker Ki67 expression levels are enhanced in the inflamed organ. Our results imply that in vivo BDNF release to the peripheral organ is an important event in neurogenic inflammatory state.

  1. Land management as a factor controlling dissolved organic carbon release from upland peat soils 1: spatial variation in DOC productivity.

    PubMed

    Yallop, A R; Clutterbuck, B

    2009-06-01

    The importance of soil storage in global carbon cycling is well recognised and factors leading to increased losses from this pool may act as a positive feedback mechanism in global warming. Upland peat soils are usually assumed to serve as carbon sinks, there is however increasing evidence of carbon loss from upland peat soils, and DOC concentrations in UK rivers have increased markedly over the past three decades. A number of drivers for increasing DOC release from peat soils have been proposed although many of these would not explain fine-scale variations in DOC release observed in many catchments. We examined the effect of land use and management on DOC production in upland peat catchments at two spatial scales within the UK. DOC concentration was measured in streams draining 50 small-scale catchments (b3 km2) in three discrete regions of the south Pennines and one area in the North Yorkshire Moors. Annual mean DOC concentration was also derived from water colour data recorded at water treatment works for seven larger scale catchments (1.5-20 km2) in the south Pennines. Soil type and land use/management in all catchments were characterised from NSRI digital soil data and ortho-corrected colour aerial imagery. Of the factors assessed, representing all combinations of soil type and land use together with catchment slope and area, the proportion of exposed peat surface resulting from new heather burning was consistently identified as the most significant predictor of variation in DOC concentration. This relationship held across all blanket peat catchments and scales. We propose that management activities are driving changes in edaphic conditions in upland peat to those more favourable for aerobic microbial activity and thus enhance peat decomposition leading to increased losses of carbon from these environments.

  2. Specific features of sensorimotor cerebral cortex activity modulation by dopamine releaser amantadine.

    PubMed

    Storozhuk, Viktor M; Zinyuk, Larissa E

    2007-09-01

    The modulatory effects of amantadine (1-adamantanamine) on the activity of sensorimotor cerebral cortex neurones during microiontophoretic application of agonists of glutamatergic and GABA-ergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transmission were studied. In non-anaesthetised cats, dopamine (DA) released by amantadine application in a small area of the neocortex increased baseline and evoked neuronal activity, providing stabilization and optimum course of both the neuronal and the conditioned responses of the animal. Amantadine eliminates a decrease in the level of neuronal baseline and evoked activity and marked increase in the latency of neuronal activation and conditioned movement mediated by D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride ((S)-5-aminosulfonyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-2-methoamantadineybenzamide) or GABA. This is reflected by a proportionate decrease in the onset of neuronal impulse reaction and latency of conditioned movement. Combined NMDA (N-methyl-D: -aspartate) and amantadine application also caused a considerable increase in baseline and evoked activity, but produced a slightly weaker effect than that evoked by NMDA application alone. A decrease in the baseline and evoked neuronal activity after NMDA withdrawn lasted during next control session (up to 40 min). The ability of DA releaser amantadine to alleviate significant increase in the latency of neuronal responses and conditioned movement induced by sulpiride or GABA suggests that dopamine modulates the activity of GABA-ergic inhibitory fast spike interneurons in the cat sensorimotor cortex during conditioning.

  3. Effect of treatment with an ivermectin sustained-release bolus on productivity of stocker beef calves.

    PubMed

    Williams, J C; Loyacano, A F; Broussard, S D; Coombs, D F

    1995-05-01

    Three groups of 30 crossbred beef steers, 8-10 months of age and ranging in weight from 158 to 320 kg, were used to compare effects of treatment with an ivermectin sustained-release bolus or two ivermectin injectable treatments on parasite control and productivity in relation to untreated controls during a 168 day winter-spring grazing period. Each group of 30 consisted of five cattle on each of six separate 1.6 ha pastures. Treatments on Day 0 (12 December) were: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: ivermectin injectable at 200 micrograms kg-1 bodyweight, s.c., on Day 0 and Day 56; Group 3: ivermectin sustained-release bolus to deliver ivermectin at 12 mg day-1 over approximately 135 days. All cattle were weighed at 28 day intervals and fecal samples were collected for egg per gram counts (EPG). Geometric mean EPG for Group 3 remained consistently less than 1.0 after Day 0 and were highest (2.4) on Day 168. All group EPG were significantly different (P < 0.01) by Day 56, and EPG of Group 2 had increased to 10.5 following initial treatment and to 42.8 on Day 112. With the exception of a low mean EPG of 6.8 for Group 1 on Day 112, EPG of the group were consistently highest (range 24.9-36.0) to the end of the experiment. Ostertagia ostertagi was predominant, along with smaller proportions of Haemonchus placei and Cooperia spp. Throughout the experiment Group 3 had highest liveweights and gains that were most often different from those of Group 1 at P < 0.01 or greater.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Size-fractionated characterization and quantification of nanoparticle release rates from a consumer spray product containing engineered nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Lorenz, Christiane; Kaegi, Ralf; Sinnet, Brian; Gehrig, Robert; Goetz, Natalie V.; Scheringer, Martin; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    This study describes methods developed for reliable quantification of size- and element-specific release of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) from consumer spray products. A modified glove box setup was designed to allow controlled spray experiments in a particle-minimized environment. Time dependence of the particle size distribution in a size range of 10-500 nm and ENP release rates were studied using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). In parallel, the aerosol was transferred to a size-calibrated electrostatic TEM sampler. The deposited particles were investigated using electron microscopy techniques in combination with image processing software. This approach enables the chemical and morphological characterization as well as quantification of released nanoparticles from a spray product. The differentiation of solid ENP from the released nano-sized droplets was achieved by applying a thermo-desorbing unit. After optimization, the setup was applied to investigate different spray situations using both pump and gas propellant spray dispensers for a commercially available water-based nano-silver spray. The pump spray situation showed no measurable nanoparticle release, whereas in the case of the gas spray, a significant release was observed. From the results it can be assumed that the homogeneously distributed ENP from the original dispersion grow in size and change morphology during and after the spray process but still exist as nanometer particles of size <100 nm. Furthermore, it seems that the release of ENP correlates with the generated aerosol droplet size distribution produced by the spray vessel type used. This is the first study presenting results concerning the release of ENP from spray products.

  5. Determination of the potential for release of mercury from combustion product amended soils: Part 1 - Simulations of beneficial use

    SciTech Connect

    Mae Sexauer Gustin; Jody Ericksen; George C. Fernandez

    2008-05-15

    This paper describes a project that assessed the potential for mercury (Hg) release to air and water from soil amended with combustion products to simulate beneficial use. Combustion products (ash) derived from wood, sewage sludge, subbituminous coal, and a subbituminous coal-petroleum coke mixture were added to soil as agricultural supplements, soil stabilizers, and to develop low permeability surfaces. Hg release was measured from the latter when intact and after it was broken up and mixed into the soil. Air-substrate Hg exchange was measured for all materials six times over 24 hr, providing data that reflected winter, spring, summer, and fall meteorological conditions. Dry deposition of atmospheric Hg and emission of Hg to the atmosphere were both found to be important fluxes. Measured differences in seasonal and diel (24 hr) fluxes demonstrated that to establish an annual estimate of air-substrate flux from these materials data on both of these time steps should be collected. Air-substrate exchange was highly correlated with soil and air temperature, as well as incident light. Hg releases to the atmosphere from coal and wood combustion product-amended soils to simulate an agricultural application were similar to that measured for the unamended soil, whereas releases to the air for the sludge-amended materials were higher. Hg released to soil solutions during the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure for ashamended materials was higher than that released from soil alone. On the basis of estimates of annual releases of Hg to the air from the materials used, emissions from coal and wood ash-amended soil to simulate an agricultural application could simply be re-emission of Hg deposited by wet processes from the atmosphere; however, releases from sludge-amended materials and those generated to simulate soil stabilization and disturbed low-permeability pads include Hg indigenous to the material. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide production is increased by ATP released from red blood cells incubated with hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Sarah Y; Erkal, Jayda L; Spence, Dana M

    2014-04-30

    Red blood cells (RBCs) release adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in response to a variety of stimuli, including flow-induced deformation. Hydroxyurea (HU), a proven therapy for individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD), is known to improve blood flow. However, the exact mechanism leading to the improved blood flow is incomplete. Here, we report that the incubation of human RBCs with HU enhances ATP release from these cells and that this ATP is capable of stimulating nitric oxide (NO) production in an endothelium. RBCs incubated with HU were pumped through micron-size flow channels in a microfluidic device. The release of ATP from the RBCs was measured using the luciferin-luciferase assay in detection wells on the device that were separated from the flow channels by a porous polycarbonate membrane. NO released from a layer of bovine artery endothelial cells (bPAECs) cultured on the polycarbonate membrane was also measured using the extracellular NO probe DAF-FM. ATP release from human RBCs incubated with 100 μM HU was observed to be 2.06±0.37-fold larger than control samples without HU (p<0.05, N ≥ 3). When HU-incubated RBCs were flowed under a layer of bPAECs, NO released from the bPAEC layer was measured to be 1.34±0.10-fold higher than controls. An antagonist of the P2Y receptor established that this extra 30% increase in NO release is ATP mediated. Furthermore, when RBCs were incubated with L-NAME, a significant decrease in endothelium-derived NO production was observed. Control experiments suggest that RBC-generated NO indirectly affects endothelial NO production via its effects on RBC-derived ATP release.

  7. Fission product release and microstructure changes of irradiated MOX fuel at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colle, J.-Y.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Beneš, O.; Thiele, H.; Papaioannou, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Sasahara, A.; Sonoda, T.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2013-11-01

    burnups correspond reasonably well with measurement of Walker et al. [11]. All those data are shown Fig. 2.Fragments of 2-8 mg were chosen for the experiments. Since these specimens are small compared to the drilled sample size and were taken randomly, the precise radial position could not be determined, in particular the specimens of sample type, A and B could be from close radial locations.Specimens from each drilled sample type were annealed up to complete vaporisation (˜2600 K) at a speed of about 10 K min-1 in a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer (KEMS) described previously [13,14]. In addition to helium and to the FGs all the species present in the vapour between 83 and 300 a.m.u. were measured during the heating. Additionally, the 85Kr isotope was analysed in a cold trap by β and γ counting. The long-lived fission gas isotopes correspond to masses 131, 132, 134 and 136 for Xe and 83, 84, 85 and 86 for Kr. The absolute quantities of gas released from specimens of sample types A and B were also determined using the in-house built Q-GAMES (Quantitative gas measurement system), described in detail in [15].For each of the samples, fragments were also annealed and measured in the KEMS up to specific temperatures corresponding to different stages of the FGs or He release. These fragments were subsequently analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Philips XL40) [16] in order to investigate the relationship between structural changes, burn-up, irradiation temperature and fission products release. SEM observations were also done on the samples before the KEMS experiments and the fracture surface appearance of the samples is shown in Fig. 3, revealing the presence of the high burnup structure (HBS) in the Pu-rich agglomerates.A summary of the 12 samples analysed by KEMS, SEM and Q-GAMES is given in Table 1. At 1300 K no clear change potentially related to gas release appears in the UM and PA. At 1450 K a beginning of grain boundaries opening can be observed as well as

  8. Isolation and characterization of two peptides with prolactin release-inhibiting activity from porcine hypothalami.

    PubMed Central

    Schally, A V; Guoth, J G; Redding, T W; Groot, K; Rodriguez, H; Szonyi, E; Stults, J; Nikolics, K

    1991-01-01

    Two peptides with in vitro prolactin release-inhibiting activity were purified from stalk median eminence (SME) fragments of 20,000 pig hypothalami. Monolayer cultures of rat anterior pituitary cells were incubated with aliquots of chromatographic fractions and the inhibition of release of prolactin in vitro was measured by RIA in order to monitor the purification. The hypothalamic tissue extract was separated into 11 fractions by high-performance aqueous size-exclusion chromatography with one fraction showing a 4-fold increase in prolactin release-inhibiting factor (PIF) activity. This material was further purified by semipreparative reversed-phase (RP) HPLC. This process resulted in the separation of two distinct fractions that showed high PIF activity. These were further purified by semipreparative and analytical RP-HPLC to apparent homogeneity as judged by the UV absorbance profiles. Neither of the two peptides showed cross-reactivity with gonadotropin releasing hormone-associated peptide or with somatostatin-14 antibodies. Protein sequence analysis revealed that one of the PIF peptides was Trp-Cys-Leu-Glu-Ser-Ser-Gln-Cys-Gln-Asp-Leu-Ser-Thr-Glu-Ser-Asn-Leu-Leu- Ala-Cys - Ile-Arg-Ala-Cys-Lys-Pro, identical to residues 27-52 of the N-terminal region of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) precursor (corresponding to amino acids 1-26 of the 16-kDa fragment). The sequence of the other PIF was Ala-Ser-Asp-Arg-Ser-Asn-Ala-Thr-Leu-Leu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Ser-Gly-Ala-Leu-Leu- Leu-Arg - Leu-Val-Gln-Leu-Ala-Gly-Ala-Pro-Glu-Pro-Ala-Glu-Pro-Ala-Gln-Pro-Gly-Val- Tyr, representing residues 109-147 of the vasopressin-neurophysin precursor. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the N-terminal region of POMC had significant PIF activity in vitro. PMID:2023899

  9. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  10. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  11. Release activity-dependent control of vesicle endocytosis by the synaptic adhesion molecule N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    van Stegen, Bernd; Dagar, Sushma; Gottmann, Kurt

    2017-01-20

    At synapses in the mammalian brain, continuous information transfer requires the long-term maintenance of homeostatic coupling between exo- and endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Because classical endocytosis is orders of magnitude slower than the millisecond-range exocytosis of vesicles, high frequency vesicle fusion could potentially compromise structural stability of synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the tight coupling of exo- and endocytosis are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the transsynaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 in regulating vesicle exo- and endocytosis by using activity-induced FM4-64 staining and by using synaptophysin-pHluorin fluorescence imaging. The synaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 had distinct impacts on exo- and endocytosis at mature cortical synapses. Expression of Neuroligin1 enhanced vesicle release in a N-cadherin-dependent way. Most intriguingly, expression of N-cadherin enhanced both vesicle exo- and endocytosis. Further detailed analysis of N-cadherin knockout neurons revealed that the boosting of endocytosis by N-cadherin was largely dependent on preceding high levels of vesicle release activity. In summary, regulation of vesicle endocytosis was mediated at the molecular level by N-cadherin in a release activity-dependent manner. Because of its endocytosis enhancing function, N-cadherin might play an important role in the coupling of vesicle exo- and endocytosis.

  12. Release activity-dependent control of vesicle endocytosis by the synaptic adhesion molecule N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    van Stegen, Bernd; Dagar, Sushma; Gottmann, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    At synapses in the mammalian brain, continuous information transfer requires the long-term maintenance of homeostatic coupling between exo- and endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Because classical endocytosis is orders of magnitude slower than the millisecond-range exocytosis of vesicles, high frequency vesicle fusion could potentially compromise structural stability of synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the tight coupling of exo- and endocytosis are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the transsynaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 in regulating vesicle exo- and endocytosis by using activity-induced FM4–64 staining and by using synaptophysin-pHluorin fluorescence imaging. The synaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 had distinct impacts on exo- and endocytosis at mature cortical synapses. Expression of Neuroligin1 enhanced vesicle release in a N-cadherin-dependent way. Most intriguingly, expression of N-cadherin enhanced both vesicle exo- and endocytosis. Further detailed analysis of N-cadherin knockout neurons revealed that the boosting of endocytosis by N-cadherin was largely dependent on preceding high levels of vesicle release activity. In summary, regulation of vesicle endocytosis was mediated at the molecular level by N-cadherin in a release activity-dependent manner. Because of its endocytosis enhancing function, N-cadherin might play an important role in the coupling of vesicle exo- and endocytosis. PMID:28106089

  13. Wound-induced ATP release and EGF receptor activation in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jia; Xu, Keping; Zhang, Jing; Kumar, Ashok; Yu, Fu-Shin X.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We have shown previously that wounding of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells resulted in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation through ectodomain shedding of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF). However, the initial signal to trigger these signaling events in response to cell injury remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated the role of ATP released from the injured cells in EGFR transactivation in HCE cells as well as in BEAS 2B cells, a bronchial epithelial cell line. Wounding of epithelial monolayer resulted in the release of ATP into the culture medium. The wound-induced rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in HCE cells was attenuated by eliminating extracellular ATP, ADP and adenosine. The nonhydrolyzable ATP analog ATP-γ-S induced rapid and sustained EGFR activation that depended on HB-EGF shedding and ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase). Targeting pathways leading to HB-EGF shedding and EGFR activation attenuated ATP-γ-S-enhanced closure of small scratch wounds. The purinoceptor antagonist reactive blue 2 decreased wound closure and attenuated ATP-γ-S induced HB-EGF shedding. Taken together, our data suggest that ATP, released upon epithelial injury, acts as an early signal to trigger cell responses including an increase in HB-EGF shedding, subsequent EGFR transactivation and its downstream signaling, resulting in wound healing. PMID:17284517

  14. Enhancement of GABA release through endogenous activation of axonal GABA(A) receptors in juvenile cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Chat, Mireille; Marty, Alain

    2007-11-14

    Recent evidence indicates the presence of presynaptic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) in the axon domain of several classes of central neurons, including cerebellar basket and stellate cells. Here, we investigate the possibility that these receptors could be activated in the absence of electrical or chemical stimulation. We find that low concentrations of GABA increase the frequency of miniature GABAergic synaptic currents. Submaximal concentrations of a GABA(A)R blocker, gabazine, decrease both the miniature current frequency and the probability of evoked GABA release. Zolpidem, an agonist of the benzodiazepine binding site, and NO-711 (1-[2-[[(diphenylmethylene)imino]oxy]ethyl]-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride), a blocker of GABA uptake, both increase the frequency of miniature currents. These effects occur up to postnatal day 14, but not later. Immunohistochemistry indicates the presence of alpha1-containing GABA(A)Rs in interneuron presynaptic terminals with a similar age dependence. We conclude that, under resting conditions, axonal GABA(A)Rs are significantly activated, that this activation results in enhanced GABA release, and that it can be augmented by increasing the affinity of GABA(A)Rs or reducing GABA uptake. Our findings suggest the existence of a positive-feedback mechanism involving presynaptic GABA(A)Rs that maintains a high release rate and a high local GABA concentration in the immature cerebellar network.

