Science.gov

Sample records for activation product release

  1. Activation product release from fusion structural materials in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya, I.; Montgomery, F.; Trester, P.; Burnette, R.; Johnson, W.; Schultz, K.

    1985-08-01

    The release and transport of activated materials-of-construction in a fusion reactor during an accident scenario involving overheating and ingress of oxidants is an important area of safety research. This investigation quantified material release characteristics which result from surface oxide spallation and vaporization for the steel alloys PCA and HT-9 in impure helium and air environments.

  2. Doses from accidental releases of tritium and activation products into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskob, W.

    1993-06-01

    In view of public acceptance and the licensing procedure of projected fusion reactors, the release of tritium and activation products during normal operation as well as after accidents is a significant safety aspect. Calculations have been performed under accidental conditions for unit releases of corrosion products from water coolant loops, of first wall erosion products including different coating materials, and of tritium in its chemical form of tritiated water (HTO). Dose assessments during normal operation have been performed for corrosion products from first wall primary coolant loop and for tritium in both chemical forms (HT/HTO). The two accident consequence assessment (ACA) codes UFOTRI and COSYMA have been applied for the deterministic dose calculations with nearly the same input variables and for several radiological source terms. Furthermore, COSYMA and NORMTRI have been applied for routine release scenarios. The paper analyzes the radioation doses to individuals and the population resulting from the different materials assumed to be released in the environment.

  3. A method for production and determination of histamine releasing activity from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kampen, G T; Poulsen, L K; Reimert, C M; Skov, P S

    1997-12-29

    Histamine releasing factors, i.e. cytokines capable of inducing histamine release from basophils or mast cells, have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of, for example, allergic late-phase reactions. Here we describe a controlled method for production and determination of histamine releasing activity (HRA) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC). MNC were incubated with concanavalin A (Con A) for 2 h and cultured for another 40 h in fresh serum free medium. The culture supernatants were concentrated 19-25 fold by ultrafiltration (molecular weight cut-off: 3000 Da). The preparations of HRA induced dose- and Ca2+-dependent histamine release from leukocytes. Supernatants of parallel cultures of unstimulated MNC did not induce histamine release. The HRA was neither due to exogenous histamine releasing compounds (e.g. Con A) nor to residual histamine in the preparations of HRA. The kinetics of HRA induced histamine release (half-maximal release after > 40 min) were slower and more protracted than those of anti-IgE induced histamine release. However, based on a comparison between HRA induced histamine release from leukocytes and purified (97%) basophils, this did not appear to be due to an indirect effect on the basophils. Finally, neither the production of nor the response to HRA was dependent on the allergic status of the donor. PMID:9520301

  4. Activated mast cells release biological activities able to support eosinophil production from mouse hemopoietic precursors.

    PubMed

    Oskéritzian, C; Milon, G; Braquet, P; Mencia-Huerta, J M; David, B

    1996-02-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells cultured for 6 days in the presence of recombinant murine IL-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were used as a source of precursors responsive to eosinopoietins. They were further cultured for 7 days in the presence of either a combination of recombinant cytokines or supernatants of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) activated with either immunological or nonimmunological stimuli. Cytosmears of collected cells were analyzed for eosinophil contents and allowed to demonstrate that supernatants of passively sensitized BMMC support both total cell proliferation and eosinophil production, after various periods of incubation with monoclonal rat anti-mouse IgE antibodies (the 6HD5 mAbs). In contrast, a stimulation with 100 ng/ml dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) did not generate supernatants displaying such bioactivities. Low doses of methyl ester of L (but not D)-leucine or of the calcium ionophore A23187 also allowed the release of eosinopoietic bioactivities. In addition, immunoreactive IL-5, GM-CSF, and IL-3 were quantified in the BMMC supernatants. These results demonstrate that activated BMMC are able to effect eosinophil production. PMID:8603429

  5. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_C Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima; Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP satellite was successfully launched January 31st 2015, and began acquiring Earth observation data following in-orbit sensor calibration. Global data products derived from the SMAP L-band microwave measurements include Level 1 calibrated and geolocated radiometric brightness temperatures, Level 23 surface soil moisture and freezethaw geophysical retrievals mapped to a fixed Earth grid, and model enhanced Level 4 data products for surface to root zone soil moisture and terrestrial carbon (CO2) fluxes. The post-launch SMAP mission CalVal Phase had two primary objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product pertaining to the validated release. The L4_C validated product release effectively replaces an earlier L4_C beta-product release (Kimball et al. 2015). The validated release described in this report incorporates a longer data record and benefits from algorithm and CalVal refinements acquired during the SMAP post-launch CalVal intensive period. The SMAP L4_C algorithms utilize a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and component carbon fluxes for vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw (FT) controls on GPP and respiration (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and

  6. Soluble microbial products (SMPs) release in activated sludge systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the characterization, production and implications of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in biological wastewater treatment. The precise definition of SMPs is open to talk about, but is currently regarded as “the pool of organic compounds that are released into solution from substrate metabolism and biomass decay”'. Some of the SMPs have been identified as humic acids, polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, antibiotics, extracellular enzymes and structural components of cells and products of energy metabolism. They adversely affect the kinetic activity, flocculating and settling properties of sludge. This review outlines some important findings with regard to biodegradability and treatability of SMPs and also the effect of process parameters on their production. As SMPs are produced during biological treatment process, their trace amounts normally remain in the effluent that defines the highest COD removal efficiency. Their presence in effluent represents a high potential risk of toxic by-product formation during chlorine disinfection. Studies have indicated that among all wastewater post-treatment processes, the adsorption by granular activated carbon combined with biologically induced degradation is the most effective method for removal of SMPs. However, it may be concludes that the knowledge regarding SMPs is still under progress and more work is required to fully understand their contribution to the treatment process. PMID:23369231

  7. Soluble microbial products (SMPs) release in activated sludge systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Azami, Hamed; Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Mehrnia, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the characterization, production and implications of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in biological wastewater treatment. The precise definition of SMPs is open to talk about, but is currently regarded as "the pool of organic compounds that are released into solution from substrate metabolism and biomass decay"'. Some of the SMPs have been identified as humic acids, polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, antibiotics, extracellular enzymes and structural components of cells and products of energy metabolism. They adversely affect the kinetic activity, flocculating and settling properties of sludge. This review outlines some important findings with regard to biodegradability and treatability of SMPs and also the effect of process parameters on their production. As SMPs are produced during biological treatment process, their trace amounts normally remain in the effluent that defines the highest COD removal efficiency. Their presence in effluent represents a high potential risk of toxic by-product formation during chlorine disinfection. Studies have indicated that among all wastewater post-treatment processes, the adsorption by granular activated carbon combined with biologically induced degradation is the most effective method for removal of SMPs. However, it may be concludes that the knowledge regarding SMPs is still under progress and more work is required to fully understand their contribution to the treatment process. PMID:23369231

  8. Macelignan inhibits histamine release and inflammatory mediator production in activated rat basophilic leukemia mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Sun; Kim, Myung-Suk; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-10-01

    Type I allergy is characterized by the release of granule-associated mediators, lipid-derived substances, cytokines, and chemokines by activated mast cells. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt., we determined its ability to inhibit calcium (Ca(2+)) influx, degranulation, and inflammatory mediator production in RBL-2 H3 cells stimulated with A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macelignan inhibited Ca(2+) influx and the secretion of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, prostaglandin E(2), and leukotriene C(4); decreased mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and attenuated phosphorylation of Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results indicate the potential of macelignan as a type I allergy treatment. PMID:22729280

  9. Release of platelet activating factor by the isolated kidney is not linked to the production of prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Nies, A S; Tunney, A; Barden, A; Sturm, M; Vandongen, R

    1991-11-01

    In many isolated tissues, including glomerular mesangial cells and endothelial cells, the synthesis of platelet activating factor (PAF) occurs by remodeling the phospholipids so that the production of PAF results in the release of arachidonic acid with subsequent production of cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase products. In some tissues, including the renal medulla, another pathway for PAF biosynthesis (the de novo pathway) has been found in which the production of PAF is not linked to the production of arachidonic acid products. We tested the hypothesis that the remodeling pathway was active in the release of PAF into renal venous effluent of the isolated kidney. Isolated rat kidneys perfused at constant flow with albumin-containing buffer were stimulated to produce prostaglandin by an infusion of angiotensin II or bradykinin. Some kidneys were also challenged with the calcium ionophore A23187. Perfusate was collected for bioassay of PAF and radioimmunoassay of prostaglandin (PG) E2; urine was collected for PAF bioassay. Angiotensin II (10(-9) to 10(-8) M) increased renal vascular resistance, and bradykinin (10(-8) to 10(-7) M) and A23187 (3 x 10(-6) M) reduced renal vascular resistance. PGE2 production was increased significantly by bradykinin and angiotensin II but not by A23187. Only A23187 increased the release of PAF into the perfusate. Urine PAF was not changed by any of the stimuli. These data indicate that the release of PGE2 by the isolated, perfused rat kidney can be dissociated from the release of PAF. The findings support the suggestion that PAF released by the kidney into the renal venous effluent is not produced by remodeling the lipids that are the source of renally released prostaglandins. PMID:1941608

  10. TESTING PHARMACEUTICAL RELEASE OF ACTIVE SUBSTANCES FROM MEDICINAL PRODUCTS CONTAINING ST. JOHN'S WORT.

    PubMed

    Sakowska, Joanna; Anyzewska, Małgorzata; Łozak, Anna; Kowalczuk, Anna; Jabłczyńska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the content of hypericins and flavonoids in tablets and capsules containing the extract or powdered herb of St. John's wort, in herbs for infusion and herbal infusions and to release of these compounds from tablets and capsules. HPLC method was used to determine the assay of hypericins and flavonoids in all tested products. The hypericins content was between 0.35 mg and 1.44 mg per tablet or capsule. The release of hypericins from these products in the phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 is between 30 and 60% of the determined content. The degree of hypericins release from herbs into infusions was 15% on average, which corresponds to 0.64 mg of hypericins per infusion of 4 g of herbs. The flavonoids content was between 8.79 and 36.3 mg per tablet or capsule. The release of flavonoids in the phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 is between 63 and 85% of the determined content. The degree of flavonoids release was 76% on average, which corresponds to 77.0 mg per infusion of 4 g of herbs. The test results confirmed that infusions from the St. John's wort constitute are a rich source of flavonoids. At the same time, the universally accepted opinion that aqueous infusions contain only trace amounts of hypericins was not confirmed. Infusions from Herba hyperici may also be a source of hypericins in amounts comparable with the minimum dose recommended for the treatment of mild to moderate depressive episodes. PMID:27180432

  11. Autocrine Regulation of UVA-Induced IL-6 Production via Release of ATP and Activation of P2Y Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Ayumi; Kadomatsu, Remi; Ono, Miyu; Kojima, Shuji; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Sakamoto, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides, such as ATP, are released from cells in response to various stimuli and act as intercellular signaling molecules through activation of P2 receptors. Exposure to the ultraviolet radiation A (UVA) component of sunlight causes molecular and cellular damage, and in this study, we investigated the involvement of extracellular nucleotides and P2 receptors in the UVA-induced cellular response. Human keratinocyte-derived HaCaT cells were irradiated with a single dose of UVA (2.5 J/cm2), and ATP release and interleukin (IL)-6 production were measured. ATP was released from cells in response to UVA irradiation, and the release was blocked by pretreatment with inhibitors of gap junction hemichannels or P2X7 receptor antagonist. IL-6 production was increased after UVA irradiation, and this increase was inhibited by ecto-nucleotidase or by antagonists of P2Y11 or P2Y13 receptor. These results suggest that UVA-induced IL-6 production is mediated by release of ATP through hemichannels and P2X7 receptor, followed by activation of P2Y11 and P2Y13 receptors. Interestingly, P2Y11 and P2Y13 were associated with the same pattern of IL-6 production, though they trigger different intracellular signaling cascades: Ca2+-dependent and PI3K-dependent, respectively. Thus, IL-6 production in response to UVA-induced ATP release involves at least two distinct pathways, mediated by activation of P2Y11 and P2Y13 receptors. PMID:26030257

  12. Uronic Acid products release from enzymically active cell wall from tomato fruit and its dependency on enzyme quantity and distribution.

    PubMed

    Huber, D J; Lee, J H

    1988-07-01

    Isolated cell wall from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Rutgers) fruit released polymeric (degree of polymerization [DP] > 8), oligomeric, and monomeric uronic acids in a reaction mediated by bound polygalacturonase (PG) (EC 3.2.1.15). Wall autolytic capacity increased with ripening, reflecting increased levels of bound PG; however, characteristic oligomeric and monomeric products were recovered from all wall isolates exhibiting net pectin release. The capacity of wall from fruit at early ripening (breaker, turning) to generate oligomeric and monomeric uronic acids was attributed to the nonuniform ripening pattern of the tomato fruit and, consequently, a locally dense distribution of enzyme in wall originating from those fruit portions at more temporally advanced stages of ripening. Artificial autolytically active wall, prepared by permitting solubilized PG to bind to enzymically inactive wall from maturegreen fruit, released products which were similar in size characteristics to those recovered from active wall isolates. Extraction of wall-bound PG using high concentrations of NaCl (1.2 molar) did not attenuate subsequent autolytic activity but greatly suppressed the production of oligomeric and monomeric products. An examination of water-soluble uronic acids recovered from ripe pericarp tissue disclosed the presence of polymeric and monomeric uronic acids but only trace quantities of oligomers. The significance in autolytic reactions of enzyme quantity and distribution and their possible relevance to in vivo pectin degradation will be discussed. PMID:16666191

  13. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_SM Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf Helmut; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Chen, Fan; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Crow, Wade; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John; Koster, Randal D.; Smith, E. Brent

    2016-01-01

    During the post-launch SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase there are two objectives for each science data product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithm, and 2) validate the accuracy of the science data product as specified in the science requirements and according to the Cal/Val schedule. This report provides an assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture Passive (L4_SM) product specifically for the product's public Version 2 validated release scheduled for 29 April 2016. The assessment of the Version 2 L4_SM data product includes comparisons of SMAP L4_SM soil moisture estimates with in situ soil moisture observations from core validation sites and sparse networks. The assessment further includes a global evaluation of the internal diagnostics from the ensemble-based data assimilation system that is used to generate the L4_SM product. This evaluation focuses on the statistics of the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals and the analysis increments. Together, the core validation site comparisons and the statistics of the assimilation diagnostics are considered primary validation methodologies for the L4_SM product. Comparisons against in situ measurements from regional-scale sparse networks are considered a secondary validation methodology because such in situ measurements are subject to up-scaling errors from the point-scale to the grid cell scale of the data product. Based on the limited set of core validation sites, the wide geographic range of the sparse network sites, and the global assessment of the assimilation diagnostics, the assessment presented here meets the criteria established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites for Stage 2 validation and supports the validated release of the data. An analysis of the time average surface and root zone soil moisture shows that the global pattern of arid and humid regions are captured by the L4_SM estimates. Results from the

  14. New RuII Complex for Dual Activity: Photoinduced Ligand Release and 1O2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Lauren M.; White, Jessica K.; Albani, Bryan A.; Kohler, Lars; Kodanko, Jeremy J.; Thummel, Randolph P.

    2016-01-01

    The new complex [Ru(pydppn)(biq)(py)]2+ (1) undergoes both py photodissociation in CH3CN with Φ500=0.0070(4) and 1O2 production with ΦΔ=0.75(7) in CH3OH from a long-lived 3ππ* state centered on the pydppn ligand (pydppn=3-(pyrid-2-yl)benzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine; biq = 2,2′-biquinoline; py= pyridine). This represents an order of magnitude decrease in the Φ500 compared to the previously reported model compound [Ru(tpy)(biq)(py)]2+ (3) (tpy=2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine) that undergoes only ligand exchange. The effect on the quantum yields by the addition of a second deactivation pathway through the low-lying 3ππ* state necessary for dual reactivity was investigated using ultrafast and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, revealing a significantly shorter 3MLCT lifetime in 1 relative to that of the model complex 3. Due to the structural similarities between the two compounds, the lower values of Φ500 and ΦΔ compared to that of [Ru(pydppn)(bpy)(py)]2+ (2) (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine) are attributed to a competitive excited state population between the 3LF states involved in ligand dissociation and the long-lived 3ππ* state in 1. Complex 1 represents a model compound for dual activity that may be applied to photochemotherapy. PMID:26715085

  15. Store-Operated Ca2+ Release-Activated Ca2+ Channels Regulate PAR2-Activated Ca2+ Signaling and Cytokine Production in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Yamashita, Megumi; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2015-09-01

    The G-protein-coupled protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and auto-immune disorders. In airway epithelial cells (AECs), stimulation of PAR2 by allergens and proteases triggers the release of a host of inflammatory mediators to regulate bronchomotor tone and immune cell recruitment. Activation of PAR2 turns on several cell signaling pathways of which the mobilization of cytosolic Ca(2+) is likely a critical but poorly understood event. In this study, we show that Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by stromal interaction molecule 1 and Orai1 are a major route of Ca(2+) entry in primary human AECs and drive the Ca(2+) elevations seen in response to PAR2 activation. Activation of CRAC channels induces the production of several key inflammatory mediators from AECs including thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-6, and PGE2, in part through stimulation of gene expression via nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Furthermore, PAR2 stimulation induces the production of many key inflammatory mediators including PGE2, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF in a CRAC channel-dependent manner. These findings indicate that CRAC channels are the primary mechanism for Ca(2+) influx in AECs and a vital checkpoint for the induction of PAR2-induced proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26238490

  16. Crystal structures of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase: structural insights into activation mechanism and product release.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Javier; Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-01

    Sterol esterases are able to efficiently hydrolyze both sterol esters and triglycerides and to carry out synthesis reactions in the presence of organic solvents. Their high versatility makes them excellent candidates for biotechnological purposes. Sterol esterase from fungus Ophiostoma piceae (OPE) belongs to the family abH03.01 of the Candida rugosa lipase-like proteins. Crystal structures of OPE were solved in this study for the closed and open conformations. Enzyme activation involves a large displacement of the conserved lid, structural rearrangements of loop α16-α17, and formation of a dimer with a large opening. Three PEG molecules are placed in the active site, mimicking chains of the triglyceride substrate, demonstrating the position of the oxyanion hole and the three pockets that accommodate the sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 fatty acids chains. One of them is an internal tunnel, connecting the active center with the outer surface of the enzyme 30 Å far from the catalytic Ser220. Based on our structural and biochemical results we propose a mechanism by which a great variety of different substrates can be hydrolyzed in OPE paving the way for the construction of new variants to improve the catalytic properties of these enzymes and their biotechnological applications. PMID:25108239

  17. In vitro Effects of Selected Saponins on the Production and Release of Lysozyme Activity of Human Monocytic and Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Helal, Racha; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2011-01-01

    Lysozyme is one of the most important factors of innate immunity and a unique enzybiotic in that it exerts not only antibacterial activity, but also antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anticancer and immunomodulatory activities. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether in vitro exposure to saponins can affect the release and production of lysozyme activity in human monocytic cells THP-1, and in human epithelial cells HT-29. Lysozyme activity levels in cell culture fluids were measured using highly sensitive fluorescence-based lysozyme activity assay. Majority of the examined saponins were demonstrated to stimulate significantly the release of lysozyme activity of monocytes and epithelial cells after one hour treatment at non-toxic concentrations. On the contrary, cells treated with saponins for longer periods up to 72 hours showed tendency to decrease in the secretion and production of lysozyme activity. However, these inhibitory effects of saponins observed with long-term treatment periods were mostly associated with toxic effects of saponins to cells. The results suggested positive contribution of some saponins to lysozyme release of monocytes and epithelial cells upon short exposure. Furthermore, demonstrated ability of these saponins to enhance the release of lysozyme activity can present a new mechanism contribute to explaining important biological characteristics of saponins, including the antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory or immune-stimulating properties. PMID:21773070

  18. A single mutation in a tunnel to the active site changes the mechanism and kinetics of product release in haloalkane dehalogenase LinB.

    PubMed

    Biedermannová, Lada; Prokop, Zbyněk; Gora, Artur; Chovancová, Eva; Kovács, Mihály; Damborsky, Jiří; Wade, Rebecca C

    2012-08-17

    Many enzymes have buried active sites. The properties of the tunnels connecting the active site with bulk solvent affect ligand binding and unbinding and also the catalytic properties. Here, we investigate ligand passage in the haloalkane dehalogenase enzyme LinB and the effect of replacing leucine by a bulky tryptophan at a tunnel-lining position. Transient kinetic experiments show that the mutation significantly slows down the rate of product release. Moreover, the mechanism of bromide ion release is changed from a one-step process in the wild type enzyme to a two-step process in the mutant. The rate constant of bromide ion release corresponds to the overall steady-state turnover rate constant, suggesting that product release became the rate-limiting step of catalysis in the mutant. We explain the experimental findings by investigating the molecular details of the process computationally. Analysis of trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations with a tunnel detection software reveals differences in the tunnels available for ligand egress. Corresponding differences are seen in simulations of product egress using a specialized enhanced sampling technique. The differences in the free energy barriers for egress of a bromide ion obtained using potential of mean force calculations are in good agreement with the differences in rates obtained from the transient kinetic experiments. Interactions of the bromide ion with the introduced tryptophan are shown to affect the free energy barrier for its passage. The study demonstrates how the mechanism of an enzymatic catalytic cycle and reaction kinetics can be engineered by modification of protein tunnels. PMID:22745119

  19. A Single Mutation in a Tunnel to the Active Site Changes the Mechanism and Kinetics of Product Release in Haloalkane Dehalogenase LinB*

    PubMed Central

    Biedermannová, Lada; Prokop, Zbyněk; Gora, Artur; Chovancová, Eva; Kovács, Mihály; Damborský, Jiří; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-01-01

    Many enzymes have buried active sites. The properties of the tunnels connecting the active site with bulk solvent affect ligand binding and unbinding and also the catalytic properties. Here, we investigate ligand passage in the haloalkane dehalogenase enzyme LinB and the effect of replacing leucine by a bulky tryptophan at a tunnel-lining position. Transient kinetic experiments show that the mutation significantly slows down the rate of product release. Moreover, the mechanism of bromide ion release is changed from a one-step process in the wild type enzyme to a two-step process in the mutant. The rate constant of bromide ion release corresponds to the overall steady-state turnover rate constant, suggesting that product release became the rate-limiting step of catalysis in the mutant. We explain the experimental findings by investigating the molecular details of the process computationally. Analysis of trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations with a tunnel detection software reveals differences in the tunnels available for ligand egress. Corresponding differences are seen in simulations of product egress using a specialized enhanced sampling technique. The differences in the free energy barriers for egress of a bromide ion obtained using potential of mean force calculations are in good agreement with the differences in rates obtained from the transient kinetic experiments. Interactions of the bromide ion with the introduced tryptophan are shown to affect the free energy barrier for its passage. The study demonstrates how the mechanism of an enzymatic catalytic cycle and reaction kinetics can be engineered by modification of protein tunnels. PMID:22745119

  20. CALIOP V4 Level 1 Product Release

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-11-13

    CALIOP V4 Level 1 Product Release Thursday, November 13, 2014 ...   This updated version of the CALIOP Level 1 data product substantially improves both the 532nm and 1064nm calibration ...   The version 3.x (3.01, 3.02 and 3.30) CALIOP Level 1 data product will continue to be generated and made publically available, ...

  1. Production of hybrid lipid-based particles loaded with inorganic nanoparticles and active compounds for prolonged topical release.

    PubMed

    García-González, C A; Sampaio da Sousa, A R; Argemí, A; López Periago, A; Saurina, J; Duarte, C M M; Domingo, C

    2009-12-01

    The production of particulate hybrid carriers containing a glyceryl monostearate (Lumulse GMS-K), a waxy triglyceride (Cutina HR), silanized TiO(2) and caffeine were investigated with the aim of producing sunscreens with UV-radiation protection properties. Particles were obtained using the supercritical PGSS (Particles from Gas Saturated Solutions) technique. This method takes advantages of the lower melting temperatures of the lipids obtained from the dissolution of CO(2) in the bulk mixture. Experiments were performed at 13 MPa and 345 K, according to previous melting point measurements. Blends containing Lumulse GMS-K and Cutina HR lipids (50 wt%) were loaded with silanized TiO(2) and caffeine in percentile proportions of 6 and 4 wt%, respectively. The particles produced were characterized using several analytical techniques as follows: system crystallinity was checked by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, thermal stability by thermogravimetric analysis, and morphology by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Further, the UV-shielding ability of TiO(2) after its dispersion in the lipidic matrix was assessed by solid UV-vis spectroscopy. Preliminary results indicated that caffeine-loaded solid lipid particles presented a two-step dissolution profile, with an initial burst of 60 wt% of the loaded active agent. Lipid blends loaded with TiO(2) and caffeine encompassed the UV-filter behavior of TiO(2) and the photoaging prevention properties of caffeine. PMID:19720123

  2. Correlation of recent fission product release data

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, T.S.; Lorenz, R.A.; Nakamura, T.; Osborne, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    For the calculation of source terms associated with severe accidents, it is necessary to model the release of fission products from fuel as it heats and melts. Perhaps the most definitive model for fission product release is that of the FASTGRASS computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. There is persuasive evidence that these processes, as well as additional chemical and gas phase mass transport processes, are important in the release of fission products from fuel. Nevertheless, it has been found convenient to have simplified fission product release correlations that may not be as definitive as models like FASTGRASS but which attempt in some simple way to capture the essence of the mechanisms. One of the most widely used such correlation is called CORSOR-M which is the present fission product/aerosol release model used in the NRC Source Term Code Package. CORSOR has been criticized as having too much uncertainty in the calculated releases and as not accurately reproducing some experimental data. It is currently believed that these discrepancies between CORSOR and the more recent data have resulted because of the better time resolution of the more recent data compared to the data base that went into the CORSOR correlation. This document discusses a simple correlational model for use in connection with NUREG risk uncertainty exercises. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Fission product release from nuclear fuel by recoil and knockout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.

    1987-03-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the fission product release from nuclear fuel arising from the surface-fission release mechanisms of recoil and knockout. Release expressions are evaluated and compared to the short-lived activity measurements from in-reactor experiments with intact operating fuel. Recoil is shown to be an important process for releasing fission products from free UO 2 surfaces into the fuel-to-sheath gap. The model is also applied to tramp uranium in a power reactor primary heat transport circuit where it is demonstrated that recoil is the dominant release mechanism for small particles of fuel which are deposited on in-core surfaces. A methodology is established whereby release from surface contamination can be distinguished from that of fuel pin failure.

  4. Role of lymphocyte activation products (LAP) in cell-mediated immunity. II. Effects of lymphocyte activation products on lymph node architecture and evidence for peripheral release of LAP following antigenic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, R. H.; Wolstencroft, R. A.; Dumonde, D. C.; Balfour, Brigid M.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments reported here were concerned with determining the effects of lymphocyte activation products (LAP) on lymph node architecture, and with assaying afferent lymph for evidence of the peripheral release of LAP during the induction of an immune response. Intralymphatic inoculation of purified homologous LAP into guinea-pigs resulted in increased weight and cellular content of the draining node. Histologically these nodes showed paracortical distension and dense aggregations of lymphoid cells or `cellular plugs' in the paracortical sinuses. It was suggested that one effect of LAP may be to cause cellular retention in the paracortex of lymph nodes by regulating the rate of cell exit via the sinuses of the node. The peripheral lymph of rabbits was assayed for its ability to inhibit macrophage migration and to accelerate lymphocyte DNA synthesis after stimulation with three different antigens. The antigens were chosen to give a spectrum which ranged from a primarily humoral response (erythrocyte stimulation) through a mixed humoral and cell-mediated response (diphtheria toxoid stimulation) to a predominantly cell-mediated type of response (skin contact sensitization to fluorodinitrobenzene–FDNB). Paracortical distension with lymphoid cell sinus plugging, similar to that observed in the guinea-pig nodes following intralymphatic injection of LAP, were common features of both the diphtheria toxoid and FDNB responses. It was concluded that the development of this type of sinus plugging and paracortical distension might be related to multiple activities of LAP generated and released either at the peripheral antigen depot or within the draining node. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4111695

  5. GENIE Production Release 2.10.0

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.; Andreopoulos, C.; Athar, M.; Bodek, A.; Christy, E.; Coopersmith, B.; Dennis, S.; Dytman, S.; Gallagher, H.; Geary, N.; Golan, T.; Hatcher, R.; Hoshina, K.; Liu, J.; Mahn, K.; Marshall, C.; Morrison, J.; Nirkko, M.; Nowak, J.; Perdue, G. N.; Yarba, J.

    2015-12-25

    GENIE is a neutrino Monte Carlo event generator that simulates the primary interaction of a neutrino with a nuclear target, along with the subsequent propagation of the reaction products through the nuclear medium. It additionally contains libraries for fully-featured detector geometries and for managing various types of neutrino flux. This note details recent updates to GENIE, in particular, changes introduced into the newest production release, version 2.10.0.

  6. ORNL fission product release tests VI-6

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Lee, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The ORNL fission product release tests investigate release and transport of the major fission products from high-burnup fuel under LWR accident conditions. The two most recent tests (VI-4 and VI-5) were conducted in hydrogen. In three previous tests in this series (VI-1, VI-2, and VI-3), which had been conducted in steam, the oxidized Zircaloy cladding remained largely intact and acted as a barrier to steam reaction with the UO{sub 2}. Test VI-6 was designed to insure significant oxidation of the UO{sub 2} fuel, which has been shown to enhance release of certain fission products, especially molybdenum and ruthenium. The BR3 fuel specimen used in test VI-6 will be heated in hydrogen to 2300 K; the Zircaloy cladding is expected to melt and runoff at {approximately}2150 K. Upon reaching the 2300 K test temperature, the test atmosphere will be changed to steam, and that temperature will be maintained for 60 min, with the three collection trains being operated for 2-, 18-, and 40-min periods. The releases of {sup 85}Kr and {sup 137}Cs will be monitored continuously throughout the test. Posttest analyses of the material collected on the three trains will provide results on the release and transport of Mo, Ru, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, and Eu as a function of time at 2300 K. Continuous monitoring of the hydrogen produced during the steam atmosphere period at high temperature will provide a measure of the oxidation rate of the cladding and fuel. Following delays in approval of the safety documentation and in decontamination of the hot cell and test apparatus, test VI-6 will be conducted in late May.

  7. Active Region Release Two CMEs

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar material can be seen blowing off the sun in this video captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on the night of Feb. 5, 2013. This active region on the sun sent out two coronal ...

  8. Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

    2012-09-10

    Measurements of several radionuclides within environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Company website following the recent tsunami-initiated catastrophe were evaluated for the purpose of identifying the source term, reconstructing the release mechanisms, and estimating the extent of the release. 136Cs/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs ratios identified Units 1-3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil close to the facility. A trend was observed between the fraction of the total core inventory released for a number of fission product isotopes and their corresponding Gibbs Free Energy of formation for the primary oxide form of the isotope, suggesting that release was dictated primarily by chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the primary containment vessels of the vented reactors. The absence of any major fractionation beyond volatilization suggested all coolant had evaporated by the time of venting. High estimates for the fraction of the total inventory released of more volatile species (Te, Cs, I) indicated the damage to fuel bundles was likely extensive, minimizing any potential containment due to physical migration of these species through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall. 238Pu/239,240Pu ratios close-in and at 30 km from the facility indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of Pu to surface soil at the source but that this contribution likely decreased rapidly with distance from the facility. The fraction of the total Pu inventory released to the environment from venting units 1 and 3 was estimated to be ~0.003% based upon Pu/Cs isotope ratios relative to the within-reactor modeled inventory prior to venting and was consistent with an independent model evaluation that considered chemical volatility based upon measured fission product release trends. Significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel

  9. Product Release Pathways in Human and Plasmodium falciparum Phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Tarak; Roy, Sourav; Balaram, Hemalatha; Prakash, Meher K; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2016-08-22

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the metadynamics technique were carried out to delineate the product (PPi.2Mg and IMP) release mechanisms from the active site of both human (Hs) and Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) hypoxanthine-guanine-(xanthine) phosphoribosyltransferase (HG(X)PRT). An early movement of PPi.2Mg from its binding site has been observed. The swinging motion of the Asp side chain (D134/D145) in the binding pocket facilitates the detachment of IMP, which triggers the opening of flexible loop II, the gateway to the bulk solvent. In PfHGXPRT, PPi.2Mg and IMP are seen to be released via the same path in all of the biased MD simulations. In HsHGPRT too, the product molecules follow similar routes from the active site; however, an alternate but minor escape route for PPi.2Mg has been observed in the human enzyme. Tyr 104 and Phe 186 in HsHGPRT and Tyr 116 and Phe 197 in PfHGXPRT are the key residues that mediate the release of IMP, whereas the motion of PPi.2Mg away from the reaction center is guided by the negatively charged Asp and Glu and a few positively charged residues (Lys and Arg) that line the product release channels. Mutations of a few key residues present in loop II of Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) HGPRT have been shown to reduce the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Herein, in silico mutation of corresponding residues in loop II of HsHGPRT and PfHGXPRT resulted in partial opening of the flexible loop (loop II), thus exposing the active site to bulk water, which offers a rationale for the reduced catalytic activity of these two mutant enzymes. Investigations of the product release from these HsHGPRT and PfHGXPRT mutants delineate the role of these important residues in the enzymatic turnover. PMID:27404508

  10. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  11. Energy release, beam attenuation radiation damage, gas production and accumulation of long-lived activity in Pb, Pb-Bi and Hg targets

    SciTech Connect

    Shubin, Yu.N.

    1996-06-01

    The calculation and analysis of the nuclei concentrations and long-lived residual radioactivity accumulated in Pb, Pb-Bi and Hg targets irradiated by 800 MeV, 30 mA proton beam have been performed. The dominating components to the total radioactivity of radionuclides resulting from fission and spallation reactions and radiative capture by both target nuclei and accumulated radioactive nuclei for various irradiation and cooling times were analyzed. The estimations of spectral component contributions of neutron and proton fluxes to the accumulated activity were carried out. The contributions of fission products to the targets activity and partial activities of main long-lived fission products to the targets activity and partial activities of main long-lived fission products were evaluated. The accumulation of Po isotopes due to reactions induced by secondary alpha-particles were found to be important for the Pb target as compared with two-step radiative capture. The production of Tritium in the targets and its contribution to the total targets activity was considered in detail. It is found that total activities of both targets are close to one another.

  12. Light-Activated Content Release from Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Successful integration of diagnostic and therapeutic actions at the level of individual cells requires new materials that combine biological compatibility with functional versatility. This review focuses on the development of liposome-based functional materials, where payload release is activated by light. Methods of sensitizing liposomes to light have progressed from the use of organic molecular moieties to the use of metallic plasmon resonant structures. This development has facilitated application of near infrared light for activation, which is preferred for its deep penetration and low phototoxicity in biological tissues. Presented mechanisms of light-activated liposomal content release enable precise in vitro manipulation of minute amounts of reagents, but their use in clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications will require demonstration of safety and efficacy. PMID:23139729

  13. Effects of artemisinin sustained-release granules on mixed alga growth and microcystins production and release.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Danye; Hu, Shuzhen; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-12-01

    To safely and effectively apply artemisinin sustained-release granules to control and prevent algal water-blooms, the effects of artemisinin and its sustained-release granules on freshwater alga (Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) and Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa)), as well as the production and release of microcystins (MCs) were studied. The results showed that artemisinin sustained-release granules inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa (above 95% IR) and S. obliquus (about 90% IR), with M. aeruginosa more sensitive. The artemisinin sustained-release granules had a longer inhibition effect on growth of pure algae and algal coexistence than direct artemisinin dosing. The artemisinin sustained-release granules could decrease the production and release of algal toxins due to the continued stress of artemisinin released from artemisinin sustained-release granules. There was no increase in the total amount of MC-LR in the algal cell culture medium. PMID:26432265

  14. Recent Release of the ASTER Global DEM Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J.; Hall, A.; Meyer, D.; Sohre, T.; Doescher, C.

    2009-12-01

    On June 29th, the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (DEM) release was announced to the public and to a very eager audience. ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) is an imaging instrument flying on Terra, a satellite launched in December 1999 as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). ASTER is a cooperative effort between NASA, Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and Japan's Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC). On June 21, NASA Headquarters along with colleagues in Japan (METI) signed a plan for distribution of this product. The global digital elevation model of Earth is available online to users everywhere at no cost from NASA's Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) located at Sioux Falls, SD. The DAAC is a joint project of NASA and the USGS and is a key component of NASA's EOSDIS. The new ASTER GDEM was created from nearly 1.3 million individual stereo-pair images acquired by the Japanese Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (Aster) instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite. The ASTER elevation model was jointly developed by NASA and METI under contract to Sensor Information Laboratory Corp., Tsukuba, Japan. On June 29, the NASA press release was picked up quickly by numerous news organizations and online sites. Response to the product was incredible! The news of the release of the product was carried on websites across the globe, this fueled a tremendous response from users. Here are a few interesting metrics about the release: - over 41,000 unique visitors to website in first week following release - top countries in order were: US (approx. 20%), Germany, U.K., Brazil, Austria, Canada, Spain, Switzerland, Japan - approximately 29,000 visitors came to the news page in the first week and about 11,000 of these users downloaded the actual press release - by the end of August, over 2 Million ASTER GDEM files had been downloaded from the Land

  15. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 42; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Calibration and Validation for the L4_C Beta-Release Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima (Editor); Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch Cal/Val Phase of SMAP there are two objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements according to the Cal/Val timeline. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product specifically for the beta release. The beta-release version of the SMAP L4_C algorithms utilizes a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily NEE and component carbon fluxes, particularly vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (<10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape FT controls on GPP and Reco (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and underlying freeze/thaw and soil moisture constraints to these processes, 2) documenting primary connections between terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, and 3) improving understanding of terrestrial carbon sink activity in northern ecosystems.

  16. Induction of apoptosis by Uncaria tomentosa through reactive oxygen species production, cytochrome c release, and caspases activation in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, An-Chin; Jian, Cheng-Bang; Huang, Yu-Ting; Lai, Ching-Shu; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2007-11-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (Wild.) DC., found in the Amazon rain forest in South-America and known commonly as cat's claw, has been used in traditional medicine to prevent and treat inflammation and cancer. Recently, it has been found to possess potent anti-inflammation activities. In this study, we extracted cat's claw using four different solvents of different polarities and compared their relative influence on proliferation in human premyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cell lines. Cat's claw n-hexane extracts (CC-H), ethyl acetate extracts (CC-EA) and n-butanol extracts (CC-B) had a greater anti-cancer effect on HL-60 cells than those extracted with methanol (CC-M). Furthermore, CC-EA induced DNA fragmentation in HL-60 cells in a clearly more a concentration- and time-dependent manner than the other extracts. CC-EA-induced cell death was characterized by cell body shrinkage and chromatin condensation. Further investigating the molecular mechanism behind CC-EA-induced apoptosis, sells treated with CC-EA underwent a rapid loss of mitochondrial transmembrane (DeltaPsi(m)) potential, stimulation of phosphatidylserine flip-flop, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytosol, induction of caspase-3 activity in a time-dependent manner, and induced the cleavage of DNA fragmentation factor (DFF-45) and PARP poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). CC-EA promoted the up-regulation of Fas before the processing and activation of procaspase-8 and cleavage of Bid. In addition, the apoptosis induced by CC-EA was accompanied by up-regulation of Bax, down-regulation of Bcl-X(L) and cleavage of Mcl-1, suggesting that CC-EA may have some compounds that have anti-cancer activities and that further studies using cat's claw extracts need to be pursued. Taken together, the results of our studies show clearly that CC-EA's induction of apoptosis in HL-60 cells may make it very important in the development of medicine that can trigger chemopreventive actions in the body. PMID:17619071

  17. Release and activity of histone in diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Kang, R; Fan, X-G; Tang, D

    2014-01-01

    Histones and their post-translational modifications have key roles in chromatin remodeling and gene transcription. Besides intranuclear functions, histones act as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules when they are released into the extracellular space. Administration of exogenous histones to animals leads to systemic inflammatory and toxic responses through activating Toll-like receptors and inflammasome pathways. Anti-histone treatment (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, activated protein C, recombinant thrombomodulin, and heparin) protect mice against lethal endotoxemia, sepsis, ischemia/reperfusion injury, trauma, pancreatitis, peritonitis, stroke, coagulation, and thrombosis. In addition, elevated serum histone and nucleosome levels have been implicated in multiple pathophysiological processes and progression of diseases including autoimmune diseases, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Therefore, extracellular histones could serve as biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets in human diseases. PMID:25118930

  18. Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Sanecki, J.E.; Osborne, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel is being studied by heating fuel rod segments in flowing steam and an inert carrier gas to simulate accident conditions. Fuels with a range of irradiation histories are being subjected to several steam flow rates over a wide range of temperatures. Fission product release during each test is measured by gamma spectroscopy and by detailed examination of the collection apparatus after the test has been completed. These release results are complemented by a detailed posttest examination of samples of the fuel rod segment. Results of release measurements and fuel rod characterizations for tests at 1400 through 2000/sup 0/C are presented in this paper.

  19. Hanford production reactor heat releases 1951--1971

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to document and detail the thermal releases from the Hanford nuclear production reactors during the period 1951 through 1971, and to put these releases in historical perspective with respect to changing Columbia River flows and temperatures. This information can also be used as a foundation for further ecological evaluations. When examining Hanford production reactor thermal releases to the Columbia River all related factors affecting the releases and the characteristics of the river should be considered. The major considerations in the present study were the characteristics of the releases themselves (primarily coolant flow rate, temperatures, discharge facilities, period of operation, and level of operation) and the characteristics of the river in that reach (primarily flow rate, temperature and mixing characteristics; the effects of dam construction were also taken into account). In addition, this study addressed ecological effects of thermal releases on aquatic species. Accordingly, this report includes discussion of the reactor cooling system, historical heat releases, thermal mixing and transport studies, hydroelectric power development, and ecologic effects of Hanford production reactor heat releases on salmon and trout. Appendix A contains reactor operating statistics, and Appendix B provide computations of heat added to the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and Richland, Washington.

  20. Analysis of a nuclear accident: fission and activation product releases from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility as remote indicators of source identification, extent of release, and state of damaged spent nuclear fuel.

    PubMed

    Schwantes, Jon M; Orton, Christopher R; Clark, Richard A

    2012-08-21

    Researchers evaluated radionuclide measurements of environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Co. Website following the 2011 tsunami-initiated catastrophe. This effort identified Units 1 and 3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil near the facility. Radionuclide trends identified in the soils suggested that: (1) chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the vented reactors' primary containment vessels dictated the extent of release of radiation; (2) all coolant had likely evaporated by the time of venting; and (3) physical migration through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall were minimally effective at containing volatile species, suggesting damage to fuel bundles was extensive. Plutonium isotopic ratios and their distance from the source indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of plutonium to surface soil at the source, decreasing rapidly with distance from the facility. Two independent evaluations estimated the fraction of the total plutonium inventory released to the environment relative to cesium from venting Units 1 and 3 to be ∼0.002-0.004%. This study suggests significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel at the time of venting, but not as yet observed and reported within environmental samples, as potential analytes of concern for future environmental surveys around the site. The majority of the reactor inventories of isotopes of less volatile elements like Pu, Nb, and Sr were likely contained within the damaged reactors during venting. PMID:22680069

  1. Thermal-induced conformational changes in the product release area drive the enzymatic activity of xylanases 10B: Crystal structure, conformational stability and functional characterization of the xylanase 10B from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Camila Ramos; Meza, Andreia Navarro; Hoffmam, Zaira Bruna; Silva, Junio Cota; Alvarez, Thabata Maria; Ruller, Roberto; Giesel, Guilherme Menegon; Verli, Hugo; Squina, Fabio Marcio; Prade, Rolf Alexander; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyperthermostable xylanase 10B from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1 produces exclusively xylobiose at the optimum temperature. {yields} Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests a coupling effect of temperature-induced structural changes with its enzymatic behavior. {yields} Crystallographic and molecular dynamics studies indicate that conformational changes in the product release area modulate the enzyme action mode. -- Abstract: Endo-xylanases play a key role in the depolymerization of xylan and recently, they have attracted much attention owing to their potential applications on biofuels and paper industries. In this work, we have investigated the molecular basis for the action mode of xylanases 10B at high temperatures using biochemical, biophysical and crystallographic methods. The crystal structure of xylanase 10B from hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1 (TpXyl10B) has been solved in the native state and in complex with xylobiose. The complex crystal structure showed a classical binding mode shared among other xylanases, which encompasses the -1 and -2 subsites. Interestingly, TpXyl10B displayed a temperature-dependent action mode producing xylobiose and xylotriose at 20 {sup o}C, and exclusively xylobiose at 90 {sup o}C as assessed by capillary zone electrophoresis. Moreover, circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested a coupling effect of temperature-induced structural changes with this particular enzymatic behavior. Molecular dynamics simulations supported the CD analysis suggesting that an open conformational state adopted by the catalytic loop (Trp297-Lys326) provokes significant modifications in the product release area (+1,+2 and +3 subsites), which drives the enzymatic activity to the specific release of xylobiose at high temperatures.

  2. Coalition releases declaration for healthy and productive oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    Coalition releases declaration for healthy and productive oceans A coalition of 13 countries or federal agencies participating in a new Global Partnership for Oceans (GPO) indicated its support for a “Declaration for Healthy and Productive Oceans to Help Reduce Poverty” on 16 June, just prior to the Rio+20 conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  3. ALKALINITY, PH, AND COPPER CORROSION BY-PRODUCT RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water i...

  4. Recoil release of fission products from nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, C.

    1985-10-01

    An analytical approximation is developed for calculating recoil release from nuclear fuel into gas filled interspaces. This expression is evaluated for a number of interspace geometries and shown to be generally accurate to within about 10% by comparison with numerical calculations. The results are applied to situations of physical interest and it is demonstrated that recoil can be important when modelling fission product release from low temperature CAGR pin failures. Furthermore, recoil can contribute significantly in experiments on low temperature fission product release, particularly where oxidation enhancement of this release is measured by exposing the fuel to CO 2. The calculations presented here are one way of allowing for this, other methods are suggested.

  5. Neuronal adenosine release, and not astrocytic ATP release, mediates feedback inhibition of excitatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Lovatt, Ditte; Xu, Qiwu; Liu, Wei; Takano, Takahiro; Smith, Nathan A.; Schnermann, Jurgen; Tieu, Kim; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is a potent anticonvulsant acting on excitatory synapses through A1 receptors. Cellular release of ATP, and its subsequent extracellular enzymatic degradation to adenosine, could provide a powerful mechanism for astrocytes to control the activity of neural networks during high-intensity activity. Despite adenosine's importance, the cellular source of adenosine remains unclear. We report here that multiple enzymes degrade extracellular ATP in brain tissue, whereas only Nt5e degrades AMP to adenosine. However, endogenous A1 receptor activation during cortical seizures in vivo or heterosynaptic depression in situ is independent of Nt5e activity, and activation of astrocytic ATP release via Ca2+ photolysis does not trigger synaptic depression. In contrast, selective activation of postsynaptic CA1 neurons leads to release of adenosine and synaptic depression. This study shows that adenosine-mediated synaptic depression is not a consequence of astrocytic ATP release, but is instead an autonomic feedback mechanism that suppresses excitatory transmission during prolonged activity. PMID:22421436

  6. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  7. Explanatory Supplement to the WISE Preliminary Data Release Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Wright, E. L.; Conrow, T.; Bauer, J.; Benford, D.; Brandenburg, H.; Dailey, J.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Evans, T.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Fowler, J.; Gelino, C.; Grillmair, C.; Harbut, M.; Hoffman, D.; Jarrett, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Liu, W.; Mainzer, A.; Marsh, K.; Masci, F.; McCallon, H.; Padgett, D.; Ressler, M. E.; Royer, D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Stanford, S. A.; Wyatt, P. L.; Tholen, D.; Tsai, C. W.; Wachter, S.; Wheelock, S. L.; Yan, L.; Alles, R.; Beck, R.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; McCollum, B.; McGehee, P.; Wittman, M.

    2011-04-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) surveyed the entire sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns in 2010, achieving 5-sigma point source sensitivities per band better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic. The WISE Preliminary Data Release, conducted on April 14, 2011, incorporates data covering the first ~57% of the sky surveyed that were processed with initial calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include: (1) an Atlas of 10,464 sets of calibrated, coadded images, depth-of-coverage and uncertainty maps in the four WISE bands, (2) a Source Catalog containing positions and four-band photometry for 257 million objects, and (3) an Explanatory Supplement. Ancillary products include an archive of 754,000 sets of calibrated WISE single-exposure images, uncertainty and bit-mask maps, and a database of 2.2 billion source extractions made from the single-exposure images, and moving object tracklets identified by the NEOWISE program (Mainzer et al. 2011). The Explanatory Supplement to the WISE Preliminary Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the WISE data. The Supplement contains an overview of the WISE mission, facilities, and operations, a description of the contents and formats of the WISE image and tabular data products, and cautionary notes that describe known limitations of the Preliminary Release products. Instructions for accessing the WISE data products via the services of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive are provided. Detailed descriptions of the data processing system and algorithms used to ingest and convert raw WISE data to the calibrated data products are presented, along with assessments of the achieved sky coverage, photometric and astrometric characteristics and completeness and reliability of the Preliminary Release data products. The WISE Preliminary Release Explanatory Supplement is an on-line document that is updated frequently to provide the most current

  8. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  9. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-6

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Collins, J.L.

    1994-03-01

    Test VI-6 was the sixth test in the VI series conducted in the vertical furnace. The fuel specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium. The fuel had experienced a burnup of {approximately}42 MWd/kg, with inert gas release during irradiation of {approximately}2%. The fuel specimen was heated in an induction furnace at 2300 K for 60 min, initially in hydrogen, then in a steam atmosphere. The released fission products were collected in three sequentially operated collection trains designed to facilitate sampling and analysis. The fission product inventories in the fuel were measured directly by gamma-ray spectrometry, where possible, and were calculated by ORIGEN2. Integral releases were 75% for {sup 85}Kr, 67% for {sup 129}I, 64% for {sup 125}Sb, 80% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, 14% for {sup 154}Eu, 63% for Te, 32% for Ba, 13% for Mo, and 5.8% for Sr. Of the totals released from the fuel, 43% of the Cs, 32% of the Sb, and 98% of the Eu were deposited in the outlet end of the furnace. During the heatup in hydrogen, the Zircaloy cladding melted, ran down, and reacted with some of the UO{sub 2} and fission products, especially Te and Sb. The total mass released from the furnace to the collection system, including fission products, fuel, and structural materials, was 0.57 g, almost equally divided between thermal gradient tubes and filters. The release behaviors for the most volatile elements, Kr and Cs, were in good agreement with the ORNL Diffusion Model.

  10. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-5

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Collins, J.L. )

    1991-10-01

    Test VI-5, the fifth in a series of high-temperature fission product release tests in a vertical test apparatus, was conducted in a flowing mixture of hydrogen and helium. The test specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium which had been irradiated to a burnup of {approximately}42 MWd/kg. Using a hot cell-mounted test apparatus, the fuel rod was heated in an induction furnace under simulated LWR accident conditions to two test temperatures, 2000 K for 20 min and then 2700 K for an additional 20 min. The released fission products were collected in three sequentially operated collection trains on components designed to measure fission product transport characteristics and facilitate sampling and analysis. The results from this test were compared with those obtained in previous tests in this series and with the CORSOR-M and ORNL diffusion release models for fission product release. 21 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Presence in, and release of, nanomaterials from consumer products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Westerhoff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Widespread use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in consumer products has led to concerns about their potential impact on humans and the environment. In order to fully assess the impacts and release of ENMs from consumer products, this chapter provides an overview of the types of consumer products that contain nanomaterials, the potential release mechanisms of these ENMs from consumer products, and the associated human exposure. Information from two large datasets on consumer goods associated with ENMs, namely, the U.S.-based Project for Emerging Nanotechnologies from the Woodrow Wilson International Center, and the European-based National Institute for Public Health and the Environment of Netherlands, have been summarized. These databases reveal that silver, titanium, carbon-based ENMs are the major nanomaterials associated with consumer products. The presence and potential release of silver, titanium, carbon-based, and other nanomaterials from consumer goods available in published literature are also summarized, as well as the potential human exposure scenarios of inhalation, ingestion, dermal, and combination of all means. The prospecting of nanomaterial in water and biosolids provides further evidence of ENM occurrence, which could be linked to the use of nanomaterials containing consumer goods. Finally, this overview provides guidelines on toxicity studies, which calls for further efforts to analyze the biological effects of ENMs on human beings and their exposure pathways in consumer products. PMID:24683024

  12. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  13. Fission product release from TRIGA-LEU reactor fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.L.; Foushee, F.C.; Greenwood, J.S

    1980-07-01

    Due to present international concerns over nuclear proliferation, TRIGA reactor fuels will utilize only low-enriched uranium (LEU) (enrichment <20%). This requires increased total uranium loading per unit volume of fuel in order to maintain the appropriate fissile loading. Tests were conducted to determine the fractional release of gaseous and metallic fission products from typical uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA fuels containing up to 45 wt-% uranium. These tests, performed in late 1977 and early 1978, were similar to those conducted earlier on TRIGA fuels with 8.5 wt-% U. Fission gas release measurements were made on prototypic specimens from room temperature to 1100 deg. C in the TRIGA King Furnace Facility. The fuel specimens were irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at a low power level. The fractional releases of the gaseous nuclides of krypton and xenon were measured under steady-state operating conditions. Clean helium was used to sweep the fission gases released during irradiation from the furnace into a standard gas collection trap for gamma counting. The results of these tests on TRIGA-LEU fuel agree well with data from the similar, earlier tests on TRIGA fuel. The correlation used to calculate the release of fission products from 8.5 wt-% U TRIGA fuel applies equally well for U contents up to 45 wt-%. (author)

  14. Stagnation pressure activated fuel release mechanism for hypersonic projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Cartland, Harry E.; Hunter, John W.

    2003-01-01

    A propulsion-assisted projectile has a body, a cowl forming a combustion section and a nozzle section. The body has a fuel reservoir within a central portion of the body, and a fuel activation system located along the central axis of the body and having a portion of the fuel activation system within the fuel reservoir. The fuel activation system has a fuel release piston with a forward sealing member where the fuel release piston is adapted to be moved when the forward sealing member is impacted with an air flow, and an air-flow channel adapted to conduct ambient air during flight to the fuel release piston.

  15. Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Release Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) surveyed the entire sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns in 2010, achieving 5-sigma point source sensitivities per band better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic. The WISE All-Sky Data Release, conducted on March 14, 2012, incorporates all data taken during the full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 20l0,that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include: (1) an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets; (2) a Source Catalog containing positions and four-band photometry for over 563 million objects, and (3) an Explanatory Supplement. Ancillary products include a Reject Table that contains 284 million detections that were not selected for the Source Catalog because they are low signal-to-noise ratio or spurious detections of image artifacts, an archive of over 1.5 million sets of calibrated WISE Single-exposure images, and a database of 9.4 billion source extractions from those single images, and moving object tracklets identified by the NEOWISE program (Mainzer et aI. 2011). The WISE All-Sky Data Release products supersede those from the WISE Preliminary Data Release (Cutri et al. 2011). The Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the WISE data. The Supplement contains an overview of the WISE mission, facilities, and operations, a detailed description of WISE data processing algorithms, a guide to the content and formals of the image and tabular data products, and cautionary notes that describe known limitations of the All-Sky Release products. Instructions for accessing the WISE data products via the services of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive are provided. The Supplement also provides analyses of the achieved sky coverage, photometric and astrometric characteristics and completeness and reliability of the All

  16. ORNL studies of fission product release under LWR accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    High burnup Zircaloy-clad UO{sub 2} fuel specimens have been heated to study the release of fission products in tests simulating LWR accident conditions. The dominant variable was found to be temperature, with atmosphere, time, and burnup also being significant variables. Comparison of data from tests in steam and hydrogen, at temperatures of 2000 to 2700 K, have shown that the releases of the most volatile species (Kr, Xe, I, and Cs) are relatively insensitive to atmosphere. The releases of the less-volatile species (Sr, Mo, Ru, Sb, Te, Ba, and Eu), however, may vary by orders of magnitude depending on atmosphere. In addition, the atmosphere may drastically affect the mode and extent of fuel destruction.

  17. Development of Active Control Method for Supercooling Releasing of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, Daisuke; Kozawa, Yoshiyuki; Tanino, Masayuki; Inada, Takaaki

    We have tested the prototype ice-slurry generator that enables both production of supercooled water (-2°C) and releasing of its supercooling simultaneously and continuously in a closed piping system. In the experiment, we adopted the irradiation of ultrasonic wave as an active control method of triggering for supercooling releasing, and evaluated the reliability for a practical use compared with the seed ice-crystal trigger. As the results, it has been confirmed that the ultrasonic wave trigger acts assuredly at the same level of degree of supercooling as that by using the seed ice-crystal Trigger. Moreover, it can be found that the ultrasonic wave trigger has the advantage of removing the growing ice-crystals on the pipe wall at the same time. Finally, we have specified the bombardment condition of ultrasonic wave enough to make continuously the ice-slurry in a closed system as the output surface power density > 31.4kW/m2 and the superficial bombardment time > 4.1sec. We have also demonstrated the continuous ice-slurry making for more than 6hours by using the refrigerator system with the practical scale of 88kW.

  18. Fission-product release from TRIGA-LEU reactor fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.L.; Foushee, F.C.; Greenwood, J.S.

    1980-11-01

    The release of fission products, both gaseous and volatile metals, from TRIGA fuel is important for the analysis of possible accident conditions related to reactor operation and the design of future TRIGA fuel systems. Because of present national concerns over nuclear proliferation, it has become clear that future reactor fuels will, of necessity, utilize low-enriched uranium (LEU, enrichment <20%). This will require increasing the total uranium loading per unit volume of the higher-loaded TRIGA fuels for the purpose of maintaining the appropriate fissile loading. Because of these new developments, tests were conducted to determine the fractional release of gaseous and metallic fission products from typical uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA fuels containing 8.5 to 45 wt % uranium.

  19. The search for active release of volcanic gases on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Alain; Villanueva, Geronimo; Mumma, Michael; Tokunaga, Alan

    2015-11-01

    The study of planetary atmospheres by means of spectroscopy is important for understanding their origin and evolution. The presence of short-lived trace gases in the martian atmosphere would imply recent production, for example, by ongoing geologic activity. On Earth, sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfur monoxide (SO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are the main sulfur-bearing gases released during volcanic outgassing. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), also released from some volcanoes on Earth (e.g., Erebus and Nyiragongo), could be formed by reactions involving SO2 or H2S inside magma chambers. We carried out the first ground-based, semi-simultaneous, multi-band and multi-species search for such gases above the Tharsis and Syrtis volcanic regions on Mars. The submillimeter search extended between 23 November 2011 and 13 May 2012 which corresponded to Mars’ mid Northern Spring and early Northern Summer seasons (Ls = 34-110°). The strong submillimeter rotational transitions of SO2, SO and H2S were targeted using the high-resolution heterodyne receiver (aka Barney) on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We reached sensitivities sufficient to detect a volcanic release on Mars that is 4% of the SO2 released continuously from Kilauea volcano in Hawaii, or 5% that of the Masaya volcano in Nicaragua. The infrared search covered OCS in its combination band (ν2+ν3) at 3.42 μm at two successive Mars years, during Mars’ late Northern Spring and mid Northern Summer seasons, spanning Ls= 43º and Ls= 147º. The targeted volcanic districts were observed during the two intervals, 14 Dec. 2011 to 6 Jan. 2012 in the first year, and 30 May 2014 to 16 June 2014 in the second year, using the high resolution infrared spectrometer (CSHELL) on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (NASA/IRTF). We will present our results and discuss their implications for current volcanic outgassing activity on the red planet. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program under NASA

  20. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. J.; Evans, Elizabeth; Valić, F.; Žuškin, Eugenija

    1973-01-01

    Nicholls, P. J., Evans, E., Valić, F., and Žuškin, E. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 142-145. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal. Extracts of dry and oiled sisal released histamine from pig and human but not from rat lung tissue. A suspension in Tyrode solution of the oil used for softening the sisal fibres had a pH of 8·1 and also released histamine from pig and human lung. The releasing activity was abolished when the pH of this suspension was adjusted to pH 7·4. As all the sisal extracts were adjusted to pH 7·4 for incubation with lung tissue, the histamine-releasing activity of sisal in vitro is unrelated to the presence of the oil. Significant (P < 0·01) mean reductions over the work shift of ventilatory capacity (PEF and FEV1·0) were recorded in all the workers exposed to airborne sisal dust. These reductions were greater in combers than in drawers and spinners. Sisal collected from combing machines possessed more histamine-releasing activity than material from drawing and spinning machines. These results indicate that histamine release by sisal may be the cause of acute ventilatory capacity changes in sisal exposure. PMID:4122162

  1. Vagal hyperactivity due to ventromedial hypothalamic lesions increases adiponectin production and release.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoko; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Noriko; Kubota, Naoto; Kubota, Tetsuya; Senoo, Akira; Kageyama, Haruaki; Osaka, Toshimasa; Hirako, Satoshi; Kim, Hyoun-Ju; Matsumoto, Akiyo; Shioda, Seiji; Mori, Masatomo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Inoue, Shuji

    2014-05-01

    In obese humans and animals, adiponectin production and release in adipose tissue are downregulated by feedback inhibition, resulting in decreased serum adiponectin. We investigated adiponectin production and release in ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH)-lesioned animals. VMH-lesioned mice showed significant increases in food intake and body weight gain, with hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia at 1 and 4 weeks after VMH-lesioning. Serum adiponectin was elevated in VMH-lesioned mice at 1 and 4 weeks, despite adipocyte hypertrophy in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues and increased body fat. Adiponectin production and mRNA were also increased in both adipose tissues in VMH-lesioned mice at 1 week. These results were replicated in VMH-lesioned rats at 1 week. Daily atropine administration for 5 days or subdiaphragmatic vagotomy completely reversed the body weight gain and eliminated the increased adiponectin production and release in these rats, with reversal to a normal serum adiponectin level. Parasympathetic nerve activation by carbachol infusion for 5 days in rats increased serum adiponectin, with increased adiponectin production in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues without changes of body weight. These results demonstrate that activation of the parasympathetic nerve by VMH lesions stimulates production of adiponectin in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues and adiponectin release, resulting in elevated serum adiponectin. PMID:24487025

  2. OBSERVATIONS ON ASBESTOS RELEASE DURING DEMOLITION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory has monitored block-wide building demolition and debris disposal activities at Santa Cruz and Watsonville, California following the earthquake, an implosion demolition of a 26-story building in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the demolition of two ...