  15. Activation of adriamycin by the pH-dependent formaldehyde-releasing prodrug hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Swift, Lonnie P; Cutts, Suzanne M; Rephaeli, Ada; Nudelman, Abraham; Phillips, Don R

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that Adriamycin can react with formaldehyde to yield an activated form of Adriamycin that can further react with DNA to yield Adriamycin-DNA adducts. Because hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) is known to hydrolyze under cellular conditions and release six molecules of formaldehyde in a pH-dependent manner, we examined this clinical agent for its potential as a formaldehyde-releasing prodrug for the activation of Adriamycin. In IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells in culture, increasing levels of HMTA resulted in enhanced levels of Adriamycin-DNA adducts. These adducts were formed in a pH-dependent manner, with 4-fold more detected at pH 6.5 compared with pH 7.4, consistent with the known acid lability of HMTA. The resulting drug-DNA lesion was shown to be cytotoxic, with combined Adriamycin and prodrug treatment resulting in a 3-fold lower IC(50) value compared with that of Adriamycin alone. Given the acidic nature of solid tumors and the preferential release of formaldehyde from HMTA in acidic environments, HMTA therefore has some potential for localized activation of Adriamycin in solid tumors.

  16. Reactive oxygen species and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activate Bax to induce mitochondrial cytochrome c release and apoptosis in response to malonate.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lazaro, M; Galindo, M F; Melero-Fernandez de Mera, R M; Fernandez-Gómez, F J; Concannon, C G; Segura, M F; Comella, J X; Prehn, J H M; Jordan, J

    2007-03-01

    Malonate, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex II, is a widely used toxin to study neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease and ischemic stroke. We have shown previously that malonate increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, leading to oxidative stress, cytochrome c release, and apoptotic cell death. Expression of a green fluorescent protein-Bax fusion protein in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells demonstrated a Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after 12 to 24 h of malonate treatment that coincided with mitochondrial potential collapse and chromatin condensation. Inhibition of Bax translocation using furosemide, as well as Bax gene deletion, afforded significant protection against malonate-induced apoptosis. Further experiments revealed that malonate induced a prominent increase in the level of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and that treatment with the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SKF86002 potently blocked malonate-induced Bax translocation and apoptosis. Treatment with vitamin E diminished ROS production, reduced the activation status of p38 MAP kinase, inhibited Bax translocation, and protected against malonate-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that malonate-induced ROS production and subsequent p38 MAP kinase activation mediates the activation of the pro-apoptotic Bax protein to induce mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and neuronal apoptosis.

  17. Simultaneous detection of histamine release and lactate production in rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 using sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizaki, Kazuo; Arizono, Naoki )

    1991-04-01

    {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was used to evaluate histamine release and lactate production in intact mast cells isolated from rats. The resonance lines of the aromatic histamine protons in mast cells, detected by the selective spin-excitation technique, were broader and located in a lower magnetic field than those in free histamine solution. When exocytosis of mast-cell granules was induced by compound 48/80, free histamine appeared, with a corresponding decrease in the amount of histamine in the mast cells; the lactate signal was also detected in the spectrum. On the addition of compound 48/ 80, there was a further release of histamine from mast cells, accompanied by further production of lactate. This result indicates that the mechanisms which induce the exocytosis of granules, and/or the events following exocytosis, activate glycolysis.

  18. Identification of the growth hormone-releasing hormone analogue [Pro1, Val14]-hGHRH with an incomplete C-term amidation in a confiscated product.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Simone; Deventer, Koen; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a modified version of the 44 amino acid human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGHRH(1-44)) containing an N-terminal proline extension, a valine residue in position 14, and a C-terminus amidation (sequence: PYADAIFTNSYRKVVLGQLSARKLLQDIMSRQQGESNQERGARARL-NH2 ) has been identified in a confiscated product by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Investigation of the product suggests also an incomplete C-term amidation. Similarly to other hGHRH analogues, available in black markets, this peptide can potentially be used as performance-enhancing drug due to its growth hormone releasing activity and therefore it should be considered as a prohibited substance in sport. Additionally, the presence of partially amidated molecule reveals the poor pharmaceutical quality of the preparation, an aspect which represents a big concern for public health as well.

  19. Evaluation of photodynamic activity, photostability and in vitro drug release of zinc phthalocyanine-loaded nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thiane Deprá; Ziembowicz, Francieli Isa; Müller, Debora Friedrich; Lauermann, Sâmera Cristina; Kloster, Carmen Luisa; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Machado, Giovanna; Villetti, Marcos Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Nanocapsule formulations containing zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) were investigated as drug delivery systems for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT). ZnPc loaded chitosan, PCL, and PCL coated with chitosan nanocapsules were prepared and characterized by means of their physicochemical properties, photodynamic activity, photostability and drug release profile. All formulations presented nanometric hydrodynamic radius, around 100 nm, low polydispersity index (0.08-0.24), slightly negative zeta potential for PCL nanoparticles and positive zeta potential for suspension containing chitosan. Encapsulation efficiencies were higher than 99%. The capacity of ZnPc loaded nanocapsules to produce cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O2) by irradiation with red laser was monitored using 1.3-diphenylisobenzofuran as a probe. The singlet oxygen quantum yields (ΦΔ) for ZnPc loaded chitosan nanocapsules were high and similar to that of the standard (ZnPc in DMSO), displaying excellent ability to generate (1)O2. The photosensitizer loaded nanocapsules are photostable in the timescale usually utilized in PDT and only a small photobleaching event was observed when a light dose of 610J/cm(2) was applied. The in vitro drug release studies of ZnPc from all nanocapsules demonstrated a sustained release profile controlled by diffusion, without burst effect. The nature of the polymer and the core type of the nanocapsules regulated ZnPc release. Thus, the nanocapsules developed in this work are a promising strategy to be employed in PDT.

  20. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy.

  1. Nanoprecipitated catestatin released from pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) exerts pro-survival effects on MSC.

    PubMed

    Angotti, C; Venier-Julienne, M C; Penna, C; Femminò, S; Sindji, L; Paniagua, C; Montero-Menei, C N; Pagliaro, P

    2016-11-22

    Catestatin (CST), a fragment of Chromogranin-A, exerts angiogenic, arteriogenic, vasculogenic and cardioprotective effects. CST is a very promising agent for revascularization purposes, in "NOOPTION" patients. However, peptides have a very short half-life after administration and must be conveniently protected. Fibronectin-coated pharmacologically active microcarriers (FN-PAM), are biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric microspheres that can convey mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs) and therapeutic proteins delivered in a prolonged manner. In this study, we first evaluated whether a small peptide such as CST could be nanoprecipitated and incorporated within FN-PAMs. Subsequently, whether CST may be released in a prolonged manner by functionalized FN-PAMs (FN-PAM-CST). Finally, we assessed the effect of CST released by FN-PAM-CST on the survival of MSCs under stress conditions of hypoxia-reoxygenation. An experimental design, modifying three key parameters (ionic strength, mixing and centrifugation time) of protein nanoprecipitation, was used to define the optimum condition for CST. An optimal nanoprecipitation yield of 76% was obtained allowing encapsulation of solid CST within FN-PAM-CST, which released CST in a prolonged manner. In vitro, MSCs adhered to FN-PAMs, and the controlled release of CST from FN-PAM-CST greatly limited hypoxic MSC-death and enhanced MSC-survival in post-hypoxic environment. These results suggest that FN-PAM-CST are promising tools for cell-therapy.

  2. Hypoxia leads to Na,K-ATPase downregulation via Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels and AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Gusarova, Galina A; Trejo, Humberto E; Dada, Laura A; Briva, Arturo; Welch, Lynn C; Hamanaka, Robert B; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Chandel, Navdeep S; Prakriya, Murali; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2011-09-01

    To maintain cellular ATP levels, hypoxia leads to Na,K-ATPase inhibition in a process dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activation of AMP-activated kinase α1 (AMPK-α1). We report here that during hypoxia AMPK activation does not require the liver kinase B1 (LKB1) but requires the release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and redistribution of STIM1 to ER-plasma membrane junctions, leading to calcium entry via Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. This increase in intracellular Ca(2+) induces Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)-mediated AMPK activation and Na,K-ATPase downregulation. Also, in cells unable to generate mitochondrial ROS, hypoxia failed to increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration while a STIM1 mutant rescued the AMPK activation, suggesting that ROS act upstream of Ca(2+) signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of CRAC channel function in rat lungs prevented the impairment of alveolar fluid reabsorption caused by hypoxia. These data suggest that during hypoxia, calcium entry via CRAC channels leads to AMPK activation, Na,K-ATPase downregulation, and alveolar epithelial dysfunction.

  3. Trypanocidal Activity of Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Amy J.; Grkovic, Tanja; Sykes, Melissa L.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine natural products are a diverse, unique collection of compounds with immense therapeutic potential. This has resulted in these molecules being evaluated for a number of different disease indications including the neglected protozoan diseases, human African trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease, for which very few drugs are currently available. This article will review the marine natural products for which activity against the kinetoplastid parasites; Trypanosoma brucei brucei, T.b. rhodesiense and T. cruzi has been reported. As it is important to know the selectivity of a compound when evaluating its trypanocidal activity, this article will only cover molecules which have simultaneously been tested for cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line. Compounds have been grouped according to their chemical structure and representative examples from each class were selected for detailed discussion. PMID:24152565

  4. A new PEG-beta-alanine active derivative for releasable protein conjugation.

    PubMed

    Pasut, Gianfranco; Mero, Anna; Caboi, Francesca; Scaramuzza, Silvia; Sollai, Luigi; Veronese, Francesco M

    2008-12-01

    A new PEGylating agent, PEG-betaAla-NHCO-OSu, has been studied for protein amino conjugation using human growth hormone (hGH) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as model therapeutic proteins. This new activated PEG possesses a convenient property for protein modification when compared to other activated carboxylate PEGs, namely, lower reactivity. When this polymer reacts with a protein, its features lead to fewer PEG-protein conjugate isomers because it preferentially binds the most nucleophilic and exposed amines. Furthermore, the conjugates obtained with PEG-betaAla-NHCO-OSu showed an interesting slow release of polymer chains upon incubation under physiological conditions. Further investigations determined that the PEG chains released are those coupled to histidine residues, and this finally yields less PEGylated species as well as free protein. This release allows a partial recovery of protein activity that is often remarkably and permanently reduced after stable PEGylation, and it occurs in water or blood without the involvement of enzymes. On the other hand, the rate of PEG release, tuned by the chemical structure of this new PEGylating agent, is not too high, and therefore, the achievement of a desired prolongation of protein half-life in vivo is still feasible. The pharmacokinetics of hGH-PEG6k-betaAla conjugate was compared to that of native hGH in rats and monkeys, and the blood residence times were increased by 10- and 7-fold, respectively. The conjugate potency was evaluated in hypophysectomized rats demonstrating a superior pharmacodynamic profile with respect to native hGH.

  5. Product-specific validation of a serological potency test for release of Leptospira vaccines in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Catrina; Novokova, Viera

    2013-09-01

    Historically in the European Union, all Leptospira vaccines were released using the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) hamster potency assay. Recently, there has been a shift toward alternatives that offer either refinement of testing or replacement of animals for product release. This is being driven by animal welfare concerns but also by a drive to have more consistent, cheaper, and faster batch release tests. This publication discusses one such example of a multicomponent canine vaccine that includes three Leptospira serovars and has recently been registered in the European Union. The potency release test is a refinement because it uses rabbit serology rather than hamster challenge. This publication covers the principles of the test method, challenges faced during its development and registration, and discussion about benefits and limitations of this method. It concludes with a view of how the use of serology testing could fit into an overall strategy to move to fully in vitro testing by adopting a consistency approach.

  6. Filler particles used in dental biomaterials induce production and release of inflammatory mediators in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ansteinsson, Vibeke E; Samuelsen, Jan Tore; Dahl, Jon E

    2009-04-01

    Although dental composites are in extensive use today, little is known about the biological effects of the filler particles. As composite materials are gradually broken down in the aggressive environment of the oral cavity, the filler particles may leak and induce toxic effects on the surrounding tissue and cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate possible adverse biological effects of commonly used dental filler particles; bariumaluminiumsilica (BaAlSi) and bariumaluminiumfluorosilica (BaAlFSi) with mean size of 1 microm. BEAS-2B cells were used as a model system. Particle morphology, mean particle size in solution, and particle surface charge were determined by scanning electron microscopy and Malvern zetasizer technology, respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect secretion of cytokine and chemokine (IL-8 and IL-6) and quantitative PCR for detection of gene activity. Both types of particle increased the release of IL-6 and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. BaAlFSi particles induced a more marked IL-8 response compared to BaAlSi particles, whereas no significant difference was observed for the IL-6 response. Mechanistic studies using specific inhibitors and activators indicated that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A is partly involved in the observed IL-8 response. In conclusion, we consider dental filler particles to have potential to induce adverse biological response in cell cultures.

  7. Novel bio-active lipid nanocarriers for the stabilization and sustained release of sitosterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacatusu, I.; Badea, N.; Stan, R.; Meghea, A.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, new stable and efficiently bio-active lipid nanocarriers (NLCs) with antioxidant properties have been developed for the transport of active ingredients in food. The novel NLCs loaded with β-sitosterol/β-sitosterol and green tea extract (GTE) and prepared by a combination of natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and squalene) and biological lipids with food grade surfactants, were physico-chemically examined by DLS, TEM, electrokinetic potential, DSC and HPLC and found to have main diameters less than 200 nm, a spherical morphology, excellent physical stability, an imperfect crystalline lattice and high entrapment efficiency. The novel loaded-NLCs have demonstrated the potential to develop a high blocking action of chain reactions, trapping up to 92% of the free-oxygen radicals, as compared to the native β-sitosterol (AA%=36.5). Another advantage of this study is associated with the quality of bio-active NLCs based on grape seed oil and squalene to manifest a better sitosterol—sustained release behaviour as compared to their related nanoemulsions. By coupling both in vitro results, i.e. the enhanced antioxidant activity and superior release properties, this study emphasizes the sustainability of novel bio-active nanocarriers to gain specific bio-food features for development of functional foods with a high applicability spectrum.

  8. Balance of calcineurin Aα and CDK5 activities sets release probability at nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    The control of neurotransmitter release at nerve terminals is of profound importance for neurological function and provides a powerful control system in neural networks. We show that the balance of enzymatic activities of the alpha isoform of the phosphatase calcineurin (CNAα) and the kinase CDK5 has a dramatic influence over single AP-driven exocytosis at nerve terminals. Acute or chronic loss of these enzymatic activities results in a 7-fold impact on single action potential-driven exocytosis. We demonstrate that this control is mediated almost entirely through Cav2.2 (N-type) voltage-gated calcium channels as blocking these channels with a peptide toxin eliminates modulation by these enzymes. We found that a fraction of nerve terminals are kept in a presynaptically silent state with no measurable Ca2+ influx driven by single AP stimuli due to the balance of CNAα and CDK5 activities as blockade of either CNAα or CDK5 activity changes the proportion of presynaptically silent nerve terminals. Thus CNAα and CDK5 enzymatic activities are key determinants of release probability. PMID:23699505

  9. The conservative treatment of Trigger Thumb using Graston Techniques and Active Release Techniques®

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Scott; Wong, Jerome; Zabukovec, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Objective To detail the progress of a patient with unresolved symptoms of Trigger thumb who underwent a treatment plan featuring Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique. Clinical Features The most important feature is painful snapping or restriction of movement, most notably in actively extending or flexing the digit. The cause of this flexor tendinopathy is believed to be multi-factorial including anatomical variations of the pulley system and biomechanical etiologies such as exposure to shear forces and unaccustomed activity. Conventional treatment aims at decreasing inflammation through corticosteroid injection or surgically removing imposing tissue. Intervention and Outcome The conservative treatment approach utilized in this case involved Active Release Technique (ART®) and Graston Technique (GT). An activity specific rehabilitation protocol was employed to re-establish thumb extensor strength and ice was used to control pain and any residual inflammation. Outcome measures included subjective pain ratings with range of motion and motion palpation of the first right phalangeal joint. Objective measures were made by assessing range of motion. Conclusion A patient with trigger thumb appeared to be relieved of his pain and disability after a treatment plan of GT and ART. PMID:17549185

  10. [Soil biological activities at maize seedling stage under application of slow/controlled release nitrogen fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Li, Dongpo; Wu, Zhijie; Chen, Lijun; Liang, Chenghua; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Weicheng; Yang, Defu

    2006-06-01

    With pot experiment and simulating field ecological environment, this paper studied the effects of different slow/ controlled release N fertilizers on the soil nitrate - reductase and urease activities and microbial biomass C and N at maize seedling stage. The results showed that granular urea amended with dicyandiamide (DCD) and N-(n-bultyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) induced the highest soil nitrate-reductase activity, granular urea brought about the highest soil urease activity and microbial biomass C and N, while starch acetate (SA)-coated granular urea, SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD, methyl methacrylate (MMA) -coated granular urea amended with DCD, and no N fertilization gave a higher soil urease activity. Soil microbial C and N had a similar variation trend after applying various kinds of test slow/controlled release N fertilizers, and were the lowest after applying SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD and NBPT. Coated granular urea amended with inhibitors had a stronger effect on soil biological activities than coated granular urea, and MMA-coating had a better effect than SA-coating.

  11. The oxygen isotope composition of phosphate released from phytic acid by the activity of wheat and Aspergillus niger phytase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, C. v.; Tamburini, F.; Brunner, B.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms. Under P-limiting conditions plants and microorganisms can exude extracellular phosphatases that release inorganic phosphate (Pi) from organic phosphorus compounds (Porg). Phytic acid (IP6) is an important form of Porg in many soils. The enzymatic hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase yields plant available inorganic phosphate (Pi) and less phosphorylated inositol derivates as products. The hydrolysis of organic P-compounds by phosphatases leaves an isotopic imprint on the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of released Pi, which might be used to trace P in the environment. This study aims at determining the effect of phytase on the oxygen isotope composition of released Pi. For this purpose, enzymatic assays with histidine acid phytases from wheat and Aspergillus niger were prepared using IP6, adenosine 5'monophosphate (AMP) and glycerophosphate (GPO4) as substrates. For a comparison to the δ18O of Pi released by other extracellular enzymes, enzymatic assays with acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ with IP6 as substrate were prepared. During the hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase, four Pi are released, and one oxygen atom from water is incorporated into each Pi. This incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi is subject to an apparent inverse isotopic fractionation (ϵ ∼ 6 to 10‰), which is similar to that imparted by acid phosphatase from potato during the hydrolysis of IP6 (ϵ ∼ 7‰) where less than three Pi are released. The incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi during the hydrolysis of AMP and GPO4 by phytase yielded a normal isotopic fractionation (ϵ ∼ -12‰), again similar to values reported for acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ. We attribute this similarity in ɛ to the same amino acid sequence motif (RHGXRXP) at the active site of these enzymes, which leads to similar reaction mechanisms. We suggest that the striking substrate-dependency of

  12. The oxygen isotope composition of phosphate released from phytic acid by the activity of wheat and Aspergillus niger phytase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sperber, C.; Tamburini, F.; Brunner, B.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2015-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms. Under P-limiting conditions plants and microorganisms can exude extracellular phosphatases that release inorganic phosphate (Pi) from organic phosphorus compounds (Porg). Phytic acid (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, IP6) is an important form of Porg in many soils. The enzymatic hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase yields available Pi and less phosphorylated inositol derivates as products. The hydrolysis of organic P compounds by phosphatases leaves an isotopic imprint on the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of released Pi, which might be used to trace P in the environment. This study aims at determining the effect of phytase on the oxygen isotope composition of released Pi. For this purpose, enzymatic assays with histidine acid phytases from wheat and Aspergillus niger were prepared using IP6, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) and glycerophosphate (GPO4) as substrates. For a comparison to the δ18O of Pi released by other extracellular enzymes, enzymatic assays with acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ with IP6 as a substrate were prepared. During the hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase, four of the six Pi were released, and one oxygen atom from water was incorporated into each Pi. This incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi was subject to an apparent inverse isotopic fractionation (ϵ ~ 6 to 10 ‰), which was similar to that imparted by acid phosphatase from potato during the hydrolysis of IP6 (ϵ ~ 7 ‰), where less than three Pi were released. The incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi during the hydrolysis of AMP and GPO4 by phytase yielded a normal isotopic fractionation (ϵ ~ -12 ‰), similar to values reported for acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ. We attribute this similarity in ϵ to the same amino acid sequence motif (RHGXRXP) at the active site of these enzymes, which leads to similar reaction mechanisms. We suggest that the striking

  13. Rapid estimation of sugar release from winter wheat straw during bioethanol production using FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Bekiaris, Georgios; Lindedam, Jane; Peltre, Clément; ...

    2015-06-18

    Complexity and high cost are the main limitations for high-throughput screening methods for the estimation of the sugar release from plant materials during bioethanol production. In addition, it is important that we improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which different chemical components are affecting the degradability of plant material. In this study, Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) was combined with advanced chemometrics to develop calibration models predicting the amount of sugars released after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw during bioethanol production, and the spectra were analysed to identify components associated with recalcitrance. A total of 1122more » wheat straw samples from nine different locations in Denmark and one location in the United Kingdom, spanning a large variation in genetic material and environmental conditions during growth, were analysed. The FTIR-PAS spectra of non-pretreated wheat straw were correlated with the measured sugar release, determined by a high-throughput pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis (HTPH) assay. A partial least square regression (PLSR) calibration model predicting the glucose and xylose release was developed. The interpretation of the regression coefficients revealed a positive correlation between the released glucose and xylose with easily hydrolysable compounds, such as amorphous cellulose and hemicellulose. Additionally, we observed a negative correlation with crystalline cellulose and lignin, which inhibits cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis. FTIR-PAS was used as a reliable method for the rapid estimation of sugar release during bioethanol production. The spectra revealed that lignin inhibited the hydrolysis of polysaccharides into monomers, while the crystallinity of cellulose retarded its hydrolysis into glucose. Amorphous cellulose and xylans were found to contribute significantly to the released amounts of glucose and xylose

  14. Rapid estimation of sugar release from winter wheat straw during bioethanol production using FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bekiaris, Georgios; Lindedam, Jane; Peltre, Clément; Decker, Stephen R.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Magid, Jakob; Bruun, Sander

    2015-06-18

    Complexity and high cost are the main limitations for high-throughput screening methods for the estimation of the sugar release from plant materials during bioethanol production. In addition, it is important that we improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which different chemical components are affecting the degradability of plant material. In this study, Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) was combined with advanced chemometrics to develop calibration models predicting the amount of sugars released after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw during bioethanol production, and the spectra were analysed to identify components associated with recalcitrance. A total of 1122 wheat straw samples from nine different locations in Denmark and one location in the United Kingdom, spanning a large variation in genetic material and environmental conditions during growth, were analysed. The FTIR-PAS spectra of non-pretreated wheat straw were correlated with the measured sugar release, determined by a high-throughput pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis (HTPH) assay. A partial least square regression (PLSR) calibration model predicting the glucose and xylose release was developed. The interpretation of the regression coefficients revealed a positive correlation between the released glucose and xylose with easily hydrolysable compounds, such as amorphous cellulose and hemicellulose. Additionally, we observed a negative correlation with crystalline cellulose and lignin, which inhibits cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis. FTIR-PAS was used as a reliable method for the rapid estimation of sugar release during bioethanol production. The spectra revealed that lignin inhibited the hydrolysis of polysaccharides into monomers, while the crystallinity of cellulose retarded its hydrolysis into glucose. Amorphous cellulose and xylans were found to contribute significantly to the released amounts of glucose and xylose, respectively.

  15. Hydrological controls on dissolved organic carbon production and release from UK peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenner, Nathalie; Freeman, Chris; Worrall, Fred

    Long-term increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from peatlands to British aquatic ecosystems are widely acknowledged, and are now confirmed to occur in a wide variety of boreal and subboreal settings. Depth to water table is probably the single most important hydrological factor governing that DOC generation and will modulate the response of the system to other environmental factors (such as warming and rising atmospheric carbon dioxide) in a changing climate. Many workers have attempted to attribute the rising DOC trend to a single "universal" driving variable. However, two fundamental problems prevent this: (1) universal theories, i.e., climate change theories that can account for rising trends in diverse catchment types, seem insufficient to account for the large observed increases, and (2) regional theories cannot account for the trend in all catchment types. Here it is suggested that multiple and possibly different drivers can modify DOC exports at four stages, namely, production, diffusion, solubility, and transport, with hydrology undoubtedly having a direct or indirect role in all the potential drivers considered here. These mechanisms, and the interactions between them, need to be more fully understood if we are to predict the response of the United Kingdom and global peatland carbon stores to environmental changes. Moreover, if we are to attempt to ameliorate rising DOC, we will need to fully appreciate the implications of restoration of drained peatlands and land management practices, to ensure that carbon losses are reduced on various temporal scales. These are research topics that remain in their infancy.

  16. Resveratrol cross-linked chitosan loaded with phospholipid for controlled release and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hun; Samdani, Kunda J; Yoo, Dong Hyuck; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Nam Hoon; Yoo, Il-Soo; Lee, Joong Hee

    2016-12-01

    Despite the therapeutic effects of resveratrol, its clinical application is restricted by its poor oral bioavailability and low water solubility. To overcome these physicochemical and pharmacokinetic limitations, encapsulation of resveratrol (RV) into nanodevices has been explored. Resveratrol cross-linked chitosan nanoparticles modified with phospholipids (RVC-lipid) were synthesized using a double emulsion technique. The surface morphology of RVC-lipid nanoparticles was evaluated with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particle size was measured using dynamic light scattering technique (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed to identify the crystallographic nature and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to measure changes in the chemical structures of the resveratrol and RVC-lipid nanoparticles. Results showed RVC-lipid nanoparticle had a characteristic amorphous structure, a mean particle sizes of 570nm in DI water and 950nm in ethanol, and an encapsulation efficiency of 63.82% in aqueous medium and 85.59% in ethanol medium. In-vitro release studies demonstrated a slow and sustained release of resveratrol governed by diffusion. Based on assays of antioxidant activity the scavenging activity of RVC-lipid nanoparticles was inferior to that of resveratrol due to its prolonged release. We concluded that phospholipids are the potential carriers for resveratrol.

  17. Antibacterial activity of chitosan nanofiber meshes with liposomes immobilized releasing gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nelson; Martins, Margarida; Martins, Albino; Fonseca, Nuno A; Moreira, João N; Reis, Rui L; Neves, Nuno M

    2015-05-01

    Chitsan (Ch) nanofiber mesh (NFM) is a material with natural characteristics favoring its use in human wound dressing. The present work proposes a gentamicin-loaded liposome immobilized at the surface of Ch NFMs to promote its antibacterial activity. To achieve this purpose, Ch NFMs were functionalized with thiol groups, and gentamicin-loaded liposomes were covalently immobilized by the reaction of the SH groups with maleimide. The maximum concentration of SH groups (55.52±11.19nmolcm(-2)) was obtained at pH 7. A fluorescent dye was covalently bound to the SH groups present at the surface of electrospun Ch NFMs. Their spatial distribution was uniform throughout the NFMs when analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. Gentamicin was successfully encapsulated into the liposomes with an efficiency of 17%. Gentamicin-loaded liposomes were uniformly distributed at the surface of the Ch NFMs and the drug release kinetic showed a sustained release of gentamicin during 16h, achieving a steady state at 24h. The in vitro susceptibility tests confirmed that the gentamicin released from the liposomes immobilized at the surface of electrospun Ch NFM has bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The results show that the developed system has promising performance for wound dressing applications, avoiding infections caused by these common pathogens.

  18. Molecular Machines Regulating the Release Probability of Synaptic Vesicles at the Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Körber, Christoph; Kuner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ) upon arrival of an action potential (AP) at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabilistic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr), is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffering of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying molecules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ. PMID:26973506

  19. Striatal dopamine release and biphasic pattern of locomotor and motor activity under gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Balon, Norbert; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blanc, François; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Weiss, Michel

    2003-05-02

    Inert gas narcosis is a neurological syndrome appearing when humans or animals are exposed to hyperbaric inert gases (nitrogen, argon) composed by motor and cognitive impairments. Inert gas narcosis induces a decrease of the dopamine release at the striatum level, structure involved in the regulation of the extrapyramidal motricity. We have investigated, in freely moving rats exposed to different narcotic conditions, the relationship between the locomotor and motor activity and the striatal dopamine release, using respectively a computerized device that enables a quantitative analysis of this behavioural disturbance and voltammetry. The use of 3 MPa of nitrogen, 2 MPa of argon and 0.1 MPa of nitrous oxide, revealed after a transient phase of hyperactivity, a lower level of the locomotor and motor activity, in relation with the decrease of the striatal dopamine release. It is concluded that the striatal dopamine decrease could be related to the decrease of the locomotor and motor hyperactivity, but that other(s) neurotransmitter(s) could be primarily involved in the behavioural motor disturbances induced by narcotics. This biphasic effect could be of major importance for future pharmacological investigations, and motor categorization, on the basic mechanisms of inert gas at pressure.

  20. Microparticles containing propolis and metronidazole: in vitro characterization, release study and antimicrobial activity against periodontal pathogens.

    PubMed

    de Souza Ferreira, Sabrina Barbosa; de Assis Dias, Bruno Rafael; Obregón, Clarissa Silva; Gomes, Carla Carolina; de Araújo Pereira, Raphaela Regina; Ribeiro Godoy, Janine Silva; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez; Bruschi, Marcos Luciano

    2014-03-01

    Ethylcellulose microparticles containing metronidazole and propolis extractive solution were prepared and evaluated in vitro against periodontal pathogens. Scanning electron microscopy, particle size analysis, drug entrapment efficiency and drug release of microparticles were determined. The antimicrobial activity of microparticles was evaluated against microorganisms of periodontal importance (Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli). It was obtained particles with regular morphology, mean diameter of 1.23 µm, and entrapment efficiency for propolis and metronidazole were 91.41% and 22.23%, respectively. In vitro release studies of propolis and metronidazole from microparticles showed prolonged drug release and controlled by Fickian diffusion. Both propolis and metronidazole displayed activity against the tested strains. Moreover, the results showed that the strains of E. faecalis, S. pyogenes and S. mutans were more susceptible to the propolis and E. faecalis to the metronidazole. It was also observed that the amount of metronidazole to inhibit the microorganism strains in the physical mixture with propolis was smaller than in the metronidazole alone, suggesting potentiation effect between propolis and metronidazole. These microparticles would be useful for developing intermediary or eventual dosage form to be administered into the periodontal pocket more easily and safely.

  1. Promising applications of cyclodextrins in food: Improvement of essential oils retention, controlled release and antiradical activity.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Miriana; Auezova, Lizette; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Fourmentin, Sophie

    2015-10-20

    Essential oils (EOs) are gaining great interest as alternatives for harmful synthetic food preservatives. Due to their volatile nature, they could be applied in food packaging to improve food quality and extend shelf-life. To provide long-term effects of EOs by increasing their retention and ensuring controlled release of their components, they could be encapsulated in cyclodextrins (CDs). Herein, the ability of six CDs to retain nine EOs and to bind their individual components was investigated. Retention capacities and binding abilities of CDs were assessed by static headspace-gas chromatography (SH-GC) using a new validated "rapid method". The ability of CDs to generate controlled release systems was examined by multiple headspace extraction (MHE). Finally, radical scavenging activity of free and encapsulated EOs was evaluated. The highest retention capacity toward the studied EOs was obtained for β-CD and its derivatives (69-78%). Also, β-CD and its derivatives showed, with one exception, the highest Kf values for all the studied guests. In addition, encapsulation in CDs reduced the releasing rate of EO components (from 1.43 to 2.43-fold for β-CD/Satureja montana EO used as a model). Furthermore, the inclusion complexes showed higher ABTS(+) scavenging capacity than the free EOs. Results confirmed the usefulness of CDs as encapsulant for EOs and should encourage their application in food and as part of active packaging systems.

  2. Encapsulation and controlled release of active DNA from uncrosslinked gelatin microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, James Otey, IV

    This thesis work investigates the encapsulation of DNA in gelatin microspheres (GMS) and the subsequent temperature controlled release of the encapsulated DNA from these GMS. DNA-loaded GMS were then used as templates for colloidal satellite assemblies and the released DNA was shown to competitively displace the original partner strands of immobilized DNA on the surface of the assemblies. To support these investigations, hybridization of DNA at colloidal surfaces was also investigated using in situ measurements. DNA hybridization is of particular interest as means of controlling the functionality of colloidal structures because it is uniquely reversible and tunable as well as biocompatible. Gelatin was chosen as the encapsulation matrix for its superior biocompatibility, convenient gel to liquid phase transition at ˜35°C, and economical availability. This thesis is divided into five chapters. Chapter 1 covers the motivation of this work and provides a general background for the materials used. Chapter 2 details the synthesis of GMS and the use of these uncrosslinked GMS as controlled release matrices for active DNA. Bare GMS were not found to be able to inhibit DNA release on their own. With the addition of a polyelectrolyte bilayer, however, clear inhibition of DNA release at room temperature and permitted release at 37 °C was observed. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the thermodynamics and kinetics of primary and secondary DNA hybridization at colloidal surfaces. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the hybridization reaction in situ and compare it to more conventional measurement protocols involving washing steps. The post washing results illuminated the importance of the toehold region and demonstrated changes in kinetics with changing toehold length which are consistent with published solution studies of toehold-mediated strand displacement. The in situ studies enabled the measurement of primary hybridization rate as well as secondary hybridization rate

  3. Platelet activating factor: release from colonic mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis and its effect on colonic secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, T D; Hall, L; Turnberg, L A

    1996-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis. They may stimulate intestinal secretion and contribute to the production of diarrhoea. Platelet activating factor (PAF) may be responsible for a high proportion of this secretory response. Biopsy specimens from inflamed and quiescent mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis and normal human colonic mucosa were cultured or co-cultured. The release of PAF, prostaglandin E2, and leukotriene D4 into the culture medium was measured and the ability of this culture medium, from inflamed and normal tissues, to influence secretion in rat colonic mucosa was assessed. PAF was liberated by inflamed tissue. Its release from quiescent but not normal tissue was stimulated by medium in which inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues had been cultured and by exogenous bradykinin and 5-hydroxytryptamine, but not by histamine. PAF stimulated eicosanoid production. The rise in short circuit current produced in vitro by inflamed tissue culture medium was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist (CV 6209) (46%) (32.4 (2.9) v 17.5 (1.19) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005) and further by combined cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibition (indomethacin plus ICI 207968) (58%) (32.4 (2.9) v 13.6 (1.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005). Mepacrine and hydrocortisone attenuated considerably the electrical response evoked by medium from inflamed mucosa to a similar extent (32.4 (2.9) v 6.3 (1.2) v 5.1 (0.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.001). These data suggest that PAF accounted for 46% of the culture medium secretory effect. Thus, any attempt to block its release in patients with ulcerative colitis may have only a partial effect on their symptoms. PMID:8675086

  4. Meteorite organics in planetary environments: hydrothermal release, surface activity, and microbial utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mautner, M. N.; Leonard, R. L.; Deamer, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    Up to 50% of the organics in the Murchison meteorite, possibly including some of the polymer, is released in high temperature and pressure aqueous environments, to 350 degrees C and 250 bar, that simulate submarine volcanic, hydrothermal or impact-induced conditions. Meteorite organics of prebiotic significance, such as nonanoic acid, glycine, and pyrene survive the hydrothermal conditions. The released material is surface active with surface pressures up to 19.8 x 10(-3) N m-1, and exhibits an extended surface tension isotherm which suggests a mixture of amphiphilic components. One component, nonanoic acid, is shown to form vesicles. The materials extracted under mild conditions, at 120 degrees C, are nutrients for the humic acid bacterium Pseudomonas maltophilia and efficient nutrients for the oligotroph Flavobacterium oryzihabitans, demonstrating the capability of microorganisms to metabolize extraterrestrial organics.

  5. Meteorite organics in planetary environments: hydrothermal release, surface activity, and microbial utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.; Leonard, Robert L.; Deamer, David W.

    1995-02-01

    Up to 50% of the organics in the Murchison meteorite, possibly including some of the polymer, is released in high temperature and pressure aqueous environments, to 350°C and 250 bar, that simulate submarine volcanic, hydrothermal or impact-induced conditions. Meteorite organics of prebiotic significance, such as nonanoic acid, glycine, and pyrene survive the hydrothermal conditions. The released material is surface active with surface pressures up to 19.8 × 10 -3 N m -1, and exhibits an extended surface tension isotherm which suggests a mixture of amphiphilic components. One component, nonanoic acid, is shown to form vesicles. The materials extracted under mild conditions, at 120°C, are nutrients for the humic acid bacterium Pseudomonas maltophilia and efficient nutrients for the oligotroph Flavobacterium oryzihabitans, demonstrating the capability of micro-organisms to metabolize extraterrestrial organics.