  3. ASBESTOS RELEASE DURING BUILDING DEMOLITION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory has monitored block-wide building demolition and debris disposal activities at Santa Cruz and Watsonsville, California following the earthquake, an implosion demolition of a 26-story building in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the demolition of two...

  4. ASBESTOS RELEASE DURING BUILDING DEMOLITION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) monitored block-wide building demolition and debris disposal activities at Santa Cruz and Watsonsville, California following the 1989 earthquake; an implosion demolition of a 26-story bu...

  5. Controlled Release of Biologically Active Silver from Nanosilver Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Sonshine, David A.; Shervani, Saira; Hurt, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Major pathways in the antibacterial activity and eukaryotic toxicity of nano-silver involve the silver cation and its soluble complexes, which are well established thiol toxicants. Through these pathways, nano-silver behaves in analogy to a drug delivery system, in which the particle contains a concentrated inventory of an active species, the ion, which is transported to and released near biological target sites. Although the importance of silver ion in the biological response to nano-silver is widely recognized, the drug delivery paradigm has not been well developed for this system, and there is significant potential to improve nano-silver technologies through controlled release formulations. This article applies elements of the drug delivery paradigm to nano-silver dissolution and presents a systematic study of chemical concepts for controlled release. After presenting thermodynamic calculations of silver species partitioning in biological media, the rates of oxidative silver dissolution are measured for nanoparticles and macroscopic foils and used to derive unified area-based release kinetics. A variety of competing chemical approaches are demonstrated for controlling the ion release rate over four orders of magnitude. Release can be systematically slowed by thiol and citrate ligand binding, formation of sulfidic coatings, or the scavenging of peroxy-intermediates. Release can be accelerated by pre-oxidation or particle size reduction, while polymer coatings with complexation sites alter the release profile by storing and release inventories of surface-bound silver. Finally, the ability to tune biological activity is demonstrated through bacterial inhibition zone assay carried out on selected formulations of controlled release nano-silver. PMID:20968290

  6. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 40; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Assessment Report for the Beta-Release L4_SM Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase there are two objectives for each science data product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithm, and 2) validate the accuracy of the science data product as specified in the science requirements and according to the Cal/Val schedule. This report provides an assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture Passive (L4_SM) product specifically for the product's public beta release scheduled for 30 October 2015. The primary objective of the beta release is to allow users to familiarize themselves with the data product before the validated product becomes available. The beta release also allows users to conduct their own assessment of the data and to provide feedback to the L4_SM science data product team. The assessment of the L4_SM data product includes comparisons of SMAP L4_SM soil moisture estimates with in situ soil moisture observations from core validation sites and sparse networks. The assessment further includes a global evaluation of the internal diagnostics from the ensemble-based data assimilation system that is used to generate the L4_SM product. This evaluation focuses on the statistics of the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals and the analysis increments. Together, the core validation site comparisons and the statistics of the assimilation diagnostics are considered primary validation methodologies for the L4_SM product. Comparisons against in situ measurements from regional-scale sparse networks are considered a secondary validation methodology because such in situ measurements are subject to upscaling errors from the point-scale to the grid cell scale of the data product. Based on the limited set of core validation sites, the assessment presented here meets the criteria established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites for Stage 1 validation and supports the beta release of the data. The validation against

  7. Production of ascorbic acid releasing biomaterials for pelvic floor repair

    PubMed Central

    Mangır, Naşide; Bullock, Anthony J.; Roman, Sabiniano; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Objective An underlying abnormality in collagen turnover is implied in the occurrence of complications and recurrences after mesh augmented pelvic floor repair surgeries. Ascorbic acid is a potent stimulant of collagen synthesis. The aim of this study is to produce ascorbic acid releasing poly-lactic acid (PLA) scaffolds and evaluate them for their effects on extracellular matrix production and the strength of the materials. Materials and methods Scaffolds which contained either l-ascorbic acid (AA) and Ascorbate-2-Phosphate (A2P) were produced with emulsion electrospinning. The release of both drugs was measured by UV spectrophotometry. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on scaffolds and cultured for 2 weeks. Cell attachment, viability and total collagen production were evaluated as well as mechanical properties. Results No significant differences were observed between AA, A2P, Vehicle and PLA scaffolds in terms of fibre diameter and pore size. The encapsulation efficiency and successful release of both AA and A2P were demonstrated. Both AA and A2P containing scaffolds were significantly more hydrophilic and stronger in both dry and wet states compared to PLA scaffolds. Fibroblasts produced more collagen on scaffolds containing either AA or A2P compared to cells grown on control scaffolds. Conclusion This study is the first to directly compare the two ascorbic acid derivatives in a tissue engineered scaffold and shows that both AA and A2P releasing electrospun PLA scaffolds increased collagen production of fibroblasts to similar extents but AA scaffolds seemed to be more hydrophilic and stronger compared to A2P scaffolds. Statement of significance Mesh augmented surgical repair of the pelvic floor currently relies on non-degradable materials which results in severe complications in some patients. There is an unmet and urgent need for better pelvic floor repair materials. Our current understanding suggests that the ideal material should be able to better

  8. Data summary report for fission product release Test VI-7

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorentz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Collins, J.L.; Webster, C.S.

    1995-05-01

    Test VI-7 was the final test in the VI series conducted in the vertical furnace. The fuel specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the Monticello boiling water reactor (BWR). The fuel had experienced a burnup of {approximately}-40 Mwd/kg U. It was heated in an induction furnace for successive 20-min periods at 2000 and 2300 K in a moist air-helium atmosphere. Integral releases were 69% for {sup 85}Kr, 52% for {sup 125}Sb, 71% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 0.04% for {sup 154}Eu. For the non-gamma-emitting species, release values for 42% for I, 4.1% for Ba, 5.3% for Mo, and 1.2% for Sr were determined. The total mass released from the furnace to the collection system, including fission products, fuel, and structural materials, was 0.89 g, with 37% being collected on the thermal gradient tubes and 63% downstream on filters. Posttest examination of the fuel specimen indicated that most of the cladding was completely oxidized to ZrO{sub 2}, but that oxidation was not quite complete at the upper end. The release behaviors for the most volatile elements, Kr and Cs, were in good agreement with the ORNL-Booth Model.

  9. Thermal release of volatile fission products from irradiated nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Burger, L.L.; Morgan, L.G.; Baldwin, D.L.

    1983-06-01

    An effective procedure for removing /sup 3/H, Xe and Kr from irradiated fuels was demonstrated using Shippingport UO/sub 2/ fuel. The release characteristics of /sup 3/H, Kr, Xe, and I from irradiated nuclear fuel have been determined as a function of temperature and gaseous environment. Vacuum outgassing and a flowing gas stream have been used to vary the gaseous environment. Vacuum outgassing released about 99% of the /sup 3/H and 20% of both Kr and Xe within a 3 h at 1500/sup 0/C. Similar results were obtained using a carrier gas of He containing 6% H/sub 2/. However, a carrier gas containing only He resulted in the release of approximately 80% of the /sup 3/H and 99% of both Kr and Xe. These results indicate that the release of these volatile fission products from irradiated nuclear fuel is a function of the chemical composition of the gaseous environment. The rate of tritium release increased with increasing temperature (1100 to 1500/sup 0/C) and with the addition of hydrogen to the gas stream. Using crushed UO/sub 2/ fuel without cladding and He as the carrier gas, Kr was completely released at 1500/sup 0/C in 2.5 h. Below 1350/sup 0/C, no Kr-Xe release was observed. Approximately 86% of the /sup 129/I and 95% of the cesium was released from a piece (3.9 g) of UO/sub 2/ fuel at 1500/sup 0/C in He. The zirconium cladding was observed to fracture during heat treatment. A large-scale thermal outgassing system was conceptually designed by the General Atomic Company from an engineering analysis of available experimental data. The direct cost of a 0.5 metric/ton day thermal outgassing system is estimated to be $1,926,000 (1982 dollars), including equipment, installation, instrumentation and controls, piping, and services. The thermal outgassing process was determined to be a technically feasible and cost-competitive process to remove tritium in the head-end portion of a LWR fuel reprocessing plant. Additional laboratory-scale development has been recommended.

  10. Influences of use activities and waste management on environmental releases of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Henning; Hackmann, Stephan; Zimmermann, Till; Köser, Jan; Thöming, Jorg; von Gleich, Arnim

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) offer enhanced or new functionalities and properties that are used in various products. This also entails potential environmental risks in terms of hazard and exposure. However, hazard and exposure assessment for ENM still suffer from insufficient knowledge particularly for product-related releases and environmental fate and behavior. This study therefore analyzes the multiple impacts of the product use, the properties of the matrix material, and the related waste management system (WMS) on the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) by applying nine prospective life cycle release scenarios based on reasonable assumptions. The products studied here are clothing textiles treated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), since they constitute a controversial application. Surprisingly, the results show counter-intuitive increases by a factor of 2.6 in PEC values for the air compartment in minimal AgNP release scenarios. Also, air releases can shift from washing to wearing activity; their associated release points may shift accordingly, potentially altering release hot spots. Additionally, at end-of-life, the fraction of AgNP-residues contained on exported textiles can be increased by 350% when assuming short product lifespans and globalized WMS. It becomes evident that certain combinations of use activities, matrix material characteristics, and WMS can influence the regional PEC by several orders of magnitude. Thus, in the light of the findings and expected ENM market potential, future assessments should consider these aspects to derive precautionary design alternatives and to enable prospective global and regional risk assessments. PMID:25728395

  11. Antibacterial activities and release kinetics of a newly developed recoverable controlled agent-release system.

    PubMed

    Ehara, A; Torii, M; Imazato, S; Ebisu, S

    2000-03-01

    We attempted to develop a resin with a recoverable antibacterial activity based on the desorption/adsorption of a cationic bactericide by the ion-exchange mechanism. The aims of this study were to investigate the release kinetics of the agent and the antibacterial activity of this newly designed resin system. An experimental resin was prepared by the addition of methacrylic acid as a cation-exchanger and a cationic antibacterial agent, cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), to triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. The amount of CPC desorbed from the experimental resin into buffer solutions at pH 4-8 was measured. The adsorption of CPC to control resin and re-adsorption of CPC to the experimental resin, which had once desorbed the agent, were also determined. The antibacterial activity of experimental resin against Streptococcus mutans was evaluated, and the relationship between bacterial acid production and antibacterial effect was assessed. The experimental resin desorbed CPC at pH < or = 6, and the amount of agent desorbed increased with increasing acidity. The control resin adsorbed CPC when immersed in CPC aqueous solution at a rate determined by the concentration of the agent and immersion time. The experimental resin, once desorbed CPC, could re-adsorb the bactericide by being exposed to a solution of the agent. Less plaque formed on the experimental resin, and the growth and survival of S. mutans was inhibited in the condition in which acid was produced. These results demonstrate that the resin system proposed was able to desorb and re-adsorb the cationic bactericide by an ion-exchange mechanism and could show an inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth and plaque formation. PMID:10765955

  12. Microfibrillated cellulose coatings as new release systems for active packaging.

    PubMed

    Lavoine, Nathalie; Desloges, Isabelle; Bras, Julien

    2014-03-15

    In this work, a new use of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) is highlighted for high-added-value applications. For the first time, a nanoporous network formed by MFC coated on paper is used for a controlled release of molecules. The release study was carried out in water with caffeine as a model molecule. The release process was studied by means of (i) continuous, and (ii) intermittent diffusion experiments (with renewal of the medium every 10 min). The effect of the MFC was first observed for the samples impregnated in the caffeine solution. These samples, coated with MFC (coat weight of about 7 g/m(2)), released the caffeine over a longer period (29 washings compared with 16), even if the continuous diffusions were similar for both samples (without and with MFC coating). The slowest release of caffeine was observed for samples coated with the mixture (MFC+caffeine). Moreover, the caffeine was only fully released 9h after the release from the other samples was completed. This study compared two techniques for the introduction of model molecules in MFC-coated papers. The latter offers a more controlled and gradual release. This new approach creates many opportunities especially in the food-packaging field. A similar study could be carried out with an active species. PMID:24528763

  13. Explosive Products EOS: Adjustment for detonation speed and energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-05

    Propagating detonation waves exhibit a curvature effect in which the detonation speed decreases with increasing front curvature. The curvature effect is due to the width of the wave profile. Numerically, the wave profile depends on resolution. With coarse resolution, the wave width is too large and results in a curvature effect that is too large. Consequently, the detonation speed decreases as the cell size is increased. We propose a modification to the products equation of state (EOS) to compensate for the effect of numerical resolution; i.e., to increase the CJ pressure in order that a simulation propagates a detonation wave with a speed that is on average correct. The EOS modification also adjusts the release isentrope to correct the energy release.

  14. Explanatory Supplement to the NEOWISE Data Release Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Mainzer, A.; Conrow, T.; Masci, F.; Bauer, J.; Dailey, J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Gelino, C.; Grillmair, C.; Wheelock, S. L.; Yan, L.; Harbut, M.; Beck, R.; Wittman, M.; Wright, E. L.; Masiero, J.; Grav, T.; Sonnett, S.; Nugent, C.; Kramer, E.; Stevenson, R.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Fabinsky, B.; Tholen, D.; Papin, M.; Fowler, J.; McCallon, H.

    2015-03-01

    's survey observations. The Explanatory Supplement to the NEOWISE Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the NEOWISE data. The Supplement contains an overview of the NEOWISE mission, facilities, and operations, a description of the contents and formats of the NEOWISE image and tabular data products, and cautionary notes that describe known limitations of the Release products. Instructions for accessing the NEOWISE data products via the services of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive are provided. Descriptions of the data processing system and algorithms used to ingest and convert raw NEOWISE images to the calibrated data products are presented, along with assessments of the sky coverage, photometric and astrometric characteristics and completeness and reliability of the NEOWISE Release data products. The NEOWISE Data Release Explanatory Supplement is an on-line document that is updated frequently to provide the most current information for users of the NEOWISE data products. The Explanatory Supplement is maintained at: http://wise2.ipac.caltech.edu/docs/release/neowise/expsup/ NEOWISE is a project of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the Planetary Science Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. Explanatory Supplement to the AllWISE Data Release Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Wright, E. L.; Conrow, T.; Fowler, J. W.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Grillmair, C.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Masci, F.; McCallon, H. L.; Wheelock, S. L.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Yan, L.; Benford, D.; Harbut, M.; Jarrett, T.; Lake, S.; Leisawitz, D.; Ressler, M. E.; Stanford, S. A.; Tsai, C. W.; Liu, F.; Helou, G.; Mainzer, A.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A.; Hoffman, D.; Marsh, K. A.; Padgett, D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Beck, R. P.; Papin, M.; Wittman, M.

    2013-11-01

    The AllWISE program builds upon the successful Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) mission by combining data from all WISE and NEOWISE (Mainzer et al. 2011) survey phases to form the most comprehensive view of the mid-infrared sky currently available. By combining the data from two complete sky coverage epochs in an advanced data processing system, AllWISE has generated new products that have enhanced photometric sensitivity and accuracy, and improved astrometric precision compared with the earlier WISE All-Sky Data Release. Exploiting the 6 month baseline between the WISE sky coverage epochs enables AllWISE to measure source motions for the first time, and to compute improved flux variability statistics. AllWISE data release products include: a Source Catalog that contains 4-band fluxes, positions, apparent motion measurements, and flux variability statistics for over 747 million objects detected at SNR>5 in the combined exposures; a Multiepoch Photometry Database containing over 42 billion time-tagged, single-exposure fluxes for each object detected on the combined exposures; and an Image Atlas of 18,240 4-band calibrated FITS images, depth-of-coverage and noise maps that cover the sky produced by coadding nearly 7.9 million single-exposure images from the cryogenic and post-cryogenic survey phases. The Explanatory Supplement to the AllWISE Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the AllWISE data. The Supplement contains detailed descriptions of the format and characteristics of the AllWISE data products, as well as a summary of cautionary notes that describe known limitations. The Supplement is an on-line document that is updated frequently to provide the most current information for users of the AllWISE data products. The Explanatory Supplement is maintained at: http://wise2.ipac.caltech.edu/docs/release/allwise/expsup/index.html AllWISE makes use of data from WISE, which is a joint project of the University of

  16. Infralimbic cortex activation and motivated arousal induce histamine release

    PubMed Central

    Forray, María Inés; Torrealba, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Appetitive behaviours occur in a state of behavioural and physiological activation that allows the optimal performance of these goal-directed behaviours. Here, we tested the hypothesis that histamine neurons under the command of the infralimbic cortex are important to provide behavioural activation. Extracellular histamine and serotonin were measured by microdialysis of the medial prefrontal cortex in behaving rats in parallel with a picrotoxin microinjection into the infralimbic cortex. The injection aroused the rats behaviourally, increased histamine release and decreased serotonin levels. Inhibition of the infralimbic cortex with muscimol produced the opposite effects on neurotransmitter release. The behavioural activation induced by motivating hungry rats with caged food was paralleled by an immediate histamine release, whereas awakening induced by tapping their microdialysis bowl increased serotonin, but not histamine levels. In conclusion, picrotoxin injection into the infralimbic cortex produces behavioural activation together with histamine release; in a similar manner, induction of an appetitive state produced histamine release, likely related to increased behavioural activation characteristic of an appetitive behaviour. PMID:25746330

  17. Assessment of sup 18 F gaseous releases during the production of sup 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Kleck, J.H.; Benedict, S.H.; Cook, J.S.; Birdsall, R.L.; Satyamurthy, N. )

    1991-05-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose labeled with {sup 18}F ({sup 18}F-FDG) is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18-labeled FDG is used as a diagnostic tool in PET studies to monitor the physiology of the brain, diagnose heart function and disease, and to image cancerous tumors. At the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), three cyclotrons produce ({sup 18}F)-fluoride ion using {sup 18}O-enriched water targets. Fluorine-18, which has a half-life of 109.8 min, is produced using an {sup 18}O(p.n.){sup 18}F reaction and is chemically processed to yield {sup 18}F-FDG. This study presents data which demonstrate that during the radiochemical processes involved in the production of {sup 18}F-FDG, gaseous effluent containing {sup 18}F is released. Forty cyclotron production runs with average end of cyclotron bombardment activities of 15.9 +/- 1.88 GBq (430 +/- 50.8 mCi) and end of radiochemical synthesis activities of 5.40 +/- 1.27 GBq (146 +/- 34.3 mCi) yield {sup 18}F gaseous effluent releases ranging from 0 to 2560 MBq (0 to 69.2 mCi) with a mean of 437 MBq (11.8 mCi). Temporal correlation of the {sup 18}F gaseous releases during {sup 18}F-FDG radiochemical production has tied the {sup 18}F release to the addition of the glucose precursor (mannotriflate) and ethyl ether in the radiochemical processing. The results are presented in terms of activities released and dilution factors required from the release stack point to maintain controlled (occupational) and uncontrolled (public) area limits in accordance with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the regulatory requirements of the federal government.

  18. A Home Production Activity Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Ivan F.; Owen, Alma J.

    1980-01-01

    The family is examined as a focal unit of production and a home production activity model is developed. An interdisciplinary approach is used which puts the broad range of family activities on a continuum from production to consumption. (Author/SK)

  19. [Mechanism of production and release of tumor necrosis factor implicated in inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Hide, Izumi

    2003-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine involved in many pathophysiological conditions including rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. Despite recent evidence regarding signal transduction via TNF receptor and its biological actions, the mechanism of TNF release remains poorly understood. To clarify how production and release of TNF are regulated, we focused on mast cells and microglia which are involved in allergic inflammation and brain damage or recovery, respectively. In RBL-2H3 mast cells, anti-allergic drugs including azelastine inhibited the release of TNF more potently than degranulation in response to antigen or ionomycin. It was also demonstrated that TNF releasing steps are regulated via the PKC alpha-dependent pathway. Furthermore, Rho GTPases, possibly Rac, were shown to be involved in antigen-induced TNF transcription through activating PKC beta I. In cultured rat brain microglia, we found that extracellular ATP triggers the release of TNF via the P2X7 receptor. ERK and JNK are also involved in ATP-induced TNF transcription, while p38 regulates the transport of TNF mRNA from the nucleus to the cytosol. Additionally, JNK and p38, but not ERK, are activated via the P2X7 receptor. A better understanding of the specific pathways that regulate TNF release for each effector cell may offer further possible therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases. PMID:12673950

  20. Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

    2010-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

  1. Signaling Mechanism of Cannabinoid Receptor-2 Activation-Induced β-Endorphin Release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fang; Zhang, Ling-Hong; Su, Tang-Feng; Li, Lin; Zhou, Rui; Peng, Miao; Wu, Cai-Hua; Yuan, Xiao-Cui; Sun, Ning; Meng, Xian-Fang; Tian, Bo; Shi, Jing; Pan, Hui-Lin; Li, Man

    2016-08-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) results in β-endorphin release from keratinocytes, which then acts on primary afferent neurons to inhibit nociception. However, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The CB2 receptor is generally thought to couple to Gi/o to inhibit cAMP production, which cannot explain the peripheral stimulatory effects of CB2 receptor activation. In this study, we found that in a keratinocyte cell line, the Gβγ subunits from Gi/o, but not Gαs, were involved in CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Inhibition of MAPK kinase, but not PLC, abolished CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Also, CB2 receptor activation significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+). Treatment with BAPTA-AM or thapsigargin blocked CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Using a rat model of inflammatory pain, we showed that the MAPK kinase inhibitor PD98059 abolished the peripheral effect of the CB2 receptor agonist on nociception. We thus present a novel mechanism of CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release through Gi/o-Gβγ-MAPK-Ca(2+) signaling pathway. Our data also suggest that stimulation of MAPK contributes to the peripheral analgesic effect of CB2 receptor agonists. PMID:26108183

  2. Production of slow-released nitrogen fertilizer from urine.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryusei; Takahashi, Eri; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Human excreta, especially urine is rich in nitrogen that can be utilized for agricultural purposes, while the slow-release fertilizer allows effective utilization of nutrients in agricultural production. The direct formation of slow-release fertilizer--methylene urea--from urine was being proposed in this study. The experiments were tried to prove formation of methylene urea from human urine, and to investigate the effect of pH and salt concentration on the reaction rate. The synthetic urine and real urine were used for the urea source of the reaction. As a result, the precipitates were prepared from synthetic urine, while the small molecule fractions generated then they grew into precipitate. The nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, element analyses showed the precipitates in synthetic urine were the same compound found in the urea solution, which was methylene urea. The reaction rate was high at low pH value. The reaction rate in the buffer solution was lower than the synthetic urine at the same pH, because some salts may work as a catalyst. The urea concentration reduction rate in real urine showed the same trend with synthetic urine at the same pH, while the precipitation was quite similar to methylene urea. PMID:24527645

  3. [The release of biologically active compounds from peat peloids].

    PubMed

    Babaskin, D V

    2011-01-01

    This work had the objective to study kinetics of the release of flavonoides from peat peloid compositions containing extracts of medicinal herbs in model systems.The key parameters of the process are defined. The rate of liberation of flavonoides is shown to depend on their initial concentration in the compositions being used. The influence of the flavonoide composition of the tested extracts and dimethylsulfoxide on the release of biologically active compounds contained in the starting material in the model environment is estimated. The possibility of the layer-by-layer deposition of the compositions and peat peloids in order to increase the efficacy of flavonoide release from the starting composition and to ensure more rational utilization of the extracts of medicinal plants is demonstrated. PMID:22165149

  4. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  5. Mechanical stretch induces MMP-2 release and activation in lung endothelium: role of EMMPRIN.

    PubMed

    Haseneen, Nadia A; Vaday, Gayle G; Zucker, Stanley; Foda, Hussein D

    2003-03-01

    High-volume mechanical ventilation leads to ventilator-induced lung injury. This type of lung injury is accompanied by an increased release and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). To investigate the mechanism leading to the increased MMP release, we systematically studied the effect of mechanical stretch on human microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the lung. We exposed cells grown on collagen 1 BioFlex plates to sinusoidal cyclic stretch at 0.5 Hz using the Flexercell system with 17-18% elongation of cells. After 4 days of cell stretching, conditioned media and cell lysate were collected and analyzed by gelatin, casein, and reverse zymograms as well as Western blotting. RT-PCR of mRNA extracted from stretched cells was performed. Our results show that 1) cyclic stretch led to increased release and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-1; 2) the activation of MMP-2 was accompanied by an increase in membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) and inhibited by a hydroxamic acid-derived inhibitor of MMPs (Prinomastat, AG3340); and 3) the MMP-2 release and activation were preceded by an increase in production of extracellular MMP inducer (EMMPRIN). These results suggest that cyclic mechanical stretch leads to MMP-2 activation through an MT1-MMP mechanism. EMMPRIN may play an important role in the release and activation of MMPs during lung injury. PMID:12456388

  6. Nonexocytotic serotonin release tonically suppresses serotonergic neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Baccini, Gilda; Tatini, Francesca; Palmini, Rolando Berlinguer; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    The firing activity of serotonergic neurons in raphe nuclei is regulated by negative feedback exerted by extracellular serotonin (5-HT)o acting through somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. The steady-state [5-HT]o, sensed by 5-HT1A autoreceptors, is determined by the balance between the rates of 5-HT release and reuptake. Although it is well established that reuptake of 5-HTo is mediated by 5-HT transporters (SERT), the release mechanism has remained unclear. It is also unclear how selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants increase the [5-HT]o in raphe nuclei and suppress serotonergic neuron activity, thereby potentially diminishing their own therapeutic effect. Using an electrophysiological approach in a slice preparation, we show that, in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), continuous nonexocytotic 5-HT release is responsible for suppression of phenylephrine-facilitated serotonergic neuron firing under basal conditions as well as for autoinhibition induced by SSRI application. By using 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated G protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels of patched serotonergic neurons as 5-HTo sensors, we show substantial nonexocytotic 5-HT release under conditions of abolished firing activity, Ca2+ influx, vesicular monoamine transporter 2–mediated vesicular accumulation of 5-HT, and SERT-mediated 5-HT transport. Our results reveal a cytosolic origin of 5-HTo in the DRN and suggest that 5-HTo may be supplied by simple diffusion across the plasma membrane, primarily from the dense network of neurites of serotonergic neurons surrounding the cell bodies. These findings indicate that the serotonergic system does not function as a sum of independently acting neurons but as a highly interdependent neuronal network, characterized by a shared neurotransmitter pool and the regulation of firing activity by an interneuronal, yet activity-independent, nonexocytotic mechanism. PMID:25712017

  7. Modifying release characteristics from 3D printed drug-eluting products.

    PubMed

    Boetker, Johan; Water, Jorrit Jeroen; Aho, Johanna; Arnfast, Lærke; Bohr, Adam; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-07-30

    This work describes an approach to modify the release of active compound from a 3D printed model drug product geometry intended for flexible dosing and precision medication. The production of novel polylactic acid and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose based feed materials containing nitrofurantoin for 3D printing purposes is demonstrated. Nitrofurantoin, Metolose® and polylactic acid were successfully co-extruded with up to 40% Metolose® content, and subsequently 3D printed into model disk geometries (ø10mm, h=2mm). Thermal analysis with differential scanning calorimetry and solid phase identification with Raman spectroscopy showed that nitrofurantoin remained in its original solid form during both hot-melt extrusion and subsequent 3D printing. Rheological measurements of the different compositions showed that the flow properties were sensitive to the amount of undissolved particles present in the formulation. Release of nitrofurantoin from the disks was dependent on Metolose® loading, with higher accumulated release observed for higher Metolose® loads. This work shows the potential of custom-made, drug loaded feed materials for 3D printing of precision drug products with tailored drug release characteristics. PMID:26987609

  8. Linear Free Energy Correlations for Fission Product Release from the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes, et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the source of the radionuclides to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form ln χ = -α (ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)+β were obtained between the deposited concentration and the reduction potential of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn(TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2130 K and 2220 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, 151Sm through atmospheric venting and releases during the first month following the accident were performed, and indicate large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  9. Commercial Product Activation Using RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) would be used for commercial product activation, according to a proposal. What is new here is the concept of combining RFID with activation - more specifically, using RFID for activating commercial products (principally, electronic ones) and for performing such ancillary functions as tracking individual product units on production lines, tracking shipments, and updating inventories. According to the proposal, an RFID chip would be embedded in each product. The information encoded in the chip would include a unique number for identifying the product. An RFID reader at the point of sale would record the number of the product and would write digital information to the RFID chip for either immediate activation of the product or for later interrogation and processing. To be practical, an RFID product-activation system should satisfy a number of key requirements: the system should be designed to be integrable into the inventory-tracking and the data-processing and -communication infrastructures of businesses along the entire supply chain from manufacture to retail; the system should be resistant to sophisticated hacking; activation codes should be made sufficiently complexity to minimize the probability of activating stolen products; RFID activation equipment at points of sale must be capable to two-way RF communication for the purposes of reading information from, and writing information to, embedded RFID chips; the equipment at points of sale should be easily operable by sales clerks with little or no training; the point-of-sale equipment should verify activation and provide visible and/or audible signals indicating verification or lack thereof; and, the system should be able to handle millions of products per year with minimal human intervention, among other requirements.

  10. Fluoride release and antibacterial activity of selected dental materials.

    PubMed

    Marczuk-Kolada, Grazyna; Jakoniuk, Piotr; Mystkowska, Joanna; Łuczaj-Cepowicz, Elzbieta; Waszkiel, Danuta; Dabrowski, Jan Ryszard; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the fluoride ion release and antibacterial activities of the glassionomer cement Fuji IX and the compomer (composite modified polyacid) Dyract AP. Fluoride ion release was measured using direct potentiometry with an Orion fluoride ion selective electrode. The measurement was carried out after 1, 4, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days of storage in phosphate buffer at pH 6.8. The antibacterial activity of the materials was evaluated against the bacteria Streptococcus mutans ATCC 35668, Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419, Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556, and Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393. The agar diffusion test was applied. The material specimens were assessed twice: after setting and seven days later. Zones of bacterial growth inhibition were measured in millimeters after 24 hours. The results of the study showed that both materials released ion fluoride, with a higher emission of Fuji IX than Dyract AP. The highest level of emission was observed on the seventh day of the study in both materials. After 24 hours of bonding there was inhibition of bacterial growth by Fuji IX, whereas Dyract AP did not show similar activity. On the eighth day after polymerization, Dyract AP was significantly more active towards Streptococcus sanguis and salivarius. PMID:18493226

  11. Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Shifts Temporally Engendered Patterns of Dopamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Oleson, Erik B; Cachope, Roger; Fitoussi, Aurelie; Tsutsui, Kimberly; Wu, Sharon; Gallegos, Jacqueline A; Cheer, Joseph F

    2014-01-01

    The ability to discern temporally pertinent environmental events is essential for the generation of adaptive behavior in conventional tasks, and our overall survival. Cannabinoids are thought to disrupt temporally controlled behaviors by interfering with dedicated brain timing networks. Cannabinoids also increase dopamine release within the mesolimbic system, a neural pathway generally implicated in timing behavior. Timing can be assessed using fixed-interval (FI) schedules, which reinforce behavior on the basis of time. To date, it remains unknown how cannabinoids modulate dopamine release when responding under FI conditions, and for that matter, how subsecond dopamine release is related to time in these tasks. In the present study, we hypothesized that cannabinoids would accelerate timing behavior in an FI task while concurrently augmenting a temporally relevant pattern of dopamine release. To assess this possibility, we measured subsecond dopamine concentrations in the nucleus accumbens while mice responded for food under the influence of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55 212-2 in an FI task. Our data reveal that accumbal dopamine concentrations decrease proportionally to interval duration—suggesting that dopamine encodes time in FI tasks. We further demonstrate that WIN 55 212-2 dose-dependently increases dopamine release and accelerates a temporal behavioral response pattern in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner—suggesting that cannabinoid receptor activation modifies timing behavior, in part, by augmenting time-engendered patterns of dopamine release. Additional investigation uncovered a specific role for endogenous cannabinoid tone in timing behavior, as elevations in 2-arachidonoylglycerol, but not anandamide, significantly accelerated the temporal response pattern in a manner akin to WIN 55 212-2. PMID:24345819

  12. Comparison in vitro felodipine release rate from the original versus generic product with controlled release of the drug.

    PubMed

    Vetchy, David; Vetcha, Martina; Rabiskova, Miloslava; Gryczova, Eva; Bartosikova, Lenka

    2007-01-01

    After patent protection of original brand is over, there are a lot of generic products occurring on the pharmaceutical market. It may be the way to reduce the price, but on the other hand, one should expect the same quality and almost identity with original brand, because the development of generic drugs is based on pharmacological properties of the original brand. The aim of this study was to compare the similarity of two products with controlled release of felodipine--generic product Presid and original brand Plendil--which are commercially available in Czech Republic, based on in vitro dissolution testing. The dissolution test in three dissolution media of increasing pH (1.2, 4.5, and 6.5) for the simulation of physiological pH within the gastrointestinal tract confirmed controlled release of felodipine from the original product Plendil ER 5 mg and Plendil ER 10 mg during the period of 24 hours. The release of felodipine from generic products Presid 5 mg and Presid 10 mg was not controlled for 24 hours as it is indicated in the information leaflet. In the generic products, felodipine release was controlled just for 12 or 18 hours and in this respect did not show similarity with the original brand. Since patients take the drug just once a day in the morning, the controlled release of felodipine, which lasts only 12 to 18 hours, can cause insufficient blood pressure control especially in the most critical morning hours and higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:17485960

  13. Analysis of fission product release behavior during the TMI-2 accident

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, D. A.; Adams, J. P.; Anderson, J. L.; Hobbins, R. R.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of fission product release during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident has been initiated to provide an understanding of fission product behavior that is consistent with both the best estimate accident scenario and fission product results from the ongoing sample acquisition and examination efforts. ''First principles'' fission product release models are used to describe release from intact, disrupted, and molten fuel. Conclusions relating to fission product release, transport, and chemical form are drawn. 35 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. The Sustainable Release of Vancomycin and Its Degradation Products From Nanostructured Collagen/Hydroxyapatite Composite Layers.

    PubMed

    Suchý, Tomáš; Šupová, Monika; Klapková, Eva; Horný, Lukáš; Rýglová, Šárka; Žaloudková, Margit; Braun, Martin; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Ballay, Rastislav; Veselý, Jan; Chlup, Hynek; Denk, František

    2016-03-01

    Infections of the musculoskeletal system present a serious problem with regard to the field of orthopedic and trauma medicine. The aim of the experiment described in this study was to develop a resorbable nanostructured composite layer with the controlled elution of antibiotics. The layer is composed of collagen, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, and vancomycin hydrochloride (10 wt%). The stability of the collagen was enhanced by means of cross-linking. Four cross-linking agents were studied, namely an ethanol solution, a phosphate buffer solution of N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide, genipin, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. High performance liquid chromatography was used so as to characterize the in vitro release rates of the vancomycin and its crystalline degradation antibiotically inactive products over a 21-day period. The maximum concentration of the released active form of vancomycin (approximately 265 mg/L) exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration up to an order of 17 times without triggering the burst releasing effect. At the end of the experiment, the minimum inhibitory concentration was exceeded by up to 6 times (approximately 100 mg/L). It was determined that the modification of collagen with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles does not negatively influence the sustainable release of vancomycin. The balance of vancomycin and its degradation products was observed after 14 days of incubation. PMID:26886321

  15. Production and release of asexual sporangia in Plasmopara viticola.

    PubMed

    Caffi, Tito; Gilardi, Giovanna; Monchiero, Matteo; Rossi, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    To study the influence of environmental conditions on sporulation of Plasmopara viticola lesions under vineyard's conditions, unsprayed vines were inspected every second or third day and the numbers of sporulating and nonsporulating lesions were counted in two North Italy vineyards in 2008 to 2010. Infected leaves were removed so that only fresh lesions were assessed at each field assessment. Sporulation was studied at two scales, across field assessments and across the seasonal population of lesions. Frequencies of sporulating lesions were positively correlated with the numbers of moist hours in the preceding dark period (i.e., the number of hours between 8:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. with relative humidity ≥80%, rainfall >0 mm, or wetness duration >30 min). In a receiver operating characteristic analysis, predicted sporulation based on the occurrence of ≥3 moist hours at night provided overall accuracy of 0.85. To study the time course of sporulation on lesions which were not washed by rainfall, numbers of sporangia produced per square millimeter of lesion were estimated on individual cohorts of lesions over the whole infectious period. The numbers of sporangia per square millimeter of lesion increased rapidly during the first 4 days after the beginning of sporulation and then tapered off prior to a halt; the time course of cumulative sporangia production by a lesion followed a monomolecular growth model (R(2) = 0.97). The total number of sporangia produced by a square millimeter of lesion increased as the maximum temperature decreased and moist hours in the dark increased. To study the release pattern of the sporangia, spore samplers were placed near grapevines with sporulating lesions. Airborne sporangia were caught in 91.2% of the days over a wide range of weather conditions, including rainless periods. The results of this study provide quantitative information on production of P. viticola sporangia that may help refine epidemiological models used as decision

  16. Peripheral activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Granata, R

    2016-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates GH synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition to its endocrine role, GHRH exerts a wide range of extrapituitary effects which include stimulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation, and inhibition of apoptosis. Accordingly, expression of GHRH, as well as the receptor GHRH-R and its splice variants, has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types. Among the direct peripheral activities, GHRH regulates pancreatic islet and β-cell survival and function and endometrial cell proliferation, promotes cardioprotection and wound healing, influences the immune and reproductive systems, reduces inflammation, indirectly increases lifespan and adiposity and acts on skeletal muscle cells to inhibit cell death and atrophy. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly clear that GHRH exerts important extrapituitary functions, suggesting potential therapeutic use of the peptide and its analogs in a wide range of medical settings. PMID:26891937

  17. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-01

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores. PMID:25675358

  18. Substrate lability and plant activity controls greenhouse gas release from Neotropical peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Hoyos, Jorge; Lomax, Barry; Turner, Ben; Wright, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Almost one third of global CO2 emissions resulting from land use change and substantial CH4 emissions originate from tropical peatlands. However, our understanding of the controls of CO2 and CH4 release from tropical peatlands are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peat lability and the activity of the vegetation on gas release using a combination of field and laboratory experiments. We demonstrated that peat lability constrained CH4 production to the surface peat under anaerobic conditions. The presence of plants shifted the C balance from a C source to a C sink with respect to CO2 while the activity of the root system strongly influenced CH4 emissions through its impact on soil O2 inputs. Both field and laboratory data suggest a coupling between the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation and the release of both CO2 and CH4 following the circadian rhythm of the dominant plant functional types. Forest clearance for agriculture resulted in elevated CH4 release, which we attribute in part to the cessation of root O2 inputs to the peat. We conclude that high emissions of CO2 and CH4 from forested tropical peatlands are likely driven by labile C inputs from the vegetation but that root O2 release may limit CH4 emissions.

  19. Most Plastic Products Release Estrogenic Chemicals: A Potential Health Problem That Can Be Solved

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun Z.; Yaniger, Stuart I.; Jordan, V. Craig; Klein, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chemicals having estrogenic activity (EA) reportedly cause many adverse health effects, especially at low (picomolar to nanomolar) doses in fetal and juvenile mammals. Objectives: We sought to determine whether commercially available plastic resins and products, including baby bottles and other products advertised as bisphenol A (BPA) free, release chemicals having EA. Methods: We used a roboticized MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, which is very sensitive, accurate, and repeatable, to quantify the EA of chemicals leached into saline or ethanol extracts of many types of commercially available plastic materials, some exposed to common-use stresses (microwaving, ultraviolet radiation, and/or autoclaving). Results: Almost all commercially available plastic products we sampled—independent of the type of resin, product, or retail source—leached chemicals having reliably detectable EA, including those advertised as BPA free. In some cases, BPA-free products released chemicals having more EA than did BPA-containing products. Conclusions: Many plastic products are mischaracterized as being EA free if extracted with only one solvent and not exposed to common-use stresses. However, we can identify existing compounds, or have developed, monomers, additives, or processing agents that have no detectable EA and have similar costs. Hence, our data suggest that EA-free plastic products exposed to common-use stresses and extracted by saline and ethanol solvents could be cost-effectively made on a commercial scale and thereby eliminate a potential health risk posed by most currently available plastic products that leach chemicals having EA into food products. PMID:21367689

  20. Improved estimates of environmental copper release rates from antifouling products.

    PubMed

    Finnie, Alistair A

    2006-01-01

    The US Navy Dome method for measuring copper release rates from antifouling paint in-service on ships' hulls can be considered to be the most reliable indicator of environmental release rates. In this paper, the relationship between the apparent copper release rate and the environmental release rate is established for a number of antifouling coating types using data from a variety of available laboratory, field and calculation methods. Apart from a modified Dome method using panels, all laboratory, field and calculation methods significantly overestimate the environmental release rate of copper from antifouling coatings. The difference is greatest for self-polishing copolymer antifoulings (SPCs) and smallest for certain erodible/ablative antifoulings, where the ASTM/ISO standard and the CEPE calculation method are seen to typically overestimate environmental release rates by factors of about 10 and 4, respectively. Where ASTM/ISO or CEPE copper release rate data are used for environmental risk assessment or regulatory purposes, it is proposed that the release rate values should be divided by a correction factor to enable more reliable generic environmental risk assessments to be made. Using a conservative approach based on a realistic worst case and accounting for experimental uncertainty in the data that are currently available, proposed default correction factors for use with all paint types are 5.4 for the ASTM/ISO method and 2.9 for the CEPE calculation method. Further work is required to expand this data-set and refine the correction factors through correlation of laboratory measured and calculated copper release rates with the direct in situ environmental release rate for different antifouling paints under a range of environmental conditions. PMID:17110352

  1. Presynaptic Kainate Receptor Activation Preserves Asynchronous GABA Release Despite the Reduction in Synchronous Release from Hippocampal CCK Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Michael I.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Chittajallu, Ramesh; McBain, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus in mediated by a wide variety of different interneuron classes which are assumed to play different roles in network activity. Activation of presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) has been shown to reduce inhibitory transmission but the interneuron class(es) at which they act is only recently beginning to emerge. Using paired recordings we show that KAR activation causes a decrease in presynaptic release from CCK- but not PV-containing interneurons and that this decrease is observed when pyramidal cells, but not interneurons, are the postsynaptic target. We also show that although the synchronous release component is reduced, the barrage of asynchronous GABA release from CCK interneurons during sustained firing is unaffected by KAR activation. This indicates that presynaptic KARs preserve and act in concert with asynchronous release to switch CCK interneurons from a phasic inhibition mode to produce prolonged inhibition during periods of intense activity. PMID:20720128

  2. Triple Activity of Lamivudine Releasing Sulfonated Polymers against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Andersen, Anna H F; Zuwala, Kaja; Cosson, Steffen; Riber, Camilla Frich; Smith, Anton A A; Tolstrup, Martin; Moad, Graeme; Zelikin, Alexander N; Postma, Almar

    2016-07-01

    In this article a library of polymeric therapeutic agents against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is presented. The library of statistical copolymers of varied molar mass was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The synthesized polymers comprise pendent hydroxyl and sulfonated side chains as well as the reverse transcriptase prodrug lamivudine (3TC) attached via a disulfide self-immolative linker. The glutathione mediated release of 3TC is demonstrated as well as the antiviral efficacy against HIV entry and polymerase activity. Although a high degree of polymer sulfonation is required for effective HIV entry inhibition, polymers with approximately ∼50% sulfonated monomer demonstrated potent kinase independent reverse transcriptase inhibition. In addition, the sulfonated polymers demonstrate activity against DNA-DNA polymerase, which suggests that these polymers may exhibit activity against a broad spectrum of viruses. In summary, the polymers described provide a triple-active arsenal against HIV with extracellular activity via entry inhibition and intracellular activity by kinase-dependent lamivudine-based and kinase-independent sulfonated polymer based inhibition. Since these sulfonated copolymers are easily formulated into gels, we envision them to be particularly suited for topical application to prevent the mucosal transmission of viruses, particularly HIV. PMID:27244595

  3. The Pathway of Product Release from the R State of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Kimberly R.; Kantrowitz, Evan R.

    2010-01-01

    The pathway of product release from the R state of aspartate transcarbamoylase has been determined here by solving the crystal structure of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) locked in the R-quaternary structure by specific introduction of disulfide bonds. ATCase displays ordered substrate binding and product release, remaining in the R state until substrates are exhausted. The structure reported here represents ATCase in the R state bound to the final product molecule, phosphate. This structure has been difficult to obtain previously because the enzyme relaxes back to the T state after the substrates are exhausted. Hence cocrystallizing the wild-type enzyme with phosphate results in a T-state structure. In this structure of the enzyme trapped in the R state with specific disulfide bonds, we observe two phosphate molecules per active site. The position of the first phosphate corresponds to the position of the phosphate of carbamoyl phosphate and the position of the phosphonate of N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate. However, the second, more weakly bound phosphate, is bound in a positively charged pocket more accessible to the surface than the other phosphate. The second phosphate appears to be on the path that phosphate would have to take to exit the active site. Our results suggest that phosphate dissociation and carbamoyl phosphate binding can occur simultaneously and the dissociation of phosphate may actually promote the binding of carbamoyl phosphate for more efficient catalysis. PMID:20620149

  4. The Pathway of Product Release from the R State of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, K.; Kantrowitz, E

    2010-01-01

    The pathway of product release from the R state of aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase; EC 2.1.3.2, aspartate carbamoyltransferase) has been determined here by solving the crystal structure of Escherichia coli ATCase locked in the R quaternary structure by specific introduction of disulfide bonds. ATCase displays ordered substrate binding and product release, remaining in the R state until substrates are exhausted. The structure reported here represents ATCase in the R state bound to the final product molecule, phosphate. This structure has been difficult to obtain previously because the enzyme relaxes back to the T state after the substrates are exhausted. Hence, cocrystallizing the wild-type enzyme with phosphate results in a T-state structure. In this structure of the enzyme trapped in the R state with specific disulfide bonds, we observe two phosphate molecules per active site. The position of the first phosphate corresponds to the position of the phosphate of carbamoyl phosphate (CP) and the position of the phosphonate of N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate. However, the second, more weakly bound phosphate is bound in a positively charged pocket that is more accessible to the surface than the other phosphate. The second phosphate appears to be on the path that phosphate would have to take to exit the active site. Our results suggest that phosphate dissociation and CP binding can occur simultaneously and that the dissociation of phosphate may actually promote the binding of CP for more efficient catalysis.

  5. Stable Colloidal Drug Aggregates Catch and Release Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christopher K; Duan, Da; Ganesh, Ahil N; Torosyan, Hayarpi; Shoichet, Brian K; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-04-15

    Small molecule aggregates are considered nuisance compounds in drug discovery, but their unusual properties as colloids could be exploited to form stable vehicles to preserve protein activity. We investigated the coaggregation of seven molecules chosen because they had been previously intensely studied as colloidal aggregators, coformulating them with bis-azo dyes. The coformulation reduced colloid sizes to <100 nm and improved uniformity of the particle size distribution. The new colloid formulations are more stable than previous aggregator particles. Specifically, coaggregation of Congo Red with sorafenib, tetraiodophenolphthalein (TIPT), or vemurafenib produced particles that are stable in solutions of high ionic strength and high protein concentrations. Like traditional, single compound colloidal aggregates, the stabilized colloids adsorbed and inhibited enzymes like β-lactamase, malate dehydrogenase, and trypsin. Unlike traditional aggregates, the coformulated colloid-protein particles could be centrifuged and resuspended multiple times, and from resuspended particles, active trypsin could be released up to 72 h after adsorption. Unexpectedly, the stable colloidal formulations can sequester, stabilize, and isolate enzymes by spin-down, resuspension, and release. PMID:26741163

  6. Retarded release phosphatidylcholine benefits patients with chronic active ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Stremmel, W; Merle, U; Zahn, A; Autschbach, F; Hinz, U; Ehehalt, R

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: We examined the hypothesis of an anti-inflammatory effect of phosphatidylcholine in ulcerative colitis. Methods: A phase IIA, double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study was performed in 60 patients with chronic active, non steroid dependent, ulcerative colitis, with a clinical activity index (CAI) of ⩾4. Retarded release phosphatidylcholine rich phospholipids and placebo were administered at a dose of 6 g daily over three months. The primary end point was a change in CAI towards clinical remission (CAI ⩽3) or CAI improvement by ⩾50%. Secondary end points included ⩾50% changes in endoscopic activity index (EAI), histology, and quality of life scores. Results: Induction of clinical remission (CAI ⩽3) as the primary outcome variable was attained by 16 (53%) patients in the phosphatidylcholine treated group compared with three (10%) in the placebo group (p<0.00001). The rate of clinical remission and CAI improvement was 90% in the phosphatidylcholine group and only 10% in the placebo group. A median drop of seven points in the CAI score (70% improvement) was recorded in the phosphatidylcholine group compared with no change in the placebo group. Secondary end point analysis revealed concomitant drops in EAI and histology scores (p = 0.00016 and p = 0.0067 compared with placebo, respectively). Improvement in quality of life was reported by 16 of 29 evaluated patients in the phosphatidylcholine group compared with two of 30 in the placebo group (p = 0.00005). Conclusion: Retarded release oral phosphatidylcholine is effective in alleviating inflammatory activity caused by ulcerative colitis. PMID:15951544

  7. REEVALUATION OF WATERBORNE RELEASES OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS FROM THE MAYAK PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION INTO THE TECHA RIVER IN 1949-1951

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Shagina, N. B.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    The Mayak Production Association was the first site for the production of weapon-grade plutonium in Russia. Early operations led to the waterborne release of large amounts of radioactive materials into the small Techa River. Residents living downstream used river water for drinking and other purposes. The releases and subsequent flooding resulted in the deposition of sediments along the shoreline and on floodplain soil. Primary routes of exposure were external dose from the deposited sediments and the ingestion of 90Sr and other radionuclides. Study of the Techa River Cohort has revealed an increased incidence of leukemia and solid cancers. These epidemiologic studies are supported by extensive dose-reconstruction activities that have led to the creation of various versions of a Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS). The correctness of the TRDS has been challenged by the allegation that releases of short-lived radionuclides were much larger than those used in the TRDS. Although the dosimetry system depends more upon the measurements of 90Sr in humans and additional measurements of radionuclides and of exposure rates in the environment, a major activity has been undertaken to define more precisely the time-dependent rates of release and radionuclide composition of the releases. The major releases occurred during 1950-1951. In addition to routine releases major accidental releases occurred. The re-evaluated amount of total release is 114 PBq, about half of which was from accidents that occurred in late 1951. The composition of the radionuclides released has also been re-evaluated; this composition changed with time.

  8. Improvement of aromatic thiol release through the selection of yeasts with increased β-lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Belda, Ignacio; Ruiz, Javier; Navascués, Eva; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2016-05-16

    The development of a selective medium for the rapid differentiation of yeast species with increased aromatic thiol release activity has been achieved. The selective medium was based on the addition of S-methyl-l-cysteine (SMC) as β-lyase substrate. In this study, a panel of 245 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was tested for their ability to grow on YCB-SMC medium. Yeast strains with an increased β-lyase activity grew rapidly because of their ability to release ammonium from SMC in comparison to others, and allowed for the easy isolation and differentiation of yeasts with promising properties in oenology, or another field, for aromatic thiol release. The selective medium was also helpful for the discrimination between those S. cerevisiae strains, which present a common 38-bp deletion in the IRC7 sequence (present in around 88% of the wild strains tested and are likely to be less functional for 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one (4MMP) production), and those S. cerevisiae strains homozygous for the full-length IRC7 allele. The medium was also helpful for the selection of non-Saccharomyces yeasts with increased β-lyase activity. Based on the same medium, a highly sensitive, reproducible and non-expensive GC-MS method for the evaluation of the potential volatile thiol release by different yeast isolates was developed. PMID:26971012

  9. Activation product transport in fusion reactors. [RAPTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. Similar problems are experienced around fission reactor systems. The determination of the transport of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products through the system is achieved using the computer code RAPTOR. This code calculates the mass transfer of a number of activation products based on the corrosion and sputtering rates through the system, the deposition and release characteristics of various plant components, the neturon flux spectrum, as well as other plant parameters. RAPTOR assembles a system of first order linear differential equations into a matrix equation based upon the reactor system parameters. Included in the transfer matrix are the deposition and erosion coefficients, and the decay and activation data for the various plant nodes and radioactive isotopes. A source vector supplies the corrosion and neutron sputtering source rates. This matrix equation is then solved using a matrix operator technique to give the specific activity distribution of each radioactive species throughout the plant. Once the amount of mass transfer is determined, the photon transport due to the radioactive corrosion and sputtering product sources can be evaluated, and dose rates around the plant components of interest as a function of time can be determined. This method has been used to estimate the radiation hazards around a number of fusion reactor system designs.

  10. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  11. Reevaluation of waterborne releases of radioactive materials from the Mayak Production Association into the Techa River in 1949-1951.

    PubMed

    Degteva, M O; Shagina, N B; Vorobiova, M I; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, B A

    2012-01-01

    The Mayak Production Association was the first site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium in Russia. Early operations led to the waterborne release of radioactive materials into the small Techa River. Residents living downstream used river water for drinking and other purposes. The releases and subsequent flooding resulted in deposition of sediments along the shoreline and on floodplain soil. Primary routes of exposure were external dose from the deposited sediments and ingestion of 90Sr and other radionuclides. Study of the Techa River Cohort has revealed an increased incidence of leukemia and solid cancers. Epidemiologic studies are supported by extensive dose-reconstruction activities that have led to various versions of a Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS). The correctness of the TRDS has been challenged by the allegation that releases of short-lived radionuclides were much larger than those used in the TRDS. Although the dosimetry system depends more upon measurements of 90Sr in humans and additional measurements of radionuclides and of exposure rates in the environment, a major activity has been undertaken to define more precisely the time-dependent rates of release and their radionuclide composition. The major releases occurred during 1950-1951 in the form of routine releases and major accidental releases. The reevaluated amount of total release is 114 PBq, about half of which was from accidents that occurred in late 1951. The time-dependent composition of the radionuclides released has also been reevaluated. The improved understanding presented in this paper is possible because of access to many documents not previously available. PMID:22134076

  12. Release of antimicrobial actives from microcapsules by the action of axillary bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kromidas, L; Perrier, E; Flanagan, J; Rivero, R; Bonnet, I

    2006-04-01

    We describe the use of unique microcapsules that may be degraded by the actions of bacteria. These microcapsules are approximately 35 mum in diameter, are composed of natural protein, and may be filled with a variety of actives. We describe the use of antimicrobial actives such as farnesol and methylparaben to demonstrate that their release by the degradative actions of axillary bacteria such as Corynebacterium minutissimum, C. urealyticum, and Staphylococcus epidermidis leads to their demise. These microcapsules may be used in consumer products such as deodorants and antiperpirants that may, under actual use conditions, control malodor. PMID:18492144

  13. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... another country or an international organization require prior coordination and approval by...

  14. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... another country or an international organization require prior coordination and approval by...

  15. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... another country or an international organization require prior coordination and approval by...

  16. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... another country or an international organization require prior coordination and approval by...

  17. ASSESSMENT OF RELEASE RATES FOR RADIONUCLIDES IN ACTIVATED CONCRETE.

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN,T.M.

    2003-08-23

    The Maine Yankee (MY) nuclear power plant is undergoing the process of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Part of the process requires analyses that demonstrate that any radioactivity that remains after D&D will not cause exposure to radioactive contaminants to exceed acceptable limits. This requires knowledge of the distribution of radionuclides in the remaining material and their potential release mechanisms from the material to the contacting groundwater. In this study the concern involves radionuclide contamination in activated concrete in the ICI Sump below the containment building. Figures 1-3 are schematic representations of the ICI Sump. Figure 2 and 3 contain the relevant dimensions needed for the analysis. The key features of Figures 2 and 3 are the 3/8-inch carbon steel liner that isolates the activated concrete from the pit and the concrete wall, which is between 7 feet and 7 feet 2 inches thick. During operations, a small neutron flux from the reactor activated the carbon steel liner and the concrete outside the liner. Current MY plans call for filling the ICI sump with compacted sand.

  18. The release of nanosilver from consumer products used in the home.

    PubMed

    Benn, Troy; Cavanagh, Bridget; Hristovski, Kiril; Posner, Jonathan D; Westerhoff, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Nanosilver has become one of the most widely used nanomaterials in consumer products because of its antimicrobial properties. Public concern over the potential adverse effects of nanosilver's environmental release has prompted discussion of federal regulation. In this paper, we assess several classes of consumer products for their silver content and potential to release nanosilver into water, air, or soil. Silver was quantified in a shirt, a medical mask and cloth, toothpaste, shampoo, detergent, a towel, a toy teddy bear, and two humidifiers. Silver concentrations ranged from 1.4 to 270,000 microg Ag g product(-1). Products were washed in 500 mL of tap water to assess the potential release of silver into aqueous environmental matrices (wastewater, surface water, saliva, etc.). Silver was released in quantities up to 45 microg Ag g product(-1), and size fractions were both larger and smaller than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of nanoparticle silver in most products as well as in the wash water samples. Four products were subjected to a toxicity characterization leaching procedure to assess the release of silver in a landfill. The medical cloth released an amount of silver comparable to the toxicity characterization limit. This paper presents methodologies that can be used to quantify and characterize silver and other nanomaterials in consumer products. The quantities of silver in consumer products can in turn be used to estimate real-world human and environmental exposure levels. PMID:21284285

  19. Phenazine production enhances extracellular DNA release via hydrogen peroxide generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Manefield, Mike

    2013-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa eDNA is a crucial component essential for biofilm formation and stability. In this study we report that release of eDNA is influenced by the production of phenazine in P. aeruginosa. A ∆phzA-G mutant of P. aeruginosa PA14 deficient in phenazine production generated significantly less eDNA in comparison with the phenazine producing strains. The relationship between eDNA release and phenazine production is bridged via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation and subsequent H2O2 mediated cell lysis and ultimately release of chromosomal DNA into the extracellular environment as eDNA. PMID:23710274

  20. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  1. Design of an actively controlled snow ski release binding.

    PubMed

    Hull, M L; Allen, K W

    1981-08-01

    A new electronic ski binding has been designed which may better protect skiers from lower extremity injuries. A four-step procedure for developing binding release criteria aimed at preventing specific injuries is outlined. Using simplified biomechanical models, the release criteria for tibia fracture in both torsion and flexion are derived. A binding design which embodies the derived release criteria is described. The binding consists of three subsystems: 1) a dynamometer, 2) an analog computer controller, and 3) an electromechanical release mechanism. The strain gage dynamometer directly measures torsion and bending moments between the boot and ski. An analog computer controlled processes dynamometer signals. Dual release mode capability is achieved by parallel solution of differential equations which model the leg in both medial-lateral rotation and flexion. When the model solution reaches a critical value, the controller actuates the release mechanism. The release mechanism incorporates a unique closed circuit hydraulic system which rigidly locks the boot to the ski until release. Laboratory tests on a prototype confirm that the computer-controlled binding prevents inadvertent release under noninjurious high-magnitude, short-duration loads but releases before quasi-static loads reach injurious levels. PMID:7278190

  2. COPAR-FD. Release of Metallic Fission Products from Coated Nuclear Fuel Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tzung, F.; Richards, M.

    1992-09-01

    COPAR-FD is used to calculate the release of metallic fission products from coated nuclear fuel particles, using a finite-difference solution of the governing partial differential equation. COPAR-FD interfaces with the TRAMP and TRAFIC codes for calculating transport in and release from graphite fuel blocks.