  6. The lipid sensor GPR120 promotes brown fat activation and FGF21 release from adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Quesada-López, Tania; Cereijo, Rubén; Turatsinze, Jean-Valery; Planavila, Anna; Cairó, Montserrat; Gavaldà-Navarro, Aleix; Peyrou, Marion; Moure, Ricardo; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Eizirik, Decio L.; Villarroya, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    The thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and browning of white adipose tissue are important components of energy expenditure. Here we show that GPR120, a receptor for polyunsaturated fatty acids, promotes brown fat activation. Using RNA-seq to analyse mouse BAT transcriptome, we find that the gene encoding GPR120 is induced by thermogenic activation. We further show that GPR120 activation induces BAT activity and promotes the browning of white fat in mice, whereas GRP120-null mice show impaired cold-induced browning. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce brown and beige adipocyte differentiation and thermogenic activation, and these effects require GPR120. GPR120 activation induces the release of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) by brown and beige adipocytes, and increases blood FGF21 levels. The effects of GPR120 activation on BAT activation and browning are impaired in FGF21-null mice and cells. Thus, the lipid sensor GPR120 activates brown fat via a mechanism that involves induction of FGF21. PMID:27853148

  7. Anticancer drug released from near IR-activated prodrug overcomes spatiotemporal limits of singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Rajaputra, Pallavi; Bio, Moses; Nkepang, Gregory; Thapa, Pritam; Woo, Sukyung; You, Youngjae

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality where photosensitizer (PS) is activated by visible and near IR light to produce singlet oxygen ((1)O2). However, (1)O2 has a short lifetime (<40 ns) and cannot diffuse (<20 nm) beyond the cell diameter (e.g., ∼ 1800 nm). Thus, (1)O2 damage is both spatially and temporally limited and does not produce bystander effect. In a heterogeneous tumor, cells escaping (1)O2 damage can regrow after PDT treatment. To overcome these limitations, we developed a prodrug concept (PS-L-D) composed of a photosensitizer (PS), an anti-cancer drug (D), and an (1)O2-cleavable linker (L). Upon illumination of the prodrug, (1)O2 is generated, which damages the tumor and also releases anticancer drug. The locally released drug could cause spatially broader and temporally sustained damage, killing the surviving cancer cells after the PDT damage. In our previous report, we presented the superior activity of our prodrug of CA4 (combretastatin A-4), Pc-(L-CA4)2, compared to its non-cleavable analog, Pc-(NCL-CA4)2, that produced only PDT effects. Here, we provide clear evidence demonstrating that the released anticancer drug, CA4, indeed damages the surviving cancer cells over and beyond the spatial and temporal limits of (1)O2. In the limited light illumination experiment, cells in the entire well were killed due to the effect of released anti-cancer drug, whereas only a partial damage was observed in the pseudo-prodrug treated wells. A time-dependent cell survival study showed more cell death in the prodrug-treated cells due to the sustained damage by the released CA4. Cell cycle analysis and microscopic imaging data demonstrated the typical damage patterns by CA4 in the prodrug treated cells. A time-dependent histological study showed that prodrug-treated tumors lacked mitotic bodies, and the prodrug caused broader and sustained tumor size reduction compared to those seen in the tumors treated with the pseudo-prodrug. This data

  8. Formation and Release Behavior of Iron Corrosion Products under the Influence of Bacterial Communities in a Simulated Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the effects of biofilm on the iron corrosion, iron release and associated corrosion by-products is critical for maintaining the water quality and the integrity of drinking water distribution system (DWDS). In this work, iron corrosion experiments under sterilized a...

  9. Prostaglandin E2 release from astrocytes triggers gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron firing via EP2 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Clasadonte, Jerome; Poulain, Pierre; Hanchate, Naresh K; Corfas, Gabriel; Ojeda, Sergio R; Prevot, Vincent

    2011-09-20

    Astrocytes in the hypothalamus release prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in response to cell-cell signaling initiated by neurons and glial cells. Upon release, PGE(2) stimulates the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the neuropeptide that controls reproduction, from hypothalamic neuroendocrine neurons. Whether this effect on GnRH secretion is accompanied by changes in the firing behavior of these neurons is unknown. Using patch-clamp recording we demonstrate that PGE(2) exerts a dose-dependent postsynaptic excitatory effect on GnRH neurons. These effects are mimicked by an EP2 receptor agonist and attenuated by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors. The acute blockade of prostaglandin synthesis by indomethacin (INDO) or the selective inhibition of astrocyte metabolism by fluoroacetate (FA) suppresses the spontaneous firing activity of GnRH neurons in brain slices. Similarly, GnRH neuronal activity is reduced in mice with impaired astrocytic PGE(2) release due to defective erbB signaling in astrocytes. These results indicate that astrocyte-to-neuron communication in the hypothalamus is essential for the activity of GnRH neurons and suggest that PGE(2) acts as a gliotransmitter within the GnRH neurosecretory system.

  10. Activation of AMPA receptor promotes TNF-α release via the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade in RAW264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xiu-Li; Ding, Fan; Li, Hui; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Xiao; Cao, Ji-Min; Gao, Xue

    2015-05-29

    The relationship between glutamate signaling and inflammation has not been well defined. This study aimed to investigate the role of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) in the expression and release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. A series of approaches, including confocal microscopy, immunofluorescency, flow cytometry, ELISA and Western blotting, were used to estimate the expression of AMPAR and downstream signaling molecules, TNF-α release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The results demonstrated that AMPAR was expressed in RAW264.7 cells. AMPA significantly enhanced TNF-α release from RAW264.7 cells, and this effect was abolished by CNQX (AMPAR antagonist). AMPA also induced elevation of ROS production, phosphorylation of c-Src and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in RAW264.7 cells. Blocking c-Src by PP2, scavenging ROS by glutathione (GSH) or inhibiting NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) decreased TNF-α production from RAW264.7 cells. We concluded that AMPA promotes TNF-α release in RAW264.7 macrophages likely through the following signaling cascade: AMPAR activation → ROS generation → c-Src phosphorylation → NF-κB activation → TNF-α elevation. The study suggests that AMPAR may participate in macrophage activation and inflammation. - Highlights: • AMPAR is expressed in RAW264.7 macrophages and is upregulated by AMPA stimulation. • Activation of AMPAR stimulates TNF-α release in macrophages through the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade. • Macrophage AMPAR signaling may play an important role in inflammation.

  11. TRPA1 and TRPV4 activation in human odontoblasts stimulates ATP release.

    PubMed

    Egbuniwe, O; Grover, S; Duggal, A K; Mavroudis, A; Yazdi, M; Renton, T; Di Silvio, L; Grant, A D

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism of pain in dentine hypersensitivity is poorly understood but proposed to result from the activation of dental sensory neurons in response to dentinal fluid movements. Odontoblasts have been suggested to contribute to thermal and mechanosensation in the tooth via expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. However, a mechanism by which odontoblasts could modulate neuronal activity has not been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated functional TRP channel expression in human odontoblast-like cells and measured ATP release in response to TRP channel activation. Human immortalized dental pulp cells were driven toward an odontoblast phenotype by culture in conditioned media. Functional expression of TRP channels was determined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and ratiometric calcium imaging with Fura-2. ATP release was measured using a luciferin-luciferase assay. Expression of mRNA for TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRPV4 but not TRPM8 was detected in odontoblasts by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Expression of TRPV4 protein was detected by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. The TRPA1 agonists allyl isothiocyanate and cinnamaldehyde and the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A caused a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that was inhibited by the selective antagonists HC030031, AP18, and HC067047, respectively. In contrast, exposure to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin or the TRPM8 agonist icilin had no effect on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Treatment with allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde, or GSK1016790A caused an increase in ATP concentration in culture medium that was abolished by preincubation with TRP channel antagonists. These data demonstrate that activation of TRPA1 and TRPV4 channels in human odontoblast-like cells can stimulate ATP release. We were unable to confirm the presence of thermosensitive TRPV1 and TRPM8 that has previously been reported in odontoblasts.

  12. Hypocretin-1 causes G protein activation and increases ACh release in rat pons.

    PubMed

    Bernard, René; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2003-10-01

    The effects of the arousal-promoting peptide hypocretin on brain stem G protein activation and ACh release were examined using 16 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In vitro[35S]GTPgammaS autoradiography was used to test the hypothesis that hypocretin-1-stimulated G protein activation is concentration-dependent and blocked by the hypocretin receptor antagonist SB-334867. Activated G proteins were quantified in dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), locus coeruleus (LC) and pontine reticular nucleus oral part (PnO) and caudal part (PnC). Concentration-response data revealed a significant (P < 0.001) effect of hypocretin-1 (2-2000 nm) in all brain regions examined. Maximal increases over control levels of [35S]GTPgammaS binding were 37% (DR), 58% (LC), 52% (PnO) and 44% (PnC). SB-334867 (2 micro m) significantly (P < 0.002) blocked hypocretin-1 (200 nm)-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in all four nuclei. This is the first autoradiographic demonstration that hypocretin-1 activates G proteins in arousal-related brain stem nuclei as a result of specific receptor interactions. This finding suggests that some hypocretin receptors in brain stem couple to inhibitory G proteins. In vivo microdialysis was used to test the hypothesis that PnO administration of hypocretin-1 increases ACh release in PnO. Dialysis delivery of hypocretin-1 (100 micro m) significantly (P < 0.002) increased (87%) ACh release. This finding is consistent with the interpretation that one mechanism by which hypocretin promotes arousal is by enhancing cholinergic neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation.

  13. Induction of apoptosis by tanshinone I via cytochrome c release in activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Nan, Ji-Xing; Zhao, Yu Zhe; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Sang Jun; Sohn, Dong Hwan

    2003-04-01

    Hepatic stellate cells play central roles in hepatic fibrosis. The therapeutic goal in hepatic fibrosis is to halt or reverse fibrosis. Apoptosis is suggested to eliminate activated hepatic stellate cells in fibrosis. Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional medicine used to improve blood circulation and treat chronic hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis. We investigated the effect of tanshinone I, an ingredient of Salvia miltiorrhiza, on the apoptotic death of rat hepatic stellate cells transformed by simian virus 40 (T-HSC/Cl-6), which retains the features of activated stellate cells. Treatment of T-HSC/Cl-6 cells with tanshinone I resulted in the induction of typical DNA fragmentation and DNA ladder formation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis. Treatment of T-HSC/Cl-6 cells with tanshinone I caused activation of caspase-3 and subsequent proteolytic cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Tanshinone I induced mitochondrial membrane dipolarization and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that tanshinone I induces apoptosis of T-HSC/Cl-6 cells and that tanshinone I-induced apoptosis involves caspase activation through cytochrome c release and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential.

  14. Cell death, BAX activation, and HMGB1 release during infection with Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Jungas, Thomas; Verbeke, Philippe; Darville, Toni; Ojcius, David M

    2004-11-01

    Infection by a number of Chlamydia species leads to resistance of the host cell to apoptosis, followed by induction of host-cell death. In a population of infected cells that displays protection against staurosporine-induced apoptosis among the adherent cells, we find that cells that had been recovered from the supernatant share characteristics of both apoptosis and necrosis, as assayed by the propidium iodide (PI)-annexin V double-labeling technique. Cell death was observed in both an epithelial cell line and primary fibroblasts, although the primary cells had a higher propensity to die through apoptosis than the immortalized cell line. Staurosporine-mediated activation of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member, BAX, was inhibited in the epithelial cell line infected for 32 h with the lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV/L2) but not the murine pneumonitis (MoPn) strain of C. trachomatis, but inhibition of staurosporine-mediated BAX activation disappeared after 48 h of infection with the LGV/L2 strain. Conversely, infection with MoPn (C. muridarum) but not LGV/L2 led to BAX activation after 72 h, as previously reported for shorter (48 h) infection with the guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) serovar of C. psittaci (C. caviae). These results suggest that the ability to inhibit staurosporine-mediated BAX activation or to activate BAX due to the infection itself may vary as a function of the chlamydial strain. Interestingly, both the epithelial cells and the fibroblasts also released high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) during infection, although much less HMGB1 was released from fibroblasts, consistent with the higher level of apoptosis observed in the primary cells. HMGB1 is released preferentially by necrotic or permeabilized viable cells, but not apoptotic cells. In the extracellular space, HMGB1 promotes inflammation through interaction with specific cell-surface receptors. Higher levels of HMGB1 were also measured in the genital-tract secretions of mice

  15. Locus Ceruleus Norepinephrine Release: A Central Regulator of CNS Spatio-Temporal Activation?

    PubMed Central

    Atzori, Marco; Cuevas-Olguin, Roberto; Esquivel-Rendon, Eric; Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C.; Saderi, Nadia; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Treviño, Mario; Pineda, Juan C.; Salgado, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is synthesized in the Locus Coeruleus (LC) of the brainstem, from where it is released by axonal varicosities throughout the brain via volume transmission. A wealth of data from clinics and from animal models indicates that this catecholamine coordinates the activity of the central nervous system (CNS) and of the whole organism by modulating cell function in a vast number of brain areas in a coordinated manner. The ubiquity of NE receptors, the daunting number of cerebral areas regulated by the catecholamine, as well as the variety of cellular effects and of their timescales have contributed so far to defeat the attempts to integrate central adrenergic function into a unitary and coherent framework. Since three main families of NE receptors are represented—in order of decreasing affinity for the catecholamine—by: α2 adrenoceptors (α2Rs, high affinity), α1 adrenoceptors (α1Rs, intermediate affinity), and β adrenoceptors (βRs, low affinity), on a pharmacological basis, and on the ground of recent studies on cellular and systemic central noradrenergic effects, we propose that an increase in LC tonic activity promotes the emergence of four global states covering the whole spectrum of brain activation: (1) sleep: virtual absence of NE, (2) quiet wake: activation of α2Rs, (3) active wake/physiological stress: activation of α2- and α1-Rs, (4) distress: activation of α2-, α1-, and β-Rs. We postulate that excess intensity and/or duration of states (3) and (4) may lead to maladaptive plasticity, causing—in turn—a variety of neuropsychiatric illnesses including depression, schizophrenic psychoses, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit. The interplay between tonic and phasic LC activity identified in the LC in relationship with behavioral response is of critical importance in defining the short- and long-term biological mechanisms associated with the basic states postulated for the CNS. While the model has the potential to explain a

  16. Biological activity of rhBMP-2 released from PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Oldham, J B; Lu, L; Zhu, X; Porter, B D; Hefferan, T E; Larson, D R; Currier, B L; Mikos, A G; Yaszemski, M J

    2000-06-01

    Human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) has been proven effective in stimulating the regeneration of bone in both skeletal and extraskeletal locations. Through encapsulation within, and release from, biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres, a proven vehicle for sustained delivery of various proteins, the local concentrations of rhBMP-2 could be maintained at optimal levels to stimulate bone regeneration and remodeling at the site of healing in diverse clinical settings. Thus the purpose of this work was to investigate the encapsulation of rhBMP-2 in PLGA microspheres and its biologic activity upon release. Using in vitro tests in simulated body fluids, the effect of rhBMP-2 released from PLGA microspheres upon osteoblast cell cultures was found to be statistically similar to the effect produced by positive controls consisting of nonencapsulated aqueous rhBMP-2 in simulated body fluids. This clarifies an important step in skeletal tissue engineering strategies aimed at the use of encapsulated rhBMP-2 to stimulate bone regeneration and remodeling.

  17. Electrochemical release testing of nickel-titanium orthodontic wires in artificial saliva using thin layer activation.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, M; Gilliland, D; Ceccone, G; Chiesa, R; Cigada, A

    2005-11-01

    Alloys based on Ni-Ti intermetallics generally exhibit special shape memory and pseudoelastic properties, which make them desirable for use in the dental field as orthodontic wires. The possibility of nickel release from these materials is of high concern, because the allergenicity of this element. The aim of this study was to test pseudoelastic Ni-Ti wires in simulated physiological conditions, investigating the combined effect of strain and fluoridated media: the wires were examined both under strained (5% tensile strain) and unstrained conditions, in fluoridated artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. Real time electrochemical nickel release testing was performed using a novel application of a radiotracer based method, thin layer activation (TLA). TLA was validated, in unstrained conditions, against adsorptive stripping voltammetry methodology. Control tests were also performed in non-fluoridated artificial saliva. From our research it transpired that the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Ti alloy is highly affected by the fluoride content, showing a release of 4.79+/-0.10 microg/cm2/day, but, differently from other biomaterials, it does not seem to be affected by elastic tensile strain. The application of the TLA method in the biomedical field appears a suitable technique to monitor in real time the corrosion behaviour of biomedical devices.

  18. Deuterium-oxide-induced histamine release from basophils of allergic subjects. I. Responsiveness to deuterium oxide requires an activation step

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimierczak, W.; Plaut, M.; Knauer, K.A.; Meier, H.L.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1984-04-01

    Basophils from many atopic persons, and especially asthmatic patients, have been shown to release histamine in response to 44% deuterium oxide (D2O), whereas basophils from nonatopic persons do not release histamine. The present experiments analyzed the mechanisms by which D/sub 2/O mediated release. It was found that although D/sub 2/O induced release from washed leukocytes, it failed to induce release from whole blood or from leukocytes that had sedimented but had not been washed. The kinetics of release after washing were rapid and were equivalent regardless of the temperature at which cells were sedimented (O degrees or 37 degrees C). Washed cells became desensitized to the action of D/sub 2/O within 30 to 60 min at 37 degrees C, whereas unwashed leukocytes did not become desensitized. Serum or plasma inhibited D/sub 2/O-induced release, although high concentrations (1/5) were less inhibitory than lower ones (1/10 to 1/100). Basophils from D/sub 2/O responders also released histamine in response to a ''platelet enhancing factor'' (PEF), whereas those from D/sub 2/O nonresponders did not. As with D/sub 2/O-mediated release, PEF-mediated release occurred only with washed leukocytes, desensitized within 30 to 60 min at 37 degrees C, and was inhibited by serum. These results suggest that D/sub 2/O induces histamine release by augmenting the effects of an endogenous activation mechanism, and that PEF acts on the same (D/sub 2/O-responsive) donors to augment this activation mechanism. Cell activation, as well as desensitization of this activation mechanism, occurs rapidly when basophils are washed free of plasma inhibitors and placed at 37 degrees C.

  19. Influences of two antibiotic contaminants on the production, release and toxicity of microcystins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Guan, Yuntao; Wang, Yan; Huang, Lihui

    2012-03-01

    The influences of spiramycin and amoxicillin on the algal growth, production and release of target microcystins (MCs), MC-LR, MC-RR and MC-YR, in Microcystis aeruginosa were investigated through the seven-day exposure test. Spiramycin were more toxic to M. aeruginosa than amoxicillin according to their 50 percent effective concentrations (EC(50)) in algal growth, which were 1.15 and 8.03 μg/l, respectively. At environmentally relevant concentrations of 100 ng/l-1 μg/l, spiramycin reduced the total MC content per algal cell and inhibited the algal growth, while exposure to amoxicillin led to increases in the total MC content per algal cell and the percentage of extracellular MCs, without affecting the algal growth. Toxicity of MCs in combination with each antibiotic was assessed in the luminescent bacteria test using the toxic unit (TU) approach. The 50 percent effective concentrations for the mixtures (EC(50mix)) were 0.56 TU and 0.48 TU for MCs in combination with spiramycin and amoxicillin, respectively, indicating a synergistic interaction between MCs and each antibiotic (EC(50mix)<1TU). After seven-day exposure to 100 ng/l-1 μg/l of antibiotics, spiramycin-treated algal media and amoxicillin-treated algal media showed significantly lower (p<0.05) and higher (p<0.05) inhibition on the luminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum, respectively, compared with the untreated algal medium. These results indicated that the toxicity of MCs were alleviated by spiramycin and enhanced by amoxicillin, and the latter effect would increase threats to the aquatic environment.