  3. Isotopic noble gas signatures released from medical isotope production facilities--simulations and measurements.

    PubMed

    Saey, Paul R J; Bowyer, Theodore W; Ringbom, Anders

    2010-09-01

    Radioxenon isotopes play a major role in confirming whether or not an underground explosion was nuclear in nature. It is then of key importance to understand the sources of environmental radioxenon to be able to distinguish civil sources from those of a nuclear explosion. Based on several years of measurements, combined with advanced atmospheric transport model results, it was recently shown that the main source of radioxenon observations are strong and regular batch releases from a very limited number of medical isotope production facilities. This paper reviews production processes in different medical isotope facilities during which radioxenon is produced. Radioxenon activity concentrations and isotopic compositions are calculated for six large facilities. The results are compared with calculated signals from nuclear explosions. Further, the outcome is compared and found to be consistent with radioxenon measurements recently performed in and around three of these facilities. Some anomalies in measurements in which (131m)Xe was detected were found and a possible explanation is proposed. It was also calculated that the dose rate of the releases is well below regulatory values. Based on these results, it should be possible to better understand, interpret and verify signals measured in the noble gas measurement systems in the International Monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. PMID:20447828

  4. Isotopic noble gas signatures released from medical isotope production facilities - Simulations and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Saey, Paul R.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Ringbom, Anders

    2010-09-09

    Journal article on the role that radioxenon isotopes play in confirming whether or not an underground explosion was nuclear in nature. Radioxenon isotopes play a major role in confirming whether or not an underground explosion was nuclear in nature. It is then of key importance to understand the sources of environmental radioxenon to be able to distinguish civil sources from those of a nuclear explosion. Based on several years of measurements, combined with advanced atmospheric transport model results, it was recently shown that the main source of radioxenon observations are strong and regular batch releases from a very limited number of medical isotope production facilities. This paper reviews production processes in different medical isotope facilities during which radioxenon is produced. Radioxenon activity concentrations and isotopic compositions are calculated for six large facilities. The results are compared with calculated signals from nuclear explosions. Further, the outcome is compared and found to be consistent with radioxenon measurements recently performed in and around three of these facilities. Some anomalies in measurements in which {sup 131m}Xe was detected were found and a possible explanation is proposed. It was also calculated that the dose rate of the releases is well below regulatory values. Based on these results, it should be possible to better understand, interpret and verify signals measured in the noble gas measurement systems in the International Monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

  5. Modulation of pulmonary macrophage superoxide release and tumoricidal activity following activation by biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B

    1986-10-01

    Following immunologic activation, pulmonary macrophages may prevent or cause regression of lung metastases by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. The studies described here were designed to determine if enhanced oxygen metabolite release was related to postactivation tumoricidal activity. We have shown that in vitro activation of Fischer 344 rat pulmonary macrophages by either free or liposome-encapsulated muramyl dipeptide leads to both enhanced release of superoxide anions and marked tumoricidal activity against syngenic (Fischer 13762), allogeneic (Schmidt-Ruppin RR 1022) and xenogeneic (Fibrosarcoma MCA-F) 125I-deoxyuridine-labeled target cells. This immune modulator did not, however, metabolically activate pulmonary macrophages as effectively as liposome-encapsulated lipopolysaccharide. A 24-h in vitro incubation with either 150 U or 300 U of interferon-gamma (3 X 10(6) U/mg) or 30 U, 150 U or 300 U of interferon-alpha (6 X 10(5) U/mg) caused a significant elevation in superoxide release above controls, whereas short-term exposure (2 or 4 h) had little or no effect. Free or encapsulated 6-O-stearoyl muramyl dipeptide, on the other hand, did increase superoxide levels at all 3 time periods. When either interferon-gamma or free or encapsulated muramyl dipeptide derivative were administered to intact rats by either i.v. injection, intratracheal instillation or osmotic minipump infusion, pulmonary macrophage tumoricidal activity was observed 96 h after cell harvesting. Zymosan-stimulated superoxide release, however, was not consistently elevated above control or empty liposome treatment following this course of in vivo activation. The data collectively suggest that in vivo pulmonary macrophage activation to a tumoricidal state and metabolic activation resulting in enhanced superoxide may be separable events. PMID:3021650

  6. Soluble interleukin 2 receptors are released from activated human lymphoid cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, L.A.; Kurman, C.C.; Fritz, M.E.; Biddison, W.E.; Boutin, B.; Yarchoan, R.; Nelson, D.L.

    1985-11-01

    With the use of an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay to measure soluble human interleukin 2 receptors (IL 2R), certain human T cell leukemia virus I (HTLV I)-positive T cell lines were found to spontaneously release large quantities of IL 2R into culture supernatants. This was not found with HTLV I-negative and IL 2 independent T cell lines, and only one of seven B cell-derived lines examined produced small amounts of IL 2R. In addition to this constitutive production of soluble IL 2R by certain cell lines, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could be induced to release soluble IL 2R by plant lectins, the murine monoclonal antibody OKT3, tetanus toxoid, and allogeneic cells. Such activated cells also expressed cellular IL 2R measurable in detergent solubilized cell extracts. The generation of cellular and supernatant IL 2R was: dependent on cellular activation, rapid, radioresistant (3000 rad), and inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. NaDodSO4-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of soluble IL 2R demonstrated molecules of apparent Mr = 35,000 to 40,000, and 45,000 to 50,000, respectively, somewhat smaller than the mature surface receptor on these cells. The release of soluble IL 2R appears to be a characteristic marker of T lymphocyte activation and might serve an immunoregulatory function during both normal and abnormal cell growth and differentiation.

  7. Fate of corrosion products released from stainless steel in marine sediments and seawater. Part 3. Calcareous ooze

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.L.

    1982-04-01

    The physicochemical forms and partitioning of corrosion products released from stainless steel upon exposure to selected environmental conditions is the subject of this investigation. This report describes the influence of calcareous sediment on the rate of release and fate of corrosion products produced when neutron-activated stainless steel specimens were exposed to a Globigerina ooze taken from the Northeast Pacific Ocean. The calcareous ooze used in this study consists largely of planktonic formanifera tests and was found to be about 90% CaCO/sub 3/. The trace metal content of this sediment was typical of average deep-sea carbonate sediments, and the ratios of trace elements to Ti were not remarkably different from a coastal clayey silt or a Northeast Pacific pelagic red clay. Most (>80%) of the trace metals extracted by sequential chemical treatment were associated with reductant-soluble materials, i.e., amorphous Mn and Fe oxides, or were incorporated in the carbonate substrate. Specimens of neutron-activated stainless steel exposed to calcareous ooze suspended in seawater under aerated and non-oxygenated conditions released corrosion products at rates of 1.7 and 4.2 ..mu..g year/sup -1/ cm/sup -2/, respectively. Almost 90% of the corrosion products (/sup 60/Co activity) released under aerated conditions were relatively labile. Of these materials, over 80% were soluble upon treatment with a strong complexing agent, DTPA, indicating that adsorption of corrosion products as cations had been the major mechanism of incorporation into the sediment. In the absence of O/sub 2/, a large fraction (approx. 80%) of the corrosion products were also relatively labile. Larger fractions of the corrosion products were soluble, easily dissolved, or present as carbonates or sulfides under non-oxygenated conditions than they were for the aerated treatment.

  8. Get Up to Speed on the Latest Product Releases in the Education Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article provides brief descriptions of the latest product releases in the education market. These products include hardware, software, and resources. The following products are presented in this article, but not limited to: (1) Radius Audio Learning System(www.learningresources.com); (2) The Indigo Learning System from LearningSoft, LLC…

  9. ATP Released by Injured Neurons Activates Schwann Cells

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Samuele; Bergamin, Elisanna; Rodella, Umberto; Duregotti, Elisa; Scorzeto, Michele; Jalink, Kees; Montecucco, Cesare; Rigoni, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Injured nerve terminals of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) can regenerate. This remarkable and complex response is governed by molecular signals that are exchanged among the cellular components of this synapse: motor axon nerve terminal (MAT), perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs), and muscle fiber. The nature of signals that govern MAT regeneration is ill-known. In the present study the spider toxin α-latrotoxin has been used as tool to investigate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuroregeneration. Indeed this neurotoxin induces an acute, specific, localized and fully reversible damage of the presynaptic nerve terminal, and its action mimics the cascade of events that leads to nerve terminal degeneration in injured patients and in many neurodegenerative conditions. Here we provide evidence of an early release by degenerating neurons of adenosine triphosphate as alarm messenger, that contributes to the activation of a series of intracellular pathways within Schwann cells that are crucial for nerve regeneration: Ca2+, cAMP, ERK1/2, and CREB. These results contribute to define the cross-talk taking place among degenerating nerve terminals and PSCs, involved in the functional recovery of the NMJ. PMID:27242443

  10. Behavior of Cs, I, and Te in the fission product release program at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.; Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted at ORNL with highly irradiated light-water reactor (PWR and BWR) fuel rod segments to investigate fission product release in steam in the temperature range 500 to 2000/sup 0/C. Objectives were to quantify and characterize the releases under conditions postulated for LOCA) and severe accident conditions. In all, 26 experiments have been conducted - 24 with high burnup and 2 with low burnup fuels. To aid in the interpretation of fission product release, 12 implant and 18 control experiments were also conducted; the behavior of HI, I/sub 2/, Cs/sub 2/O, CsOH, Te, and TeO/sub 2/ (individually and in different combinations) was studied. This paper discusses only the observed behavior of cesium, iodine, and tellurium. Cs and I were released primarily as CsOH and CsI, and Te release was controlled by steam oxidation of Zircaloy cladding.

  11. Primary system fission product release and transport: A state-of-the-art report to the committee on the safety of nuclear installations

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.L.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the status of research activities associated with fission product behavior (release and transport) under severe accident conditions within the primary systems of water-moderated and water-cooled nuclear reactors. For each of the areas of fission product release and fission product transport, the report summarizes relevant information on important phenomena, major experiments performed, relevant computer models and codes, comparisons of computer code calculations with experimental results, and general conclusions on the overall state of the art. Finally, the report provides an assessment of the overall importance and knowledge of primary system release and transport phenomena and presents major conclusions on the state of the art.

  12. Antarctic Stratospheric Chemistry of Chlorine Nitrate, Hydrogen Chloride, and Ice: Release of Active Chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Mario J.; Tso, Tai-Ly; Molina, Luisa T.; Wang, Frank C.-Y.

    1987-11-01

    The reaction rate between atmospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is greatly enhanced in the presence of ice particles; HCl dissolves readily into ice, and the collisional reaction probability for ClONO2 on the surface of ice with HCl in the mole fraction range from ~ 0.003 to 0.010 is in the range from ~ 0.05 to 0.1 for temperatures near 200 K. Chlorine (Cl2) is released into the gas phase on a time scale of at most a few milliseconds, whereas nitric acid (HNO3), the other product, remains in the condensed phase. This reaction could play an important role in explaining the observed depletion of ozone over Antarctica; it releases photolytically active chlorine from its most abundant reservoir species, and it promotes the formation of HNO3 and thus removes nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the gas phase. Hence it establishes the necessary conditions for the efficient catalytic destruction of ozone by halogenated free radicals. In the absence of HCl, ClONO2 also reacts irreversibly with ice with a collision efficiency of ~ 0.02 at 200 K; the product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is released to the gas phase on a time scale of minutes.

  13. The Production and Release of Volatiles in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Vervack, Ronald J.; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2014-11-01

    Recent observations of comets with high-resolution infrared spectroscopy have enabled the opportunity to study the spatial distributions of volatile species in the comae of comets providing information on how volatiles are stored and released from cometary nuclei. The spatial distributions of H2O, HCN, C2H6, C2H2, CH3OH, H2CO, CH4, CO, OCS, NH3, NH2, CN and dust can be measured in sufficiently bright comets at infrared wavelengths. Here we focus on a chemically diverse sample of comets that combine high signal-to-noise spectra with high spatial resolution. In particular, we compare the spatial distribution of volatiles in recently observed comets 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3, 103P/Hartley 2, C/2007 N3 Lulin and C/2012 S1 ISON. Spatial distributions of unidentified emission features are also determined and compared to the spatial distributions of known volatiles in order to reveal characteristics that can lead to their identification. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Astronomy Programs, and also partially supported by the MEXT Supported Program for the Strategic Research Foundation at Private Universities, 2014 - 2018.

  14. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  15. Spectroscopic measurement of cortical nitric oxide release induced by ascending activation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, N; Cudeiro, J; Mariño, J

    2015-01-29

    The transition from sleep to the awake state is regulated by the activation of subcortical nuclei of the brainstem (BS) and basal forebrain (BF), releasing acetylcholine and glutamate throughout the cortex and inducing a tonic state of neural activity. It has been suggested that such activation is also mediated by the massive and diffuse cortical release of nitric oxide (NO). In this work we have combined the spectroscopic measurement of NO levels in the somatosensory cortex of the cat through its marker methemoglobin, as well as two other hemodynamic markers (oxyhemoglobin--oxyHb--and deoxyhemoglobin--deoxyHb), together with the electrical stimulation of BS and BF--to induce an experimental transition from a sleep-like state to an awake-like mode. The results show an increase of NO levels either after BS or BF activation. The response induced by BS stimulation was biphasic in the three studied markers, and lasted for up to 30s. The changes induced by BF were monophasic lasting for up to 20s. The systemic blockade of NO production abolished the observed responses to BS whereas responses to BF stimulation were much less affected. These results indicate a crucial role for NO in the neuronal activation induced by the ascending systems. PMID:25463513

  16. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ryan C; Fees, Colby P; Holland, William L; Winger, Courtney C; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca](i)). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 min after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca](i) and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA specifically bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca](i), PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca](i) release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca](i) release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  17. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Ryan C.; Fees, Colby P.; Holland, William L.; Winger, Courtney C.; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC- γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca]i). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 minute after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca]i and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA strongly bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca]i, PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca]i release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca]i release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  18. Chinese plasma-derived products supply under the lot release management system in 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejun; Ye, Shengliang; Du, Xi; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Chaoming; Li, Changqing

    2013-11-01

    In 2007, the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) implemented a management system for lot release of all plasma-derived products. Since then, there have been only a few systematic studies of the blood supply, which is a concern when considering the small amount of plasma collected per capita (approximately 3 L/1000 people). As a result, there may be a threat to the safety of the available blood supply. In this study, we examined the characteristics of the supply of Chinese plasma-derived products. We investigated the reports of lot-released biological products derived from all 8 national or regional regulatory authorities in China from 2007 to 2011. The market supply characteristics of Chinese plasma-derived products were analyzed by reviewing the changes in supply varieties, the batches of lot-released plasma-derived products and the actual supply. As a result, the national regulatory authorities can more accurately develop a specific understanding of the production and quality management information provided by Chinese plasma product manufacturers. The implementation of the lot release system further ensures the clinical validity of the plasma-derived products in China and improves the safety of using plasma-derived products. This work provides an assessment of the future Chinese market supply of plasma-derived products and can function as a theoretical basis for the establishment of hemovigilance. PMID:23856276

  19. Release of silver from nanotechnology-based consumer products for children.

    PubMed

    Quadros, Marina E; Pierson, Raymond; Tulve, Nicolle S; Willis, Robert; Rogers, Kim; Thomas, Treye A; Marr, Linsey C

    2013-08-01

    We assessed the potential for children's exposure to bioavailable silver during the realistic use of selected nanotechnology-based consumer products (plush toy, fabric products, breast milk storage bags, sippy cups, cleaning products, humidifiers, and humidifier accessory). We measured the release of ionic and particulate silver from products into water, orange juice, milk formula, synthetic saliva, sweat, and urine (1:50 product to liquid mass ratio); into air; and onto dermal wipes. Of the liquid media, sweat and urine yielded the highest amount of silver release, up to 38% of the silver mass in products; tap water yielded the lowest amount, ≤1.5%. Leaching from a blanket into sweat plateaued within 5 min, with less silver released after washing. Between 0.3 and 23 μg m(-2) of silver transferred from products to wipes. Aerosol concentrations were not significantly elevated during product use. Fabrics, a plush toy, and cleaning products were most likely to release silver. Silver leached mainly via dissolution and was facilitated in media with high salt concentrations. Levels of silver to which children may potentially be exposed during the normal use of these consumer products is predicted to be low, and bioavailable silver is expected to be in ionic rather than particulate form. PMID:23822900

  20. A quality-by-design study for an immediate-release tablet platform: examining the relative impact of active pharmaceutical ingredient properties, processing methods, and excipient variability on drug product quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Joseph; Langdon, Beth A; Hicks, Ian; Song, Daniel; Li, Fasheng; Kathiria, Lalji; Kane, Anil; Ranade, Gautam; Agarwal, Kam

    2014-02-01

    The impact of filler-lubricant particle size ratio variation (3.4-41.6) on the attributes of an immediate-release tablet was compared with the impacts of the manufacturing method used (direct compression or dry granulation) and drug loading (1%, 5%, and 25%), particle size (D[4,3]: 8-114 μm), and drug type (theophylline or ibuprofen). All batches were successfully manufactured, except for direct compression of 25% drug loading of 8 μm (D[4,3]) drug, which exhibited very poor flow properties. All manufactured tablets possessed adequate quality attributes: tablet weight uniformity <4% RSD, tablet potency: 94%-105%, content uniformity <6% RSD, acceptance value ≤ 15, solid fraction: 0.82-0.86, tensile strength >1 MPa, friability ≤ 0.2% weight loss, and disintegration time < 4 min. The filler-lubricant particle size ratio exhibited the greatest impact on blend and granulation particle size and granulation flow, whereas drug property variation dominated blend flow, ribbon solid fraction, and tablet quality attributes. Although statistically significant effects were observed, the results of this study suggest that the manufacturability and performance of this immediate-release tablet formulation is robust to a broad range of variation in drug properties, both within-grade and extra-grade excipient particle size variations, and the choice of manufacturing method. PMID:24375069

  1. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces the Production and Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Canine Synovial Explant Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Straubinger, Alix F.; Summers, Brian A.; Erb, Hollis N.; Härter, Luc; Appel, Max J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Canine synovial membrane explants were exposed to high- or low-passage Borrelia burgdorferi for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Spirochetes received no treatment, were UV light irradiated for 16 h, or were sonicated prior to addition to synovial explant cultures. In explant tissues, mRNA levels for the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, and IL-8 were surveyed semiquantitatively by reverse transcription-PCR. Culture supernatants were examined for numbers of total and motile (i.e., viable) spirochetes, TNF-like and IL-1-like activities, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis-inducing activities, and IL-8. During exposure to synovial explant tissues, the total number of spirochetes in the supernatants decreased gradually by ∼30%, and the viability also declined. mRNAs for TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 were up-regulated in synovial explant tissues within 3 h after infection with untreated or UV light-irradiated B. burgdorferi, and mRNA levels corresponded to the results obtained with bioassays. During 24 h of coincubation, cultures challenged with untreated or UV light-irradiated spirochetes produced similar levels of TNF-like and IL-1-like activities. In contrast, explant tissues exposed to untreated B. burgdorferi generated significantly higher levels of chemotactic factors after 24 h of incubation than did explant tissues exposed to UV light-treated spirochetes. In identical samples, a specific signal for IL-8 was identified by Western blot analysis. High- and low-passage borreliae did not differ in their abilities to induce proinflammatory cytokines. No difference in cytokine induction between untreated and sonicated high-passage spirochetes was observed, suggesting that fractions of the organism can trigger the production and release of inflammatory mediators. The titration of spirochetes revealed a dose-independent cytokine response, where 103 to 107 B. burgdorferi organisms induced similar TNF

  2. Solvent and viscosity effects on the rate-limiting product release step of glucoamylase during maltose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sierks, M R; Sico, C; Zaw, M

    1997-01-01

    Release of product from the active site is the rate-limiting step in a number of enzymatic reactions, including maltose hydrolysis by glucoamylase (GA). With GA, an enzymatic conformational change has been associated with the product release step. Solvent characteristics such as viscosity can strongly influence protein conformational changes. Here we show that the rate-limiting step of GA has a rather complex dependence on solvent characteristics. Seven different cosolvents were added to the GA/maltose reaction solution. Five of the cosolvents, all having an ethylene glycol base, resulted in an increase in activity at low concentration of cosolvent and variable decreases in activity at higher concentrations. The increase in enzyme activity was dependent on polymer length of the cosolvent; the longer the polymer, the lower the concentration needed. The maximum increase in catalytic activity at 45 degrees C (40-45%) was obtained with the three longest polymers (degree of polymerization from 200 to 8000). A further increase in activity to 60-65% was obtained at 60 degrees C. The linear relationship between ln(kcat) and (viscosity)2 obtained with all the cosolvents provides further evidence that product release is the rate-limiting step in the GA catalytic mechanism. A substantial increase in the turnover rate of GA by addition of relatively small amounts of a cosolvent has potential applications for the food industry where high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is one of the primary products produced with GA. Since maltodextrin hydrolysis by GA is by far the slowest step in the production of HFCS, increasing the catalytic rate of GA can substantially reduce the process time. PMID:9336980

  3. Neuronal transporter and astrocytic ATP exocytosis underlie activity-dependent adenosine release in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Mark J; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine plays an important role in many physiological and pathological processes within the mammalian CNS. However, the precise mechanisms of how the concentration of extracellular adenosine increases following neural activity remain contentious. Here we have used microelectrode biosensors to directly measure adenosine release induced by focal stimulation in stratum radiatum of area CA1 in mouse hippocampal slices. Adenosine release was both action potential and Ca2+ dependent and could be evoked with low stimulation frequencies and small numbers of stimuli. Adenosine release required the activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and could be evoked by local application of glutamate receptor agonists. Approximately 40% of stimulated-adenosine release occurred by translocation of adenosine via equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). This component of release persisted in the presence of the gliotoxin fluoroacetate and thus results from the direct release of adenosine from neurons. A reduction of adenosine release in the presence of NTPDase blockers, in slices from CD73−/− and dn-SNARE mice, provides evidence that a component of adenosine release arises from the extracellular metabolism of ATP released from astrocytes. This component of release appeared to have slower kinetics than the direct ENT-mediated release of adenosine. These data suggest that activity-dependent adenosine release is surprisingly complex and, in the hippocampus, arises from at least two distinct mechanisms with different cellular sources. PMID:23713028

  4. Fission product iodine release and retention in nuclear reactor accidents— experimental programme at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchertseifer, H.; Cripps, R.; Guentay, S.; Jaeckel, B.

    2003-01-01

    Iodine radionuclides constitute one of the most important fission products of uranium and plutonium. If the volatile forms would be released into the environment during a severe accident, a potential health hazard would then ensue. Understanding its behaviour is an important prerequisite for planning appropriate mitigation measures. Improved and extensive knowledge of the main iodine species and their reactions important for the release and retention processes in the reactor containment is thus mandatory. The aim of PSI's radiolytical studies is to improve the current thermodynamic and kinetic databases and the models for iodine used in severe accident computer codes. Formation of sparingly soluble silver iodide (AgI) in a PWR containment sump can substantially reduce volatile iodine fraction in the containment atmosphere. However, the effectiveness is dependent on its radiation stability. The direct radiolytic decomposition of AgI and the effect of impurities on iodine volatilisation were experimentally determined at PSI using a remote-controlled and automated high activity 188W/Re generator (40 GBq/ml). Low molecular weight organic iodides are difficult to be retained in engineered safety systems. Investigation of radiolytic decomposition of methyl iodide in aqueous solutions, combined with an on-line analysis of iodine species is currently under investigation at PSI.

  5. Release Storage and Disposal Program Product Sampling Support

    SciTech Connect

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-07-19

    This document includes recommended capabilities and/or services to support transport, analysis, and disposition of Immobilized High-Level and Low-Activity Waste samples as requested by the US DOE-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) as specified in the Privatization Contract between DOE-ORP and BNFL Inc. In addition, an approved implementation path forward is presented which includes use of existing Hanford Site services to provide the required support capabilities.

  6. Mass spectrometric study of the release of volatile fission products from irradiated LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Steidl, D.V.; Johnson, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of these studies is to experimentally determine the chemical form and the rate of release of volatile fission product species from defected irradiated LWR reactor fuel pins. After release from the defected fuel pin the gaseous species immediately enters the ionizer of a quadrupole mass spectrometer thus ensuring that their chemical form is not likely to be changed prior to identification and measurement. These studies differ from prior studies in that: (1) the chemical form of the volatile fission products will be determined; and (2) the detection and measurement method does not depend on the radioactivity of the fission product element. Information on the chemical form of the released fission product species will enable a more accurate description of their transport and reaction in the primary system. These studies are also expected to yield information on the reaction of fission products after release from the fuel oxide with the zircaloy cladding. The results of these studies are expected to increase the understanding of the first step in the release of fission products by irradiated fuel and therefore help in the accurate prediction of source terms.

  7. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release. PMID:27306967

  8. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-16

    In spite of the massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Here we show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases, and we usemore » molecular simulations to demonstrate it. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Finally, our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.« less

  9. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix-a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30-47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3-35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release. PMID:27306967

  10. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  11. FK506 inhibition of histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils.

    PubMed

    Sengoku, T; Kishi, S; Sakuma, S; Ohkubo, Y; Goto, T

    2000-03-01

    Histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils are thought to be closely involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Some reports show that FK506 (tacrolimus hydrate) inhibited histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils. However, as the effects of FK506 has not been compared with those of clinically used drugs in those reports, the clinical relevancy of FK506 inhibition remained unclear. In this paper, we compared the actions of FK506 with those of steroids or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) which has been clinically used. FK506 inhibited histamine release by Brown-Norway rat peritoneal mast cells more potently than steroids and especially DSCG. FK506 also inhibited histamine release by a mast rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cell line and human peripheral blood basophils, whereas steroids failed to inhibit histamine release by human basophils. FK506 as well as steroids inhibited TNF-alpha and IL-4 production by RBL-1 cells. FK506 was therefore more effective than steroids and DSCG in inhibiting histamine release, and it also had the ability of inhibiting cytokine production by mast cells as steroids do. We concluded that FK506 might regulate allergic diseases via these actions, judging from the viewpoint of clinical relevancy. PMID:10685002

  12. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone activates KCa channels in gastric smooth muscle cells via intracellular Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Petkova-Kirova, P S; Lubomirov, L T; Gagov, H S; Kolev, V B; Duridanova, D B

    2001-03-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is released in high concentrations into gastric juice, but its direct effect on gastric smooth muscles has not been studied yet. We undertook studies on TRH effect on gastric smooth muscle using contraction and patch clamp methods. TRH was found to inhibit both acetylcholine- and BaCl2-induced contractions of gastric strips. TRH, applied to single cells, inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents and activated the whole-cell K+ currents. The TRH-induced changes in K+ currents and membrane potential were effectively abolished by inhibitors of either intracellular Ca2+ release channels or phospholipase C. Neither activators, nor blockers of protein kinase C could affect the action of TRH on K+ currents. In conclusion, TRH activates K+ channels via inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced release of Ca2+ in the direction to the plasma membrane, which in turn leads to stimulation of the Ca2+-sensitive K+ conductance, membrane hyperpolarization and relaxation. The data imply that TRH may act physiologically as a local modulator of gastric smooth muscle tone. PMID:11508821

  13. Effects of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Post-Production Performance of Impatiens Wallerana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled release fertilizers (CRF) in production systems have been known to reduce environmental contamination. However, there is a lot to be explored as per its use in bedding plant production. Bedding plant growers have not adapted CRF use because there is little information about its use and ...

  14. Activated Corrosion Product Analysis. Analytical Approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Golubov, Stanislav I; Busby, Jeremy T; Stoller, Roger E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of activated corrosion products (ACPs) in a water cooling system is a key factor in the licensing of ITER and affects nuclear classification, which governs design and operation. The objective of this study is to develop a method to accurately estimate radionuclide concentrations during ITER operation in support of nuclear classification. A brief overview of the PACTITER numerical code, which is currently used for ACP estimation, is presented. An alternative analytical approach for calculation of ACPs, which can also be used for validation of existing numerical codes, including PACTITER, has been proposed. A continuity equation describing the kinetics of accumulation of radioactive isotopes in a water cooling system in the form of a closed ring has been formulated, taking into account the following processes: production of radioactive elements and their decay, filtration, and ACP accumulation in filter system. Additional work is needed to more accurately assess the ACP inventory in the cooling water system, including more accurate simulation of the Tokamak cooling water system (TCWS) operating cycle and consideration of material corrosion, release, and deposition rates.

  15. Production, detection, storage and release of spin currents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: Quantum rings connected to ballistic circuits couple strongly to external magnetic fields if the connection is not symmetric. Moreover, properly connected rings can be used to pump currents in the wires giving raise to a number of interesting new phenomena. At half filling using a time-dependent magnetic field in the plane of the ring one can pump a pure spin current, excited by the the spin–orbit interaction in the ring. Results: Such a magnetic current is even under time reversal and produces an electric field instead of the usual magnetic field. Numerical simulations show that one can use magnetizable bodies as storage units to concentrate and save the magnetization in much the same way as capacitors operating with charge currents store electric charge. The polarization obtained in this way can then be used on command to produce spin currents in a wire. These currents show interesting oscillations while the storage units exchange their polarizations. Conclusion: The magnetic production of spin currents can be a useful alternative to optical excitation and electric field methods. PMID:25821714

  16. Effect of corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein on prostaglandin release from cultured maternal decidua and on contractile activity of human myometrium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, F; Benedetto, C; Florio, P; D'Ambrogio, G; Genazzani, A D; Marozio, L; Vale, W

    1995-10-01

    Human placenta and uterine tissues are sites of production and local action of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). The recent evidence that CRF-binding protein (CRF-BP), a protein that blocks CRF-induced pituitary ACTH release, is produced by placental tissues suggested the present study to investigate the effects of CRF-BP on prostaglandin release and contractile activity of myometrial strips. Primary cultures of decidual cells were prepared using tissue collected from healthy women undergoing cesarean delivery at term. Mechanical and enzymatic cell dispersions were carried out, and experiments were performed 24-28 h after cell plating. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration in cultured medium was measured by RIA. Myometrial strips were obtained from the upper edge of the uterine incision during elective cesarean section at term. Dissected free of connective tissue, strips were mounted in a 30-mL two-chamber organ bath containing oxygenated Tyrode's buffer (37 C) and connected to a two-channel isometric smooth muscle transducer. Cultured decidual cells collected at term significantly increased the release of PGE2 in the presence of CRF (P < 0.01). The addition of CRF-BP did not significantly modify PGE2 release, but completely reversed the effect of CRF. When human myometrial strips were incubated in the presence of CRF and PGF2 alpha, a significant increase in contractile activity was observed (P < 0.01); preincubation with CRF-BP prevented the increased contractile activity induced by CRF. The present data show that CRF-BP is able to counteract the biological effect of CRF on human pregnancy endometrium and myometrium and suggest that CRF-BP may be a regulatory protein that plays a role in the local function of uterine tissues during pregnancy. PMID:7559899

  17. Release-Modulated Antioxidant Activity of a Composite Curcumin-Chitosan Polymer.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Martin G; Soucy, Patricia A; Chauhan, Rajat; Raju, Mandapati V Ramakrishnam; Patel, Dhruvina N; Nunn, Betty M; Keynton, Megan A; Ehringer, William D; Nantz, Michael H; Keynton, Robert S; Gobin, Andrea S

    2016-04-11

    Curcumin is known to have immense therapeutic potential but is hindered by poor solubility and rapid degradation in solution. To overcome these shortcomings, curcumin has been conjugated to chitosan through a pendant glutaric anhydride linker using amide bond coupling chemistry. The hybrid polymer has been characterized by UV-visible, fluorescence, and infrared spectroscopies as well as zeta potential measurements and SEM imaging. The conjugation reactivity was confirmed through gel permeation chromatography and quantification of unconjugated curcumin. An analogous reaction of curcumin with glucosamine, a small molecule analogue for chitosan, was performed and the purified product characterized by mass spectrometry, UV-visible, fluorescence, and infrared spectroscopies. Conjugation of curcumin to chitosan has greatly improved curcumin aqueous solubility and stability, with no significant curcumin degradation detected after one month in solution. The absorbance and fluorescence properties of curcumin are minimally perturbed (λmax shifts of 2 and 5 nm, respectively) by the conjugation reaction. This conjugation strategy required use of one out of two curcumin phenols (one of the main antioxidant functional groups) for covalent linkage to chitosan, thus temporarily attenuating its antioxidant capacity. Hydrolysis-based release of curcumin from the polymer, however, is accompanied by full restoration of curcumin's antioxidant potential. Antioxidant assays show that curcumin radical scavenging potential is reduced by 40% after conjugation, but that full antioxidant potential is restored upon hydrolytic release from chitosan. Release studies show that curcumin is released over 19 days from the polymer and maintains a concentration of 0.23 ± 0.12 μM curcumin/mg polymer/mL solution based on 1% curcumin loading on the polymer. Release studies in the presence of carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme with known phenolic esterase activity, show no significant difference from

  18. 14 CFR § 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News releases concerning international... international activities. (a) Releases of information involving NASA activities, views, programs, or projects involving another country or an international organization require prior coordination and approval by...

  19. Structure-activity relationship studies on chalcone derivatives. the potent inhibition of chemical mediators release.

    PubMed

    Ko, Horng-Huey; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Yu, Kun-Lung; Liu, Cheng-Tsung; Wang, Jih-Pyang; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2003-01-01

    Some chalcones exert potent anti-inflammatory activities. 2',5'-Dialkoxychalcones and 2',5'-dihydroxy-4-chloro-dihydrochalcone inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-activated N9 microglial cells and in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells have been demonstrated in our previous reports. These compounds also suppressed the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity in RAW 264.7 cells. In an effort to continually develop potent anti-inflammatory agent, a series of chalcones were prepared by Claisen-Schmidt condensation of appropriate acetophenones with appropriate aromatic aldehyde and then evaluated their inhibitory effects on the activation of mast cells, neutrophils, macrophages, and microglial cells. Most of the 2',5'-dihydroxychaclone derivatives exhibited potent inhibitory effects on the release of beta-glucuronidase and lysozyme from rat neutrophils stimulated with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)/cytochalasin B (CB). Some chalcones showed potent inhibitory effects on superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils in response to fMLP/CB. Compounds 1 and 5 exhibited potent inhibitory effects on NO production in macrophages and microglial cells. Compound 11 showed inhibitory effect on NO production and iNOS protein expression in RAW 264.7 cells. The present results demonstrated that most of the 2',5'-dihydroxychaclones have anti-inflammatory effects. The potent inhibitory effect of 2',5'-dihydroxy-dihydrochaclones on NO production in LPS-activated macrophage, probably through the suppression of iNOS protein expression, is proposed to be useful for the relief of septic shock. PMID:12467713

  20. ACRR (Annular Core Research Reactor) fission product release tests: ST-1 and ST-2

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Stockman, H.W.; Reil, K.O.; Grimley, A.J.; Camp, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments (ST-1 and ST-2) have been performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACER) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under light water reactor (LWR) severe accident conditions. Both experiments were conducted in a highly reducing environment at maximum fuel temperatures of greater than 2400 K. These experiments were designed specifically to investigate the effect of increased total pressure on fission product release; ST-1 was performed at approximately 0.16 MPa and ST-2 was run at 1.9 MPa, whereas other parameters were matched as closely as possible. Release rate data were measured for Cs, I, Ba, Sr, Eu, Te, and U. The release rates were higher than predicted by existing codes for Ba, Sr, Eu, and U. Te release was very low, but Te did not appear to be sequestered by the zircaloy cladding; it was evenly distributed in the fuel. In addition, in posttest analysis a unique fuel morphology (fuel swelling) was observed which may have enhanced fission product release, especially in the high pressure test (ST-2). These data are compared with analytical results from the CORSOR correlation and the VICTORIA computer model. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Environmental fate and effects of nicotine released during cigarette production.

    PubMed

    Seckar, Joel A; Stavanja, Mari S; Harp, Paul R; Yi, Yongsheng; Garner, Charles D; Doi, Jon

    2008-07-01

    A variety of test methods were used to study the gradation, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of nicotine. Studies included determination of the octanol-water partition coefficient, conversion to CO2 in soil and activated sludge, and evaluation of the effects on microbiological and algal inhibition as well as plant germination and root elongation. The partitioning of nicotine between octanol and water indicated that nicotine will not bioaccumulate regardless of the pH of the medium. The aqueous and soil-based biodegradation studies indicated that nicotine is readily biodegradable in both types of media. The microbiological inhibition and aquatic and terrestrial toxicity tests indicated that nicotine has low toxicity. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Persistence, Bioaccumulation, and Toxicity Profiler model, based on the structure of nicotine and the predictive rates of hydroxyl radical and ozone reactions, estimated an atmospheric half-life of less than 5.0 h. Using this value in the Canadian Environmental Modeling Center level III model, the half-life of nicotine was estimated as 3.0 d in water and 0.5 d in soil. This model also estimated nicotine discharge into the environment; nicotine would be expected to be found predominantly in water (93%), followed by soil (4%), air (3%), and sediment (0.4%). Using the estimated nicotine concentrations in water, soil, and sediment and the proper median effective concentrations derived from the algal growth, biomass inhibition, and buttercrunch lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed germination and root elongation studies, hazard quotients of between 10(-7) and 10(-8) were calculated, providing further support for the conclusion that the potential for nicotine toxicity to aquatic and terrestrial species in the environment is extremely low. PMID:18399728

  2. Consequences of tritium release to water pathways from postulated accidents in a DOE production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    O`Kula, K.R.; Olson, R.L.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    A full-scale PRA of a DOE production reactor has been completed that considers full release of tritium as part of the severe accident source term. Two classes of postulated reactor accidents, a loss-of-moderator pumping accident and a loss-of-coolant accident, are used to bound the expected dose consequence from liquid pathway release. Population doses from the radiological release associated with the two accidents are compared for aqueous discharge and atmospheric release modes. The expectation values of the distribution of possible values for the societal effective dose equivalent to the general public, given a tritium release to the atmosphere, is 2.8 person-Sv/PBq (9.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} person-rem/Ci). The general public drinking water dose to downstream water consumers is 6.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} person-Sv/Pbq (2.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} person-rem/Ci) for aqueous releases to the surface streams eventually reaching the Savannah River. Negligible doses are calculated for freshwater fish and saltwater invertebrate consumption, irrigation, and recreational use of the river, given that an aqueous release is assumed to occur. Relative to the balance of fission products released in a hypothetical severe accident, the tritium-related dose is small. This study suggests that application of regional models (1610 km radius) will indicate larger dose consequences from short-term tritium release to the atmosphere than from comparable tritium source terms to water pathways. However, the water pathways assessment is clearly site-specific, and the overall aqueous dose will be dependent on downstream receptor populations and uses of the river.

  3. Consequences of tritium release to water pathways from postulated accidents in a DOE production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    O'Kula, K.R.; Olson, R.L.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    A full-scale PRA of a DOE production reactor has been completed that considers full release of tritium as part of the severe accident source term. Two classes of postulated reactor accidents, a loss-of-moderator pumping accident and a loss-of-coolant accident, are used to bound the expected dose consequence from liquid pathway release. Population doses from the radiological release associated with the two accidents are compared for aqueous discharge and atmospheric release modes. The expectation values of the distribution of possible values for the societal effective dose equivalent to the general public, given a tritium release to the atmosphere, is 2.8 person-Sv/PBq (9.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} person-rem/Ci). The general public drinking water dose to downstream water consumers is 6.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} person-Sv/Pbq (2.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} person-rem/Ci) for aqueous releases to the surface streams eventually reaching the Savannah River. Negligible doses are calculated for freshwater fish and saltwater invertebrate consumption, irrigation, and recreational use of the river, given that an aqueous release is assumed to occur. Relative to the balance of fission products released in a hypothetical severe accident, the tritium-related dose is small. This study suggests that application of regional models (1610 km radius) will indicate larger dose consequences from short-term tritium release to the atmosphere than from comparable tritium source terms to water pathways. However, the water pathways assessment is clearly site-specific, and the overall aqueous dose will be dependent on downstream receptor populations and uses of the river.

  4. Characterization and chemistry of fission products released from LWR fuel under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, K.S.; Collins, J.L.; Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Wichner, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Segments from commercial LWR fuel rods have been tested at temperatures between 1400 and 2000/sup 0/C in a flowing steam-helium atmosphere to simulate severe accident conditions. The primary goals of the tests were to determine the rate of fission product release and to characterize the chemical behavior. This paper is concerned primarily with the identification and chemical behavior of the released fission products with emphasis on antimony, cesium, iodine, and silver. The iodine appeared to behave primarily as cesium iodide and the antimony and silver as elements, while cesium behavior was much more complex. 17 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Doxorubicin resistant cancer cells activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells by releasing PGE2.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yuan; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Zhou, Hu; Guan, Qing; Yang, Na; Leng, Xiao-Hua; Bu, Lang; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapies often induce drug-resistance in cancer cells and simultaneously stimulate proliferation and activation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor T cells, thus result in poor prognosis of patients with breast cancers. To date, the mechanism underlying the expansion of MDSCs in response to chemotherapies is poorly understood. In the present study, we used in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal studies to demonstrate that doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells secret significantly more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than their parental doxorubicin-sensitive cells. The secreted PGE2 can stimulate expansion and polymerization of MDSCs by directly target to its receptors, EP2/EP4, on the surface of MDSCs, which consequently triggers production of miR-10a through activating PKA signaling. More importantly, activated MDSCs can inhibit CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells as evidenced by reduced proliferation and IFN-γ release. In order to determine the molecular pathway that involves miR-10a mediated activation of MDSCs, biochemical and pharmacological studies were carried out. We found that miR-10a can activate AMPK signaling to promote expansion and activation of MDSCs. Thus, these results reveal, for the first time, a novel role of PGE2/miR-10a/AMPK signaling axis in chemotherapy-induced immune resistance, which might be targeted for treatment of chemotherapy resistant tumors. PMID:27032536

  6. Doxorubicin resistant cancer cells activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells by releasing PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Zhou, Hu; Guan, Qing; Yang, Na; Leng, Xiao-Hua; Bu, Lang; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapies often induce drug-resistance in cancer cells and simultaneously stimulate proliferation and activation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor T cells, thus result in poor prognosis of patients with breast cancers. To date, the mechanism underlying the expansion of MDSCs in response to chemotherapies is poorly understood. In the present study, we used in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal studies to demonstrate that doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells secret significantly more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than their parental doxorubicin-sensitive cells. The secreted PGE2 can stimulate expansion and polymerization of MDSCs by directly target to its receptors, EP2/EP4, on the surface of MDSCs, which consequently triggers production of miR-10a through activating PKA signaling. More importantly, activated MDSCs can inhibit CD4+CD25− T cells as evidenced by reduced proliferation and IFN-γ release. In order to determine the molecular pathway that involves miR-10a mediated activation of MDSCs, biochemical and pharmacological studies were carried out. We found that miR-10a can activate AMPK signaling to promote expansion and activation of MDSCs. Thus, these results reveal, for the first time, a novel role of PGE2/miR-10a/AMPK signaling axis in chemotherapy-induced immune resistance, which might be targeted for treatment of chemotherapy resistant tumors. PMID:27032536

  7. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  8. Structure of a low-population intermediate state in the release of an enzyme product

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Alfonso; Aprile, Francesco A; Dhulesia, Anne; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes can increase the rate of biomolecular reactions by several orders of magnitude. Although the steps of substrate capture and product release are essential in the enzymatic process, complete atomic-level descriptions of these steps are difficult to obtain because of the transient nature of the intermediate conformations, which makes them largely inaccessible to standard structure determination methods. We describe here the determination of the structure of a low-population intermediate in the product release process by human lysozyme through a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. We validate this structure by rationally designing two mutations, the first engineered to destabilise the intermediate and the second to stabilise it, thus slowing down or speeding up, respectively, product release. These results illustrate how product release by an enzyme can be facilitated by the presence of a metastable intermediate with transient weak interactions between the enzyme and product. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02777.001 PMID:25575179

  9. Cytotoxicity of release products from magnetic nanocomposites in targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wamocha, H L; Misak, H E; Song, Z; Chu, H Y; Chen, Y Y; Asmatulu, R; Yang, S-Y; Ho, J C

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapy can be significantly improved if the therapeutic agent remains localized at the afflicted area and released at controlled rates. Such a targeted drug delivery can be achieved using magnetic nanocomposite (MNC), which incorporates drug and magnetic nanoparticles in biodegradable polymer microspheres. Reported here are results from an in vitro study on drug release rate and cytotoxicity of other release products from MNC. The model system contains an anti-cancer chemotherapy agent 5-flurouracil (5-FU) and (Co(0.5)Zn(0.5))Fe(2)O(4) in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) matrix produced by an oil/oil emulsion technique. Cell proliferation data indicate a sustained release of 5-FU for mouse macrophage cell eradication, whereas other microsphere components of magnetic nanoparticles and PLGA have little cytotoxic effects. PMID:22071353

  10. Effects of heparin on platelet aggregation and release and thromboxane A2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, S.F.; Anderson, W.H.; Smith, J.B.; Chuang, H.Y.; Mason, R.G.

    1981-08-01

    Heparin, when added to citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP), caused potentiation of platelet aggregation and the release reaction induced by the aggregating agents adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen, and epinephrine. At low concentrations (4.7 x 10(-5) M) arachidonic acid failed to cause aggregation of platelets in citrated PRP. However, in the presence of heparin, the same concentration of arachidonic acid caused aggregation. Examination of PRP for the presence of thromboxane A2 (TxA2) by use of a bioassay revealed that heparin also stimulated release of TxA2. This finding indicated that platelets released more TxA2 when they were challenged by low concentrations of arachidonic acid in the presence of heparin than in its absence. Platelets were labeled with /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid and /sup 14/C-serotonin, and attempts were made to determine whether heparin stimulated the platelet release reaction first with subsequent increased production of TxA2, or alternatively, whether heparin stimulated TxA2 production first with subsequent enhancement of the release reaction. In view of the demonstrated simultaneous release of /sup 14/C-serotonin and /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid metabolites, it appeared that either release of /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H occurs concurrently or, even if one of these events is dependent on the other, both events take place in rapid succession. Timed sequential studies revealed that in the presence of arachidonic acid, the addition of heparin hastened the apparently simultaneous release of both /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H.

  11. Activation and regulation of arachidonic acid release in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid release in rabbit neutrophils can be enhanced by the addition of chemotactic fMet-Leu-Phe, platelet-activating factor, PAF, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Over 80% of the release ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid comes from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The release is dose-dependent and increases with increasing concentration of the stimulus. The A23187-induced release increases with increasing time of the stimulation. ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid release, but not the rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium, is inhibited in pertussis toxin-treated neutrophils stimulated with PAF. The ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid released by A23187 is potentiated while that release by fMET-Leu-Phe or PAF is inhibited in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA, treated rabbit neutrophils. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H-7, has no effect on the potentiation by PMA of the A23187-induced release, it prevents the inhibition by PMA of the release produced by PAF or fMet-Leu-Phe. In addition, PMA increases arachidonic acid release in H-7-treated cells stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 increases the level of diacylglycerol in neutrophils stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, R59022 potentiates ({sup 3}H) arachidonic acid release produced by fMet-Leu-Phe. This potentiation is not inhibited by H-7, in fact, it is increased in H-7-treated neutrophils.

  12. Concentration-triggered fission product release from zirconia: consequences for nuclear safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentils, A.; Thomé, L.; Jagielski, J.; Garrido, F.

    2002-02-01

    Crystalline oxide ceramics, more particularly zirconia and spinel, are promising matrices for plutonium and minor actinide transmutation. An important issue concerning these materials is the investigation of their ability to confine radiotoxic elements resulting from the fission of actinides. This letter reports the study of the release, upon annealing or irradiation at high temperature, of one of the most toxic fission product (Cs) in zirconia. The foreign species are introduced by ion implantation and the release is studied by Rutherford backscattering experiments. The results emphasize the decisive influence of the fission product concentration on the release properties. The Cs mobility in zirconia is strongly increased when the impurity concentration exceeds a threshold of the order of a few atomic per cent. Irradiation with medium-energy heavy ions is shown to enhance Cs outdiffusion with respect to annealing at the same temperature.

  13. Chronic diabetes increases advanced glycation end products on cardiac ryanodine receptors/calcium-release channels.

    PubMed

    Bidasee, Keshore R; Nallani, Karuna; Yu, Yongqi; Cocklin, Ross R; Zhang, Yinong; Wang, Mu; Dincer, U Deniz; Besch, Henry R

    2003-07-01

    Decrease in cardiac contractility is a hallmark of chronic diabetes. Previously we showed that this defect results, at least in part, from a dysfunction of the type 2 ryanodine receptor calcium-release channel (RyR2). The mechanism(s) underlying RyR2 dysfunction is not fully understood. The present study was designed to determine whether non-cross-linking advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on RyR2 increase with chronic diabetes and if formation of these post-translational complexes could be attenuated with insulin treatment. Overnight digestion of RyR2 from 8-week control animals (8C) with trypsin afforded 298 peptides with monoisotopic mass (M+H(+)) >or=500. Digestion of RyR2 from 8-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals (8D) afforded 21% fewer peptides, whereas RyR2 from 6-week diabetic/2-week insulin-treated animals generated 304 peptides. Using an in-house PERLscript algorithm, search of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass data files identified several M+H(+) peaks corresponding to theoretical RyR2 peptides with single N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine, imidazolone A, imidazone B, pyrraline, or 1-alkyl-2-formyl-3,4-glycosyl pyrrole modification that were present in 8D but not 8C. Insulin treatment minimized production of some of these nonenzymatic glycation products. These data show for the first time that AGEs are formed on intracellular RyR2 during diabetes. Because AGE complexes are known to compromise protein activity, these data suggest a potential mechanism for diabetes-induced RyR2 dysfunction. PMID:12829653

  14. Estimating methane releases from natural gas production and transmission in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedikov, J. V.; Akopova (Vniigaz), G. S.; Gladkaja (Vniigaz), N. G.; Piotrovskij (Tyumentransgaz), A. S.; Markellov (Volgotransgaz), V. A.; Salichov (Yamburggazdabuicha), S. S.; Kaesler, H.; Ramm, A.; Müller von Blumencron, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    Methane releases from the RAO Gazprom gas production and transmission facilities in Russia were determined in an extensive measurement program carried out in 1996 and 1997. Subsequently, the measurements were extrapolated to the Russian scale. The results show that methane releases from gas transmission are less than 1% of throughput. Methane loss from gas production in northwestern Siberia appears to be relatively small, generally less than 0.1%. The largest methane emissions result from venting during maintenance and repairs, leaks from valves on transmission lines, and from compressor stations. The measurements show that, in the case of leaks, a limited number of major ones accounts for most of the methane releases. Methane emissions expressed as a percentage of the gas volume produced or transported are (rounded figures): production and processing 0.1%, pipelines 0.2%, compressor stations 0.7%, so that the total release by production and transmission in Russia amounts to about 1.0%, i.e. ˜5.4×10 9 m 3/a (˜4 Tg/a). This is consistent with our previous preliminary estimates, indicating that maximum emissions are 1.5-1.8%/a. However, this is generally lower than most other estimates and speculations.

  15. Release and transport of fission product cesium in the TMI-2 accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Approximately 50% of the fission product cesium was released from the overheated UO/sub 2/ fuel in the TMI-2 accident. Steam that boiled away from a water pool in the bottom of the reactor vessel transported the released fission products throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS). Some fission products passed directly through a leaking valve with steam and water into the containment structure, but most deposited on dry surfaces inside of the RCS before being dissolved or resuspended when the RCS was refilled with water. A cesium transport model was developed that extended measured cesium in the RCS back to the first day of the accident. The model revealed that approx.62% of the released /sup 137/Cs deposited on dry surfaces inside of the RCS before being slowly leached and transported out of the RCS in leaked or letdown water. The leach rates from the model agreed reasonably well with those measured in the laboratory. The chemical behavior of cesium in the TMI-2 accident agreed with that observed in fission product release tests at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL RELEASE OF ASBESTOS/SUBSTITUTES FROM COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS USE AND DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the first time, the release of respirable asbestos fibers has been quantified in terms of standard mechanical forces using widely accepted methodology and specified QA/QC procedures. Both fabrication of new products from asbestos containing materials and repair or removal of ...

  17. The production and release to the atmosphere of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC 22)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, P. M.; Fisher, D. A.

    The results of an audited production and use survey for chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC 22) for the years 1980-1991 are reported. Annual production figures for 1970-1979 have also been collected. The time delays for release to the atmosphere for the various uses of this commercial gas are estimated in order to calculate annual emissions. Calculated atmospheric concentrations and trends are compared with available measurements. Uncertainties in calculated parameters are examined relative to assumptions made in the analysis.

  18. Affinity-mediated capture and release of amphiphilic copolymers for controlling antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Haruko; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2015-08-14

    Capture and release of amphiphilic copolymers by a nano-sized polysaccharide gel (nanogel) was controlled by altering the hydrophobic binding affinity between the copolymer chains and nanogel. The antimicrobial activity of captured copolymer chains was suppressed, and regained upon release from the nanogel. PMID:26154063

  19. Studies on the Release of Renin by Direct and Reflex Activation of Renal Sympathetic Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents data on release of renin during direct and indirect stimulation of renal nerves. Conclusions show that renin release is influenced by change in activity of carotid and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor systems, and excitation of discrete areas of brain and hypothalamus by changes in renal sympathetic nerve. (Author/SA)

  20. Biochemical characterization of polyunsaturated fatty acid synthesis in Schizochytrium: release of the products as free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Metz, James G; Kuner, Jerry; Rosenzweig, Bradley; Lippmeier, James C; Roessler, Paul; Zirkle, Ross

    2009-06-01

    In marine bacteria and some thraustochytrids (marine stramenopiles) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are produced de novo by PUFA synthases. These large, multi-domain enzymes carry out the multitude of individual reactions required for conversion of malonyl-CoA to the final LC-PUFA products. Here we report on the release of fatty acids from the PUFA synthase found in Schizochytrium, a thraustochytrid that has been developed as a commercial source for DHA-enriched biomass and oil. Data from in vitro activity assays indicate that the PUFAs are released from the enzyme as free fatty acids (FFAs). Addition of ATP and Mg(2+) to in vitro assays facilitates appearance of radiolabel from (14)C-malonyl-CoA in a triacylglycerol fraction, suggesting the involvement of acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Furthermore, addition of triascin C, an inhibitor of ACSs, to the assays blocks this conversion. When the Schizochytrium PUFA synthase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the products of the enzyme accumulate as FFAs, suggesting that the thioesterase activity required for fatty acid release is an integral part of the PUFA synthase. PMID:19272783

  1. Leptin production and release in the dually in vitro perfused human placenta.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, K; Malek, A; Sager, R; Blum, W F; Schneider, H; Fusch, C

    2000-11-01

    There is clear evidence that the placenta produces leptin. However, it is still unclear to what extent leptin is released into the maternal and the fetal circulation. The aim of our study was to determine placental leptin release rates into these 2 compartments. In 10 term placentas, using dual in vitro perfusion of an isolated cotyledon, concentrations of leptin, hCG, and human placental lactogen (hPL) were determined in perfusates and in the tissue before and after perfusion. With perfusions lasting 270-840 min, total leptin production was 225 pg/g x min [median; interquartile range (IQR), 76-334 pg/g x min]. The release into the fetal circulation was very low (median, 2.5; IQR, 1.1-5.9 pg/g x min) compared with the release into the maternal circulation (median, 203; IQR, 79-373 pg/g x min) corresponding to 1.6% and 98.4% of net release. Only 0.05% of hPL and hCG were released into the fetal circulation and 99.95% into the maternal circulation, confirming previous results. Release into the fetal circulation correlated significantly with release into the maternal circulation for leptin (r = 0.648; P < 0.05) and hPL (r = 0.721; P < 0.05). Furthermore, release of leptin into the fetal circulation was positively correlated with release of fetal hCG (r = 0.661; P < 0.05). Most of the leptin produced by the placenta is released into the maternal circulation, but compared with other placental hormones (hCG and hPL), a considerably higher proportion of leptin is released into the fetal circulation. These findings may at least partially explain the marked increase in maternal serum leptin levels in pregnancy. The rapid postnatal decrease in leptin levels in both the mother and the neonate is also consistent with the concept of placental origin. PMID:11095471

  2. [Release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Fei; Huang, Qi-Fei; Zhang, Xia; Yang, Yu; Wang, Qi

    2009-05-15

    Clinker was produced by Simulating cement calcination test, and concrete samples were also prepared according to national standard GB/T 17671-1999. Long-term cumulative release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln was researched through leaching test which refers to EA NEN 7371 and EA NEN 7375, and one-dimensional diffusion model which is on the base of Fick diffusion law. The results show that availabilities of heavy metals are lower than the total amounts in concrete. The diffusion coefficients of heavy metals are different (Cr > As > Ni > Cd). During 30 years service, the cumulative release amounts of Cr, As, Ni and Cd are 4.43 mg/kg, 0.46 mg/kg, 1.50 mg/kg and 0.02 mg/kg, respectively, and the ratios of release which is the division of cumulative release amount and availability are 27.0%, 18.0%, 3.0% and 0.2%, respectively. The most important influence factor of cumulative release amount of heavy metal is the diffusion coefficient, and it is correlative to cumulative release amount. The diffusion coefficient of Cr and As should be controlled exactly in the processing of input the cement-kiln. PMID:19558131

  3. NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget: First Results From The Release 4 GEWEX Integrated Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stackhouse, Paul; Cox, Stephen; Gupta, Shashi; Mikovitz, J. Colleen; zhang, taiping

    2016-04-01

    The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces shortwave and longwave surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes for the 1983-near present time period. Spatial resolution is 1 degree. The current release 3 (available at gewex-srb.larc.nasa.gov) uses the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) DX product for pixel level radiance and cloud information. This product is subsampled to 30 km. ISCCP is currently recalibrating and recomputing their entire data series, to be released as the H product, at 10km resolution. The ninefold increase in pixel number should help improve the RMS of the existing products and allow for future higher resolution SRB gridded product (e.g. 0.5 degree). In addition to the input data improvements, several important algorithm improvements have been made. Most notable has been the adaptation of Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) from CERES to improve the initial calculation of shortwave TOA fluxes, from which the surface flux calculations follow. Other key input improvements include a detailed aerosol history using the Max Planck Institut Aerosol Climatology (MAC), temperature and moisture profiles from HIRS, and new topography, surface type, and snow/ice. Here we present results for the improved GEWEX Shortwave and Longwave algorithm (GSW and GLW) with new ISCCP data, the various other improved input data sets and the incorporation of many additional internal SRB model improvements. As of the time of abstract submission, results from 2007 have been produced with ISCCP H availability the limiting factor. More SRB data will be produced as ISCCP reprocessing continues. The SRB data produced will be released as part of the Release 4.0 Integrated Product, recognizing the interdependence of the radiative fluxes with other GEWEX products providing estimates of the Earth's global water and energy cycle (I.e., ISCCP, SeaFlux, LandFlux, NVAP, etc.).

  4. Serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor activation induces 2-arachidonoylglycerol release through a phospholipase c-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Jason C; Nichols, David E

    2006-11-01

    To date, several studies have demonstrated that phospholipase C-coupled receptors stimulate the production of endocannabinoids, particularly 2-arachidonoylglycerol. There is now evidence that endocannabinoids are involved in phospholipase C-coupled serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated behavioral effects in both rats and mice. The main objective of this study was to determine whether activation of the 5-HT(2A) receptor leads to the production and release of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. NIH3T3 cells stably expressing the rat 5-HT(2A) receptor were first incubated with [(3)H]-arachidonic acid for 24 h. Following stimulation with 10 mum serotonin, lipids were extracted from the assay medium, separated by thin layer chromatography, and analyzed by liquid scintillation counting. Our results indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptor activation stimulates the formation and release of 2-arachidonoylglycerol. The 5-HT(2A) receptor-dependent release of 2-arachidonoylglycerol was partially dependent on phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C activation. Diacylglycerol produced downstream of 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated phospholipase D or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C activation did not appear to contribute to 2-arachidonoylglycerol formation in NIH3T3-5HT(2A) cells. In conclusion, our results support a functional model where neuromodulatory neurotransmitters such as serotonin may act as regulators of endocannabinoid tone at excitatory synapses through the activation of phospholipase C-coupled G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:17010161

  5. Ferulic acid release and 4-vinylguaiacol formation during brewing and fermentation: indications for feruloyl esterase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Coghe, Stefan; Benoot, Koen; Delvaux, Filip; Vanderhaegen, Bart; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2004-02-11

    The release of ferulic acid and the subsequent thermal or enzymatic decarboxylation to 4-vinylguaiacol are inherent to the beer production process. Phenolic, medicinal, or clove-like flavors originating from 4-vinylguaiacol frequently occur in beer made with wheat or wheat malt. To evaluate the release of ferulic acid and the transformation to 4-vinylguaiacol, beer was brewed with different proportions of barley malt, wheat, and wheat malt. Ferulic acid as well as 4-vinylguaiacol levels were determined by HPLC at several stages of the beer production process. During brewing, ferulic acid was released at the initial mashing phase, whereas moderate levels of 4-vinylguaiacol were formed by wort boiling. Higher levels of the phenolic flavor compound were produced during fermentations with brewery yeast strains of the Pof(+) phenotype. In beer made with barley malt, ferulic acid was mainly released during the brewing process. Conversely, 60-90% of ferulic acid in wheat or wheat malt beer was hydrolyzed during fermentation, causing higher 4-vinylguaiacol levels in these beers. As cereal enzymes are most likely inactivated during wort boiling, the additional release of ferulic acid during fermentation suggests the activity of feruloyl esterases produced by brewer's yeast. PMID:14759156

  6. Importance of viability and attachment to an ascites tumor in the release of plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Q.; Zhou, M.; Subbarao, V.; Ts'ao, C.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor plasminogen activator (PA) has been alleged to play a role in the growth and metastasis of tumors. Before such a role can be realized, PA first must be released from tumor cells. Having determined intra- and extracellular PA and PA-inhibitor activities in an experimental pancreatic ascites tumor grown in hamsters, the release of PA from these cells was investigated. No PA activity was detected in the suspension medium of freshly isolated tumor cells; inclusion of plasminogen, fibrinogen, or collagen in the medium yielded similar negative results. On the other hand, PA activity was demonstrated to be released in a time-dependent manner from these tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots. Plasminogen activator activity also was not found in the suspension medium of frozen-thawed tumor cells, despite the fact that most of them had breaks on their cell membrane. Unlike freshly isolated tumor cells, PA was not released from frozen-thawed cells embedded in fibrin clots. Full PA activity was demonstrated in frozen-thawed cells treated with Triton X-100, however. Frozen-thawed cells exhibited signs of severe damage, and more than 80% of them failed to exclude trypan blue. Obviously PA is released from viable tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots but not suspended in artificial medium. The PA-release mechanism, not PA itself, is destroyed in cells rendered nonviable by freeze thawing. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1902626

  7. Regulation of activity-dependent dendritic vasopressin release from rat supraoptic neurones.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Mike; Bull, Philip M; Tobin, Vicky A; Sabatier, Nancy; Landgraf, Rainer; Dayanithi, Govindan; Leng, Gareth

    2005-04-15

    Magnocellular neurones of the hypothalamus release vasopressin and oxytocin from their dendrites and soma. Using a combination of electrophysiology, microdialysis, in vitro explants, and radioimmunoassay we assessed the involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) stores in the regulation of dendritic vasopressin release. Thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, which mobilize Ca(2+) from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum, evoked vasopressin release from dendrites and somata of magnocellular neurones in the supraoptic nucleus. Thapsigargin also produced a dramatic potentiation of dendritic vasopressin release evoked by osmotic or high potassium stimulation. This effect is long lasting, time dependent, and specific to thapsigargin as caffeine and ryanodine had no effect. Furthermore, antidromic activation of electrical activity in the cell bodies released vasopressin from dendrites only after thapsigargin pretreatment. Thus, exposure to Ca(2+) mobilizers such as thapsigargin or cyclopiazonic acid primes the releasable pool of vasopressin in the dendrites, so that release can subsequently be evoked by electrical and depolarization-dependent activation. Vasopressin itself is effective in inducing dendritic vasopressin release, but it is ineffective in producing priming. PMID:15731188

  8. Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

    2005-08-02

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  9. Design and synthesis of new hybrid molecules that activate the transcription factor Nrf2 and simultaneously release carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jayne Louise; Fayad Kobeissi, Sarah; Oudir, Souhila; Haas, Benjamin; Michel, Brian; Dubois Randé, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Anthony; Martens, Thierry; Rivard, Michael; Motterlini, Roberto; Foresti, Roberta

    2014-11-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 and its downstream target heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are essential protective systems against oxidative stress and inflammation. The products of HO-1 enzymatic activity, biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO), actively contribute to this protection, suggesting that exploitation of these cellular systems may offer new therapeutic avenues in a variety of diseases. Starting from a CO-releasing compound and a chemical scaffold exhibiting electrophilic characteristics (esters of fumaric acid), we report the synthesis of hybrid molecules that simultaneously activate Nrf2 and liberate CO. These hybrid compounds, which we termed "HYCOs", release CO to myoglobin and activate the CO-sensitive fluorescent probe COP-1, while also potently inducing nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and HO-1 expression and activity in different cell types. Thus, we provide here the first example of a new class of pharmacologically active molecules that target the HO-1 pathway by combining an Nrf2 activator coordinated to a CO-releasing group. PMID:25224540

  10. Antarctic stratospheric chemistry of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and ice - Release of active chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.; Tso, Tai-Ly; Molina, Luisa T.; Wang, Frank C.-Y.