  20. Synchronous activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription and secretion by pulsatile kisspeptin stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Han Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Park, Sung Ho; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Jae-Yong; Seong, Jae Young; Lightman, Stafford L.; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile release of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is essential for pituitary gonadotrope function. Although the importance of pulsatile GnRH secretion has been recognized for several decades, the mechanisms underlying GnRH pulse generation in hypothalamic neural networks remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the ultradian rhythm of GnRH gene transcription in single GnRH neurons using cultured hypothalamic slices prepared from transgenic mice expressing a GnRH promoter-driven destabilized luciferase reporter. Although GnRH promoter activity in each GnRH neuron exhibited an ultradian pattern of oscillations with a period of ∼10 h, GnRH neuronal cultures exhibited partially synchronized bursts of GnRH transcriptional activity at ∼2-h intervals. Surprisingly, pulsatile administration of kisspeptin, a potent GnRH secretagogue, evoked dramatic synchronous activation of GnRH gene transcription with robust stimulation of pulsatile GnRH secretion. We also addressed the issue of hierarchical interaction between the circadian and ultradian rhythms by using Bmal1-deficient mice with defective circadian clocks. The circadian molecular oscillator barely affected basal ultradian oscillation of GnRH transcription but was heavily involved in kisspeptin-evoked responses of GnRH neurons. In conclusion, we have clearly shown synchronous bursts of GnRH gene transcription in the hypothalamic GnRH neuronal population in association with episodic neurohormone secretion, thereby providing insight into GnRH pulse generation. PMID:23509283

  1. Pyrazolopyrimidines: synthesis, effect on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Quintela, J M; Peinador, C; Moreira, M J; Alfonso, A; Botana, L M; Riguera, R

    2001-04-01

    A series of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (3--6) substituted at positions 1 (R(1)=Ph, H, tert-butyl and ribosetribenzoate), 4 (R(2)=chlorine, nitrogen and oxygen nucleophiles), and 6 (dimethylamino) have been synthesized and their effect on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells measured. After chemical stimulation, (polymer 48/80), several compounds (i.e. 3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4g, 5a), produce inhibition two to three times higher (40--60%) than DSCG but this action is lower after preincubation. 4b (R(1)=Ph, R(2)=NHCH(2)Ph; 50--70% inhibition) and 5a (R(1)=H, R(2)=OMe; 50--55% inhibition) are the most active ones in both experiments. With ovoalbumin as stimulus, several pyrazolopyrimidines show inhibition similar to DSCG, the most active compounds being 6a--d (IC(50)=12--16 microM; R(1)=ribosetribenzoate, R(2)=methoxy and amino). Compounds 4e (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=OMe) and 4g (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=piperidino) are inducers of the release of histamine (60 and 150% increase). Compounds 4b and 4c showed cytotoxic activity (IC(50)=1 microg/mL) to HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

  2. Modified hydrotalcite-like compounds as active fillers of biodegradable polymers for drug release and food packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Umberto; Nocchetti, Morena; Tammaro, Loredana; Vittoria, Vittoria

    2012-11-01

    This review treats the recent patents and related literature, mainly from the Authors laboratories, on biomedical and food packaging applications of nano-composites constituted of biodegradable polymers filled with micro or nano crystals of organically modified Layered Double Hydroxides of Hydrotalcite type. After a brief outline of the chemical and structural aspects of Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) and of their manipulation via intercalation of functional molecular anions to obtain materials for numerous, sometime unexpected applications, the review approaches the theme in three separated parts. Part 1 deals with the synthetic method used to prepare the pristine Mg-Al and Zn-Al HTlc and with the procedures of their functionalization with anti-inflammatory (diclofenac), antibacterial (chloramphenicol hemisuccinate), antifibrinolytic (tranexamic acid) drugs and with benzoates with antimicrobial activity. Procedures used to form (nano) composites of polycaprolactone, used as an example of biodegradable polymer, and functionalized HTlc are also reported. Part 2 discusses a patent and related papers on the preparation and biomedical use of a controlled delivery system of the above mentioned pharmacologically active substances. After an introduction dealing with the recent progress in the field of local drug delivery systems, the chemical and structural aspects of the patented system constituted of a biodegradable polymer and HTlc loaded with the active substances will be presented together with an extensive discussion of the drug release in physiological medium. Part 3 deals with a recent patent and related papers on chemical, structural and release property of antimicrobial species of polymeric films containing antimicrobial loaded HTlc able to act as active packaging for food products prolonging their shelf life.

  3. Putative implication of alpha-amylase loop 7 in the mechanism of substrate binding and reaction products release.

    PubMed

    André, G; Tran, V

    2004-10-05

    Alpha-amylases are widespread endo-enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of internal alpha-(1,4) glycosidic linkages of starch polymers. Molecular modeling of amylose-amylase interactions is a step toward enzymatic mechanism understanding and rational design of new enzymes. From the crystallographic complex of barley alpha-amylase AMY2-acarbose, the static aspects of amylose-amylase docking have been characterized with a model of maltododecaose (DP12) (G. André, A. Buléon, R. Haser, and V. Tran, Biopolymers 1999, Vol. 50, pp. 751-762; G. André and V. Tran, Special Publication no. 246 1999, The Royal Society of Chemistry, H. J. Gilbert, G. J. Davies, B. Henrissat, and B. Svensson, Eds., Cambridge, pp. 165-174). These studies, consistent with the experimental subsite mapping (K. Bak-Jensen, G. André, V. Tran, and B. Svensson, Journal of Biological Chemistry, to be published), propose a propagation scheme for an amylose chain in the active cleft of AMY2. The topographical overview of alpha-amylases identified loop 7 as a conserved segment flanking the active site. Since some crystallographic experiments suspected its high flexibility, its putative motion was explored through a robotic scheme, an alternate route to dynamics simulations that consume CPU time. The present article describes the characteristics of the flexibility of loop 7: location and motion in AMY2. A back-and-forth motion with a large amplitude of more than 0.6 nm was evaluated. This movement could be triggered by two hinge residues. It results in the loop flipping over the active site to enhance the docking of the native helical substrate through specific interactions, it positions the catalytic residues, it distorts the substrate towards its transition state geometry, and finally monitors the release of the products after hydrolysis. The residues involved in the process are now rational mutation points in the hands of molecular biologists.

  4. Umami Receptor Activation Increases Duodenal Bicarbonate Secretion via Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Release in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joon-Ho; Inoue, Takuya; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Luminal nutrient chemosensing during meal ingestion is mediated by intestinal endocrine cells, which regulate secretion and motility via the release of gut hormones. We have reported that luminal coperfusion of l-Glu and IMP, common condiments providing the umami or proteinaceous taste, synergistically increases duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) possibly via taste receptor heterodimers, taste receptor type 1, member 1 (T1R1)/R3. We hypothesized that glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) or glucagon-like peptide (GLP) is released by duodenal perfusion with l-Glu/IMP. We measured DBS with pH and CO2 electrodes through a perfused rat duodenal loop in vivo. GIP, exendin (Ex)-4 (GLP-1 receptor agonist), or GLP-2 was intravenously infused (0.01–1 nmol/kg/h). l-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally perfused with or without bolus intravenous injection (3 or 30 nmol/kg) of the receptor antagonists Pro3GIP, Ex-3(9-39), or GLP-2(3-33). GIP or GLP-2 infusion dose-dependently increased DBS, whereas Ex-4 infusion gradually decreased DBS. Luminal perfusion of l-Glu/IMP increased DBS, with no effect of Pro3GIP or Ex-3(9-39), whereas GLP-2(3-33) inhibited l-Glu/IMP-induced DBS. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)(6–28) intravenously or NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester coperfusion inhibited the effect of l-Glu/IMP. Perfusion of l-Glu/IMP increased portal venous concentrations of GLP-2, followed by a delayed increase of GLP-1, with no effect on GIP release. GLP-1/2 and T1R1/R3 were expressed in duodenal endocrine-like cells. These results suggest that luminal l-Glu/IMP-induced DBS is mediated via GLP-2 release and receptor activation followed by VIP and nitric oxide release. Because GLP-1 is insulinotropic and GLP-2 is intestinotrophic, umami receptor activation may have additional benefits in glucose metabolism and duodenal mucosal protection and regeneration. PMID:21846840

  5. Neurally released pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide enhances guinea pig intrinsic cardiac neurone excitability.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, John D; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Hoover, Donald B; Parsons, Rodney L

    2007-07-01

    Intracellular recordings were made in vitro from guinea-pig cardiac ganglia to determine whether endogenous neuropeptides such as pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) or substance P released during tetanic neural stimulation modulate cardiac neurone excitability and/or contribute to slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (sEPSPs). When nicotinic and muscarinic receptors were blocked by hexamethonium and atropine, 20 Hz stimulation for 10 s initiated a sEPSP in all innervated neurones. In 40% of the cells, excitability was enhanced after termination of the sEPSP. This suggested that non-cholinergic receptor-mediated mechanisms contributed to the sEPSP and modulated neuronal excitability. Exogenous PACAP and substance P initiated a slow depolarization in the neurones whereas neuronal excitability was only increased by PACAP. When ganglia were treated with the PAC1 antagonist PACAP6-38 (500 nM), the sEPSP evoked by 20 Hz stimulation was reduced by approximately 50% and an enhanced excitability occurred in only 10% of the cells. These observations suggested that PACAP released from preganglionic nerve terminals during tetanic stimulation enhanced neuronal excitability and evoked sEPSPs. After addition of 1 nM PACAP to the bath, 7 of 9 neurones exhibited a tonic firing pattern whereas in untreated preparations, the neurons had a phasic firing pattern. PACAP6-38 (500 nM) diminished the increase in excitability caused by 1 nM PACAP so that only 4 of 13 neurones exhibited a tonic firing pattern and the other 9 cells retained a phasic firing pattern. These findings indicate that PACAP can be released by tetanic neural stimulation in vitro and increase the excitability of intrinsic cardiac neurones. We hypothesize that in vivo PACAP released during preganglionic firing may modulate neurotransmission within the intrinsic cardiac ganglia.

  6. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  7. Fate of corrosion products released from stainless steel in marine sediments and seawater. Part 2. Sequim Bay clayey silt

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.L.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments in which neutron-activated 347 stainless steel specimens were exposed to clayey silt from Sequim Bay, Washington. The properties and trace metal geochemistry of the sediment and the amounts of corrosion products that were released under oxic and reduced conditions and their distribution among different chemical fractions of the sediment are discussed. The distributions of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu among different chemical forms in the Sequim Bay sediment show that DTPA removed <10% of extractable Cr, Fe and Mn, approx. 20% of extractable Ni and approx. 30% of extractable Cu. The inorganic fraction (material soluble in 2.5% acetic acid) accounted for approx. 30% of total extractable Mn and approx. 10% or less of Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu. Major portions of Cr and Cu, and a large amount of Fe were in the organic fraction. Extractable Mn, Fe and Ni were associated with hydrous oxides likely as coatings on the mineral substrate of the sediment. No Co was detectable in any of the extracts. (PSB)

  8. Thimerosal compromises human dendritic cell maturation, IL-12 production, chemokine release, and T-helper polarization.

    PubMed

    Loison, Emily; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Thimerosal is a preservative used in multidose vials of vaccine formulations to prevent bacterial and fungal contamination. We recently reported that nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal induce cell cycle arrest of human T cells activated via the TCR and inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production, thus interfering with T-cell functions. Given the essential role of dendritic cells (DCs) in T-cell polarization and vaccine immunity, we studied the influence of non-toxic concentrations of thimerosal on DC maturation and functions. Ex-vivo exposure of human monocyte-derived DCs to nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal prevented LPS-induced DC maturation, as evidenced by the inhibition of morphological changes and a decreased expression of the maturation markers CD86 and HLA-DR. In addition thimerosal dampened their proinflammatory response, in particular the production of the Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12, as well as TNF-α and IL-6. DC-dependent T helper polarization was altered, leading to a decreased production of IFN-γ IP10 and GM-CSF and increased levels of IL-8, IL-9, and MIP-1α. Although multi-dose vials of vaccines containing thimerosal remain important for vaccine delivery, our results alert about the ex-vivo immunomodulatory effects of thimerosal on DCs, a key player for the induction of an adaptive response.

  9. Hypocretin (orexin) receptor subtypes differentially enhance acetylcholine release and activate g protein subtypes in rat pontine reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, René; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2006-04-01

    The hypothalamic peptides hypocretin-1 (orexin A) and -2 (orexin B) promote wakefulness by mechanisms that are not well understood. Defects in hypocretinergic neurotransmission underlie the human sleep disorder narcolepsy. Hypocretins alter cell excitability via two receptor subtypes, hypocretin receptor subtype 1 (hcrt-r1) and hypocretin receptor subtype 2 (hcrt-r2). This study aimed to identify G protein subtypes activated by hypocretin in rat pontine reticular nucleus oral part (PnO) and the hypocretin receptor subtype modulating acetylcholine (ACh) release in the PnO. G protein activation was quantified using in vitro [(35)S]guanylyl-5'-O-(gamma-thio)triphosphate autoradiography. ACh release was measured using in vivo microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography. Hypocretin-1-stimulated G protein activation was significantly decreased by pertussis toxin, demonstrating that some hypocretin receptors in rat PnO activate inhibitory G proteins. Hypocretin-1-stimulated ACh release was not blocked by pertussis toxin, supporting the conclusion that the hypocretin receptors modulating ACh release in rat PnO activate stimulatory G proteins. Hypocretin-1 and -2 each caused a concentration-dependent increase in ACh release with similar potencies, indicating that hcrt-r2 modulates ACh release in PnO. Hypocretin-1 caused a significantly greater increase in ACh release than hypocretin-2, suggesting a role for hcrt-r1 in the modulation of PnO ACh release. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that hypocretin receptors in rat PnO signal via inhibitory and stimulatory G proteins and that ACh release in rat PnO is modulated by hcrt-r2 and hcrt-r1. One mechanism by which hypocretin promotes arousal may be to increase ACh release in the pontine reticular formation.

  10. RIG-I activation induces the release of extracellular vesicles with antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Daßler-Plenker, Juliane; Reiners, Katrin S.; van den Boorn, Jasper G.; Hansen, Hinrich P.; Putschli, Bastian; Barnert, Sabine; Schuberth-Wagner, Christine; Schubert, Rolf; Tüting, Thomas; Hallek, Michael; Schlee, Martin; Hartmann, Gunther; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Coch, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activation of the innate immune receptor retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) by its specific ligand 5′-triphosphate-RNA (3pRNA) triggers antitumor immunity predominantly via NK cell activation and direct apoptosis induction in tumor cells. However, how NK cells are mobilized to attack the tumor cells remains elusive. Here, we show that RIG-I activation induced the secretion of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from melanoma cells, which by themselves revealed antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. RIG-I-induced EVs from melanoma cells exhibited an increased expression of the NKp30-ligand (BAG6, BAT3) on their surface triggering NK cell-mediated lysis of melanoma cells via activation of the cytotoxicity NK cell-receptor NKp30. Moreover, systemic administration of RIG-I-induced melanoma-EVs showed a potent antitumor activity in a melanoma mouse model in vivo. In conclusion, our data establish a new RIG-I-dependent pathway leading to NK cell-mediated tumor cell killing. PMID:27853642

  11. Genetic variation in COMT activity impacts learning and dopamine release capacity in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Eleanor H.; Morud, Julia; Winiger, Vanessa; Biezonski, Dominik; Zhu, Judy P.; Bach, Mary Elizabeth; Malleret, Gael; Polan, H. Jonathan; Ng-Evans, Scott; Phillips, Paul E.M.; Kellendonk, Christoph; Kandel, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    A common genetic polymorphism that results in increased activity of the dopamine regulating enzyme COMT (the COMT Val158 allele) has been found to associate with poorer cognitive performance and increased susceptibility to develop psychiatric disorders. It is generally assumed that this increase in COMT activity influences cognitive function and psychiatric disease risk by increasing dopamine turnover in cortical synapses, though this cannot be directly measured in humans. Here we explore a novel transgenic mouse model of increased COMT activity, equivalent to the relative increase in activity observed with the human COMT Val158 allele. By performing an extensive battery of behavioral tests, we found that COMT overexpressing mice (COMT-OE mice) exhibit cognitive deficits selectively in the domains that are affected by the COMT Val158 allele, stimulus–response learning and working memory, functionally validating our model of increased COMT activity. Although we detected no changes in the level of markers for dopamine synthesis and dopamine transport, we found that COMT-OE mice display an increase in dopamine release capacity in the striatum. This result suggests that increased COMT activity may not only affect dopamine signaling by enhancing synaptic clearance in the cortex, but may also cause changes in presynaptic dopamine function in the striatum. These changes may underlie the behavioral deficits observed in the mice and might also play a role in the cognitive deficits and increased psychiatric disease risk associated with genetic variation in COMT activity in humans. PMID:24639487

  12. Asbestos-activated peritoneal macrophages release a factors(s) which inhibits lymphocyte mitogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, K.; Davis, J.M.G.; James, K.

    1984-10-01

    Intraperitoneal asbestos injection in mice has previously been reported to elicit an activated macrophage population. In the present study supernatants from such macrophages were tested for their effect on thymocyte mitogenesis in response to concanavalin A; control supernantants were obtained from saline- and latex-elicited macrophages. Supernatants from asbestos-elicited macrophages were significantly inhibitory to thymocyte mitogenesis while saline- and latex-elicited macrophages did not release significant amounts of such activity. Asbestos-activated macrophage supernatants were inhibitory in a dose-dependent way and the activity was not secreted by macrophages from mice which had received asbestos in the long term. The inhibitory activity was partially dialysable. Supernatants prepared by treating macrophages in vitro with a lethal dose of asbestos were not inhibitory suggesting that the inhibitory activity in the supernatants of asbestos-activated macrophages did not leak from dead or dying cells. The asbestos macrophage supernatant was also significantly inhibitory to mature T-cell-enriched spleen cells but had no effect on fibroblasts, suggesting that the inhibitory effect could be lymphoid cell specific.

  13. Silver nanoparticles temporarily retard NO2 - production without significantly affecting N2 O release by Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Michels, Camila; Yang, Yu; Moreira Soares, Hugo; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-10-01

    Nitrifying bacteria are highly susceptible to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the effect of sublethal exposure to AgNPs after their release of nitrogenous compounds of environmental concern (e.g., the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide [N2 O] and the common water pollutant nitrite [NO2 -]) has not been systematically investigated. The present study reports the effect of AgNPs (and potentially released silver ions [Ag(+) ]) on NO2 - and N2 O production by Nitrosomonas europaea, and on the transcription of the associated genes. The release of NO2 - was more negatively affected than the production of N2 O. For example, exposure to AgNPs at 0.075 mg/L temporarily enhanced N2 O production (by 12%) without affecting nitrite release, whereas higher AgNP concentrations (>0.25 mg/L) inhibited NO2 - release (by >12%) but not N2 O production. Transcriptomic analyses corroborated these trends; AgNPs at 0.075 mg/L increased the expression of the nitric oxide reductase gene (norQ) associated with N2 O production (by 5.3-fold to 12.8-fold), whereas both 0.075 mg/L of Ag(+) and 0.75 mg/L of AgNPs down-regulated the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA2; by 0.08-fold to 0.15-fold and 0.32-fold to 0.64-fold, respectively), the nitrite reductase gene (nirK; by 0.01-fold to 0.02-fold and 0.22-fold to 0.44-fold, respectively), and norQ (by 0.11-fold to 0.15-fold and 0.32-fold to 0.57-fold, respectively). These results suggest that AgNP release to sewage treatment plants and land application of AgNP-containing biosolids should be minimized because of their potential temporary stimulation of N2 O release and interference with nitrification. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:2231-2235. © 2015 SETAC.