    1987-01-01

    The reaction rate between atmospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is greatly enhanced in the presence of ice particles; HCl dissolves readily into ice, and the collisional reaction probability for ClONO2 on the surface of ice with HCl in the mole fraction range from about 0.003 to 0.010 is in the range from about 0.05 to 0.1 for temperatures near 200 K. Chlorine is released into the gas phase on a time scale of at most a few milliseconds, whereas nitric acid (HNO3), the other product, remains in the condensed phase. This reaction could play an important role in explaining the observed depletion of ozone over Antarctica; it releases photolytically active chlorine from its most abundant reservoir species, and it promotes the formation of HNO3 and thus removes nitrogen dioxide from the gas phase. Hence it establishes the necessary conditions for the efficient catalytic destruction of ozone by halogenated free radicals.

  11. The current state of the science related to the re-release of mercury from coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect

    Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink; Tera D. Buckley

    2006-07-01

    The stability of mercury associated with CCPs is an issue that has only recently been under investigation but has become a prominent question as the industry strives to determine if current management options for CCPs will need to be modified. Mercury and other air toxic elements can be present in fly ash, FGD material and bottom ash and boiler slag. Mercury concentrations ranging from {lt} 0.01 to 2.41 ppm in fly ash and from 0.001 to 0.342 ppm in bottom ash have been reported. Stability of mercury must be evaluated by tests that include 1) direct leachability; 2) vapor-phase release at ambient and elevated temperatures; and 3) microbiologically induced leachability and vapor-phase release. The amount of mercury leached from currently produced CCPs is extremely low and does not appear to represent an environmental or re-release hazard. Concentrations of mercury in leachates from fly ashes and FGD material using either the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) or the synthetic groundwater leaching procedure (SGLP) are generally below detection limits. The release of mercury vapor from CCPs resulting from the use of mercury control technologies has been evaluated on a limited basis. Research indicates that mercury bound to the ash or activated carbon is fairly stable. The EERC found that organomercury species were detected at very low levels both in the vapor and leachate generated from the microbiologically mediated release experiments. The current state of the science indicates that mercury associated with CCPs is stable and highly unlikely to be released under most management conditions, including utilisation and disposal. The exception to this is exposure to high temperatures such as those that may be achieved in cement and wallboard production. Therefore, existing CCPs management options are expected to be environmentally sound options for CCPs from systems with mercury control technologies installed. 2 refs., 2 photos.

  12. [STS-31 Onboard 16mm Photography Quick Release]. [Onboard Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This video features scenes shot by the crew of onboard activities including Hubble Space Telescope deploy, remote manipulator system (RMS) checkout, flight deck and middeck experiments, and Earth and payload bay views.

  13. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This report documents comparisons between post-irradiation examination measurements and model predictions of silver (Ag), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) release from selected tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program that occurred from December 2006 to November 2009 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact) but it can be assessed at the particle level by adjusting the diffusivity in the fuel matrix to very high values. Furthermore, the diffusivity of each layer can be individually set to a high value (typically 10-6 m2/s) to simulate a failed layer with no capability of fission product retention. In this study, the comparison to PIE focused on fission product release and because of the lack of failure in the irradiation, the probability of particle failure was not calculated. During the AGR-1 irradiation campaign, the fuel kernel produced and released fission products, which migrated through the successive

  14. Push and release: TLR9 activation plus STAT3 blockade for systemic antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Kortylewski, Marcin; Kuo, Ya-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Proper immunostimulation ("push") and immune checkpoint blockade ("release") are both critical for the efficacy of anticancer immunotherapy. We have recently shown that activating Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) while specifically blocking signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in leukemic cells enhances their immunogenicity, allowing for CD8(+) T cell-mediated tumor eradication. These findings underscore the therapeutic potential of such a "Push & Release" strategy against hematological malignancies. PMID:24800162

  15. Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Data Release Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Wright, E. L.; Conrow, T.; Bauer, J.; Benford, D.; Brandenburg, H.; Dailey, J.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Evans, T.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Fowler, J.; Gelino, C.; Grillmair, C.; Harbut, M.; Hoffman, D.; Jarrett, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Leisawitz, D.; Liu, W.; Mainzer, A.; Marsh, K.; Masci, F.; McCallon, H.; Padgett, D.; Ressler, M. E.; Royer, D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Stanford, S. A.; Wyatt, P. L.; Tholen, D.; Tsai, C. W.; Wachter, S.; Wheelock, S. L.; Yan, L.; Alles, R.; Beck, R.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; McCollum, B.; McGehee, P.; Papin, M.; Wittman, M.

    2012-03-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) surveyed the entire sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns in 2010, achieving 5-sigma point source sensitivities per band better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic. The WISE All-Sky Data Release, conducted on March 14, 2012, incorporates all data taken during the full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include: (1) an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets; (2) a Source Catalog containing positions and four-band photometry for over 563 million objects, and (3) an Explanatory Supplement. Ancillary products include a Reject Table that contains 284 million detections that were not selected for the Source Catalog because they are low signal-to-noise ratio or spurious detections of image artifacts, an archive of over 1.5 million sets of calibrated WISE Single-exposure images, and a database of 9.4 billion source extractions from those single-images, and moving object tracklets identified by the NEOWISE program (Mainzer et al. 2011). The WISE All-Sky Data Release products supersede those from the WISE Preliminary Data Release (Cutri et al. 2011). The Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the WISE data. The Supplement contains an overview of the WISE mission, facilities, and operations, a detailed description of WISE data processing algorithms, a guide to the content and formats of the image and tabular data products, and cautionary notes that describe known limitations of the All-Sky Release products. Instructions for accessing the WISE data products via the services of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive are provided. The Supplement also provides analyses of the achieved sky coverage, photometric and astrometric characteristics and completeness and reliability of the All

  16. Release of primary microplastics from consumer products to wastewater in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Wezel, Annemarie; Caris, Inez; Kools, Stefan A E

    2016-07-01

    The authors estimate the release of primary microplastics from consumer products-cosmetics and personal care products, cleaning agents, and paint and coatings-via sewage effluent as an expected relevant route to the marine environment. Total estimated concentrations in the 3 scenarios are 0.2 μg/L, 2.7 μg/L, and 66 μg/L in sewage-treatment plant (STP) effluent, respectively. All product categories relevantly contribute. Predicted concentrations are compared with reported actual concentrations in STP effluents. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1627-1631. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627661

  17. Activation of the chicken gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor reduces gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Mamiko; Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2010-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a hypothalamic peptide from the RFamide peptide family that has been identified in multiple avian species. Although GnIH has clearly been shown to reduce LH release from the anterior pituitary gland, its mechanism of action remains to be determined. The overall objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R) signaling pathway, (2) to evaluate potential interactions with gonadotropin releasing hormone type III receptor (GnRH-R-III) signaling, and (3) to determine the molecular mechanisms by which GnIH and GnRH regulate pituitary gonadotrope function during a reproductive cycle in the chicken. Using real-time PCR, we showed that in the chicken pituitary gland, GnIH-R mRNA levels fluctuate in an opposite manner to GnRH-R-III, with higher and lower levels observed during inactive and active reproductive stages, respectively. We demonstrated that the chicken GnIH-R signals by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase cAMP production, most likely by coupling to G(alphai). We also showed that this inhibition is sufficient to significantly reduce GnRH-induced cAMP responsive element (CRE) activation in a dose-dependent manner, and that the ratio of GnRH/GnIH receptors is a significant factor. We propose that in avian species, sexual maturation is characterized by a change in GnIH/GnRH receptor ratio, resulting in a switch in pituitary sensitivity from inhibitory (involving GnIH) to stimulatory (involving GnRH). In turn, decreasing GnIH-R signaling, combined with increasing GnRH-R-III signaling, results in significant increases in CRE activation, possibly initiating gonadotropin synthesis. PMID:20350548

  18. Nonsynaptic Communication Through ATP Release from Volume-Activated Anion Channels in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Fields, R. Douglas; Ni, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    The release of neuronal messengers outside synapses has broad biological implications, particularly with regard to communication between axons and glia. We identify a mechanism for nonsynaptic, nonvesicular release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from axons through volume-activated anion channels (VAACs) activated by microscopic axon swelling during action potential firing. We used a combination of single-photon imaging of ATP release, together with imaging for intrinsic optical signals, intracellular calcium ions (Ca2+), time-lapse video, and confocal microscopy, to investigate action potential–induced nonsynaptic release of this neurotransmitter. ATP release from cultured embryonic dorsal root ganglion axons persisted when bafilomycin or botulinum toxin was used to block vesicular release, whereas pharmacological inhibition of VAACs or prevention of action potential–induced axon swelling inhibited ATP release and disrupted activity-dependent signaling between axons and astrocytes. This nonvesicular, nonsynaptic communication could mediate various activity-dependent interactions between axons and nervous system cells in normal conditions, development, and disease. PMID:20923934

  19. Enzymatic production by tissue extracts of a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with calcium-releasing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Tich, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    This research investigated the occurrence and characterization of the metabolite in mammalian tissues. In all mammalian tissues tested, including rabbit liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain, the factor to convert NAD into its active metabolite was present. The conversion exhibited many characteristics of an enzymatic process such as temperature sensitivity, concentration dependence and protease sensitivity. Production of the NAD metabolite occurred within a time frame of 15-45 minutes at 37{degree}C, depending upon the particular preparation. The metabolite was isolated using high performance liquid chromatography from all mammalian tissues. This purified metabolite was then tested for its effectiveness in releasing intracellular calcium in an intact cell by microinjecting it into unfertilized sea urchin eggs. These eggs undergo a massive morphological change upon fertilization which is dependent upon the release of calcium from inside the cell. Upon injection of the NAD metabolite into unfertilized eggs, this same morphological change was observed showing indirectly that the metabolite released intracellular calcium from an intact, viable cell. In addition, radioactive studies using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} loaded into permeabilized hepatocytes, indicated in preliminary studies that the NAD metabolite could also release calcium from intracellular stores of mammalian cells.

  20. Fission Product Release from Molten U/Al Alloy Fuel: A Vapor Transpiration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Whitkop, P.G.

    2001-06-26

    This report describes the application of a vapor transportation model to fission product release data obtained for uranium/aluminum alloy fuel during early Oak Ridge fuel melt experiments. The Oak Ridge data validates the vapor transpiration model and suggests that iodine and cesium are released from the molten fuel surface in elemental form while tellurium and ruthenium are released as oxides. Cesium iodide is postulated to form in the vapor phase outside of the fuel matrix. Kinetic data indicates that cesium iodide can form from Cs atoms and diatomic iodine in the vapor phase. Temperatures lower than those capable of melting fuel are necessary in order to maintain a sufficient I2 concentration. At temperatures near the fuel melting point, cesium can react with iodine atoms to form CsI only on solid surfaces such as aerosols.

  1. Impact of biodiversity loss on production in complex marine food webs mitigated by prey-release.

    PubMed

    Fung, Tak; Farnsworth, Keith D; Reid, David G; Rossberg, Axel G

    2015-01-01

    Public concern over biodiversity loss is often rationalized as a threat to ecosystem functioning, but biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) relations are hard to empirically quantify at large scales. We use a realistic marine food-web model, resolving species over five trophic levels, to study how total fish production changes with species richness. This complex model predicts that BEF relations, on average, follow simple Michaelis-Menten curves when species are randomly deleted. These are shaped mainly by release of fish from predation, rather than the release from competition expected from simpler communities. Ordering species deletions by decreasing body mass or trophic level, representing 'fishing down the food web', accentuates prey-release effects and results in unimodal relationships. In contrast, simultaneous unselective harvesting diminishes these effects and produces an almost linear BEF relation, with maximum multispecies fisheries yield at ≈40% of initial species richness. These findings have important implications for the valuation of marine biodiversity. PMID:25799523

  2. Impact of biodiversity loss on production in complex marine food webs mitigated by prey-release

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Tak; Farnsworth, Keith D.; Reid, David G.; Rossberg, Axel G.

    2015-01-01

    Public concern over biodiversity loss is often rationalized as a threat to ecosystem functioning, but biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) relations are hard to empirically quantify at large scales. We use a realistic marine food-web model, resolving species over five trophic levels, to study how total fish production changes with species richness. This complex model predicts that BEF relations, on average, follow simple Michaelis–Menten curves when species are randomly deleted. These are shaped mainly by release of fish from predation, rather than the release from competition expected from simpler communities. Ordering species deletions by decreasing body mass or trophic level, representing ‘fishing down the food web’, accentuates prey-release effects and results in unimodal relationships. In contrast, simultaneous unselective harvesting diminishes these effects and produces an almost linear BEF relation, with maximum multispecies fisheries yield at ≈40% of initial species richness. These findings have important implications for the valuation of marine biodiversity. PMID:25799523

  3. A novel hybrid aspirin-NO-releasing compound inhibits TNFalpha release from LPS-activated human monocytes and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Catriona M; Marcarino, Paolo; Sheldrake, Tara A; Lazzarato, Loretta; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Fox, Sarah; Megson, Ian L; Rossi, Adriano G

    2008-01-01

    Background The cytoprotective nature of nitric oxide (NO) led to development of NO-aspirins in the hope of overcoming the gastric side-effects of aspirin. However, the NO moiety gives these hybrids potential for actions further to their aspirin-mediated anti-platelet and anti-inflammatory effects. Having previously shown that novel NO-aspirin hybrids containing a furoxan NO-releasing group have potent anti-platelet effects, here we investigate their anti-inflammatory properties. Here we examine their effects upon TNFα release from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages and investigate a potential mechanism of action through effects on LPS-stimulated nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Methods Peripheral venous blood was drawn from the antecubital fossa of human volunteers. Mononuclear cells were isolated and cultured. The resultant differentiated macrophages were treated with pharmacologically relevant concentrations of either a furoxan-aspirin (B8, B7; 10 μM), their respective furazan NO-free counterparts (B16, B15; 10 μM), aspirin (10 μM), existing nitroaspirin (NCX4016; 10 μM), an NO donor (DEA/NO; 10 μM) or dexamethasone (1 μM), in the presence and absence of LPS (10 ng/ml; 4 h). Parallel experiments were conducted on undifferentiated fresh monocytes. Supernatants were assessed by specific ELISA for TNFα release and by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for cell necrosis. To assess NF-κB activation, the effects of the compounds on the loss of cytoplasmic inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBα (assessed by western blotting) and nuclear localisation (assessed by immunofluorescence) of the p65 subunit of NF-κB were determined. Results B8 significantly reduced TNFα release from LPS-treated macrophages to 36 ± 10% of the LPS control. B8 and B16 significantly inhibited monocyte TNFα release to 28 ± 5, and 49 ± 9% of control, respectively. The B8 effect was equivalent in magnitude to that of dexamethasone, but

  4. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Y. H.; Kim, W.; Park, K. U.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) according to different activation protocols. Methods Two manual preparation procedures (single-spin (SS) at 900 g for five minutes; double-spin (DS) at 900 g for five minutes and then 1500 g for 15 minutes) were performed for each of 14 healthy subjects. Both preparations were tested for platelet activation by one of three activation protocols: no activation, activation with calcium (Ca) only, or calcium with a low dose (50 IU per 1 ml PRP) of thrombin. Each preparation was divided into four aliquots and incubated for one hour, 24 hours, 72 hours, and seven days. The cytokine-release kinetics were evaluated by assessing PDGF, TGF, VEGF, FGF, IL-1, and MMP-9 concentrations with bead-based sandwich immunoassay. Results The concentration of cytokine released from PRP varied over time and was influenced by various activation protocols. Ca-only activation had a significant effect on the DS PRPs (where the VEGF, FGF, and IL-1 concentrations were sustained) while Ca/thrombin activation had effects on both SS and DS PRPs (where the PDGF and VEGF concentrations were sustained and the TGF and FGF concentrations were short). The IL-1 content showed a significant increase with Ca-only or Ca/thrombin activation while these activations did not increase the MMP-9 concentration. Conclusion The SS and DS methods differed in their effect on cytokine release, and this effect varied among the cytokines analysed. In addition, low dose of thrombin/calcium activation increased the overall cytokine release of the PRP preparations over seven days, relative to that with a calcium-only supplement or non-activation. Cite this article: Professor J. H. Oh. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:37–45. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000540 PMID:26862077

  5. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration. PMID:19996631

  6. Changes in FDA enforcement activities following changes in federal administration: the case of regulatory letters released to pharmaceutical companies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for the protection of the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness and security of human drugs and biological products through the enforcement of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) and related regulations. These enforcement activities include regulatory letters (i.e. warning letters and notice of violation) to pharmaceutical companies. A regulatory letter represents the FDA’s first official notification to a pharmaceutical company that the FDA has discovered a product or activity in violation of the FDCA. This study analyzed trends in the pharmaceutical-related regulatory letters released by the FDA during the period 1997–2011 and assessed differences in the average number and type of regulatory letters released during the last four federal administrations. Methods Data derived from the FDA webpage. Information about the FDA office releasing the letter, date, company, and drug-related violation was collected. Regulatory letters were classified by federal administration. Descriptive statistics were performed for the analysis. Results Between 1997 and 2011 the FDA released 2,467 regulatory letters related to pharmaceuticals. FDA headquarters offices released 50.6% and district offices 49.4% of the regulatory letters. The Office of Prescription Drug Promotion released the largest number of regulatory letters (850; 34.5% of the total), followed by the Office of Scientific Investigations (131; 5.3%), and the Office of Compliance (105; 4.3%). During the 2nd Clinton Administration (1997–2000) the average number of regulatory letters per year was 242.8 ± 45.6, during the Bush Administration (2001–2008) it was 120.4 ± 33.7, and during the first three years of the Obama administration (2009–2011) it was 177.7.0 ± 17.0. The average number of regulatory letters released by the Office of Prescription Drug Promotion also varied by administration

  7. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2016-04-07

    Safety tests were conducted on fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800 °C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during 15 of these safety tests. Comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination results of the safety tests were conducted on two types of AGR-1 compacts: compactsmore » containing only intact particles and compacts containing one or more particles whose SiC layers failed during safety testing. In both cases, PARFUME globally over-predicted the experimental release fractions by several orders of magnitude: more than three (intact) and two (failed SiC) orders of magnitude for silver, more than three and up to two orders of magnitude for strontium, and up to two and more than one orders of magnitude for krypton. The release of cesium from intact particles was also largely over-predicted (by up to five orders of magnitude) but its release from particles with failed SiC was only over-predicted by a factor of about 3. These over-predictions can be largely attributed to an over-estimation of the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles. The integral release nature of the data makes it difficult to estimate the individual over-estimations in the kernel or each coating layer. Nevertheless, a tentative assessment of correction factors to these diffusivities was performed to enable a better match between the modeling predictions and the safety testing results. The method could only be successfully applied to silver and cesium. In the case of strontium, correction factors could not be assessed

  8. Mass production of genetically modified Aedes aegypti for field releases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Danilo O; Nimmo, Derric; Naish, Neil; McKemey, Andrew R; Gray, Pam; Wilke, André B B; Marrelli, Mauro T; Virginio, Jair F; Alphey, Luke; Capurro, Margareth L

    2014-01-01

    New techniques and methods are being sought to try to win the battle against mosquitoes. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the development of new and innovative methods of mosquito control based around the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)(1-3). A control method known as RIDL (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal)(4), is based around SIT, but uses genetic methods to remove the need for radiation-sterilization(5-8). A RIDL strain of Ae. aegypti was successfully tested in the field in Grand Cayman(9,10); further field use is planned or in progress in other countries around the world. Mass rearing of insects has been established in several insect species and to levels of billions a week. However, in mosquitoes, rearing has generally been performed on a much smaller scale, with most large scale rearing being performed in the 1970s and 80s. For a RIDL program it is desirable to release as few females as possible as they bite and transmit disease. In a mass rearing program there are several stages to produce the males to be released: egg production, rearing eggs until pupation, and then sorting males from females before release. These males are then used for a RIDL control program, released as either pupae or adults(11,12). To suppress a mosquito population using RIDL a large number of high quality male adults need to be reared(13,14). The following describes the methods for the mass rearing of OX513A, a RIDL strain of Ae. aegypti (8), for release and covers the techniques required for the production of eggs and mass rearing RIDL males for a control program. PMID:24430003

  9. Mass Production of Genetically Modified Aedes aegypti for Field Releases in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Danilo O.; Nimmo, Derric; Naish, Neil; McKemey, Andrew R.; Gray, Pam; Wilke, André B. B.; Marrelli, Mauro T.; Virginio, Jair F.; Alphey, Luke; Capurro, Margareth L.

    2014-01-01

    New techniques and methods are being sought to try to win the battle against mosquitoes. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the development of new and innovative methods of mosquito control based around the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)1-3. A control method known as RIDL (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal)4, is based around SIT, but uses genetic methods to remove the need for radiation-sterilization5-8. A RIDL strain of Ae. aegypti was successfully tested in the field in Grand Cayman9,10; further field use is planned or in progress in other countries around the world. Mass rearing of insects has been established in several insect species and to levels of billions a week. However, in mosquitoes, rearing has generally been performed on a much smaller scale, with most large scale rearing being performed in the 1970s and 80s. For a RIDL program it is desirable to release as few females as possible as they bite and transmit disease. In a mass rearing program there are several stages to produce the males to be released: egg production, rearing eggs until pupation, and then sorting males from females before release. These males are then used for a RIDL control program, released as either pupae or adults11,12. To suppress a mosquito population using RIDL a large number of high quality male adults need to be reared13,14. The following describes the methods for the mass rearing of OX513A, a RIDL strain of Ae. aegypti 8, for release and covers the techniques required for the production of eggs and mass rearing RIDL males for a control program. PMID:24430003

  10. Newly Released TRMM Version 7 Products, Other Precipitation Datasets and Data Services at NASA GES DISC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, D.; Teng, W. L.; Trivedi, Bhagirath; Kempler, S.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is home of global precipitation product archives, in particular, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) products. TRMM is a joint U.S.-Japan satellite mission to monitor tropical and subtropical (40 S - 40 N) precipitation and to estimate its associated latent heating. The TRMM satellite provides the first detailed and comprehensive dataset on the four dimensional distribution of rainfall and latent heating over vastly undersampled tropical and subtropical oceans and continents. The TRMM satellite was launched on November 27, 1997. TRMM data products are archived at and distributed by GES DISC. The newly released TRMM Version 7 consists of several changes including new parameters, new products, meta data, data structures, etc. For example, hydrometeor profiles in 2A12 now have 28 layers (14 in V6). New parameters have been added to several popular Level-3 products, such as, 3B42, 3B43. Version 2.2 of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) dataset has been added to the TRMM Online Visualization and Analysis System (TOVAS; URL: http://disc2.nascom.nasa.gov/Giovanni/tovas/), allowing online analysis and visualization without downloading data and software. The GPCP dataset extends back to 1979. Version 3 of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) monitoring product has been updated in TOVAS as well. The product provides global gauge-based monthly rainfall along with number of gauges per grid. The dataset begins in January 1986. To facilitate data and information access and support precipitation research and applications, we have developed a Precipitation Data and Information Services Center (PDISC; URL: http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/precipitation). In addition to TRMM, PDISC provides current and past observational precipitation data. Users can access precipitation data archives consisting of both remote sensing and in-situ observations. Users can use these data

  11. Effect of some fat replacers on the release of volatile aroma compounds from low-fat meat products.

    PubMed

    Chevance, F F; Farmer, L J; Desmond, E M; Novelli, E; Troy, D J; Chizzolini, R

    2000-08-01

    The effect of fat content and carbohydrate fat-replacers on the release of volatile odor compounds from beefburger, salami, and frankfurter has been investigated. The reduction in fat content in any of the three meat products studied resulted in a tendency toward an increase in the quantities of volatiles released in the headspace. Tapioca starch and maltodextrin appear to delay the release of certain classes of compounds selectively; for instance, tapioca starch appears to slow the release of some Maillard products while maltodextrin has a similar effect on terpenes. In contrast, oat fiber decreases the release of most of the compounds analyzed. Thus, the addition of carbohydrate fat-replacers to low-fat meat products could assist the flavor qualities of low-fat meat products by slowing down the release of odor compounds. PMID:10956136

  12. Biopharmaceutical characterization of oral immediate release drug products. In vitro/in vivo comparison of phenoxymethylpenicillin potassium, glimepiride and levofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Frick, A; Möller, H; Wirbitzki, E

    1998-11-01

    The development of in vitro dissolution tests using the paddle and basket apparatus is described with respect to the qualification/validation of the testing procedure. Three examples of immediate release products containing phenoxymethylpenicillin potassium, glimepiride, and levofloxacin providing different solubility characteristics are evaluated. The solubility was high in the case of phenoxymethylpenicillin potassium and levofloxacin and low for glimepiride according to the biopharmaceutics classification system. The permeability is studied using the human colorectal carcinoma cell line CaCo-2. The permeability (10(-6) cm/s) of phenoxymethylpenicillin potassium, glimepiride, and levofloxacin was high. The determined permeability data are confirmed by absorption data obtained by means of numerical deconvolution of plasma concentrations. Recommendations are given for the biopharmaceutical characterization of the three immediate release drug products, taking into account in vitro and in vivo comparison as well as the biopharmaceutics drug classification system. The evaluated acceptance criteria are the following: phenoxymethylpenicillin potassium (80% in 30 min), glimepiride (80% in 15 min) and levofloxacin (80% in 30 min). Typically, for immediate release formulations, one limit is specified for the dissolution to ensure the release of the active ingredient within the present time period. Since phenoxymethylpenicillin potassium and levofloxacin belong to Case 1, no in vitro/in vivo correlation is expected, absorption may be gastric emptying dependent. Glimepiride is categorized to Case 2. Nevertheless, a correlation with the in vivo dissolution profile does not exist, because of the pH-dependent low solubility of the drug. Finally, recommendations are made for the batch control of drug products in accordance with the four Cases. PMID:9885303

  13. Glial cell regulation of neuronal activity and blood flow in the retina by release of gliotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes in the brain release transmitters that actively modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic efficacy. Astrocytes also release vasoactive agents that contribute to neurovascular coupling. As reviewed in this article, Müller cells, the principal retinal glial cells, modulate neuronal activity and blood flow in the retina. Stimulated Müller cells release ATP which, following its conversion to adenosine by ectoenzymes, hyperpolarizes retinal ganglion cells by activation of A1 adenosine receptors. This results in the opening of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels. Tonic release of ATP also contributes to the generation of tone in the retinal vasculature by activation of P2X receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells. Vascular tone is lost when glial cells are poisoned with the gliotoxin fluorocitrate. The glial release of vasoactive metabolites of arachidonic acid, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), contributes to neurovascular coupling in the retina. Neurovascular coupling is reduced when neuronal stimulation of glial cells is interrupted and when the synthesis of arachidonic acid metabolites is blocked. Neurovascular coupling is compromised in diabetic retinopathy owing to the loss of glial-mediated vasodilation. This loss can be reversed by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase. It is likely that future research will reveal additional important functions of the release of transmitters from glial cells. PMID:26009774

  14. Diffusion modeling of fission product release during depressurized core conduction cooldown conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    A simple model for diffusion through the silicon carbide layer of TRISO particles is applied to the data for accident condition testing of fuel spheres for the High-Temperature Reactor program of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Categorization of sphere release of {sup 137}Cs based on fast neutron fluence permits predictions of release with an accuracy comparable to that of the US/FRG accident condition fuel performance model. Calculations are also performed for {sup 85}Kr, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 110m}Ag. Diffusion of cesium through SiC suggests that models of fuel failure should consider fuel performance during repeated accident condition thermal cycling. Microstructural considerations in models in fission product release are discussed. The neutron-induced segregation of silicon within the SiC structure is postulated as a mechanism for enhanced fission product release during accident conditions. An oxygen-enhanced SiC decomposition mechanism is also discussed. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Fission product release and fuel cladding interaction in severe-accident tests of LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Osborne, M.F.

    1983-11-01

    The examination of these samples indicated a correlation between the posttest fuel microstructure and the fission product release during the test. As expected, structural changes in the fuel and fission product release increased with test temperature. The effect of steam flow rate, which controls the extent of cladding oxidation, however, was less clear. The amount of fuel-cladding reaction and liquefaction was greatest in the test with a low steam flow rate, which was also the highest temperature test. Other data indicate, however, that extensive fuel-cladding reaction and liquefaction would be expected at approx. 1700/sup 0/C with reduced steam flow rate (i.e., with reduced oxidation). The similar gas release values and fuel microstructures for the 1700 and 2000/sup 0/C test are somewhat surprising, but may indicate the influence of the steam conditions on gas release as well as on fuel-cladding reaction. The extent of fuel-cladding interaction in these tests, and the resulting intermediate phases, appear to be consistent with the observations of Hofmann and Kerwin-Peck.

  16. Estimation of (41)Ar activity concentration and release rate from the TRIGA Mark-II research reactor.

    PubMed

    Hoq, M Ajijul; Soner, M A Malek; Rahman, A; Salam, M A; Islam, S M A

    2016-03-01

    The BAEC TRIGA research reactor (BTRR) is the only nuclear reactor in Bangladesh. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Regulatory Authority (BAERA) regulations require that nuclear reactor licensees undertake all reasonable precautions to protect the environment and the health and safety of persons, including identifying, controlling and monitoring the release of nuclear substances to the environment. The primary activation product of interest in terms of airborne release from the reactor is (41)Ar. (41)Ar is a noble gas readily released from the reactor stacks and most has not decayed by the time it moves offsite with normal wind speed. Initially (41)Ar is produced from irradiation of dissolved air in the primary water which eventually transfers into the air in the reactor bay. In this study, the airborne radioisotope (41)Ar generation concentration, ground level concentration and release rate from the BTRR bay region are evaluated theoretically during the normal reactor operation condition by several governing equations. This theoretical calculation eventually minimizes the doubt about radiological safety to determine the radiation level for (41)Ar activity whether it is below the permissible limit or not. Results show that the estimated activity for (41)Ar is well below the maximum permissible concentration limit set by the regulatory body, which is an assurance for the reactor operating personnel and general public. Thus the analysis performed within this paper is so much effective in the sense of ensuring radiological safety for working personnel and the environment. PMID:26736180

  17. Alkalinity, pH, and copper corrosion by-product release

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.; Meyer, T.E.; Schock, M.R.

    1996-03-01

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water increases linearly with bicarbonate concentration at constant pH. This relationship implicates cupric hydroxide solubility in control of copper release from relatively new (less than a few years old) copper plumbing. Decision-marking guidance from a traditional Larson`s ratio or Langelier index approach can aggravate copper corrosion problems; consequently, their use should be discontinued for copper corrosion mitigation. In contrast, aeration-CO{sub 2} stripping is a particularly attractive strategy because benefits from higher pH are realized without adverse effects from higher alkalinity.

  18. Natural products and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gaofeng; Wahlqvist, Mark L; He, Guoqing; Yang, Min; Li, Duo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review paper was to summarise some commonly available natural products and their anti-inflammatory activity. We have collected data from MEDLINE, Current Contents and scientific journals, which included 92 publications. There are numerous natural products detailed in this literature; however we have summarized a few of the most commonly available and potent ones. In this paper, the natural products with anti-inflammatory activity including curcumin, parthenolide, cucurbitacins, 1,8-cineole, pseudopterosins, lyprinol, bromelain, flavonoids, saponins, marine sponge natural products and Boswellia serrata gum resin were reviewed. Natural products play a significant role in human health in relation to the prevention and treatment of inflammatory conditions. Further studies are being conducted to investigate the mechanism of action, metabolism, safety and long term side effect of these natural products, as well as interactions between these natural products with food and drug components. PMID:16672197

  19. Stepwise Release of Biologically Active HMGB1 during HSV-2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Chloé; Barnay-Verdier, Stéphanie; Gaillard, Claire; Hocini, Hakim

    2011-01-01

    Background High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a major endogenous danger signal that triggers inflammation and immunity during septic and aseptic stresses. HMGB1 recently emerged as a key soluble factor in the pathogenesis of various infectious diseases, but nothing is known of its behaviour during herpesvirus infection. We therefore investigated the dynamics and biological effects of HMGB1 during HSV-2 infection of epithelial HEC-1 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Despite a transcriptional shutdown of HMGB1 gene expression during infection, the intracellular pool of HMGB1 protein remained unaffected, indicating its remarkable stability. However, the dynamics of HMGB1 was deeply modified in infected cells. Whereas viral multiplication was concomitant with apoptosis and HMGB1 retention on chromatin, a subsequent release of HMGB1 was observed in response to HSV-2 mediated necrosis. Importantly, extracellular HMGB1 was biologically active. Indeed, HMGB1-containing supernatants from HSV-2 infected cells induced the migration of fibroblasts from murine or human origin, and reactivated HIV-1 from latently infected T lymphocytes. These effects were specifically linked to HMGB1 since they were blocked by glycyrrhizin or by a neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody, and were mediated through TLR2 and the receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE). Finally, we show that genital HSV-2 active infections also promote HMGB1 release in vivo, strengthening the clinical relevance of our experimental data. Conclusions These observations target HMGB1 as an important actor during HSV-2 genital infection, notably in the setting of HSV-HIV co-infection. PMID:21283827

  20. Human Erythroid 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase Mutations Associated with X-Linked Protoporphyria Disrupt the Conformational Equilibrium and Enhance Product Release.

    PubMed

    Fratz, Erica J; Clayton, Jerome; Hunter, Gregory A; Ducamp, Sarah; Breydo, Leonid; Uversky, Vladimir N; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent; Puy, Hervé; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2015-09-15

    Regulation of 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) is at the origin of balanced heme production in mammals. Mutations in the C-terminal region of human erythroid-specific ALAS (hALAS2) are associated with X-linked protoporphyria (XLPP), a disease characterized by extreme photosensitivity, with elevated blood concentrations of free protoporphyrin IX and zinc protoporphyrin. To investigate the molecular basis for this disease, recombinant hALAS2 and variants of the enzyme harboring the gain-of-function XLPP mutations were constructed, purified, and analyzed kinetically, spectroscopically, and thermodynamically. Enhanced activities of the XLPP variants resulted from increases in the rate at which the product 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) was released from the enzyme. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the XLPP mutations altered the microenvironment of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor, which underwent further and specific alterations upon succinyl-CoA binding. Transient kinetic analyses of the variant-catalyzed reactions and protein fluorescence quenching upon binding of ALA to the XLPP variants demonstrated that the protein conformational transition step associated with product release was predominantly affected. Of relevance is the fact that XLPP could also be modeled in cell culture. We propose that (1) the XLPP mutations destabilize the succinyl-CoA-induced hALAS2 closed conformation and thus accelerate ALA release, (2) the extended C-terminus of wild-type mammalian ALAS2 provides a regulatory role that allows for allosteric modulation of activity, thereby controlling the rate of erythroid heme biosynthesis, and (3) this control is disrupted in XLPP, resulting in porphyrin accumulation. PMID:26300302

  1. Dss1 Release Activates DNA Binding Potential in Brh2

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qingwen; Kojic, Milorad; Holloman, William K.

    2013-01-01

    Dss1 is an intrinsically unstructured polypeptide that partners with the much larger Brh2 protein, the BRCA2 ortholog in Ustilago maydis, to form a tight complex. Mutants lacking Dss1 have essentially the same phenotype as mutants defective in Brh2, implying that through physical interaction Dss1 serves as a positive activator of Brh2. Dss1 associates with Brh2 through an interaction surface in the carboxy-terminal region. Certain derivatives of Brh2 lacking this interaction surface remain highly competent in DNA repair as long as a DNA-binding domain is present. However, the Dss1-independent activity raises the question of what function might be met in the native protein by having Brh2 under Dss1 control. Using a set of Brh2 fusions and truncated derivatives, we show here that Dss1 is capable of exerting control when there is a cognate Dss1-interacting surface present. We find that association of Dss1 attenuates the DNA binding potential of Brh2 and that the amino-terminal domain of Brh2 helps evict Dss1 from its carboxy-terminal interaction surface. The findings presented here add to the notion that Dss1 serves in a regulatory capacity to dictate order in association of Brh2’s amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal domains with DNA. PMID:23094644

  2. RADIOLOGICAL RELEASES DUE TO AIR AND SILICA DUST ACTIVATION IN EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Tang

    2003-05-07

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the quantity and significance of annual Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface normal radiological releases due to neutron activation of air and silica dust in emplacement drifts. This calculation includes the following items: (1) Calculate activation of ventilation airflow through emplacement drifts to quantify radioactive gaseous releases; and (2) Calculate the bounding potential activated silica dust concentration and releases. The sources of silica dust may arise from air supply to emplacement drifts as well as host rock around emplacement drifts. For this calculation, the source of dust is conservatively assumed to be the host rock (Assumption 3.6), which is subject to long-term neutron exposure resulting in saturated radioactivity. The scope of this calculation is limited to releases from activated air and silica dust only, excluding natural radioactive releases such as radon or releases from defective waste packages (breached or contaminated). This work supports the repository ventilation system design and Preclosure Safety Analysis. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package (CRWMS M&O [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management and Operation Contractor] 1999a, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE [U.S. Department of Energy] 2003). The performance of the calculation and development of this document are carried out in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculation and Analyses'' and LP-3.30Q-BSC, ''Hazards Analysis System''.

  3. Release 2 data products from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Limb Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Q. Philippe; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen R.; Deland, Matthew T.; Larsen, Jack C.; Fleig, Albert; Kahn, Daniel; Zhu, Tong; Chen, Zhong; Gorkavyi, Nick; Warner, Jeremy; Linda, Mike; Chen, Hong; Kowitt, Mark; Haken, Michael; Hall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) was launched on board the NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite in October 2011. OMPS-LP is a limb-scattering hyperspectral sensor that provides ozone profiling capability at 1.5 km vertical resolution from cloud top to 60 km altitude. The use of three parallel slits allows global coverage in approximately four days. We have recently completed a full reprocessing of all LP data products, designated as Release 2, that improves the accuracy and quality of these products. Level 1 gridded radiance (L1G) changes include intra-orbit and seasonal correction of variations in wavelength registration, revised static and intra-orbit tangent height adjustments, and simplified pixel selection from multiple images. Ozone profile retrieval changes include removal of the explicit aerosol correction, exclusion of channels contaminated by stratospheric OH emission, a revised instrument noise characterization, improved synthetic solar spectrum, improved pressure and temperature ancillary data, and a revised ozone climatology. Release 2 data products also include aerosol extinction coefficient profiles derived with the prelaunch retrieval algorithm. Our evaluation of OMPS LP Release 2 data quality is good. Zonal average ozone profile comparisons with Aura MLS data typically show good agreement, within 5-10% over the altitude range 20-50 km between 60 deg S and 60 deg N. The aerosol profiles agree well with concurrent satellite measurements such as CALIPSO and OSIRIS, and clearly detect exceptional events such as volcanic eruptions and the Chelyabinsk bolide in February 2013.

  4. Water Production and Release in Comets from Hot-Band Fluorescence near 2.9 microns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, N.; DiSanti, M. A.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Gibb, E.; Mumma, M. J.

    2002-09-01

    Water is the dominant ice in most (perhaps all) comets and its sublimation controls the release of other volatiles within 3-4 AU of the sun. For this reason, the volatile activity of a comet and the abundances of minor species are often expressed relative to water production. Severe atmospheric extinction makes direct detection of water in comets difficult from ground-based observatories - its strong transitions terminate in the ground vibrational level that is highly populated in Earth's atmosphere, causing absorption of the incident photons. To avoid such extinction, we target water lines in non-resonance fluorescence - direct absorption of sunlight excites molecules from the lowest vibrational level (000) to a higher vibrational level, followed by cascade into an intermediate level that is not significantly populated in the atmosphere. This approach has been used to successfully detect water in ten comets using lines from hot-bands in the 2, 2.9, and 5-micron regions. Detection of water lines from several different hot-bands helps in the determination of accurate water production rates and allows temperature-dependent fluorescence models for individual hot-bands to be tested for internal consistency. The 2.9-micron region is particularly diagnostic since a dense grouping of strong lines can be detected from several hot-bands. We have been able to perform high-resolution studies of parent volatiles at infrared wavelengths with the Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSPEC) at Keck 2 and the Cryogenic Echelle Spectrometer (CSHELL) at the NASA IRTF. Both instruments provide spectral resolution sufficient to resolve individual ro-vibrational lines (R 20,000). Here we present water production rates, rotational temperatures, and ortho-to-para ratios in Oort cloud comets C/1999 H1 (Lee), C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/2001 A2 (LINEAR), and C/2002 C1 (Ikeya-Zhang) derived from hot-band emissions near 2.9-microns using NIRSPEC and CSHELL. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary

  5. A slow-release system of bacterial cellulose gel and nanoparticles for hydrophobic active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Numata, Yukari; Mazzarino, Leticia; Borsali, Redouane

    2015-01-01

    A combination of bacterial cellulose (BC) gel and amphiphilic block copolymer nanoparticles was investigated as a drug delivery system (DDS) for hydrophobic active ingredients. Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) and retinol were used as the block copolymer and hydrophobic active ingredient, respectively. The BC gel was capable of incorporating copolymer nanoparticles and releasing them in an acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer solution (pH 5.2) at 37 °C. The percentage of released copolymer reached a maximum value of approximately 60% after 6h and remained constant after 24h. The percentage of retinol released from the copolymer-containing BC gel reached a maximum value at 4h. These results show that the combination of BC gel and nanoparticles is a slow-release system that may be useful in the cosmetic and biomedical fields for skin treatment and preparation. PMID:25840273

  6. Efficacy of antimicrobial activity of slow release silver nanoparticles dressing in post-cardiac surgery mediastinitis.

    PubMed

    Totaro, Pasquale; Rambaldini, Manfredo

    2009-01-01

    We report our preliminary experience in post-cardiac surgery mediastinitis using a recently introduced silver-releasing dressing claiming prompt antibacterial activity. Acticoat, a silver nanoparticles slow release dressing was used in four patients with documented post-cardiac surgery mediastinitis and persistently positive microbiological cultures despite vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy. In all four patients negative cultures were obtained within a maximum of 72 h and patients were discharged within a maximum of 20 days. PMID:18948308

  7. Ganglioside GQ1b induces dopamine release through the activation of Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Chu, Shi-Feng; Mou, Zheng; Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Gui-Ning; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that GQ1b, one of the gangliosides members, contributes to synaptic transmission and synapse formation. Previous studies have shown that GQ1b could enhance depolarization induced neurotransmitter release, while the role of GQ1b in asynchronous release is still largely unknown. Here in our result, we found low concentration of GQ1b, but not GT1b or GD1b (which were generated from GQ1b by plasma membrane-associated sialidases), evoked asynchronous dopamine (DA) release from both clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and rat striatal slices significantly. The release peaked at 2min after GQ1b exposure, and lasted for more than 6min. This effect was caused by the enhancement of intracellular Ca(2+) and the activation of Pyk2. Inhibition of Pyk2 by PF-431396 (a dual inhibitor of Pyk2 and FAK) or Pyk2 siRNA abolished DA release induced by GQ1b. Moreover, Pyk2 Y402, but not other tyrosine site, was phosphorylated at the peaking time. The mutant of Pyk2 Y402 (Pyk2-Y402F) was built to confirm the essential role of Y402 activation. Further studies revealed that activated Pyk2 stimulated ERK1/2 and p-38, while only the ERK1/2 activation was indispensable for GQ1b induced DA release, which interacted with Synapsin I directly and led to its phosphorylation, then depolymerization of F-actin, thus contributed to DA release. In conclusion, low concentration of GQ1b is able to enhance asynchronous DA release through Pyk2/ERK/Synapsin I/actin pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the role of GQ1b in neuronal communication, and implicate the potential application of GQ1b in neurological disorders. PMID:26704905

  8. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  9. Rac1 Modulates Stimulus-evoked Ca2+ Release in Neuronal Growth Cones via Parallel Effects on Microtubule/Endoplasmic Reticulum Dynamics and Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The small G protein Rac regulates cytoskeletal protein dynamics in neuronal growth cones and has been implicated in axon growth, guidance, and branching. Intracellular Ca2+ is another well known regulator of growth cone function; however, effects of Rac activity on intracellular Ca2+ metabolism have not been well characterized. Here, we investigate how Rac1 activity affects release of Ca2+ from intracellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores stimulated by application of serotonin (5-hydroxytriptamine). We also address how Rac1 effects on microtubule assembly dynamics affect distribution of Ca2+ release sites. Multimode fluorescent microscopy was used to correlate microtubule and ER behavior, and ratiometric imaging was used to assess intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. We report that Rac1 activity both promotes Ca2+ release and affects its spatial distribution in neuronal growth cones. The underlying mechanism involves synergistic Rac1 effects on microtubule assembly and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rac1 activity modulates Ca2+ by 1) enhancing microtubule assembly which in turn promotes spread of the ER-based Ca2+ release machinery into the growth cone periphery, and 2) by increasing ROS production which facilitated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Ca2+ release. These results cast Rac1 as a key modulator of intracellular Ca2+ function in the neuronal growth cone. PMID:19570918

  10. Evidence of arsenic release promoted by disinfection by-products within drinking-water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Botsaris, George; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Kalyvas, Harris; Costa, Costas N

    2014-02-15

    Changes in disinfectant type could trigger a cascade of reactions releasing pipe-anchored metals/metalloids into finished water. However, the effect of pre-formed disinfection by-products on the release of sorbed contaminants (arsenic-As in particular) from drinking water distribution system pipe scales remains unexplored. A bench-scale study using a factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the independent and interaction effects of trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (HAA) on arsenic (As) release from either scales-only or scale-biofilm conglomerates (SBC) both anchored on asbestos/cement pipe coupons. A model biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was allowed to grow on select pipe coupons prior experimentation. Either TTHM or HAA individual dosing did not promote As release from either scales only or SBC, detecting <6 μg AsL(-1) in finished water. In the case of scales-only coupons, the combination of the highest spike level of TTHM and HAA significantly (p<0.001) increased dissolved and total As concentrations to levels up to 16 and 95 μg L(-1), respectively. Similar treatments in the presence of biofilm (SBC) resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in dissolved and total recoverable As up to 20 and 47 μg L(-1), respectively, exceeding the regulatory As limit. Whether or not, our laboratory-based results truly represent mechanisms operating in disinfected finished water in pipe networks remains to be investigated in the field. PMID:24365518

  11. Release of platelet activating factor (PAF) and eicosanoids in UVC-irradiated corneal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Y; Birkle, D L

    1995-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation provokes acute inflammation of the eye, and can be used to model processes that occur in response to damage to the anterior segment. This study characterized ultraviolet-C (UVC, 254 nm) irradiation-induced PAF synthesis, and arachidonic acid (20:4) and eicosanoid release in rabbit corneal stromal cells maintained in vitro. PAF was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after exposing cultured corneal stromal cells to UVC irradiation (20 min, 2, 5, 10 mW/cm2). 14C-20:4-labeled stromal cells were also stimulated with UVC and radiolabeled phospholipids, neutral lipids and eicosanoids were measured. Synthesis of cell-associated and secreted PAF from corneal stromal cells was increased by UV irradiation. UV irradiation (254 nm, 5mW/cm2) enhanced 20:4 release from triacylglycerols, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, and increased levels of 20:4-diacylglycerol and unesterified 20:4. The released 20:4 entered both the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways after UVC irradiation. The PAF antagonist, BN52021 (10 microM) reduced UVC irradiation-induced stimulation of prostaglandin production, but failed to inhibit UVC-induced 20:4 release and synthesis of lipoxygenase products. Furthermore, exogenous PAF (1 microM) stimulated prostaglandin production, but did not increase the synthesis of lipoxygenase products from radiolabeled 20:4. The effects of PAF on prostaglandin synthesis were inhibited by BN52021. These findings indicate that responses to injury in cultured corneal stromal cells include PAF synthesis, release of 20:4 from glycerolipids, accumulation of diacylglycerol and synthesis of eicosanoids. The data further suggest that during UVC irradiation in vitro, PAF is not a primary or initial mediator of 20:4 release and synthesis of lipoxygenase products, but may mediate UVC-induced prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:7648859

  12. Reactive oxygen species induced by presynaptic glutamate receptor activation is involved in [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain cortical nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A; Krupko, O; Himmelreich, N

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a response to presynaptic glutamate receptor activation, and the role of ROS in neurotransmitter (GABA) release. Experiments were performed with rat brain cortical synaptosomes using glutamate, NMDA and kainate as agonists of glutamate receptors. ROS production was evaluated with the fluorogenic compound dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCF-DA), and GABA release was studied using synaptosomes loaded with [(3)H]GABA. All agonists were found to stimulate ROS production, and specific antagonists of NMDA and kainate/AMPA receptors, dizocilpine hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-done (CNQX), significantly inhibited the ROS increase. Spontaneous as well as agonist-evoked ROS production was effectively attenuated by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a commonly used potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity, that suggests a high contribution of NADPH-oxidase to this process. The replacement of glucose with pyruvate or the simultaneous presence of both substrates in the medium led to the decrease in spontaneous and NMDA-evoked ROS production, but to the increase in ROS production induced by kainate. Scavenging of agonist-evoked ROS production by a potent antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was tightly correlated with the inhibition of agonist-evoked GABA release. Together, these findings show that the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors induces an increase in ROS production, and there is a tight correlation between ROS production and GABA secretion. The pivotal role of kainate/AMPA receptors in ROS production is under discussion. PMID:22864357

  13. Spatial and activity-dependent catecholamine release in rat adrenal medulla under native neuronal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle; Zarkua, Georgy; Chan, Shyue-An; Sridhar, Arun; Smith, Corey

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla in rat receive excitatory synaptic input through anterior and posterior divisions of the sympathetic splanchnic nerve. Upon synaptic stimulation, the adrenal medulla releases the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine into the suprarenal vein for circulation throughout the body. Under sympathetic tone, catecholamine release is modest. However, upon activation of the sympathoadrenal stress reflex, and increased splanchnic firing, adrenal catecholamine output increases dramatically. Moreover, specific stressors can preferentially increase release of either epinephrine (i.e., hypoglycemia) or norepinephrine (i.e., cold stress). The mechanism for this stressor-dependent segregated release of catecholamine species is not yet fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of either division of the splanchnic selects for epinephrine over norepinephrine release. We introduce an ex vivo rat preparation that maintains native splanchnic innervation of the adrenal gland and we document experimental advantages and limitations of this preparation. We utilize fast scanning cyclic voltammetry to detect release of both epinephrine and norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla, and report that epinephrine and norepinephrine release are regulated spatially and in a frequency-dependent manner. We provide data to show that epinephrine is secreted preferentially from the periphery of the medulla and exhibits a higher threshold and steeper stimulus-secretion function than norepinephrine. Elevated stimulation of the whole nerve specifically enhances epinephrine release from the peripheral medulla. Our data further show that elimination of either division from stimulation greatly attenuated epinephrine release under elevated stimulation, while either division alone can largely support norepinephrine release. PMID:27597763

  14. Source term estimates of radioxenon released from the BaTek medical isotope production facility using external measured air concentrations.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Paul W; Cameron, Ian M; Dumais, Johannes Robert; Imardjoko, Yudi; Marsoem, Pujadi; McIntyre, Justin I; Miley, Harry S; Stoehlker, Ulrich; Widodo, Susilo; Woods, Vincent T

    2015-10-01

    BATAN Teknologi (BaTek) operates an isotope production facility in Serpong, Indonesia that supplies (99m)Tc for use in medical procedures. Atmospheric releases of (133)Xe in the production process at BaTek are known to influence the measurements taken at the closest stations of the radionuclide network of the International Monitoring System (IMS). The purpose of the IMS is to detect evidence of nuclear explosions, including atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The major xenon isotopes released from BaTek are also produced in a nuclear explosion, but the isotopic ratios are different. Knowledge of the magnitude of releases from the isotope production facility helps inform analysts trying to decide if a specific measurement result could have originated from a nuclear explosion. A stack monitor deployed at BaTek in 2013 measured releases to the atmosphere for several isotopes. The facility operates on a weekly cycle, and the stack data for June 15-21, 2013 show a release of 1.84 × 10(13) Bq of (133)Xe. Concentrations of (133)Xe in the air are available at the same time from a xenon sampler located 14 km from BaTek. An optimization process using atmospheric transport modeling and the sampler air concentrations produced a release estimate of 1.88 × 10(13) Bq. The same optimization process yielded a release estimate of 1.70 × 10(13) Bq for a different week in 2012. The stack release value and the two optimized estimates are all within 10% of each other. Unpublished production data and the release estimate from June 2013 yield a rough annual release estimate of 8 × 10(14) Bq of (133)Xe in 2014. These multiple lines of evidence cross-validate the stack release estimates and the release estimates based on atmospheric samplers. PMID:26093852

  15. Source Term Estimates of Radioxenon Released from the BaTek Medical Isotope Production Facility Using External Measured Air Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Cameron, Ian M.; Dumais, Johannes R.; Imardjoko, Yudi; Marsoem, Pujadi; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Stoehlker, Ulrich; Widodo, Susilo; Woods, Vincent T.

    2015-10-01

    Abstract Batan Teknologi (BaTek) operates an isotope production facility in Serpong, Indonesia that supplies 99mTc for use in medical procedures. Atmospheric releases of Xe-133 in the production process at BaTek are known to influence the measurements taken at the closest stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). The purpose of the IMS is to detect evidence of nuclear explosions, including atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The xenon isotopes released from BaTek are the same as those produced in a nuclear explosion, but the isotopic ratios are different. Knowledge of the magnitude of releases from the isotope production facility helps inform analysts trying to decide whether a specific measurement result came from a nuclear explosion. A stack monitor deployed at BaTek in 2013 measured releases to the atmosphere for several isotopes. The facility operates on a weekly cycle, and the stack data for June 15-21, 2013 show a release of 1.84E13 Bq of Xe-133. Concentrations of Xe-133 in the air are available at the same time from a xenon sampler located 14 km from BaTek. An optimization process using atmospheric transport modeling and the sampler air concentrations produced a release estimate of 1.88E13 Bq. The same optimization process yielded a release estimate of 1.70E13 Bq for a different week in 2012. The stack release value and the two optimized estimates are all within 10 percent of each other. Weekly release estimates of 1.8E13 Bq and a 40 percent facility operation rate yields a rough annual release estimate of 3.7E13 Bq of Xe-133. This value is consistent with previously published estimates of annual releases for this facility, which are based on measurements at three IMS stations. These multiple lines of evidence cross-validate the stack release estimates and the release estimates from atmospheric samplers.

  16. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II–actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca2+-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s–1 per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mm, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40–50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin–actin reaction in which the structural transitions responsible for the myosin working stroke and the release of the hydrolysis products are orthogonal explains the results assuming that Pi and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The rate of ADP release from the conformation at the end of the working stroke is also strain-sensitive, further increasing by one order of magnitude within a few nanometres of negative strain. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and the load during muscle contraction. Key points Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin–actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to

  17. Species production and heat release rates in two-layered natural gas fires

    SciTech Connect

    Zukoski, E.E.; Morehart, J.H.; Kubota, T.; Toner, S.J. )

    1991-02-01

    A fire burning in an enclosure with restricted ventilation will result in the accumulation of a layer of warm products of combustion mixed with entrained air adjacent to the ceiling. For many conditions, the depth of this layer will extend to occupy a significant fraction of the volume of the room. Eventually, the interface between this vitiated ceiling layer and the uncontaminated environment below will position itself so that a large portion of the combustion processes occur in this vitiated layer. A description is given of experimental work concerning the rates of formation of product species and heat release in a turbulent, buoyant natural gas diffusion flame burning in this two-layered configuration. The enclosure was modeled by placing a hood above a burner so that it accumulated the plume gases, and the unsteady development of the ceiling layer was modeled by the direct addition of air into the upper portion of the hood. Measurements of the composition of these gases allowed the computation of stoichiometries and heat release rates. These investigations showed that the species produced in the flame depend primarily on the stoichiometry of the gases present in the ceiling layer and weakly on the temperature of the layer, but are independent of the fuel pair ratio of the mass transported into the layer by the plume. Heat release rates in the fires were compared to a theoretical limit based on a stoichiometric reaction of fuel and air with excess components left unchanged by the combustion.

  18. Activity-dependent BDNF release via endocytic pathways is regulated by synaptotagmin-6 and complexin

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yu-Hui; Lee, Chia-Ming; Xie, Wenjun; Cui, Bianxiao; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to modulate synapse development and plasticity, but the source of synaptic BDNF and molecular mechanisms regulating BDNF release remain unclear. Using exogenous BDNF tagged with quantum dots (BDNF-QDs), we found that endocytosed BDNF-QDs were preferentially localized to postsynaptic sites in the dendrite of cultured hippocampal neurons. Repetitive neuronal spiking induced the release of BDNF-QDs at these sites, and this process required activation of glutamate receptors. Down-regulating complexin 1/2 (Cpx1/2) expression eliminated activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion, although the overall activity-independent secretion was elevated. Among eight synaptotagmin (Syt) isoforms examined, down-regulation of only Syt6 impaired activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion. In contrast, activity-induced release of endogenously synthesized BDNF did not depend on Syt6. Thus, neuronal activity could trigger the release of endosomal BDNF from postsynaptic dendrites in a Cpx- and Syt6-dependent manner, and endosomes containing BDNF may serve as a source of BDNF for activity-dependent synaptic modulation. PMID:26216953

  19. Activity-dependent BDNF release via endocytic pathways is regulated by synaptotagmin-6 and complexin.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yu-Hui; Lee, Chia-Ming; Xie, Wenjun; Cui, Bianxiao; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-08-11

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to modulate synapse development and plasticity, but the source of synaptic BDNF and molecular mechanisms regulating BDNF release remain unclear. Using exogenous BDNF tagged with quantum dots (BDNF-QDs), we found that endocytosed BDNF-QDs were preferentially localized to postsynaptic sites in the dendrite of cultured hippocampal neurons. Repetitive neuronal spiking induced the release of BDNF-QDs at these sites, and this process required activation of glutamate receptors. Down-regulating complexin 1/2 (Cpx1/2) expression eliminated activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion, although the overall activity-independent secretion was elevated. Among eight synaptotagmin (Syt) isoforms examined, down-regulation of only Syt6 impaired activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion. In contrast, activity-induced release of endogenously synthesized BDNF did not depend on Syt6. Thus, neuronal activity could trigger the release of endosomal BDNF from postsynaptic dendrites in a Cpx- and Syt6-dependent manner, and endosomes containing BDNF may serve as a source of BDNF for activity-dependent synaptic modulation. PMID:26216953

  20. The HST Frontier Fields: Science Data Pipeline, Products, and First Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Avila, R. J.; Hammer, D.; Mack, J.; Ogaz, S.; Anderson, J.; Barker, E. A.; Hilbert, B.; Gonzaga, S.; Grogin, N. A.; Fruchter, A. S.; Lotz, J.; Lucas, R. A.; Mountain, M.; Sokol, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first data release of the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program, a new Director's Discretionary program to carry out ultra-deep observations of six lensing clusters and parallel deep blank fields, probing the most distant galaxies currently observable. During the three-year program, each cluster is being observed for 140 orbits over two epochs, probing to 29th magnitude. We present here the first epoch of the cluster Abell 2744, observed to 70 orbits on the main cluster with WFC3/IR (in F105W, F125W, F140W and F160W) and on the parallel field with ACS (in F435W, F606W, F814W). We present the design of the pipeline for the data processing and calibration, including a new approach to ACS self-calibration. We discuss the various data products that we are distributing as high-level science products through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) at STScI, including distortion-corrected "drizzled" mosaics in all the filters, released throughout the course of the observations, as well as the final full-depth mosaics and related products. We deliver these high-level science products to the community on a rapid timescale to enable the widest scientific use of these data, as well as ensuring a public legacy dataset of the highest possible quality that is of lasting value to the entire community.