  14. Actinide, Activation Product and Fission Product Decay Data for Reactor-based Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.J.; Dean, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.

    2014-06-15

    The UK Activation Product Decay Data Library was first released in September 1977 as UK-PADD1, to be followed by regular improvements on an almost yearly basis up to the assembly of UKPADD6.12 in March 2013. Similarly, the UK Heavy Element and Actinide Decay Data Library followed in December 1981 as UKHEDD1, with the implementation of various modifications leading to UKHEDD2.6, February 2008. Both the data content and evaluation procedures are defined, and the most recent evaluations are described in terms of specific radionuclides and the resulting consistency of their recommended decay-data files. New versions of the UKPADD and UKHEDD libraries are regularly submitted to the NEA Data Bank for possible inclusion in the JEFF library.

  15. Abrasion Testing of Products Containing Nanomaterials, SOP-R-2: Scientific Operating Procedure Series: Release (R)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    Possible applications include CNTs incorporated in epoxy or other polymer matrices and TiO2 embedded in concrete . The particle number/mass concentration...i.e., epoxy test samples, CNT reinforced epoxy test samples, commercially available CNTs, concrete disks, plates painted with ENM-containing...show possible release of 30 nm TiO2 particles from self-cleaning concrete . ERDC SR-16-2 13 Figure 3. Total particle concentration released

  16. Effect of ozonolysis pretreatment parameters on the sugar release, ozone consumption and ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Travaini, Rodolfo; Barrado, Enrique; Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    A L9(3)(4) orthogonal array (OA) experimental design was applied to study the four parameters considered most important in the ozonolysis pretreatment (moisture content, ozone concentration, ozone/oxygen flow and particle size) on ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse (SCB). Statistical analysis highlighted ozone concentration as the highest influence parameter on reaction time and sugars release after enzymatic hydrolysis. The increase on reaction time when decreasing the ozone/oxygen flow resulted in small differences of ozone consumptions. Design optimization for sugars release provided a parameters combination close to the best experimental run, where 77.55% and 56.95% of glucose and xylose yields were obtained, respectively. When optimizing the grams of sugar released by gram of ozone, the highest influence parameter was moisture content, with a maximum yield of 2.98gSUGARS/gO3. In experiments on hydrolysates fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae provided ethanol yields around 80%, while Pichia stipitis was completely inhibited.

  17. Environmental release of mercury from coal utilization by-products: will new mercury controls at power plants make a difference?

    SciTech Connect

    Aljoe, W.W.; Feeley, T.J., III; Brickett, L.A.; Schroeder, K.T.; Murphy, J.T.

    2005-09-30

    The US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) uses the term coal utilization by-products (CUBs) to describe the solid materials produced by the combustion or gasification of coal. The following general observations can be drawn from results of field tests that have been carried out thus far to determine whether new technologies for mercury emission control at coal power plants will affect the release of mercury from CUBs. There appears to be only minimal potential mercury release to the environment in typical disposal or utilization application for CUBs generated using ACI control technologies. There appears to be only minimal mercury release to the environment for CUBs generated using wet FGD control technologies. The amount of mercury leached from CUBs samples tested is significantly lower than the federal drinking water standards and water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Noradrenaline induces CX3CL1 production and release by neurons.

    PubMed

    Madrigal, José L M; Caso, Javier R; García-Bueno, Borja; Gutiérrez, Irene L; Leza, Juan C

    2017-03-01

    CX3CL1 is a chemokine for which neurons constitute its primary source within the brain. Besides acting as a chemokine, CX3CL1 regulates multiple processes and is known to inhibit microglial activation. Because of this, CX3CL1 is considered as a messenger used by neurons to communicate with microglia. Similarly, the neurotransmitter noradrenaline reduces microglial activation and production of neurotoxic agents. Based on this, the regulation of neuronal CX3CXL1 by noradrenaline was analyzed. In primary cortical neurons, noradrenaline induced the accumulation of CX3CL1 protein and mRNA. Noradrenaline also increased CX3CL1 in its soluble form despite the inhibition of the activity and synthesis of ADAM10 and ADAM17, the main proteases known to cleave CX3CL1 from the neuronal membrane. Noradrenaline-treated neurons displayed a higher degree of dendritic arborization and a characteristic accumulation of CX3CL1 in the dendritic bifurcation zones. The soluble CX3CL1 produced by neurons after noradrenaline treatment, reduced the accumulation of nitrites in microglia. These findings indicate that NA anti-inflammatory actions are mediated by neuronal CX3CL1. In addition, CX3CL1 seems to be involved in the development of neuronal processes stimulated by noradrenaline.

  19. Mesoporous silica coatings for cephalosporin active release at the bone-implant interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rădulescu, Dragoş; Voicu, Georgeta; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Grumezescu, Valentina; Holban, Alina Maria; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Socol, Gabriel; Mogoantă, Laurenţiu; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Balaure, Paul Cătălin; Rădulescu, Radu; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential of MAPLE-deposited coatings mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) to release Zinforo (ceftarolinum fosmil) in biologically active form. The MSNs were prepared by using a classic procedure with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as sacrificial template and tetraethylorthosilicate as the monomer. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses revealed network-forming granules with diameters under 100 nm and an average pore diameter of 2.33 nm. The deposited films were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD and IR. Microbiological analyses performed on ceftaroline-loaded films demonstrated that the antibiotic was released in an active form, decreasing the microbial adherence rate and colonization of the surface. Moreover, the in vitro and in vivo assays proved the excellent biodistribution and biocompatibility of the prepared systems. Our results suggest that the obtained bioactive coatings possess a significant potential for the design of drug delivery systems and antibacterial medical-use surfaces, with great applications in bone implantology.

  20. Real-time measurement of volatile chemicals released by bed bugs during mating activities.

    PubMed

    Kilpinen, Ole; Liu, Dezhao; Adamsen, Anders Peter S

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) problems have increased dramatically in many parts of the world, leading to a renewed interest in their chemical ecology. Most studies of bed bug semiochemicals have been based on the collection of volatiles over a period of time followed by chemical analysis. Here we present for the first time, a combination of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and video analysis for real-time measurement of semiochemicals emitted by isolated groups of bed bugs during specific behavioural activities. The most distinct peaks in the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry recordings were always observed close to the termination of mating attempts, corresponding to the defensive emissions that bed bugs have been suspected to exploit for prevention of unwanted copulations. The main components of these emissions were (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal recorded in ratios between 1:3 and 3:1. In the current study, the quantity varied over 1000 fold for both of the compounds with up to 40 µg total release in a single emission. Males also emit defensive compounds due to homosexual copulation attempts by other males, and no significant differences were observed in the ratio or the amount of the two components released from males or females. In summary, this study has demonstrated that combining proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry with video analysis can provide detailed information about semiochemicals emitted during specific behavioural activities.

  1. External coxa saltans (snapping hip) treated with active release techniques®: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Andreo A.

    2007-01-01

    Background The presence of painful coxa saltans (snapping hip) can be a debilitating injury for a competitive athlete, hindering both training, and performance. Considering the various potential etiologies, it often poses a diagnostic and management dilemma for health care practitioners and the success of treatment is often dependent on the practitioner’s precise understanding of the cause. Although it is suggested by various authors that conservative therapy should be attempted before considering surgical management, little is known in terms of the most effective modes of manual therapy that should be attempted. Case Presentation A case of chronic, external coxa saltans in a 16 year old competitive dancer treated with Active Release Techniques® is presented. The clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, management and rehabilitation of the case are discussed. Conclusion Active Release Techniques®, or ART, is a soft tissue treatment method that focuses on relieving tissue tension via the removal of fibrosis/adhesion that develops in tissue that is overloaded with repetitive use. In this case of external coxa saltans, the underlying cause of the condition was increased tissue tension leading to increased friction of the proximal Iliotibial band (ITB) complex over the greater trochanter. Utilizing ART resulted in a complete resolution of this athlete’s symptoms and may be a good treatment option for external coax saltans. PMID:17657288

  2. Real-Time Measurement of Volatile Chemicals Released by Bed Bugs during Mating Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kilpinen, Ole; Liu, Dezhao; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) problems have increased dramatically in many parts of the world, leading to a renewed interest in their chemical ecology. Most studies of bed bug semiochemicals have been based on the collection of volatiles over a period of time followed by chemical analysis. Here we present for the first time, a combination of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and video analysis for real-time measurement of semiochemicals emitted by isolated groups of bed bugs during specific behavioural activities. The most distinct peaks in the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry recordings were always observed close to the termination of mating attempts, corresponding to the defensive emissions that bed bugs have been suspected to exploit for prevention of unwanted copulations. The main components of these emissions were (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal recorded in ratios between 1∶3 and 3∶1. In the current study, the quantity varied over 1000 fold for both of the compounds with up to 40 µg total release in a single emission. Males also emit defensive compounds due to homosexual copulation attempts by other males, and no significant differences were observed in the ratio or the amount of the two components released from males or females. In summary, this study has demonstrated that combining proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry with video analysis can provide detailed information about semiochemicals emitted during specific behavioural activities. PMID:23227225

  3. Smoking activates cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and causes survivin release in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wasén, Caroline; Turkkila, Minna; Bossios, Apostolos; Erlandsson, Malin; Andersson, Karin M; Ekerljung, Linda; Malmhäll, Carina; Brisslert, Mikael; Töyrä Silfverswärd, Sofia; Lundbäck, Bo; Bokarewa, Maria I

    2017-03-01

    CD8(+) T cells have an emerging role in RA. Resent research indicates a causal relationship between the non-exhausted state of CD8(+) T cells, defined by lost function of PD-1, and development of arthritis. We investigated how smoking contributes to the non-exhausted phenotype of CD8(+) T cells and cause survivin release to serum. We compared serum survivin levels between smokers and non-smokers in 252 RA and 168 healthy subjects. Nicotine effects on CD8(+) T cells were studied in peripheral blood of smoking women, bone marrow of nicotine treated mice and in sorted CD8 spleen cells in vitro using flow cytometry and quantitative PCR. Smoking increased the frequency of survivin release in serum of healthy women (OR 3.64, p = 0.025) and in RA patients (OR 1.98, p = 0.039). CD8(+) T cells of smokers gained a non-exhausted PD-1 deficient phenotype. Expression of the cytotoxic marker CD107 correlated to survivin levels in serum. In the experimental setting, nicotine exposure led to an accumulation of non-exhausted PD-1(-)IL-7R(+) CD8(+) T cells in the bone marrow that is abundant with survivin producing cells. The production of the cytolytic protein perforin in bone marrow correlated to serum survivin levels. In vitro stimulation of nicotinic receptors on murine CD8(+) T cells induced repressive transcription factors T-bet and Blimp-1 in support of the non-exhausted phenotype. We conclude that nicotine contributes to autoimmunity by supporting the non-exhausted state of CD8(+) T cells resulting in the release of survivin. This presents a new mechanism by which smoking may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA.

  4. Release bursts in English word-final stops: A longitudinal study of Korean adults' and children's production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Kimiko; Mack, Molly; Sung, Hyekyung; Birdsong, David; Bialystok, Ellen

    2002-05-01

    Stops at the end of Korean words are always unreleased. The question addressed here was whether Korean adults and children living in the U.S. can learn to release stops at the end of English words. Four groups of 18 native Koreans (NK) who differed according to age (adult versus child) and length of residence in the U.S. (3 vs 5 years at T1) participated. Two native English (NE) groups served as age-matched controls. Production data were collected at two times (T1, T2) separated by one year. English words ending in /t/ and /k/ were then examined in perception experiments (Exp. 1, Exp. 2). NE-speaking judges decided whether the final stop has a release burst or not. Exp. 1 showed that NE talkers released /t/ more often than NK talkers did. The effect of time was also significant. Talkers produced release bursts more often at T2 than at T1. Exp. 2 showed that, unlike Exp. 1, there were significant differences between NK adults and children. While NK children did not differ from NE children, NK adults released the final /k/ much less often than NE adults did. Possible reasons for why the expected children's advantage was seen for /k/, but not for /t/, will be discussed. [Work supported by NIH.

  5. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, L.-H.; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, C.-Y.; Liu Tao; Yue, H.-Y.; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na{sup +}-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  6. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase.

    PubMed

    Piao, Lian-Hua; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, Chang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Yue, Hai-Yuan; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na(+)-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  7. How do secretory products cross the plant cell wall to be released? A new hypothesis involving cyclic mechanical actions of the protoplast

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Elder Antônio Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Background In plants, the products of secretory activity leave the protoplast and cross the plasma membrane by means of transporters, fusion with membranous vesicles or, less commonly, as result of disintegration of the cell. These mechanisms do not address an intriguing question: How do secretory products cross the cell wall? Furthermore, how do these substances reach the external surface of the plant body? Such diverse substances as oils, polysaccharides or nectar are forced to cross the cell wall and, in fact, do so. How are chemical materials that are repelled by the cell wall or that are sufficiently viscous to not cross passively released from plant cells? Scope and Conclusions I propose a cell-cycle model developed based on observations of different secreting systems, some unpublished results and an extensive literature review, aiming to understand the processes involved in both the secretory process and the release of secretion products. In the absence of facilitated diffusion, a mechanical action of the protoplast is necessary to ensure that some substances can cross the cell wall. The mechanical action of the protoplast, in the form of successive cycles of contraction and expansion, causes the material accumulated in the periplasmic space to cross the cell wall and the cuticle. This action is particularly relevant for the release of lipids, resins and highly viscous hydrophilic secretions. The proposed cell-cycle model and the statements regarding exudate release will also apply to secretory glands not elaborated upon here. Continuous secretion of several days, as observed in extrafloral nectaries, salt glands and some mucilage-producing glands, is only possible because the process is cyclical. PMID:26929201

  8. Leveraging electrokinetics for the active control of dendritic fullerene-1 release across a nanochannel membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giacomo; Geninatti, Thomas; Hood, R. Lyle; Fine, Daniel; Scorrano, Giovanni; Schmulen, Jeffrey; Hosali, Sharath; Ferrari, Mauro; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (<=1.5 V), and power (100 nW). Temporal, reproducible tuning and interruption of dendritic fullerene 1 (DF-1) transport was demonstrated over multi-day release experiments. Conductance tests showed limiting currents in the low applied potential range, implying ionic concentration polarization (ICP) at the interface between the membrane's micro- and nanochannels, even in concentrated solutions (<=1 M NaCl). The ability of this nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian dysfunction, pain, and stress, among others.General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5

  9. 31 CFR 593.412 - Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded warehouse or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Release of any round log or timber... Interpretations § 593.412 Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded... from a bonded warehouse or foreign trade zone of any round log or timber product originating in...

  10. 31 CFR 593.412 - Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded warehouse or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Release of any round log or timber... Interpretations § 593.412 Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded... from a bonded warehouse or foreign trade zone of any round log or timber product originating in...

  11. 31 CFR 593.412 - Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded warehouse or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Release of any round log or timber... Interpretations § 593.412 Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded... from a bonded warehouse or foreign trade zone of any round log or timber product originating in...

  12. 31 CFR 593.412 - Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded warehouse or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Release of any round log or timber... Interpretations § 593.412 Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded... from a bonded warehouse or foreign trade zone of any round log or timber product originating in...

  13. 31 CFR 593.412 - Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded warehouse or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release of any round log or timber... Interpretations § 593.412 Release of any round log or timber product originating in Liberia from a bonded... from a bonded warehouse or foreign trade zone of any round log or timber product originating in...

  14. Blockade of IL-33 release and suppression of type 2 innate lymphoid cell responses by helminth secreted products in airway allergy.

    PubMed

    McSorley, H J; Blair, N F; Smith, K A; McKenzie, A N J; Maizels, R M

    2014-09-01

    Helminth parasites such as the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus strongly inhibit T helper type 2 (Th2) allergy, as well as colitis and autoimmunity. Here, we show that the soluble excretory/secretory products of H. polygyrus (HES) potently suppress inflammation induced by allergens from the common fungus Alternaria alternata. Alternaria extract, when administered to mice intranasally with ovalbumin (OVA) protein, induces a rapid (1-48 h) innate response while also priming an OVA-specific Th2 response that can be evoked 14 days later by intranasal administration of OVA alone. In this model, HES coadministration with Alternaria/OVA suppressed early IL-33 release, innate lymphoid cell (ILC) production of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and localized eosinophilia. Upon OVA challenge, type 2 ILC (ILC2)/Th2 cytokine production and eosinophilia were diminished in HES-treated mice. HES administration 6 h before Alternaria blocked the allergic response, and its suppressive activity was abolished by heat treatment. Administration of recombinant IL-33 at sensitization with Alternaria/OVA/HES abrogated HES suppression of OVA-specific responses at challenge, indicating that suppression of early Alternaria-induced IL-33 release could be central to the anti-allergic effects of HES. Thus, this helminth parasite targets IL-33 production as part of its armory of suppressive effects, forestalling the development of the type 2 immune response to infection and allergic sensitization.

  15. State-of-the-art on instant release of fission products from spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kienzler, Bernhard; Gonzalez-Robles, Ernesto

    2013-07-01

    Within the EURATOM FP7 Collaborative Project 'Fast / Instant Release of Safety Relevant Radionuclides from Spent Nuclear Fuel (CP FIRST-Nuclides)', a State-of-the-Art Report was prepared. The fast / instant release fraction (IRF) is defined as a fraction of the inventory of radionuclides that may be rapidly released from the fuel and fuel assembly materials at the time of canister breaching. In the context of safety analysis for a repository, the time span for mobilization of this fraction can be considered instantaneously, even if the process takes some time in experiments. Radionuclides contributing to the fast release are fission gases (Kr and Xe), easily soluble elements such as cesium and iodine, and other elements which are hardly incorporated in the UO{sub 2} crystal lattice. The present contribution summarizes the results obtained from published studies focused on rapid release experiments carried out with different spent nuclear fuel (SNF), samples, sizes, techniques (batch and flow-through), and durations. A total of 80 experiments cover the study of UO{sub 2} SNF from pressure water reactors (PWR) of different initial enrichments and burn-up, while 20 experiments were performed with UO{sub 2} SNF from boiling water reactors (BWR) and 8 with MOX fuel. (authors)

  16. A Fluorescein Tracer Release Experiment in the Hydrothermally Active Crater of Vailulu'u Volcano, Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.; Staudigel, H.; Workman, R.; Koppers, A.; Girard, A.

    2001-12-01

    Vailulu'u (Rockne) volcano marks the active end of the Samoa hotspot chain. The volcano is 4400 meters high, with a summit crater 2000 meters wide by 400 meters deep and summit peaks reaching to within 600 meters of the sea surface. The crater is hydrothermally active, as witnessed by intense particulate concentrations in the water column (values to 1.4 NTU's), a particulate smog ``halo'' surrounding the summit and extending out many kilometers, high Mn concentrations and 3He/4He ratios (values to 3.8 ppb and 8.6 Ra, respectively), and bottom-water temperature anomalies of 0.5oC. Basalts from the crater have been dated in the range 5-50 years, and likely reflect eruptions associated with a 1995 earthquake swarm. On April 3, 2001, we released a 20 kg point-source charge of fluorescein dye 30 meters above the 975m deep crater floor. The dye was dissolved in a 180 liter mixture of propanol and water, adjusted to a density 1.3 per mil heavier than the ambient water at the release depth. Released from a rubberized bag by means of a galvanic link. First detection of the released dye was 39 hours after the deployment; the dye was in a 50 meter thick layer, with a concentration peak at 900 meters (relative to the release depth of 945m). Tracking was carried out by a CTD-based fluorometer operated in tow-yo mode from the U.S.C.G. Icebreaker Polar Sea. The detection limit was 25 picograms/gram, and the maximum detected concentration was 18,000 pg/g (if evenly dispersed in the lower 150 meters of water in the crater, the expected concentration would be approx. 130 pg/g). While the dye pool was only surveyed for 4 days due to ship-transit constraints, significant horizontal and vertical dispersion was apparent. Vertical dispersion velocities were typically 0.05 cm/sec; horizontal velocities were typically higher by a factor of 10. An approximate diapycnal or eddy diffusivity, K, can be calculated from the rate of vertical spreading of the dye layer: K = Z2/2(t-t0), where Z is

  17. Encapsulation, protection, and release of hydrophilic active components: potential and limitations of colloidal delivery systems.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian

    2015-05-01

    There have been major advances in the development of edible colloidal delivery systems for hydrophobic bioactives in recent years. However, there are still many challenges associated with the development of effective delivery systems for hydrophilic bioactives. This review highlights the major challenges associated with developing colloidal delivery systems for hydrophilic bioactive components that can be utilized in foods, pharmaceuticals, and other products intended for oral ingestion. Special emphasis is given to the fundamental physicochemical phenomena associated with encapsulation, stabilization, and release of these bioactive components, such as solubility, partitioning, barriers, and mass transport processes. Delivery systems suitable for encapsulating hydrophilic bioactive components are then reviewed, including liposomes, multiple emulsions, solid fat particles, multiple emulsions, biopolymer particles, cubosomes, and biologically-derived systems. The advantages and limitations of each of these delivery systems are highlighted. This information should facilitate the rational selection of the most appropriate colloidal delivery systems for particular applications in the food and other industries.

  18. Selenoprotein N is required for ryanodine receptor calcium release channel activity in human and zebrafish muscle.

    PubMed

    Jurynec, Michael J; Xia, Ruohong; Mackrill, John J; Gunther, Derrick; Crawford, Thomas; Flanigan, Kevin M; Abramson, Jonathan J; Howard, Michael T; Grunwald, David Jonah

    2008-08-26

    Mutations affecting the seemingly unrelated gene products, SepN1, a selenoprotein of unknown function, and RyR1, the major component of the ryanodine receptor intracellular calcium release channel, result in an overlapping spectrum of congenital myopathies. To identify the immediate developmental and molecular roles of SepN and RyR in vivo, loss-of-function effects were analyzed in the zebrafish embryo. These studies demonstrate the two proteins are required for the same cellular differentiation events and are needed for normal calcium fluxes in the embryo. SepN is physically associated with RyRs and functions as a modifier of the RyR channel. In the absence of SepN, ryanodine receptors from zebrafish embryos or human diseased muscle have altered biochemical properties and have lost their normal sensitivity to redox conditions, which likely accounts for why mutations affecting either factor lead to similar diseases.

  19. Release of nitric oxide during the T cell-independent pathway of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, K.P.; Rogers, H.W.; Corbett, J.A.; Schreiber, R.D.; McDaniel, M.L.; Unanue, E.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Immunodeficient mice are remarkably resistant to Listeria monocytogenes (LM) infection. The authors examined the role that nitric oxide (NO) plays in the CB-17/lcr SCID (SCID) response to LM. SCID spleen cells produced large quantities of NO (as measured by nitrite formation) when incubated in the presence of heat-killed LM. NO produced large quantities of nitrite in response to LM, but only in the presence of IFN-[gamma]. The production of NO induced by LM was not affected by neutralizing antibodies to TNF or IL-1. The production of NO was inhibited by addition of either of two inhibitors of NO synthase, N[sup G]-monomethyl arginine, or aminoguanidine. In a different situation, NK cells that were stimulated by TNF and Listeria products to release IFN-[gamma] did not produce NO. Macrophages cultured with IFN-[gamma] killed live LM. This increased killing of LM was significantly inhibited by amino-guanidine. In vivo, administration of aminoguanidine resulted in a marked increase in the mortality and spleen bacterial loads of LM-infected SCID or immunocompetent control mice. It is concluded that NO is a critical effector molecule of T cell-independent natural resistence of LM as studied in the SCID mouse, and that the NO-mediated response is essential for both SCID and immunocompetent host to survive after LM infection. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  20. MELCOR 1.8.5 modeling aspects of fission product release, transport and deposition an assessment with recommendations.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, Randall O.

    2010-04-01

    The Phebus and VERCORS data have played an important role in contemporary understanding and modeling of fission product release and transport from damaged light water reactor fuel. The data from these test programs have allowed improvement of MELCOR modeling of release and transport processes for both low enrichment uranium fuel as well as high burnup and mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. This paper discusses the synthesis of these findings in the MELCOR severe accident code. Based on recent assessments of MELCOR 1.8.5 fission product release modeling against the Phebus FPT-1 test and on observations from the ISP-46 exercise, modifications to the default MELCOR 1.8.5 release models are recommended. The assessments identified an alternative set of Booth diffusion parameters recommended by ORNL (ORNL-Booth), which produced significantly improved release predictions for cesium and other fission product groups. Some adjustments to the scaling factors in the ORNL-Booth model were made for selected fission product groups, including UO{sub 2}, Mo and Ru in order to obtain better comparisons with the FPT-1 data. The adjusted model, referred to as 'Modified ORNL-Booth,' was subsequently compared to original ORNL VI fission product release experiments and to more recently performed French VERCORS tests, and the comparisons was as favorable or better than the original CORSOR-M MELCOR default release model. These modified ORNL-Booth parameters, input to MELCOR 1.8.5 as 'sensitivity coefficients' (i.e. user input that over-rides the code defaults) are recommended for the interim period until improved release models can be implemented into MELCOR. For the case of ruthenium release in air-oxidizing conditions, some additional modifications to the Ru class vapor pressure are recommended based on estimates of the RuO{sub 2} vapor pressure over mildly hyperstoichiometric UO{sub 2}. The increased vapor pressure for this class significantly increases the net transport of Ru from the fuel to

  1. Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2001 Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Martin, Paul F.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Steele, Jackie L.

    2001-02-01

    This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses LAWABP1 and HLP-31 that will be used for simulations of the immobilized lowactivity waste disposal system with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code. The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in March of 2001. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali-H ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow and vapor hydration experiments were used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses. The majority of the thermodynamic data were extracted from the thermodynamic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6. However, several secondary reaction products identified from laboratory tests with prototypical LAW glasses were not included in this database, nor are the thermodynamic data available in the open literature. One of these phases, herschelite, was determined to have a potentially significant impact on the release calculations and so a solubility product was estimated using a polymer structure model developed for zeolites. Although this data package is relatively complete, final selection of ILAW glass compositions has not been done by the waste treatment plant contractor. Consequently, revisions to this data package to address new ILAW glass formulations are to be regularly expected.

  2. Assessment of Heat Resistance of Bacterial Spores from Food Product Isolates by Fluorescence Monitoring of Dipicolinic Acid Release

    PubMed Central

    Kort, Remco; O'Brien, Andrea C.; van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Oomes, Suus J. C. M.; Crielaard, Wim; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; Brul, Stanley

    2005-01-01

    This study is aimed at the development and application of a convenient and rapid optical assay to monitor the wet-heat resistance of bacterial endospores occurring in food samples. We tested the feasibility of measuring the release of the abundant spore component dipicolinic acid (DPA) as a probe for heat inactivation. Spores were isolated from the laboratory type strain Bacillus subtilis 168 and from two food product isolates, Bacillus subtilis A163 and Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4. Spores from the lab strain appeared much less heat resistant than those from the two food product isolates. The decimal reduction times (D values) for spores from strains 168, A163, and IC4 recovered on Trypticase soy agar were 1.4, 0.7, and 0.3 min at 105°C, 120°C, and 131°C, respectively. The estimated Z values were 6.3°C, 6.1°C, and 9.7°C, respectively. The extent of DPA release from the three spore crops was monitored as a function of incubation time and temperature. DPA concentrations were determined by measuring the emission at 545 nm of the fluorescent terbium-DPA complex in a microtiter plate fluorometer. We defined spore heat resistance as the critical DPA release temperature (Tc), the temperature at which half the DPA content has been released within a fixed incubation time. We found Tc values for spores from Bacillus strains 168, A163, and IC4 of 108°C, 121°C, and 131°C, respectively. On the basis of these observations, we developed a quantitative model that describes the time and temperature dependence of the experimentally determined extent of DPA release and spore inactivation. The model predicts a DPA release rate profile for each inactivated spore. In addition, it uncovers remarkable differences in the values for the temperature dependence parameters for the rate of spore inactivation, DPA release duration, and DPA release delay. PMID:16000762

  3. Monascus secondary metabolites: production and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Patakova, Petra

    2013-02-01

    The genus Monascus, comprising nine species, can reproduce either vegetatively with filaments and conidia or sexually by the formation of ascospores. The most well-known species of genus Monascus, namely, M. purpureus, M. ruber and M. pilosus, are often used for rice fermentation to produce red yeast rice, a special product used either for food coloring or as a food supplement with positive effects on human health. The colored appearance (red, orange or yellow) of Monascus-fermented substrates is produced by a mixture of oligoketide pigments that are synthesized by a combination of polyketide and fatty acid synthases. The major pigments consist of pairs of yellow (ankaflavin and monascin), orange (rubropunctatin and monascorubrin) and red (rubropunctamine and monascorubramine) compounds; however, more than 20 other colored products have recently been isolated from fermented rice or culture media. In addition to pigments, a group of monacolin substances and the mycotoxin citrinin can be produced by Monascus. Various non-specific biological activities (antimicrobial, antitumor, immunomodulative and others) of these pigmented compounds are, at least partly, ascribed to their reaction with amino group-containing compounds, i.e. amino acids, proteins or nucleic acids. Monacolins, in the form of β-hydroxy acids, inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis in animals and humans.

  4. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  5. Release of ethanol to the atmosphere during use of consumer cleaning products

    SciTech Connect

    Wooley, J.; Nazaroff, W.W. ); Hodgson, A.T. )

    1990-08-01

    Liquid laundry and hand dish washing detergents contain volatile organic compounds, including ethanol, that may be liberated during use and contribute to photochemical air pollution. In this study, the release of ethanol to the atmosphere during simulated household use of liquid detergents was measured. Three replicate experiments, plus a blank, were conducted in a 20-m{sup 3} environmental chamber for each of four conditions: typical dish washing (DT), high-release dish washing (DH), typical laundry (LT), and high-release laundry (LH). Average amounts of ethanol transferred to the atmosphere per use (and the fraction of ethanol used so liberated) were 32 mg (0.038) for DT, 100 mg (0.049) for DH, 18 mg (0.002) for LT, and 110 mg (0.011) for LH. Thus, a large fraction of the ethanol added to wash solutions with liquid detergents is discharged to the sewer rather than transferred to the atmosphere during use.

  6. Fractionation and characterization of the immunosuppressive substance in crude extracellular products released by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed Central

    Arala-Chaves, M P; Porto, M T; Arnaud, P; Saraiva, M J; Geada, H; Patrick, C C; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-01-01

    The noncytotoxic immunosuppressive substance detected in crude extracellular products of Streptococcus intermedius (CEP-SI) was fractionated by two steps of preparative isoelectric focusing in sucrose gradients using ampholytes of pH range from 3.5 to 6 and 4 to 5, respectively. The in vitro and in vivo suppressor effects of the most highly purified fraction of CEP-Si, designated fraction 3' (F3'EP-Si), corresponded well with those of the original CEP-Si. F3'EP-Si was sensitive to the effects of alpha, gamma, and delta chymotrypsin, trypsin, and heating. It contained approximately 1% of the total amount of protein found in the original CEP-Si, corresponding to a single band on analytical isoelectric focusing, stainable by Coomassie Blue and of isoelectric point of 4.25. The absorption spectrum of F3'EP-Si had a maximum at 260 nm but its biological activity was resistant to deoxyribonuclease and ribonuclease A and it did not contain material stainable by methylene blue. It was also resistant to neuraminidase and did not contain material stainable by periodic acid schiff. We conclude that the substance responsible for the suppressor activity of CEP-Si is a protein of molecular weight approximately 90,000, which adheres to Sephadex of cellulose acetate and forms complexes with other, nonactive constituents of CEP-Si. Images PMID:6454698

  7. Thioredoxin Ameliorates Cutaneous Inflammation by Regulating the Epithelial Production and Release of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hai; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Ono, Ryusuke; Nishigori, Chikako; Yodoi, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Human thioredoxin-1 (TRX) is a 12-kDa protein with redox-active dithiol in the active site -Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration and transgenic overexpression of TRX ameliorate inflammation in various animal models, but its anti-inflammatory mechanism is not well characterized. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of topically applied recombinant human TRX (rhTRX) in a murine irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) induced by croton oil. Topically applied rhTRX was distributed only in the skin tissues under both non-inflammatory and inflammatory conditions, and significantly suppressed the inflammatory response by inhibiting the production of cytokines and chemokines, such as TNF-α, Il-1β, IL-6, CXCL-1, and MCP-1. In an in vitro study, rhTRX also significantly inhibited the formation of cytokines and chemokines produced by keratinocytes after exposure to croton oil and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. These results indicate that TRX prevents skin inflammation via the inhibition of local formation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. As a promising new approach, local application of TRX may be useful for the treatment of various skin and mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:24058364

  8. Formation and release behavior of iron corrosion products under the influence of bacterial communities in a simulated water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Lytle, Darren A; Bai, Yaohui; Wang, Dongsheng

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation and release behavior of iron corrosion products in a drinking water distribution system, annular reactors (ARs) were used to investigate the development processes of corrosion products and biofilm community as well as the concomitant iron release behavior. Results showed that the formation and transformation of corrosion products and bacterial community are closely related to each other. The presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, e.g. Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum), sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB, e.g. Sulfuricella), and iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB, e.g. Acidovorax, Gallionella, Leptothrix, and Sphaerotilus) in biofilms could speed up iron corrosion; however, iron-reducing bacteria (IRB, e.g. Bacillus, Clostridium, and Pseudomonas) could inhibit iron corrosion and iron release. Corrosion scales on iron coupons could develop into a two-layered structure (top layer and inner layer) with time. The relatively stable constituents such as goethite (α-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe3O4) mainly existed in the top layers, while green rust (Fe6(OH)12CO3) mainly existed in the inner layers. The IOB (especially Acidovorax) contributed to the formation of α-FeOOH, while IRB and the anaerobic conditions could facilitate the formation of Fe3O4. Compared with the AR test without biofilms, the iron corrosion rate with biofilms was relatively higher (p < 0.05) during the whole experimental period, but the iron release with biofilms was obviously lower both at the initial stage and after 3 months. Biofilm and corrosion scale samples formed under different water supply conditions in an actual drinking water distribution system verified the relationships between the bacterial community and corrosion products.

  9. Urokinase plasminogen activator released by alveolar epithelial cells modulates alveolar epithelial repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Van Leer, Coretta; Stutz, Monika; Haeberli, André; Geiser, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Intra-alveolar fibrin is formed following lung injury and inflammation and may contribute to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrin turnover is altered in patients with pulmonary fibrosis, resulting in intra-alveolar fibrin accumulation, mainly due to decreased fibrinolysis. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC) repair the injured alveolar epithelium by migrating over the provisional fibrin matrix. We hypothesized that repairing alveolar epithelial cells modulate the underlying fibrin matrix by release of fibrinolytic activity, and that the degree of fibrinolysis modulates alveolar epithelial repair on fibrin. To test this hypothesis we studied alveolar epithelial wound repair in vitro using a modified epithelial wound repair model with human A549 alveolar epithelial cells cultured on a fibrin matrix. In presence of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta, wounds increase by 800% in 24 hours mainly due to detachment of the cells, whereas in serum-free medium wound areas decreases by 22.4 +/- 5.2% (p < 0.01). Increased levels of D-dimer, FDP and uPA in the cell supernatant of IL-1beta-stimulated A549 epithelial cells indicate activation of fibrinolysis by activation of the plasmin system. In presence of low concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, including specific blocking anti-uPA antibodies, alveolar epithelial repair in vitro was improved, whereas in presence of high concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, a decrease was observed mainly due to decreased spreading and migration of cells. These findings suggest the existence of a fibrinolytic optimum at which alveolar epithelial repair in vitro is most efficient. In conclusion, uPA released by AEC alters alveolar epithelial repair in vitro by modulating the underlying fibrin matrix.

  10. Saturated fatty acids activate caspase-4/5 in human monocytes, triggering IL-1β and IL-18 release.

    PubMed

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Chan, Kenny L; Zhang, Shitian; Mejdani, Marios; Jacobson, Maya R; Ducos, Alexandre; Bilan, Philip J; Niu, Wenyan; Klip, Amira

    2016-11-01

    Obesity is associated with metabolic tissue infiltration by monocyte-derived macrophages. Saturated fatty acids contribute to proinflammatory gene induction in tissue-embedded immune cells. However, it is unknown how circulating monocytes, the macrophage precursors, react to high-fat environments. In macrophages, saturated fatty acids activate inflammatory pathways and, notably, prime caspase-associated inflammasomes. Inflammasome-activated IL-1β contributes to type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that 1) human monocytes from obese patients show caspase activation, and 2) fatty acids trigger this response and consequent release of IL-1β/IL-18. Human peripheral blood monocytes were sorted by flow cytometry, and caspase activity was measured with a FLICA dye-based assay. Blood monocytes from obese individuals exhibited elevated caspase activity. To explore the nature and consequence of this activity, human THP1 monocytes were exposed to saturated or unsaturated fatty acids. Caspase activity was revealed by isoform-specific cleavage and enzymatic activity; cytokine expression/release was measured by qPCR and ELISA. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, increased caspase activity in parallel to the release of IL-1β and IL-18. Palmitate induced eventual monocyte cell death with features of pyroptosis (an inflammation-linked cell death program involving caspase-4/5), scored through LDH release, vital dye influx, cell volume changes, and nuclear morphology. Notably, selective gene silencing or inhibition of caspase-4/5 reduced palmitate-induced release of IL-1β and IL-18. In summary, monocytes from obese individuals present elevated caspase activity. Mechanistically, palmitate activates a pyroptotic program in monocytes through caspase-4/5, causing inflammatory cytokine release, additional to inflammasomes. These caspases represent potential, novel, therapeutic targets to taper obesity-associated inflammation.