  1. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    Safety tests were conducted on fourteen fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800°C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during the safety tests, and the predicted values were compared with experimental results. Preliminary comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination (PIE) results of the safety tests show different trends in the prediction of the fractional release depending on the species, and it leads to different conclusions regarding the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles: • For silver, the diffusivity in silicon carbide (SiC) might be over-estimated by a factor of at least 102 to 103 at 1600°C and 1700°C, and at least 10 to 102 at 1800°C. The diffusivity of silver in uranium oxy-carbide (UCO) might also be over-estimated, but the available data are insufficient to allow definitive conclusions to be drawn. • For cesium, the diffusivity in UCO might be over-estimated by a factor of at least 102 to 103 at 1600°C, 105 at 1700°C, and 103 at 1800°C. The diffusivity of cesium in SiC might also over-estimated, by a factor of 10 at 1600°C and 103 at 1700°C, based upon the comparisons between calculated and measured release fractions from intact particles. There is no available estimate at 1800°C since all the compacts heated up at 1800°C contain particles with failed SiC layers whose release dominates the release from intact particles. • For strontium, the diffusivity in SiC might be over-estimated by a factor of 10 to 102 at 1600 and 1700°C, and 102 to 103 at 1800°C. These

  2. Activation and propagation of Ca2+ release from inside the sarcoplasmic reticulum network of mammalian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cully, Tanya R; Edwards, Joshua N; Launikonis, Bradley S

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibres are large and highly elongated cells specialized for producing the force required for posture and movement. The process of controlling the production of force within the muscle, known as excitation–contraction coupling, requires virtually simultaneous release of large amounts of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) at the level of every sarcomere within the muscle fibre. Here we imaged Ca2+ movements within the SR, tubular (t-) system and in the cytoplasm to observe that the SR of skeletal muscle is a connected network capable of allowing diffusion of Ca2+ within its lumen to promote the propagation of Ca2+ release throughout the fibre under conditions where inhibition of SR ryanodine receptors (RyRs) was reduced. Reduction of cytoplasmic [Mg2+] ([Mg2+]cyto) induced a leak of Ca2+ through RyRs, causing a reduction in SR Ca2+ buffering power argued to be due to a breakdown of SR calsequestrin polymers, leading to a local elevation of [Ca2+]SR. The local rise in [Ca2+]SR, an intra-SR Ca2+ transient, induced a local diffusely rising [Ca2+]cyto. A prolonged Ca2+ wave lasting tens of seconds or more was generated from these events. Ca2+ waves were dependent on the diffusion of Ca2+ within the lumen of the SR and ended as [Ca2+]SR dropped to low levels to inactivate RyRs. Inactivation of RyRs allowed re-accumulation of [Ca2+]SR and the activation of secondary Ca2+ waves in the persistent presence of low [Mg2+]cyto if the threshold [Ca2+]SR for RyR opening could be reached. Secondary Ca2+ waves occurred without an abrupt reduction in SR Ca2+ buffering power. Ca2+ release and wave propagation occurred in the absence of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. These observations are consistent with the activation of Ca2+ release through RyRs of lowered cytoplasmic inhibition by [Ca2+]SR or store overload-induced Ca2+ release. Restitution of SR Ca2+ buffering power to its initially high value required imposing normal resting ionic conditions in the cytoplasm

  3. Inhibitory effects of compounds from Phyllanthus amarus on nitric oxide production, lymphocyte proliferation, and cytokine release from phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yuandani; Jantan, Ibrahim; Ilangkovan, Menaga; Husain, Khairana; Chan, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Standardized extract of Phyllanthus amarus has previously been shown to have a strong inhibitory effect on phagocytic activity of human neutrophils. The current study was carried out to evaluate the effects of constituents of the extract of P. amarus on nitric oxide (NO) production as well as lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine release from phagocytes. Three compounds, ethyl 8-hydroxy-8-methyl-tridecanoate, 7β,19α dihydroxy-urs-12-ene, and 1,7,8-trihydroxy-2-naphtaldehyde, together with seven known compounds were isolated from the whole plant of P. amarus. The isolated compounds and reference standards, ie, gallic acid, ellagic acid, corilagin, and geraniin, which were quantitatively analyzed in the extracts, were evaluated for their effects on immune cells. Among the compounds tested, the lignans, especially phyltetralin and phyllanthin, showed strong inhibition on lymphocyte proliferation with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 1.07 μM and 1.82 μM, respectively. Ethyl 8-hydroxy-8-methyl-tridecanoate and 1,7,8-trihydroxy-2-naphtaldehyde exhibited strong inhibition on nitric oxide production with IC50 values of 0.91 μM and 1.07 μM, respectively. Of all the compounds, corilagin was the strongest inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-α release with an IC50 value of 7.39 μM, whereas geraniin depicted the strongest inhibitory activity on interleukin-1β release with an IC50 value of 16.41 μM. The compounds constituting the extract of P. amarus were able to inhibit the innate immune response of phagocytes at different steps. PMID:27354767

  4. Radioactive Fission Product Release from Defective Light Water Reactor Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Konyashov, Vadim V.; Krasnov, Alexander M.

    2002-04-15

    Results are provided of the experimental investigation of radioactive fission product (RFP) release, i.e., krypton, xenon, and iodine radionuclides from fuel elements with initial defects during long-term (3 to 5 yr) irradiation under low linear power (5 to 12 kW/m) and during special experiments in the VK-50 vessel-type boiling water reactor.The calculation model for the RFP release from the fuel-to-cladding gap of the defective fuel element into coolant was developed. It takes into account the convective transport in the fuel-to-cladding gap and RFP sorption on the internal cladding surface and is in good agreement with the available experimental data. An approximate analytical solution of the transport equation is given. The calculation dependencies of the RFP release coefficients on the main parameters such as defect size, fuel-to-cladding gap, temperature of the internal cladding surface, and radioactive decay constant were analyzed.It is shown that the change of the RFP release from the fuel elements with the initial defects during long-term irradiation is, mainly, caused by fuel swelling followed by reduction of the fuel-to-cladding gap and the fuel temperature. The calculation model for the RFP release from defective fuel elements applicable to light water reactors (LWRs) was developed. It takes into account the change of the defective fuel element parameters during long-term irradiation. The calculation error according to the program does not exceed 30% over all the linear power change range of the LWR fuel elements (from 5 to 26 kW/m)

  5. Inflammatory neurodegeneration mediated by nitric oxide from activated glia-inhibiting neuronal respiration, causing glutamate release and excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bal-Price, A; Brown, G C

    2001-09-01

    Glia undergo inflammatory activation in most CNS pathologies and are capable of killing cocultured neurons. We investigated the mechanisms of this inflammatory neurodegeneration using a mixed culture of neurons, microglia, and astrocytes, either when the astrocytes were activated directly with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or LPS/IFN-gamma-activated microglia were added to mixed neuronal cultures. In either case, activated glia caused 75-100% necrotic cell death within 48 hr, which was completely prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (aminoguanidine or 1400W). Activated astrocytes or microglia produced nitric oxide (NO) (steady-state level approximately 0.5 microm), which immediately inhibited the cellular respiration of cocultured neurons, as did authentic NO. NO donors also decreased ATP levels and stimulated lactate production by neurons, consistent with NO-induced respiratory inhibition. NO donors or a specific respiratory inhibitor caused rapid (<1 min) release of glutamate from neuronal and neuronal-astrocytic cultures and subsequent neuronal death that was blocked by an antagonist of NMDA receptor (MK-801). MK-801 also blocked neuronal death induced by activated glia. High oxygen also prevented NO-induced neuronal death, consistent with death being induced by NO inhibition of cytochrome c oxidation in competition with oxygen. Thus activated glia kill neurons via NO from iNOS, which inhibits neuronal respiration resulting in glutamate release and subsequent excitotoxicity. This may contribute to neuronal cell death in inflammatory, infectious, ischemic, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:11517237

  6. Characterization of the Inflammatory Properties of Actively Released HMGB1 in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Stridh, Pernilla; Klevenvall, Lena; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Fischer, Marie; Sundberg, Erik; Andersson, Ulf; Antoine, Daniel J.; Harris, Helena Erlandsson

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pathogenic effects of the endogenous inflammatory mediator high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) have been described in several inflammatory diseases. Recent reports have underlined the importance of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in determination of HMGB1 function and release mechanisms. We investigated the occurrence of PTMs of HMGB1 obtained from synovial fluid (SF) of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Results: Analyses of 17 JIA patients confirmed high HMGB1 levels in SF. Liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of PTMs revealed that total HMGB1 levels were not associated with increased lactate dehydrogenase activity but strongly correlated with nuclear location sequence 2 (NLS2) hyperacetylation, indicating active release of HMGB1. The correlation between total HMGB1 levels and NLS2 hypoacetylation suggests additional, acetylation-independent release mechanisms. Monomethylation of lysine 43 (K43), a proposed neutrophil-specific PTM, was strongly associated with high HMGB1 levels, implying that neutrophils are a source of released HMGB1. Analysis of cysteine redox isoforms, fully reduced HMGB1, disulfide HMGB1, and oxidized HMGB1, revealed that HMGB1 acts as both a chemotactic and a cytokine-inducing mediator. These properties were associated with actively released HMGB1. Innovation: This is the first report that characterizes HMGB1-specific PTMs during a chronic inflammatory condition. Conclusion: HMGB1 in SF from JIA patients is actively released through both acetylation-dependent and -nondependent manners. The presence of various functional HMGB1 redox isoforms confirms the complexity of their pathogenic role during chronic inflammation. Defining HMGB1 release pathways and redox isoforms is critical for the understanding of the contribution of HMGB1 during inflammatory processes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 605–619. PMID:25532033

  7. Release and Skin Permeation of Scopolamine From Thin Polymer Films in Relation to Thermodynamic Activity.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Anders; Lee, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    The object was to demonstrate if the diffusional flux of the drug out of a drug-in-adhesive-type matrix and its subsequent permeation through an excised skin membrane is a linear function of the drug's thermodynamic activity in the thin polymer film. The thermodynamic activity, ap(*), is defined here as the degree of saturation of the drug in the polymer. Both release and release/permeation of scopolamine base from 3 different poylacrylate pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) were measured. The values for ap(*) were calculated using previous published saturation solubilities, wp(s), of the drug in the PSAs. Different rates of release and release/permeation were determined between the 3 PSAs. These differences could be accounted for quantitatively by correlating with ap(*) rather than the concentration of the drug in the polymer films. At similar values for ap(*) the same release or release/permeation rates from the different polymers were measured. The differences could not be related to cross-linking or presence of ionizable groups of the polymers that should influence diffusivity. PMID:27019963

  8. Implementation of a Thermodynamic Solver within a Computer Program for Calculating Fission-Product Release Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Duncan Henry

    During some postulated accidents at nuclear power stations, fuel cooling may be impaired. In such cases, the fuel heats up and the subsequent increased fission-gas release from the fuel to the gap may result in fuel sheath failure. After fuel sheath failure, the barrier between the coolant and the fuel pellets is lost or impaired, gases and vapours from the fuel-to-sheath gap and other open voids in the fuel pellets can be vented. Gases and steam from the coolant can enter the broken fuel sheath and interact with the fuel pellet surfaces and the fission-product inclusion on the fuel surface (including material at the surface of the fuel matrix). The chemistry of this interaction is an important mechanism to model in order to assess fission-product releases from fuel. Starting in 1995, the computer program SOURCE 2.0 was developed by the Canadian nuclear industry to model fission-product release from fuel during such accidents. SOURCE 2.0 has employed an early thermochemical model of irradiated uranium dioxide fuel developed at the Royal Military College of Canada. To overcome the limitations of computers of that time, the implementation of the RMC model employed lookup tables to pre-calculated equilibrium conditions. In the intervening years, the RMC model has been improved, the power of computers has increased significantly, and thermodynamic subroutine libraries have become available. This thesis is the result of extensive work based on these three factors. A prototype computer program (referred to as SC11) has been developed that uses a thermodynamic subroutine library to calculate thermodynamic equilibria using Gibbs energy minimization. The Gibbs energy minimization requires the system temperature (T) and pressure (P), and the inventory of chemical elements (n) in the system. In order to calculate the inventory of chemical elements in the fuel, the list of nuclides and nuclear isomers modelled in SC11 had to be expanded from the list used by SOURCE 2.0. A

  9. Platelet-activating factor induces eosinophil peroxidase release from purified human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Kroegel, C; Yukawa, T; Dent, G; Chanez, P; Chung, K F; Barnes, P J

    1988-01-01

    The degranulation response of purified human eosinophils to platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been studied. PAF induced release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and beta-glucuronidase from highly purified human eosinophils with an EC50 of 0.9 nM. The order of release was comparable with that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The new specific PAF antagonist 3-[4-(2-chlorophenyl)-9-methyl-H-thieno[3,2-f] [1,2,4]triazolo-[4,3a][1,4]-diazepin-2-yl](4-morpholinyl)- 1-propane-one (WEB 2086) inhibited the PAF-induced enzyme release by human eosinophils in a dose-dependent manner. The viability of eosinophils were unaffected both by PAF and WEB 2086. The results suggest that PAF may amplify allergic and inflammatory reactions by release of preformed proteins from eosinophil granules. PMID:3410498

  10. Developmental changes in hypothalamic Kiss1 expression during activation of the pulsatile release of luteinising hormone in maturing ewe lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onset of puberty is characterized by a marked increase in the frequency of release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The KISS1 gene plays a critical role in pubertal development and its product, kisspeptin, stimulates GnRH and LH release. In the study reported h...

  11. Overview of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center's Urban Research and Development Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Sugiyama, G.; Nasstrom, J.

    2007-12-01

    Administration (NOAA), U.S. Navy, and U.S. Air Force, as well as an in-house mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. NARAC provides an easy-to-use Geographical Information System (GIS) for display of plume predictions with affected population counts and detailed maps, and the ability to export plume predictions to other standard GIS capabilities. Data collection and product distribution is provided through a variety of communication methods, including dial-up, satellite, and wired and wireless networks. Ongoing research and development activities will be highlighted. The NARAC scientific support team is developing urban parameterizations for use in a regional dispersion model (see companion paper by Delle Monache). Modifications to the numerical weather prediction model WRF to account for characteristics of urban dynamics are also in progress, as is boundary-layer turbulence model development for simulations with resolutions greater than 1km. The NARAC building-resolving computational fluid dynamics capability, FEM3MP, enjoys ongoing development activities such as the expansion of its ability to model releases of dense gases. Other research activities include sensor-data fusion, such as the reconstruction of unknown source terms from sparse and disparate observations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. The Department of Homeland Security sponsored the production of this material under the Department of Energy contract for the management and operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. UCRL-PROC-234355

  12. The Microsponge Delivery System (MDS): a topical delivery system with reduced irritancy incorporating multiple triggering mechanisms for the release of actives.

    PubMed

    Embil, K; Nacht, S

    1996-01-01

    The Microsponge Delivery System (MDS) is a unique technology for the controlled release of topical agents and consists of macroporous beads, typically 10-25 microns in diameter, loaded with active agent. When applied to the skin, the MDS releases its active ingredient on a time mode and also in response to other stimuli (rubbing, temperature, pH, etc). MDS technology is being used currently in cosmetics, over-the-counter (OTC) skin care, sunscreens and prescription products. By delivering the active gradually to the skin, MDS-benzoyl peroxide formulations, for example, have excellent efficacy with minimal irritation. These are typical benefits from the use of the MDS. PMID:8864994

  13. Regional release of cyclooxygenase products after radiation exposure of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Schneidkraut, M.J.; Kot, P.A.; Ramwell, P.W.; Rose, J.C.

    1986-10-01

    The present study evaluated the regional release of cyclooxygenase products 4 h following 20 Gy gamma irradiation. Thoracic shielding reduced the radiation-induced increase in immunoreactive thromboxane B2 (iTxB2) excretion to control levels while abdominal shielding partially attenuated the altered excretion of this cyclooxygenase product. To assess the role the kidneys play in the radiation-induced increase in iTxB2 excretion, an in situ isolated perfused rat kidney model was developed. The excretion rate of iTxB2 from irradiated isolated perfused kidneys was not significantly different from sham-irradiated perfused kidneys. Radiation exposure did alter renal cyclooxygenase product release in that the excretion of immunoreactive prostaglandin E2 (iPG2) and immunoreactive 6-keto-PGF1 alpha was significantly increased (P less than 0.05) in irradiated isolated perfused kidneys. These data show that radiation-induced increases in iTxB2 excretion are primarily due to altered extrarenal synthesis and/or metabolism of this arachidonate metabolite.

  14. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  15. Activity-dependent, homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release from auditory nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Ngodup, Tenzin; Goetz, Jack A; McGuire, Brian C; Sun, Wei; Lauer, Amanda M; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A

    2015-05-19

    Information processing in the brain requires reliable synaptic transmission. High reliability at specialized auditory nerve synapses in the cochlear nucleus results from many release sites (N), high probability of neurotransmitter release (Pr), and large quantal size (Q). However, high Pr also causes auditory nerve synapses to depress strongly when activated at normal rates for a prolonged period, which reduces fidelity. We studied how synapses are influenced by prolonged activity by exposing mice to constant, nondamaging noise and found that auditory nerve synapses changed to facilitating, reflecting low Pr. For mice returned to quiet, synapses recovered to normal depression, suggesting that these changes are a homeostatic response to activity. Two additional properties, Q and average excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitude, were unaffected by noise rearing, suggesting that the number of release sites (N) must increase to compensate for decreased Pr. These changes in N and Pr were confirmed physiologically using the integration method. Furthermore, consistent with increased N, endbulbs in noise-reared animals had larger VGlut1-positive puncta, larger profiles in electron micrographs, and more release sites per profile. In current-clamp recordings, noise-reared BCs had greater spike fidelity even during high rates of synaptic activity. Thus, auditory nerve synapses regulate excitability through an activity-dependent, homeostatic mechanism, which could have major effects on all downstream processing. Our results also suggest that noise-exposed bushy cells would remain hyperexcitable for a period after returning to normal quiet conditions, which could have perceptual consequences. PMID:25944933

  16. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Data Products, Quality, and Initial Public Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    As a spectroscopic imaging survey, MaNGA presents a host of technical challenges ranging from spectrophotometic calibration to image reconstruction. I will present an overview of the MaNGA data reduction pipeline (DRP) and the algorithms used to process the MaNGA data. Additionally, I will describe the format and quality of the MaNGA data products, and the means by which the first year of survey data will be made publicly available in SDSS Data Release 13 (DR-13).

  17. Controlling the release of active compounds from the inorganic carrier halloysite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tescione, F.; Buonocore, G. G.; Stanzione, M.; Oliviero, M.; Lavorgna, M.

    2014-05-01

    Halloysite (HNTs), a natural material characterized by a nanotube structure, has been used as an inorganic carrier of active compounds in several applications from medicine to anticorrosion coatings. In this present work, vanillin (VAN) used as a antimicrobial model, has been encapsulated within HNTs for exploiting its applicability in the active food packaging sector. The molecule release rate has been controlled by crosslinking at the tube ends the loaded vanillin with copper ions, thus producing a stopper network. The vanillin-loaded HNTs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The antimicrobial release kinetics from the loaded nanoparticles (VAN/HNTs) in water was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the vanillin crosslinked with cupper ions is a feasible method to tailor the release rate of antimicrobial model from HTNs nanoparticles.

  18. Controlling the release of active compounds from the inorganic carrier halloysite

    SciTech Connect

    Tescione, F.; Buonocore, G. G.; Stanzione, M.; Oliviero, M.; Lavorgna, M.

    2014-05-15

    Halloysite (HNTs), a natural material characterized by a nanotube structure, has been used as an inorganic carrier of active compounds in several applications from medicine to anticorrosion coatings. In this present work, vanillin (VAN) used as a antimicrobial model, has been encapsulated within HNTs for exploiting its applicability in the active food packaging sector. The molecule release rate has been controlled by crosslinking at the tube ends the loaded vanillin with copper ions, thus producing a stopper network. The vanillin-loaded HNTs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The antimicrobial release kinetics from the loaded nanoparticles (VAN/HNTs) in water was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the vanillin crosslinked with cupper ions is a feasible method to tailor the release rate of antimicrobial model from HTNs nanoparticles.

  19. Controlled release and antibacterial activity of tetracycline hydrochloride-loaded bacterial cellulose composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shuxia; Wu, Jimin; Huang, Min; Min, Huihua; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-07-10

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is widely used in biomedical applications. In this study, we prepared an antibiotic drug tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH)-loaded bacterial cellulose (BC) composite membranes, and evaluated the drug release, antibacterial activity and biocompatibility. The structure and morphology of the fabricated BC-TCH composite membranes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The TCH release results show that the incorporation of BC matrix to load TCH is able to control the release. In vitro antibacterial assay demonstrate that the developed BC-TCH composites displayed excellent antibacterial activity solely associated with the loaded TCH drug. More importantly, the BC-TCH composite membranes display good biocompatibility. These characteristics of BC-TCH composite membranes indicate that they may successfully serve as wound dressings and other medical biomaterials. PMID:27106158

  20. A curcumin activated carboxymethyl cellulose-montmorillonite clay nanocomposite having enhanced curcumin release in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Madusanka, Nadeesh; de Silva, K M Nalin; Amaratunga, Gehan

    2015-12-10

    A novel curcumin activated carboxymethylcellulose-montmorillonite nanocomposite is reported. A superabsorbent biopolymer; carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was used as an emulsifier for curcumin which is a turmeric derived water insoluble polyphenolic compound with antibacterial/anti-cancer properties. Montmorillonite (MMT) nanoclay was incorporated in the formulation as a matrix material which also plays a role in release kinetics. It was observed that water solubility of curcumin in the nanocomposite has significantly increased (60% release within 2h and 30 min in distilled water at pH 5.4) compared to pure curcumin. The prepared curcumin activated carboxymethylcellulose-montmorillonite nanocomposite is suitable as a curcumin carrier having enhanced release and structural properties. PMID:26428174

  1. Unrecognized delayed toxic lithium peak concentration in an acute poisoning with sustained release lithium product.

    PubMed

    Borrás-Blasco, Joaquín; Sirvent, Ana Esther; Navarro-Ruiz, Andrés; Murcia-López, Ana; Romero-Crespo, Isabel; Enriquez, Ricardo

    2007-03-01

    A 32-year-old female with a history of bipolar disorder was admitted after taking approximately 16 g of an extended-release lithium carbonate formulation in an attempted suicide. Five hours after consumption, the lithium serum level was 3.2 mEq/L. Fourteen hours after consumption, the lithium level was 5.1 mEq/L and the patient was asymptomatic. Due to a level > 4 mEq/L, the patient was transferred to a renal medicine service for hemodialysis. The lithium concentration 6 hours after the hemodialysis was 2.54 mEq/L. Thirty seven hours after the consumption (15 hours after hemodialysis), lithium levels increased up to 6.09 mEq/L. A second hemodialysis session was performed, which successfully reduced the serum lithium concentration to 1.86 mEq/L. Lithium levels 85 hours after the consumption were 0.61 mEq/L and the patient was transferred to the Psychiatry Department. Unrecognized delayed toxic peak lithium concentration may appear in an acute poisoning with a sustained release lithium product. Therefore, patients presenting with acute intoxication with extended release formulations should be managed with caution, and continued drug monitoring is suggested. PMID:17396741

  2. Low pH anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge for enhanced phosphorous release.

    PubMed

    Latif, Muhammad A; Mehta, Chirag M; Batstone, Damien J

    2015-09-15

    This paper assesses anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) at low pH to enhance phosphorous solubility. Batch biochemical methane potential tests were conducted at a pH range of 5 to 7.2 in two separate sets (two different WAS samples collected from municipal WWTP). Low pH (<5.7) caused a significant (p = 0.004) decrease in methane potential (B0) up to 33% and 3.6 times increase in phosphorus release compared to neutral pH (7-7.7), but with no major change in methane production rate coefficient (khyd). The loss in methane yield was mainly due to decrease in hydrolytic capability rather than inhibition of methanogenesis with volatile fatty acids being <300 mgCOD L(-1) and soluble COD <1300 mgCOD L(-1) even at low pH. While pH did not influence the acetoclastic community (Methanosaeta dominated), it was the primary driver for the remaining community (p = 0.004), and caused a loss of diversity and shift to Clostridia. PMID:26081435

  3. Cell-Demanded VEGF Release via Nanocapsules Elicits Different Receptor Activation Dynamics and Enhanced Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Suwei; Segura, Tatiana

    2016-06-01

    Although the delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with extended release profiles has consistently shown beneficial therapeutic effects compared with bolus delivery, [Martino, M. M., F. Tortelli, M. Mochizuki, S. Traub, D. Ben-David, G. A. Kuhn, R. Muller, E. Livne, S. A. Eming, and J. A. Hubbell. Sci. Transl. Med. 3(100):100ra189, 2011; Martino, M. M., P. S. Briquez, A. Ranga, M. P. Lutolf, and J. A. Hubbell. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 110(12):4563-4568, 2013; Amiram, M., K. M. Luginbuhl, X. Li, M. N. Feinglos, and A. Chilkoti. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 110(8):2792-2797, 2013] it remains unclear if the reason is solely due to the physical availability and the reduced degradation of the protein. Here we studied the activation of VEGF receptor 2 (VR-2) by sustained released VEGF compared with bolus delivered VEGF to unveil that sustained delivery system alters the dynamics of receptor activation and affects the actions of cells between sprouting and proliferation. We utilized a protein nanocapsule delivery strategy that releases VEGF as mediated by extracellular proteases. These protein nanocapsules were synthesized through an aqueous assembly of a nanogel-peptide shell around the protein, leading to one to two proteins encapsulated per nanocapsule. Receptor activation studies revealed differential dynamics of receptor activation for slowly released VEGF compared with bolus delivered VEGF. As expected sustained released VEGF via nanocapsules resulted in enhanced vascular sprouting in vitro and in vivo. These studies demonstrate the physical presentation of VEGF, in this case of a slow release with time, can affect its molecular mechanism of actions and cause alterations in cellular responses and therapeutic outcomes. PMID:26940611

  4. Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and Xe-133 data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of Xe-133 from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8×1014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 1.2×1016 to 2.5×1016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 6.1×1013 to 3.6×1014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases.

  5. UVB Generates Microvesicle Particle Release in Part Due to Platelet-activating Factor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bihl, Ji C; Rapp, Christine M; Chen, Yanfang; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    The lipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) and oxidized glycerophosphocholine PAF agonists produced by ultraviolet B (UVB) have been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in UVB-mediated processes, from acute inflammation to delayed systemic immunosuppression. Recent studies have provided evidence that microvesicle particles (MVPs) are released from cells in response to various signals including stressors. Importantly, these small membrane fragments can interact with various cell types by delivering bioactive molecules. The present studies were designed to test if UVB radiation can generate MVP release from epithelial cells, and the potential role of PAF receptor (PAF-R) signaling in this process. We demonstrate that UVB irradiation of the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT resulted in the release of MVPs. Similarly, treatment of HaCaT cells with the PAF-R agonist carbamoyl PAF also generated equivalent amounts of MVP release. Of note, pretreatment of HaCaT cells with antioxidants blocked MVP release from UVB but not PAF-R agonist N-methyl carbamyl PAF (CPAF). Importantly, UVB irradiation of the PAF-R-negative human epithelial cell line KB and KB transduced with functional PAF-Rs resulted in MVP release only in PAF-R-positive cells. These studies demonstrate that UVB can generate MVPs in vitro and that PAF-R signaling appears important in this process. PMID:26876152

  6. Glyceryl monooleate-based otic delivery system of ofloxacin: release profile and bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Samer; Abu-Dahab, Rana; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Sallam, Alsayyed

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the preparation and characterization of glyceryl monooleate- (GMO) based drug delivery system containing ofloxacin for the treatment of otitis externa. Acetate buffer (pH 4.5) containing dissolved ofloxacin was added to molten GMO as an aqueous phase, this resulted in the formation of a cubic and a reverse hexagonal phases. The release behavior of ofloxacin from the drug delivery system was studied using three different methods. The mechanism of drug release using paddles/dissolution apparatus and Franz diffusion cells followed Higuchi and Fickian diffusion models; whereas intrinsic release rate method showed zero-order kinetics. The intrinsic release rate was estimated and found to be 187.2 µg/cm(2)/h. The release mechanisms were similar irrespective of the loaded ofloxacin amount, however, the higher drug load displayed higher release rate. The drug delivery system was proven to be microbiologically effective by using agar diffusion method, against Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The GMO/ofloxacin formulation was stable for 6 months after preparation at room temperature as measured with respect to phase stability and antibacterial activity. PMID:24392877

  7. 27 CFR 41.85 - Release from customs custody of imported tobacco products or cigarette papers or tubes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Release from customs custody of imported tobacco products or cigarette papers or tubes. 41.85 Section 41.85 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  8. Greenhouse production of Impatiens wallerana using a controlled-release fertiliser produces quality finished plants with enhanced garden performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management during production can greatly influence post-production quality of plants. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of controlled release fertilizer (CRF) applied at the time of plug planting on the garden performance (post-production) of impatiens (Impatiens wal...

  9. Vanadium(V) and -(IV) complexes of anionic polysaccharides: Controlled release pharmaceutical formulations and models of vanadium biotransformation products.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Lauren E; McLeod, Andrew I; Aitken, Jade B; Levina, Aviva; Lay, Peter A

    2015-06-01

    Uncontrolled reactions in biological media are a main obstacle for clinical translation of V-based anti-diabetic or anti-cancer pro-drugs. We investigated the use of controlled-release pharmaceutical formulations to ameliorate this issue with a series of V(V) and (IV) complexes of anionic polysaccharides. Carboxymethyl cellulose, xanthan gum, or alginic acid formulations were prepared by the reactions of [VO4](3-) with one or two molar equivalents of biological reductants, L-ascorbic acid (AA) or L-cysteine (Cys), in the presence of excess polysaccharide at pH~7 or pH~4. XANES studies with the use of a previously developed library of model V(V), V(IV) and V(III) complexes showed that reactions in the presence of AA led mostly to the mixtures of five- and six-coordinate V(IV) species, while the reactions in the presence of Cys led predominantly to the mixtures of five- and six-coordinate V(V) species. The XANES spectra of some of these samples closely matched those reported previously for [VO4](3-) biotransformation products in isolated blood plasma, red blood cells, or cultured adipocytes, which supports the hypothesis that modified polysaccharides are major binders of V(V) and V(IV) in biological systems. Studies by EPR spectroscopy suggested predominant V(IV)-carboxylato binding in complexes with polysaccharides. One of the isolated products (a V(IV)-alginato complex) showed selective release of low-molecular-mass V species at pH~8, but not at pH~2, which makes it a promising lead for the development of V-containing formulations for oral administration that are stable in the stomach, but release the active ingredient in the intestines. PMID:25958254

  10. Granzyme B Cleaves Decorin, Biglycan and Soluble Betaglycan, Releasing Active Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Wendy A.; Shackleford, Marlo; Vanden Hoek, Amanda; Zhao, Hongyan; Hackett, Tillie L.; Knight, Darryl A.; Granville, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Granzyme B (GrB) is a pro-apoptotic serine protease that contributes to immune-mediated target cell apoptosis. However, during inflammation, GrB accumulates in the extracellular space, retains its activity, and is capable of cleaving extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recent studies have implicated a pathogenic extracellular role for GrB in cardiovascular disease, yet the pathophysiological consequences of extracellular GrB activity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to identify proteoglycan (PG) substrates of GrB and examine the ability of GrB to release PG-sequestered TGF-β1 into the extracellular milieu. Methods/Results Three extracellular GrB PG substrates were identified; decorin, biglycan and betaglycan. As all of these PGs sequester active TGF-β1, cytokine release assays were conducted to establish if GrB-mediated PG cleavage induced TGF-β1 release. Our data confirmed that GrB liberated TGF-β1 from all three substrates as well as from endogenous ECM and this process was inhibited by the GrB inhibitor 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin. The released TGF-β1 retained its activity as indicated by the induction of SMAD-3 phosphorylation in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells. Conclusion In addition to contributing to ECM degradation and the loss of tissue structural integrity in vivo, increased extracellular GrB activity is also capable of inducing the release of active TGF-β1 from PGs. PMID:22479366

  11. Main individual and product characteristics influencing in-mouth flavour release during eating masticated food products with different textures: mechanistic modelling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Doyennette, M; Déléris, I; Féron, G; Guichard, E; Souchon, I; Trelea, I C

    2014-01-01

    A mechanistic model predicting flavour release during oral processing of masticated foods was developed. The description of main physiological steps (product mastication and swallowing) and physical mechanisms (mass transfer, product breakdown and dissolution) occurring while eating allowed satisfactory simulation of in vivo release profiles of ethyl propanoate and 2-nonanone, measured by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry on ten representative subjects during the consumption of four cheeses with different textures. Model sensitivity analysis showed that the main parameters affecting release intensity were the product dissolution rate in the mouth, the mass transfer coefficient in the bolus, the air-bolus contact area in the mouth and the respiratory frequency. Parameters furthermore affecting release dynamics were the mastication phase duration, the velopharynx opening and the rate of saliva incorporation into the bolus. Specific retention of 2-nonanone on mucosa was assumed to explain aroma release kinetics and confirmed when gaseous samples were consumed. PMID:24045155

  12. Characterizing the release of bioactive N-glycans from dairy products by a novel endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Karav, Sercan; Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega De Moura; Le Parc, Annabelle; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A; Block, David E; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase isolated from B. infantis ATCC 15697 (EndoBI-1) is a novel enzyme that cleaves N-N'-diacetyl chitobiose moieties found in the N-glycan core of high mannose, hybrid, and complex N-glycans. These conjugated N-glycans are recently shown as a new prebiotic source that stimulates the growth of a key infant gut microbe, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. Infantis. The effects of pH (4.45-8.45), temperature (27.5-77.5°C), reaction time (15-475 min), and enzyme/protein ratio (1:3,000-1:333) were evaluated on the release of N-glycans from bovine colostrum whey by EndoBI-1. A central composite design was used, including a two-level factorial design (2(4)) with four center points and eight axial points. In general, low pH values, longer reaction times, higher enzyme/protein ratio, and temperatures around 52°C resulted in the highest yield. The results demonstrated that bovine colostrum whey, considered to be a by/waste product, can be used as a glycan source with a yield of 20 mg N-glycan/g total protein under optimal conditions for the ranges investigated. Importantly, these processing conditions are suitable to be incorporated into routine dairy processing activities, opening the door for an entirely new class of products (released bioactive glycans and glycan-free milk). The new enzyme's activity was also compared with a commercially available enzyme, showing that EndoBI-1 is more active on native proteins than PNGase F and can be efficiently used during pasteurization, streamlining its integration into existing processing strategies. PMID:26097235

  13. Vascular and angiogenic activities of CORM-401, an oxidant-sensitive CO-releasing molecule.

    PubMed

    Fayad-Kobeissi, Sarah; Ratovonantenaina, Johary; Dabiré, Hubert; Wilson, Jayne Louise; Rodriguez, Anne Marie; Berdeaux, Alain; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Mann, Brian E; Motterlini, Roberto; Foresti, Roberta

    2016-02-15

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is generated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and displays important signaling, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities, indicating that pharmacological agents mimicking its action may have therapeutic benefit. This study examined the biochemical and pharmacological properties of CORM-401, a recently described CO-releasing molecule containing manganese as a metal center. We used in vitro approaches, ex-vivo rat aortic rings and the EA.hy926 endothelial cell line in culture to address how CORM-401 releases CO and whether the compound modulates vascular tone and pro-angiogenic activities, respectively. We found that CORM-401 released up to three CO/mole of compound depending on the concentration of the acceptor myoglobin. Oxidants such as H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide or hypochlorous acid increased the CO liberated by CORM-401. CORM-401 also relaxed pre-contracted aortic rings and vasorelaxation was enhanced in combination with H2O2. Consistent with the release of multiple CO molecules, CORM-401-induced vasodilation was three times higher than that elicited by CORM-A1, which exhibits a similar half-life to CORM-401 but liberates only one CO/mole of compound. Furthermore, endothelial cells exposed to CORM-401 accumulated CO intracellularly, accelerated migration in vitro and increased VEGF and IL-8 levels. Studies using pharmacological inhibitors revealed HO-1 and p38 MAP kinase as two independent and parallel mechanisms involved in stimulating migration. We conclude that the ability of CORM-401 to release multiple CO, its sensitivity to oxidants which increase CO release, and its vascular and pro-angiogenic properties highlight new advances in the design of CO-releasing molecules that can be tailored for the treatment of inflammatory and oxidative stress-mediated pathologies. PMID:26721585

  14. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Enhances Tissue Plasminogen Activator Release Capacity in Atherosclerotic Man

    PubMed Central

    Svennerholm, Kristina; Haney, Michael; Biber, Björn; Ulfhammer, Erik; Saluveer, Ott; Larsson, Pia; Omerovic, Elmir; Jern, Sverker; Bergh, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    The expression of the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) gene appears to be under epigenetic control and can be affected by histone deacetylation inhibition. The study aimed to test if histone deacetalyase inhibitor treatment lead to increased t-PA release or reduced exhaustion in t-PA release in response to stimulation, as well as change in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in subjects with coronary disease. In this clinical study, 16 post-myocardial infarction subjects, the perfused forearm model was used with isoprenaline provocation during 20 minutes, to stimulate local t-PA release. Each subject was measured twice on the same day (repeated stimuli sequences) as well as on two different occasions, without treatment and after four weeks of treatment with valproic acid (500 mg, twice daily). Net forearm release for t-PA in response to isoprenaline at minutes 1.5, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 was measured, allowing assessment of cumulative t-PA release. There was a reduction in the exhaustion of cumulative t-PA release during repeated and prolonged stimulation with valproic acid treatment compared to non-treatment. Plasma PAI-1 antigen was decreased following treatment compared to non-treatment (18.4 ± 10.0 vs. 11.0 ± 7.1 nanograms/ml respectively, mean with 95% confidence interval). These findings demonstrate that histone deacetylation inhibition increases the capacity for endogenous t-PA release in subjects with vascular disease. Furthermore, the fibrinolytic balance is favored with suppressed PAI-1 levels. More studies are needed to establish the clinical relevance of these findings. Trial registration EU Clinical Trials Register 2012-004950-27 PMID:25807501

  15. Activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z L; Mochizuki, T; Watanabe, H; Maeyama, K

    1999-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism by which stress induces rapid histamine release from mast cells, Wistar rats, pretreated as neonates with capsaicin, were subjected to immobilization stress for 2 h, and histamine release was measured in paws of anesthetized rats by using in vivo microdialysis after activation of sensory nerves by electrical or chemical stimulation. Immobilization stress studies indicated that in control rats stress induced a 2.7-fold increase in the level of plasma histamine compared to that in freely moving rats. Whereas pretreatment with capsaicin significantly decreased stress-induced elevation of plasma histamine. Microdialysis studies showed that electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve resulted in a 4-fold increase of histamine release in rat paws. However, this increase was significantly inhibited in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Furthermore, injection of capsaicin into rat paw significantly increased histamine release in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells. PMID:10462124

  16. Active food packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymers: study of the release kinetics of ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Otero-Pazos, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bernaldo de Quirós, Ana; Sendón, Raquel; Benito-Peña, Elena; González-Vallejo, Victoria; Moreno-Bondi, M Cruz; Angulo, Immaculada; Paseiro-Losada, Perfecto

    2014-11-19

    A novel active packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was developed for the controlled release of ferulic acid. The release kinetics of ferulic acid from the active system to food simulants (10, 20, and 50% ethanol (v/v), 3% acetic acid (w/v), and vegetable oil), substitutes (95% ethanol (v/v) and isooctane), and real food samples at different temperatures were studied. The key parameters of the diffusion process were calculated by using a mathematical modeling based on Fick's second law. The ferulic acid release was affected by the temperature as well as the percentage of ethanol of the simulant. The fastest release occurred in 95% ethanol (v/v) at 20 °C. The diffusion coefficients (D) obtained ranged between 1.8 × 10(-11) and 4.2 × 10(-9) cm(2)/s. A very good correlation between experimental and estimated data was obtained, and consequently the model could be used to predict the release of ferulic acid into food simulants and real food samples. PMID:25369799

  17. Production and characterization of antibodies to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hazum, E; Schvartz, I; Popliker, M

    1987-01-15

    Antibodies to the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor of bovine pituitary membranes have been raised in rabbits by immunization with affinity-purified receptor preparations. These antibodies did not compete with 125I-labeled GnRH analog (Buserelin) for binding to the receptors but did precipitate rat and bovine solubilized receptors labeled with 125I-Buserelin. Binding of the antibodies to the receptors was also demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of 125I-labeled purified receptors and photoaffinity-labeled receptors. The antibodies did not have a GnRH-like activity but rather inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone release from cultured rat pituitary cells. In addition, the antibodies did not inhibit luteinizing hormone release stimulated by high K+ concentration. This suggests that the antibodies recognize domains of the receptor other than the binding site of the hormone and thereby inhibit the biological response. These GnRH receptor antibodies provide a useful tool for studying GnRH receptor structure, function, localization, and biosynthesis. PMID:3027055

  18. Characteristics of organic, nitrogen and phosphorus species released from ultrasonic treatment of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Qiu, Zhaofu; Lu, Shuguang; Ying, Weichi

    2010-04-15

    Batch ultrasonic treatments (sonication) were performed on two waste activated sludge (WAS) samples, BNR-WAS from the biological nitrogen removal unit and BNPR-WAS from the biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal unit of two Shanghai municipal WWTPs, to determine the effects of sonication time and intensity on the amount and distribution of the organic, N and P species released from the samples. The concentration profiles of COD, TOC fractions in different molecular weight (MW) ranges (<2 kDa, 2-100 kDa, and >100 kDa), TN, organic-N, NH(3)-N, TP and PO(4)-P were monitored during the treatment at three sonication intensity levels (0.167, 0.330 and 0.500 W/mL). Species releases increased with sonication time and/or intensity; the release rates were accelerated when the sonication intensity was above a critical level between 0.330 and 0.500 W/mL. After 1 h of treatment, 37.9%, 37.5% and 50.8% of the organic content (measured as COD) of BNR-WAS were released, while the same for BNPR-WAS were 40.9%, 55.3% and 56.9%. It also resulted in the release of 40.9%, 38.7%, and 52.1% of total nitrogen from BNR-WAS, relative to 46.2%, 61.6%, and 70.4% of the same from BNPR-WAS; most released nitrogen were organic-N (65.0% and 84.9%), followed by NH(3)-N (34.7% and 14.9%) and trace amounts of nitrate and nitrite. More total phosphorus of a higher orthophosphate content was released from BNRP-WAS (>60% release after 1 h of sonication, 80% was PO(4)-P) than from BNR-WAS (<50% release, 40% was PO(4)-P). The differences in the releases as well as the molecular weight distribution pattern of the soluble TOC species were due to the different structure and composition of the sludge samples. Sonication is a viable sludge treatment process when it is combined with a phosphorus recovery process to remove most of the released PO(4)-P so that the supernatant may be returned for further biological treatment. PMID:20022695

  19. Anhydrous ammonia thefts and releases associated with illicit methamphetamine production--16 states, January 2000-June 2004.

    PubMed

    2005-04-15

    Anhydrous ammonia, a colorless gas with a pungent, suffocating fumes, is used primarily as an agricultural fertilizer and industrial refrigerant. Anhydrous ammonia is also a key ingredient for illicit methamphetamine (meth) production in makeshift laboratories. Exposure to anhydrous ammonia can be immediately dangerous to life or health. Anhydrous ammonia generally is not available for sale to the public; states require a license for purchase. Because of this, many illicit meth producers (i.e., "cookers") resort to stealing anhydrous ammonia. If released into the environment, anhydrous ammonia can cause acute injuries to emergency responders, the public, and the cookers themselves. In addition, when handled improperly, anhydrous ammonia can be explosive and deadly. This report describes examples of anhydrous ammonia thefts associated with illicit meth production, summarizes ammonia theft events reported to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and suggests injury prevention recommendations, such as installing valve locks or fencing on unattended tanks and donning appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when responding to releases. PMID:15829866

  20. Fission product release and survivability of UN-kernel LWR TRISO fuel

    SciTech Connect

    T. M. Besmann; M. K. Ferber; H.-T. Lin; B. P. Collin

    2014-05-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from fission product recoil calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 um diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated within a TRISO particle undergoing burnup. Creep and swelling of the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by computing the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers from internal pressure and thermomechanics of the layers. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.

  1. Fission product release and survivability of UN-kernel LWR TRISO fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besmann, T. M.; Ferber, M. K.; Lin, H.-T.; Collin, B. P.

    2014-05-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from fission product recoil calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 μm diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated within a TRISO particle undergoing burnup. Creep and swelling of the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by computing the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers from internal pressure and thermomechanics of the layers. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.

  2. Overview of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center's urban research and development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Sugiyama, G A; Nasstrom, J

    2007-09-05

    Administration (NOAA), U.S. Navy, and U.S. Air Force, as well as an in-house mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. NARAC provides an easy-to-use Geographical Information System (GIS) for display of plume predictions with affected population counts and detailed maps, and the ability to export plume predictions to other standard GIS capabilities. Data collection and product distribution is provided through a variety of communication methods, including dial-up, satellite, and wired and wireless networks. Ongoing research and development activities will be highlighted. The NARAC scientific support team is developing urban parameterizations for use in a regional dispersion model (see companion paper by Delle Monache). Modifications to the numerical weather prediction model WRF to account for characteristics of urban dynamics are also in progress, as is boundary-layer turbulence model development for simulations with resolutions greater than 1km. The NARAC building-resolving computational fluid dynamics capability, FEM3MP, enjoys ongoing development activities such as the expansion of its ability to model releases of dense gases. Other research activities include sensor-data fusion, such as the reconstruction of unknown source terms from sparse and disparate observations.

  3. Remote modulation of neural activities via near-infrared triggered release of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Luo, Rongcong; Lin, Xudong; Jadhav, Amol D; Zhang, Zicong; Yan, Li; Chan, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Xianfeng; He, Jufang; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2015-10-01

    The capability to remotely control the release of biomolecules provides an unique opportunity to monitor and regulate neural signaling, which spans extraordinary spatial and temporal scales. While various strategies, including local perfusion, molecular "uncaging", or photosensitive polymeric materials, have been applied to achieve controlled releasing of neuro-active substances, it is still challenging to adopt these technologies in many experimental contexts that require a straightforward but versatile loading-releasing mechanism. Here, we develop a synthetic strategy for remotely controllable releasing of neuro-modulating molecules. This platform is based on microscale composite hydrogels that incorporate polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles as photo-thermal transducers and is triggered by near-infrared-light (NIR) irradiation. Specifically, we first demonstrate the utility of our technology by recapitulating the "turning assay" and "collapse assay", which involve localized treatment of chemotactic factors (e.g. Netrin or Semaphorin 3A) to subcellular neural elements and have been extensively used in studying axonal pathfinding. On a network scale, the photo-sensitive microgels are also validated for light-controlled releasing of neurotransmitters (e.g. glutamate). A single NIR-triggered release is sufficient to change the dynamics of a cultured hippocampal neuron network. Taking the advantage of NIR's capability to penetrate deep into live tissue, this technology is further shown to work similarly well in vivo, which is evidenced by synchronized spiking activity in response to NIR-triggered delivery of glutamate in rat auditory cortex, demonstrating remote control of brain activity without any genetic modifications. Notably, our nano-composite microgels are capable of delivering various molecules, ranging from small chemicals to large proteins, without involving any crosslinking chemistry. Such great versatility and ease-of-use will likely make our optically

  4. Botulinum Toxin B in the Sensory Afferent: Transmitter release, Spinal activation and Pain Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Marc J.; Terashima, Tetsuji; Steinauer, Joanne J.; Eddinger, Kelly A.; Yaksh, Tony L.; Xu, Qinghao

    2014-01-01

    We addressed the hypothesis that intraplantar Botulinum toxin B (rimabotulinumtoxin B: BoNT-B) has an early local effect upon peripheral afferent terminal releasing function and over time will be transported to the central terminals of the primary afferent. Once in the terminals it will cleave synaptic protein, block spinal afferent transmitter release and thereby prevent spinal nociceptive excitation and behavior. In mice, C57Bl/6 males, intraplantar BoNT-B (1U), given unilaterally into the hind paw had no effect upon survival or motor function but ipsilaterally decreased: i) intraplantar formalin evoked flinching; ii) intraplantar capsaicin evoked plasma extravasation in the hindpaw measured by Evans blue in the paw; iii) intraplantar formalin evoked dorsal horn SP release (NK1 receptor internalization); iv) intraplantar formalin evoked dorsal horn neuronal activation (cFos); v) ipsilateral DRG VAMP; vi) ipsilateral SP release otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal capsaicin; vii) ipsilateral activation of cFos otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal substance P. These results indicate that BoNT-B after unilateral intraplantar delivery is taken up by the peripheral terminal, is locally active (blocking plasma extravasation), is transported to the ipsilateral DRG to cleave VAMP and is acting presynaptically to block release from the spinal peptidergic terminal. The observations following intrathecal SP offer evidence for a possible transsynaptic effect of intraplantar BoNT. These results provide robust evidence that peripheral BoNT-B can alter peripheral and central terminal release from a nociceptor and attenuate downstream nociceptive processing via a presynaptic effect, with further evidence suggesting a possible postsynaptic effect. PMID:24333775

  5. Rapid aqueous release of fission products from high burn-up LWR fuel: Experimental results and correlations with fission gas release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.; Günther-Leopold, I.; Kobler Waldis, J.; Linder, H. P.; Low, J.; Cui, D.; Ekeroth, E.; Spahiu, K.; Evins, L. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the rapid aqueous release of fission products from UO 2 and MOX fuel are of interest for the assessment of the safety of geological disposal of spent fuel, because of the associated potential contribution to dose in radiological safety assessment. Studies have shown that correlations between fission gas release (FGR) and the fraction rapidly leached of various long-lived fission products can provide a useful method to obtain some of this information. Previously, these studies have been limited largely to fuel with burn-up values below 50 MWd/kg U. Collaborative studies involving SKB, Studsvik, Nagra and PSI have provided new data on short-term release of 137Cs and 129I for a number of fuels irradiated to burn-ups of 50-75 MWd/kgU. In addition a method for analysis of leaching solutions for 79Se was developed. The results of the studies show that the fractional release of 137Cs is usually much lower than the FGR covering the entire range of burn-ups studied. Fractional 129I releases are somewhat larger, but only in cases in which the fuel was forcibly extracted from the cladding. Despite the expected high degree of segregation of fission gas (and by association 137Cs and 129I) in the high burn-up rim, no evidence was found for a significant contribution to release from the rim region. The method for 79Se analysis developed did not permit its detection. Nonetheless, based on the detection limit, the results suggest that 79Se is not preferentially leached from spent fuel.

  6. Interaction of urokinase A chain with the receptor of human keratinocytes stimulates release of urokinase-like plasminogen activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Magnelli, L.; Pucci, M.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1990-03-01

    On the basis of a fibrinolytic assay with {sup 125}I-fibrin, zymography, and immunoprobing with anti-human urokinase antibody, the authors have observed that the in vitro established NCTC human keratinocyte cell line releases into the culture medium a 54,000-Da plasminogen activator which is indistinguishable from human urokinase. Only the early release following the washing of keratinocyte monolayers is accounted for by secretion of preformed enzyme, while late secretory events require the de novo synthesis of urokinase. The released enzyme can interact by autocriny with its own receptor present on keratinocytes. The addition to the keratinocyte culture medium of the urokinase A chain can stimulate a concentration-dependent urokinase oversecretion, which is not paralleled by oversecretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Since stimulation of urokinase production can be obtained by an A chain concentration which was previously shown to be efficient in inducing keratinocyte mobilization in an in vitro migration model system, they hypothesize that this mechanism may be important in vivo during the process of wound repair.

  7. Intracellular calcium-release and protein kinase C-activation stimulate sonic hedgehog gene expression during gastric acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Zavros, Yana; Tessier, Art; Waghray, Meghna; Lentz, Steve; Gumucio, Deborah; Todisco, Andrea; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hypochlorhydria during Helicobacter pylori infection inhibits gastric Shh expression. We investigated whether acid-secretory mechanisms regulate Shh gene expression through Ca2+i-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) or cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA)-activation. Method We blocked Hedgehog signaling by transgenically overexpressing a secreted form of the Hedgehog interacting protein-1 (sHip-1), a natural inhibitor of hedgehog ligands, which induced hypochlorhydria. Gadolinium, EGTA+BAPTA, PKC-overexpressing adenoviruses, and PKC-inhibitors were used to modulate Ca2+i-release, PKC-activity and Shh gene expression in primary gastric cell, organ, and AGS cell line cultures. PKA hyperactivity was induced in the H+/K+-β-cholera-toxin overexpressing mice (Ctox). Results Mice that expressed sHip-1 had lower levels of gastric acid (hypochlorhydria), reduced production of somatostatin, and increased gastrin gene expression. Hypochlorhydria in these mice repressed Shh gene expression, similar to the levels obtained with omeprazole treatment of wild-type mice. However, Shh expression was also repressed in the hyperchlorhydric Ctox model with elevated cAMP, suggesting that the regulation of Shh was not solely acid-dependent, but pertained to specific acid-stimulatory signaling pathways. Based on previous reports that Ca2+i-release also stimulates acid secretion in parietal cells, we showed that gadolinium-, thapsigargin- and carbachol-mediated release of Ca2+i induced Shh expression. Ca2+-chelation with BAPTA+EGTA reduced Shh expression. Overexpression of PKC-α, -β and -δ (but not PKC-ε) induced Shh gene expression. In addition, phorbol esters induced a Shh-regulated reporter gene. Conclusion Secretagogues that stimulate gastric acid secretion induce Shh gene expression through increased Ca2+i-release and PKC activation. Shh might be the ligand transducing changes in gastric acidity to the regulation of G-cell secretion of gastrin. PMID:20816837

  8. Stimulus specificity of prostaglandin inhibition of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocyte lysosomal enzyme release and superoxide anion production.

    PubMed Central

    Fantone, J. C.; Marasco, W. A.; Elgas, L. J.; Ward, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) of the E series and PGI2 have been shown to inhibit acute inflammatory reactions in vivo and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), chemotaxis, lysosomal enzyme release, and superoxide anion (O-2) production in vitro. This inhibition of neutrophil stimulation by PGEs and PGI2 has been correlated with their ability to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. However, the mechanism(s) by which PGEs and PGI2 alter the complex biochemical and biophysical events associated with stimulus-response coupling in the neutrophil are not clear. It is reported here that both PGEs and PGI2 in micromolar concentrations inhibit formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)- and zymosan-induced lysosomal enzyme secretion and superoxide anion production in a dose-dependent manner. No preincubation time of PMNs with the prostaglandins is required for inhibition. Addition of PGEs 10 seconds or later after FMLP stimulation does not alter the biologic response of the neutrophils to the stimulus, suggesting that the prostaglandin inhibition effects early events associated with stimulus-response coupling in the neutrophil. Prostaglandin inhibition of lysosomal enzyme release by the calcium ionophore A23187 was overcome by increasing the extracellular ionophore and/or calcium concentration, suggesting that PGs may modulate intracellular free calcium levels in a manner similar to that observed with platelets. Inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced neutrophil lysosomal enzyme secretion by PGEs and PGI2 was overcome by increasing concentrations of PMA. However, neither PGEs nor PGI2 altered O-2 production by PMA-treated neutrophils. These data indicate a dissociation between PMA-stimulated O-2 production and lysosomal enzyme release. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of neutrophil stimulation by PGEs and PGI2 is a result of increased intracellular cyclic AMP levels and modulation of calcium

  9. Antinociception mediated by alpha2-adrenergic activation involves increasing TNFα expression and restoring TNFα and alpha2-adrenergic inhibition of norepinephrine release

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Robert N.; Sud, Reeteka; Knight, Paul R.; Ignatowski, Tracey A.

    2007-01-01

    The central component that establishes chronic pain from peripheral nerve injury is associated with increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production in the brain. This study examined TNFα and its reciprocally permissive role with α2-adrenergic activation during peak and progressive decline of thermal hyperalgesia in sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI). Accumulation of TNFα mRNA (in situ hybridization) increases in the hippocampus and locus coeruleus during the onset of neuropathic pain and persists as hyperalgesia abates. Activation of α2-adrenergic receptors in control rats decreases TNFα mRNA accumulation in these brain regions. In contrast, during hyperalgesia, α2-adrenergic activation enhances TNFα mRNA accumulation. Whether this enhanced TNFα production is associated with changes in the regulation of norepinephrine (NE) release was tested. Hippocampal slices were electrically depolarized to evaluate α2-adrenergic and TNFα regulation of NE release. While inhibition of NE release by TNFα is maximal during peak hyperalgesia, it subsequently transforms to facilitate NE release. In addition, α2-adrenergic receptor activation with clonidine (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) in CCI rats experiencing hyperalgesia restores TNFα and α2-adrenergic inhibition of NE release. While TNFα directs the development of hyperalgesia, it also directs its resolution. Transformed sensitivity to α2-adrenergic agonists during hyperalgesia demonstrates a mechanism for therapy. PMID:17055005

  10. Sum Product Networks for Activity Recognition.

    PubMed

    Amer, Mohamed R; Todorovic, Sinisa

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses detection and localization of human activities in videos. We focus on activities that may have variable spatiotemporal arrangements of parts, and numbers of actors. Such activities are represented by a sum-product network (SPN). A product node in SPN represents a particular arrangement of parts, and a sum node represents alternative arrangements. The sums and products are hierarchically organized, and grounded onto space-time windows covering the video. The windows provide evidence about the activity classes based on the Counting Grid (CG) model of visual words. This evidence is propagated bottom-up and top-down to parse the SPN graph for the explanation of the video. The node connectivity and model parameters of SPN and CG are jointly learned under two settings, weakly supervised, and supervised. For evaluation, we use our new Volleyball dataset, along with the benchmark datasets VIRAT, UT-Interactions, KTH, and TRECVID MED 2011. Our video classification and activity localization are superior to those of the state of the art on these datasets. PMID:26390445

  11. Structure-activity relationship of polyphenols on inhibition of chemical mediator release from rat peritoneal exudate cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Shoji, K; Mori, M; Ueyama, T; Matsuo, N; Oka, S; Nishiyama, K; Sugano, M

    1999-03-01

    The effect of phenolic compounds in foodstuffs on histamine and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) release from rat peritoneal exudate cells and their antioxidative activity were examined to assess their antiallergenic activities. Among them, triphenols such as pyrogallol and gallic acid inhibited histamine release from the cells, but diphenols did not. On the other hand, o- and p-diphenols such as catechol and hydroquinone with strong antioxidative activity inhibited LTB4 release as strongly as pyrogallol, but an m-derivative resorcinol with weak antioxidative activity did not. Though carboxylated compounds and their noncarboxylated counterparts were antioxidative, the former exerted a much weaker inhibitory effect on the LTB4 release than the latter. In flavonols, only myricetin with a triphenolic B ring strongly inhibited histamine release, but all flavonols strongly suppressed LTB4 release irrespective of the number of OH groups in the B ring. Among flavonoids with an o-diphenolic B ring, flavonol and flavone with a C4-carbonyl group strongly inhibited LTB4 release, whereas the activity of anthocyan without C4-carbonyl was much weaker than the above compounds. These results suggest that triphenolic structure is essential for the inhibition of histamine release. On the other hand, antioxidative activity and membrane permeability of phenolic compounds seemed to be essential for the inhibition of LTB4 release. In addition, the C4-carbonyl group seemed to be important for strongly inhibiting LTB4 release. PMID:10476914

  12. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Melissa A.; Woods, Catherine A.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Lee, Christian R.; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P.; Jones, Kymry T.; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate–putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices. PMID:26503322

  13. Antioxidant activity and nutrient release from polyphenol-enriched cheese in a simulated gastrointestinal environment.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, Sophie; Langlois, Ariane; Bazinet, Laurent; Couillard, Charles; Britten, Michel

    2016-03-01

    Green tea polyphenols are recognized for their antioxidant properties and their effects on lipid digestion kinetics. Polyphenols are sensitive to degradation in the intestinal environment. Interactions with dairy proteins could modulate the stability and biological activity of polyphenols during digestion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the release of nutrients (polyphenols, fatty acids and peptides) and the antioxidant activity in polyphenol-enriched cheese containing different levels of calcium in a simulated gastrointestinal environment. The relationship between cheese matrix texture, matrix degradation and nutrient release during digestion was also studied. Green tea extract was added to milk at 0% or 0.1%, and cheeses were produced on a laboratory scale. The level of available calcium was adjusted to low (Ca(low)), regular (Ca(reg)) or high (Ca(high)) during the salting step of the cheese-making process. Cheeses were subjected to simulated digestion. The rate and extent of fatty acid release were 21% lower for Ca(low) cheese than for Ca(reg) and Ca(high) cheeses. The greater adhesiveness of Ca(low) cheese, which resulted in lower rates of matrix degradation and proteolysis, contributed to the reduced rate of lipolysis. The presence of green tea extract in cheese reduced the release of free fatty acids at the end of digestion by 7%. The addition of green tea extract increased cheese hardness but did not influence matrix degradation or proteolysis profiles. The formation of complexes between tea polyphenols and proteins within the cheese matrix resulted in a more than twofold increase in polyphenol recovery in the intestinal phase compared with the control (tea polyphenol extract incubated with polyphenol-free cheese). Antioxidant activity was 14% higher in the digest from polyphenol-enriched cheese than in the control. These results suggest that cheese is an effective matrix for the controlled release of nutrients and for the protection of green

  14. Dependence of serotonin release in the locus coeruleus on dorsal raphe neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Kaehler, S T; Singewald, N; Philippu, A

    1999-05-01

    The serotonergic innervation of the locus coeruleus paetly derives from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Using the push-pull superfusion technique, we investigated whether and to what extent the release of serotonin and the extracellular concentration of its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the locus coeruleus are influenced by the neuronal activity of the DRN. In anaesthetized rats, a push-pull cannula was inserted into the locus coeruleus, which was continuously superfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). Serotonin and 5-HIAA levels in the superfusate were determined by HPLC combined with electrochemical detection. Electrical stimulation (5 Hz, 300 microA, 1 ms) of the DRN for 5 min, or its chemical stimulation by microinjection of glutamate (3.5 nmol, 50 nl), led to an increased release of serotonin in the locus coeruleus and to a slight (2 mmHg) decrease in blood pressure. Superfusion of the locus coeruleus with tetrodotoxin (1 microM) abolished the increase in the release rate of serotonin evoked by electrical stimulation of the DRN, while the slight fall in blood pressure was not influenced. Thermic lesion (75 degrees C, 1 min) of the DRN elicited a pronounced decline in serotonin release rate within the locus coeruleus, the maximum decrease being 52%. The decrease in the release of serotonin was associated with a long-lasting rise in blood pressure. Microinjection of the serotonin neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5 microg, 250 nl) into the DRN led to an initial increase in the serotonin release rate that coincided with a short-lasting fall in blood pressure. Subsequently, the release of serotonin was permanently reduced and was associated with hypertension. Microinjection of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (+/-)-8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 7.5 nmol, 50 nl) into the DRN led to a long-lasting reduction of the release rate of serotonin in the locus coeruleus. Microinjection of 8-OH-DPAT into the DRN also slightly

  15. Redox and pH-responsive degradable micelles for dually activated intracellular anticancer drug release.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhong, Ping; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-08-10

    Redox and pH dual-responsive biodegradable micelles were developed based on poly(ethylene glycol)-SS-poly(2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidene-pentaerythritol carbonate) (PEG-SS-PTMBPEC) copolymer and investigated for intracellular doxorubicin (DOX) release. PEG-SS-PTMBPEC copolymer with an Mn of 5.0-4.1kg/mol formed micellar particles with an average diameter of 140nm and a low polydispersity of 0.12. DOX was loaded into PEG-SS-PTMBPEC micelles with a decent drug loading content of 11.3wt.%. The in vitro release studies showed that under physiological conditions only ca. 24.5% DOX was released from DOX-loaded micelles in 21h. The release of DOX was significantly accelerated at pH5.0 or in the presence of 10mM glutathione (GSH) at pH7.4, in which 62.8% and 74.3% of DOX was released, respectively, in 21h. The drug release was further boosted under 10mM GSH and pH 5.0 conditions, with 94.2% of DOX released in 10h. Notably, DOX release was also facilitated by 2 or 4h incubation at pH 5.0 and then at pH 7.4 with 10mM GSH, which mimics the intracellular pathways of endocytosed micellar drugs. Confocal microscopy observation indicated that DOX was delivered and released into the nuclei of HeLa cells following 8h incubation with DOX-loaded PEG-SS-PTMBPEC micelles, while DOX was mainly located in the cytoplasm for reduction-insensitive PEG-PTMBPEC controls. MTT assays revealed that DOX-loaded PEG-SS-PTMBPEC micelles had higher anti-tumor activity than reduction-insensitive controls, with low IC50 of 0.75 and 0.60μg/mL for HeLa and RAW 264.7 cells, respectively, following 48h incubation. PEG-SS-PTMBPEC micelles displayed low cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 1.0mg/mL. These redox and pH dual-bioresponsive degradable micelles have appeared as a promising platform for targeted intracellular anticancer drug release. PMID:23306022

  16. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  17. Health Effects of Cut Gas Lines and Other Petroleum Product Release Incidents - Seven States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ayana R

    2015-06-12

    Large mass casualty gas explosions and catastrophic oil spills are widely reported and receive considerable regulatory attention. Smaller, less catastrophic petroleum product releases are less likely to receive publicity, although study of these incidents might help focus and prioritize prevention efforts. To describe the causes and health impacts of petroleum product release incidents (including gas explosions and oil spills), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) analyzed 2010-2012 data from the National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP). A total of 1,369 petroleum product release incidents were reported from seven states, resulting in 512 injuries and 36 deaths. Approximately one fourth of the incidents were associated with utilities, and approximately one fifth were associated with private vehicles or residences. Approximately 10% of petroleum product releases resulted from inadvertent damage to utility lines. Understanding the characteristics of acute petroleum product releases can aid the public and utility workers in the development of preventive strategies and reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with such releases. PMID:26068562

  18. The Use of Release-Active Antibody-Based Preparations for Vertigo Prevention in Adults.

    PubMed

    Barchukov, V V; Zhavbert, E S; Dugina, Yu L; Epstein, O I

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of antibody-based release-active preparations Impaza (antibodies to eNOS), Tenoten (antibodies to brain-specific protein S-100), Dietressa (antibodies to type 1 cannabinoid receptor), Brizantin (combined preparation, antibodies to brain-specific protein S-100 and type 1 cannabinoid receptor), and Divaza (combined preparation, antibodies to brain-specific protein S-100 and eNOS) in the prevention of vertigo was studied on the model of intermittent accumulation of Coriolis accelerations (ICCA). Modification of activity of vestibular receptors and signal systems by release-active preparations contributed to an increase in ICCA tolerance time. Combined preparation Impaza possessed the most significant antinaupathic properties. Brizantin was less potent in this respect. PMID:26608378

  19. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  20. Calcium release through P2X4 activates calmodulin to promote endolysosomal membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Murrell-Lagnado, Ruth; Zhu, Michael X.

    2015-01-01

    Intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release is required for endolysosomal membrane fusion with intracellular organelles. However, the molecular mechanisms for intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release and the downstream Ca2+ targets involved in the fusion remain elusive. Previously, we demonstrated that endolysosomal P2X4 forms channels activated by luminal adenosine triphosphate in a pH-dependent manner. In this paper, we show that overexpression of P2X4, as well as increasing endolysosomal P2X4 activity by alkalinization of endolysosome lumen, promoted vacuole enlargement in cells and endolysosome fusion in a cell-free assay. These effects were prevented by inhibiting P2X4, expressing a dominant-negative P2X4 mutant, and disrupting the P2X4 gene. We further show that P2X4 and calmodulin (CaM) form a complex at endolysosomal membrane where P2X4 activation recruits CaM to promote fusion and vacuolation in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. Moreover, P2X4 activation-triggered fusion and vacuolation were suppressed by inhibiting CaM. Our data thus suggest a new molecular mechanism for endolysosomal membrane fusion involving P2X4-mediated endolysosomal Ca2+ release and subsequent CaM activation. PMID:26101220

  1. Determination of urease activity in soils by carbon dioxide release for ecotoxicological evaluation of contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Guettes, Ralf; Dott, Wolfgang; Eisentraeger, Adolf

    2002-10-01

    A method for the quantification of urease enzyme activity has been set up, which is based on the quantification of carbon dioxide set free into the head space of gastight vessels. The method can be applied for ecotoxicological characterisation of contaminated soil samples besides other methods like soil respiration measurements or nitrification inhibition tests. The sieved soil sample can be incubated under nearly natural conditions with an adjusted water content of about 50% of the water holding capacity. Ammonia or urea do not need to be extracted, since carbon dioxide release is correlated to urease activity. Thus carbon dioxide release is a direct result of urease activity which can be measured in the head space using gastight syringes and gaschromatographic equipment. The urease activity is determined by comparing the carbon dioxide release of incubation vessels with and without urea supply. The applicability of this method has been demonstrated by experiments with N-(n-butyl)phosphoric triamide (NBPT), copper ions and zinc ions as known inhibitors of urease activity. PMID:12463682

  2. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signaling Inhibits Inflammasome Activation by Preventing Mitochondrial DNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ben; Kwan, Kevin; Levine, Yaakov A; Olofsson, Peder S; Yang, Huan; Li, Jianhua; Joshi, Sonia; Wang, Haichao; Andersson, Ulf; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Tracey, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian immune system and the nervous system coevolved under the influence of cellular and environmental stress. Cellular stress is associated with changes in immunity and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, a key component of innate immunity. Here we show that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR)-signaling inhibits inflammasome activation and prevents release of mitochondrial DNA, an NLRP3 ligand. Cholinergic receptor agonists or vagus nerve stimulation significantly inhibits inflammasome activation, whereas genetic deletion of α7 nAchR significantly enhances inflammasome activation. Acetylcholine accumulates in macrophage cytoplasm after adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stimulation in an α7 nAchR-independent manner. Acetylcholine significantly attenuated calcium or hydrogen oxide–induced mitochondrial damage and mitochondrial DNA release. Together, these findings reveal a novel neurotransmitter-mediated signaling pathway: acetylcholine translocates into the cytoplasm of immune cells during inflammation and inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation by preventing mitochondrial DNA release. PMID:24849809

  3. Activation of microglia with zymosan promotes excitatory amino acid release via volume-regulated anion channels: the role of NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Harrigan, Timothy J.; Abdullaev, Iskandar F.; Jourd'heuil, David; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the CNS, which are important for preserving neural tissue functions, but may also contribute to neurodegeneration. Activation of these cells in infection, inflammation, or trauma leads to the release of various toxic molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the excitatory amino acid glutamate. In this study we used an electrophysiological approach and a D-[3H]aspartate (glutamate) release assay to explore the ROS-dependent regulation of glutamate-permeable volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs). Exposure of rat microglia to hypoosmotic media stimulated Cl− currents and D-[3H]aspartate release, both of which were inhibited by the selective VRAC blocker DCPIB. Exogenously applied H2O2 potently increased swelling-activated glutamate release. Stimulation of microglia with zymosan triggered production of endogenous ROS and strongly enhanced glutamate release via VRAC in swollen cells. The effects of zymosan were attenuated by the ROS scavenger MnTMPyP, and by two inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (NOX) diphenyliodonium and thioridazine. However, zymosan-stimulated glutamate release was insensitive to other NOX blockers, apocynin and AEBSF. This pharmacological profile pointed to the potential involvement of apocynin-insensitive NOX4. Using RT-PCR we confirmed that NOX4 is expressed in rat microglial cells, along with NOX1 and NOX2. To check for potential involvement of phagocytic NOX2 we stimulated this isoform using protein kinase C (PKC) activator PMA, or inhibited it with the broad spectrum PKC blocker Gö6983. Both agents potently modulated endogenous ROS production by NOX2, but not VRAC activity. Taken together, these data suggest that the anion channel VRAC may contribute to microglial glutamate release, and that its activity is regulated by endogenous ROS originating from NOX4. PMID:18624925

  4. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  5. Phospholipid Ozonation Products Activate the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Murphy, Robert C

    2016-08-15

    Ozone is a highly reactive environmental toxicant that can react with the double bonds of lipids in pulmonary surfactant. This study was undertaken to investigate the proinflammatory properties of the major lipid-ozone product in pulmonary surfactant, 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (16:0/9al-PC), with respect to eicosanoid production. A dose-dependent increase in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products was observed in murine resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM) and alveolar macrophages (AM) upon treatment with 16:0/9al-PC. In contrast, the production of cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids did not change from basal levels in the presence of 16:0/9al-PC. When 16:0/9al-PC and the TLR2 ligand, zymosan, were added to RPM or AM, an enhancement of 5-LO product formation along with a concomitant decrease in COX product formation was observed. Neither intracellular calcium levels nor arachidonic acid release was influenced by the addition of 16:0/9al-PC to RPM. Results from mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor studies and direct measurement of phosphorylation of MAPKs revealed that 16:0/9al-PC activates the p38 MAPK pathway in RPM, which results in the activation of 5-LO. Our results indicate that 16:0/9al-PC has a profound effect on the eicosanoid pathway, which may have implications in inflammatory pulmonary disease states where eicosanoids have been shown to play a role. PMID:27448436

  6. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release.

  7. Fouling-release and chemical activity effects of a siloxane-based material on tunicates.

    PubMed

    Filip, Natalia; Pustam, Amanda; Ells, Veronica; Grosicki, Kathleen M T; Yang, Jin; Oguejiofor, Ikenna; Bishop, Cory D; DeMont, M Edwin; Smith-Palmer, Truis; Wyeth, Russell C

    2016-05-01

    The antifouling performance of a siloxane-based elastomeric impression material (EIM) was compared to that of two silicone fouling-release coatings, Intersleek 757 and RTV-11. In field immersion trials, the EIM caused the greatest reduction in fouling by the solitary tunicate Ciona intestinalis and caused the longest delay in the progression of fouling by two species of colonial tunicate. However, in pseudobarnacle adhesion tests, the EIM had higher attachment strengths. Further laboratory analyses showed that the EIM leached alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) that were toxic to C. intestinalis larvae. The EIM thus showed the longest duration of chemical activity measured to date for a siloxane-based coating (4 months), supporting investigations of fouling-release coatings that release targeted biocides. However, due to potential widespread effects of APEs, the current EIM formulation should not be considered as an environmentally-safe antifoulant. Thus, the data also emphasize consideration of both immediate and long-term effects of potentially toxic constituents released from fouling-release coatings. PMID:26986763

  8. [Effect of nano-TiO2 on the release and activation of mercury in sediment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Yang; Li, Chu-Xian; Wang, Ding-Yong; Zhou, Xiong; Sun, Rong-Guo; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Liang

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effects of nano-TiO2 on mercury release and activation in sediment, flooding simulation experiments were conducted. The impacts of nano-TiO2 on total mercury and methylmercury concentrations in overlying water were analyzed. And the influences of nano-TiO2 on the migration and transformation of mercury were discussed based on changes of mercury speciation in sediment. The results indicated that nano-TiO2 promoted the release of mercury in sediment, leading to more mercury released into the water. Compared with the control, 4 g x kg(-1) TiO2 nanoparticles increased the total mercury by 91.32%, when the concentration of total mercury in overlying water was the highest. Release of mercury in soil was increased by approximately 10% finally. The main reason may be that the dissolution of oxidation state mercury was improved by nano-TiO2. It indicated that the risk of mercury contamination in water may increase. Moreover, under the experimental conditions, nano-TiO2 may reduce the formation of methylmercury in sediment in the short-term, but no significant effects in the long-term. Generally, the effects of nano-TiO2 on the release and transformation of mercury in sediment showed concentration dependence. Thus, with increasing nano-TiO2 content in sediment or soil, its impact on the geochemical cycle of mercury may increase. PMID:25826926

  9. Alternaria extract activates autophagy that induces IL-18 release from airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murai, Hiroki; Okazaki, Shintaro; Hayashi, Hisako; Kawakita, Akiko; Hosoki, Koa; Yasutomi, Motoko; Sur, Sanjiv; Ohshima, Yusei

    2015-09-01

    Alternaria alternata is a major outdoor allergen that causes allergic airway diseases. Alternaria extract (ALT-E) has been shown to induce airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 and thereby initiate Th2-type responses. We investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in IL-18 release from ALT-E-stimulated airway epithelial cells. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were stimulated with ALT-E in the presence of different inhibitors of autophagy or caspases. IL-18 levels in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. The numbers of autophagosomes, an LC3-I to LC3-II conversion, and p62 degradation were determined by immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting. 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin, which inhibit the formation of preautophagosomal structures and autolysosomes, respectively, suppressed ALT-E-induced IL-18 release by cells, whereas caspase 1 and 8 inhibitors did not. ALT-E-stimulation increased autophagosome formation, LC-3 conversion, and p62 degradation in airway epithelial cells. LPS-stimulation induced the LC3 conversion in A549 cells, but did not induce IL-18 release or p62 degradation. Unlike LPS, ALT-E induced airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 via an autophagy dependent, caspase 1 and 8 independent pathway. Although autophagy has been shown to negatively regulate canonical inflammasome activity in TLR-stimulated macrophages, our data indicates that this process is an unconventional mechanism of IL-18 secretion by airway epithelial cells. PMID:26032499

  10. In Vivo Release Kinetics and Antibacterial Activity of Novel Polyphenols-Enriched Chewing Gums.

    PubMed

    Ferrazzano, Gianmaria Fabrizio; Cantile, Tiziana; Coda, Marco; Alcidi, Brunella; Sangianantoni, Giancarla; Ingenito, Aniello; Di Stasio, Michele; Volpe, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Chewing gums may be particularly effective means for delivering and maintaining bioactive molecules, included in the gum formulation, able to have an anti-cariogenic effect. The purposes of this study were: to develop novel chewing gums containing quercetin (Qt); to evaluate their release using in vivo trial; finally, to test their in vivo antibacterial effect against oral Streptococcus mutans strains. A preliminary study was performed to produce new gums, enriched with the polyphenol quercetin. Then, a first in vivo experimental study was assessed to test the percentages of Qt released in the saliva of young volunteers. Moreover, a second clinical trial was performed to analyze the antibacterial capability of these enriched chewing gums against S. mutans strains after 14 days of daily consumption. The release analysis showed that a more effective release of Qt occurs in the first minutes of chewing, and it does not change saliva pH values. Moreover, Qt included in gums demonstrates an effective antibacterial activity, showing a reduction of the concentration of S. mutans strains in saliva samples, especially after 7 days. Qt included in experimental chewing gums could be efficiently released into the oral cavity and could promote an effective anti-caries concentration in volunteer's saliva, without changing salivary pH values. PMID:27490529

  11. Sustained release of active chemotherapeutics from injectable-solid β-hairpin peptide hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jessie E P; Stewart, Brandon; Litan, Alisa; Lee, Seung Joon; Schneider, Joel P; Langhans, Sigrid A; Pochan, Darrin J

    2016-05-26

    MAX8 β-hairpin peptide hydrogel is a solid, preformed gel that can be syringe injected due to shear-thinning properties and can recover solid gel properties immediately after injection. This behavior makes the hydrogel an excellent candidate as a local drug delivery vehicle. In this study, vincristine, a hydrophobic and commonly used chemotherapeutic, is encapsulated within MAX8 hydrogel and shown to release constantly over the course of one month. Vincristine was observed to be cytotoxic in vitro at picomolar to nanomolar concentrations. The amounts of drug released from the hydrogels over the entire time-course were in this concentration range. After encapsulation, release of vincristine from the hydrogel was observed for four weeks. Further characterization showed the vincristine released during the 28 days remained biologically active, well beyond its half-life in bulk aqueous solution. This study shows that vincristine-loaded MAX8 hydrogels are excellent candidates as drug delivery vehicles, through sustained, low, local and effective release of vincristine to a specific target. Oscillatory rheology was employed to show that the shear-thinning and re-healing, injectable-solid properties that make MAX8 a desirable drug delivery vehicle are unaffected by vincristine encapsulation. Rheology measurements also were used to monitor hydrogel nanostructure before and after drug encapsulation. PMID:26906463

  12. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  13. Sulfite species enhance carbon monoxide release from CO-releasing molecules: implications for the deoxymyoglobin assay of activity.

    PubMed

    McLean, Samantha; Mann, Brian E; Poole, Robert K

    2012-08-01

    Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) emulate the beneficial (e.g., anti-inflammatory) effects of CO in biology. CO release from CO-RMs is routinely determined in the presence of reduced deoxy-myoglobin by measuring the formation of carboxy-myoglobin (Mb-CO). Previous studies have highlighted discrepancies between the apparent CO release rates of some CO-RMs established using this assay versus other experimental data where a slower or more complex mechanism of release is suggested. It has been hypothesized that some CO-RMs require a CO acceptor, believed to be reduced myoglobin in Mb-CO assays, in order to facilitate the release of CO. Here, we show, for the first time, that CO is not liberated from the ruthenium (Ru)-based [Ru(CO)(3)Cl(2)](2) (CORM-2) and [Ru(CO)(3)Cl(glycinate)] (CORM-3) at an appreciable rate in the presence of reduced myoglobin alone. Rather, we confirm that it is the reducing agent sodium dithionite that facilitates release of CO from these CO-RMs. Other sulfite compounds, namely sodium sulfite and potassium metabisulfite, also promote the liberation of CO from CORM-3. We describe an alternative oxy-hemoglobin assay that eliminates dithionite and suggest that the efficacy of CO-RMs results from intracellular interactions with anions that facilitate CO delivery to therapeutic targets. PMID:22561917

  14. Alendronate augments interleukin-1{beta} release from macrophages infected with periodontal pathogenic bacteria through activation of caspase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xue; Tamai, Riyoko; Endo, Yasuo; Kiyoura, Yusuke

    2009-02-15

    Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs) are anti-bone-resorptive drugs with inflammatory side effects that include osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Oral bacteria have been considered to be a trigger for these NBP-associated jaw bone diseases. The present study examined the effects of alendronate (a typical NBP) and clodronate (a non-NBP) on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia, which are important pathogens of periodontal diseases. Pretreatment with alendronate augmented IL-1{beta}, but not TNF{alpha}, production by macrophages infected with P. gingivalis or T. forsythia. This augmentation of IL-1{beta} production was inhibited by clodronate. Furthermore, caspase-1, a promoter of IL-1{beta} production, was activated by treatment with alendronate, and caspase-1 inhibitor reduced the production of IL-1{beta} induced by alendronate and P. gingivalis. These results suggest that NBPs augment periodontal pathogenic bacteria-induced IL-1{beta} release via caspase-1 activation, and this phenomenon may contribute to the development of NBP-associated inflammatory side effects including jaw osteomyelitis. Co-treatment with clodronate may prevent and/or reduce these inflammatory effects induced by NBPs.

  15. Essential requirement of cytochrome c release for caspase activation by procaspase-activating compound defined by cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Seervi, M; Joseph, J; Sobhan, P K; Bhavya, B C; Santhoshkumar, T R

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c (cyt. c) release and caspase activation are often impaired in tumors with Bcl-2 overexpression or Bax and Bak-defective status. Direct triggering of cell death downstream of Bax and Bak is an attractive strategy to kill such cancers. Small molecule compounds capable of direct caspase activation appear to be the best mode for killing such tumors. However, there is no precise model to screen such compounds. The currently employed cell-free systems possess the inherent drawback of lacking cellular contents and organelles that operate in integrating cell death signaling. We have developed highly refined cell-based approaches to validate direct caspase activation in cancer cells. Using this approach, we show that PAC-1 (first procaspase-activating compound), the first direct activator of procaspases identified in a cell-free system, in fact requires mitochondrial cyt. c release for triggering caspase activation similar to other antitumor agents. It can induce significant caspase activation and cell death in the absence of Bax and Bak, and in cells overexpressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. This study for the first time defines precise criteria for the validation of direct caspase-activating compounds using specialized cellular models that is expected to accelerate the discovery of potential direct caspase activators. PMID:21900958

  16. cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation decreases cytokine release in bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Jill A.; Nordgren, Tara M.; DeVasure, Jane M.; Heires, Art J.; Bailey, Kristina L.; Romberger, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    Lung injury caused by inhalation of dust from swine-concentrated animal-feeding operations (CAFO) involves the release of inflammatory cytokine interleukin 8 (IL-8), which is mediated by protein kinase C-ε (PKC-ε) in airway epithelial cells. Once activated by CAFO dust, PKC-ε is responsible for slowing cilia beating and reducing cell migration for wound repair. Conversely, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) stimulates contrasting effects, such as increased cilia beating and an acceleration of cell migration for wound repair. We hypothesized that a bidirectional mechanism involving PKA and PKC regulates epithelial airway inflammatory responses. To test this hypothesis, primary human bronchial epithelial cells and BEAS-2B cells were treated with hog dust extract (HDE) in the presence or absence of cAMP. PKC-ε activity was significantly reduced in cells that were pretreated for 1 h with 8-bromoadenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) before exposure to HDE (P < 0.05). HDE-induced IL-6, and IL-8 release was significantly lower in cells that were pretreated with 8-Br-cAMP (P < 0.05). To exclude exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) involvement, cells were pretreated with either 8-Br-cAMP or 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-CPT-2Me-cAMP) (EPAC agonist). 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP did not activate PKA and did not reduce HDE-stimulated IL-6 release. In contrast, 8-Br-cAMP decreased HDE-stimulated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-converting enzyme (TACE; ADAM-17) activity and subsequent TNF-α release (P < 0.001). 8-Br-cAMP also blocked HDE-stimulated IL-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine release in precision-cut mouse lung slices (P < 0.05). These data show bidirectional regulation of PKC-ε via a PKA-mediated inhibition of TACE activity resulting in reduced PKC-ε-mediated release of IL-6 and IL-8. PMID:25150062

  17. cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation decreases cytokine release in bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Todd A; Poole, Jill A; Nordgren, Tara M; DeVasure, Jane M; Heires, Art J; Bailey, Kristina L; Romberger, Debra J

    2014-10-15

    Lung injury caused by inhalation of dust from swine-concentrated animal-feeding operations (CAFO) involves the release of inflammatory cytokine interleukin 8 (IL-8), which is mediated by protein kinase C-ε (PKC-ε) in airway epithelial cells. Once activated by CAFO dust, PKC-ε is responsible for slowing cilia beating and reducing cell migration for wound repair. Conversely, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) stimulates contrasting effects, such as increased cilia beating and an acceleration of cell migration for wound repair. We hypothesized that a bidirectional mechanism involving PKA and PKC regulates epithelial airway inflammatory responses. To test this hypothesis, primary human bronchial epithelial cells and BEAS-2B cells were treated with hog dust extract (HDE) in the presence or absence of cAMP. PKC-ε activity was significantly reduced in cells that were pretreated for 1 h with 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) before exposure to HDE (P < 0.05). HDE-induced IL-6, and IL-8 release was significantly lower in cells that were pretreated with 8-Br-cAMP (P < 0.05). To exclude exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) involvement, cells were pretreated with either 8-Br-cAMP or 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-CPT-2Me-cAMP) (EPAC agonist). 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP did not activate PKA and did not reduce HDE-stimulated IL-6 release. In contrast, 8-Br-cAMP decreased HDE-stimulated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-converting enzyme (TACE; ADAM-17) activity and subsequent TNF-α release (P < 0.001). 8-Br-cAMP also blocked HDE-stimulated IL-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine release in precision-cut mouse lung slices (P < 0.05). These data show bidirectional regulation of PKC-ε via a PKA-mediated inhibition of TACE activity resulting in reduced PKC-ε-mediated release of IL-6 and IL-8. PMID:25150062

  18. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection. PMID:6346309

  19. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  20. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  1. Production of bromoform and dibromomethane by Giant Kelp: Factors affecting release and comparison to anthropogenic bromine sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; North, W.J.; Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    Macrocystis pyrifera (Giant Kelp), a dominant macroalgal species in southern California, produced 171 ng per g fresh wt (gfwt) per day of CHBr3 and 48 ng gfwt-1 d-1 of CH2Br2 during laboratory incubations of whole blades. Comparable rates were measured during in situ incubations of intact fronds. Release of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 by M. pyrifera was affected by light and algal photosynthetic activity, suggesting that environmental factors influencing kelp physiology can affect halomethane release to the atmosphere. Data from H2O2 additions suggest that brominated methane production during darkness is limited by bromide oxidant supply. A bromine budget constructed for a region of southern California indicated that bromine emitted from the use of CH3Br as a fumigant (1 x 108 g Br yr-1) dominates macroalgal sources (3 x 106 g Br yr-1). Global projections, however, suggest that combined emissions of marine algae (including microalgae) contribute substantial amounts of bromine to the global cycle, perhaps on the same order of magnitude as anthropogenic sources.

  2. Comparative Mutagenesis Studies of Retinal Release in Light-Activated Zebrafish Rhodopsin Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morrow, J M; Chang, B S W

    2015-07-28

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment responsible for initiating scotopic (dim-light) vision in vetebrates. Once activated by light, release of all-trans-retinal from rhodopsin involves hydrolysis of the Schiff base linkage, followed by dissociation of retinal from the protein moiety. This kinetic process has been well studied in model systems such as bovine rhodopsin, but not in rhodopsins from cold-blooded animals, where physiological temperatures can vary considerably. Here, we characterize the rate of retinal release from light-activated rhodopsin in an ectotherm, zebrafish (Danio rerio), demonstrating in a fluorescence assay that this process occurs more than twice as fast as bovine rhodopsin at similar temperatures in 0.1% dodecyl maltoside. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that differences in retinal release rates can be attributed to a series of variable residues lining the retinal channel in three key structural motifs: an opening in metarhodopsin II between transmembrane helix 5 (TM5) and TM6, in TM3 near E122, and in the "retinal plug" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2). The majority of these sites are more proximal to the β-ionone ring of retinal than the Schiff base, indicating their influence on retinal release is more likely due to steric effects during retinal dissociation, rather than alterations to Schiff base stability. An Arrhenius plot of zebrafish rhodopsin was consistent with this model, inferring that the activation energy for Schiff base hydrolysis is similar to that of bovine rhodopsin. Functional variation at key sites identified in this study is consistent with the idea that retinal release might be an adaptive property of rhodopsin in vertebrates. Our study is one of the few investigating a nonmammalian rhodopsin, which will help establish a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms contributing to vision in cold-blooded vertebrates. PMID:26098991

  3. Active bio-based food-packaging: Diffusion and release of active substances through and from cellulose nanofiber coating toward food-packaging design.

    PubMed

    Lavoine, Nathalie; Guillard, Valérie; Desloges, Isabelle; Gontard, Nathalie; Bras, Julien

    2016-09-20

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) were recently investigated for the elaboration of new functional food-packaging materials. Their nanoporous network was especially of interest for controlling the release of active species. Qualitative release studies were conducted, but quantification of the diffusion phenomenon observed when the active species are released from and through CNF coating has not yet been studied. Therefore, this work aims to model CNF-coated paper substrates as controlled release system for food-packaging using release data obtained for two model molecules, namely caffeine and chlorhexidine digluconate. The applied mathematical model - derived from Fickian diffusion - was validated for caffeine only. When the active species chemically interacts with the release device, another model is required as a non-predominantly diffusion-controlled release was observed. From caffeine modeling data, a theoretical active food-packaging material was designed. The use of CNFs as barrier coating was proved to be the ideal material configuration that best meets specifications. PMID:27261728

  4. Control of toxic gas release during the production of copper-indium-diselenide photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, P.K.; Dobryn, D.G.; Lee, C.M.

    1986-03-01

    Toxic gas control systems will be needed to treat both routine and accidental H/sub 2/Se and H/sub 2/S emissions from manufacturing facilities producing CuInSe/sub 2/ photovoltaic cells. In this study, routine and accidental environmental control options were evaluated for a manufacturing plant with an annual production of cells capable of generating 10 MWp. A routine emissions treatment facility was designed which uses a venture scrubber, a packed-bed scrubber, and a carbon adsorption bed to reduce emissions to allowable limits. This facility incrementally increases the cost of manufacturing CuInSe/sub 2/ photovoltaic cells by 0.60 cents/Wp. Two alternative systems were designed to handle an accidental release: a packed-bed scrubber/carbon adsorption bed, and a containment scheme followed by carbon adsorption. The incremental costs of manufacturing for these release systems are 0.91 cents/Wp and 1.25 cents/Wp, respectively.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Absorption and Release Properties of Pyrolysis Products of Dolomite Calcined in Vacuum Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Kuzuya, Toshihiro; Hirai, Shinji; Li, Jihua; Li, Te

    2014-01-01

    The decomposition of dolomite into CaO and MgO was performed at 1073 K in vacuum and at 1273 K in an Ar atmosphere. The dolomite calcined in vacuum was found to have a higher specific surface area and a higher micropore volume when compared to the dolomite calcined in the Ar atmosphere. These pyrolysis products of dolomite were reacted with CO2 at 673 K for 21.6 ks. On the absorption of CO2, the formation of CaCO3 was observed. The degree of absorption of the dolomite calcined in vacuum was determined to be above 50%, which was higher than the degree of absorption of the dolomite calcined in the Ar atmosphere. The CO2 absorption and release procedures were repeated three times for the dolomite calcined in vacuum. The specific surface area and micropore volume of calcined dolomite decreased with successive repetitions of the CO2 absorption and release cycles leading to a decrease in the degree of absorption of CO2. PMID:25136696

  6. Fission Product Release and Survivability of UN-Kernel LWR TRISO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M; Ferber, Mattison K; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2014-01-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from range calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 m diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated with a TRISO particle as a function of fluence. Creep and swelling of the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by measuring the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers as a function of fluence. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.

  7. Effects of Globally Waste-Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W. ); Huckaby, James L. ); Meyer, Perry A. )

    2002-08-30

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single-shell and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a significant volume of retained gas. Analyses are presented for expected gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. Recommendations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are also given.

  8. Synaptic GABA release prevents GABA transporter type-1 reversal during excessive network activity

    PubMed Central

    Savtchenko, Leonid; Megalogeni, Maria; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Walker, Matthew C.; Pavlov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    GABA transporters control extracellular GABA, which regulates the key aspects of neuronal and network behaviour. A prevailing view is that modest neuronal depolarization results in GABA transporter type-1 (GAT-1) reversal causing non-vesicular GABA release into the extracellular space during intense network activity. This has important implications for GABA uptake-targeting therapies. Here we combined a realistic kinetic model of GAT-1 with experimental measurements of tonic GABAA receptor currents in ex vivo hippocampal slices to examine GAT-1 operation under varying network conditions. Our simulations predict that synaptic GABA release during network activity robustly prevents GAT-1 reversal. We test this in the 0 Mg2+ model of epileptiform discharges using slices from healthy and chronically epileptic rats and find that epileptiform activity is associated with increased synaptic GABA release and is not accompanied by GAT-1 reversal. We conclude that sustained efflux of GABA through GAT-1 is unlikely to occur during physiological or pathological network activity. PMID:25798861

  9. Nitric oxide-releasing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylenimine nanoparticles for prolonged nitric oxide release, antibacterial efficacy, and in vivo wound healing activity.

    PubMed

    Nurhasni, Hasan; Cao, Jiafu; Choi, Moonjeong; Kim, Il; Lee, Bok Luel; Jung, Yunjin; Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as a wound healing enhancer and a novel antibacterial agent that can circumvent antibiotic resistance. However, the NO release from NPs over extended periods of time is still inadequate for clinical application. In this study, we developed NO-releasing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylenimine (PEI) NPs (NO/PPNPs) composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and PEI/diazeniumdiolate (PEI/NONOate) for prolonged NO release, antibacterial efficacy, and wound healing activity. Successful preparation of PEI/NONOate was confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry. NO/PPNPs were characterized by particle size, surface charge, and NO loading. The NO/PPNPs showed a prolonged NO release profile over 6 days without any burst release. The NO/PPNPs exhibited potent bactericidal efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa concentration-dependently and showed the ability to bind on the surface of the bacteria. We also found that the NO released from the NO/PPNPs mediates bactericidal efficacy and is not toxic to healthy fibroblast cells. Furthermore, NO/PPNPs accelerated wound healing and epithelialization in a mouse model of a MRSA-infected wound. Therefore, our results suggest that the NO/PPNPs presented in this study could be a suitable approach for treating wounds and various skin infections. PMID:25960648

  10. Nitric oxide-releasing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylenimine nanoparticles for prolonged nitric oxide release, antibacterial efficacy, and in vivo wound healing activity

    PubMed Central

    Nurhasni, Hasan; Cao, Jiafu; Choi, Moonjeong; Kim, Il; Lee, Bok Luel; Jung, Yunjin; Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as a wound healing enhancer and a novel antibacterial agent that can circumvent antibiotic resistance. However, the NO release from NPs over extended periods of time is still inadequate for clinical application. In this study, we developed NO-releasing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylenimine (PEI) NPs (NO/PPNPs) composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and PEI/diazeniumdiolate (PEI/NONOate) for prolonged NO release, antibacterial efficacy, and wound healing activity. Successful preparation of PEI/NONOate was confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry. NO/PPNPs were characterized by particle size, surface charge, and NO loading. The NO/PPNPs showed a prolonged NO release profile over 6 days without any burst release. The NO/PPNPs exhibited potent bactericidal efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa concentration-dependently and showed the ability to bind on the surface of the bacteria. We also found that the NO released from the NO/PPNPs mediates bactericidal efficacy and is not toxic to healthy fibroblast cells. Furthermore, NO/PPNPs accelerated wound healing and epithelialization in a mouse model of a MRSA-infected wound. Therefore, our results suggest that the NO/PPNPs presented in this study could be a suitable approach for treating wounds and various skin infections. PMID:25960648

  11. Extended-release niacin/lovastatin: the first combination product for dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E

    2004-07-01

    Many clinical studies have demonstrated that lipid-altering drug treatments, including the use of statin and niacin monotherapy, can be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease, but only in a minority of patients relative to placebo. Since statins and niacin have entirely different mechanisms of action and predominantly different effects on blood lipid levels, the combined use of both a statin and niacin may confer complementary benefits on multiple lipid parameters, produce a more global improvement in lipid blood levels and result in greater reductions in coronary heart disease risk factors than the administration of either agent alone. This may be of particular importance in patients with complex dyslipidemias, such as those with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. This review summarizes the efficacy and safety of extended-release niacin/lovastatin (Advicor, Kos Pharmaceuticals Inc.), the first combination product approved for the management of dyslipidemia. PMID:15225109

  12. Fission product partitioning in aerosol release from simulated spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lemma, F. G.; Colle, J. Y.; Rasmussen, G.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2015-10-01

    Aerosols created by the vaporization of simulated spent nuclear fuel (simfuel) were produced by laser heating techniques and characterised by a wide range of post-analyses. In particular attention has been focused on determining the fission product behaviour in the aerosols, in order to improve the evaluation of the source term and consequently the risk associated with release from spent fuel sabotage or accidents. Different simulated spent fuels were tested with burn-up up to 8 at. %. The results from the aerosol characterisation were compared with studies of the vaporization process by Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry and thermochemical equilibrium calculations. These studies permit an understanding of the aerosol gaseous precursors and the gaseous reactions taking place during the aerosol formation process.

  13. Release of asbestos fibers from weathered and corroded asbestos cement products

    SciTech Connect

    Spurny, K.R.

    1989-02-01

    The controversy on whether weathered and corroded asbestos cement products are emitting biologically significant asbestos fiber concentrations in ambient air has not been resolved. Nor is it known if the weathered and corroded asbestos cement products release asbestos fibers which have the same carcinogenic potency as standard chrysotile. The purpose of this research project was to develop a method for sampling and measuring asbestos fiber emissions from solid planar surfaces (i.e., roofs and facades) consisting of asbestos cement products and to develop methods for studying the physical and chemical changes and the carcinogenic potency of the emitted fibers. Using this method asbestos fiber emissions in ambient air have been measured in the FRG during 1984/1986. The emissions of asbestos fibers longer than 5 microns were in the range 10(6) to 10(8) fibers/m2.hr. The ambient air concentrations of these asbestos fibers were for the most part less than 10(3) fibers/m3. It was shown that the emitted asbestos fibers were chemically changed and it was shown with animal experiments that their carcinogenic potency did not differ from the carcinogenicity of standard chrysotile fibers.

  14. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  15. PFOS and PFC releases and associated pollution from a PFC production plant in Minnesota (USA).

    PubMed

    Oliaei, Fardin; Kriens, Don; Weber, Roland; Watson, Alan

    2013-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and PFOS-related substances have been listed as persistent organic pollutants in the Stockholm Convention. From August 2012, Parties to the Convention needed to address the use, storage, and disposal of PFOS-including production sites and sites where PFOS wastes have been deposited-in their national implementation plans. The paper describes the pollution in Minnesota (USA) caused by the 3M Company at one of the largest per/polyfluorinated chemical (PFC) production facilities. From early 1950s until the end of 2002, when 3M terminated PFOS and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) production, PFOS, PFOA, and other PFC production wastes were disposed around the plant and in local disposal sites. Discharges from the site and releases from deposits caused widespread contamination of ground and surface waters including local drinking water wells. Fish in the river downstream were contaminated with PFOS to levels that led to fish consumption advisories. Human exposures resulted from ingesting contaminated drinking water, requiring installation of water treatment facilities and alternate water supplies. The critical evaluation of the assessments done revealed a range of gaps in particular of human exposure where relevant exposure pathways including the entire exposure via food have not been taken into consideration. Currently, the exposure assessment of vulnerable groups such as children or Hmong minorities is inadequate and needs to be improved/validated by epidemiological studies. The assessment methodology described for this site may serve-with highlighted improvements-as a model for assessment of other PFOS/PFC production sites in the Stockholm Convention implementation. PMID:23128989

  16. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Stimulate Aldosterone Production in a Subset of Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Rui; Oki, Kenji; Yoneda, Masayasu; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Ohno, Haruya; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Itcho, Kiyotaka; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to detect novel genes associated with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and elucidate the mechanisms underlying aldosterone production. Microarray analysis targeting GPCR-associated genes was conducted using APA without known mutations (APA-WT) samples (n = 3) and APA with the KCNJ5 mutation (APA-KCNJ5; n = 3). Since gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) was the highest expression in APA-WT by microarray analysis, we investigated the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation on aldosterone production. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay results revealed higher GNRHR expression levels in APA-WT samples those in APA-KCNJ5 samples (P < 0.05). LHCGR levels were also significantly elevated in APA-WT samples, and there was a significant and positive correlation between GNRHR and LHCGR expression in all APA samples (r = 0.476, P < 0.05). Patients with APA-WT (n = 9), which showed higher GNRHR and LHCGR levels, had significantly higher GnRH-stimulated aldosterone response than those with APA-KCNJ5 (n = 13) (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the presence of the KCNJ5 mutation was linked to GNRHR mRNA expression (β = 0.94 and P < 0.01). HAC15 cells with KCNJ5 gene carrying T158A mutation exhibited a significantly lower GNRHR expression than that in control cells (P < 0.05). We clarified increased expression of GNRHR and LHCGR in APA-WT, and the molecular analysis including the receptor expression associated with clinical findings of GnRH stimulation. PMID:27196470

  17. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Stimulate Aldosterone Production in a Subset of Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Rui; Oki, Kenji; Yoneda, Masayasu; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Ohno, Haruya; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Itcho, Kiyotaka; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to detect novel genes associated with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and elucidate the mechanisms underlying aldosterone production.Microarray analysis targeting GPCR-associated genes was conducted using APA without known mutations (APA-WT) samples (n = 3) and APA with the KCNJ5 mutation (APA-KCNJ5; n = 3). Since gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) was the highest expression in APA-WT by microarray analysis, we investigated the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation on aldosterone production.The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay results revealed higher GNRHR expression levels in APA-WT samples those in APA-KCNJ5 samples (P < 0.05). LHCGR levels were also significantly elevated in APA-WT samples, and there was a significant and positive correlation between GNRHR and LHCGR expression in all APA samples (r = 0.476, P < 0.05). Patients with APA-WT (n = 9), which showed higher GNRHR and LHCGR levels, had significantly higher GnRH-stimulated aldosterone response than those with APA-KCNJ5 (n = 13) (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the presence of the KCNJ5 mutation was linked to GNRHR mRNA expression (β = 0.94 and P < 0.01). HAC15 cells with KCNJ5 gene carrying T158A mutation exhibited a significantly lower GNRHR expression than that in control cells (P < 0.05).We clarified increased expression of GNRHR and LHCGR in APA-WT, and the molecular analysis including the receptor expression associated with clinical findings of GnRH stimulation. PMID:27196470

  18. Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Using TRMM Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Olson, W. S.; Meneghini, R.; Yang, S.; Simpson, J.; Kummerow, C.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents the first attempt to use TRMM rainfall information to estimate the four dimensional latent heating structure over the global tropics for February 1998. The mean latent heating profiles over six oceanic regions (TOGA COARE IFA, Central Pacific, S. Pacific Convergence Zone, East Pacific, Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean) and three continental regions (S. America, Central Africa and Australia) are estimated and studied. The heating profiles obtained from the results of diagnostic budget studies over a broad range of geographic locations are used to provide comparisons and indirect validation for the heating algorithm estimated heating profiles. Three different latent heating algorithms, the Goddard Convective-Stratiform (CSH) heating, the Goddard Profiling (GPROF) heating, and the Hydrometeor heating (HH) are used and their results are intercompared. The horizontal distribution or patterns of latent heat release from the three different heating retrieval methods are quite similar. They all can identify the areas of major convective activity (i.e., a well defined ITCZ in the Pacific, a distinct SPCZ) in the global tropics. The magnitude of their estimated latent heating release is also not in bad agreement with each other and with those determined from diagnostic budget studies. However, the major difference among these three heating retrieval algorithms is the altitude of the maximum heating level. The CSH algorithm estimated heating profiles only show one maximum heating level, and the level varies between convective activity from various geographic locations. These features are in good agreement with diagnostic budget studies. By contrast, two maximum heating levels were found using the GPROF heating and HH algorithms. The latent heating profiles estimated from all three methods can not show cooling between active convective events. We also examined the impact of different TMI (Multi-channel Passive Microwave Sensor) and PR (Precipitation Radar

  19. IMPACT OF OIL PRODUCTION RELEASES ON SOME SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES AT THE OSPER SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface and soil core samples were collected at two field sites in an old oil production area near Skiatook Lake in Oklahoma. The soil samples were analyzed for nitrates, organic matter, total petroleum hydrocarbons, conductivity, chlorides and dehydrogenase activity. Low level...

  20. An analytical study of volatile metallic fission product release from very high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel and core

    SciTech Connect

    Mitake, S.; Okamoto, F.

    1988-04-01

    Release characteristics of volatile metallic fission products from the coated fuel particle and the reactor core for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor during its power operation has been studied using numerical analysis. A computer code FORNAX, based on Fick's diffusion law and the evaporation mass transfer relation, has been developed, which considers, in particular, distribution and time histories of power density, fuel temperature, and failed and degraded fuel particle fractions in the core. Applicability of the code to evaluate the core design has been shown and the following have been indicated on the release of cesium from the reactor: 1. The release from the intact fuel particles by diffusion through their intact coatings shows larger contribution in the total core release at higher temperature. 2. The diffusion release from the intact particle is governed not only by the diffusion in the silicon carbide layer but also by that in the fuel kernel.

  1. Current natural products with antihypertensive activity.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ren-Ren; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Jin-Yi

    2015-10-01

    Natural products have been an important source of new drugs, which also played a dominant role in the discovery and research of new drugs for the treatment of hypertension. This review article reviews the recent progress in the research and development of natural lead compounds with antihypertensive activity, including alkaloids, diterpenes, coumarins, flavonoids, and peptides. We summarized their structures, sources, as well as the antihypertensive mechanisms. These information provides instructive reference for the following structural modifications and optimization. PMID:26481372

  2. Photothermally activated drug release from liposomes coupled to hollow gold nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Natalie; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2011-03-01

    Liposomes show great promise as intravenous drug delivery vehicles, but it is difficult to combine stability in the circulation, extended drug retention and rapid, targeted release at the site of interest. Accessorizing conventional and multicompartment liposomes with photo-activated hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) provides a convenient method to initiate drug release with spatial and temporal control. HGN efficiently absorb near infrared (NIR) light and rapidly convert the absorbed optical energy into heat. Femto- to nano-second NIR light pulses cause the HGNs to rapidly heat, creating large temperature gradients between the HGNs and surrounding fluid. The formation and collapse of unstable vapor bubbles transiently rupture liposome and other bilayer membranes to trigger contents release. Near-complete contents release occurs when the nanoshells are encapsulated within the liposome or tethered to the outer surface of the liposome, with no chemical damage to the contents. Release is achieved by focusing the laser beam at the target, eliminating the need for highly specific targeting ligands or antibodies. Although HGN heating can be intense, the overall energy input is small causing minimal heating of the surroundings. To ensure that drugs are retained within the liposomes until delivery in a physiological environment, we have made novel multicompartment carriers called vesosomes, which consist of an outer lipid bilayer shell that encloses and protects the drug-carrying liposomes. The second bilayer increases the serum half-life of ciprofloxacin from <10 minutes in liposomes to 6 hours in vesosomes and alters the release kinetics. The enhanced drug retention is due to the outer membrane preventing enzymes and proteins in the blood from breaking down the drug-carrying interior compartments.

  3. Endocytosis is required for synaptic activity-dependent release of amyloid-β in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cirrito, John R.; Kang, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jiyeon; Stewart, Floy R.; Verges, Deborah K.; Silverio, Luz M.; Bu, Guojun; Mennerick, Steven; Holtzman, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into soluble and insoluble forms within the brain extracellular space is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Full length amyloid precursor protein (APP) is endocytosed from the cell surface into endosomes where it is cleaved to produce Aβ. Aβ is subsequently released into the brain interstitial fluid (ISF). We hypothesized that synaptic transmission results in more APP endocytosis, thereby increasing Aβ generation and release into the ISF. We found that inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis immediately lowers ISF Aβ levels in vivo. Two distinct methods which increased synaptic transmission resulted in an elevation of ISF Aβ levels. Inhibition of endocytosis, however, prevented the activity-dependent increase in Aβ. We estimate that ~70% of ISF Aβ arises from endocytosis-associated mechanisms with the vast majority of this pool also dependent on synaptic activity. These findings have implications for AD pathogenesis and may provide insights into therapeutic intervention. PMID:18400162

  4. Design for manufacturability production management activity report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Norihiko; Sato, T.; Honma, M.; Yoshioka, N.; Hosono, K.; Onodera, T.; Itoh, H.; Suzuki, H.; Uga, T.; Kadota, K.; Iriki, N.

    2006-05-01

    Design For Manufacturability Production Management (DFM-PM) Subcommittee has been started in succession to Reticle Management Subcommittee (RMS) in Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology Committee for Japan (SMTCJ) from 2005. Our activity focuses on the SoC (System On Chip) Business, and it pursues the improvement of communication in manufacturing technique. The first theme of activity is the investigation and examination of the new trends about production (manufacturer) technology and related information, and proposals of business solution. The second theme is the standardization activity about manufacture technology and the cooperation with related semiconductors' organizations. And the third theme is holding workshop and support for promotion and spread of the standardization technology throughout semiconductor companies. We expand a range of scope from design technology to wafer pattern reliability and we will propose the competition domain, the collaboration area and the standardization technology on DFM. Furthermore, we will be able to make up a SoC business model as the 45nm node technology beyond manufacturing platform in cooperating with the design information and the production information by utilizing EDA technology.

  5. Kupffer cells suppress perfluorononanoic acid-induced hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α expression by releasing cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Zou, Shanshan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Cui, Ruina; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jiayue; Dai, Jiayin

    2012-10-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) have been demonstrated to play a role in the regulation of intra-hepatic lipid metabolism through the synthesis and secretion of biologically active products. The involvement of KCs in the disturbance of lipid metabolism that induced by perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), a known agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), was investigated in this study. Rats were exposed to PFNA or PFNA combined with gadolinium chloride, an inhibitor of KCs, for 14 days. PFNA exposure dose-dependently increased absolute and relative liver weights, induced triglyceride accumulation, up-regulated the expression of both SERBP-1c and PPARα, and stimulated the release of TNFα and IL-1β. Inactivation of KCs markedly lowered TNFα and IL-1β level, enhanced PFNA-induced expression of PPARα and its target genes, and reduced liver triglyceride levels. In vitro, PFNA-induced expression of PPARα in primary cultured hepatocytes was suppressed by recombinant rat TNFα and IL-1β. However, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway prevented this. Transient transfection and promoter analysis further revealed that these two cytokines and NF-κB were coordinately involved in the suppression of PPARα promoter activity. Our data demonstrate that TNFα and IL-1β released from KCs following PFNA exposure can suppress the expression of PPARα via NF-κB pathway, which partially contribute to the evident accumulation of triglycerides in rat liver. PMID:22648072

  6. Minimizing the release of proinflammatory and toxic bacterial products within the host: a promising approach to improve outcome in life-threatening infections.

    PubMed

    Nau, Roland; Eiffert, Helmut

    2005-04-01

    Various bacterial components (e.g., endotoxin, teichoic and lipoteichoic acids, peptidoglycans, DNA) induce or enhance inflammation by stimulating the innate immune system and/or are directly toxic in eukariotic cells (e.g., hemolysins). When antibiotics which inhibit bacterial protein synthesis kill bacteria, smaller quantities of proinflammatory or toxic compounds are released in vitro and in vivo than during killing of bacteria by beta-lactams and other cell-wall active drugs. In general, high antibiotic concentrations liberate lower quantities of bacterial proinflammatory or toxic compounds than concentrations close to the minimum inhibitory concentration. In animal models of Escherichia coli Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis/sepsis and of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis, a lower release of proinflammatory bacterial compounds was associated with a reduced mortality or neuronal injury. Pre-treatment with a bacterial protein synthesis inhibitor reduced the strong release of bacterial products usually observed during treatment with a beta-lactam antibiotic. Data available strongly encourage clinical trials comparing antibiotic regimens with different release of proinflammatory/toxic bacterial products. The benefit of the approach to reduce the liberation of bacterial products should be greatest in patients with a high bacterial load. PMID:15780573

  7. Smart magnetic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to control the release of bio-active molecules.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Chiara; Lungaro, Lisa; Goranov, Vitaly; Riminucci, Alberto; Piñeiro-Redondo, Yolanda; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, José; Dediu, Valentin

    2014-10-01

    Thermo switchable magnetic hydrogels undoubtedly have a great potential for medical applications since they can behave as smart carriers able to transport bioactive molecules to a chosen part of the body and release them on demand via magneto-thermal activation. We report on the ability to modify the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) on demand from 32 °C to LCST ≥ 37 °C. This was achieved by the absorption of controlled amounts of magnetite nanoparticles on the polymer chains. We show, through the effect on cell viability, that the resulting magnetic PNIPAM is able to trap and to release bio-active molecules, such as cell growth factors. The activities of the released bio molecule are tested on human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture. We demonstrate that the LCST of the magnetic PNIPAM can be reached remotely via inductive heating with an alternating magnetic field. This approach on magnetic PNIPAM clearly supports appealing applications in safe biomedicine. PMID:24477874

  8. Load release balance test under unstable conditions effectively discriminates between physically active and sedentary young adults.

    PubMed

    Zemková, E; Štefániková, G; Muyor, J M

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates test-retest reliability and diagnostic accuracy of the load release balance test under four varied conditions. Young, early and late middle-aged physically active and sedentary subjects performed the test over 2 testing sessions spaced 1week apart while standing on either (1) a stable or (2) an unstable surface with (3) eyes open (EO) and (4) eyes closed (EC), respectively. Results identified that test-retest reliability of parameters of the load release balance test was good to excellent, with high values of ICC (0.78-0.92) and low SEM (7.1%-10.7%). The peak and the time to peak posterior center of pressure (CoP) displacement were significantly lower in physically active as compared to sedentary young adults (21.6% and 21.0%) and early middle-aged adults (22.0% and 20.9%) while standing on a foam surface with EO, and in late middle-aged adults on both unstable (25.6% and 24.5%) and stable support surfaces with EO (20.4% and 20.0%). The area under the ROC curve >0.80 for these variables indicates good discriminatory accuracy. Thus, these variables of the load release balance test measured under unstable conditions have the ability to differentiate between groups of physically active and sedentary adults as early as from 19years of age. PMID:27203382

  9. Cellulase activity and dissolved organic carbon release from lignocellulose macrophyte-derived in four trophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Flávia; Cunha-Santino, Marcela Bianchessi; Bianchini, Irineu

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of lignocellulose macrophyte-derived for the energy flux in aquatic ecosystems and the nutrient concentrations as a function of force which influences the decomposition process, this study aims to relate the enzymatic activity and lignocellulose hydrolysis in different trophic statuses. Water samples and two macrophyte species were collected from the littoral zone of a subtropical Brazilian Reservoir. A lignocellulosic matrix was obtained using aqueous extraction of dried plant material (≈40°C). Incubations for decomposition of the lignocellulosic matrix were prepared using lignocelluloses, inoculums and filtered water simulating different trophic statuses with the same N:P ratio. The particulate organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC, respectively) were quantified, the cellulase enzymatic activity was measured by releasing reducing sugars and immobilized carbon was analyzed by filtration. During the cellulose degradation indicated by the cellulase activity, the dissolved organic carbon daily rate and enzyme activity increased. It was related to a fast hydrolysable fraction of cellulose that contributed to short-term carbon immobilization (ca. 10 days). After approximately 20 days, the dissolved organic carbon and enzyme activity were inversely correlated suggesting that the respiration of microorganisms was responsible for carbon mineralization. Cellulose was an important resource in low nutrient conditions (oligotrophic). However, the detritus quality played a major role in the lignocelluloses degradation (i.e., enzyme activity) and carbon release. PMID:26991278

  10. Arachidonate metabolism, 5-hydroxytryptamine release and aggregation in human platelets activated by palmitaldehyde acetal phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Brammer, J. P.; Maguire, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Palmitaldehyde acetal phosphatidic acid ( PGAP ) caused dose-dependent aggregation of human platelets resuspended in modified Tyrode medium, with a threshold concentration of 0.5-1 microM and an EC50 of 4 microM. Concentrations of PGAP which elicited biphasic irreversible aggregation concomitantly induced formation of 1.02 +/- 0.029 nmol (mean +/- s.e. mean) of malondialdehyde (MDA) per 10(9) platelets and caused release of 58 +/- 2.8% of platelet [14C]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([14C]-5-HT) from prelabelled platelets; no MDA formation or [14C]-5-HT release occurred at lower doses of PGAP which elicited only monophasic reversible aggregation. Adenosine 5'-pyrophosphate (ADP)-induced platelet activation resulted in formation of 0.344 +/- 0.004 nmol of MDA per 10(9) platelets in association with irreversible aggregation and 49.1 +/- 1% release of [14C]-5-HT. Mepacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, at 2.5 microM reduced PGAP -induced MDA formation and [14C]-5-HT release by the resuspended platelets without affecting irreversible aggregation; higher concentrations of mepacrine abolished all three responses. Chlorpromazine, a calmodulin antagonist, similarly inhibited PGAP -induced MDA formation and irreversible aggregation, and at 100 microM abolished monophasic aggregation. The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin caused a concentration-dependent reduction of PGAP -induced MDA formation by resuspended human platelets without significantly inhibiting [14C]-5-HT release or irreversible aggregation; concentrations (greater than or equal to 1.75 microM) which inhibited MDA formation by more than 94% abolished [14C]-5-HT release, and converted second phase irreversible aggregation to an extensive reversible response. 2-Methylthioadenosine 5'-phosphate (2 methylthio-AMP), an ADP antagonist, inhibited PGAP -induced MDA formation, [14C]-5-HT release and second phase aggregation in the human platelet suspensions in a parallel, concentration-dependent manner; at 9.4 microM 2

  11. Scube/You activity mediates release of dually lipid-modified Hedgehog signal in soluble form

    PubMed Central

    Creanga, Adrian; Glenn, Thomas D.; Mann, Randall K.; Saunders, Adam M.; Talbot, William S.; Beachy, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their covalent modification by cholesterol and palmitate, Hedgehog (Hh) signaling proteins are localized predominantly to the plasma membrane of expressing cells. Yet Hh proteins are also capable of mobilizing to and eliciting direct responses from distant cells. The zebrafish you gene, identified genetically >15 years ago, was more recently shown to encode a secreted glycoprotein that acts cell-nonautonomously in the Hh signaling pathway by an unknown mechanism. We investigated the function of the protein encoded by murine Scube2, an ortholog of you, and found that it mediates release in soluble form of the mature, cholesterol- and palmitate-modified Sonic hedgehog protein signal (ShhNp) when added to cultured cells or purified detergent-resistant membrane microdomains containing ShhNp. The efficiency of Scube2-mediated release of ShhNp is enhanced by the palmitate adduct of ShhNp and by coexpression in ShhNp-producing cells of mDispatchedA (mDispA), a transporter-like protein with a previously defined role in the release of lipid-modified Hh signals. The structural determinants of Scube2 required for its activity in cultured cell assays match those required for rescue of you mutant zebrafish embryos, and we thus conclude that the role of Scube/You proteins in Hh signaling in vivo is to facilitate the release and mobilization of Hh proteins for distant action. PMID:22677548

  12. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy. PMID:26513754

  13. Evaluation of photodynamic activity, photostability and in vitro drug release of zinc phthalocyanine-loaded nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thiane Deprá; Ziembowicz, Francieli Isa; Müller, Debora Friedrich; Lauermann, Sâmera Cristina; Kloster, Carmen Luisa; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Machado, Giovanna; Villetti, Marcos Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Nanocapsule formulations containing zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) were investigated as drug delivery systems for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT). ZnPc loaded chitosan, PCL, and PCL coated with chitosan nanocapsules were prepared and characterized by means of their physicochemical properties, photodynamic activity, photostability and drug release profile. All formulations presented nanometric hydrodynamic radius, around 100 nm, low polydispersity index (0.08-0.24), slightly negative zeta potential for PCL nanoparticles and positive zeta potential for suspension containing chitosan. Encapsulation efficiencies were higher than 99%. The capacity of ZnPc loaded nanocapsules to produce cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O2) by irradiation with red laser was monitored using 1.3-diphenylisobenzofuran as a probe. The singlet oxygen quantum yields (ΦΔ) for ZnPc loaded chitosan nanocapsules were high and similar to that of the standard (ZnPc in DMSO), displaying excellent ability to generate (1)O2. The photosensitizer loaded nanocapsules are photostable in the timescale usually utilized in PDT and only a small photobleaching event was observed when a light dose of 610J/cm(2) was applied. The in vitro drug release studies of ZnPc from all nanocapsules demonstrated a sustained release profile controlled by diffusion, without burst effect. The nature of the polymer and the core type of the nanocapsules regulated ZnPc release. Thus, the nanocapsules developed in this work are a promising strategy to be employed in PDT. PMID:26678154

  14. Novel lead structures and activation mechanisms for CO-releasing molecules (CORMs).

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, U

    2015-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous small signalling molecule in the human body, produced by the action of haem oxygenase on haem. Since it is very difficult to apply safely as a gas, solid storage and delivery forms for CO are now explored. Most of these CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) are based on the inactivation of the CO by coordinating it to a transition metal centre in a prodrug approach. After a brief look at the potential cellular target structures of CO, an overview of the design principles and activation mechanisms for CO release from a metal coordination sphere is given. Endogenous and exogenous triggers discussed include ligand exchange reactions with medium, enzymatically-induced CO release and photoactivated liberation of CO. Furthermore, the attachment of CORMs to hard and soft nanomaterials to confer additional target specificity to such systems is critically assessed. A survey of analytical methods for the study of the stoichiometry and kinetics of CO release, as well as the tracking of CO in living systems by using fluorescent probes, concludes this review. CORMs are very valuable tools for studying CO bioactivity and might lead to new drug candidates; however, in the design of future generations of CORMs, particular attention has to be paid to their drug-likeness and the tuning of the peripheral 'drug sphere' for specific biomedical applications. Further progress in this field will thus critically depend on a close interaction between synthetic chemists and researchers exploring the physiological effects and therapeutic applications of CO. PMID:24628281

  15. Impact of Zr metal and coking reactions on the fission product aerosol release during MCCI (Molten Core Concrete Interactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Davis, R.E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1987-01-01

    During a core meltdown accident in a light water reactor, molten core materials (corium) could leave the reactor vessel and interact with concrete. In this paper, the impact of the zirconium content of the corium pool and the coking reaction on the release of fission products during Molten Core Concrete Interactions (MCCI) are quantified using CORCON/MOD2 and VANESA computer codes. Detailed calculations show that the total aerosol generation is proportional to the zirconium content of the corium pool. Among the twelve fission product groups treated by the VANESA code, CsI, CsO/sub 2/ and Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/ are completely released over the course of the core/concrete interaction, while an insignificant quantity of Mo, Ru and ZrO/sub 2/ are predicted to be released. The release of BaO, SrO and CeO/sub 2/ increase with increased Zr content, while the releases of Te and La/sub 2/O/sub 3/ are relatively unaffected by the Zr content of the corium pool. The impact of the coking reaction on the radiological releases is estimated to be significant; while the impact of the coking reaction on the aerosol production is insignificant.

  16. Mechanisms of caffeine activation of single calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Sitsapesan, R; Williams, A J

    1990-01-01

    1. Calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum were incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers. Single-channel current fluctuations were recorded under voltage clamp conditions. 2. Channels incorporate into the bilayer with a fixed orientation and channel open probability is regulated by the calcium concentration at the cytosolic face of the membrane. 3. Addition of caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) to the cytosolic side of the membrane increased the open probability of the calcium-activated calcium-release channel by increasing the frequency of opening without significant alteration to the durations of open events. This effect was observed at both 0.1 and 10 microM-activating cytosolic calcium. 4. Caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) did not activate the channel at a subactivating cytosolic calcium concentration (80 pM). 5. At subactivating calcium concentrations, channels could be activated by higher concentrations of caffeine (greater than 5.0 mM) revealing a second, calcium-independent, mechanism for channel activation. Channel openings induced by these high concentrations of caffeine at subactivating calcium concentrations displayed different kinetics from those observed with calcium as the sole activating ligand or with combinations of calcium and low concentrations of caffeine. 6. Activation of channel opening by caffeine in the presence of calcium did not affect single-channel conductance. Channel openings produced by caffeine at subactivating cytosolic calcium concentrations had identical conductance and relative permeability to those seen on calcium activation. 7. Channels activated by caffeine at both activating and subactivating calcium concentrations were characteristically modified by ryanodine, Ruthenium Red, ATP and magnesium, implying that the same channel is involved under both conditions. PMID:2167363

  17. Saccharification of ozonated sugarcane bagasse using enzymes from Myceliophthora thermophila JCP 1-4 for sugars release and ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Josiani de Cassia; Travaini, Rodolfo; Marques, Natalia Paganini; Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia; Martins, Daniela Alonso Bocchini

    2016-03-01

    The saccharification of ozonated sugarcane bagasse (SCB) by enzymes from Myceliophthora thermophila JCP 1-4 was studied. Fungal enzymes provided slightly higher sugar release than commercial enzymes, working at 50°C. Sugar release increased with temperature increase. Kinetic studies showed remarkable glucose release (4.99 g/L, 3%w/w dry matter) at 60°C, 8 h of hydrolysis, using an enzyme load of 10 FPU (filter paper unit). FPase and β-glucosidase activities increased during saccharification (284% and 270%, respectively). No further significant improvement on glucose release was observed increasing the enzyme load above 7.5 FPU per g of cellulose. Higher dry matter contents increased sugars release, but not yields. The fermentation of hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae provided glucose-to-ethanol conversions around to 63%. PMID:26773948

  18. Grading clinical guidelines for the use of transmucosal immediate-release fentanyl products in breakthrough pain.

    PubMed

    Handsaker, Scott; Dempsey, Laura; Fabby, Carole

    2013-02-01

    Pain is a complex symptom that is commonly feared in palliative care owing to its significant effects on patients' quality of life (QoL), and is directly associated with morbidity. More specifically, the management of breakthrough pain (BTP) is particularly important. Opioids play a major part in the management of BTP, and the various transmucosal immediate-release fentanyl (TIRF) products are a common treatment choice. This paper considers the strength of the evidence underlying recommendations regarding the use of TIRF. Failure to consider the quality of evidence in practice can lead to misguided recommendations. Guidelines should therefore be used to inform clinicians of the quality of the underlying evidence and whether recommendations are strong or weak. The GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) approach is increasingly being adopted worldwide as it provides a system for rating quality of evidence and strength of recommendations that is clear, comprehensive, transparent, and practical. This paper adopts the GRADE approach to assess the strength of recommendations made in a 2011 review by Zeppetella in order to develop guidelines for the use of TIRF. The recommendations include that TIRF products can be considered for first-line treatment and that they should be individualised to patients who are on a background opioid. PMID:23435534

  19. Novel bio-active lipid nanocarriers for the stabilization and sustained release of sitosterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacatusu, I.; Badea, N.; Stan, R.; Meghea, A.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, new stable and efficiently bio-active lipid nanocarriers (NLCs) with antioxidant properties have been developed for the transport of active ingredients in food. The novel NLCs loaded with β-sitosterol/β-sitosterol and green tea extract (GTE) and prepared by a combination of natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and squalene) and biological lipids with food grade surfactants, were physico-chemically examined by DLS, TEM, electrokinetic potential, DSC and HPLC and found to have main diameters less than 200 nm, a spherical morphology, excellent physical stability, an imperfect crystalline lattice and high entrapment efficiency. The novel loaded-NLCs have demonstrated the potential to develop a high blocking action of chain reactions, trapping up to 92% of the free-oxygen radicals, as compared to the native β-sitosterol (AA%=36.5). Another advantage of this study is associated with the quality of bio-active NLCs based on grape seed oil and squalene to manifest a better sitosterol—sustained release behaviour as compared to their related nanoemulsions. By coupling both in vitro results, i.e. the enhanced antioxidant activity and superior release properties, this study emphasizes the sustainability of novel bio-active nanocarriers to gain specific bio-food features for development of functional foods with a high applicability spectrum.

  20. Hypothalamic multiunit activity and pulsatile luteinizing hormone release in the castrated male rat.

    PubMed

    Goubillon, M L; Kaufman, J M; Thalabard, J C

    1995-11-01

    Using chronically implanted microelectrodes, multiunit electrical activity (MUA) was recorded from the arcuate nucleus of freely moving gonadectomized male rats. Intermittent increases in MUA activity (MUA volleys) closely associated with luteinizing hormone pulses measured in the peripheral circulation were observed, which confirms that this experimental approach can be used for monitoring the activity of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone-associated hypothalamic pulse generator in the male rat. The mean MUA volley frequency was 22.2 min (range 13-38 min), whereas the mean MUA volley duration was 2.7 +/- 0.8 min (standard deviation). In addition to a large inter-individual variability. MUA volley intervals also showed an important intra-individual variability. This observation suggests that, beside the mean frequency of pulse generator activation, the degree of variability in gonadotropin-releasing hormone-associated pulse generator activity might be an additional relevant parameter in the characterization of the reproductive function in the male rat. PMID:7581989

  1. [Soil biological activities at maize seedling stage under application of slow/controlled release nitrogen fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Li, Dongpo; Wu, Zhijie; Chen, Lijun; Liang, Chenghua; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Weicheng; Yang, Defu

    2006-06-01

    With pot experiment and simulating field ecological environment, this paper studied the effects of different slow/ controlled release N fertilizers on the soil nitrate - reductase and urease activities and microbial biomass C and N at maize seedling stage. The results showed that granular urea amended with dicyandiamide (DCD) and N-(n-bultyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) induced the highest soil nitrate-reductase activity, granular urea brought about the highest soil urease activity and microbial biomass C and N, while starch acetate (SA)-coated granular urea, SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD, methyl methacrylate (MMA) -coated granular urea amended with DCD, and no N fertilization gave a higher soil urease activity. Soil microbial C and N had a similar variation trend after applying various kinds of test slow/controlled release N fertilizers, and were the lowest after applying SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD and NBPT. Coated granular urea amended with inhibitors had a stronger effect on soil biological activities than coated granular urea, and MMA-coating had a better effect than SA-coating. PMID:16964940

  2. Activation of mitochondrial calpain and increased cardiac injury: beyond AIF release.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jeremy; Hu, Ying; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun

    2016-02-01

    Calpain 1 (CPN1) is a ubiquitous cysteine protease that exists in both cytosol and cardiac mitochondria. Mitochondrial CPN1 (mit-CPN1) is located in the intermembrane space and matrix. Activation of mit-CPN1 within the intermembrane space increases cardiac injury by releasing apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria during ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We asked if activation of mit-CPN1 is involved in mitochondrial injury during IR. MDL-28170 (MDL) was used to inhibit CPN1 in buffer-perfused hearts following 25-min ischemia and 30-min reperfusion. MDL treatment decreased the release of lactate dehydrogenase into coronary effluent compared with untreated hearts, indicating that inhibition of CPN1 decreases cardiac injury. MDL also prevented the cleavage of spectrin (a substrate of CPN1) in cytosol during IR, supporting that MDL treatment decreased cytosolic calpain activation. In addition, MDL markedly improved calcium retention capacity compared with untreated heart, suggesting that MDL treatment decreases mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. In addition, we found that IR led to decreased complex I activity, whereas inhibition of mit-CPN1 using MDL protected complex I. Pyruvate dehydrogenase content was decreased following IR. However, pyruvate dehydrogenase content was preserved in MDL-treated mitochondria. Taken together, MDL treatment decreased cardiac injury during IR by inhibiting both cytosolic and mit-CPN1. Activation of mit-CPN1 increases cardiac injury during IR by sensitizing mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and impairing mitochondrial metabolism through damage of complex I. PMID:26637561

  3. Substances released from probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 potentiate NF-κB activity in Escherichia coli-stimulated urinary bladder cells.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mattias; Scherbak, Nikolai; Khalaf, Hazem; Olsson, Per-Erik; Jass, Jana

    2012-11-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 is a probiotic bacterium used to maintain urogenital health. The putative mechanism for its probiotic effect is by modulating the host immunity. Urinary tract infections (UTI) are often caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli that frequently evade or suppress immune responses in the bladder and can target pathways, including nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). We evaluated the role of L. rhamnosus GR-1 on NF-κB activation in E. coli-stimulated bladder cells. Viable L. rhamnosus GR-1 was found to potentiate NF-κB activity in E. coli-stimulated T24 bladder cells, whereas heat-killed lactobacilli demonstrated a marginal increase in NF-κB activity. Surface components released by trypsin- or LiCl treatment, or the resultant heat-killed shaved lactobacilli, had no effect on NF-κB activity. Isolation of released products from L. rhamnosus GR-1 demonstrated that the induction of NF-κB activity was owing to released product(s) with a relatively large native size. Several putative immunomodulatory proteins were identified, namely GroEL, elongation factor Tu and NLP/P60. GroEL and elongation factor Tu have previously been shown to elicit immune responses from human cells. Isolating and using immune-augmenting substances produced by lactobacilli is a novel strategy for the prevention or treatment of UTI caused by immune-evading E. coli. PMID:22620976

  4. HTR 2014 Paper - Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise P. Collin

    2001-10-01

    Safety tests were conducted on fourteen fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800°C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during the safety tests, and the predicted values were compared with experimental results. Preliminary comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination (PIE) results of the safety tests show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of these fission products, which is largely attributed to an over-estimation of the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles. Correction factors to these diffusivities were assessed for silver and cesium in order to enable a better match between the modeling predictions and the safety testing results. In the case of strontium, correction factors could not be assessed because potential release during the safety tests could not be distinguished from matrix content released during irradiation. In the case of krypton, all the coating layers are partly retentive and the available data did not allow to determine their respective retention powers, hence preventing to derive any correction factors.

  5. TNF-alpha released by comigrating monocytes promotes transendothelial migration of activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Green, D M; Trial, J; Birdsall, H H

    1998-09-01

    We investigated mechanisms that increase motility and transendothelial trafficking of activated lymphocytes. Freshly isolated lymphocytes stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 for 2 h migrate into polymerized collagen in 1.99+/-0.25-fold greater numbers and across confluent endothelial monolayers in 4.8+/-0.5-fold greater numbers compared with leukocytes incubated with non-specific IgG. Activated lymphocytes form clusters with monocytes, and their increased motility was dependent on the presence of comigrating monocytes. Five lines of evidence support the idea that monocytes modulate lymphocyte motility through the release of TNF-alpha: 1) flow-cytometric analyses, using highly specific and avid mAbs to probe permeabilized whole blood leukocytes, showed that >80% of circulating monocytes contain intracellular TNF-alpha, whereas <5% contain IL-1 and none contain IL-6; 2) stimulation with immobilized anti-CD3 that was intended to activate lymphocytes also induced monocytes to release increased quantities of TNF-alpha; 3) rTNF-alpha, added in doses of 1 to 20 pg/ml to purified anti-CD3-stimulated lymphocytes, reproduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the motility-enhancing effect of adding monocytes; 4) the transient increase in the expression of TNF R-I on CD3-activated T lymphocytes parallels their transiently increased motility; and 5) addition of anti-TNF-alpha, anti-TNF R-I, anti-TNF R-II, or soluble TNF R-I decreased the motility of stimulated lymphocytes. These results suggest that T lymphocyte stimulation via the CD3-TCR complex signals nearby monocytes to release TNF-alpha, which feeds back on the lymphocytes to increase their locomotor activity. PMID:9725247

  6. Determination of the potential for release of mercury from combustion product amended soils: Part 1--Simulations of beneficial use.

    PubMed

    Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Ericksen, Jody; Fernandez, George C

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes a project that assessed the potential for mercury (Hg) release to air and water from soil amended with combustion products to simulate beneficial use. Combustion products (ash) derived from wood, sewage sludge, subbituminous coal, and a subbituminous coal-petroleum coke mixture were added to soil as agricultural supplements, soil stabilizers, and to develop low-permeability surfaces. Hg release was measured from the latter when intact and after it was broken up and mixed into the soil. Air-substrate Hg exchange was measured for all materials six times over 24 hr, providing data that reflected winter, spring, summer, and fall meteorological conditions. Dry deposition of atmospheric Hg and emission of Hg to the atmosphere were both found to be important fluxes. Measured differences in seasonal and diel (24 hr) fluxes demonstrated that to establish an annual estimate of air-substrate flux from these materials data on both of these time steps should be collected. Air-substrate exchange was highly correlated with soil and air temperature, as well as incident light. Hg releases to the atmosphere from coal and wood combustion product-amended soils to simulate an agricultural application were similar to that measured for the unamended soil, whereas releases to the air for the sludge-amended materials were higher. Hg released to soil solutions during the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure for ash-amended materials was higher than that released from soil alone. On the basis of estimates of annual releases of Hg to the air from the materials used, emissions from coal and wood ash-amended soil to simulate an agricultural application could simply be re-emission of Hg deposited by wet processes from the atmosphere; however, releases from sludge-amended materials and those generated to simulate soil stabilization and disturbed low-permeability pads include Hg indigenous to the material. PMID:18512444

  7. Determination of the potential for release of mercury from combustion product amended soils: Part 1 - Simulations of beneficial use

    SciTech Connect

    Mae Sexauer Gustin; Jody Ericksen; George C. Fernandez

    2008-05-15

    This paper describes a project that assessed the potential for mercury (Hg) release to air and water from soil amended with combustion products to simulate beneficial use. Combustion products (ash) derived from wood, sewage sludge, subbituminous coal, and a subbituminous coal-petroleum coke mixture were added to soil as agricultural supplements, soil stabilizers, and to develop low permeability surfaces. Hg release was measured from the latter when intact and after it was broken up and mixed into the soil. Air-substrate Hg exchange was measured for all materials six times over 24 hr, providing data that reflected winter, spring, summer, and fall meteorological conditions. Dry deposition of atmospheric Hg and emission of Hg to the atmosphere were both found to be important fluxes. Measured differences in seasonal and diel (24 hr) fluxes demonstrated that to establish an annual estimate of air-substrate flux from these materials data on both of these time steps should be collected. Air-substrate exchange was highly correlated with soil and air temperature, as well as incident light. Hg releases to the atmosphere from coal and wood combustion product-amended soils to simulate an agricultural application were similar to that measured for the unamended soil, whereas releases to the air for the sludge-amended materials were higher. Hg released to soil solutions during the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure for ashamended materials was higher than that released from soil alone. On the basis of estimates of annual releases of Hg to the air from the materials used, emissions from coal and wood ash-amended soil to simulate an agricultural application could simply be re-emission of Hg deposited by wet processes from the atmosphere; however, releases from sludge-amended materials and those generated to simulate soil stabilization and disturbed low-permeability pads include Hg indigenous to the material. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Fission product release and microstructure changes of irradiated MOX fuel at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colle, J.-Y.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Beneš, O.; Thiele, H.; Papaioannou, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Sasahara, A.; Sonoda, T.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2013-11-01

    burnups correspond reasonably well with measurement of Walker et al. [11]. All those data are shown Fig. 2.Fragments of 2-8 mg were chosen for the experiments. Since these specimens are small compared to the drilled sample size and were taken randomly, the precise radial position could not be determined, in particular the specimens of sample type, A and B could be from close radial locations.Specimens from each drilled sample type were annealed up to complete vaporisation (˜2600 K) at a speed of about 10 K min-1 in a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer (KEMS) described previously [13,14]. In addition to helium and to the FGs all the species present in the vapour between 83 and 300 a.m.u. were measured during the heating. Additionally, the 85Kr isotope was analysed in a cold trap by β and γ counting. The long-lived fission gas isotopes correspond to masses 131, 132, 134 and 136 for Xe and 83, 84, 85 and 86 for Kr. The absolute quantities of gas released from specimens of sample types A and B were also determined using the in-house built Q-GAMES (Quantitative gas measurement system), described in detail in [15].For each of the samples, fragments were also annealed and measured in the KEMS up to specific temperatures corresponding to different stages of the FGs or He release. These fragments were subsequently analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Philips XL40) [16] in order to investigate the relationship between structural changes, burn-up, irradiation temperature and fission products release. SEM observations were also done on the samples before the KEMS experiments and the fracture surface appearance of the samples is shown in Fig. 3, revealing the presence of the high burnup structure (HBS) in the Pu-rich agglomerates.A summary of the 12 samples analysed by KEMS, SEM and Q-GAMES is given in Table 1. At 1300 K no clear change potentially related to gas release appears in the UM and PA. At 1450 K a beginning of grain boundaries opening can be observed as well as

  9. Molecular Machines Regulating the Release Probability of Synaptic Vesicles at the Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Körber, Christoph; Kuner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ) upon arrival of an action potential (AP) at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabilistic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr), is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffering of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying molecules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ. PMID:26973506

  10. Molecular Machines Regulating the Release Probability of Synaptic Vesicles at the Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Körber, Christoph; Kuner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ) upon arrival of an action potential (AP) at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabilistic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr), is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffering of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying molecules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ. PMID:26973506

  11. Promising applications of cyclodextrins in food: Improvement of essential oils retention, controlled release and antiradical activity.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Miriana; Auezova, Lizette; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Fourmentin, Sophie

    2015-10-20

    Essential oils (EOs) are gaining great interest as alternatives for harmful synthetic food preservatives. Due to their volatile nature, they could be applied in food packaging to improve food quality and extend shelf-life. To provide long-term effects of EOs by increasing their retention and ensuring controlled release of their components, they could be encapsulated in cyclodextrins (CDs). Herein, the ability of six CDs to retain nine EOs and to bind their individual components was investigated. Retention capacities and binding abilities of CDs were assessed by static headspace-gas chromatography (SH-GC) using a new validated "rapid method". The ability of CDs to generate controlled release systems was examined by multiple headspace extraction (MHE). Finally, radical scavenging activity of free and encapsulated EOs was evaluated. The highest retention capacity toward the studied EOs was obtained for β-CD and its derivatives (69-78%). Also, β-CD and its derivatives showed, with one exception, the highest Kf values for all the studied guests. In addition, encapsulation in CDs reduced the releasing rate of EO components (from 1.43 to 2.43-fold for β-CD/Satureja montana EO used as a model). Furthermore, the inclusion complexes showed higher ABTS(+) scavenging capacity than the free EOs. Results confirmed the usefulness of CDs as encapsulant for EOs and should encourage their application in food and as part of active packaging systems. PMID:26256184

  12. HTR-2014 Paper Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2001-10-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict fission product release from tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements provided data on release of fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of fission products in the compacts outside of the SiC layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of these fission products was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed silicon carbide (SiC) layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of about two, corresponding to an over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of about 100. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by an average of about an order of magnitude, which could additionally be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 30%. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-estimated by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release from intact particles varied considerably from compact to compact, making it difficult to assess the effective over-estimation of the diffusivities. Furthermore, the release of strontium from particles with failed SiC is difficult to observe experimentally due to the release from intact particles, preventing any conclusions to be made on the accuracy or validity of the

  13. The oxygen isotope composition of phosphate released from phytic acid by the activity of wheat and Aspergillus niger phytase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sperber, C.; Tamburini, F.; Brunner, B.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2015-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms. Under P-limiting conditions plants and microorganisms can exude extracellular phosphatases that release inorganic phosphate (Pi) from organic phosphorus compounds (Porg). Phytic acid (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, IP6) is an important form of Porg in many soils. The enzymatic hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase yields available Pi and less phosphorylated inositol derivates as products. The hydrolysis of organic P compounds by phosphatases leaves an isotopic imprint on the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of released Pi, which might be used to trace P in the environment. This study aims at determining the effect of phytase on the oxygen isotope composition of released Pi. For this purpose, enzymatic assays with histidine acid phytases from wheat and Aspergillus niger were prepared using IP6, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) and glycerophosphate (GPO4) as substrates. For a comparison to the δ18O of Pi released by other extracellular enzymes, enzymatic assays with acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ with IP6 as a substrate were prepared. During the hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase, four of the six Pi were released, and one oxygen atom from water was incorporated into each Pi. This incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi was subject to an apparent inverse isotopic fractionation (ϵ ~ 6 to 10 ‰), which was similar to that imparted by acid phosphatase from potato during the hydrolysis of IP6 (ϵ ~ 7 ‰), where less than three Pi were released. The incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi during the hydrolysis of AMP and GPO4 by phytase yielded a normal isotopic fractionation (ϵ ~ -12 ‰), similar to values reported for acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ. We attribute this similarity in ϵ to the same amino acid sequence motif (RHGXRXP) at the active site of these enzymes, which leads to similar reaction mechanisms. We suggest that the striking

  14. The oxygen isotope composition of phosphate released from phytic acid by the activity of wheat and Aspergillus niger phytase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, C. v.; Tamburini, F.; Brunner, B.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms. Under P-limiting conditions plants and microorganisms can exude extracellular phosphatases that release inorganic phosphate (Pi) from organic phosphorus compounds (Porg). Phytic acid (IP6) is an important form of Porg in many soils. The enzymatic hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase yields plant available inorganic phosphate (Pi) and less phosphorylated inositol derivates as products. The hydrolysis of organic P-compounds by phosphatases leaves an isotopic imprint on the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of released Pi, which might be used to trace P in the environment. This study aims at determining the effect of phytase on the oxygen isotope composition of released Pi. For this purpose, enzymatic assays with histidine acid phytases from wheat and Aspergillus niger were prepared using IP6, adenosine 5'monophosphate (AMP) and glycerophosphate (GPO4) as substrates. For a comparison to the δ18O of Pi released by other extracellular enzymes, enzymatic assays with acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ with IP6 as substrate were prepared. During the hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase, four Pi are released, and one oxygen atom from water is incorporated into each Pi. This incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi is subject to an apparent inverse isotopic fractionation (ϵ ∼ 6 to 10‰), which is similar to that imparted by acid phosphatase from potato during the hydrolysis of IP6 (ϵ ∼ 7‰) where less than three Pi are released. The incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi during the hydrolysis of AMP and GPO4 by phytase yielded a normal isotopic fractionation (ϵ ∼ -12‰), again similar to values reported for acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ. We attribute this similarity in ɛ to the same amino acid sequence motif (RHGXRXP) at the active site of these enzymes, which leads to similar reaction mechanisms. We suggest that the striking substrate-dependency of

  15. Simultaneous detection of histamine release and lactate production in rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 using sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizaki, Kazuo; Arizono, Naoki )

    1991-04-01

    {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was used to evaluate histamine release and lactate production in intact mast cells isolated from rats. The resonance lines of the aromatic histamine protons in mast cells, detected by the selective spin-excitation technique, were broader and located in a lower magnetic field than those in free histamine solution. When exocytosis of mast-cell granules was induced by compound 48/80, free histamine appeared, with a corresponding decrease in the amount of histamine in the mast cells; the lactate signal was also detected in the spectrum. On the addition of compound 48/ 80, there was a further release of histamine from mast cells, accompanied by further production of lactate. This result indicates that the mechanisms which induce the exocytosis of granules, and/or the events following exocytosis, activate glycolysis.

  16. Identification of the growth hormone-releasing hormone analogue [Pro1, Val14]-hGHRH with an incomplete C-term amidation in a confiscated product.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Simone; Deventer, Koen; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a modified version of the 44 amino acid human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGHRH(1-44)) containing an N-terminal proline extension, a valine residue in position 14, and a C-terminus amidation (sequence: PYADAIFTNSYRKVVLGQLSARKLLQDIMSRQQGESNQERGARARL-NH2 ) has been identified in a confiscated product by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Investigation of the product suggests also an incomplete C-term amidation. Similarly to other hGHRH analogues, available in black markets, this peptide can potentially be used as performance-enhancing drug due to its growth hormone releasing activity and therefore it should be considered as a prohibited substance in sport. Additionally, the presence of partially amidated molecule reveals the poor pharmaceutical quality of the preparation, an aspect which represents a big concern for public health as well. PMID:25283153

  17. Meteorite organics in planetary environments: hydrothermal release, surface activity, and microbial utilization.

    PubMed

    Mautner, M N; Leonard, R L; Deamer, D W

    1995-01-01

    Up to 50% of the organics in the Murchison meteorite, possibly including some of the polymer, is released in high temperature and pressure aqueous environments, to 350 degrees C and 250 bar, that simulate submarine volcanic, hydrothermal or impact-induced conditions. Meteorite organics of prebiotic significance, such as nonanoic acid, glycine, and pyrene survive the hydrothermal conditions. The released material is surface active with surface pressures up to 19.8 x 10(-3) N m-1, and exhibits an extended surface tension isotherm which suggests a mixture of amphiphilic components. One component, nonanoic acid, is shown to form vesicles. The materials extracted under mild conditions, at 120 degrees C, are nutrients for the humic acid bacterium Pseudomonas maltophilia and efficient nutrients for the oligotroph Flavobacterium oryzihabitans, demonstrating the capability of microorganisms to metabolize extraterrestrial organics. PMID:11538427

  18. Meteorite organics in planetary environments: hydrothermal release, surface activity, and microbial utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mautner, M. N.; Leonard, R. L.; Deamer, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    Up to 50% of the organics in the Murchison meteorite, possibly including some of the polymer, is released in high temperature and pressure aqueous environments, to 350 degrees C and 250 bar, that simulate submarine volcanic, hydrothermal or impact-induced conditions. Meteorite organics of prebiotic significance, such as nonanoic acid, glycine, and pyrene survive the hydrothermal conditions. The released material is surface active with surface pressures up to 19.8 x 10(-3) N m-1, and exhibits an extended surface tension isotherm which suggests a mixture of amphiphilic components. One component, nonanoic acid, is shown to form vesicles. The materials extracted under mild conditions, at 120 degrees C, are nutrients for the humic acid bacterium Pseudomonas maltophilia and efficient nutrients for the oligotroph Flavobacterium oryzihabitans, demonstrating the capability of microorganisms to metabolize extraterrestrial organics.

  19. Meteorite organics in planetary environments: hydrothermal release, surface activity, and microbial utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.; Leonard, Robert L.; Deamer, David W.

    1995-02-01

    Up to 50% of the organics in the Murchison meteorite, possibly including some of the polymer, is released in high temperature and pressure aqueous environments, to 350°C and 250 bar, that simulate submarine volcanic, hydrothermal or impact-induced conditions. Meteorite organics of prebiotic significance, such as nonanoic acid, glycine, and pyrene survive the hydrothermal conditions. The released material is surface active with surface pressures up to 19.8 × 10 -3 N m -1, and exhibits an extended surface tension isotherm which suggests a mixture of amphiphilic components. One component, nonanoic acid, is shown to form vesicles. The materials extracted under mild conditions, at 120°C, are nutrients for the humic acid bacterium Pseudomonas maltophilia and efficient nutrients for the oligotroph Flavobacterium oryzihabitans, demonstrating the capability of micro-organisms to metabolize extraterrestrial organics.

  20. Release Activation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (REACTION): A novel environmentally sensitive MRI paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Dorit; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2011-01-01

    Smart contrast agents for MRI-based cell tracking would enable the use of MRI methodologies to not only detect the location of cells, but also gene expression. Here we report on a new enzyme/contrast agent paradigm which involves the enzymatic degradation of the polymer coating of magnetic nanoparticles to release encapsulated magnetic cores. Cells were labeled with particles coated with a polymer which is cleavable by a specific enzyme. This coat restricts the approach of water to the particle, preventing the magnetic core from efficiently relaxing protons. The reactive enzyme was delivered to cells and changes in cellular T2 and T2* relaxation times of ~ 35% and ~ 50% were achieved in vitro. Large enhancements of dark contrast volume (240%) and CNR (48%) within the contrast regions were measured, in vivo, for cells co-labeled with enzyme and particles. These results warrant exploration of genetic avenues towards achieving RElease ACTivation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (REACTION). PMID:21360745

  1. Sympathetic activation triggers endogenous opioid release and analgesia within peripheral inflamed tissue.

    PubMed

    Binder, Waltraud; Mousa, Shaaban A; Sitte, Nicolle; Kaiser, Myriam; Stein, Christoph; Schäfer, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Stress induces analgesia by mechanisms within and outside the brain. Here we show that the sympathetic nervous system is an essential trigger of intrinsic opioid analgesia within peripheral injured tissue. Noradrenaline, injected directly into inflamed hind paws of male Wistar rats, produced dose-dependent antinociception, reversible by alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-antagonists. alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors were demonstrated on beta-endorphin-containing immune cells and noradrenaline induced adrenergic receptor-specific release of beta-endorphin from immune cell suspensions. This antinociceptive effect of noradrenaline was reversed by micro - and delta-opioid antagonists as well as by anti-beta-endorphin. Stress-induced peripheral analgesia was abolished by chemical sympathectomy and by adrenergic antagonists. These findings indicate that sympathetic neuron-derived noradrenaline stimulates adrenergic receptors on inflammatory cells to release beta-endorphin, which induces analgesia via activation of peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:15245482

  2. RIM-binding protein, a central part of the active zone, is essential for neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Liu, Karen S Y; Siebert, Matthias; Mertel, Sara; Knoche, Elena; Wegener, Stephanie; Wichmann, Carolin; Matkovic, Tanja; Muhammad, Karzan; Depner, Harald; Mettke, Christoph; Bückers, Johanna; Hell, Stefan W; Müller, Martin; Davis, Graeme W; Schmitz, Dietmar; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2011-12-16

    The molecular machinery mediating the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at presynaptic active zone (AZ) membranes has been studied in detail, and several essential components have been identified. AZ-associated protein scaffolds are viewed as only modulatory for transmission. We discovered that Drosophila Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM)-binding protein (DRBP) is essential not only for the integrity of the AZ scaffold but also for exocytotic neurotransmitter release. Two-color stimulated emission depletion microscopy showed that DRBP surrounds the central Ca(2+) channel field. In drbp mutants, Ca(2+) channel clustering and Ca(2+) influx were impaired, and synaptic release probability was drastically reduced. Our data identify RBP family proteins as prime effectors of the AZ scaffold that are essential for the coupling of SVs, Ca(2+) channels, and the SV fusion machinery. PMID:22174254

  3. Curcumin-Loaded, Self-Assembled Aloevera Template for Superior Antioxidant Activity and Trans-Membrane Drug Release.

    PubMed

    Kitture, Rohini; Ghosh, Sougata; More, Piyush A; Date, Kalyani; Gaware, Shankar; Datar, Suwarna; Chopade, Balu A; Kale, S N

    2015-06-01

    Fine combination of natural botanical extracts to evaluate and maximize their medicinal efficacy has been studied for long. However, their limited shelf-life, complicated extraction protocols, and difficult compositional analysis have always been a problem. It is due to this that such materials take time to convert them into a proper pharmaceutical technology or product. In this context, we report on synthesis of self-assembled template of one of the most popular natural product, aloevera. This forms a fine porous membrane like structure, in which a natural drug, curcumin has been immobilized/trapped. The so-made curcumin-loaded-aloevera (CLA) structures have been carefully evaluated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. While FTIR shows that there is no chemical interaction between aloevera and curcumin, the pores are finely occupied by curcumin molecules. Fine microscopy structures reveal their distribution and fluorescence microscopy confirm the presence of curcumin within the pores. TGA shows 15% loading of the curcumin in the template and UV-visible spectroscopy data shows independent peaks of both, aloevera (196 nm and 256 nm) and curcumin (423 nm), respectively. When subjected to antioxidant studies, using DPPH assays, CLAs show a synergistically superior DPPH radical scavenging activity as compared to only curcumin and only aloevera extract. Same is true for hydroxyl and NO2 radicals. Trans-membrane release study reveals that there is no significant difference in the amount of curcumin release from CLAs till initial 30 min, however, it increases steadily thereafter. CLA is found to facilitate efficient release of curcumin in 5 h, which is higher as compared to the curcumin alone. PMID:26369010

  4. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  5. A systematic comparison of two new releases of exome sequencing products: the aim of use determines the choice of product.

    PubMed

    Altmüller, Janine; Motameny, Susanne; Becker, Christian; Thiele, Holger; Chatterjee, Sreyoshi; Wollnik, Bernd; Nürnberg, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We received early access to the newest releases of exome sequencing products, namely Agilent SureSelect v6 (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and NimbleGen MedExome (Roche NimbleGen, Basel, Switzerland), and we conducted whole exome sequencing (WES) of several DNA samples with each of these products in order to assess their performance. Here, we provide a detailed evaluation of the original, normalized (with respect to the different target sizes), and trimmed data sets and compare them in terms of the amount of duplicates, the reads on target, and the enrichment evenness. In addition to these general statistics, we performed a detailed analysis of the frequently mutated and newly described genes found in 'The Deciphering Developmental Disorders Study' published very recently (Fitzgerald, T.W., Gerety, S.S., Jones, W.D., van Kogelenberg, M., King, D.A., McRae, J., Morley, K.I., Parthiban, V., Al-Turki, S., Ambridge, K., et al. (2015). Large-scale discovery of novel genetic causes of developmental disorders. Nature 519, 223-228.). In our comparison, the Agilent v6 exome performs better than the NimbleGen's MedExome both in terms of efficiency and evenness of coverage distribution. With its larger target size, it is also more comprehensive, and therefore the better choice in research projects that aim to identify novel disease-associated genes. In contrast, if the exomes are mainly used in a diagnostic setting, we see advantages for the new NimbleGen MedExome. We find a superior coverage here in those genes of high clinical relevance that likely allows for a better detection of relevant, disease-causing mutations. PMID:27021259

  6. Production of BSA-loaded alginate microcapsules: influence of spray dryer parameters on the microcapsule characteristics and BSA release.

    PubMed

    Benchabane, Samir; Subirade, Muriel; Vandenberg, Grant W

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the production of BSA-loaded alginate microcapsules by spray drying and to study the release of bovine serum albumin fraction V (BSA) under gastric simulated conditions. Microcapsule yield, BSA release, microcapsule size and size distribution were characterized following the application of different production parameters including inlet air temperature, inlet air pressure and liquid feed rate. The microcapsules were incubated in 0.1 N HCl and BSA release was quantified over time. The yields were higher with the pressure of 3 bar compared to 4 bar and with a feed rate of 0.45 vs. 0.2 ml s(-1). A high feed rate (0.45 vs. 0.2 ml s(-1)) allows one to obtain microcapsules with a low BSA release (p = 0.0327). The increase of the atomizer inlet temperature leads to microcapsules with a higher BSA release (p = 0.0230). A higher air pressure of 4 bar compared to 3 bar resulted in a lower microcapsule size (2.55 vs. 2.80 microm) and led to a narrower size distribution (0.92 vs. 1.07). In conclusion, the spray dryer parameters influenced the alginate microcapsule characteristics as well as subsequent protein release into a simulated gastric medium. PMID:17654176

  7. RASGRF2 regulates alcohol-induced reinforcement by influencing mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity and dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, David; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Easton, Alanna C.; Longueville, Sophie; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Büchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia J.; Desrivières, Sylvane; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Palkovits, Miklós; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruggeri, Barbara; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael N.; Staehlin, Oliver; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Mameli, Manuel; Müller, Christian P.; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Schumann, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    The firing of mesolimbic dopamine neurons is important for drug-induced reinforcement, although underlying genetic factors remain poorly understood. In a recent genome-wide association metaanalysis of alcohol intake, we identified a suggestive association of SNP rs26907 in the ras-specific guanine-nucleotide releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene, encoding a protein that mediates Ca2+-dependent activation of the ERK pathway. We performed functional characterization of this gene in relation to alcohol-related phenotypes and mesolimbic dopamine function in both mice and adolescent humans. Ethanol intake and preference were decreased in Rasgrf2−/− mice relative to WT controls. Accordingly, ethanol-induced dopamine release in the ventral striatum was blunted in Rasgrf2−/− mice. Recording of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area revealed reduced excitability in the absence of Ras-GRF2, likely because of lack of inhibition of the IA potassium current by ERK. This deficit provided an explanation for the altered dopamine release, presumably linked to impaired activation of dopamine neurons firing. Functional neuroimaging analysis of a monetary incentive–delay task in 663 adolescent boys revealed significant association of ventral striatal activity during reward anticipation with a RASGRF2 haplotype containing rs26907, the SNP associated with alcohol intake in our previous metaanalysis. This finding suggests a link between the RASGRF2 haplotype and reward sensitivity, a known risk factor for alcohol and drug addiction. Indeed, follow-up of these same boys at age 16 y revealed an association between this haplotype and number of drinking episodes. Together, these combined animal and human data indicate a role for RASGRF2 in the regulation of mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity, reward response, and alcohol use and abuse. PMID:23223532

  8. RASGRF2 regulates alcohol-induced reinforcement by influencing mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity and dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Stacey, David; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Easton, Alanna C; Longueville, Sophie; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Büchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia J; Desrivières, Sylvane; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Bokde, Arun L W; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Palkovits, Miklós; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruggeri, Barbara; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael N; Staehlin, Oliver; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Mameli, Manuel; Müller, Christian P; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Schumann, Gunter

    2012-12-18

    The firing of mesolimbic dopamine neurons is important for drug-induced reinforcement, although underlying genetic factors remain poorly understood. In a recent genome-wide association metaanalysis of alcohol intake, we identified a suggestive association of SNP rs26907 in the ras-specific guanine-nucleotide releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene, encoding a protein that mediates Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the ERK pathway. We performed functional characterization of this gene in relation to alcohol-related phenotypes and mesolimbic dopamine function in both mice and adolescent humans. Ethanol intake and preference were decreased in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice relative to WT controls. Accordingly, ethanol-induced dopamine release in the ventral striatum was blunted in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice. Recording of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area revealed reduced excitability in the absence of Ras-GRF2, likely because of lack of inhibition of the I(A) potassium current by ERK. This deficit provided an explanation for the altered dopamine release, presumably linked to impaired activation of dopamine neurons firing. Functional neuroimaging analysis of a monetary incentive-delay task in 663 adolescent boys revealed significant association of ventral striatal activity during reward anticipation with a RASGRF2 haplotype containing rs26907, the SNP associated with alcohol intake in our previous metaanalysis. This finding suggests a link between the RASGRF2 haplotype and reward sensitivity, a known risk factor for alcohol and drug addiction. Indeed, follow-up of these same boys at age 16 y revealed an association between this haplotype and number of drinking episodes. Together, these combined animal and human data indicate a role for RASGRF2 in the regulation of mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity, reward response, and alcohol use and abuse. PMID:23223532

  9. Activation of AMPA receptor promotes TNF-α release via the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade in RAW264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xiu-Li; Ding, Fan; Li, Hui; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Xiao; Cao, Ji-Min; Gao, Xue

    2015-05-29

    The relationship between glutamate signaling and inflammation has not been well defined. This study aimed to investigate the role of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) in the expression and release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. A series of approaches, including confocal microscopy, immunofluorescency, flow cytometry, ELISA and Western blotting, were used to estimate the expression of AMPAR and downstream signaling molecules, TNF-α release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The results demonstrated that AMPAR was expressed in RAW264.7 cells. AMPA significantly enhanced TNF-α release from RAW264.7 cells, and this effect was abolished by CNQX (AMPAR antagonist). AMPA also induced elevation of ROS production, phosphorylation of c-Src and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in RAW264.7 cells. Blocking c-Src by PP2, scavenging ROS by glutathione (GSH) or inhibiting NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) decreased TNF-α production from RAW264.7 cells. We concluded that AMPA promotes TNF-α release in RAW264.7 macrophages likely through the following signaling cascade: AMPAR activation → ROS generation → c-Src phosphorylation → NF-κB activation → TNF-α elevation. The study suggests that AMPAR may participate in macrophage activation and inflammation. - Highlights: • AMPAR is expressed in RAW264.7 macrophages and is upregulated by AMPA stimulation. • Activation of AMPAR stimulates TNF-α release in macrophages through the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade. • Macrophage AMPAR signaling may play an important role in inflammation.

  10. Nitrite Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Released by Antimicrobial Agents and Complement Induces Interleukin-8 Production in Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sar, Borann; Oishi, Kazunori; Wada, Akihiro; Hirayama, Toshiya; Matsushima, Kouji; Nagatake, Tsuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    We have recently reported that nitrite reductase, a bifunctional enzyme located in the periplasmic space of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, could induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) generation in a variety of respiratory cells, including bronchial epithelial cells (K. Oishi et al. Infect. Immun. 65:2648–2655, 1997). In this report, we examined the mode of nitrite reductase (PNR) release from a serum-sensitive strain of live P. aeruginosa cells during in vitro treatment with four different antimicrobial agents or human complement. Bacterial killing of P. aeruginosa by antimicrobial agents induced PNR release and mediated IL-8 production in human bronchial epithelial (BET-1A) cells. Among these agents, imipenem demonstrated rapid killing of P. aeruginosa as well as rapid release of PNR and resulted in the highest IL-8 production. Complement-mediated killing of P. aeruginosa was also associated with PNR release and enhanced IL-8 production. The immunoprecipitates of the aliquots of bacterial culture containing imipenem or complement with anti-PNR immunoglobulin G (IgG) induced a twofold-higher IL-8 production than did the immunoprecipitates of the aliquots of bacterial culture with a control IgG. These pieces of evidence confirmed that PNR released in the aliquots of bacterial culture was responsible for IL-8 production in the BET-1A cells. Furthermore, the culture supernatants of the BET-1A cells stimulated with aliquots of bacterial culture containing antimicrobial agents or complement similarly mediated neutrophil migration in vitro. These data support the possibility that a potent inducer of IL-8, PNR, could be released from P. aeruginosa after exposure to antimicrobial agents or complement and contributes to neutrophil migration in the airways during bronchopulmonary infections with P. aeruginosa. PMID:10103183

  11. Product-specific validation of a serological potency test for release of Leptospira vaccines in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Catrina; Novokova, Viera

    2013-09-01

    Historically in the European Union, all Leptospira vaccines were released using the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) hamster potency assay. Recently, there has been a shift toward alternatives that offer either refinement of testing or replacement of animals for product release. This is being driven by animal welfare concerns but also by a drive to have more consistent, cheaper, and faster batch release tests. This publication discusses one such example of a multicomponent canine vaccine that includes three Leptospira serovars and has recently been registered in the European Union. The potency release test is a refinement because it uses rabbit serology rather than hamster challenge. This publication covers the principles of the test method, challenges faced during its development and registration, and discussion about benefits and limitations of this method. It concludes with a view of how the use of serology testing could fit into an overall strategy to move to fully in vitro testing by adopting a consistency approach. PMID:23849308

  12. Characterization of ovolin, an orally active tryptic peptide released from ovalbumin with anxiolytic-like activity.

    PubMed

    Oda, Ayako; Kaneko, Kentaro; Mizushige, Takafumi; Lazarus, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro; Ohinata, Kousaku

    2012-07-01

    We found that tryptic digest of ovalbumin after oral (p.o.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration exhibited anxiolytic-like activity in mice, and then searched for orally active low-molecular-weight peptides with anxiolytic-like activity in the tryptic digest. Val-Tyr-Leu-Pro-Arg, named ovolin, corresponding to ovalbumin (280-284), mimicked the anxiolytic-like activity after p.o. and i.p. administration. The anxiolytic-like activity of ovolin was inhibited by indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, or BWA868C, an antagonist of the DP1 receptor for prostaglandin (PG) D2 . Ovolin-induced anxiolytic-like activity was also blocked by SCH58261 or bicuculline, antagonists of the adenosine A2A and GABAA receptors, respectively. Ovolin has no affinity for the DP1 , A2A and GABAA receptors. Taken together, ovolin may exhibit anxiolytic-like activity in a manner dependent on the PGD2 -DP1 system coupled to the A2A and GABAA receptors. PMID:22564055

  13. Locus Ceruleus Norepinephrine Release: A Central Regulator of CNS Spatio-Temporal Activation?

    PubMed Central

    Atzori, Marco; Cuevas-Olguin, Roberto; Esquivel-Rendon, Eric; Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C.; Saderi, Nadia; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Treviño, Mario; Pineda, Juan C.; Salgado, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is synthesized in the Locus Coeruleus (LC) of the brainstem, from where it is released by axonal varicosities throughout the brain via volume transmission. A wealth of data from clinics and from animal models indicates that this catecholamine coordinates the activity of the central nervous system (CNS) and of the whole organism by modulating cell function in a vast number of brain areas in a coordinated manner. The ubiquity of NE receptors, the daunting number of cerebral areas regulated by the catecholamine, as well as the variety of cellular effects and of their timescales have contributed so far to defeat the attempts to integrate central adrenergic function into a unitary and coherent framework. Since three main families of NE receptors are represented—in order of decreasing affinity for the catecholamine—by: α2 adrenoceptors (α2Rs, high affinity), α1 adrenoceptors (α1Rs, intermediate affinity), and β adrenoceptors (βRs, low affinity), on a pharmacological basis, and on the ground of recent studies on cellular and systemic central noradrenergic effects, we propose that an increase in LC tonic activity promotes the emergence of four global states covering the whole spectrum of brain activation: (1) sleep: virtual absence of NE, (2) quiet wake: activation of α2Rs, (3) active wake/physiological stress: activation of α2- and α1-Rs, (4) distress: activation of α2-, α1-, and β-Rs. We postulate that excess intensity and/or duration of states (3) and (4) may lead to maladaptive plasticity, causing—in turn—a variety of neuropsychiatric illnesses including depression, schizophrenic psychoses, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit. The interplay between tonic and phasic LC activity identified in the LC in relationship with behavioral response is of critical importance in defining the short- and long-term biological mechanisms associated with the basic states postulated for the CNS. While the model has the potential to explain a

  14. Locus Ceruleus Norepinephrine Release: A Central Regulator of CNS Spatio-Temporal Activation?

    PubMed

    Atzori, Marco; Cuevas-Olguin, Roberto; Esquivel-Rendon, Eric; Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C; Saderi, Nadia; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Treviño, Mario; Pineda, Juan C; Salgado, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is synthesized in the Locus Coeruleus (LC) of the brainstem, from where it is released by axonal varicosities throughout the brain via volume transmission. A wealth of data from clinics and from animal models indicates that this catecholamine coordinates the activity of the central nervous system (CNS) and of the whole organism by modulating cell function in a vast number of brain areas in a coordinated manner. The ubiquity of NE receptors, the daunting number of cerebral areas regulated by the catecholamine, as well as the variety of cellular effects and of their timescales have contributed so far to defeat the attempts to integrate central adrenergic function into a unitary and coherent framework. Since three main families of NE receptors are represented-in order of decreasing affinity for the catecholamine-by: α2 adrenoceptors (α2Rs, high affinity), α1 adrenoceptors (α1Rs, intermediate affinity), and β adrenoceptors (βRs, low affinity), on a pharmacological basis, and on the ground of recent studies on cellular and systemic central noradrenergic effects, we propose that an increase in LC tonic activity promotes the emergence of four global states covering the whole spectrum of brain activation: (1) sleep: virtual absence of NE, (2) quiet wake: activation of α2Rs, (3) active wake/physiological stress: activation of α2- and α1-Rs, (4) distress: activation of α2-, α1-, and β-Rs. We postulate that excess intensity and/or duration of states (3) and (4) may lead to maladaptive plasticity, causing-in turn-a variety of neuropsychiatric illnesses including depression, schizophrenic psychoses, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit. The interplay between tonic and phasic LC activity identified in the LC in relationship with behavioral response is of critical importance in defining the short- and long-term biological mechanisms associated with the basic states postulated for the CNS. While the model has the potential to explain a large

  15. Interleukin-1alpha treatment of meniscal explants stimulates the production and release of aggrecanase-generated, GAG-substituted aggrecan products and also the release of pre-formed, aggrecanase-generated G1 and m-calpain-generated G1-G2.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Angelika K; Sandy, John D; Voigt, Henning; Dreier, Rita; Lee, Jennifer H; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Mentlein, Rolf; Fay, Jakob; Schünke, Michael; Kurz, Bodo

    2010-04-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines induce meniscal matrix degradation and inhibition of endogenous repair mechanisms, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this are mostly unknown. Therefore, we investigated details of interleukin-1 (IL-1alpha)-induced aggrecan turnover in mature meniscal tissue explants. Fibro-cartilagenous disks (3 mm diameter x 1 mm thickness) were isolated from the central, weight-bearing region of menisci from 2-year-old cattle. After 3 or 6 days of IL-1alpha-treatment, GAG loss (DMMB assay), biosynthetic activity ([(35)SO(4)]-sulfate and [(3)H]-proline incorporation), gene expression (quantitative RT-PCR) and the abundance (zymography, Western blot) of matrix-degrading enzymes and specific aggrecan products were determined. Meniscal fibrocartilage had a 4-fold lower GAG content (per wet weight) than adjacent articular cartilage, and expressed MMPs-1, -2, -3 and ADAMTS4 constitutively, whereas ADAMTS5 m-RNA was essentially undetectable. Significant IL-1 effects were a decrease in biosynthetic activity, an increase in GAG release and in the expression/abundance of MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAMTS4. Fresh tissue contained aggrecan core protein products similar to those previously described for bovine articular cartilage of this age. IL-1 induced the release of aggrecanase-generated CS-substituted products including both high (>250 kDa) and low molecular weight (about 75 kDa) species. TIMP-3 (but not TIMP-1 and -2 or a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor) inhibited IL-1-dependent GAG loss. In addition, IL-1 induced the release of preformed pools of three known G1-bearing products. We conclude that aggrecanases are responsible for IL-1-stimulated GAG release from meniscal explants, and that IL-1 also stimulates release of G1-bearing products, by a process possibly involving hyaluronan fragmentation. PMID:20217136

  16. Rapid estimation of sugar release from winter wheat straw during bioethanol production using FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bekiaris, Georgios; Lindedam, Jane; Peltre, Clément; Decker, Stephen R.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Magid, Jakob; Bruun, Sander

    2015-06-18

    Complexity and high cost are the main limitations for high-throughput screening methods for the estimation of the sugar release from plant materials during bioethanol production. In addition, it is important that we improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which different chemical components are affecting the degradability of plant material. In this study, Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) was combined with advanced chemometrics to develop calibration models predicting the amount of sugars released after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw during bioethanol production, and the spectra were analysed to identify components associated with recalcitrance. A total of 1122more » wheat straw samples from nine different locations in Denmark and one location in the United Kingdom, spanning a large variation in genetic material and environmental conditions during growth, were analysed. The FTIR-PAS spectra of non-pretreated wheat straw were correlated with the measured sugar release, determined by a high-throughput pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis (HTPH) assay. A partial least square regression (PLSR) calibration model predicting the glucose and xylose release was developed. The interpretation of the regression coefficients revealed a positive correlation between the released glucose and xylose with easily hydrolysable compounds, such as amorphous cellulose and hemicellulose. Additionally, we observed a negative correlation with crystalline cellulose and lignin, which inhibits cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis. FTIR-PAS was used as a reliable method for the rapid estimation of sugar release during bioethanol production. The spectra revealed that lignin inhibited the hydrolysis of polysaccharides into monomers, while the crystallinity of cellulose retarded its hydrolysis into glucose. Amorphous cellulose and xylans were found to contribute significantly to the released amounts of glucose and xylose

  17. Rapid estimation of sugar release from winter wheat straw during bioethanol production using FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bekiaris, Georgios; Lindedam, Jane; Peltre, Clément; Decker, Stephen R.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Magid, Jakob; Bruun, Sander

    2015-06-18

    Complexity and high cost are the main limitations for high-throughput screening methods for the estimation of the sugar release from plant materials during bioethanol production. In addition, it is important that we improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which different chemical components are affecting the degradability of plant material. In this study, Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) was combined with advanced chemometrics to develop calibration models predicting the amount of sugars released after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw during bioethanol production, and the spectra were analysed to identify components associated with recalcitrance. A total of 1122 wheat straw samples from nine different locations in Denmark and one location in the United Kingdom, spanning a large variation in genetic material and environmental conditions during growth, were analysed. The FTIR-PAS spectra of non-pretreated wheat straw were correlated with the measured sugar release, determined by a high-throughput pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis (HTPH) assay. A partial least square regression (PLSR) calibration model predicting the glucose and xylose release was developed. The interpretation of the regression coefficients revealed a positive correlation between the released glucose and xylose with easily hydrolysable compounds, such as amorphous cellulose and hemicellulose. Additionally, we observed a negative correlation with crystalline cellulose and lignin, which inhibits cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis. FTIR-PAS was used as a reliable method for the rapid estimation of sugar release during bioethanol production. The spectra revealed that lignin inhibited the hydrolysis of polysaccharides into monomers, while the crystallinity of cellulose retarded its hydrolysis into glucose. Amorphous cellulose and xylans were found to contribute significantly to the released amounts of glucose and xylose, respectively.

  18. Identification and characterization of a surface protein-releasing activity in Streptococcus mutans and other pathogenic streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S F

    1992-01-01

    Surface proteins of Streptococcus mutans have been reported to be released into the culture filtrate at concentrations that vary with the growth conditions. The reason for this is not clear. The present study attempts to investigate the mechanism of the protein release. The results showed that whole cells and raffinose-stabilized protoplasts of S. mutans NG8, when incubated in buffers, were capable of releasing their surface proteins in a pH-dependent manner with optimal release at pH 5 to 6. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the released proteins were very complex. Two proteins, adhesin P1, which has been previously shown to interact with a human salivary agglutinin, and glucosyltransferase have been identified among the released proteins. The release of adhesin P1 and other proteins was found to be inhibited by heat, Cu2+,Zn2+, and thiol-blocking reagents. The inhibition by heat and Cu2+ was irreversible, whereas that by the thiol-blocking reagents was reversible. EDTA, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and N-p-tosyl-L-lysyl-chloromethyl ketone had no effect on the release of P1, indicating that the release was probably not due to proteolytic activity. Adhesin P1 from Cu(2+)-inactivated S. mutans NG8 protoplasts could be released by mixing with fresh whole cells and protoplasts, but not the culture filtrate, of a P1-negative mutant of NG8, suggesting that the enzyme is located on the cell surface. This P1-releasing activity was also detected in two other strains of S. mutans and one strain each of S. gordonii, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae, and S. pyogenes. The biological role(s) of this enzyme activity remains to be determined. However, owing to its ability to release virulent surface proteins from the cell, it may play an important role in cell surface modulation among the pathogenic streptococci. Images PMID:1398915

  19. Identification and characterization of a surface protein-releasing activity in Streptococcus mutans and other pathogenic streptococci.

    PubMed

    Lee, S F

    1992-10-01

    Surface proteins of Streptococcus mutans have been reported to be released into the culture filtrate at concentrations that vary with the growth conditions. The reason for this is not clear. The present study attempts to investigate the mechanism of the protein release. The results showed that whole cells and raffinose-stabilized protoplasts of S. mutans NG8, when incubated in buffers, were capable of releasing their surface proteins in a pH-dependent manner with optimal release at pH 5 to 6. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the released proteins were very complex. Two proteins, adhesin P1, which has been previously shown to interact with a human salivary agglutinin, and glucosyltransferase have been identified among the released proteins. The release of adhesin P1 and other proteins was found to be inhibited by heat, Cu2+,Zn2+, and thiol-blocking reagents. The inhibition by heat and Cu2+ was irreversible, whereas that by the thiol-blocking reagents was reversible. EDTA, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and N-p-tosyl-L-lysyl-chloromethyl ketone had no effect on the release of P1, indicating that the release was probably not due to proteolytic activity. Adhesin P1 from Cu(2+)-inactivated S. mutans NG8 protoplasts could be released by mixing with fresh whole cells and protoplasts, but not the culture filtrate, of a P1-negative mutant of NG8, suggesting that the enzyme is located on the cell surface. This P1-releasing activity was also detected in two other strains of S. mutans and one strain each of S. gordonii, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae, and S. pyogenes. The biological role(s) of this enzyme activity remains to be determined. However, owing to its ability to release virulent surface proteins from the cell, it may play an important role in cell surface modulation among the pathogenic streptococci. PMID:1398915

  20. POLARIZED RELEASE OF LIPID MEDIATORS DERIVED FROM PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 ACTIVITY IN A HUMAN BRONCHIAL CELL LINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The release of arachidonic acid (AA) and platelet activating factory (PAF) from airway epithelial cells may be an important mediating factor in lung physiological and inflammatory processes. The type of lung response may be determined by the directional release of AA and PAF. We ...

  1. Pyrazolopyrimidines: synthesis, effect on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Quintela, J M; Peinador, C; Moreira, M J; Alfonso, A; Botana, L M; Riguera, R

    2001-04-01

    A series of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (3--6) substituted at positions 1 (R(1)=Ph, H, tert-butyl and ribosetribenzoate), 4 (R(2)=chlorine, nitrogen and oxygen nucleophiles), and 6 (dimethylamino) have been synthesized and their effect on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells measured. After chemical stimulation, (polymer 48/80), several compounds (i.e. 3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4g, 5a), produce inhibition two to three times higher (40--60%) than DSCG but this action is lower after preincubation. 4b (R(1)=Ph, R(2)=NHCH(2)Ph; 50--70% inhibition) and 5a (R(1)=H, R(2)=OMe; 50--55% inhibition) are the most active ones in both experiments. With ovoalbumin as stimulus, several pyrazolopyrimidines show inhibition similar to DSCG, the most active compounds being 6a--d (IC(50)=12--16 microM; R(1)=ribosetribenzoate, R(2)=methoxy and amino). Compounds 4e (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=OMe) and 4g (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=piperidino) are inducers of the release of histamine (60 and 150% increase). Compounds 4b and 4c showed cytotoxic activity (IC(50)=1 microg/mL) to HT-29 human colon cancer cells. PMID:11461757

  2. HSF1 transcriptional activity mediates alcohol induction of Vamp2 expression and GABA release.

    PubMed

    Varodayan, Florence P; Harrison, Neil L

    2013-01-01

    Many central synapses are highly sensitive to alcohol, and it is now accepted that short-term alterations in synaptic function may lead to longer-term changes in circuit function. The regulation of postsynaptic receptors by alcohol has been well studied, but the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol on the presynaptic terminal are relatively unexplored. To identify a pathway by which alcohol regulates neurotransmitter release, we recently investigated the mechanism by which ethanol induces Vamp2, but not Vamp1, in mouse primary cortical cultures. These two genes encode isoforms of synaptobrevin, a vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein required for synaptic vesicle fusion. We found that alcohol activates the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) to induce Vamp2 expression, while Vamp1 mRNA levels remain unaffected. As the Vamp2 gene encodes a SNARE protein, we then investigated whether ethanol exposure and HSF1 transcriptional activity alter neurotransmitter release using electrophysiology. We found that alcohol increased the frequency of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated miniature IPSCs via HSF1, but had no effect on mEPSCs. Overall, these data indicate that alcohol induces HSF1 transcriptional activity to trigger a specific coordinated adaptation in GABAergic presynaptic terminals. This mechanism could explain some of the changes in synaptic function that occur soon after alcohol exposure, and may underlie some of the more enduring effects of chronic alcohol intake on local circuit function. PMID:24376402

  3. HSF1 transcriptional activity mediates alcohol induction of Vamp2 expression and GABA release

    PubMed Central

    Varodayan, Florence P.; Harrison, Neil L.

    2013-01-01

    Many central synapses are highly sensitive to alcohol, and it is now accepted that short-term alterations in synaptic function may lead to longer-term changes in circuit function. The regulation of postsynaptic receptors by alcohol has been well studied, but the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol on the presynaptic terminal are relatively unexplored. To identify a pathway by which alcohol regulates neurotransmitter release, we recently investigated the mechanism by which ethanol induces Vamp2, but not Vamp1, in mouse primary cortical cultures. These two genes encode isoforms of synaptobrevin, a vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein required for synaptic vesicle fusion. We found that alcohol activates the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) to induce Vamp2 expression, while Vamp1 mRNA levels remain unaffected. As the Vamp2 gene encodes a SNARE protein, we then investigated whether ethanol exposure and HSF1 transcriptional activity alter neurotransmitter release using electrophysiology. We found that alcohol increased the frequency of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated miniature IPSCs via HSF1, but had no effect on mEPSCs. Overall, these data indicate that alcohol induces HSF1 transcriptional activity to trigger a specific coordinated adaptation in GABAergic presynaptic terminals. This mechanism could explain some of the changes in synaptic function that occur soon after alcohol exposure, and may underlie some of the more enduring effects of chronic alcohol intake on local circuit function. PMID:24376402

  4. Actinide, Activation Product and Fission Product Decay Data for Reactor-based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R. J.; Dean, C. J.; Nichols, A. L.

    2014-06-01

    The UK Activation Product Decay Data Library was first released in September 1977 as UK-PADD1, to be followed by regular improvements on an almost yearly basis up to the assembly of UKPADD6.12 in March 2013. Similarly, the UK Heavy Element and Actinide Decay Data Library followed in December 1981 as UKHEDD1, with the implementation of various modifications leading to UKHEDD2.6, February 2008. Both the data content and evaluation procedures are defined, and the most recent evaluations are described in terms of specific radionuclides and the resulting consistency of their recommended decay-data files. New versions of the UKPADD and UKHEDD libraries are regularly submitted to the NEA Data Bank for possible inclusion in the JEFF library.

  5. Actinide, Activation Product and Fission Product Decay Data for Reactor-based Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.J.; Dean, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.

    2014-06-15

    The UK Activation Product Decay Data Library was first released in September 1977 as UK-PADD1, to be followed by regular improvements on an almost yearly basis up to the assembly of UKPADD6.12 in March 2013. Similarly, the UK Heavy Element and Actinide Decay Data Library followed in December 1981 as UKHEDD1, with the implementation of various modifications leading to UKHEDD2.6, February 2008. Both the data content and evaluation procedures are defined, and the most recent evaluations are described in terms of specific radionuclides and the resulting consistency of their recommended decay-data files. New versions of the UKPADD and UKHEDD libraries are regularly submitted to the NEA Data Bank for possible inclusion in the JEFF library.

  6. Ultrasound-triggered Release of Recombinant Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator from Echogenic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Denise A.B.; Vaidya, Sampada S.; Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Huang, Shao-Ling; Klegerman, Melvin E.; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2009-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) were developed as ultrasound-triggered targeted drug or gene delivery vehicles (Lanza et al., 1997; Huang et al., 2001). Recombinant tissue-type Plasminogen Activator (rt-PA), a thrombolytic, has been loaded into ELIP (Tiukinhoy-Laing et al., 2007). These vesicles have the potential to be used for ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, deep vein thrombosis, or pulmonary embolus. A clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner (Philips HDI 5000) equipped with a linear array transducer (L12-5) was employed for in vitro studies using rt-PA-loaded ELIP (T-ELIP). The goal of this study was to quantify ultrasound-triggered drug release from rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes. T-ELIP samples were exposed to 6.9-MHz B-mode pulses at a low pressure amplitude (600 kPa) to track the echogenicity over time under four experimental conditions: 1) flow alone to monitor gas diffusion from the T-ELIP, 2) pulsed 6.0-MHz color Doppler exposure above the acoustically driven threshold (0.8 MPa) to force gas out of the liposome gently, 3) pulsed 6.0-MHz color Doppler above the rapid fragmentation threshold (2.6 MPa), or 4) Triton X-100 to rupture the T-ELIP chemically as a positive control. Release of rt-PA for each ultrasound exposure protocol was assayed spectrophotometrically. T-ELIP were echogenic in the flow model (5 ml/min) for thirty minutes. The thrombolytic drug remained associated with the liposome when exposed to low-amplitude B-mode pulses over 60 min and was released when exposed to color Doppler pulses or Triton X-100. The rt-PA released from the liposomes had similar enzymatic activity as the free drug. These T-ELIP are robust and echogenic during continuous fundamental 6.9-MHz B-mode imaging at a low exposure output level (600 kPa). Furthermore, a therapeutic concentration of rt-PA can be released by fragmenting the T-ELIP with pulsed 6.0-MHz color Doppler ultrasound above the rapid

  7. Novel lead structures and activation mechanisms for CO-releasing molecules (CORMs)

    PubMed Central

    Schatzschneider, U

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous small signalling molecule in the human body, produced by the action of haem oxygenase on haem. Since it is very difficult to apply safely as a gas, solid storage and delivery forms for CO are now explored. Most of these CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) are based on the inactivation of the CO by coordinating it to a transition metal centre in a prodrug approach. After a brief look at the potential cellular target structures of CO, an overview of the design principles and activation mechanisms for CO release from a metal coordination sphere is given. Endogenous and exogenous triggers discussed include ligand exchange reactions with medium, enzymatically-induced CO release and photoactivated liberation of CO. Furthermore, the attachment of CORMs to hard and soft nanomaterials to confer additional target specificity to such systems is critically assessed. A survey of analytical methods for the study of the stoichiometry and kinetics of CO release, as well as the tracking of CO in living systems by using fluorescent probes, concludes this review. CORMs are very valuable tools for studying CO bioactivity and might lead to new drug candidates; however, in the design of future generations of CORMs, particular attention has to be paid to their drug-likeness and the tuning of the peripheral ‘drug sphere’ for specific biomedical applications. Further progress in this field will thus critically depend on a close interaction between synthetic chemists and researchers exploring the physiological effects and therapeutic applications of CO. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:24628281

  8. Constitutively active PKA regulates neuronal acetylcholine release and contractility of guinea pig urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenkuan; Li, Ning; Fernandes, Vitor S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2016-06-01

    Autonomic and somatic motor neurons that innervate the urinary bladder and urethra control the highly coordinated functions of the lower urinary tract, the storage, and the emptying of urine. ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the bladder. Here, we aimed to determine whether PKA regulates neuronal ACh release and related nerve-evoked detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contractions in the guinea pig urinary bladder. Isometric DSM tension recordings were used to measure spontaneous phasic and electrical field stimulation (EFS)- and carbachol-induced DSM contractions with a combination of pharmacological tools. The colorimetric method was used to measure ACh released by the parasympathetic nerves in DSM isolated strips. The pharmacological inhibition of PKA with H-89 (10 μM) increased the spontaneous phasic contractions, whereas it attenuated the EFS-induced DSM contractions. Intriguingly, H-89 (10 μM) attenuated the (primary) cholinergic component, whereas it simultaneously increased the (secondary) purinergic component of the nerve-evoked contractions in DSM isolated strips. The acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, eserine (10 μM), increased EFS-induced DSM contractions, and the subsequent addition of H-89 attenuated the contractions. H-89 (10 μM) significantly increased DSM phasic contractions induced by the cholinergic agonist carbachol. The inhibition of PKA decreased the neuronal release of ACh in DSM tissues. This study revealed that PKA-mediated signaling pathways differentially regulate nerve-evoked and spontaneous phasic contractions of guinea pig DSM. Constitutively active PKA in the bladder nerves controls synaptic ACh release, thus regulating the nerve-evoked DSM contractions, whereas PKA in DSM cells controls the spontaneous phasic contractility. PMID:27029424

  9. Formation and Release Behavior of Iron Corrosion Products under the Influence of Bacterial Communities in a Simulated Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the effects of biofilm on the iron corrosion, iron release and associated corrosion by-products is critical for maintaining the water quality and the integrity of drinking water distribution system (DWDS). In this work, iron corrosion experiments under sterilized a...

  10. Genetic variation in COMT activity impacts learning and dopamine release capacity in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Eleanor H.; Morud, Julia; Winiger, Vanessa; Biezonski, Dominik; Zhu, Judy P.; Bach, Mary Elizabeth; Malleret, Gael; Polan, H. Jonathan; Ng-Evans, Scott; Phillips, Paul E.M.; Kellendonk, Christoph; Kandel, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    A common genetic polymorphism that results in increased activity of the dopamine regulating enzyme COMT (the COMT Val158 allele) has been found to associate with poorer cognitive performance and increased susceptibility to develop psychiatric disorders. It is generally assumed that this increase in COMT activity influences cognitive function and psychiatric disease risk by increasing dopamine turnover in cortical synapses, though this cannot be directly measured in humans. Here we explore a novel transgenic mouse model of increased COMT activity, equivalent to the relative increase in activity observed with the human COMT Val158 allele. By performing an extensive battery of behavioral tests, we found that COMT overexpressing mice (COMT-OE mice) exhibit cognitive deficits selectively in the domains that are affected by the COMT Val158 allele, stimulus–response learning and working memory, functionally validating our model of increased COMT activity. Although we detected no changes in the level of markers for dopamine synthesis and dopamine transport, we found that COMT-OE mice display an increase in dopamine release capacity in the striatum. This result suggests that increased COMT activity may not only affect dopamine signaling by enhancing synaptic clearance in the cortex, but may also cause changes in presynaptic dopamine function in the striatum. These changes may underlie the behavioral deficits observed in the mice and might also play a role in the cognitive deficits and increased psychiatric disease risk associated with genetic variation in COMT activity in humans. PMID:24639487

  11. Keeping pace with NPS releases: fast GC-MS screening of legal high products.

    PubMed

    Elie, Mathieu P; Elie, Leonie E; Baron, Mark G

    2013-05-01

    The continuous appearance of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) in legal high products presents a challenge for the routine analytical laboratory. A rapid screening method for NPS analysis using fast gas chromatography mass spectrometry (fast GC-MS) is presented. Twenty-three analytes, including 5-iodo-2-aminoindane (5-IAI), 1-(thiophen-2-yl)-2-methylaminopropane (MPA), 1-benzylpiperazine (BZP), 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone), 5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane (MDAI) and methoxetamine (MXE) were separated within 4 min. The method was used to analyze 35 Internet and head shop purchased 'legal high' products with the successful identification of their active ingredients. As previously observed, legal high products do not always contain their stated ingredients. Of the group of products purchased as 5-IAI not one contained 5-IAI with several containing mixtures of substances either already controlled in the UK or under consideration by the Advisory Council on Misuse of Drugs (ACMD). The low bleed and high inertness of the chromatography column used ensured clean high quality mass spectrometry data which when combined with the short run time resulted in an efficient tool for NPS screening, even when standards were unavailable. Electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectra used in combination for the identification of unknown NPS are presented. PMID:23297247

  12. Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Stimulated Mouse Gonadotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Dennis W.; Turgeon, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    GnRH receptor activation elicits release of intracellular Ca2+, which leads to secretion and also activates Ca2+-activated ion channels underlying membrane voltage changes. The predominant Ca2+-activated ion channels in rat and mouse gonadotrophs are Ca2+-activated K+ channels. To establish the temporal relationship between GnRH-induced changes in intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) and membrane current (Im), and to identify specific Ca2+-activated K+ channels linking GnRH-induced increase in [Ca2+]i to changes in plasma membrane electrical activity, we used single female mouse gonadotrophs in the perforated patch configuration of the patch-clamp technique, which preserves signaling pathways. Simultaneous measurement of [Ca2+]i and Im in voltage-clamped gonadotrophs revealed that GnRH stimulates an increase in [Ca2+]i that precedes outward Im, and that activates two kinetically distinct currents identified, using specific toxin inhibitors, as small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) current (ISK) and large (big) conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) current (IBK). We show that the apamin-sensitive current has an IC50 of 69 pM, consistent with the SK2 channel subtype and confirmed by immunocytochemistry. The magnitude of the SK current response to GnRH was attenuated by 17β-estradiol (E2) pretreatment. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of BK channels, completely blocked the residual apamin-insensitive outward Im, substantiating that IBK is a component of the GnRH-induced outward Im. In contrast to its suppression of ISK, E2 pretreatment augmented peak IBK. SK or BK channel inhibition modulated GnRH-stimulated LH secretion, implicating a role for these channels in gonadotroph function. In summary, in mouse gonadotrophs the GnRH-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i activates ISK and IBK, which are differentially regulated by E2 and which may be targets for E2 positive feedback in LH secretion. PMID:19106218

  13. Monocyte Caspase-1 Is Released in a Stable, Active High Molecular Weight Complex Distinct from the Unstable Cell Lysate-Activated Caspase-1

    PubMed Central

    Shamaa, Obada R.; Mitra, Srabani; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Wewers, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes utilize caspase-1 activation as a means to respond to danger signals. Although caspase-1 was discovered using highly concentrated cell extracts that spontaneously activate caspase-1, it is now clear that in live cell models caspase-1 activation occurs in the process of its cellular release and is not an intracellular event. Therefore, we compared the characteristics of caspase-1 activation in the cell lysate model to that of caspase-1 that is released in response to exogenous inflammasome activation. Whereas both models generated active caspase-1, the cell-lysate induced caspase-1 required highly concentrated cell lysates and had a short half-life (~15 min) whereas, the activation induced released caspase-1 required 2–3 log fold fewer cells and was stable for greater than 12 h. Both forms were able to cleave proIL-1beta but unexpectedly, the released activity was unable to be immunodepleted by caspase-1 antibodies. Size exclusion chromatography identified two antigenic forms of p20 caspase-1 in the activation induced released caspase-1: one at the predicted size of tetrameric, p20/p10 caspase-1 and the other at >200 kDa. However, only the high molecular weight form had stable functional activity. These results suggest that released caspase-1 exists in a unique complex that is functionally stable and protected from immunodepletion whereas cell-extract generated active caspase-1 is rapidly inhibited in the cytosolic milieu. PMID:26599267

  14. Light-controlled active release of photocaged ciprofloxacin for lipopolysaccharide-targeted drug delivery using dendrimer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pamela T; Tang, Shengzhuang; Mukherjee, Jhindan; Tang, Kenny; Gam, Kristina; Isham, Danielle; Murat, Claire; Sun, Rachel; Baker, James R; Choi, Seok Ki

    2016-08-16

    We report an active delivery mechanism targeted specifically to Gram(-) bacteria based on the photochemical release of photocaged ciprofloxacin carried by a cell wall-targeted dendrimer nanoconjugate. PMID:27476878

  15. Effects of Globally Waste-Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Huckaby, James L.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2003-07-30

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford tanks that disturb all or much of the waste. The globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given. This revision (Rev. 2)incorporates additional comments from Office of River Protection reviewers. An appendix presents the checklist for technical peer review of Revision 1 of this report.

  16. Effects of Globally Waste-Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Huckaby, James L.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2002-12-18

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  17. Dependence of spontaneous electrical activity and basal prolactin release on nonselective cation channels in pituitary lactotrophs.

    PubMed

    Kučka, M; Kretschmannová, K; Stojilkovic, S S; Zemková, H; Tomić, M

    2012-01-01

    All secretory anterior pituitary cells fire action potentials spontaneously and exhibit a high resting cation conductance, but the channels involved in the background permeability have not been identified. In cultured lactotrophs and immortalized GH(3) cells, replacement of extracellular Na(+) with large organic cations, but not blockade of voltage-gated Na(+) influx, led to an instantaneous hyperpolarization of cell membranes that was associated with a cessation of spontaneous firing. When cells were clamped at -50 mV, which was close to the resting membrane potential in these cells, replacement of bath Na(+) with organic cations resulted in an outward-like current, reflecting an inhibition of the inward holding membrane current and indicating loss of a background-depolarizing conductance. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the high expression of mRNA transcripts for TRPC1 and much lower expression of TRPC6 in both lactotrophs and GH(3) cells. Very low expression of TRPC3, TRPC4, and TRPC5 mRNA transcripts were also present in pituitary but not GH(3) cells. 2-APB and SKF-96365, relatively selective blockers of TRPC channels, inhibited electrical activity, Ca(2+) influx and prolactin release in a concentration-dependent manner. Gd(3+), a common Ca(2+) channel blocker, and flufenamic acid, an inhibitor of non-selective cation channels, also inhibited electrical activity, Ca(2+) influx and prolactin release. These results indicate that nonselective cation channels, presumably belonging to the TRPC family, contribute to the background depolarizing conductance and firing of action potentials with consequent contribution to Ca(2+) influx and hormone release in lactotrophs and GH(3) cells. PMID:22480423

  18. Expression of functional NK1 receptors in human alveolar macrophages: superoxide anion production, cytokine release and involvement of NF-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Claudio; Gunella, Gabriele; Varsaldi, Federica; Balbo, Pietro; Del Boca, Elisa; Bernardone, Ilaria Seren; Amoruso, Angela; Brunelleschi, Sandra

    2005-06-01

    1 Substance P (SP) is deeply involved in lung pathophysiology and plays a key role in the modulation of inflammatory-immune processes. We previously demonstrated that SP activates guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AMs) and human monocytes, but a careful examination of its effects on human AMs is still scarce. 2 This study was undertaken to establish the role of SP in human AM isolated from healthy smokers and non-smokers, by evaluating the presence of tachykinin NK(1) receptors (NK-1R) and SP's ability to induce superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production and cytokine release, as well as activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway. 3 By Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence, we demonstrate that authentic NK-1R are present on human AMs, a three-fold enhanced expression being observed in healthy smokers. These NK-1R are functional, as SP and NK(1) agonists dose-dependently induce O(2)(-) production and cytokine release. In AMs from healthy smokers, SP evokes an enhanced respiratory burst and a significantly increased release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha as compared to healthy non-smokers, but has inconsistent effects on IL-10 release. The NK(1) selective antagonist CP 96,345 ((2S,3S)-cis-2-diphenylmethyl-N[(2-methoxyphenyl)-methyl]-1-azabicyclo-octan-3-amine)) competitively antagonized SP-induced effects. 4 SP activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB, a three-fold increased nuclear translocation being observed in AMs from healthy smokers. This effect is receptor-mediated, as it is reproduced by the NK(1) selective agonist [Sar(9)Met(O(2))(11)]SP and reverted by CP 96,345. 5 These results clearly indicate that human AMs possess functional NK-1R on their surface, which are upregulated in healthy smokers, providing new insights on the mechanisms involved in tobacco smoke toxicity. PMID:15778738

  19. Pyruvate Occupancy in the Carboxyl Transferase Domain of Pyruvate Carboxylase Facilitates Product Release from the Biotin Carboxylase Domain through an Intermolecular Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Westerhold, Lauren E; Adams, Stephanie L; Bergman, Hanna L; Zeczycki, Tonya N

    2016-06-21

    Protein structure, ligand binding, and catalytic turnover contributes to the governance of catalytic events occurring at spatially distinct domains in multifunctional enzymes. Coordination of these catalytic events partially rests on the ability of spatially discrete active sites to communicate with other allosteric and active sites on the same polypeptide chain (intramolecular) or on different polypeptide chains (intermolecular) within the holoenzyme. Often, communication results in long-range effects on substrate binding or product release. For example, pyruvate binding to the carboxyl transferase (CT) domain of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) increases the rate of product release in the biotin carboxylase (BC) domain. In order to address how CT domain ligand occupancy is "sensed" by other domains, we generated functional, mixed hybrid tetramers using the E218A (inactive BC domain) and T882S (low pyruvate binding, low activity) mutant forms of PC. The apparent Ka pyruvate for the pyruvate-stimulated release of Pi catalyzed by the T882S:E218A[1:1] hybrid tetramer was comparable to the wild-type enzyme and nearly 10-fold lower than that for the T882S homotetramer. In addition, the ratio of the rates of oxaloacetate formation to Pi release for the WT:T882S[1:1] and E218A:T882S[1:1] hybrid tetramer-catalyzed reactions was 0.5 and 0.6, respectively, while the T882S homotetramer exhibited a near 1:1 coupling of the two domains, suggesting that the mechanisms coordinating catalytic events is more complicated that we initially assumed. The results presented here are consistent with an intermolecular communication mechanism, where pyruvate binding to the CT domain is "sensed" by domains on a different polypeptide chain within the tetramer. PMID:27254467

  20. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  1. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1994-09-13

    A process for the preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  2. Putative implication of alpha-amylase loop 7 in the mechanism of substrate binding and reaction products release.

    PubMed

    André, G; Tran, V

    2004-10-01

    Alpha-amylases are widespread endo-enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of internal alpha-(1,4) glycosidic linkages of starch polymers. Molecular modeling of amylose-amylase interactions is a step toward enzymatic mechanism understanding and rational design of new enzymes. From the crystallographic complex of barley alpha-amylase AMY2-acarbose, the static aspects of amylose-amylase docking have been characterized with a model of maltododecaose (DP12) (G. André, A. Buléon, R. Haser, and V. Tran, Biopolymers 1999, Vol. 50, pp. 751-762; G. André and V. Tran, Special Publication no. 246 1999, The Royal Society of Chemistry, H. J. Gilbert, G. J. Davies, B. Henrissat, and B. Svensson, Eds., Cambridge, pp. 165-174). These studies, consistent with the experimental subsite mapping (K. Bak-Jensen, G. André, V. Tran, and B. Svensson, Journal of Biological Chemistry, to be published), propose a propagation scheme for an amylose chain in the active cleft of AMY2. The topographical overview of alpha-amylases identified loop 7 as a conserved segment flanking the active site. Since some crystallographic experiments suspected its high flexibility, its putative motion was explored through a robotic scheme, an alternate route to dynamics simulations that consume CPU time. The present article describes the characteristics of the flexibility of loop 7: location and motion in AMY2. A back-and-forth motion with a large amplitude of more than 0.6 nm was evaluated. This movement could be triggered by two hinge residues. It results in the loop flipping over the active site to enhance the docking of the native helical substrate through specific interactions, it positions the catalytic residues, it distorts the substrate towards its transition state geometry, and finally monitors the release of the products after hydrolysis. The residues involved in the process are now rational mutation points in the hands of molecular biologists. PMID:15356864

  3. Superoxide anions mediate veratridine-induced cytochrome c release and caspase activity in bovine chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F; Tornero, Daniel; Benavides, Amparo; González, Constancio; Agapito, María T; González-Garcia, Carmen; Ceña, Valentín

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondrial mechanisms involved in veratridine-induced chromaffin cell death have been explored. Exposure to veratridine (30 μM, 1 h) produces cytochrome c release to the cytoplasm that seems to be mediated by superoxide anions and that is blocked by cyclosporin A (10 μM), MnTBAP (10 nM), catalase (100 IU ml−1) and vitamin E (50 μM). Following veratridine treatment, there is an increase in caspase-like activity, blocked by vitamin E (50 μM) and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker cyclosporin A (10 μM). Superoxide anions open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in isolated mitochondria, an effect that is blocked by vitamin E (50 μM) and cyclosporin A (10 μM), but not by the Ca2+ uniporter blocker ruthenium red (5 μM). These results strongly suggest that under the stress situation caused by veratridine, superoxide anions become important regulators of mitochondrial function in chromaffin cells. Exposure of isolated bovine chromaffin mitochondria to Ca2+ results in mitochondrial swelling. This effect was prevented by ruthenium red (5 μM) and cyclosporin A (10 μM), while it was not modified by vitamin E (50 μM). Veratridine (30 μM, 1 h) markedly decreased total glutathione and GSH content in bovine chromaffin cells. In conclusion, superoxide anions seem to mediate veratridine-induced cytochrome c release, decrease in total glutathione, caspase activation and cell death in bovine chromaffin cells. PMID:12429571

  4. Mesoporous silica coatings for cephalosporin active release at the bone-implant interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rădulescu, Dragoş; Voicu, Georgeta; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Grumezescu, Valentina; Holban, Alina Maria; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Socol, Gabriel; Mogoantă, Laurenţiu; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Balaure, Paul Cătălin; Rădulescu, Radu; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential of MAPLE-deposited coatings mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) to release Zinforo (ceftarolinum fosmil) in biologically active form. The MSNs were prepared by using a classic procedure with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as sacrificial template and tetraethylorthosilicate as the monomer. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses revealed network-forming granules with diameters under 100 nm and an average pore diameter of 2.33 nm. The deposited films were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD and IR. Microbiological analyses performed on ceftaroline-loaded films demonstrated that the antibiotic was released in an active form, decreasing the microbial adherence rate and colonization of the surface. Moreover, the in vitro and in vivo assays proved the excellent biodistribution and biocompatibility of the prepared systems. Our results suggest that the obtained bioactive coatings possess a significant potential for the design of drug delivery systems and antibacterial medical-use surfaces, with great applications in bone implantology.

  5. Enhanced Nematicidal Activity of Organic and Inorganic Ammonia-Releasing Amendments by Azadirachta indica Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Yuji; Tkachi, Nadia; Shuker, Shimshon; Yerumiyahu, Uri

    2007-01-01

    The nematicidal activities of ammonium sulfate, chicken litter and chitin, alone or in combination with neem (Azadirachta indica) extracts were tested against Meloidogyne javanica. Soil application of these amendments or the neem extracts alone did not reduce the root galling index of tomato plants or did so only slightly, but application of the amendments in combination with the neem extracts reduced root galling significantly. Soil analysis indicated that the neem extract inhibited the nitrification of the ammonium released from the amendments and extended the persistence of the ammonium concentrations in the soil. In microplot experiments, tomato plants were grown in pots filled with soils from the treated microplots. The galling indices of tomato plants grown in soil treated with ammonium sulfate or chicken litter in combination with the neem extract or a chemical nitrification inhibitor were far lower than those of plants grown in the control soil or in soil treated with chicken litter, neem extract or nitrification inhibitor alone. However, plants grown in the microplots showed only slight reductions in galling, probably because the soil amendments were inadequately mixed compared to their application in the pot experiments. The extended exposure of nematodes to ammonia as a result of nitrification inhibition by the neem extracts appeared to be the cause of the enhanced nematicidal activity of the ammonia-releasing amendments. PMID:19259469

  6. Real-Time Measurement of Volatile Chemicals Released by Bed Bugs during Mating Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kilpinen, Ole; Liu, Dezhao; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) problems have increased dramatically in many parts of the world, leading to a renewed interest in their chemical ecology. Most studies of bed bug semiochemicals have been based on the collection of volatiles over a period of time followed by chemical analysis. Here we present for the first time, a combination of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and video analysis for real-time measurement of semiochemicals emitted by isolated groups of bed bugs during specific behavioural activities. The most distinct peaks in the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry recordings were always observed close to the termination of mating attempts, corresponding to the defensive emissions that bed bugs have been suspected to exploit for prevention of unwanted copulations. The main components of these emissions were (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal recorded in ratios between 1∶3 and 3∶1. In the current study, the quantity varied over 1000 fold for both of the compounds with up to 40 µg total release in a single emission. Males also emit defensive compounds due to homosexual copulation attempts by other males, and no significant differences were observed in the ratio or the amount of the two components released from males or females. In summary, this study has demonstrated that combining proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry with video analysis can provide detailed information about semiochemicals emitted during specific behavioural activities. PMID:23227225

  7. Release of surfactant cargo from interfacially-active halloysite clay nanotubes for oil spill remediation.

    PubMed

    Owoseni, Olasehinde; Nyankson, Emmanuel; Zhang, Yueheng; Adams, Samantha J; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Bose, Arijit; Gupta, Ram B; John, Vijay T

    2014-11-18

    Naturally occurring halloysite clay nanotubes are effective in stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions and can serve as interfacially-active vehicles for delivering oil spill treating agents. Halloysite nanotubes adsorb at the oil-water interface and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions that are stable for months. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) imaging of the oil-in-water emulsions shows that these nanotubes assemble in a side-on orientation at the oil-water interface and form networks on the interface through end-to-end linkages. For application in the treatment of marine oil spills, halloysite nanotubes were successfully loaded with surfactants and utilized as an interfacially-active vehicle for the delivery of surfactant cargo. The adsorption of surfactant molecules at the interface serves to lower the interfacial tension while the adsorption of particles provides a steric barrier to drop coalescence. Pendant drop tensiometry was used to characterize the dynamic reduction in interfacial tension resulting from the release of dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (DOSS) from halloysite nanotubes. At appropriate surfactant compositions and loadings in halloysite nanotubes, the crude oil-saline water interfacial tension is effectively lowered to levels appropriate for the dispersion of oil. This work indicates a novel concept of integrating particle stabilization of emulsions together with the release of chemical surfactants from the particles for the development of an alternative, cheaper, and environmentally-benign technology for oil spill remediation. PMID:25346266

  8. Cigarette smoke induces proinflammatory cytokine release by activation of NF-kappaB and posttranslational modifications of histone deacetylase in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Se-Ran; Chida, Asiya S; Bauter, Mark R; Shafiq, Nusrat; Seweryniak, Kathryn; Maggirwar, Sanjay B; Kilty, Iain; Rahman, Irfan

    2006-07-01

    Cigarette smoke-mediated oxidative stress induces an inflammatory response in the lungs by stimulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Chromatin remodeling due to histone acetylation and deacetylation is known to play an important role in transcriptional regulation of proinflammatory genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism(s) of inflammatory responses caused by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in the human macrophage-like cell line MonoMac6 and whether the treatment of these cells with the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) monoethyl ester, or modulation of the thioredoxin redox system, can attenuate cigarette smoke-mediated IL-8 release. Exposure of MonoMac6 cells to CSE (1% and 2.5%) increased IL-8 and TNF-alpha production vs. control at 24 h and was associated with significant depletion of GSH levels associated with increased reactive oxygen species release in addition to activation of NF-kappaB. Inhibition of IKK ablated the CSE-mediated IL-8 release, suggesting that this process is dependent on the NF-kappaB pathway. CSE also reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 protein levels. This was associated with posttranslational modification of HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 protein by nitrotyrosine and aldehyde-adduct formation. Pretreatment of cells with GSH monoethyl ester, but not thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase, reversed cigarette smoke-induced reduction in HDAC levels and significantly inhibited IL-8 release. Thus cigarette smoke-induced release of IL-8 is associated with activation of NF-kappaB via IKK and reduction in HDAC levels/activity in macrophages. Moreover, cigarette smoke-mediated proinflammatory events are regulated by the redox status of the cells. PMID:16473865

  9. Bruchpilot and Synaptotagmin collaborate to drive rapid glutamate release and active zone differentiation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mila M; Pauli, Martin; Ehmann, Nadine; Hallermann, Stefan; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J; Heckmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The active zone (AZ) protein Bruchpilot (Brp) is essential for rapid glutamate release at Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Quantal time course and measurements of action potential-waveform suggest that presynaptic fusion mechanisms are altered in brp null mutants (brp(69) ). This could account for their increased evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) delay and rise time (by about 1 ms). To test the mechanism of release protraction at brp(69) AZs, we performed knock-down of Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt) via RNAi (syt(KD) ) in wildtype (wt), brp(69) and rab3 null mutants (rab3(rup) ), where Brp is concentrated at a small number of AZs. At wt and rab3(rup) synapses, syt(KD) lowered EPSC amplitude while increasing rise time and delay, consistent with the role of Syt as a release sensor. In contrast, syt(KD) did not alter EPSC amplitude at brp(69) synapses, but shortened delay and rise time. In fact, following syt(KD) , these kinetic properties were strikingly similar in wt and brp(69) , which supports the notion that Syt protracts release at brp(69) synapses. To gain insight into this surprising role of Syt at brp(69) AZs, we analyzed the structural and functional differentiation of synaptic boutons at the NMJ. At 'tonic' type Ib motor neurons, distal boutons contain more AZs, more Brp proteins per AZ and show elevated and accelerated glutamate release compared to proximal boutons. The functional differentiation between proximal and distal boutons is Brp-dependent and reduced after syt(KD) . Notably, syt(KD) boutons are smaller, contain fewer Brp positive AZs and these are of similar number in proximal and distal boutons. In addition, super-resolution imaging via dSTORM revealed that syt(KD) increases the number and alters the spatial distribution of Brp molecules at AZs, while the gradient of Brp proteins per AZ is diminished. In summary, these data demonstrate that normal structural and functional differentiation of Drosophila AZs requires

  10. dsRNA Released by Tissue Damage Activates TLR3 to Drive Skin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Amanda M; Reddy, Sashank K; Ratliff, Tabetha S; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Katseff, Adiya S; Zhu, Amadeus S; Chang, Emily; Resnik, Sydney R; Page, Carly; Kim, Dongwon; Whittam, Alexander J; Miller, Lloyd S; Garza, Luis A

    2015-08-01

    Regeneration of skin and hair follicles after wounding--a process known as wound-induced hair neogenesis (WIHN)--is a rare example of adult organogenesis in mammals. As such, WIHN provides a unique model system for deciphering mechanisms underlying mammalian regeneration. Here, we show that dsRNA, which is released from damaged skin, activates Toll-Like Receptor 3 (TLR3) and its downstream effectors IL-6 and STAT3 to promote hair follicle regeneration. Conversely, TLR3-deficient animals fail to initiate WIHN. TLR3 activation promotes expression of hair follicle stem cell markers and induces elements of the core hair morphogenetic program, including ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR) and the Wnt and Shh pathways. Our results therefore show that dsRNA and TLR3 link the earliest events of mammalian skin wounding to regeneration and suggest potential therapeutic approaches for promoting hair neogenesis. PMID:26253200

  11. Activity-dependent changes in partial VAMP complexes during neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Hua, S Y; Charlton, M P

    1999-12-01

    The temporal sequence of SNARE protein interactions that cause exocytosis is unknown. Blockade of synaptic neurotransmitter release through cleavage of VAMP/synaptobrevin by tetanus toxin light chain (TeNT-LC) was accelerated by nerve stimulation. Botulinum/B neurotoxin light chain (BoNT/B-LC), which cleaves VAMP at the same site as TeNT-LC, did not require stimulation. Because TeNT-LC requires the N-terminal coil domain of VAMP for binding but BoNT/B-LC requires the C-terminal coil domain, it seems that, before nerve activity, the N-terminal domain is shielded in a protein complex, but the C-terminal domain is exposed. This N-terminal complex lasts until nerve activity occurs and may serve to cock synaptic vesicles for immediate exocytosis upon Ca2+ entry. PMID:10570484

  12. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, L.-H.; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, C.-Y.; Liu Tao; Yue, H.-Y.; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na{sup +}-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  13. Curdlan in fibers as carriers of tetracycline hydrochloride: Controlled release and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Mehrez E; Abdelgawad, Abdelrahman M; Salas, Carlos; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-12-10

    Curdlan (CURD) and polyethylene oxide were used to synthesize nanofibers as carriers of hydro soluble tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH). The viscosity, surface tension and conductivity of the precursor multicomponent aqueous solutions were determined and adjusted to produce defect-free fiber webs. Except for a slight increase in diameter, the addition of TCH did not affect the original morphology of the CURD/PEO nanofibers, as determined by FE-SEM imaging. However, the thermal stability of the system was enhanced (TGA and DSC). Moreover, water resistance, as measured with 24-h immersion tests, was observed upon crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. In-vitro activity measurements indicated a sustained and controlled TCH time-release pattern and excellent antibacterial activity against E. coli, as assessed by UV-vis spectroscopy and viable cell counting, respectively. Overall, we propose nanofibers based on CURD as promising platforms for scaffolds for wound dressing and drug delivery. PMID:27577910

  14. Selected demonstration and educational products/activities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.J.; Mann, H.C.

    1992-07-01

    The information in this paper was assembled for several informal presentations to a variety of visitor groups during the summer of 1992. A number of staff members at TVA`s National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) found it useful as a quick overview for their use and for their sharing with external colleagues and customers. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive list or explanation of all products and services available from NFERC. However, the authors believe it will give a flavor and tenor of some of the ongoing activities of the Center, especially those activities relating to the retail fertilizer dealer. Programs over the years have focused on key aspects of nutrient efficiency and management. TVA is uniquely positioned to assist the fertilizer industry and US agriculture in protecting the environment from potential adverse environmental impacts of agriculture, especially for fertilizer and the attendant agrichemicals. TVA has the technical base and an ongoing working relationship with the fertilizer industry in technology development and introduction. Dealer education is very important in TVA programs in two aspects: (1) education for the dealer in meeting new environmental stewardship challenges from an operational perspective; and (2) education for the dealer in meeting the site-specific information needs of the farmer.

  15. Production of radioisotopes by direct electron activation.

    PubMed

    Weeks, K J; O'Shea, P G

    1998-04-01

    High-energy electrons bombarded on materials can induce radioactivity by either directly knocking out neutrons or by first converting a fraction of the electron kinetic energy into electromagnetic energy, with subsequent neutron emission induced by the photons produced. The purpose of this paper was to develop a calculation method for estimating neutron emission and radionuclide production by high-energy (15-25 MeV) electrons directly interacting with a nucleus. The reaction (e,n) is considered using the method of virtual photons. The cross section for electron bombardment of lead, tantalum, rhenium, and tungsten targets is calculated. The electron cross sections are roughly 100 times less than the corresponding photon cross sections. The cross section increases monotonically with incident energy. A traveling wave linear accelerator was used for a qualitative test of the magnitude and energy dependence of the calculated cross sections. Tantalum was bombarded with electrons and the resultant emission of neutrons was inferred from the induced activation of 180Ta. The energy dependence and magnitude of the calculated electron cross sections agree with experiment within experimental uncertainties. It is concluded that accurate estimates of electron activation via the direct process is possible. PMID:9571615

  16. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  17. Fate of corrosion products released from stainless steel in marine sediments and seawater. Part 2. Sequim Bay clayey silt

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.L.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments in which neutron-activated 347 stainless steel specimens were exposed to clayey silt from Sequim Bay, Washington. The properties and trace metal geochemistry of the sediment and the amounts of corrosion products that were released under oxic and reduced conditions and their distribution among different chemical fractions of the sediment are discussed. The distributions of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu among different chemical forms in the Sequim Bay sediment show that DTPA removed <10% of extractable Cr, Fe and Mn, approx. 20% of extractable Ni and approx. 30% of extractable Cu. The inorganic fraction (material soluble in 2.5% acetic acid) accounted for approx. 30% of total extractable Mn and approx. 10% or less of Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu. Major portions of Cr and Cu, and a large amount of Fe were in the organic fraction. Extractable Mn, Fe and Ni were associated with hydrous oxides likely as coatings on the mineral substrate of the sediment. No Co was detectable in any of the extracts. (PSB)

  18. Thimerosal compromises human dendritic cell maturation, IL-12 production, chemokine release, and T-helper polarization

    PubMed Central

    Loison, Emily; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Thimerosal is a preservative used in multidose vials of vaccine formulations to prevent bacterial and fungal contamination. We recently reported that nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal induce cell cycle arrest of human T cells activated via the TCR and inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production, thus interfering with T-cell functions. Given the essential role of dendritic cells (DCs) in T-cell polarization and vaccine immunity, we studied the influence of non-toxic concentrations of thimerosal on DC maturation and functions. Ex-vivo exposure of human monocyte-derived DCs to nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal prevented LPS-induced DC maturation, as evidenced by the inhibition of morphological changes and a decreased expression of the maturation markers CD86 and HLA-DR. In addition thimerosal dampened their proinflammatory response, in particular the production of the Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12, as well as TNF-α and IL-6. DC-dependent T helper polarization was altered, leading to a decreased production of IFN-γ IP10 and GM-CSF and increased levels of IL-8, IL-9, and MIP-1α. Although multi-dose vials of vaccines containing thimerosal remain important for vaccine delivery, our results alert about the ex-vivo immunomodulatory effects of thimerosal on DCs, a key player for the induction of an adaptive response PMID:25424939

  19. Mechanistic prediction of fission product release under normal and accident conditions: key uncertainties that need better resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.

    1983-09-01

    A theoretical model has been used for predicting the behavior of fission gas and volatile fission products (VFPs) in UO/sub 2/-base fuels during steady-state and transient conditions. This model represents an attempt to develop an efficient predictive capability for the full range of possible reactor operating conditions. Fission products released from the fuel are assumed to reach the fuel surface by successively diffusing (via atomic and gas-bubble mobility) from the grains to grain faces and then to the grain edges, where the fission products are released through a network of interconnected tunnels of fission-gas induced and fabricated porosity. The model provides for a multi-region calculation and uses only one size class to characterize a distribution of fission gas bubbles.

  20. Mechanistic prediction of fission-product release under normal and accident conditions: key uncertainties that need better resolution. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.

    1983-09-01

    A theoretical model has been used for predicting the behavior of fission gas and volatile fission products (VFPs) in UO/sub 2/-base fuels during steady-state and transient conditions. This model represents an attempt to develop an efficient predictive capability for the full range of possible reactor operating conditions. Fission products released from the fuel are assumed to reach the fuel surface by successively diffusing (via atomic and gas-bubble mobility) from the grains to grain faces and then to the grain edges, where the fission products are released through a network of interconnected tunnels of fission-gas induced and fabricated porosity. The model provides for a multi-region calculation and uses only one size class to characterize a distribution of fission gas bubbles.

  1. Cellular mechanisms regulating activity-dependent release of native brain-derived neurotrophic factor from hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    2002-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in activity-dependent modifications of neuronal connectivity and synaptic strength, including establishment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). To shed light on mechanisms underlying BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity, the present study was undertaken to characterize release of native BDNF from newborn rat hippocampal neurons in response to physiologically relevant patterns of electrical field stimulation in culture, including tonic stimulation at 5 Hz, bursting stimulation at 25 and 100 Hz, and theta-burst stimulation (TBS). Release was measured using the ELISA in situ technique, developed in our laboratory to quantify secretion of native BDNF without the need to first overexpress the protein to nonphysiological levels. Each stimulation protocol resulted in a significant increase in BDNF release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive and occurred in the absence of glutamate receptor activation. However, 100 Hz tetanus and TBS, stimulus patterns that are most effective in inducing hippocampal LTP, were significantly more effective in releasing native BDNF than lower-frequency stimulation. For all stimulation protocols tested, removal of extracellular calcium, or blockade of N-type calcium channels, prevented BDNF release. Similarly, depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin and treatment with dantrolene, an inhibitor of calcium release from caffeine-ryanodine-sensitive stores, markedly inhibited activity-dependent BDNF release. Our results indicate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of hippocampal neuronal activity. The dual requirement for calcium influx through N-type calcium channels and calcium mobilization from intracellular stores strongly implicates a role for calcium-induced calcium release in activity-dependent BDNF secretion. PMID:12451139

  2. Leveraging electrokinetics for the active control of dendritic fullerene-1 release across a nanochannel membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giacomo; Geninatti, Thomas; Hood, R. Lyle; Fine, Daniel; Scorrano, Giovanni; Schmulen, Jeffrey; Hosali, Sharath; Ferrari, Mauro; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (<=1.5 V), and power (100 nW). Temporal, reproducible tuning and interruption of dendritic fullerene 1 (DF-1) transport was demonstrated over multi-day release experiments. Conductance tests showed limiting currents in the low applied potential range, implying ionic concentration polarization (ICP) at the interface between the membrane's micro- and nanochannels, even in concentrated solutions (<=1 M NaCl). The ability of this nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian dysfunction, pain, and stress, among others.General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5

  3. Silver nanoparticles temporarily retard NO2 - production without significantly affecting N2 O release by Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Michels, Camila; Yang, Yu; Moreira Soares, Hugo; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-10-01

    Nitrifying bacteria are highly susceptible to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the effect of sublethal exposure to AgNPs after their release of nitrogenous compounds of environmental concern (e.g., the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide [N2 O] and the common water pollutant nitrite [NO2 -]) has not been systematically investigated. The present study reports the effect of AgNPs (and potentially released silver ions [Ag(+) ]) on NO2 - and N2 O production by Nitrosomonas europaea, and on the transcription of the associated genes. The release of NO2 - was more negatively affected than the production of N2 O. For example, exposure to AgNPs at 0.075 mg/L temporarily enhanced N2 O production (by 12%) without affecting nitrite release, whereas higher AgNP concentrations (>0.25 mg/L) inhibited NO2 - release (by >12%) but not N2 O production. Transcriptomic analyses corroborated these trends; AgNPs at 0.075 mg/L increased the expression of the nitric oxide reductase gene (norQ) associated with N2 O production (by 5.3-fold to 12.8-fold), whereas both 0.075 mg/L of Ag(+) and 0.75 mg/L of AgNPs down-regulated the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA2; by 0.08-fold to 0.15-fold and 0.32-fold to 0.64-fold, respectively), the nitrite reductase gene (nirK; by 0.01-fold to 0.02-fold and 0.22-fold to 0.44-fold, respectively), and norQ (by 0.11-fold to 0.15-fold and 0.32-fold to 0.57-fold, respectively). These results suggest that AgNP release to sewage treatment plants and land application of AgNP-containing biosolids should be minimized because of their potential temporary stimulation of N2 O release and interference with nitrification. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:2231-2235. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26010547

  4. A Fluorescein Tracer Release Experiment in the Hydrothermally Active Crater of Vailulu'u Volcano, Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.; Staudigel, H.; Workman, R.; Koppers, A.; Girard, A.

    2001-12-01

    Vailulu'u (Rockne) volcano marks the active end of the Samoa hotspot chain. The volcano is 4400 meters high, with a summit crater 2000 meters wide by 400 meters deep and summit peaks reaching to within 600 meters of the sea surface. The crater is hydrothermally active, as witnessed by intense particulate concentrations in the water column (values to 1.4 NTU's), a particulate smog ``halo'' surrounding the summit and extending out many kilometers, high Mn concentrations and 3He/4He ratios (values to 3.8 ppb and 8.6 Ra, respectively), and bottom-water temperature anomalies of 0.5oC. Basalts from the crater have been dated in the range 5-50 years, and likely reflect eruptions associated with a 1995 earthquake swarm. On April 3, 2001, we released a 20 kg point-source charge of fluorescein dye 30 meters above the 975m deep crater floor. The dye was dissolved in a 180 liter mixture of propanol and water, adjusted to a density 1.3 per mil heavier than the ambient water at the release depth. Released from a rubberized bag by means of a galvanic link. First detection of the released dye was 39 hours after the deployment; the dye was in a 50 meter thick layer, with a concentration peak at 900 meters (relative to the release depth of 945m). Tracking was carried out by a CTD-based fluorometer operated in tow-yo mode from the U.S.C.G. Icebreaker Polar Sea. The detection limit was 25 picograms/gram, and the maximum detected concentration was 18,000 pg/g (if evenly dispersed in the lower 150 meters of water in the crater, the expected concentration would be approx. 130 pg/g). While the dye pool was only surveyed for 4 days due to ship-transit constraints, significant horizontal and vertical dispersion was apparent. Vertical dispersion velocities were typically 0.05 cm/sec; horizontal velocities were typically higher by a factor of 10. An approximate diapycnal or eddy diffusivity, K, can be calculated from the rate of vertical spreading of the dye layer: K = Z2/2(t-t0), where Z is

  5. Neutron activation-based gamma scintigraphy in pharmacoscintigraphic evaluation of an Egalet constant-release drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Marvola, Janne; Kanerva, Hanna; Slot, Lillian; Lipponen, Maija; Kekki, Tommi; Hietanen, Heikki; Mykkänen, Sirpa; Ariniemi, Kari; Lindevall, Kai; Marvola, Martti

    2004-08-20

    This paper is a report from a pharmacoscintigraphic study with an Egalet constant-release system containing caffeine and natural abundance samarium oxide. First the formulation was tested in vitro to clarify integrity during irradiation in the nuclear reactor. Then six healthy male volunteers were enrolled into the in vivo study. The in vitro release of caffeine obeyed all the time linear zero-order kinetics. The in vivo release of radioactive Sm2O3 consisted of three consequent linear phases with different slopes. The release rate was fastest while the product was in the small intestine and slowest when the product was in the descending colon. In terms of the bioavailability of caffeine, the most important factor seemed to be the residence time in the ascending and transverse colon. A long residence time in these sections led to high AUC values for caffeine. PMID:15288338

  6. GATA2 Mediates Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone-Induced Transcriptional Activation of the Thyrotropin β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Kenji; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) activates not only the secretion of thyrotropin (TSH) but also the transcription of TSHβ and α-glycoprotein (αGSU) subunit genes. TSHβ expression is maintained by two transcription factors, Pit1 and GATA2, and is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone (T3). Our prior studies suggest that the main activator of the TSHβ gene is GATA2, not Pit1 or unliganded T3 receptor (TR). In previous studies on the mechanism of TRH-induced activation of the TSHβ gene, the involvements of Pit1 and TR have been investigated, but the role of GATA2 has not been clarified. Using kidney-derived CV1 cells and pituitary-derived GH3 and TαT1 cells, we demonstrate here that TRH signaling enhances GATA2-dependent activation of the TSHβ promoter and that TRH-induced activity is abolished by amino acid substitution in the GATA2-Zn finger domain or mutation of GATA-responsive element in the TSHβ gene. In CV1 cells transfected with TRH receptor expression plasmid, GATA2-dependent transactivation of αGSU and endothelin-1 promoters was enhanced by TRH. In the gel shift assay, TRH signal potentiated the DNA-binding capacity of GATA2. While inhibition by T3 is dominant over TRH-induced activation, unliganded TR or the putative negative T3-responsive element are not required for TRH-induced stimulation. Studies using GH3 cells showed that TRH-induced activity of the TSHβ promoter depends on protein kinase C but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that the signaling pathway is different from that in the prolactin gene. These results indicate that GATA2 is the principal mediator of the TRH signaling pathway in TSHβ expression. PMID:21533184

  7. Optimising aroma quality in curry sauce products using in vivo aroma release measurements.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Jun; Davidson, James M; Kant, Avinash; Koizumi, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Fumiyo; Taylor, Andrew J

    2014-08-15

    Reducing fat content in foods to meet consumers' preferences and to address the obesity issue is a key task for food manufacturers but simply reducing fat content affects aroma quality adversely. Measuring the aroma release from regular and low-fat samples during eating to rebalance the aroma release has proved successful in model systems. Here, the reformulation of the spice content in a low fat curry sauce is described. Volatile markers of the key spices (coriander, cumin and turmeric) were selected and used to measure aroma release in regular (10 g oil/100 g) and low (2.5 or 5 g oil/100 g) fat sauces. Regression models were used to adjust the ingredient formulation so that the aroma release profiles in vivo were the same for the regular and reduced oil curry sauces and sensory analysis showed no significant difference between these samples. Despite the complexity of spice aromas, rebalancing was successful. PMID:24679775

  8. Toxic Chemicals in Production-Related Wastes Combusted for Energy Recovery, Released, Treated, or Recycled

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes trends in the quantities of reportable toxic chemicals generated, managed, and/or released by manufacturing operations, certain service businesses, and federal facilities across the United States from 2001 to 2009. Persistent bioaccumulative and toxic ...

  9. Release of nitric oxide during the T cell-independent pathway of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, K.P.; Rogers, H.W.; Corbett, J.A.; Schreiber, R.D.; McDaniel, M.L.; Unanue, E.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Immunodeficient mice are remarkably resistant to Listeria monocytogenes (LM) infection. The authors examined the role that nitric oxide (NO) plays in the CB-17/lcr SCID (SCID) response to LM. SCID spleen cells produced large quantities of NO (as measured by nitrite formation) when incubated in the presence of heat-killed LM. NO produced large quantities of nitrite in response to LM, but only in the presence of IFN-[gamma]. The production of NO induced by LM was not affected by neutralizing antibodies to TNF or IL-1. The production of NO was inhibited by addition of either of two inhibitors of NO synthase, N[sup G]-monomethyl arginine, or aminoguanidine. In a different situation, NK cells that were stimulated by TNF and Listeria products to release IFN-[gamma] did not produce NO. Macrophages cultured with IFN-[gamma] killed live LM. This increased killing of LM was significantly inhibited by amino-guanidine. In vivo, administration of aminoguanidine resulted in a marked increase in the mortality and spleen bacterial loads of LM-infected SCID or immunocompetent control mice. It is concluded that NO is a critical effector molecule of T cell-independent natural resistence of LM as studied in the SCID mouse, and that the NO-mediated response is essential for both SCID and immunocompetent host to survive after LM infection. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2001 Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Martin, Paul F.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Steele, Jackie L.

    2001-02-01

    This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses LAWABP1 and HLP-31 that will be used for simulations of the immobilized lowactivity waste disposal system with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code. The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in March of 2001. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali-H ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow and vapor hydration experiments were used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses. The majority of the thermodynamic data were extracted from the thermodynamic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6. However, several secondary reaction products identified from laboratory tests with prototypical LAW glasses were not included in this database, nor are the thermodynamic data available in the open literature. One of these phases, herschelite, was determined to have a potentially significant impact on the release calculations and so a solubility product was estimated using a polymer structure model developed for zeolites. Although this data package is relatively complete, final selection of ILAW glass compositions has not been done by the waste treatment plant contractor. Consequently, revisions to this data package to address new ILAW glass formulations are to be regularly expected.

  11. Fas activation in alveolar epithelial cells induces KC (CXCL1) release by a MyD88-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Farnand, Alex W; Eastman, Alison J; Herrero, Raquel; Hanson, Josiah F; Mongovin, Steve; Altemeier, William A; Matute-Bello, Gustavo

    2011-09-01

    Activation of the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system is associated with activation of apoptotic and proinflammatory pathways that lead to the development of acute lung injury. Previous studies in chimeric mice and macrophage-depleted mice suggested that the main effector cell in Fas-mediated lung injury is not a myeloid cell, but likely an epithelial cell. The goal of this study was to determine whether epithelial cells release proinflammatory cytokines after Fas activation, and to identify the relevant pathways. Incubation of the murine alveolar epithelial cell line, MLE-12, with the Fas-activating monoclonal antibody, Jo2, resulted in release of the CXC chemokine, KC, in a dose-dependent manner. KC release was not prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk. Silencing of the adaptor protein, MyD88, with small interfering (si)RNA resulted in attenuation of KC release in response to Jo2. Fas activation resulted in phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), and pharmacologic inhibition of ERK and JNK attenuated KC release in a dose-response manner. Similarly, primary human small airways epithelial cells released IL-8 in response to soluble FasL, and this was abrogated by inhibition of JNK and ERK. In vivo confirmatory studies showed that MyD88-null mice are protected from Fas-induced acute lung injury. In summary, we conclude that Fas induces KC release in MLE-12 cells by a mechanism requiring MyD88, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and likely activator protein-1. PMID:21257927

  12. An in vivo biosensor for neurotransmitter release and in situ receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Mank, Marco; Muller, Arnaud; Taylor, Palmer; Griesbeck, Oliver; Kleinfeld, David

    2013-01-01

    Tools from molecular biology, in combination with in vivo optical imaging techniques, provide new mechanisms to noninvasively observe brain processing. Current approaches primarily probe cell-based variables, such as cytosolic calcium or membrane potential, but not cell-to-cell signaling. Here we introduce CNiFERs, cell-based neurotransmitter fluorescent engineered reporters, to address this challenge and monitor in situ neurotransmitter receptor activation. CNiFERs are cultured cells that are engineered to express a chosen metabotropic receptor, make use of the Gq protein-coupled receptor cascade to transform receptor activity into a rise in cytosolic [Ca2+], and report [Ca2+] with a genetically encoded fluorescent Ca2+ sensor. The initial realization of CNiFERs detects acetylcholine release via activation of M1 muscarinic receptors. Chronic implantation of M1-CNiFERs in frontal cortex of the adult rat is used to elucidate the muscarinic action of the atypical neuroleptics clozapine and olanzapine. We show that these drugs potently inhibit in situ muscarinic receptor activity. PMID:20010818

  13. Evaluation of the Microbicidal Activity and Cytokines/Chemokines Profile Released by Neutrophils from HTLV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Caroline A.; Cardoso, Thiago M.; Giudice, Angela; Porto, Aurélia F.; Santos, Silvane B.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2011-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces activation and spontaneous proliferation of T cells with production of type-1 pro-inflammatory cytokines. It modifies the immune response to other antigens and increases susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, little is known about innate immunity in HTLV-1 infection. HTLV-1-infected individuals have higher spontaneous neutrophil activation than HTLV-1-seronegative individuals, as shown by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This study was conducted to evaluate neutrophil function in HTLV-1-infected individuals. Participants in the study included 18 HTLV-1-infected individuals and 14 HTLV-1-seronegative controls. We evaluated the ability of neutrophils (PMNs) to control a parasite infection, to produce peroxynitrite, cytokines and chemokines and to express activation markers in cultures when stimulated with LPS or infected with Leishmania. When compared with the control group, there was no difference in the percentage of PMNs infected with Leishmania or in the number of amastigotes/100 PMNs in HTLV-1-infected individuals. The microbicidal activity of the PMNs and the levels of CXCL8 and CCL4 released by these cells did not show a difference between HTLV-1-infected individuals and the control group. In both the HTLV-1 group and the control group, infection with Leishmania or stimulation of PMNs led to cellular activation. These observations suggest that neutrophils from HTLV-1-infected individuals have preserved their ability to become activated and to produce chemokines and peroxynitrite after stimulation and that the susceptibility to infection by intracellular Leishmania amazonensis in HTLV-1-infected individuals does not depend on impairment of neutrophil function. PMID:21595736

  14. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  15. Anion-activated, thermoreversible gelation system for the capture, release, and visual monitoring of CO2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Lee, Songyi; Liu, Yifan; Lee, Minji; Yin, Jun; Sessler, Jonathan L; Yoon, Juyoung

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important green house gas. This is providing an incentive to develop new strategies to detect and capture CO2. Achieving both functions within a single molecular system represents an unmet challenge in terms of molecular design and could translate into enhanced ease of use. Here, we report an anion-activated chemosensor system, NAP-chol 1, that permits dissolved CO2 to be detected in organic media via simple color changes or through ratiometric differences in fluorescence intensity. NAP-chol 1 also acts as a super gelator for DMSO. The resulting gel is transformed into a homogeneous solution upon exposure to fluoride anions. Bubbling with CO2 regenerates the gel. Subsequent flushing with N2 or heating serves to release the CO2 and reform the sol form. This series of transformations is reversible and can be followed by easy-to-discern color changes. Thus, NAP-chol 1 allows for the capture and release of CO2 gas while acting as a three mode sensing system. In particular, it permits CO2 to be detected through reversible sol-gel transitions, simple changes in color, or ratiometric monitoring of the differences in the fluorescence features. PMID:24699626

  16. Lipoplex formulation of superior efficacy exhibits high surface activity and fusogenicity, and readily releases DNA

    PubMed Central

    Koynova, Rumiana; Tarahovsky, Yury S.; Wang, Li; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Lipoplexes containing a mixture of cationic phospholipids dioleoylethylphosphatidylcholine (EDOPC) and dilauroylethylphosphatidylcholine (EDLPC) are known to be far more efficient agents in transfection of cultured primary endothelial cells than are lipoplexes containing either lipid alone. The large magnitude of the synergy permits comparison of the physical and physico-chemical properties of lipoplexes that have very different transfection efficiencies, but minor chemical differences. Here we report that the superior transfection efficiency of the EDLPC/EDOPC lipoplexes correlates with higher surface activity, higher affinity to interact and mix with negatively charged membrane-mimicking liposomes, and with considerably more efficient DNA release relative to the EDOPC lipoplexes. Observations on cultured cells agree with the results obtained with model systems; confocal microscopy of transfected human umbilical artery endothelial cells (HUAEC) demonstrated more extensive DNA release into the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm for the EDLPC/EDOPC lipoplexes than for EDOPC lipoplexes; electron microscopy of cells fixed and embedded directly on the culture dish revealed contact of EDLPC/EDOPC lipoplexes with various cellular membranes, including those of the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. The sequence of events outlining efficient lipofection is discussed based on the presented data. PMID:17156744

  17. Anion-activated, thermoreversible gelation system for the capture, release, and visual monitoring of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Lee, Songyi; Liu, Yifan; Lee, Minji; Yin, Jun; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important green house gas. This is providing an incentive to develop new strategies to detect and capture CO2. Achieving both functions within a single molecular system represents an unmet challenge in terms of molecular design and could translate into enhanced ease of use. Here, we report an anion-activated chemosensor system, NAP-chol 1, that permits dissolved CO2 to be detected in organic media via simple color changes or through ratiometric differences in fluorescence intensity. NAP-chol 1 also acts as a super gelator for DMSO. The resulting gel is transformed into a homogeneous solution upon exposure to fluoride anions. Bubbling with CO2 regenerates the gel. Subsequent flushing with N2 or heating serves to release the CO2 and reform the sol form. This series of transformations is reversible and can be followed by easy-to-discern color changes. Thus, NAP-chol 1 allows for the capture and release of CO2 gas while acting as a three mode sensing system. In particular, it permits CO2 to be detected through reversible sol-gel transitions, simple changes in color, or ratiometric monitoring of the differences in the fluorescence features. PMID:24699626

  18. Indolic Uremic Solutes Enhance Procoagulant Activity of Red Blood Cells through Phosphatidylserine Exposure and Microparticle Release

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-01-01

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process. PMID:26516916

  19. Indolic uremic solutes enhance procoagulant activity of red blood cells through phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-11-01

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process. PMID:26516916