  11. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  12. Quantifying the Release of Silver from Nanotechnology-Based Consumer Products for Children

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the potential for children’s exposure to bioavailable silver during the realistic use of selected nanotechnology-based consumer products (plush toy, fabric products, breast milk storage bags, sippy cups, cleaning products). All products had at least one componen...

  13. Development of antiproliferative nanohybrid compound with controlled release property using ellagic acid as the active agent

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Al Ali, Samer Hasan; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2011-01-01

    An ellagic acid (EA)–zinc layered hydroxide (ZLH) nanohybrid (EAN) was synthesized under a nonaqueous environment using EA and zinc oxide (ZnO) as the precursors. Powder X-ray diffraction showed that the basal spacing of the nanohybrid was 10.4 Å, resulting in the spatial orientation of EA molecules between the interlayers of 22.5° from z-axis with two negative charges at 8,8′ position of the molecules pointed toward the ZLH interlayers. FTIR study showed that the intercalated EA spectral feature is generally similar to that of EA, but with bands slightly shifted. This indicates that some chemical bonding of EA presence between the nanohybrid interlayers was slightly changed, due to the formation of host–guest interaction. The nanohybrid is of mesopores type with 58.8% drug loading and enhanced thermal stability. The release of the drug active, EA from the nanohybrid was found to be sustained and therefore has good potential to be used as a drug controlled-release formulation. In vitro bioassay study showed that the EAN has a mild effect on the hepatocytes cells, similar to its counterpart, free EA. PMID:21796241

  14. Anion-activated, thermoreversible gelation system for the capture, release, and visual monitoring of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Lee, Songyi; Liu, Yifan; Lee, Minji; Yin, Jun; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2014-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important green house gas. This is providing an incentive to develop new strategies to detect and capture CO2. Achieving both functions within a single molecular system represents an unmet challenge in terms of molecular design and could translate into enhanced ease of use. Here, we report an anion-activated chemosensor system, NAP-chol 1, that permits dissolved CO2 to be detected in organic media via simple color changes or through ratiometric differences in fluorescence intensity. NAP-chol 1 also acts as a super gelator for DMSO. The resulting gel is transformed into a homogeneous solution upon exposure to fluoride anions. Bubbling with CO2 regenerates the gel. Subsequent flushing with N2 or heating serves to release the CO2 and reform the sol form. This series of transformations is reversible and can be followed by easy-to-discern color changes. Thus, NAP-chol 1 allows for the capture and release of CO2 gas while acting as a three mode sensing system. In particular, it permits CO2 to be detected through reversible sol-gel transitions, simple changes in color, or ratiometric monitoring of the differences in the fluorescence features.

  15. Release of soluble protein from peanut (Arachis hypogaea, Leguminosae) and its adsorption by activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    Kopper, Randall; Van, Trang; Kim, Ara; Helm, Ricki

    2011-01-12

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea, Leguminosae) allergy is a major cause of food-induced anaphylaxis. The potential use of activated charcoal (AC) to adsorb and reduce the bioavailability of peanut protein allergens for use in the moderation of hypersensitivity reactions was investigated. The rate and extent of protein release from peanut and the adsorption of the solubilized protein by AC was determined under physiological pH values and confirmed in vivo using a porcine animal model system. Peanut proteins were adsorbed with equal efficiency at pH 2 and 7 and are completely removed from solution by an AC/protein ratio of approximately 80:1. This suggests that AC can bind protein under gastric (pH 2) or intestinal (pH 7) conditions. The rapid adsorption of soluble peanut allergens and the continuous binding of allergens released from peanut particulate material suggest the potential efficacy of using AC for gastric decontamination and possible elimination of a biphasic allergic reaction.

  16. Indolic uremic solutes enhance procoagulant activity of red blood cells through phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-10-28

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process.

  17. Anion-activated, thermoreversible gelation system for the capture, release, and visual monitoring of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Lee, Songyi; Liu, Yifan; Lee, Minji; Yin, Jun; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important green house gas. This is providing an incentive to develop new strategies to detect and capture CO2. Achieving both functions within a single molecular system represents an unmet challenge in terms of molecular design and could translate into enhanced ease of use. Here, we report an anion-activated chemosensor system, NAP-chol 1, that permits dissolved CO2 to be detected in organic media via simple color changes or through ratiometric differences in fluorescence intensity. NAP-chol 1 also acts as a super gelator for DMSO. The resulting gel is transformed into a homogeneous solution upon exposure to fluoride anions. Bubbling with CO2 regenerates the gel. Subsequent flushing with N2 or heating serves to release the CO2 and reform the sol form. This series of transformations is reversible and can be followed by easy-to-discern color changes. Thus, NAP-chol 1 allows for the capture and release of CO2 gas while acting as a three mode sensing system. In particular, it permits CO2 to be detected through reversible sol-gel transitions, simple changes in color, or ratiometric monitoring of the differences in the fluorescence features. PMID:24699626

  18. Histamine release in the basal forebrain mediates cortical activation through cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zant, Janneke C; Rozov, Stanislav; Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Panula, Pertti; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2012-09-19

    The basal forebrain (BF) is a key structure in regulating both cortical activity and sleep homeostasis. It receives input from all ascending arousal systems and is particularly highly innervated by histaminergic neurons. Previous studies clearly point to a role for histamine as a wake-promoting substance in the BF. We used in vivo microdialysis and pharmacological treatments in rats to study which electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral properties are associated with histamine-induced wakefulness and whether this wakefulness is followed by increased sleep and increased EEG delta power during sleep. We also investigated which BF neurons mediate histamine-induced cortical activation. Extracellular BF histamine levels rose immediately and remained constant throughout a 6 h period of sleep deprivation, returning to baseline levels immediately afterward. During the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle, we observed a strong correlation between wakefulness and extracellular histamine concentrations in the BF, which was unaffected by the time of day. The perfusion of histamine into the BF increased wakefulness and cortical activity without inducing recovery sleep. The perfusion of a histamine receptor 1 antagonist into the BF decreased both wakefulness and cortical activity. Lesioning the BF cholinergic neurons abolished these effects. Together, these results show that activation of the cholinergic BF by histamine is important in sustaining a high level of cortical activation, and that a lack of activation of the cholinergic BF by histamine may be important in initiating and maintaining nonrapid eye movement sleep. The level of histamine release is tightly connected to behavioral state, but conveys no information about sleep pressure.

  19. Ghrelin activates hypophysiotropic corticotropin-releasing factor neurons independently of the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Agustina; Portiansky, Enrique; Sánchez-Jaramillo, Edith; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Perello, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Previous work has established that the hormone ghrelin engages the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal neuroendocrine axis via activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The neuronal circuitry that mediates this effect of ghrelin is currently unknown. Here, we show that ghrelin-induced activation of PVN CRF neurons involved inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inputs, likely via ghrelin binding sites that were localized at GABAergic terminals within the PVN. While ghrelin activated PVN CRF neurons in the presence of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor antagonists or in arcuate nucleus (ARC)-ablated mice, it failed to do it so in mice with ghrelin receptor expression limited to ARC agouti gene related protein (AgRP)/NPY neurons. These data support the notion that ghrelin activates PVN CRF neurons via inhibition of local GABAergic tone, in an ARC-independent manner. Furthermore, these data suggest that the neuronal circuits mediating ghrelin's orexigenic action vs. its role as a stress signal are anatomically dissociated.

  20. Readily releasable vesicles recycle at the active zone of hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Schikorski, Thomas

    2014-04-08

    During the synaptic vesicle cycle, synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane and recycle for repeated exo/endocytic events. By using activity-dependent N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino) styryl) pyridinium dibromide dye uptake combined with fast (<1 s) microwave-assisted fixation followed by photoconversion and ultrastructural 3D analysis, we tracked endocytic vesicles over time, "frame by frame." The first retrieved synaptic vesicles appeared 4 s after stimulation, and these endocytic vesicles were located just above the active zone. Second, the retrieved vesicles did not show any sign of a protein coat, and coated pits were not detected. Between 10 and 30 s, large labeled vesicles appeared that had up to 5 times the size of an individual synaptic vesicle. Starting at around 20 s, these large labeled vesicles decreased in number in favor of labeled synaptic vesicles, and after 30 s, labeled vesicles redocked at the active zone. The data suggest that readily releasable vesicles are retrieved as noncoated vesicles at the active zone.

  1. Rotavirus Stimulates Release of Serotonin (5-HT) from Human Enterochromaffin Cells and Activates Brain Structures Involved in Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Engblom, David; Karlsson, Thommie; Rodriguez-Diaz, Jesus; Buesa, Javier; Taylor, John A.; Loitto, Vesa-Matti; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Ahlman, Håkan; Lundgren, Ove; Svensson, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children. A virus-encoded enterotoxin, NSP4 is proposed to play a major role in causing RV diarrhoea but how RV can induce emesis, a hallmark of the illness, remains unresolved. In this study we have addressed the hypothesis that RV-induced secretion of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) by enterochromaffin (EC) cells plays a key role in the emetic reflex during RV infection resulting in activation of vagal afferent nerves connected to nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and area postrema in the brain stem, structures associated with nausea and vomiting. Our experiments revealed that RV can infect and replicate in human EC tumor cells ex vivo and in vitro and are localized to both EC cells and infected enterocytes in the close vicinity of EC cells in the jejunum of infected mice. Purified NSP4, but not purified virus particles, evoked release of 5-HT within 60 minutes and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a human midgut carcinoid EC cell line (GOT1) and ex vivo in human primary carcinoid EC cells concomitant with the release of 5-HT. Furthermore, NSP4 stimulated a modest production of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), but not of cAMP. RV infection in mice induced Fos expression in the NTS, as seen in animals which vomit after administration of chemotherapeutic drugs. The demonstration that RV can stimulate EC cells leads us to propose that RV disease includes participation of 5-HT, EC cells, the enteric nervous system and activation of vagal afferent nerves to brain structures associated with nausea and vomiting. This hypothesis is supported by treating vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. PMID:21779163

  2. Acute response of hypophysiotropic thyrotropin releasing hormone neurons and thyrotropin release to behavioral paradigms producing varying intensities of stress and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Mariscal, Mariana; Sánchez, Edith; García-Vázquez, Arlene; Rebolledo-Solleiro, Daniela; Charli, Jean-Louis; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia

    2012-11-10

    The activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis is essential for energy homeostasis and is differentially modulated by physical and by psychological stress. Contradictory effects of stressful behavioral paradigms on TSH or thyroid hormone release are due to type, length and controllability of the stressor. We hypothesized that an additional determinant of the activity of the HPT axis is the energy demand due to physical activity. We thus evaluated the response of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in Wistar male rats submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM), the open field test (OFT), or restraint, and sacrificed within 1h after test completion; the response to OFT was compared during light (L) or dark (D) phases. Locomotion and anxiety behaviors were similar if animals were tested in L or D phases but their relation to the biochemical parameters differed. All paradigms increased serum corticosterone concentration; the levels of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 and of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNAs in the PVN were enhanced after restraint or OFT-L. Levels of proTRH mRNA increased in the PVN after exposure to EPM-L or OFT-D; serum levels of thyrotropin (TSH) and T(4) only after OFT-D. In contrast, restraint decreased TRH mRNA and serum TSH levels, while it increased TRH content in the mediobasal hypothalamus, implying reduced release. Expression of proTRH in the PVN varied proportionally to the degree of locomotion in OFT-D, while inversely to anxiety in the EPM-L, and to corticosterone in EPM-L and OFT-D. TRH mRNA levels were analyzed by in situ hybridization in the rostral, middle and caudal zones of the PVN in response to OFT-D; they increased in the middle PVN, where most TRH hypophysiotropic neurons reside; levels correlated positively with the velocity attained in the periphery of the OF and negatively, with anxiety. Variations of serum TSH levels correlated positively with

  3. Enhancement of phosphorus removal in a low temperature A(2)/O process by anaerobic phosphorus release of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzheng; Jin, Yu; Guo, Yaqiong; He, Junguo

    2013-01-01

    An anaerobic phosphorus release tank was introduced to an anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic (A(2)/O) process treating domestic sewage to enhance the phosphorus removal at low temperature. Phosphorus release of the activated sludge from the second sedimentation tank was evaluated at 14 °C by batch cultures, and the nutrient removal in the modified low temperature A(2)/O process was further investigated at the same temperature. The results showed that the feasible sludge retention time was 14 h for sequencing batch reaction and 12 h for continuous flow operation. The ratio of raw sewage to activated sludge from the second sedimentation tank was 1:1 in volume to meet the demand of carbon resource for the growth of phosphorus release microbes. The feasible chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rate of the activated sludge in the phosphorus release tank was 0.015-0.02 g COD/g MLSS (mixed liquor suspended solids) and the nitrate concentration should be less than 5 mg/L. The phosphorus release was doubled when the sludge was blended intermittently and gently. The anaerobic phosphorus release of the activated sludge improved the phosphate removal remarkably, as well as the removal of NH4(+)-N and total nitrogen (TN) in the modified low temperature A(2)/O process. The effluent COD, NH4(+)-N, TN and total phosphorus could meet a stricter discharge standard.

  4. Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection By-Product Precursor Release from Managed Peat Soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, J.A.; Bossio, D.A.; Fujii, R.

    2004-01-01

    A wetland restoration demonstration project examined the effects of a permanently flooded wetland on subsidence of peat soils. The project, started in 1997, was done on Twitchell Island, in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Conversion of agricultural land to a wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from the peat soils, relative to the previous land use. Dissolved organic C in delta waters is a concern because it reacts with chlorine, added as a disinfectant in municipal drinking waters, to form carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). This study explores the effects of peat soil biogeochemistry on DOC and DBP release under agricultural and wetland management. Results indicate that organic matter source, extent of soil organic matter decomposition, and decomposition pathways all are factors in THM formation. The results show that historical management practices dominate the release of DOC and THM precursors. However, within-site differences indicate that recent management decisions can contribute to changes in DOC quality and THM precursor formation. Not all aromatic forms of carbon are highly reactive and certain environmental conditions produce the specific carbon structures that form THMs. Both HAA and THM precursors are elevated in the DOC released under wetland conditions. The findings of this study emphasize the need to further investigate the roles of organic matter sources, microbial decomposition pathways, and decomposition status of soil organic matter in the release of DOC and DBP precursors from delta soils under varying land-use practices.

  5. Predicting the Release of Sulfide Oxidation Products at Mine Waste Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowes, D. W.; Ptacek, C. J.; Mayer, K. U.; Bain, J. G.; Moncur, M. C.; Jambor, J. L.

    2004-05-01

    Reactive solute transport models provide sophisticated tools for predicting the magnitude and duration of acid generation and metal release in mine waste disposal facilities. Over the past decade, these models have become increasingly advanced. The ability of reactive solute transport models to simulate integrated biogeochemical and hydrological processes now challenges our ability to characterize these systems on the field and laboratory scale. Application of reactive solute transport models relies on the development of an accurate conceptual model and specification of the chemical, physical and hydrological characteristics of the waste materials. Release of acidic water and dissolved metals from mine waste disposal facilities is controlled by a complex combination of physical, chemical, and biological processes. The oxidation of sulfide minerals is ultimately controlled by the availability of oxygen, which is usually transported in its gaseous form. The reaction between oxygen and sulfide minerals is catalyzed by chemolithotrophic bacteria. The oxidation of individual sulfide minerals occurs at differing rates. Sulfide oxidation reactions release acid, sulfate and dissolved metals. The acid released may be neutralized by reaction with carbonate, hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals. The metals released may be attenuated by precipitation of secondary minerals, by coprecipitation or by adsorption reactions. Thorough characterization of the waste properties which control gas transport and water flow through the waste materials is required. In addition, a thorough knowledge of the initial composition and mineralogy is required to develop representative estimates of the environmental effects of the waste materials. When sufficient information is available, the results of reactive solute transport simulations show close agreement to measurements made at field sites and in laboratory experiments.

  6. Sustained release of doxorubicin from zeolite magnetite nanocomposites prepared by mechanical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arruebo, Manuel; Fernández-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Irusta, Silvia; Arbiol, Jordi; Ibarra, M. Ricardo; Santamaría, Jesús

    2006-08-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of magnetite and FAU zeolite with a high surface area and adsorption capacity have been prepared by mechanical activation using high-energy milling at room temperature. FTIR results, as well as HRTEM, EFTEM, and XPS measurements, show that the resulting magnetic nanoparticles are covered by a thin aluminosilicate coating. A saturation magnetization as high as 16 emu g-1 and 94.2 Oe of coercivity were observed for the obtained composites. The main advantages of this synthesis procedure are (i) simplicity of the preparation procedure, (ii) prevention of agglomeration of the magnetite nanoparticles to a large extent, and (iii) absence of free magnetite outside the zeolitic matrix. In addition, in vitro experiments revealed that the nanoparticles prepared were able to store and release substantial amounts of doxorubicin. In view of these advantages, these magnetic nanoparticles can be considered as potential candidates for drug-delivery applications.

  7. Regulation of feeding behavior and psychomotor activity by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in fish

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Kouhei

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide belonging to a family of neuropeptides that includes urocortins, urotensin I, and sauvagine in vertebrates. CRH and urocortin act as anorexigenic factors for satiety regulation in fish. In a goldfish model, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of CRH has been shown to affect not only food intake, but also locomotor and psychomotor activities. In particular, CRH elicits anxiety-like behavior as an anxiogenic neuropeptide in goldfish, as is the case in rodents. This paper reviews current knowledge of CRH and its related peptides derived from studies of teleost fish, as representative non-mammals, focusing particularly on the role of the CRH system, and examines its significance from a comparative viewpoint. PMID:23754974

  8. Mitochondrial alarmins released by degenerating motor axon terminals activate perisynaptic Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Duregotti, Elisa; Negro, Samuele; Scorzeto, Michele; Zornetta, Irene; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Chang, Christopher J.; Montecucco, Cesare; Rigoni, Michela

    2015-01-01

    An acute and highly reproducible motor axon terminal degeneration followed by complete regeneration is induced by some animal presynaptic neurotoxins, representing an appropriate and controlled system to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying degeneration and regeneration of peripheral nerve terminals. We have previously shown that nerve terminals exposed to spider or snake presynaptic neurotoxins degenerate as a result of calcium overload and mitochondrial failure. Here we show that toxin-treated primary neurons release signaling molecules derived from mitochondria: hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial DNA, and cytochrome c. These molecules activate isolated primary Schwann cells, Schwann cells cocultured with neurons and at neuromuscular junction in vivo through the MAPK pathway. We propose that this inter- and intracellular signaling is involved in triggering the regeneration of peripheral nerve terminals affected by other forms of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25605902

  9. The characterization of anti-T. cruzi activity relationships between ferrocenyl, cyrhetrenyl complexes and ROS release.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Romero, Valentina; Arancibia, Rodrigo; Klahn, Hugo; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisen, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Simon, Felipe; Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo