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Sample records for activation recovery interval

  1. Influence of Hypoxic Interval Training and Hyperoxic Recovery on Muscle Activation and Oxygenation in Connection with Double-Poling Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Zinner, Christoph; Hauser, Anna; Born, Dennis-Peter; Wehrlin, Jon P.; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Sperlich, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Here, we evaluated the influence of breathing oxygen at different partial pressures during recovery from exercise on performance at sea-level and a simulated altitude of 1800 m, as reflected in activation of different upper body muscles, and oxygenation of the m. triceps brachii. Ten well-trained, male endurance athletes (25.3±4.1 yrs; 179.2±4.5 cm; 74.2±3.4 kg) performed four test trials, each involving three 3-min sessions on a double-poling ergometer with 3-min intervals of recovery. One trial was conducted entirely under normoxic (No) and another under hypoxic conditions (Ho; FiO2 = 0.165). In the third and fourth trials, the exercise was performed in normoxia and hypoxia, respectively, with hyperoxic recovery (HOX; FiO2 = 1.00) in both cases. Arterial hemoglobin saturation was higher under the two HOX conditions than without HOX (p<0.05). Integrated muscle electrical activity was not influenced by the oxygen content (best d = 0.51). Furthermore, the only difference in tissue saturation index measured via near-infrared spectroscopy observed was between the recovery periods during the NoNo and HoHOX interventions (P<0.05, d = 0.93). In the case of HoHo the athletes’ Pmean declined from the first to the third interval (P < 0.05), whereas Pmean was unaltered under the HoHOX, NoHOX and NoNo conditions. We conclude that the less pronounced decline in Pmean during 3 x 3-min double-poling sprints in normoxia and hypoxia with hyperoxic recovery is not related to changes in muscle activity or oxygenation. Moreover, we conclude that hyperoxia (FiO2 = 1.00) used in conjunction with hypoxic or normoxic work intervals may serve as an effective aid when inhaled during the subsequent recovery intervals. PMID:26468885

  2. Effects of recovery mode (active vs. passive) on performance during a short high-intensity interval training program: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ben Abderrahman, Abderraouf; Zouhal, Hassane; Chamari, Karim; Thevenet, Delphine; de Mullenheim, Pierre-Yves; Gastinger, Steven; Tabka, Zouhair; Prioux, Jacques

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare two recovery modes (active vs. passive) during a seven-week high-intensity interval training program (SWHITP) aimed to improve maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]), maximal aerobic velocity (MAV), time to exhaustion (t lim) and time spent at a high percentage of [Formula: see text], i.e., above 90 % (t90 [Formula: see text]) and 95 % (t95 [Formula: see text]) of [Formula: see text]. Twenty-four adults were randomly assigned to a control group that did not train (CG, n = 6) and two training groups: intermittent exercise (30 s exercise/30 s recovery) with active (IEA, n = 9) or passive recovery (IEP, n = 9). Before and after seven weeks with (IEA and IEP) or without (CG) high-intensity interval training (HIT) program, all subjects performed a maximal graded test to determine their [Formula: see text] and MAV. Subsequently only the subjects of IEA and IEP groups carried out an intermittent exercise test consisting of repeating as long as possible 30 s intensive runs at 105 % of MAV alternating with 30 s active recovery at 50 % of MAV (IEA) or 30 s passive recovery (IEP). Within IEA and IEP, mean t lim and MAV significantly increased between the onset and the end of the SWHITP and no significant difference was found in t90 VO2max and t95 VO2max. Furthermore, before and after the SWHITP, passive recovery allowed a longer t lim for a similar time spent at a high percentage of VO2max. Finally, within IEA, but not in IEP, mean VO2max increased significantly between the onset and the end of the SWHITP both in absolute (p < 0.01) and relative values (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our results showed a significant increase in VO2max after a SWHITP with active recovery in spite of the fact that t lim was significantly longer (more than twice longer) with respect to passive recovery.

  3. Influence of warm-up duration and recovery interval prior to exercise on anaerobic performance

    PubMed Central

    Chaâri, N; Mezghanni, N; Souissi, N

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of different active warm-up (AWU) durations and the rest interval separating it from exercise on anaerobic performance. Eleven male physical education students (22.6 ± 2.52 years; 179.2 ± 4.3 cm; 82.5 ± 9.7 kg; mean ± SD) participated in a cross-over randomized study, and they all underwent the Wingate test after three AWU durations: 5 min (AWU5), 15 min (AWU15) and 20 min (AWU20), with recovery (WREC) or without a recovery interval (NREC) separating the AWU and anaerobic exercise performance. All the AWUs consisted of pedalling at a constant pace of 60 rpm at 50% of the maximal aerobic power. The rest interval between the end of warm-up and the beginning of exercise was set at 5 min. During the Wingate test, peak power (PP), mean power (MP) and the fatigue index (FI) were recorded and analysed. Oral temperature was recorded at rest and at the end of the warm-up. Likewise, rest, post-warm-up and post-Wingate heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded during each session. The ANOVA showed a significant effect of recovery interval, warm-up duration and measurement point on RPE scores (P<0.001). Although the effect of AWU duration on MP and PP was significant (P<0.05), the effect of the recovery interval on both parameters was not significant (P>0.05). Moreover, the analyses showed a significant interaction between recovery interval and AWU duration (P<0.001 and P<0.05 for MP and PP respectively). The AWU15 duration improves the MP and PP when associated with a recovery interval prior to exercise of 5 min. However, the AWU5 duration allows better improvement of power output when the exercise is applied immediately after the warm-up. Consequently, physically active males, as well as educators and researchers interested in anaerobic exercise, must take into account the duration of warm-up and the following recovery interval when practising or assessing activities requiring powerful lower

  4. Influence of warm-up duration and recovery interval prior to exercise on anaerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Frikha, M; Chaâri, N; Mezghanni, N; Souissi, N

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of different active warm-up (AWU) durations and the rest interval separating it from exercise on anaerobic performance. Eleven male physical education students (22.6 ± 2.52 years; 179.2 ± 4.3 cm; 82.5 ± 9.7 kg; mean ± SD) participated in a cross-over randomized study, and they all underwent the Wingate test after three AWU durations: 5 min (AWU5), 15 min (AWU15) and 20 min (AWU20), with recovery (WREC) or without a recovery interval (NREC) separating the AWU and anaerobic exercise performance. All the AWUs consisted of pedalling at a constant pace of 60 rpm at 50% of the maximal aerobic power. The rest interval between the end of warm-up and the beginning of exercise was set at 5 min. During the Wingate test, peak power (PP), mean power (MP) and the fatigue index (FI) were recorded and analysed. Oral temperature was recorded at rest and at the end of the warm-up. Likewise, rest, post-warm-up and post-Wingate heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded during each session. The ANOVA showed a significant effect of recovery interval, warm-up duration and measurement point on RPE scores (P<0.001). Although the effect of AWU duration on MP and PP was significant (P<0.05), the effect of the recovery interval on both parameters was not significant (P>0.05). Moreover, the analyses showed a significant interaction between recovery interval and AWU duration (P<0.001 and P<0.05 for MP and PP respectively). The AWU15 duration improves the MP and PP when associated with a recovery interval prior to exercise of 5 min. However, the AWU5 duration allows better improvement of power output when the exercise is applied immediately after the warm-up. Consequently, physically active males, as well as educators and researchers interested in anaerobic exercise, must take into account the duration of warm-up and the following recovery interval when practising or assessing activities requiring powerful lower

  5. Sunspot Time Series: Passive and Active Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zięba, S.; Nieckarz, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Solar activity slowly and irregularly decreases from the first spotless day (FSD) in the declining phase of the old sunspot cycle and systematically, but also in an irregular way, increases to the new cycle maximum after the last spotless day (LSD). The time interval between the first and the last spotless day can be called the passive interval (PI), while the time interval from the last spotless day to the first one after the new cycle maximum is the related active interval (AI). Minima of solar cycles are inside PIs, while maxima are inside AIs. In this article, we study the properties of passive and active intervals to determine the relation between them. We have found that some properties of PIs, and related AIs, differ significantly between two group of solar cycles; this has allowed us to classify Cycles 8 - 15 as passive cycles, and Cycles 17 - 23 as active ones. We conclude that the solar activity in the PI declining phase (a descending phase of the previous cycle) determines the strength of the approaching maximum in the case of active cycles, while the activity of the PI rising phase (a phase of the ongoing cycle early growth) determines the strength of passive cycles. This can have implications for solar dynamo models. Our approach indicates the important role of solar activity during the declining and the rising phases of the solar-cycle minimum.

  6. Psychophysiological effects of music on acute recovery from high-intensity interval training.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leighton; Tiller, Nicholas B; Karageorghis, Costas I

    2017-03-01

    Numerous studies have examined the multifarious effects of music applied during exercise but few have assessed the efficacy of music as an aid to recovery. Music might facilitate physiological recovery via the entrainment of respiratory rhythms with music tempo. High-intensity exercise training is not typically associated with positive affective responses, and thus ways of assuaging negative affect warrant further exploration. This study assessed the psychophysiological effects of music on acute recovery and prevalence of entrainment in between bouts of high-intensity exercise. Thirteen male runners (Mage=20.2±1.9years; BMI=21.7±1.7; V̇O2 max=61.6±6.1mL·kg·min(-1)) completed three exercise sessions comprising 5×5-min bouts of high-intensity intervals interspersed with 3-min periods of passive recovery. During recovery, participants were administered positively-valenced music of a slow-tempo (55-65bpm), fast-tempo (125-135bpm), or a no-music control. A range of measures including affective responses, RPE, cardiorespiratory indices (gas exchange and pulmonary ventilation), and music tempo-respiratory entrainment were recorded during exercise and recovery. Fast-tempo, positively-valenced music resulted in higher Feeling Scale scores throughout recovery periods (p<0.01, ηp(2)=0.38). There were significant differences in HR during initial recovery periods (p<0.05, ηp(2)=0.16), but no other music-moderated differences in cardiorespiratory responses. In conclusion, fast-tempo, positively-valenced music applied during recovery periods engenders a more pleasant experience. However, there is limited evidence that music expedites cardiorespiratory recovery in between bouts of high-intensity exercise. These findings have implications for athletic training strategies and individuals seeking to make high-intensity exercise sessions more pleasant.

  7. Remote sensing analysis of vegetation recovery following short-interval fires in Southern California shrublands.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ran; Dennison, Philip E; D'Antonio, Carla M; Moritz, Max A

    2014-01-01

    Increased fire frequency has been shown to promote alien plant invasions in the western United States, resulting in persistent vegetation type change. Short interval fires are widely considered to be detrimental to reestablishment of shrub species in southern California chaparral, facilitating the invasion of exotic annuals and producing "type conversion". However, supporting evidence for type conversion has largely been at local, site scales and over short post-fire time scales. Type conversion has not been shown to be persistent or widespread in chaparral, and past range improvement studies present evidence that chaparral type conversion may be difficult and a relatively rare phenomenon across the landscape. With the aid of remote sensing data covering coastal southern California and a historical wildfire dataset, the effects of short interval fires (<8 years) on chaparral recovery were evaluated by comparing areas that burned twice to adjacent areas burned only once. Twelve pairs of once- and twice-burned areas were compared using normalized burn ratio (NBR) distributions. Correlations between measures of recovery and explanatory factors (fire history, climate and elevation) were analyzed by linear regression. Reduced vegetation cover was found in some lower elevation areas that were burned twice in short interval fires, where non-sprouting species are more common. However, extensive type conversion of chaparral to grassland was not evident in this study. Most variables, with the exception of elevation, were moderately or poorly correlated with differences in vegetation recovery.

  8. Heart Rate Unreliability during Interval Training Recovery in Middle Distance Runners.

    PubMed

    Tocco, Filippo; Sanna, Irene; Mulliri, Gabriele; Magnani, Sara; Todde, Francesco; Mura, Roberto; Ghiani, Giovanna; Concu, Alberto; Melis, Franco; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) was tested as a reliable index for recovery management during interval training (IT), considering its relationship with the several factors involved in respiratory, metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. Thirteen runners underwent two different IT sessions: at 80% and 120% of the second ventilatory threshold (VT2). Throughout both sessions HR, oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2) and pulmonary ventilation (VE), were measured by means of a portable gas analyzer. Carbon dioxide production excess (CO2excess), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), oxygen pulse (OP) and oxygen debt (O2debt) were also estimated. A significant increase in HR values (144 versus 150 beats·min(-1) between the first recovery and the last, p < 0.001) was observed at 80% of the VT2 speed. At the over-threshold intensity, HR rose from 159 to 168 beats·min(-1) from the first recovery to the last (p < 0.001). OP showed a declining trend from the first to the last recovery at 80% at the VT2 speed (18.3 versus 16.4 mL·beats(-1), p < 0.05) and between the first and the last recovery in tests performed at 120% of the VT2 speed (17.8 versus 16.3 mL·beats(-1), p < 0.05). No change occurred in CO2excess, VO2, RER, VE and O2debt. On the basis of our research, the use of fixed HR as a reliable index of the established recovery is inaccurate and unfit for training. The phenomenon of cardiac drift to set the restart timing after the repetitions, i.e. by progressively increasing HR values, should be taken into account by coaches. Key pointsDuring an IT session, if recovery time after repetitions is fixed, HR supplies a different indication compared to all the respiratory parameters: HR indicates an incomplete recovery while the other parameters do not.The use of fixed HR values as a reliable index of the established recovery during IT is inaccurate and it may be the cause of under-training.To set the restart timing after repetitions the phenomenon of cardiac drift should be

  9. Heart Rate Unreliability during Interval Training Recovery in Middle Distance Runners

    PubMed Central

    Tocco, Filippo; Sanna, Irene; Mulliri, Gabriele; Magnani, Sara; Todde, Francesco; Mura, Roberto; Ghiani, Giovanna; Concu, Alberto; Melis, Franco; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) was tested as a reliable index for recovery management during interval training (IT), considering its relationship with the several factors involved in respiratory, metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. Thirteen runners underwent two different IT sessions: at 80% and 120% of the second ventilatory threshold (VT2). Throughout both sessions HR, oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2) and pulmonary ventilation (VE), were measured by means of a portable gas analyzer. Carbon dioxide production excess (CO2excess), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), oxygen pulse (OP) and oxygen debt (O2debt) were also estimated. A significant increase in HR values (144 versus 150 beats·min−1 between the first recovery and the last, p < 0.001) was observed at 80% of the VT2 speed. At the over-threshold intensity, HR rose from 159 to 168 beats·min−1 from the first recovery to the last (p < 0.001). OP showed a declining trend from the first to the last recovery at 80% at the VT2 speed (18.3 versus 16.4 mL·beats−1, p < 0.05) and between the first and the last recovery in tests performed at 120% of the VT2 speed (17.8 versus 16.3 mL·beats−1, p < 0.05). No change occurred in CO2excess, VO2, RER, VE and O2debt. On the basis of our research, the use of fixed HR as a reliable index of the established recovery is inaccurate and unfit for training. The phenomenon of cardiac drift to set the restart timing after the repetitions, i.e. by progressively increasing HR values, should be taken into account by coaches. Key points During an IT session, if recovery time after repetitions is fixed, HR supplies a different indication compared to all the respiratory parameters: HR indicates an incomplete recovery while the other parameters do not. The use of fixed HR values as a reliable index of the established recovery during IT is inaccurate and it may be the cause of under-training. To set the restart timing after repetitions the phenomenon of cardiac drift should

  10. Reinforcing value of interval and continuous physical activity in children.

    PubMed

    Barkley, Jacob E; Epstein, Leonard H; Roemmich, James N

    2009-08-04

    During play children engage in short bouts of intense activity, much like interval training. This natural preference for interval-type activity may have important implications for prescribing the most motivating type of physical activity, but the motivation of children to be physically active in interval or continuous fashion has not yet been examined. In the present study, ventilatory threshold (VT) and VO2 peak were determined in boys (n=16) and girls (n=16) age 10+/-1.3 years. Children sampled interval and continuous constant-load physical activity protocols on a cycle ergometer at 20% VT on another day. The physical activity protocols were matched for energy expenditure. Children then completed an operant button pressing task using a progressive fixed ratio schedule to assess the relative reinforcing value (RRV) of interval versus continuous physical activity. The number of button presses performed to gain access in interval or continuous physical activity and output maximum (O(max)) were the primary outcome variables. Children performed more button presses (P<0.005) and had a greater O(max) (P<0.005) when working to gain access to interval compared to continuous physical activity at intensities >VT and interval-type physical activity was more reinforcing than continuous constant-load physical activity for children when exercising both >VT and activity at a high-rate during natural play because it is more reinforcing than longer, continuous activity.

  11. Interval to Testosterone Recovery After Hormonal Therapy for Prostate Cancer and Risk of Death

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Anthony V. Chen, M.-H.; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Loffredo, Marian; Kantoff, Philip W.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the risk of death is associated with the time to testosterone recovery (TTR) after radiotherapy (RT) and hormonal therapy (HT) for prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2001, 206 men with localized, unfavorable-risk PCa were randomized to receive RT or RT plus 6 months of HT. A multivariate postrandomization Cox regression analysis was used to assess whether the TTR in years was associated with the risk of death after adjusting for the known prognostic factors, age, Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 score, and the use of HT for recurrence. Results: Of the 102 men randomized to receive RT and HT, 57 (56%) had a TTR of >2 years, and none of these men had died of PCa after a median follow-up of 7.6 years. As the TTR increased, the risk of death decreased significantly (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.84; p = .003). A significant interaction was noted between the TTR and the comorbidity score (p = .002). The survival estimates were similar (p = 0.17) across the TTR values in men with moderate to severe comorbidity; however, these estimates increased significantly (p < .001) with decreasing PCa-specific mortality (p = .006) as the TTR increased in men with no or minimal comorbidity. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that a longer TTR after RT plus 6 months of HT for unfavorable-risk PCa is associated with a lower risk of death in men with no or minimal comorbidity.

  12. Effect of regrowth interval and a microbial inoculant on the fermentation profile and dry matter recovery of guinea grass silages.

    PubMed

    Santos, E M; Pereira, O G; Garcia, R; Ferreira, C L L F; Oliveira, J S; Silva, T C

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize and quantify the microbial populations in guinea grass (Panicum maximum Jacq. cultivar Mombasa) harvested at different regrowth intervals (35, 45, 55, and 65 d). The chemical composition and fermentation profile of silages (after 60 d) with or without the addition of a microbial inoculant were also analyzed. Before ensiling, samples of the plants were used for the isolation and identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the epiphytic microbiota. A 4 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments (4 regrowth intervals × with/without inoculant) was used in a completely randomized design with 3 replications. Based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics and the carbohydrate fermentation profile, Lactobacillus plantarum was found to be the predominant specie of LAB in guinea grass forage. Linear increases were detected in the dry matter (DM) content and concentrations of neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, acid detergent insoluble nitrogen, and DM recovery as well as linear reductions in the concentrations of crude protein and NH3-N with regrowth interval. Additionally, linear reductions for gas and effluent losses in silages were detected with increasing regrowth interval. These results demonstrate that guinea grass plants harvested after 55 d of regrowth contain a LAB population sufficiently large to ensure good fermentation and increase the DM recovery. The use of microbial inoculant further enhanced the fermentation of guinea grass at all stages of regrowth by improving the DM recovery.

  13. Solvent recovery improved with activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    A non-woven net of activated carbon fibers as absorbing media, representing a major advancement in vapor recovery technology, is presented. The carbon fiber exhibits mass transfer coefficients for adsorption description of up to 100 times that of conventional systems.

  14. Passive recovery is superior to active recovery during a high-intensity shock microcycle.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patrick; Zinner, Christoph; Grosskopf, Christoph; Rossmann, Roman; Bloch, Wilhelm; Mester, Joachim

    2013-05-01

    The purpose was to examine the effects of a 2-week high-intensity shock microcycle on maximal oxygen consumption and parameters of exercise performance in junior triathletes on the one hand and to evaluate the long-term effects of active (A) vs. passive (P) recovery on the other hand. Sixteen healthy junior triathletes participated in the study. For the assignment to the A or P group, the subjects were matched according to age and performance. Within 2 weeks, a total of 15 high-intensity interval sessions within three 3-day training blocks were performed. Before and 1 week after the last training session, the athletes performed a ramp test to determine V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, a time trial (TT) and a Wingate test. Furthermore, total hemoglobin (Hb) mass was determined. The results of the whole group, independent of the arrangement of recovery, were analyzed at first; second, the A and P groups were analyzed separately. Peak power output (PPO) during the ramp test and TT performance significantly increased in the whole group. The comparison of the 2 groups revealed increases for the mentioned parameters and for V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and power output at VT2 for the P group only. The V[Combining Dot Above]O2max did not change. Wingate performance increased in the A group only. The tHb mass slightly decreased. The main finding of this study was that a 14-day shock microcycle is able to improve TT performance and PPO in junior triathletes in a short period of time. Furthermore, not only the intensity but also the arrangement of interval training seems to be important as well, because only the P group showed improvements in endurance performance, despite a slightly lower training volume. These findings might be relevant for future arrangements of high-intensity interval training.

  15. Can longer forest harvest intervals increase summer streamflow for salmon recovery?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mashel Streamflow Modeling Project in the Mashel River Basin, Washington, is using a watershed-scale ecohydrological model to assess whether longer forest harvest intervals can remediate summer low flow conditions that have contributed to sharply reduced runs of spawning Chin...

  16. Effects of active vs. passive recovery on work performed during serial supramaximal exercise tests.

    PubMed

    Spierer, D K; Goldsmith, R; Baran, D A; Hryniewicz, K; Katz, S D

    2004-02-01

    The current investigation was undertaken to determine the effects of active versus passive recovery on work performance during repeated bouts of supramaximal exercise. Six healthy sedentary subjects and 9 moderately trained healthy hockey players performed serial 30-second Wingate anaerobic power tests (WAnT) on a bicycle ergometer interposed with 4 minutes of active recovery at a work rate corresponding to 28 % of VO(2)max or passive recovery at rest. Peak power, mean power, total work achieved, and fatigue index were calculated for the serial WAnT. Capillary blood lactate was determined at 5-minute intervals after the last WAnT during 30 minutes of active or passive recovery. Mean power was significantly greater during active recovery in sedentary subjects when compared with passive recovery (388 +/- 42 vs. 303 +/- 37 W, p < 0.05), but did not differ according to recovery mode in moderately trained hockey players (589 +/- 22 W active vs. 563 +/- 26 W passive, p = 0.14). Total work achieved significantly increased during active when compared with passive recovery in sedentary subjects (34 890 +/- 3768 vs. 27 260 +/- 3364 J, p < 0.02) and moderately trained hockey players (86 763 +/- 9151 vs. 75 357 +/- 8281 J, p < 0.05). Capillary blood lactate levels did not differ during active when compared with passive recovery in sedentary subjects but were significantly lower during active when compared with passive recovery in moderately trained hockey players. These data demonstrate that active recovery at a work rate corresponding to 28 % of VO(2)max increases total work achieved during repeated WAnT when compared with passive recovery in sedentary subjects and moderately trained hockey players.

  17. Repeated high-intensity interval exercise shortens the positive effect on executive function during post-exercise recovery in healthy young males.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hayato; Suga, Tadashi; Takenaka, Saki; Tanaka, Daichi; Takeuchi, Tatsuya; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Isaka, Tadao; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    A single bout of aerobic exercise improves executive function (EF), but only for a short period. Compared with a single bout of aerobic exercise, we recently found that high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) could maintain a longer improvement in EF. However, the mechanism underlying the effect of different exercise modes on the modifications of EF remains unclear. The purpose of the current investigation was to test our hypothesis that the amount of exercise-induced lactate production and its accumulation affects human brain function during and after exercise, thereby affecting post-exercise EF. Ten healthy male subjects performed cycle ergometer exercise. The HIIE protocol consisted of four 4-min bouts at 90% peak VO2 with a 3-min active recovery period at 60% peak VO2. The amount of lactate produced during exercise was manipulated by repeating the HIIE twice with a resting period of 60min between the 1st HIIE and 2nd HIIE. To evaluate EF, a color-word Stroop task was performed, and reverse-Stroop interference scores were obtained. EF immediately after the 1st HIIE was significantly improved compared to that before exercise, and the improved EF was sustained during 40min of the post-exercise recovery. However, for the 2nd HIIE, the improved EF was sustained for only 10min of the post-exercise recovery period, despite the performance of the same exercise. In addition, during and following HIIE, the glucose and lactate accumulation induced by the 2nd HIIE was significantly lower than that induced by the 1st HIIE. Furthermore, there was an inverse relationship between lactate and EF by plotting the changes in lactate levels against changes in EF from pre-exercise during the late phase of post-exercise recovery. These findings suggested the possibility that repeated bouts of HIIE, which decreases lactate accumulation, may dampen the positive effect of exercise on EF during the post-exercise recovery.

  18. Low-order chaos in sympathetic nerve activity causes 1/f fluctuation of heartbeat intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaka, Motohisa; Kumagai, Hiroo; Sakata, Katsufumi; Onami, Toshiko; Chon, Ki H.; Watanabe, Mari A.; Saruta, Takao

    2004-04-01

    The mechanism of 1/f scaling of heartbeat intervals remains unknown. We recorded heartbeat intervals, sympathetic nerve activity, and blood pressure in conscious rats with normal or high blood pressure. Using nonlinear analyses, we demonstrate that the dynamics of this system of 3 variables is low-order chaos, and that sympathetic nerve activity leads to heartbeat interval and blood pressure changes. It is suggested that 1/f scaling of heartbeat intervals results from the low-order chaos of these variables and that impaired regulation of blood pressure by sympathetic nerve activity is likely to cause experimentally observable steeper scaling of heartbeat intervals in hypertensive (high blood pressure) rats.

  19. The effect of the interval from PGF treatment to ovulation on embryo recovery and pregnancy rate in the mare.

    PubMed

    Cuervo-Arango, J; Mateu-Sánchez, S; Aguilar, J J; Nielsen, J M; Etcharren, V; Vettorazzi, M L; Newcombe, J R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the interval from induced luteolysis to ovulation on fertility of mares from two different farms. At farm 1, 215 mares were inseminated with frozen/thawed semen during 513 estrous cycles over seven consecutive breeding seasons. Estrus was induced with analogues of PGF2α in 179 cycles. At farm 2, 375 embryo flushings were performed in 65 donor mares inseminated with fresh semen; of which, 327 were performed following artificial insemination after PGF-induced luteolysis. In both farms, the intervals from PGF treatment to ovulation (ITO) data were divided into three interval groups: less than 6 days, 6 to 8 days, and greater than 8 days. A mixed regression model was created to determine the effect of different factors on the pregnancy rate (PR) and embryo recovery rate (ERR). Of all factors analyzed, the ITO was the only one that significantly influenced the PR and ERR (P < 0.05). In farm 1, the PR of mares with an ITO of less than 6 days, 6 to 8 days, and greater than 8 days was 26.6%, 39.4%, and 55.9%, respectively (P = 0.01). The PR for mares inseminated after spontaneous luteolysis (without PGF) was 42.5%. In farm 2, the ERR of donor mares for the same ITO groups was 55.0%, 62.6%, and 73.7%, respectively (P = 0.02). The ERR for mares flushed after a previous spontaneous estrus was 75.0%. In conclusion, the ITO had a significant effect on the PR and ERR in the mare. Fertility was reduced as the ITO became shorter.

  20. Cultural leisure activities, recovery and work engagement among hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Tuisku, Katinka; Virtanen, Marianna; Bloom, Jessica DE; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2016-06-10

    This study explored the relationship between cultural leisure activities, recovery experiences and two outcomes among hospital workers. The differences in recovery experiences (detachment, relaxation, mastery and control) and outcomes (work engagement and subjective recovery state) among hospital personnel (N=769) were analysed by the type (receptive or creative) and frequency of cultural activities. The cross-sectional data were collected by a digital questionnaire. Employees who reported both receptive and creative cultural leisure activities on a weekly basis had the highest relaxation, mastery and control experiences during off-job time. In addition, those with weekly creative activities had beneficial mastery experiences. There were no differences in recovery outcomes after adjustment for age, except in work engagement. Cultural leisure activities, and creative activities in particular, play an important role in certain aspects of recovery.

  1. Cultural leisure activities, recovery and work engagement among hospital employees

    PubMed Central

    TUISKU, Katinka; VIRTANEN, Marianna; DE BLOOM, Jessica; KINNUNEN, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between cultural leisure activities, recovery experiences and two outcomes among hospital workers. The differences in recovery experiences (detachment, relaxation, mastery and control) and outcomes (work engagement and subjective recovery state) among hospital personnel (N=769) were analysed by the type (receptive or creative) and frequency of cultural activities. The cross-sectional data were collected by a digital questionnaire. Employees who reported both receptive and creative cultural leisure activities on a weekly basis had the highest relaxation, mastery and control experiences during off-job time. In addition, those with weekly creative activities had beneficial mastery experiences. There were no differences in recovery outcomes after adjustment for age, except in work engagement. Cultural leisure activities, and creative activities in particular, play an important role in certain aspects of recovery. PMID:26829973

  2. Low-order chaos in sympathetic nerve activity and scaling of heartbeat intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaka, Motohisa; Kumagai, Hiroo; Sakata, Katsufumi; Onami, Toshiko; Chon, Ki H.; Watanabe, Mari A.; Saruta, Takao

    2003-04-01

    The mechanism of 1/f scaling of heartbeat intervals remains unknown. We recorded heartbeat intervals, sympathetic nerve activity, and blood pressure in conscious rats with normal or high blood pressure. Using nonlinear analyses, we demonstrate that the dynamics of this system of three variables is low-order chaos, and that sympathetic nerve activity leads to heartbeat interval and blood pressure changes. It is suggested that impaired regulation of blood pressure by sympathetic nerve activity is likely to cause experimentally observable steeper scaling of heartbeat intervals in hypertensive (high blood pressure) rats.

  3. The Effect of Passive versus Active Recovery on Power Output over Six Repeated Wingate Sprints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Egla-Irina D.; Smoliga, James M.; Zavorsky, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of active versus passive recovery on 6 repeated Wingate tests (30-s all-out cycling sprints on a Velotron ergometer). Method: Fifteen healthy participants aged 29 (SD = 8) years old (body mass index = 23 [3] kg/m[superscript 2]) participated in 3 sprint interval training sessions separated…

  4. Comparison of Active and Electrostimulated Recovery Strategies After Fatiguing Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vanderthommen, Marc; Makrof, Souleyma; Demoulin, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare an electrostimulated to an active recovery strategy after a submaximal isometric fatiguing exercise. Nineteen healthy men completed three sessions (separated by at least 4 weeks) which included a knee extensors provocation exercise consisting of 3 sets of 25 isometric contractions. Contraction intensity level was fixed respectively at 60%, 55% and 50% of previously determined maximal voluntary contraction for the first, second and third sets. This provocation exercise was followed by either an active (AR) recovery (25 min pedaling on a cycle ergometer), an electrostimulated (ESR) recovery (25-min continuous and non-tetanic (5 Hz) stimulation of the quadriceps) or a strictly passive recovery (PR). Peak torques of knee extensors and subjective perception of muscle pain (VAS, 0-10) were evaluated before (pre-ex), immediately after the provocation exercise (post-ex), after the recovery period (post-rec), as well as 75 minutes (1h15) and one day (24h) after the exercise bout. Time course of peak torque was similar among the different recovery modes: ~ 75% of initial values at post-ex, ~ 90% at post-rec and at 1h15. At 24h, peak torque reached a level close to baseline values (PR: 99.1 ± 10.7%, AR: 105.3 ± 12.2%, ESR: 104.4 ± 10.5%). VAS muscle pain scores decreased rapidly between post-ex and post-rec (p < 0.001); there were no significant differences between the three recovery modes (p = 0.64). In conclusion, following a submaximal isometric knee extension exercise, neither electrostimulated nor active recovery strategies significantly improved the time course of muscle function recovery. Key points Three sets of submaximal isometric contractions at 60%, 55% and 50% of MVC induced an early fatigue without DOMS but did not lead to exhaustion. In comparison with passive recovery, active and electrostimulated recovery did not lead to significantly higher MVC torques 24h after the exercise bout. No significant differences were

  5. Episodic Bouts of Activity Accompany Recovery of Rhythmic Output by a Neuromodulator-and Activity-Deprived Adult Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Jason A.; Robie, Alice A.; Yarotsky, John; Reina, Christopher; Marder, Eve; Golowasch, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The pyloric rhythm of the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab, Cancer borealis, slows or stops when descending modulatory inputs are acutely removed. However, the rhythm spontaneously resumes after one or more days in the absence of neuromodulatory input. We recorded continuously for days to characterize quantitatively this recovery process. Activity bouts lasting 40 to 900 seconds began several hours after removal of neuromodulatory input and were followed by stable rhythm recovery after 1-4 days. Bout duration was not related to the intervals (0.3 to 800 minutes) between bouts. During an individual bout the frequency rapidly increased and then decreased more slowly. Photoablation of back-filled neuromodulatory terminals in the STG neuropil had no effect on activity bouts or recovery, suggesting that these processes are intrinsic to the STG neuronal network. After removal of neuromodulatory input the phase relationships of the components of the triphasic pyloric rhythm were altered, and then over time the phase relationships moved towards their control values. Although at low pyloric rhythm frequency the phase relationships among pyloric network neurons depended on frequency, the changes in frequency during recovery did not completely account for the change in phase seen after rhythm recovery. Additionally, we suggest that activity bouts represent underlying mechanisms controlling the restructuring of the pyloric network to allow resumption of an appropriate output following removal of neuromodulatory input. PMID:12840081

  6. Human trace fear conditioning: right-lateralized cortical activity supports trace-interval processes.

    PubMed

    Haritha, Abhishek T; Wood, Kimberly H; Ver Hoef, Lawrence W; Knight, David C

    2013-06-01

    Pavlovian conditioning requires the convergence and simultaneous activation of neural circuitry that supports conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) processes. However, in trace conditioning, the CS and US are separated by a period of time called the trace interval, and thus do not overlap. Therefore, determining brain regions that support associative learning by maintaining a CS representation during the trace interval is an important issue for conditioning research. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research has identified brain regions that support trace-conditioning processes. However, relatively little is known about whether this activity is specific to the trace CS, the trace interval, or both periods of time. The present study was designed to disentangle the hemodynamic response produced by the trace CS from that associated with the trace interval, in order to identify learning-related activation during these distinct components of a trace-conditioning trial. Trace-conditioned activity was observed within dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsolateral PFC, insula, inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and posterior cingulate (PCC). Each of these regions showed learning-related activity during the trace CS, while trace-interval activity was only observed within a subset of these areas (i.e., dorsomedial PFC, PCC, right dorsolateral PFC, right IPL, right superior/middle temporal gyrus, and bilateral insula). Trace-interval activity was greater in right than in left dorsolateral PFC, IPL, and superior/middle temporal gyrus. These findings indicate that components of the prefrontal, cingulate, insular, and parietal cortices support trace-interval processes, as well as suggesting that a right-lateralized fronto-parietal circuit may play a unique role in trace conditioning.

  7. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in mallard ducklings administered organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Bradbury, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Oral doses of the organophosphorus pesticides acephate, dicrotophos, fensulfothion, fonofos, malathion, and parathion were administered to mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos), and brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for up to 77 d after dosing. In vivo recovery of brain ChE activity to within 2 standard deviations of the mean activity of undosed birds occurred within 8 d, after being depressed an average of 25-58% at 24 h after dosing. In vivo recovery of plasma ChE appeared as fast as or faster than that of brain, but the pattern of recovery was more erratic and therefore statistical comparison with brain ChE recovery was not attempted. In vitro tests indicated that the potential for dephosphorylation to contribute to in vivo recovery of inhibited brain ChE differed among chemical treatments. Some ducklings died as a result of organophosphate dosing. In an experiment in which ducklings within each treatment group received the same dose (mg/kg), the brain ChE activity in birds that died was less than that in birds that survived. Brain ChE activities in ducklings that died were significantly different among pesticide treatments: fensulfothion > parathion> acephate > malathion (p < 0.05).

  8. Sodium bicarbonate ingestion augments the increase in PGC-1α mRNA expression during recovery from intense interval exercise in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Michael E.; Martin, Brian J.; Gillen, Jenna B.; Skelly, Lauren E.; MacInnis, Martin J.; Green, Alex E.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) prior to an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would augment signaling cascades and gene expression linked to mitochondrial biogenesis in human skeletal muscle. On two occasions separated by ∼1 wk, nine men (mean ± SD: age 22 ± 2 yr, weight 78 ± 13 kg, V̇o2 peak 48 ± 8 ml·kg−1·min−1) performed 10 × 60-s cycling efforts at an intensity eliciting ∼90% of maximal heart rate (263 ± 40 W), interspersed with 60 s of recovery. In a double-blind, crossover manner, subjects ingested a total of 0.4 g/kg body weight NaHCO3 before exercise (BICARB) or an equimolar amount of a placebo, sodium chloride (PLAC). Venous blood bicarbonate and pH were elevated at all time points after ingestion (P < 0.05) in BICARB vs. PLAC. During exercise, muscle glycogen utilization (126 ± 47 vs. 53 ± 38 mmol/kg dry weight, P < 0.05) and blood lactate accumulation (12.8 ± 2.6 vs. 10.5 ± 2.8 mmol/liter, P < 0.05) were greater in BICARB vs. PLAC. The acute exercise-induced increase in the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a downstream marker of AMP-activated protein kinase activity, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were similar between treatments (P > 0.05). However, the increase in PGC-1α mRNA expression after 3 h of recovery was higher in BICARB vs. PLAC (approximately sevenfold vs. fivefold compared with rest, P < 0.05). We conclude that NaHCO3 before HIIT alters the mRNA expression of this key regulatory protein associated with mitochondrial biogenesis. The elevated PGC-1α mRNA response provides a putative mechanism to explain the enhanced mitochondrial adaptation observed after chronic HIIT supplemented with NaHCO3 in rats. PMID:26384407

  9. Sodium bicarbonate ingestion augments the increase in PGC-1α mRNA expression during recovery from intense interval exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Percival, Michael E; Martin, Brian J; Gillen, Jenna B; Skelly, Lauren E; MacInnis, Martin J; Green, Alex E; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Gibala, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) prior to an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would augment signaling cascades and gene expression linked to mitochondrial biogenesis in human skeletal muscle. On two occasions separated by ∼1 wk, nine men (mean ± SD: age 22 ± 2 yr, weight 78 ± 13 kg, V̇O(2 peak) 48 ± 8 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed 10 × 60-s cycling efforts at an intensity eliciting ∼90% of maximal heart rate (263 ± 40 W), interspersed with 60 s of recovery. In a double-blind, crossover manner, subjects ingested a total of 0.4 g/kg body weight NaHCO3 before exercise (BICARB) or an equimolar amount of a placebo, sodium chloride (PLAC). Venous blood bicarbonate and pH were elevated at all time points after ingestion (P < 0.05) in BICARB vs. PLAC. During exercise, muscle glycogen utilization (126 ± 47 vs. 53 ± 38 mmol/kg dry weight, P < 0.05) and blood lactate accumulation (12.8 ± 2.6 vs. 10.5 ± 2.8 mmol/liter, P < 0.05) were greater in BICARB vs. PLAC. The acute exercise-induced increase in the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a downstream marker of AMP-activated protein kinase activity, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were similar between treatments (P > 0.05). However, the increase in PGC-1α mRNA expression after 3 h of recovery was higher in BICARB vs. PLAC (approximately sevenfold vs. fivefold compared with rest, P < 0.05). We conclude that NaHCO3 before HIIT alters the mRNA expression of this key regulatory protein associated with mitochondrial biogenesis. The elevated PGC-1α mRNA response provides a putative mechanism to explain the enhanced mitochondrial adaptation observed after chronic HIIT supplemented with NaHCO3 in rats.

  10. The effect of mare's age on multiple ovulation rate, embryo recovery, post-transfer pregnancy rate, and interovulatory interval in a commercial embryo transfer program in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Marinone, A I; Losinno, L; Fumuso, E; Rodríguez, E M; Redolatti, C; Cantatore, S; Cuervo-Arango, J

    2015-07-01

    Advanced maternal age is an important predisposing factor on the reduction of reproductive efficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of donor's age on several reproductive parameters in a commercial equine embryo transfer program. Donors were classified into 3 age groups: Group 1=fillies (3 and 4 years old), Group 2=middle age mares (aged 5-10) and Group 3=old mares (aged 13-25). Embryo recovery, multiple ovulation and pregnancy rates and interovulatory intervals were compared amongst age groups. Group 1 (171/244, 70.1%) and Group 2 (774/1081, 71.6%) had a higher (P<0.005) embryo recovery rate than Group 3 (385/701, 54.9%). Groups 2 and 3 were 2.5 and 3.4 times more likely to have multiple ovulations than Group 1 (P<0.05), respectively. The effect of age group on pregnancy rate was not significant (P>0.05). The interovulatory intervals length was influenced by individual mare (P<0.001), age (P<0.04), Day of flushing (P=0.009) and by month (P<0.012). The overall mean interovulatory interval of Group 1 (16.4±0.17 days) and Group 2 (16.6±0.12 days) was not different (P>0.05), but was shorter than the one of Group 3 (17.4±0.15 days; P<0.04). The embryo recovery rate of flushings from Groups 1 and 2 was influenced by the length of the previous interovulatory interval (P=0.03).

  11. Using outdoor activities in cardiac recovery.

    PubMed

    McNish, Hugh

    Evidence suggests that green spaces next to hospitals can be used to promote health. This article reports on a pilot study to determine how hospital green spaces can be used for patients with cardiac problems and their rehabilitation programmes. Over a six-week period, patients spent one hour per week taking part in activities, including tai chi, photography and willow sculpting, as part of their rehabilitation programme. Patients showed improved physical health, less social isolation, a better overall mood and increased positivity. They were also more likely to choose to exercise than at the start of the rehabilitation programme, and valued the new skills and knowledge that they gained.

  12. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Recovery from exercise at varying work loads - Time course of responses of heart rate and systolic intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nandi, P. S.; Spodick, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    The time course of the recovery period was characterized by noninvasive measurements after 4 minute bicycle exercise at 3 separate work loads in volunteers with normal peak responses. Most responses started immediately to return toward resting control values. Left ventricular ejection time and stroke volume change are discussed. Changes in pre-ejection period were determined by changes in isovolume contraction time, and factors affecting the degree and rate of return are considered. The rates of change in the ejection time index and in the ratio pre-ejection period/left ventricular ejection time were virtually independent of load throughout most of recovery.

  14. Mode of exercise and sex are not important for oxygen consumption during and in recovery from sprint interval training.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Logan K; Couture, Katie M; Hazell, Tom J

    2014-12-01

    Most sprint interval training (SIT) research involves cycling as the mode of exercise and whether running SIT elicits a similar excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) response to cycling SIT is unknown. As running is a more whole-body-natured exercise, the potential EPOC response could be greater when using a running session compared with a cycling session. The purpose of the current study was to determine the acute effects of a running versus cycling SIT session on EPOC and whether potential sex differences exist. Sixteen healthy recreationally active individuals (8 males and 8 females) had their gas exchange measured over ∼2.5 h under 3 experimental sessions: (i) a cycle SIT session, (ii) a run SIT session, and (iii) a control (CTRL; no exercise) session. Diet was controlled. During exercise, both SIT modes increased oxygen consumption (cycle: male, 1.967 ± 0.343; female, 1.739 ± 0.296 L·min(-1); run: male, 2.169 ± 0.369; female, 1.791 ± 0.481 L·min(-1)) versus CTRL (male, 0.425 ± 0.065 L·min(-1); female, 0.357 ± 0.067; P < 0.001), but not compared with each other (P = 0.234). In the first hour postexercise, oxygen consumption was still increased following both run (male, 0.590 ± 0.065; female, 0.449 ± 0.084) and cycle SIT (male, 0.556 ± 0.069; female, 0.481 ± 0.110 L·min(-1)) versus CTRL and oxygen consumption was maintained through the second hour postexercise (CTRL: male, 0.410 ± 0.048; female, 0.332 ± 0.062; cycle: male, 0.430 ± 0.047; female, 0.395 ± 0.087; run: male, 0.463 ± 0.051; female, 0.374 ± 0.087 L·min(-1)). The total EPOC was not significantly different between modes of exercise or males and females (P > 0.05). Our data demonstrate that the mode of exercise during SIT (cycling or running) is not important to O2 consumption and that males and females respond similarly.

  15. The application of Ground Penetrating Radar analysis to investigate the impact and recovery of coastal dunes and the recurrence interval of overwash events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, A.; Gouramanis, C.; Bristow, C. S.; Jankaew, K.; Rubin, C. M.; Pham, D. T.; Ildefonso, S. R.; Lee, Y. S.

    2013-12-01

    The common techniques for investigating the impact, recovery and recurrence interval in coastal systems are point source augering or pitting and/or excavations. These techniques are time and cost intensive. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) presents a rapid, non-invasive, spatially-continuous technique for identifying subsurface stratigraphy. Although GPR facies are not diagnostic of a particular sedimentary characteristic, when combined with satellite imagery, they provide an avenue for reconstructing the impact and the post event recovery, or to help constrain the spatial extent of sandy deposits in the subsurface. Here, we present results from two GPR survey campaigns at Phra Thong Island, Thailand. The first campaign targeted the large scale recovery of the coast following the 2004 Indian ocean tsunami using 200 MHz antennae and the second campaign focused on a thin-bed approach aimed at imaging thin (<15 cm) sandy tsunami deposits and their associated structures using high-frequency 500 and 1000 MHz GPR antennae complemented by auger cores. The tsunami impact and recovery was reconciled by three 100 MHz GPR profiles and quasi-yearly satellite imagery. The GPR revealed the depth and extent of tsunami scour along with the sedimentary history of post tsunami coastal aggradation and recovery. The second GPR campaign captured several distinct palaeotsunami deposits as discreet thin sand layers preserved within a swale. The base of the swale and the contacts between the sandy and muddy layers are clearly imaged, although these reflectors are less consistent across the profile, suggesting that the contacts between thin sand and mud units can be accurately imaged provided the units are thicker than ca. 10cm. Our investigations show that GPR can be used to rapidly and non-invasively assess post event recovery and to image sandy washover events in muddy swales that are the result of tsunamis or storms.

  16. Eruptions in space and time: durations, intervals, and comparison of world's active volcanic belts

    SciTech Connect

    Simkin, T.; McClelland, L.

    1986-07-01

    A computerized data bank, compiled over the last 12 years at the Smithsonian Institution, allows summaries to be made of Holocene volcanism. The Scientific Event Alert Network tracks current volcanic activity. However, the record of most volcanoes is poor before the last 100 years, and some eruptions still pass unreported. The time interval since the previous eruption can be calculated for 4835 of the 5564 compiled eruptions. The median interval is 5.0 years, but much longer intervals commonly precede unusually violent eruptions. For the 25 most violent eruptions in the file (with known preceding interval), the medium interval is 865 years. Of the historic eruptions in this group, 50% resulted in fatalities. The interval between an eruption's start and its most violent paroxysm may be measured in months or years, but it is usually short. Of the 205 larger eruptions for which data are available, 92 had the paroxysmal event within the first day of the eruption, allowing little time for emergency preparations after the eruption's opening phase. To compare the recent vigor of different volcanic belts, they calculated the number of years in which each volcano was active in the last 100 years, summed these for each belt, and divided by belt length. Another index of recent vigor is the number of recognized Holocene volcanoes divided by belt length. A third index is the number of large explosive eruptions (volcanic explosive index greater than or equal to 3) of the last 100 years, again normalized by belt length. These three measures correlate reasonably well, serving to contrast vigorous belts such as Kamchatka, Central America, and Java with relatively quiet belts such as the Cascades, South Sandwich Islands, Greece, and southern Chile.

  17. Determination of habitual physical activity by means of a portable R-R interval distribution recorder

    PubMed Central

    Masironi, R.; Mansourian, P.

    1974-01-01

    A new portable apparatus—the Interval Distribution Recorder (IDR)—has been developed by WHO for assessing habitual physical activity. It measures R-R intervals and records counts in 8 heart rate classes—i.e., at 8 levels of physical activity, from sleeping to heavy exercise. It is much simpler, easier to operate, and less expensive than tape recording systems, and it requires only a minimum of skill and of cooperation by the unsupervised subject. It is therefore suitable for population studies. The IDR system yields more precise information than that obtained by using heartbeat totalizers, which only give a mean heart rate value for the day and do not allow detection of differences in activity patterns. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4549352

  18. Recovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video discusses the recovery events that occur in high-power rocketry and the various devices used in safely recovering the rocket. The video includes a discussion of black powder and ejection...

  19. Building a beverage for recovery from endurance activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Spaccarotella, Kim J; Andzel, Walter D

    2011-11-01

    Recovery beverages are commonly used by endurance and team-sport athletes during the time between exercise sessions. Practical recommendations on the optimal nutrient composition of these drinks and timing of their consumption are therefore needed. This article summarizes research to date on the use of recovery beverages after aerobic activities and provides the following recommendations for practitioners on the optimal formula and timing of use for endurance and team-sport athletes. Current evidence suggests that, to maximize glycogen resynthesis, athletes should consume about 1.2 g carbohydrate per kilogram body weight as glucose and sucrose immediately after exercise and each hour thereafter for 4-6 hours postexercise. Alternatively, they may consume 0.8 g·kg(-1)·h(-1) in combination with 0.4 g·kg(-1)·h(-1) amino acids or protein. Liquids provide valuable fluids for rehydration, and an ideal recovery beverage should not only contain carbohydrate and protein but also contain electrolytes, including about 0.3-0.7 g sodium·per liter fluid to help restore sodium lost through sweat. Commercial beverages with this type of nutrient composition are effective, and recent work indicates that chocolate milk may be as effective as or superior to these in promoting recovery. Research regarding the effects of specific types of amino acids and antioxidants on recovery is mixed; thus, further investigation is needed before specific recommendations about these nutrients can be made. Future studies that include women and athletes representing a variety of sports, ages, and training levels and that use consistent methodology will lead to a better understanding of the effects of postexercise intake on recovery.

  20. Can different conditioning activities and rest intervals affect the acute performance of taekwondo turning kick?

    PubMed

    Santos, Jonatas F da Silva; Valenzuela, Tomás H; Franchini, Emerson

    2015-06-01

    This study compared the acute effect of strength, plyometric, and complex exercises (combined strength and plyometric exercise) in the countermovement jump (CMJ) and frequency speed of kick test (FSKT) and attempted to establish the best rest interval to maximize performance in the CMJ, number of kicks, and impact generated during FSKT. Eleven taekwondo athletes (mean ± SD; age: 20.3 ± 5.2 years; body mass: 71.8 ± 15.3 kg; height: 177 ± 7.2 cm) participated. One control and 9 experimental conditions were randomly applied. Each condition was composed of warm-up, conditioning activity (half-squat: 3 × 1 at 95% 1RM; jumps: 3 × 10 vertical jumps above 40-cm barrier; or complex exercise: half-squat 3 × 2 at 95% 1RM + 4 vertical jumps above 40-cm barrier), followed by different rest intervals (5-, 10-minute, and self-selected) before CMJ and FSKT. The conditions were compared using an analysis of variance with repeated measures, followed by Bonferroni's post hoc test. The alpha level was set at 5%. Significant difference was found in the number of kicks (F9,90 = 1.32; p = 0.239; and η2 = 0.116 [small]). The complex method with a 10-minute rest interval (23 ± 5 repetitions) was superior (p = 0.026) to the control (19 ± 3 repetitions), maximum strength with a self-selected rest interval (328 ± 139 seconds; 18 ± 2 repetitions) (p = 0.015), and plyometric with a 5-minute rest interval (18 ± 3 repetitions) (p < 0.001). Our results indicate that taekwondo athletes increased the number of kicks in a specific test by using the complex method when 10-minute rest interval was used.

  1. The promise of wearable activity sensors to define patient recovery.

    PubMed

    Appelboom, Geoff; Yang, Annie H; Christophe, Brandon R; Bruce, Eliza M; Slomian, Justine; Bruyère, Olivier; Bruce, Samuel S; Zacharia, Brad E; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Connolly, E Sander

    2014-07-01

    The recent emergence of mobile health--the use of mobile telecommunication and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, services, and research--has inspired a patient-centric approach to monitor health metrics. Sensors embedded in wearable devices are utilized to acquire greater self-knowledge by tracking basic parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature as well as data related to exercise, diet, and psychological state. To that end, recent studies on utilizing wireless fitness activity trackers to monitor and promote functional recovery in patients suggest that collecting up-to-date performance data could help patients regain functional independence and help hospitals determine the appropriate length of stay for a patient. This manuscript examines existing functional assessment scales, discusses the use of activity tracking sensors in evaluating functional independence, and explores the growing application of wireless technology in measuring and promoting functional recovery.

  2. Non-probabilistic stability reliability measure for active vibration control system with interval parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Wang, Lei; Fan, Weichao; Qiu, Zhiping

    2017-01-01

    A systematic non-probabilistic reliability analysis procedure for structural vibration active control system with unknown-but-bounded parameters is proposed. The state-space representation of active vibration control system with uncertain parameters is presented. Compared with the robust control theory, which is always over-conservative, the reliability-based analysis method is more suitable to deal with uncertain problem. Stability is the core of the closed-loop feedback control system design, so stability criterion is adopted to act as the limited state function for reliability analysis. The uncertain parameters without enough samples are modeled as interval variables. Interval perturbation method is employed to estimate the interval bounds of eigenvalues, which can be used to characterize the stability of the closed-loop active control system. Formulation of defining the reliability of active control system based on stability is discussed. A novel non-probabilistic reliability measurement index is discussed and used to determine the probability of the stability based on the area ratio. The feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated by two numerical examples.

  3. Effectiveness of Moderate Intensity Interval Training as an Index of Autonomic Nervous Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takayoshi; Oi, Rie; Nishimura, Kazushi; Morita, Shuhei; Yaoi, Riyo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of moderate intensity interval training from the change of the autonomic nervous activity. Ten male volunteers aged 21-22 years were studied. After 10-minute rest in a seated position, the subjects were asked to perform the strength of moderate cycling exercise in ergometer. Cycling rate was done in 50 times/min. Load resistance of the ergometer was set to 2.0 kgm. Subjects paused the exercise when the heart rate becomes 120 beats/min. Subjects have resumed the exercise when the heart rate returns to the value at rest. This trial was repeated twice. The experiment was ended when the heart rate of the subjects has returned to resting level. When the heart rate during exercise is maintained to less than 120 beats/min, sympathetic nerve activity during exercise did not work actively compared to the baseline. Vagus nerve activity after exercise cessation exceeds the baseline. It is clarified that the exercise as well as activating the vagus nerve activity stimulates the total autonomic nervous activity. It has revealed that at the time of interval training at moderate load the vagus nerve activity can be carried out. PMID:27957342

  4. Markers for Routine Assessment of Fatigue and Recovery in Male and Female Team Sport Athletes during High-Intensity Interval Training

    PubMed Central

    Wiewelhove, Thimo; Raeder, Christian; Meyer, Tim; Kellmann, Michael; Pfeiffer, Mark; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Aim Our study aimed to investigate changes of different markers for routine assessment of fatigue and recovery in response to high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Methods 22 well-trained male and female team sport athletes (age, 23.0 ± 2.7 years; V̇O2max, 57.6 ± 8.6 mL·min·kg−1) participated in a six-day running-based HIIT-microcycle with a total of eleven HIIT sessions. Repeated sprint ability (RSA; criterion measure of fatigue and recovery), countermovement jump (CMJ) height, jump efficiency in a multiple rebound jump test (MRJ), 20-m sprint performance, muscle contractile properties, serum concentrations of creatinkinase (CK), c-reactive protein (CRP) and urea as well as perceived muscle soreness (DOMS) were measured pre and post the training program as well as after 72 h of recovery. Results Following the microcycle significant changes (p < 0.05) in RSA as well as in CMJ and MRJ performance could be observed, showing a decline (%Δ ± 90% confidence limits, ES = effect size; RSA: -3.8 ± 1.0, ES = -1.51; CMJ: 8.4 ± 2.9, ES = -1.35; MRJ: 17.4 ± 4.5, ES = -1.60) and a return to baseline level (RSA: 2.8 ± 2.6, ES = 0.53; CMJ: 4.1 ± 2.9, ES = 0.68; MRJ: 6.5 ± 4.5, ES = 0.63) after 72 h of recovery. Athletes also demonstrated significant changes (p < 0.05) in muscle contractile properties, CK, and DOMS following the training program and after the recovery period. In contrast, CRP and urea remained unchanged throughout the study. Further analysis revealed that the accuracy of markers for assessment of fatigue and recovery in comparison to RSA derived from a contingency table was insufficient. Multiple regression analysis also showed no correlations between changes in RSA and any of the markers. Conclusions Mean changes in measures of neuromuscular function, CK and DOMS are related to HIIT induced fatigue and subsequent recovery. However, low accuracy of a single or combined use of these markers requires the verification of their applicability on an

  5. a Dynamical Model of Muscle Activation, Fatigue and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing Z.; Yue, Guang H.; Brown, Robert W.

    2001-04-01

    A dynamical model on muscle activation, fatigue, and recovery was developed to provide a theoretical framework for explaining the force produced by muscle(s) during the process of getting activated and fatigued. By simplifying the fatigue effect and the recovery effect as two phenomenological parameters (F, R), we developed a set of dynamical equations to describe the behavior of muscle(s) as a group of motor units under an external drive, e.g., voluntary brain effort. This model provides a macroscopic view for understanding the biophysical mechanisms of voluntary drive, fatigue effect, and recovery in stimulating, limiting and modulating the force output from muscle(s). Agreement between the experimental data and the predicted forces is excellent. This model may also generate new possibilities in clinical and engineering applications. The parameters introduced by this model can serve as good indicators of physical conditions, and may be useful for quantitative diagnosis of certain diseases related to muscles, especially symptoms of fatigue. Inference from the model can clarify a long-debating question regarding the maximal possibility of muscle force production. It can also be used as guideline for simulating real muscle in muscle engineering or design of human-mimic robot.

  6. A dynamical model of muscle activation, fatigue, and recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing Z; Brown, Robert W; Yue, Guang H

    2002-01-01

    A dynamical model is presented as a framework for muscle activation, fatigue, and recovery. By describing the effects of muscle fatigue and recovery in terms of two phenomenological parameters (F, R), we develop a set of dynamical equations to describe the behavior of muscles as a group of motor units activated by voluntary effort. This model provides a macroscopic view for understanding biophysical mechanisms of voluntary drive, fatigue effect, and recovery in stimulating, limiting, and modulating the force output from muscles. The model is investigated under the condition in which brain effort is assumed to be constant. Experimental validation of the model is performed by fitting force data measured from healthy human subjects during a 3-min sustained maximal voluntary handgrip contraction. The experimental results confirm a theoretical inference from the model regarding the possibility of maximal muscle force production, and suggest that only 97% of the true maximal force can be reached under maximal voluntary effort, assuming that all motor units can be recruited voluntarily. The effects of different motor unit types, time-dependent brain effort, sources of artifacts, and other factors that could affect the model are discussed. The applications of the model are also discussed. PMID:11964225

  7. Duration of Coherence Intervals in Electrical Brain Activity in Perceptual Organization

    PubMed Central

    Gepshtein, Sergei; Gong, Pulin; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between visual experience and temporal intervals of synchronized brain activity. Using high-density scalp electroencephalography, we examined how synchronized activity depends on visual stimulus information and on individual observer sensitivity. In a perceptual grouping task, we varied the ambiguity of visual stimuli and estimated observer sensitivity to this variation. We found that durations of synchronized activity in the beta frequency band were associated with both stimulus ambiguity and sensitivity: the lower the stimulus ambiguity and the higher individual observer sensitivity the longer were the episodes of synchronized activity. Durations of synchronized activity intervals followed an extreme value distribution, indicating that they were limited by the slowest mechanism among the multiple neural mechanisms engaged in the perceptual task. Because the degree of stimulus ambiguity is (inversely) related to the amount of stimulus information, the durations of synchronous episodes reflect the amount of stimulus information processed in the task. We therefore interpreted our results as evidence that the alternating episodes of desynchronized and synchronized electrical brain activity reflect, respectively, the processing of information within local regions and the transfer of information across regions. PMID:19596712

  8. ISEE 3 plasmoid and TCR observations during an extended interval of substorm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, M. F.; Mazur, E. L.; Baker, D. N.; Iyemori, T.; Singer, H. J.; Greenstadt, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    On April 9-11, 1983, the ISEE 3 spacecraft was continuously located within the earth's magnetotail for more than 36 hours at downstream distances of X = -76 to -80 R(e). During this span of time, 12 major intervals of substorm activity were observed in the AL index with good ISEE 3 telemetry coverage for 11 of them. In addition, there were two small substorms outside of these intervals, both with complete observations in the distant tail. This unusual ISEE 3 data set provides a unique opportunity to test the predictions of the near-earth neutral line model. In particular, the hypothesis that energy stored in the tail lobes during the growth phase is later dissipated, in part, through the release of one or more plasmoids following expansion phase onset is examined. Clear growth phase enhancements in the lobe magnetic field intensity preceded the onsets of nine of the substorms. Plasmoids, or their lobe signatures, traveling compression regions (TCRs), were observed at ISEE 3 in association with all 11 of the major substorm intervals for which there were ISEE observations, as well as for the two small substorms. No plasmoids or TCRs were observed in the absence of substorm activity. If these ISEE 3 observations are representative, then the release of plasmoids down the tail may be a feature common to all substorms.

  9. Reconstruction of burst activity from calcium imaging of neuronal population via Lq minimization and interval screening

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Tingwei; Lv, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Calcium imaging is becoming an increasingly popular technology to indirectly measure activity patterns in local neuronal networks. Based on the dependence of calcium fluorescence on neuronal spiking, two-photon calcium imaging affords single-cell resolution of neuronal population activity. However, it is still difficult to reconstruct neuronal activity from complex calcium fluorescence traces, particularly for traces contaminated by noise. Here, we describe a robust and efficient neuronal-activity reconstruction method that utilizes Lq minimization and interval screening (IS), which we refer to as LqIS. The simulation results show that LqIS performs satisfactorily in terms of both accuracy and speed of reconstruction. Reconstruction of simulation and experimental data also shows that LqIS has advantages in terms of the recall rate, precision rate, and timing error. Finally, LqIS is demonstrated to effectively reconstruct neuronal burst activity from calcium fluorescence traces recorded from large-size neuronal population. PMID:27375930

  10. Affective and Enjoyment Responses to High-Intensity Interval Training in Overweight-to-Obese and Insufficiently Active Adults.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Nic; Kilpatrick, Marcus W; Salomon, Kristen; Jung, Mary E; Little, Jonathan P

    2015-04-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has many known physiological benefits, but research investigating the psychological aspects of this training is limited. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the affective and enjoyment responses to continuous and high-intensity interval exercise sessions. Twenty overweight-to-obese, insufficiently active adults completed four counterbalanced trials: a 20-min trial of heavy continuous exercise and three 24-min HIIT trials that used 30-s, 60-s, and 120-s intervals. Affect declined during all trials (p < .05), but affect at the completion of trials was more positive in the shorter interval trials (p < .05). Enjoyment declined in the 120-s interval and heavy continuous conditions only (p < .05). Postexercise enjoyment was higher in the 60-s trial than in the 120-s trial and heavy continuous condition (p < .05). Findings suggest that pleasure and enjoyment are higher during shorter interval trials than during a longer interval or heavy continuous exercise.

  11. Effects of Active Recovery on Lactate Concentration, Heart Rate and RPE in Climbing

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Nick; Bird, Ellis L.; Coleman, Ian; Hodgson, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The performance advantage of active rather than passive recovery during subsequent trials for repeated high intensity short-term exercise is well documented. Research findings suggest that shorter periods of active recovery, than traditionally employed, can be prescribed and still retain performance benefits over passive recoveries in successive exercise trials. The aim of this study was to examine the benefits of a short duration active recovery for repeat climbing trials. Ten recreational climbers volunteered for the study. In this randomly assigned crossover study each climber completed five two-minute climbing trails before a two minute active or passive recovery. This was followed by a one and a half minute passive refocusing period for all climbers before the subsequent climbing trial. Heart rate was monitored continuously, RPE immediately post climbing and fingertip capillary blood samples collected during each refocusing phase. There was a non-significant difference between active and passive recoveries for heart rate during climbing. After the active phase climbers had higher heart rates than when following the passive recovery protocol, however, by the end of the refocusing phase the active recovery protocol led to lower heart rates than for the entirely passive recovery. There was a significant difference between active and passive recovery conditions in lactate concentration (F(1,9) = 18.79, p = 0.002) and RPE (F(1,9) = 6.51, p = 0.031). Lactate concentration and RPE were lower across all five climbing trials for the active recovery protocol. After active recovery climbers started the next trial with a lower arterial lactate concentration than for a passive recovery and indicated lower RPE scores at the end of each climb. The refocusing period following active recovery allowed climbers heart rates to return to a lower level at the start of the next climb than for the passive recovery condition. Key Points The three and half minute recovery strategy

  12. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  13. The Upper Limit of Sunspot Activity as Observed over a Long Time Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Obridko, V. N.; Kuleshova, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    After analyzing the observational manifestations of the α- and ω-effects of the dynamo theory and using the modified Waldmeier rule, we show that the annual mean Wolf numbers at the maximum of the 11-year cycle that are likely to occur a time interval of 104 years have an upper limit amounting approximately to W EXTR˜230 - 240. Similar values were also obtained using the results by Usoskin et al. (2014, Astron. Astrophys. 562, L10), who considered the probability of various activity levels by reconstructing the variations of solar activity over three thousand years. As an additional result, the predicted maximum of Cycle 24 is refined and is shown to be W M=72 - 132 with a 95 % confidence.

  14. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT REST INTERVALS BETWEEN ANTAGONIST PAIRED SETS ON REPETITION PERFOMANCE AND MUSCLE ACTIVATION.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Maia, Marianna; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Paz, Gabriel Andrade; Miranda, Humberto

    2014-03-11

    Recent evidence suggests that exercising the antagonist musculature acutely enhances subsequent performance for the agonist musculature. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of different rest intervals between sets for exercises that involve antagonistic muscle groups; a technique referred to as antagonist paired sets (APS). Fifteen recreationally-trained men were tested for knee extension (KE) exercise performance, with or without prior knee flexion (KF) exercise for the antagonist musculature. The following protocols were performed in random order and with 10 repetition maximum (10RM) loads for the KF and KE exercises: 1) traditional protocol (TP) - one set of KE only to repetition failure; 2) paired sets with minimal allowable rest (PMR) - one set of KF followed immediately by a set of KE; 3) P30 - 30 seconds rest between paired sets of KF and KE; 4) P1 - 1-minute rest between paired sets; 5) P3 - 3-minutes rest between paired sets; and 6) P5 - 5-minutes rest between paired sets. The number of repetitions performed and EMG activity of vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles were recorded during the KE set in each protocol. It was demonstrated that significantly greater KE repetitions were completed during the PMR, P30 and P1 protocols versus the TP protocol. Significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the RF muscle during the KE exercise in the PMR and P30 versus the TP, P3 and P5, respectively. In addition, significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the VM muscle during the PMR versus all other protocols. The results of the current study indicate that no rest or relatively shorter rest intervals (30 sec and 1 min) between APS might be more effective to elicit greater agonist repetition enhancement and muscle activation.

  15. Effects of different rest intervals between antagonist paired sets on repetition performance and muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Maia, Marianna F; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Paz, Gabriel A; Miranda, Humberto

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that exercising the antagonist musculature acutely enhances subsequent performance for the agonist musculature. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different rest intervals between sets for exercises that involve antagonistic muscle groups, a technique referred to as antagonist paired sets (APS). Fifteen recreationally trained men were tested for knee extension (KE) exercise performance, with or without previous knee flexion (KF) exercise for the antagonist musculature. The following protocols were performed in random order with 10 repetition maximum loads for the KF and KE exercises: (a) traditional protocol (TP)-1 set of KE only to repetition failure; (b) paired sets with minimal allowable rest (PMR)-1 set of KF followed immediately by a set of KE; (c) P30-30-second rest between paired sets of KF and KE; (d) P1-1-minute rest between paired sets; (e) P3-3-minute rest between paired sets; and (f) P5-5-minute rest between paired sets. The number of repetitions performed and electromyographic (EMG) activity of vastus lateralis, vastus medialis (VM), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles were recorded during the KE set in each protocol. It was demonstrated that significantly greater KE repetitions were completed during the PMR, P30, and P1 protocols vs. the TP protocol. Significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the RF muscle during the KE exercise in the PMR and P30 vs. the TP, P3, and P5, respectively. In addition, significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the VM muscle during the PMR vs. all other protocols. The results of this study indicate that no rest or relatively shorter rest intervals (30 seconds and 1 minute) between APS might be more effective to elicit greater agonist repetition enhancement and muscle activation.

  16. Dictionary learning and sparse recovery for electrodermal activity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, Malia; Dallal, Ahmed; Eldeeb, Safaa; Akcakaya, Murat; Kleckner, Ian; Gerard, Christophe; Quigley, Karen S.; Goodwin, Matthew S.

    2016-05-01

    Measures of electrodermal activity (EDA) have advanced research in a wide variety of areas including psychophysiology; however, the majority of this research is typically undertaken in laboratory settings. To extend the ecological validity of laboratory assessments, researchers are taking advantage of advances in wireless biosensors to gather EDA data in ambulatory settings, such as in school classrooms. While measuring EDA in naturalistic contexts may enhance ecological validity, it also introduces analytical challenges that current techniques cannot address. One limitation is the limited efficiency and automation of analysis techniques. Many groups either analyze their data by hand, reviewing each individual record, or use computationally inefficient software that limits timely analysis of large data sets. To address this limitation, we developed a method to accurately and automatically identify SCRs using curve fitting methods. Curve fitting has been shown to improve the accuracy of SCR amplitude and location estimations, but have not yet been used to reduce computational complexity. In this paper, sparse recovery and dictionary learning methods are combined to improve computational efficiency of analysis and decrease run time, while maintaining a high degree of accuracy in detecting SCRs. Here, a dictionary is first created using curve fitting methods for a standard SCR shape. Then, orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) is used to detect SCRs within a dataset using the dictionary to complete sparse recovery. Evaluation of our method, including a comparison to for speed and accuracy with existing software, showed an accuracy of 80% and a reduced run time.

  17. Aerobic and anaerobic changes with high-intensity interval training in active college-aged men.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Ewa; Grzywacz, Tomasz; Łuszczyk, Marcin; Laskowski, Radoslaw; Olek, Robert A; Gibson, Ann L

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the aerobic and anaerobic benefits of high-intensity interval training performed at a work-to-rest ratio of 1:2 because little performance enhancement data exist based on this ratio. Recreationally active male volunteers (21 years, 184 cm, 81.5 kg) were randomly assigned to a training (interval training [IT] n = 10) or control group (n = 11). Baseline assessments were repeated after the last training session. Each participant underwent basic anthropometric assessment and performed a VO2max test on an electronically braked cycle ergometer and a 30-second Wingate test. Venous samples were acquired at the antecubital vein and subsequently processed for lactate (LA); samples were obtained at rest, and 5 and 15-minute post-Wingate test. The interval training used a cycling power output equivalent to 80% of VO2max (80% p VO2max) applied for 6 90-second bouts (each followed by 180-second rest) per session, 3 sessions per week, for 6 weeks. The control group maintained their normal routine for the 6-week period. Group × time repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed that IT improved VO2max (5.5 ml · kg(-1) · min), anaerobic threshold (3.8 ml · kg(-1) · min), work output (12.5 J · kg(-1)), glycolytic work (11.5 J · kg(-1)), mean power (0.3 W · kg), peak power (0.4 W · kg(-1)), and max power (0.4 W · kg(-1)); p < 0.05. Posttesting LA was lower on average for IT at the 5-minute mark but significantly so at the 15-minute mark. Twenty-seven minutes of cycling at 80% p VO2max applied with a work-to-rest ratio of 1:2 and spread over 3 sessions per week for 6 weeks provided sufficient stimulus to significantly improve markers of anaerobic and aerobic performance in recreationally active college-aged men. Inclusion of such a protocol into a training program may rapidly restore or improve a client's or athlete's maximal functional capacity.

  18. Confidence interval based parameter estimation--a new SOCR applet and activity.

    PubMed

    Christou, Nicolas; Dinov, Ivo D

    2011-01-01

    Many scientific investigations depend on obtaining data-driven, accurate, robust and computationally-tractable parameter estimates. In the face of unavoidable intrinsic variability, there are different algorithmic approaches, prior assumptions and fundamental principles for computing point and interval estimates. Efficient and reliable parameter estimation is critical in making inference about observable experiments, summarizing process characteristics and prediction of experimental behaviors. In this manuscript, we demonstrate simulation, construction, validation and interpretation of confidence intervals, under various assumptions, using the interactive web-based tools provided by the Statistics Online Computational Resource (http://www.SOCR.ucla.edu). Specifically, we present confidence interval examples for population means, with known or unknown population standard deviation; population variance; population proportion (exact and approximate), as well as confidence intervals based on bootstrapping or the asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood estimates. Like all SOCR resources, these confidence interval resources may be openly accessed via an Internet-connected Java-enabled browser. The SOCR confidence interval applet enables the user to empirically explore and investigate the effects of the confidence-level, the sample-size and parameter of interest on the corresponding confidence interval. Two applications of the new interval estimation computational library are presented. The first one is a simulation of confidence interval estimating the US unemployment rate and the second application demonstrates the computations of point and interval estimates of hippocampal surface complexity for Alzheimers disease patients, mild cognitive impairment subjects and asymptomatic controls.

  19. Methane recovery from water hyacinth through anaerobic activated sludge process

    SciTech Connect

    Savaswat, N.; Khana, P.

    1986-02-01

    The concepts of phase separation, anaerobic activated sludge process, and alkali pretreatment have been incorporated in this investigation with the objective of developing rational and cost-effective designs of diphasic anaerobic activated sludge systems, with and without alkali treatment, for methane recovery from water hyacinth (WH). Evaluation of process kinetics and optimization analyses of laboratory data reveal that a diphasic system with alkali treatment could be designed with an alkali pretreatment step (3.6% Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ + 2.5% Ca(OH)/sub 2/ (w/w) of WH, 24 h duration) followed by an open acid phase (2.1 days HRT) and closed methane reactor with sludge recycle (5.7 days HRT, 7.7 days MCRT) for gas yield of 50 L/kg WH/d at 35-37/sup 0/C. Likewise, a diphasic system without alkali treatment could be designed with an open acid phase (2 days HRT) followed by closed methane reactor with sludge recycle (3.2 days HRT, 6 days MCRT) for gas yield of 32.5 L/kg WH/d at 35-37/sup 0/C. Detailed economic analyses bring forth greater cost-efficacy of the diphasic system without alkali treatment and reveal that the advantage accrued in terms of higher gas yield is overshadowed by the cost of chemicals in the diphasic system with alkali treatment.

  20. Methane recovery from water hyacinth through anaerobic activated sludge process

    SciTech Connect

    Saraswat, N.; Khanna, P.

    1986-02-01

    The concepts of phase separation, anaerobic activated sludge process, and alkali pretreatment have been incorporated in this investigation with the objective of developing rational and cost-effective designs of diphasic anaerobic activated sludge systems, with and without alkali treatment, for methane recovery from water hyacinth (WH). Evaluation of process kinetics and optimization analyses of laboratory data reveal that a diphasic system with alkali treatment could be designed with an alkali pretreatment step (3.6% Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ + 2.5% Ca(OH)/sub 2/ (w/w) of WH, 24 h duration) followed by an open acid phase (2.1 days HRT) and closed methane reactor with sludge recycle (5.7 days HRT, 7.7 days MCRT) for gas yield of 50 l/kg WH/d at 35-37/sup 0/C. Likewise, a diphasic system without alkali treatment could be designed with an open acid phase (2 days HRT) followed by close methane reactor with sludge recycle (3.2 days HRT, 6 days MCRT) for gas yield of 32.5 l.kg WH/d at 35-37/sup 0/C. Detailed economic analyses bring forth greater cost-efficacy of the diphasic system without alkali treatment and reveal that the advantage accrued in terms of higher gas yield is overshadowed by the cost of chemicals in the diphasic system with alkali treatment.

  1. Recovery of brain and plasma cholinesterase activities in ducklings exposed to organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos) exposed to dicrotophos and fenthion. Recovery rates of brain ChE did not differ between ducklings administered a single oral dose vs. a 2-week dietary dose of these organophosphates. Exposure to the organophosphates, followed by recovery of brain ChE, did not significantly affect the degree of brain ChE inhibition or the recovery of ChE activity at a subsequent exposure. Recovery of brain ChE activity followed the general model Y = a + b(logX) with rapid recovery to about 50% of normal, followed by a slower rate of recovery until normal ChE activity levels were attained. Fenthion and dicrotophos-inhibited brain ChE were only slightly reactivated in vitro by pyridine-2-aldoxime methiodide, which suggested that spontaneous reactivation was not a primary method of recovery of ChE activity. Recovery of brain ChE activity can be modeled for interpretation of sublethal inhibition of brain ChE activities in wild birds following environmental applications of organophosphates. Plasma ChE activity is inferior to brain ChE activity for environmental monitoring, because of its rapid recovery and large degree of variation among individuals.

  2. Coffee, Alcohol, Smoking, Physical Activity and QT Interval Duration: Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Post, Wendy S.; Dalal, Darshan; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Guallar, Eliseo

    2011-01-01

    Background Abnormalities in the electrocardiographic QT interval duration have been associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. However, there is substantial uncertainty about the effect of modifiable factors such as coffee intake, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity on QT interval duration. Methods We studied 7795 men and women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES III, 1988–1994). Baseline QT interval was measured from the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram. Coffee and tea intake, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activities over the past month, and lifetime smoking habits were determined using validated questionnaires during the home interview. Results In the fully adjusted model, the average differences in QT interval comparing participants drinking ≥6 cups/day to those who did not drink any were −1.2 ms (95% CI −4.4 to 2.0) for coffee, and −2.0 ms (−11.2 to 7.3) for tea, respectively. The average differences in QT interval duration comparing current to never smokers was 1.2 ms (−0.6 to 2.9) while the average difference in QT interval duration comparing participants drinking ≥7 drinks/week to non-drinkers was 1.8 ms (−0.5 to 4.0). The age, race/ethnicity, and RR-interval adjusted differences in average QT interval duration comparing men with binge drinking episodes to non-drinkers or drinkers without binge drinking were 2.8 ms (0.4 to 5.3) and 4.0 ms (1.6 to 6.4), respectively. The corresponding differences in women were 1.1 (−2.9 to 5.2) and 1.7 ms (−2.3 to 5.7). Finally, the average differences in QT interval comparing the highest vs. the lowest categories of total physical activity was −0.8 ms (−3.0 to 1.4). Conclusion Binge drinking was associated with longer QT interval in men but not in women. QT interval duration was not associated with other modifiable factors including coffee and tea intake, smoking, and physical activity. PMID

  3. Activity of the pituitary-ovarian axis in the pill-free interval during use of low-dose combined oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, A M; Fauser, B C

    1999-04-01

    This study was performed to evaluate pituitary-ovarian recovery in the pill-free interval during use of three low-dose combined oral contraceptives (COC). Either the estrogen component or the progestin component was comparable in the study groups, to evaluate their relative influence. Serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and estradiol (E2) levels were measured and follicle number and size estimated by transvaginal sonography daily during the 7-day pill-free interval in 44 healthy volunteers using three different low-dose oral contraceptives. Healthy volunteers were enrolled using 20 micrograms ethinyl estradiol (EE) + 75 micrograms gestodene (GSD) (Harmonet, Wyeth-Lederle; n = 15), 20 micrograms EE + 150 micrograms desogestrel (DSG) (Mercilon, Organon n = 17), or 30 micrograms EE + 150 micrograms DSG (Marvelon, Organon, n = 12) given according to the usual regimen of one tablet daily during 3 weeks and 1 week pill-free interval. No ovulations were observed. Pituitary hormones were not statistically significantly different at the beginning of the pill-free interval between the study groups. FSH concentrations were significantly higher at the end of the pill-free interval in the 30 micrograms EE group compared with both 20 micrograms EE groups (7.0 [0.6-12.4] IU/L vs 4.9 [1.4-6.1] IU/L and 4.5 [2.4-7.4] IU/L; p = 0.001). In both 20 micrograms EE groups, a single persistent follicle (24 and 28 mm) was present in one subject. Follicle diameters were statistically significantly smaller at the beginning and at the end of the pill-free period in the 30 micrograms EE group compared with both 20 micrograms EE study groups. Dominant follicles (defined as follicle diameter > or = 10 mm) were observed at the end of the pill-free interval in both 20 micrograms EE groups (in 27% and 18% of women, respectively) but not in the 30 micrograms EE group. Finally, the area-under-the-curve for E2 was statistically significantly lower in the 30 micrograms

  4. Rest interval duration does not influence adaptations in acid/base transport proteins following 10 weeks of sprint-interval training in active women.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Cian; Bishop, David John

    2017-02-01

    The removal of protons (H(+)) produced during intense exercise is important for skeletal muscle function, yet it remains unclear how best to structure exercise training to improve muscle pH regulation. We investigated whether 4 weeks of work-matched, sprint-interval training (SIT), performed 3 days per week, with either 1 min (Rest-1; n = 7) or 5 min (Rest-5; n = 7) of rest between sprints, influenced adaptations in acid/base transport protein content, non-bicarbonate muscle buffer capacity (βmin vitro), and exercise capacity in active women. Following one week of post-testing, comprising a biopsy, a repeated-sprint ability (RSA) test, and a graded-exercise test, maintenance of adaptations was then studied by reducing SIT volume to one day per week for a further 5 weeks. After 4 weeks of SIT, there was increased protein abundance of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)1, sodium/hydrogen exchanger (NHE)1, and carbonic anhydrase (CA)XIV for both groups, but rest interval duration did not influence the adaptive response. In contrast, greater improvements in total work performed during the RSA test after 4 weeks of SIT was evident for Rest-5 compared to Rest-1 [effect size (ES): 0.51; 90% confidence limits ±0.37), whereas both groups had similarly modest improvements in VO2peak When training volume was reduced to one day per week, enhanced acid/base transport protein abundance was maintained, although NHE1 content increased further for Rest-5 only. Finally, our data support intracellular lactate as a signaling molecule for inducing MCT1 expression, but neither lactate nor H(+) accumulation appear to be important signaling factors in MCT4 regulation.

  5. Cold catalytic recovery of loaded activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bach, Altai; Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach for the recovery of spent activated carbon by an advanced oxidation process using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts was proposed and investigated. Model organic contaminants, such as ethylene glycol and phenol, were chosen for this study as water pollutants. It was shown that there are several advantages in using catalytic oxidation recovery of activated carbon with iron oxide-based nanocatalysts: low temperature reactivity of catalytic recovery without heating; and a relatively large number of adsorption-recovery cycles, without a reduction in the adsorptive properties of the virgin activated carbon or without a performance decrease from the first adsorption-recovery cycle of the new modified adsorptive properties of the activated carbon. The catalytic recovery takes place without ultraviolet light or any visible radiation sources. Results show a high efficiency of catalytic recovery of spent activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts. A 97-99% efficiency of spent activated carbon catalytic regeneration was achieved under chosen conditions after 15-20 min of reaction. The process may be also considered as cold in situ recovery of active carbon.

  6. Attitudinal Determinants of Local Public Health Workers' Participation in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Activities.

    PubMed

    Errett, Nicole A; Egan, Shannon; Garrity, Stephanie; Rutkow, Lainie; Walsh, Lauren; Thompson, Carol B; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Altman, Brian; Schor, Kenneth; Barnett, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Local health departments play a critical role in short-, intermediate-, and long-term recovery activities after a public health emergency. However, research has not explored attitudinal determinants of health department workers' participation in the recovery phase following a disaster. Accordingly, this qualitative investigation aims to understand perceived facilitators and barriers to performing recovery-related activities following Hurricane Sandy among local health department workers. In January 2014, 2 focus groups were conducted in geographically representative clusters of local health departments affected by Hurricane Sandy (1 cluster in Maryland and 1 cluster in New Jersey). Focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to qualitatively assess attitudes toward Hurricane Sandy recovery activities. This analysis identified 5 major thematic categories as facilitators and barriers to participation in recovery activities: training, safety, family preparedness, policies and planning, and efficacy. Systems that support engagement of health department personnel in recovery activities may endeavor to develop and communicate intra- and interjurisdictional policies that minimize barriers in these areas. Development and implementation of evidence-informed curricular interventions that explain recovery roles may also increase local health department worker motivation to participate in recovery activities.

  7. Effect of process conditions on recovery of protein activity after freezing and freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Nail, S L

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this research was to gain a better understanding of the degree to which recovery of activity of model proteins after freeze-drying can be maximized by manipulation of freeze-dry process conditions in the absence of protective solutes. Catalase, beta-galactosidase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were used as model proteins. All of the three proteins exhibited a concentration-dependent loss of activity after freezing, with significantly higher recovery at higher concentration. The freezing method and the type of buffer were also important, with sodium phosphate buffer and freezing by immersion of vials in liquid nitrogen associated with the lowest recovery of activity. Differential scanning calorimetry was predictive of the onset of collapse during freeze-drying only for beta-galactosidase. For the other proteins, either no Tg' transition was observed, or the apparent glass transition did not correlate with the microscopically-observed collapse temperature. The time course of activity loss for beta-galactosidase and LDH was compared during freeze-drying under conditions which produced collapse of the dried matrix and conditions which produced retention of microstructure in the dried solid. Recovery of activity decreased continuously during primary drying, with no sharp drop in recovery of activity associated with the onset of collapse. The most important drying process variable affecting recovery of activity was residual moisture level, with a dramatic drop in activity recovery associated with residual moisture levels less than about 10%.

  8. Recovery of Hypersomnia Concurrent With Recovery of an Injured Ascending Reticular Activating System in a Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Han Do; Chang, Chul Hoon; Jung, Young Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report on a stroke patient who showed recovery of hypersomnia concurrent with the recovery of an injured ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), which was demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). A 70-year-old female patient underwent coiling of the left ruptured posterior communicating artery after subarachnoid hemorrhage and both extraventricular drainage for management of an intraventricular hemorrhage. At 2 months after onset, when she started rehabilitation, she exhibited intact consciousness, with the full score on the Glasgow Coma Scale: 15. However, she showed severe hypersomnia: she always fell asleep without external stimulation and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (EPS) score was 24 (full score: 24, cut off for hypersomnia: 10). She underwent comprehensive rehabilitative therapy, including neurotropic drugs, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Her hypersomnia has shown improvement as 14 (3 months after onset), 11 (4 months after onset), 7 (12 months after onset), and 6 (24 months after onset), respectively. On 2-month DTT, narrowing of both lower dorsal and ventral ARASs was observed on both sides: in particular, among 4 neural tracts of the lower ARAS, the right lower ventral ARAS was the narrowest. By contrast, on 24-month DTT, the 4 narrowed neural tracts of both lower dorsal and ventral ARASs were thickened compared with those of 2-month DTT. Recovery of hypersomnia with recovery of an injured lower ARAS on DTT was observed in a stroke patient. Our results suggest that evaluation of the lower ARAS using DTT might be useful for stroke patients with hypersomnia. PMID:26765455

  9. Effects of active recovery on autonomic and haemodynamic responses after aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Soares, Antonio H G; Oliveira, Tiago P; Cavalcante, Bruno R; Farah, Breno Q; Lima, Aluísio H R A; Cucato, Gabriel G; Cardoso, Crivaldo G; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of active recovery on autonomic and haemodynamic responses after exercise in healthy adults. Nineteen healthy young male individuals underwent two experimental sessions: exercise with active recovery (AR) and exercise with passive recovery (PR). The exercise sessions comprised three phases: warm-up (5 min), exercise phase (cycle ergometer, 30 min, intensity between 60 and 70% of the heart rate reserve) and recovery (5 min). In the AR, the subjects remained cycling in the recovery phase at intensity between 30% and 35% of heart rate reserve, while in the PR, the subjects stopped the exercise after finishing the exercise phase. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and over the 30 min after the interventions. There were no differences for systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate and rate pressure product between active and passive recovery sessions. Also, all heart rate variability parameters changed similarly after exercise with passive or active recovery sessions. In summary, exercise with active recovery does not affect the autonomic and haemodynamic responses after moderate-intensity aerobic exercise in healthy young male individuals.

  10. Effectiveness of active versus passive recovery strategies after futsal games.

    PubMed

    Tessitore, Antonio; Meeusen, Romain; Pagano, Rita; Benvenuti, Cinzia; Tiberi, Monica; Capranica, Laura

    2008-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of immediate postgame recovery interventions (seated rest, supine electrostimulation, low-intensity land exercises, and water exercises) on anaerobic performance (countermovement jump [CMJ], bounce jumping, 10-m sprint), hormones (salivary cortisol, urinary catecholamines), and subjective ratings (rate of perceived exertion [RPE], leg muscle pain, Questionnaire of Recovery Stress for Athletes [RestQ Sport], 10-point Likert scale), and hours of sleep of futsal players. Heart rate (HR), blood lactate, and RPE were used to evaluate the intensity of 4 futsal games in 10 players using a crossover design (P < 0.05), randomly allocating athletes to 1 of the 4 recovery interventions at the end of each game. No significant difference emerged between HR, blood lactate, RPE, and level of hydration of the games. A significant difference (P < 0.001) between games emerged for total urinary catecholamines, with an increase from the first to the second game and a gradual reduction up to the fourth game. After the game, significant reductions in CMJ (P < 0.001) and 10-m sprints (P < 0.05) emerged. No significant difference was found between recovery interventions for anaerobic performances, hormones, muscle pain, and RestQ Sport. Even though a well-balanced diet, rehydration, and controlled lifestyle might represent a sufficient recovery intervention in young elite athletes, the players perceived significantly increased benefit (P < 0.01) from the electrostimulation (7.8 +/- 1.4 points) and water exercises (7.6 +/- 2.1 points) compared to dry exercises (6.6 +/- 1.8 points) and seated rest (5.2 +/- 0.8 points.), which might improve their attitude toward playing. To induce progressive hormonal adaptation to the high exercise load of multiple games, in the last 2 weeks of the preseason, coaches should organize friendly games at a level similar to that of the competitive season.

  11. Effect of Two Types of Active Recovery on Fatigue and Climbing Performance.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Pedro L; de la Villa, Pedro; Ferragut, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    Performing intra-session recovery is important in rock climbing due to the multiple efforts that climbers are required to make in competitions, as well as repeated climbing trials that they carry out during training sessions. Active recovery has been shown to be a better option than passive recovery. However, the type of active recovery that should be done and the influence of the type and quantity of muscle mass activated are not clear. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of recovering with easy climbing (CR) or walking (WR) on markers of fatigue and climbing performance. For this purpose, 14 subjects participated in this randomly assigned crossover protocol completing three two-minute climbing trials separated by two minutes of active recovery with the assigned method. Seven days later participants carried out the same protocol with the other recovery method. Blood lactate (La(-)), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and heart rate (HR) were analyzed as markers of fatigue and recovery, while meters climbed (MC) and handgrip force (HF) were analyzed for performance. La- values before the last climbing trial (p < 0.05; d = 0.69) and Peak La- values (p < 0.05; d = 0.77) were lower for CR than for WR. Climbers were able to ascend more meters in the set time when following the CR protocol (p < 0.01; d = 0.6), which shows the important role of the active recovery method carried out on climbing performance. There were no differences in HR, HF or RPE between protocols. A more sport-specific recovery protocol, in addition to moving great muscle mass (e.g. lower limbs), seems to enhance recovery and to facilitate lactate removal. For this reason, CR appears to be a more effective active recovery method than WR in sport rock climbing. Key pointsClimbing recovery improved lactate removal in comparison with walking recovery.Subjects were able to climb more meters in a determined time when easy climbing instead of walking during recoveries.Activating both great

  12. Effect of Two Types of Active Recovery on Fatigue and Climbing Performance

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Pedro L.; de la Villa, Pedro; Ferragut, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Performing intra-session recovery is important in rock climbing due to the multiple efforts that climbers are required to make in competitions, as well as repeated climbing trials that they carry out during training sessions. Active recovery has been shown to be a better option than passive recovery. However, the type of active recovery that should be done and the influence of the type and quantity of muscle mass activated are not clear. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of recovering with easy climbing (CR) or walking (WR) on markers of fatigue and climbing performance. For this purpose, 14 subjects participated in this randomly assigned crossover protocol completing three two-minute climbing trials separated by two minutes of active recovery with the assigned method. Seven days later participants carried out the same protocol with the other recovery method. Blood lactate (La-), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and heart rate (HR) were analyzed as markers of fatigue and recovery, while meters climbed (MC) and handgrip force (HF) were analyzed for performance. La- values before the last climbing trial (p < 0.05; d = 0.69) and Peak La- values (p < 0.05; d = 0.77) were lower for CR than for WR. Climbers were able to ascend more meters in the set time when following the CR protocol (p < 0.01; d = 0.6), which shows the important role of the active recovery method carried out on climbing performance. There were no differences in HR, HF or RPE between protocols. A more sport-specific recovery protocol, in addition to moving great muscle mass (e.g. lower limbs), seems to enhance recovery and to facilitate lactate removal. For this reason, CR appears to be a more effective active recovery method than WR in sport rock climbing. Key points Climbing recovery improved lactate removal in comparison with walking recovery. Subjects were able to climb more meters in a determined time when easy climbing instead of walking during recoveries. Activating both great

  13. Embedding a Recovery Orientation into Neuroscience Research: Involving People with a Lived Experience in Research Activity.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Anthony; Brophy, Lisa; Castle, David; Harvey, Carol; Robertson, Joanne; Corlett, Philip; Davidson, Larry; Everall, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the importance and value of involving people with a lived experience of mental ill health and recovery in neuroscience research activity. In this era of recovery oriented service delivery, involving people with the lived experience of mental illness in neuroscience research extends beyond their participation as "subjects". The recovery paradigm reconceptualises people with the lived experience of mental ill health as experts by experience. To support this contribution, local policies and procedures, recovery-oriented training for neuroscience researchers, and dialogue about the practical applications of neuroscience research, are required.

  14. Activated desorption at heterogeneous interfaces and long-time kinetics of hydrocarbon recovery from nanoporous media

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas; Bocquet, Lydéric; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon recovery from unconventional reservoirs (shale gas) is debated due to its environmental impact and uncertainties on its predictability. But a lack of scientific knowledge impedes the proposal of reliable alternatives. The requirement of hydrofracking, fast recovery decay and ultra-low permeability—inherent to their nanoporosity—are specificities of these reservoirs, which challenge existing frameworks. Here we use molecular simulation and statistical models to show that recovery is hampered by interfacial effects at the wet kerogen surface. Recovery is shown to be thermally activated with an energy barrier modelled from the interface wetting properties. We build a statistical model of the recovery kinetics with a two-regime decline that is consistent with published data: a short time decay, consistent with Darcy description, followed by a fast algebraic decay resulting from increasingly unreachable energy barriers. Replacing water by CO2 or propane eliminates the barriers, therefore raising hopes for clean/efficient recovery. PMID:27327254

  15. Activated desorption at heterogeneous interfaces and long-time kinetics of hydrocarbon recovery from nanoporous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Thomas; Bocquet, Lydéric; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-06-01

    Hydrocarbon recovery from unconventional reservoirs (shale gas) is debated due to its environmental impact and uncertainties on its predictability. But a lack of scientific knowledge impedes the proposal of reliable alternatives. The requirement of hydrofracking, fast recovery decay and ultra-low permeability--inherent to their nanoporosity--are specificities of these reservoirs, which challenge existing frameworks. Here we use molecular simulation and statistical models to show that recovery is hampered by interfacial effects at the wet kerogen surface. Recovery is shown to be thermally activated with an energy barrier modelled from the interface wetting properties. We build a statistical model of the recovery kinetics with a two-regime decline that is consistent with published data: a short time decay, consistent with Darcy description, followed by a fast algebraic decay resulting from increasingly unreachable energy barriers. Replacing water by CO2 or propane eliminates the barriers, therefore raising hopes for clean/efficient recovery.

  16. Active crustal extension in the Central Apennines (Italy) inferred from GPS measurements in the interval 1994-1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, N.; Giuliani, R.; Mattone, M.; Bonci, L.

    We present the first GPS estimate of crustal extension in the central Apennines (Italy) through the analysis of the deformation of a sub-network of the National GPS Geodetic network IGM95 in the interval 1994-1999. The selected sub-network spans the entire active deformation belt perpendicularly to its axis and allows the evaluation of (1) the total extension rate absorbed in this sector of the Apennines and (2) the seismogenic potential of the normal faults active in the Late Pleistocene-Holocene interval within the network. Results of this reoccupation are consistent with an extensional strain rate of 0.18 × 10-6 yr-1 concentrated in an area of about 35 km width, giving an average extension rate of 6±2 mm/yr across the central Apennines. The pattern of active deformation suggests active elastic strain accumulation on the westernmost of the two fault systems active in the Late Pleistocene-Holocene interval and may also suggest the presence of another active fault system not recognized so far.

  17. Production of cloned dogs by decreasing the interval between fusion and activation during somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue; Park, Sun Woo; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Eugine; Kim, Yeun Wook; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2009-05-01

    To improve the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in dogs, we evaluated whether or not the interval between fusion and activation affects the success rate of SCNT. Oocytes retrieved from outbred dogs were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a male or female Golden Retriever. In total, 151 and 225 reconstructed oocytes were transferred to 9 and 14 naturally synchronized surrogates for male and female donor cells, respectively. Chromosomal morphology was evaluated in 12 oocytes held for an interval of 2 hr between fusion and activation and 14 oocytes held for an interval of 4 hr. Three hundred seventy-six and 288 embryos were transferred to 23 and 16 surrogates for the 2 and 4 hr interval groups, respectively. Both the male (two pregnant surrogates gave birth to three puppies) and female (one pregnant surrogate gave birth to one puppy) donor cells gave birth to live puppies (P > 0.05). In the 2 hr group, significantly more reconstructed oocytes showed condensed, metaphase-like chromosomes compared to the 4 hr group (P < 0.05). A significantly higher pregnancy rate and a greater number of live born puppies were observed in the 2 hr group (13.0% and 1.1%, respectively) compared to the 4 hr group (0%) (P < 0.05). In total, three surrogate dogs carried pregnancies to term and four puppies were born. These results demonstrate that decreasing the interval between fusion and activation increases the success rate of clone production and pregnancy. These results may increase the overall efficiency of SCNT in the canine family.

  18. Frequency of slow oscillations in arterial pressure and R-R intervals during muscle metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Tiinanen, Suvi; Hautala, Arto J; Seppänen, Tapio; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Huikuri, Heikki V; Tulppo, Mikko P

    2010-01-15

    Altered frequency of slow (0.04-0.15Hz) arterial pressure and R-R interval oscillations has been observed in various diseases but the mechanisms for this frequency shift are unclear. The median (Med) frequencies of slow R-R interval and blood pressure (BP) oscillations were recorded in 11 healthy subjects with paced breathing (0.25Hz) during muscle metaboreflex and baroreflex mediated sympathetic stimuli: 1) handgrip exercise (HG) followed by post-exercise circulatory occlusion (PECO), 2) handgrip exercise during ischemia by circulatory occlusion (IHG) and 3) passive head-up tilt (TILT). Med(BP) shifted to the higher frequency during HG, PECO and IHG (from 0.070+/-0.009Hz to 0.088+/-0.013, 0.085+/-0.015 and 0.099+/-0.013Hz, respectively, p<0.01 for all) but not during TILT (0.078+/-0.012Hz). Similarly, Med(R-R) shifted to the higher frequency during HG, PECO and IHG (from 0.072+/-0.009Hz to 0.085+/-0.014, 0.085+/-0.016 and 0.095+/-0.015Hz, respectively, p<0.01 for all) but not during TILT (0.075+/-0.012Hz). Med(BP) and Med(R-R) were higher during IHG compared to HG and lower during TILT compared to both HG and IHG (p<0.01 for all). We conclude that the sympathetic stimulus induced by muscle metaboreflex is an important mechanism increasing the frequency of slow oscillations in arterial pressure and R-R intervals. The present results give new insight to understand the physiology underlying the frequency of slow arterial pressure and R-R interval oscillations.

  19. Effect of passive and active recovery on the resynthesis of muscle glycogen.

    PubMed

    Choi, D; Cole, K J; Goodpaster, B H; Fink, W J; Costill, D L

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of passive and active recovery on the resynthesis of muscle glycogen after high-intensity cycle ergometer exercise in untrained subjects. In a cross-over design, six college-aged males performed three, 1-min exercise bouts at approximately 130% VO2max with a 4-min rest period between each work bout. The exercise protocol for each trial was identical, while the recovery following exercise was either active (30 min at 40-50% VO2max, 30-min seated rest) or passive (60-min seated rest). Initial muscle glycogen values averaged 144.2 +/- 3.8 mmol.kg-1 w.w. for the active trial and 158.7 +/- 8.0 mmol.kg-1 w.w. for the passive trial. Corresponding immediate postexercise glycogen contents were 97.7 +/- 5.4 and 106.8 +/- 4.7 mmol.kg-1 w.w., respectively. These differences between treatments were not significant. However, mean muscle glycogen after 60 min of passive recovery increased 15.0 +/- 4.9 mmol.kg-1 w.w., whereas it decreased 6.3 +/- 3.7 mmol.kg-1 w.w. following the 60 min active recovery protocol (P < 0.05). Also, the decrease in blood lactate concentration during active recovery was greater than during passive recovery and significantly different at 10 and 30 min of the recovery period (P < 0.05). These data suggest that the use of passive recovery following intense exercise results in a greater amount of muscle glycogen resynthesis than active recovery over the same duration.

  20. Heart rate recovery and heart rate variability are unchanged in patients with coronary artery disease following 12 weeks of high-intensity interval and moderate-intensity endurance exercise training.

    PubMed

    Currie, Katharine D; Rosen, Lee M; Millar, Philip J; McKelvie, Robert S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2013-06-01

    Decreased heart rate variability and attenuated heart rate recovery following exercise are associated with an increased risk of mortality in cardiac patients. This study investigated the effects of 12 weeks of moderate-intensity endurance exercise (END) and a novel low-volume high-intensity interval exercise protocol (HIT) on measures of heart rate recovery and heart rate variability in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Fourteen males with CAD participated in 12 weeks of END or HIT training, each consisting of 2 supervised exercise sessions per week. END consisted of 30-50 min of continuous cycling at 60% peak power output (PPO). HIT involved ten 1-min intervals at 88% PPO separated by 1-min intervals at 10% PPO. Heart rate recovery at 1 min and 2 min was measured before and after training (pre- and post-training, respectively) using a submaximal exercise bout. Resting time and spectral and nonlinear domain measures of heart rate variability were calculated. Following 12 weeks of END and HIT, there was no change in heart rate recovery at 1 min (END, 40 ± 12 beats·min(-1) vs. 37 ± 19 beats·min(-1); HIT, 31 ± 8 beats·min(-1) vs. 35 ± 8 beats·min(-1); p ≥ 0.05 for pre- vs. post-training) or 2 min (END, 44 ± 18 beats·min(-1) vs. 43 ± 19 beats·min(-1); HIT, 42 ± 10 beats·min(-1) vs. 50 ± 6 beats·min(-1); p ≥ 0.05 for pre- vs. post-training). All heart rate variability indices were unchanged following END and HIT training. In conclusion, neither END nor HIT exercise programs elicited training-induced improvements in cardiac autonomic function in patients with CAD. The absence of improvements with training may be attributed to the optimal medical management and normative pretraining state of our sample.

  1. The effect of high intensity interval exercise on postprandial triacylglycerol and leukocyte activation--monitored for 48 h post exercise.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Brendan Morris; Pugh, Jamie; Pruneta-Deloche, Valerie; Moulin, Philippe; Ratkevicius, Aivaras; Gray, Stuart Robert

    2013-01-01

    Postprandial phenomenon are thought to contribute to atherogenesis alongside activation of the immune system. A single bout of high intensity interval exercise attenuates postprandial triacylglycerol (TG), although the longevity and mechanisms underlying this observation are unknown. The aims of this study were to determine whether this attenuation in postprandial TG remained 2 days after high intensity interval exercise, to monitor markers of leukocyte activation and investigate the underlying mechanisms. Eight young men each completed two three day trials. On day 1: subjects rested (Control) or performed 5 x 30 s maximal sprints (high intensity interval exercise). On day 2 and 3 subjects consumed high fat meals for breakfast and 3 h later for lunch. Blood samples were taken at various times and analysed for TG, glucose and TG-rich lipoprotein (TRL)-bound LPL-dependent TRL-TG hydrolysis (LTTH). Flow cytometry was used to evaluate granulocyte, monocyte and lymphocyte CD11b and CD36 expression. On day 2 after high intensity interval exercise TG area under the curve was lower (P<0.05) (7.46 ± 1.53 mmol/l/7h) compared to the control trial (9.47 ± 3 .04 mmol/l/7h) with no differences during day 3 of the trial. LTTH activity was higher (P<0.05) after high intensity interval exercise, at 2 hours of day 2, compared to control. Granulocyte, monocyte and lymphocyte CD11b expression increased with time over day 2 and 3 of the study (P<0.0001). Lymphocyte and monocyte CD36 expression decreased with time over day 2 and 3 (P<0.05). There were no differences between trials in CD11b and CD36 expression on any leukocytes. A single session of high intensity interval exercise attenuated postprandial TG on day 2 of the study, with this effect abolished by day 3.The reduction in postprandial TG was associated with an increase in LTTH. High intensity interval exercise had no effect on postprandial responses of CD11b or CD36.

  2. Antibodies with beta-adrenergic activity from chronic chagasic patients modulate the QT interval and M cell action potential duration

    PubMed Central

    Medei, Emiliano Horacio; Nascimento, José H.M.; Pedrosa, Roberto C.; Barcellos, Luciane; Masuda, Masako O.; Sicouri, Serge; Elizari, Marcelo V.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.

    2009-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to investigate whether the sera from chronic chagasic patients (CChPs) with beta-1 adrenergic activity (Ab-β) can modulate ventricular repolarization. Beta-adrenergic activity has been described in CChP. It increases the L-type calcium current and heart rate in isolated hearts, but its effects on ventricular repolarization has not been described. Methods and results In isolated rabbit hearts, under pacing condition, QT interval was measured under Ab-β perfusion. Beta-adrenergic activity was also tested in guinea pig ventricular M cells. Furthermore, the immunoglobulin fraction (IgG-β) of the Ab-β was tested on Ito, ICa, and Iks currents in rat, rabbit, and guinea pig myocytes, respectively. Beta-adrenergic activity shortened the QT interval. This effect was abolished in the presence of propranolol. In addition, sera from CChP without beta-adrenergic activity (Ab-β) did not modulate QT interval. The M cell action potential duration (APD) was reversibly shortened by Ab-β. Atenolol inhibited this effect of Ab-β, and Ab- did not modulate the AP of M cells. Ito was not modulated by isoproterenol nor by IgG-β. However, IgG-β increased ICa and IKs. Conclusion The shortening of the QT interval and APD in M cells and the increase of IKs and ICa induced by IgG-β contribute to repolarization changes that may trigger malignant ventricular arrhythmias observed in patients with chronic chagasic or idiopathic cardiomyopathy. PMID:18515284

  3. The Effect of a Dairy-Based Recovery Beverage on Post-Exercise Appetite and Energy Intake in Active Females

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meghan A.; Green, Benjamin P.; James, Lewis J.; Stevenson, Emma J.; Rumbold, Penny L. S.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of a dairy-based recovery beverage on post-exercise appetite and energy intake in active females. Thirteen active females completed three trials in a crossover design. Participants completed 60 min of cycling at 65% V̇O2peak, before a 120 min recovery period. On completion of cycling, participants consumed a commercially available dairy-based beverage (DBB), a commercially available carbohydrate beverage (CHO), or a water control (H2O). Non-esterified fatty acids, glucose, and appetite-related peptides alongside measures of subjective appetite were sampled at baseline and at 30 min intervals during recovery. At 120 min, energy intake was assessed in the laboratory by ad libitum assessment, and in the free-living environment by weighed food record for the remainder of the study day. Energy intake at the ad libitum lunch was lower after DBB compared to H2O (4.43 ± 0.20, 5.58 ± 0.41 MJ, respectively; p = 0.046; (95% CI: −2.28, −0.20 MJ)), but was not different to CHO (5.21 ± 0.46 MJ), with no difference between trials thereafter. Insulin and GLP-17-36 were higher following DBB compared to H2O (p = 0.015 and p = 0.001, respectively) but not to CHO (p = 1.00 and p = 0.146, respectively). In addition, glucagon was higher following DBB compared to CHO (p = 0.008) but not to H2O (p = 0.074). The results demonstrate that where DBB consumption may manifest in accelerated recovery, this may be possible without significantly affecting total energy intake and subsequent appetite-related responses relative to a CHO beverage. PMID:27338460

  4. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for data frac'' stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  6. Classroom-based high-intensity interval activity improves off-task behaviour in primary school students.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jasmin K; Le Mare, Lucy; Gurd, Brendon J

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the effects of an acute bout of brief, high-intensity interval exercise on off-task classroom behaviour in primary school students. A grade 4 class (n = 24) and a grade 2 class (n = 20) were exposed to either a no-activity break or an active break that consisted of "FUNtervals", a high-intensity interval protocol, on alternating days for 3 weeks. No-activity days consisted of a 10-min inactive break while FUNterval days consisted of a 4-min FUNterval completed within a 10-min break from regular class activities. Off-task behaviour was observed for 50 min after each no-activity/FUNterval break, with the amount of time students spent off-task (motor, passive, and verbal behaviour) being recorded. When comparing no-activity breaks with FUNtervals the grade 4 class demonstrated reductions in both passive (no activity = 29% ± 13% vs. FUNterval = 25% ± 13%, p < 0.05, effect size (ES) = 0.31) and motor (no activity = 31% ± 16% vs. FUNterval = 24% ± 13%, p < 0.01, ES = 0.48) off-task behaviour following FUNtervals. Similarly, in the grade 2 class, passive (no activity = 23% ± 14% vs. FUNterval = 14% ± 10%, p < 0.01, ES = 0.74), verbal (no activity = 8% ± 8% vs. FUNterval = 5% ± 5%, p < 0.05, ES = 0.45), and motor (no activity = 29% ± 17% vs. FUNterval = 14% ± 10%, p < 0.01, ES = 1.076) off-task behaviours were reduced following FUNtervals. In both classrooms the effects of physical activity were greatest in those students demonstrating the highest rates of off-task behaviour on no-activity days. These data demonstrate that very brief high-intensity bouts of exercise can improve off-task behaviour in grade 2 and 4 students, particularly in students with high rates of such behaviour.

  7. Progress toward motor recovery with active neuromuscular stimulation: muscle activation pattern evidence after a stroke.

    PubMed

    Cauraugh, James H; Kim, Sangbum

    2003-03-15

    Chronic cerebrovascular accident individuals with partial paralysis in an upper extremity typically demonstrate difficulty in voluntarily controlling movement initiation. This study investigated patterns of electromyogram (EMG) activation levels while stroke subjects voluntarily initiated their impaired wrist and finger extensor muscles. Twenty subjects were randomly assigned to either a unilateral movement/stimulation group or a bilateral movement/stimulation group. Participants completed 4 days (6 h over 2 weeks) of active neuromuscular stimulation (i.e., 5 s/trial, 90 trials/day, biphasic waveform) on the wrist and finger extensors according to group assignments. The EMG activation levels were analyzed with a three-factor mixed design Motor recovery protocol x Session block x Trial block (2 x 2 x 3) ANOVA with repeated measures on the second and third factors. This robust analysis revealed higher EMG activation levels for the coupled bilateral movement/stimulation group than the unilateral movement/stimulation group. In addition, higher muscle activation levels were found for the second session block as well as trial blocks 2 and 3. Overall, these findings indicated improved motor capabilities of the impaired muscles as evidenced by the higher voluntary EMG activation levels.

  8. The Effect of Active Recovery on Power Performance During the Bench Press Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Felipe A. S.; Panissa, Valéria L. G.; Julio, Ursula F.; Menegon, Elton M.; Franchini, Emerson

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to verify the effect of active and passive recovery on blood lactate concentration and power performance. Twelve male subjects were submitted to a maximal strength test in the the bench press, a maximal aerobic test in the bench step, and to four sets of bench press exercise performed as fast and as long as possible, using 80% of maximal strength when active or passive recovery was performed. The maximum number of repetitions, mean and peak power in eccentric and concentric phases were computed and blood lactate concentration was measured. Comparisons for the variables were made using a two-way variance analysis (recovery type and set numer) with repeated measures in the second factor. When significant differences were detected (p < 0.05), a Tukey post-hoc test was used. There was a main effect of set number on maximum number of repetitions (p < 0.05) (1 > 2, 3, and 4; 2 > 3 and 4; 3 > 4). Mean and peak power in both eccentric and concentric phases also differed across sets (1 > 2, 3, and 4; 2 > 4). There was also a main effect for the recovery type, with lower values (p < 0.05) observed for the active recovery compared to the passive one. It can be concluded that active recovery resulted in lower lactate concentration, but did not improve power performance in the bench press exercise. PMID:25031684

  9. Recovery of proteolytic and collagenolytic activities from viscera by-products of rayfish (Raja clavata).

    PubMed

    Murado, Miguel Anxo; González, María del Pilar; Vázquez, José Antonio

    2009-12-15

    The aim of this work was to study the recovery of proteolytic and collagenolytic activities from rayfish (Raja clavata) viscera wastes. Initially, different parts of the gastrointestinal tract by-products (stomach, duodenum section including pancreas, final intestine) were evaluated. The extracts from proximal intestine yielded the highest values of both enzymatic activities. Optimal conditions for protease activity quantification were established at pH = 6, T = 40 degrees C and incubation time < or =20 min. The mathematical equation used to model the joint effect of pH and temperature led to maximum activity at pH = 8.66 and 59.4 degrees C, respectively. Overcooled acetone was found to be best option for recovery of enzymatic activities in comparison with ethanol, PEG-4000, ammonium sulphate and ultrafiltration system. Finally, a simple and systematic protocol of partial purification and total recovery of proteases and collagenases was defined.

  10. Recovery of Proteolytic and Collagenolytic Activities from Viscera By-products of Rayfish (Raja clavata)

    PubMed Central

    Murado, Miguel Anxo; del Pilar González, María; Vázquez, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the recovery of proteolytic and collagenolytic activities from rayfish (Raja clavata) viscera wastes. Initially, different parts of the gastrointestinal tract by-products (stomach, duodenum section including pancreas, final intestine) were evaluated. The extracts from proximal intestine yielded the highest values of both enzymatic activities. Optimal conditions for protease activity quantification were established at pH = 6, T = 40 °C and incubation time ≤20 min. The mathematical equation used to model the joint effect of pH and temperature led to maximum activity at pH = 8.66 and 59.4 °C, respectively. Overcooled acetone was found to be best option for recovery of enzymatic activities in comparison with ethanol, PEG-4000, ammonium sulphate and ultrafiltration system. Finally, a simple and systematic protocol of partial purification and total recovery of proteases and collagenases was defined. PMID:20098611

  11. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  12. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  13. Interval Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... before trying any type of interval training. Recent studies suggest, however, that interval training can be used safely for short periods even in individuals with heart disease. Also keep the risk of overuse injury in mind. If you rush into a strenuous workout before ...

  14. [Activation-dependent characteristics of the electroencephalogram during visual information--processing: Results of an automatic interval analysis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bastek, R; Gille, H G; Gruner, P; Otto, E; Ullsperger, P

    1976-01-01

    EEG signal from fronto-occipital derivation was recorded in 16 Ss during a mental performance test (modified "Konzentrations-Leistungs-Test" including four levels of performance). A balanced changer-over design was used. Interval histograms in four frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta-1 and beta-2 bands) were determined on the basis of peak detection. A total of 44 characteristics were derived and tested (multi-factor analyses of variance, multiple mean comparison and rank tests). Twenty eight of these characteristics were proved to be dependent on activation. In the visual information-processing performances chosen, it could be demonstrated that the intraindividual changes of the spontaneous EEG activity were related predominantly to the perceptual components of the performance. On the other hand, the influence of the performance rate and of the mental-arithmetic itself was of minor relevance. During higher activation an increase in the relative abudance of the theta-band activity was also observed.

  15. Limited recovery of soil microbial activity after transient exposure to gasoline vapors.

    PubMed

    Modrzyński, Jakub J; Christensen, Jan H; Mayer, Philipp; Brandt, Kristian K

    2016-09-01

    During gasoline spills complex mixtures of toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released to terrestrial environments. Gasoline VOCs exert baseline toxicity (narcosis) and may thus broadly affect soil biota. We assessed the functional resilience (i.e. resistance and recovery of microbial functions) in soil microbial communities transiently exposed to gasoline vapors by passive dosing via headspace for 40 days followed by a recovery phase of 84 days. Chemical exposure was characterized with GC-MS, whereas microbial activity was monitored as soil respiration (CO2 release) and soil bacterial growth ([(3)H]leucine incorporation). Microbial activity was strongly stimulated and inhibited at low and high exposure levels, respectively. Microbial growth efficiency decreased with increasing exposure, but rebounded during the recovery phase for low-dose treatments. Although benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) concentrations decreased by 83-97% during the recovery phase, microbial activity in high-dose treatments did not recover and numbers of viable bacteria were 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than in control soil. Re-inoculation with active soil microorganisms failed to restore microbial activity indicating residual soil toxicity, which could not be attributed to BTEX, but rather to mixture toxicity of more persistent gasoline constituents or degradation products. Our results indicate a limited potential for functional recovery of soil microbial communities after transient exposure to high, but environmentally relevant, levels of gasoline VOCs which therefore may compromise ecosystem services provided by microorganisms even after extensive soil VOC dissipation.

  16. Activated Charcoal—A Potential Material in Glucoamylase Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kareem, S. O.; Akpan, I.; Popoola, T. O. S.; Sanni, L. O.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of activated charcoal in the purification of fungal glucoamylase was investigated. Various concentrations of activated charcoal (1–4% w/v) were used to concentrate crude glucoamylase from Rhizopus oligosporus at different temperature values (30–50°C). Effects of pH (3.0–6.0) and contact time (0–60 min) on enzyme purification were also monitored. Activated charcoal (3% w/v) gave a 16-fold purification in a single-step purification at 50°C for 20 min and pH 5.5. The result of SDS-PAGE analysis of purified glucoamylase showed two major protein bands with corresponding molecular weight of 36 kDa and 50 kDa. The method is inexpensive, rapid, and simple which could facilitate downstream processing of industrial enzyme. PMID:22235364

  17. Give me a better break: Choosing workday break activities to maximize resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emily M; Wu, Cindy

    2016-02-01

    Surprisingly little research investigates employee breaks at work, and even less research provides prescriptive suggestions for better workday breaks in terms of when, where, and how break activities are most beneficial. Based on the effort-recovery model and using experience sampling methodology, we examined the characteristics of employee workday breaks with 95 employees across 5 workdays. In addition, we examined resources as a mediator between break characteristics and well-being. Multilevel analysis results indicated that activities that were preferred and earlier in the work shift related to more resource recovery following the break. We also found that resources mediated the influence of preferred break activities and time of break on health symptoms and that resource recovery benefited person-level outcomes of emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, and organizational citizenship behavior. Finally, break length interacted with the number of breaks per day such that longer breaks and frequent short breaks were associated with more resources than infrequent short breaks.

  18. Over-optimistic patient expectations of recovery and leisure activities after arthroscopic meniscus surgery.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Kenneth; Roos, Ewa M; Nissen, Nis; JøRgensen, Uffe; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - Patients' expectations of outcomes following arthroscopic meniscus surgery are largely unknown. We investigated patients' expectations concerning recovery and participation in leisure-time activities after arthroscopic meniscus surgery and the postoperative fulfillment of these. Patients and methods - The study sample consisted of 491 consecutively recruited patients (mean age 50 (SD 13) years, 55% men) who were assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus injury and later verified by arthroscopy. Before surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding their expectations of recovery time and postoperative participation in leisure activities. 3 months after surgery, the patients completed questionnaires on their actual level of leisure activity and their degree of satisfaction with their current knee function. We analyzed differences between the expected outcome and the actual outcome, and between fulfilled/exceeded expectations and satisfaction with knee function. Results - 478 patients (97%) completed the follow-up. 91% had expected to be fully recovered within 3 months. We found differences between patients' preoperative expectations of participation in leisure activities postoperatively and their actual participation in these, with 59% having unfulfilled expectations (p < 0.001). Satisfaction with current knee function was associated with expectations of leisure activities being fulfilled/exceeded. Interpretation - In general, patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscus surgery were too optimistic regarding their recovery time and postoperative participation in leisure activities. This highlights the need for shared decision making which should include giving the patient information on realistic expectations of recovery time and regarding participation in leisure-time activities after meniscal surgery.

  19. Using Physical Activity for Emotional Recovery after a Natural Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl-Alexander, Zachary; Sinelnikov, Oleg A.

    2013-01-01

    After traumatic events, such as a natural disaster, children who are directly or indirectly affected by the event often have a number of intense emotional reactions. It is important for educators to understand common emotional and psychological responses to disastrous events and to try to help. This article describes a physical activity program…

  20. Recovery of Alkylation Activity in Deactivated USY Catalyst Using Supercritical Fluids: A Comparison of Light Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Thompson; Kyle C. Burch

    2004-05-01

    Off-line, in-situ alkylation activity recovery from a completely deactivated solid acid catalyst was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical fluids (SCF). A USY zeolite catalyst was initially deactivated during the liquid phase alkylation of butene with isobutane in a single-pass reactor and then varying amounts of alkylation activity were recovered by passing supercritical fluids over the catalyst bed. A comparison of reactivation fluids on catalyst activity recovery is reported. Fluids examined included helium, propane, n-butane, isobutane, n-pentane, and isopentane. Phases studied included gas, liquid, and supercritical. As much as 82% of the fresh catalyst activity was recovered when employing supercritical isobutane. The ability of the fluid to facilitate a hydride reaction with the adsorbed deactivating high-molecular weight carbocations was indicated as an important property necessary to attain high levels of catalyst activity recovery. Activity recovery utilizing supercritical fluids that enhance reactivation by both reacting with and desorbing fouling compounds appears to be a promising technique to advance solid catalyst alkylation.

  1. Functional activation studies of word processing in the recovery from aphasia.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Roland; Schwarz, Michael; Huber, Walter

    2006-06-01

    Some reviews on theories of recovery in aphasia put an emphasis on neural network models based on empirical data from evoked-potentials in aphasia as an approach to mapping recovery of cognitive function to neural structure. We will focus here on what we call an "anatomical" approach to look at recovery in aphasia. "Anatomical" theories of recovery stated by classical aphasiologists have contributed to the understanding of language representations in the human brain. But many aspects of these theories can only be investigated by using modern techniques of lesion analysis, psychometric assessment and functional imaging. Whereas structure-function relations have been primarily established by looking for the association of deficit symptoms with certain lesions, functional activation methods offer a means to study more directly the functional anatomy of recovered or retained functions in neuropsychological patients. To falsify or build up anatomical theories of recovery we will propose a stepwise approach of inference. The methodological pitfalls of this approach will be discussed by focussing on anatomical hypotheses of semantic word comprehension and its impairment and recovery in aphasia.

  2. Decomposition degree of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and CFC replacements during recovery with surface-modified activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, Seiki; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Abe, Ikuo

    1996-02-10

    The recovery efficiency of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC113) and three CFC replacements (1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, HCFC141b; 1,3-dichloro-1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoro-propane, HCFC225cb; and 2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoro-1-propanol, 5FP) were investigated on the basis of their degree of decomposition and adsorption isotherms. The authors prepared activated carbons with various surface polarities to elucidate the recovery efficiency, the amount adsorbed, and the degree of decomposition. The amount of CFC113 adsorbed onto untreated activated carbon was the largest of all. That of HCFC225cb adsorbed onto activated carbon treated with hydrogen gas was larger than that adsorbed onto untreated activated carbon and activated carbon treated with 6 N nitric acid. The amount of 5FP and HCFC141b adsorbed on the various activated carbons was not substantial. The degree of decomposition of CFC replacements using the untreated activated carbon except for HCFC225cb was the largest of all. In the case without the activated carbon, that of CFC and the CFC replacements increased in the order 5FP, CFC113 or HCFC225cb, and HCFC141b. It is concluded that the recovery of CFC replacements was possible using the surface-modified activated carbons rather than the untreated activated carbon. The degree of decomposition of the CFC replacements during recovery using the activated carbon depends on the relationship between the adsorption site of the surface of the activated carbon and the polarity, hydrophilic site, or hydrophobic site of the CFC replacement molecule.

  3. Effect of the time interval between fusion and activation on epigenetic reprogramming and development of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Wang, Lijun; Li, Ruizhe; Li, Qian; Wu, Yongyan; Hua, Song; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the time interval between fusion and activation (FA interval) play an important role in nuclear remodeling and in vitro development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. However, the effects of FA interval on the epigenetic reprogramming and in vivo developmental competence of SCNT embryos remain unknown. In the present study, the effects of different FA intervals (0 h, 2 h, and 4 h) on the epigenetic reprogramming and developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were assessed. The results demonstrated that H3 lysine 9 (H3K9ac) levels decreased rapidly after fusion in all three groups. H3K9ac was practically undetectable 2 h after fusion in the 2-h and 4-h FA interval groups. However, H3K9ac was still evidently detectable in the 0-h FA interval group. The H3K9ac levels increased 10 h after fusion in all three groups, but were higher in the 2-h and 4-h FA interval groups than that in the 0-h FA interval group. The methylation levels of the satellite I region in day-7 blastocysts derived from the 2-h or 4-h FA interval groups was similar to that of in vitro fertilization blastocysts and is significantly lower than that of the 0-h FA interval group. SCNT embryos derived from 2-h FA interval group showed higher developmental competence than those from the 0-h and 4-h FA interval groups in terms of cleavage rate, blastocyst formation rate, apoptosis index, and pregnancy and calving rates. Hence, the FA interval is an important factor influencing the epigenetic reprogramming and developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos.

  4. How to learn effectively in medical school: test yourself, learn actively, and repeat in intervals.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Marc

    2014-06-01

    Students in medical school often feel overwhelmed by the excessive amount of factual knowledge they are obliged to learn. Although a large body of research on effective learning methods is published, scientifically based learning strategies are not a standard part of the curriculum in medical school. Students are largely unaware of how to learn successfully and improve memory. This review outlines three fundamental methods that benefit learning: the testing effect, active recall, and spaced repetition. The review summarizes practical learning strategies to learn effectively and optimize long-term retention of factual knowledge.

  5. Changes in the Hurst exponent of heartbeat intervals during physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinis, M.; Knežević, A.; Krstačić, G.; Vargović, E.

    2004-07-01

    The fractal scaling properties of the heartbeat time series are studied in different controlled ergometric regimes using both the improved Hurst rescaled range (R/S) analysis and the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The long-time “memory effect” quantified by the value of the Hurst exponent H>0.5 is found to increase during progressive physical activity in healthy subjects, in contrast to those having stable angina pectoris, where it decreases. The results are also supported by the detrended fluctuation analysis. We argue that this finding may be used as a useful new diagnostic parameter for short heartbeat time series.

  6. Activity before exercise influences recovery metabolism in the lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Scholnick, D A; Gleeson, T T

    2000-06-01

    During recovery from even a brief period of exercise, metabolic rate remains elevated above resting levels for extended periods. The intensity and duration of exercise as well as body temperature and hormone levels can influence this excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). We examined the influence of activity before exercise (ABE), commonly termed warm-up in endotherms, on EPOC in the desert iguana Dipsosaurus dorsalis. The rate of oxygen consumption and blood lactate levels were measured in 11 female D. dorsalis (mass 41.1 +/- 3.0 g; mean +/- s.e.m.) during rest, after two types of ABE and after 5 min of exhaustive exercise followed by 60 min of recovery. ABE was either single (15 s of maximal activity followed by a 27 min pause) or intermittent (twelve 15 s periods of exercise separated by 2 min pauses). Our results indicate that both single and intermittent ABE reduced recovery metabolic rate. EPOC volumes decreased from 0.261 to 0.156 ml of oxygen consumed during 60 min of recovery when lizards were subjected to intermittent ABE. The average cost of activity (net V(O2) during exercise and 60 min of recovery per distance traveled) was almost 40 % greater in lizards that exercised without any prior activity than in lizards that underwent ABE. Blood lactate levels and removal rates were greatest in animals that underwent ABE. These findings may be of particular importance for terrestrial ectotherms that typically use burst locomotion and have a small aerobic scope and a long recovery period.

  7. Postnatal Chick Choroids Exhibit Increased Retinaldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity During Recovery From Form Deprivation Induced Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Angelica R.; Wang, Xiang; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Ma, Jian-Xing; Summers, Jody A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Increases in retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) transcript in the chick choroid suggest that RALDH2 may be responsible for increases observed in all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) synthesis during recovery from myopic defocus. The purpose of the present study was to examine RALDH2 protein expression, RALDH activity, and distribution of RALDH2 cells in control and recovering chick ocular tissues. Methods Myopia was induced in White Leghorn chicks for 10 days, followed by up to 15 days of unrestricted vision (recovery). Expression of RALDH isoforms in chick ocular tissues was evaluated by Western blot. Catalytic activity of RALDH was measured in choroidal cytosol fractions using an in vitro atRA synthesis assay together with HPLC quantification of synthesized atRA. Distribution of RALDH2 cells throughout the choroid was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results RALDH2 was expressed predominately in the chick choroid (P < 0.001) and increased after 24 hours and 4 days of recovery (76%, 74%, and 165%, respectively; P < 0.05). Activity of RALDH was detected solely in the choroid and was elevated at 3 and 7 days of recovery compared to controls (70% and 48%, respectively; P < 0.05). The number of RALDH2 immunopositive cells in recovering choroids was increased at 24 hours and 4 to 15 days of recovery (P < 0.05) and were concentrated toward the RPE side compared to controls. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that RALDH2 is the major RALDH isoform in the chick choroid and is responsible for the increased RALDH activity seen during recovery. PMID:27654415

  8. Environmental and resource implications of phosphorus recovery from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Birgitte Lilholt; Dall, Ole Leinikka; Habib, Komal

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus is an essential mineral resource for the growth of crops and thus necessary to feed the ever increasing global population. The essentiality and irreplaceability of phosphorus in food production has raised the concerns regarding the long-term phosphorus availability and the resulting food supply issues in the future. Hence, the recovery of phosphorus from waste activated sludge and other waste streams is getting huge attention as a viable solution to tackle the potential availability issues of phosphorus in the future. This study explores the environmental implications of phosphorus recovery from waste activated sludge in Denmark and further elaborates on the potential availability or scarcity issue of phosphorus today and 2050. Life cycle assessment is used to assess the possibility of phosphorus recovery with little or no environmental impacts compared to the conventional mining. The phosphorus recovery method assessed in this study consists of drying process, and thermal gasification of the waste activated sludge followed by extraction of phosphorus from the ashes. Our results indicate that the environmental impacts of phosphorus recovery in an energy efficient process are comparable to the environmental effects from the re-use of waste activated sludge applied directly on farmland. Moreover, our findings conclude that the general recommendation according to the waste hierarchy, where re-use of the waste sludge on farmland is preferable to material and energy recovery, is wrong in this case. Especially when phosphorus is a critical resource due to its life threatening necessity, lack of substitution options and potential future supply risk originating due to the high level of global supply concentration.

  9. Antibacterial Activity of MTA Fillapex and AH 26 Root Canal Sealers at Different Time Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Farnaz; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Jafari, Sanaz; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Momeni, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The main goal of endodontic treatment is elimination of bacteria and their by-products from infected root canals. This study compared the antibacterial effect of two different sealers, AH 26 and MTA Fillapex, on 4 microorganisms 24, 48 and 72 h and 7 days after mixing. Methods and Materials: The microorganisms used in this study consisted of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 4356), Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 39392), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212). This test is based on the growth of bacteria and turbidity measurement technique using a spectrophotometer, and direct contact was conducted. Multiple comparisons were carried out using repeated-measures ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test and student’s t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The antibacterial activity in the indirect technique was more than the technique with both sealers. In the direct technique the antibacterial activity on all microorganisms were lower for MTA Fillapex sealer. In the indirect technique, both sealers exhibited similar antibacterial properties. Conclusion: The antibacterial effect of MTA Fillapex sealer was significantly less than that of AH 26 sealer in the direct technique. The antibacterial effects of both sealers were similar in the indirect technique. PMID:27471530

  10. Chemical aspects of the trapping and recovery of uranium hexafluoride and fluorine during remediation activities

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Toth, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    Decontamination and decommission activities related to the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) involve the trapping and recovery of radiolitically generated uranium hexafluoride and fluorine. Although fission product radiolysis was known to generate F{sub 2}, the formation of UF{sub 6} and its transport from the fuel salt was unexpected. Some of these gaseous radiolysis products have been moving through the gas piping to a charcoal bed since the reactor was shut down in 1969. Current and planned remediation and clean-up activities involve the trapping of the gaseous products, deactivation and treatment of the activated charcoal bed, stabilization and reconditioning of the fuel salt, and recovery of the uranium. The chemical aspects of these processes, including radiolytic generation mechanisms, reactions between uranium hexafluoride and fluorine and trapping materials such as activated charcoal, activated alumina, and sodium fluoride, along with the analytical techniques used for the characterization of the materials and process control will be described.

  11. Four minutes of in-class high-intensity interval activity improves selective attention in 9- to 11-year olds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jasmin K; Le Mare, Lucy; Gurd, Brendon J

    2015-03-01

    The amount of time allocated to physical activity in schools is declining. Time-efficient physical activity solutions that demonstrate their impact on academic achievement-related outcomes are needed to prioritize physical activity within the school curricula. "FUNtervals" are 4-min, high-intensity interval activities that use whole-body actions to complement a storyline. The purpose of this study was to (i) explore whether FUNtervals can improve selective attention, an executive function posited to be essential for learning and academic success; and (ii) examine whether this relationship is predicted by students' classroom off-task behaviour. Seven grade 3-5 classes (n = 88) were exposed to a single-group, repeated cross-over design where each student's selective attention was compared between no-activity and FUNtervals days. In week 1, students were familiarized with the d2 test of attention and FUNterval activities, and baseline off-task behaviour was observed. In both weeks 2 and 3 students completed the d2 test of attention following either a FUNterval break or a no-activity break. The order of these breaks was randomized and counterbalanced between weeks. Neither motor nor passive off-task behaviour predicted changes in selective attention following FUNtervals; however, a weak relationship was observed for verbal off-task behaviour and improvements in d2 test performance. More importantly, students made fewer errors during the d2 test following FUNtervals. In supporting the priority of physical activity inclusion within schools, FUNtervals, a time efficient and easily implemented physical activity break, can improve selective attention in 9- to 11-year olds.

  12. A single bout of exercise activates skeletal muscle satellite cells during subsequent overnight recovery.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Verdijk, Lex B; Beelen, Milou; McKay, Bryon R; Parise, Gianni; Kadi, Fawzi; van Loon, Luc J C

    2012-06-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cell (SC) content has been reported to increase following a single bout of exercise. Data on muscle fibre type-specific SC content and/or SC activation status are presently lacking. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of a single bout of exercise on muscle fibre type-specific SC content and activation status following subsequent overnight recovery. Eight healthy men (age, 20 ± 1 years) performed a single bout of combined endurance- and resistance-type exercise. Muscle biopsies were collected before and immediately after exercise, and following 9 h of postexercise, overnight recovery. Muscle fibre type-specific SC and myonuclear content and SC activation status were determined by immunohistochemical analyses. Satellite cell activation status was assessed by immunohistochemical staining for both Delta-like homologue 1 (DLK1) and Ki-67. Muscle fibre size and fibre area per nucleus were greater in type II compared with type I muscle fibres (P < 0.05). At baseline, no differences were observed in the percentage of SCs staining positive for DLK1 and/or Ki67 between fibre types. No significant changes were observed in SC content following 9 h of postexercise, overnight recovery; however, the percentage of DLK1-positive SCs increased significantly during overnight recovery, from 22 ± 5 to 41 ± 5% and from 24 ± 6 to 51 ± 9% in the type I and II muscle fibres, respectively. No changes were observed in the percentage of Ki-67-positive SCs. A single bout of exercise activates both type I and II skeletal muscle fibre SCs within a single night of postexercise recovery, preceding the subsequent increase in SC content.

  13. Task-induced brain activity in aphasic stroke patients: what is driving recovery?

    PubMed

    Geranmayeh, Fatemeh; Brownsett, Sonia L E; Wise, Richard J S

    2014-10-01

    The estimated prevalence of aphasia in the UK and the USA is 250 000 and 1 000 000, respectively. The commonest aetiology is stroke. The impairment may improve with behavioural therapy, and trials using cortical stimulation or pharmacotherapy are undergoing proof-of-principle investigation, but with mixed results. Aphasia is a heterogeneous syndrome, and the simple classifications according to the Broca-Wernicke-Lichtheim model inadequately describe the diverse communication difficulties with which patients may present. Greater knowledge of how intact neural networks promote recovery after aphasic stroke, either spontaneously or in response to interventions, will result in clearer hypotheses about how to improve the treatment of aphasia. Twenty-five years ago, a pioneering study on healthy participants heralded the introduction of functional neuroimaging to the study of mechanisms of recovery from aphasia. Over the ensuing decades, such studies have been interpreted as supporting one of three hypotheses, which are not mutually exclusive. The first two predate the introduction of functional neuroimaging: that recovery is the consequence of the reconstitution of domain-specific language systems in tissue around the lesion (the 'perilesional' hypothesis), or by homotopic cortex in the contralateral hemisphere (the 'laterality-shift' hypothesis). The third is that loss of transcallosal inhibition to contralateral homotopic cortex hinders recovery (the 'disinhibition' hypothesis). These different hypotheses at times give conflicting views about rehabilitative intervention; for example, should one attempt to activate or inhibit a contralateral homotopic region with cortical stimulation techniques to promote recovery? This review proposes that although the functional imaging data are statistically valid in most cases, their interpretation has often favoured one explanation while ignoring plausible alternatives. In our view, this is particularly evident when recovery is

  14. Life experiences in active addiction and in recovery among treated and untreated persons: a national study.

    PubMed

    Laudet, Alexandre; Hill, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Addiction treatment can be effective but fewer than 50% of addiction affected persons are ever treated. Little is known about the addiction and recovery experience of this large subgroup. A national sample of persons in recovery (N = 3,176, 29.5% untreated) was used to begin addressing these questions to inform strategies to encourage help-seeking and to contribute to the small knowledge base on untreated individuals. Study domains were finances, family, social and civic functioning, health, criminal justice involvement, and employment. Treated persons reported significantly greater levels of negative-and fewer positive-experiences in all areas during active addiction than did the untreated group. This gap was significantly narrowed in recovery.

  15. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Promotes Dendritic Spine Recovery and Improves Neurological Outcome Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Catano, Marcela; Echeverry, Ramiro; Torre, Enrique; Haile, Woldeab B.; An, Jie; Chen, Changhua; Cheng, Lihong; Nicholson, Andrew; Tong, Frank C.; Park, Jaekeun

    2014-01-01

    Spines are dendritic protrusions that receive most of the excitatory input in the brain. Early after the onset of cerebral ischemia dendritic spines in the peri-infarct cortex are replaced by areas of focal swelling, and their re-emergence from these varicosities is associated with neurological recovery after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine proteinase that plays a central role in tissue remodeling via binding to the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report that cerebral cortical neurons release uPA during the recovery phase from ischemic stroke in vivo or hypoxia in vitro. Although uPA does not have an effect on ischemia- or hypoxia-induced neuronal death, genetic deficiency of uPA (uPA−/−) or uPAR (uPAR−/−) abrogates functional recovery after AIS. Treatment with recombinant uPA after ischemic stroke induces neurological recovery in wild-type and uPA−/− but not in uPAR−/− mice. Diffusion tensor imaging studies indicate that uPA−/− mice have increased water diffusivity and decreased anisotropy associated with impaired dendritic spine recovery and decreased length of distal neurites in the peri-infarct cortex. We found that the excitotoxic injury induces the clustering of uPAR in dendritic varicosities, and that the binding of uPA to uPAR promotes the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and re-emergence of dendritic filopodia from uPAR-enriched varicosities. This effect is independent of uPA's proteolytic properties and instead is mediated by Rac-regulated profilin expression and cofilin phosphorylation. Our data indicate that binding of uPA to uPAR promotes dendritic spine recovery and improves functional outcome following AIS. PMID:25339736

  16. Effects of active vs. passive recovery on repeated rugby-specific exercises.

    PubMed

    Jougla, A; Micallef, J P; Mottet, D

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of active vs. passive recovery on performance of a rugby-specific intermittent test in rugby union players. Seven male rugby players (20.6+/-0.5 yrs; 181.9+/-10.0 cm; 94.5+/-12.8 kg) performed in random order, over two separate sessions, a specific repeated-sprint rugby test, the Narbonne test (6 x 4 consecutive actions: 1, scrummaging; 2, agility sprinting; 3, tackling; 4, straight sprinting) with 30s of passive or active recovery (running at 50% of maximal aerobic speed). The Narbonne tests were completed before (pre-test) and after (post-test) a 30-min rugby match. During the Narbonne test, scrum forces, agility and sprint times, heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were measured. Scrum forces were lower in active (74.9+/-13.4 kg) than in passive recovery (90.4+/-20.9 kg), only during the post-test (p<0.05). Fatigue index (%) (p<0.05) and total sprint time (s) (p<0.01) were significantly greater in active than in passive recovery, both during the pre-test (11.5+/-5.7% vs. 6.7+/-4.5% and 18.1+/-1.3s vs. 16.9+/-0.9s) and the post-test (7.3+/-3.3% vs. 4.3+/-1.5% and 18.3+/-1.6s vs. 16.9+/-1.1s). Consequently, the results indicated that passive recovery enabled better performance during the Narbonne test. However, it is obviously impractical to suggest that players should stand still during and following repeated-sprint bouts: the players have to move to ensure they have taken an optimal position.

  17. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in five avian species exposed to dicrotophos, an organophosphorus pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The responses of brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were examined in mallard ducks, bobwhite quail, barn owls, starlings, and common grackles given oral doses of dicrotophos, an organophosphorus insecticide. Up to an eightfold difference in response of brain ChE activity to dicrotophos was found among these species. Brain ChE activity recovered to within 2 SD of normal within 26 days after being depressed 55 to 64%. Recovery of brain ChE activity was similar among species and followed the model Y = a + b (log10X).

  18. Comparison of Two Different Modes of Active Recovery on Muscles Performance after Fatiguing Exercise in Mountain Canoeist and Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Mika, Anna; Oleksy, Łukasz; Kielnar, Renata; Wodka-Natkaniec, Ewa; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kamiński, Kamil; Małek, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess if the application of different methods of active recovery (working the same or different muscle groups from those which were active during fatiguing exercise) results in significant differences in muscle performance and if the efficiency of the active recovery method is dependent upon the specific sport activity (training loads). Design A parallel group non-blinded trial with repeated measurements. Methods Thirteen mountain canoeists and twelve football players participated in this study. Measurements of the bioelectrical activity, torque, work and power of the vastus lateralis oblique, vastus medialis oblique, and rectus femoris muscles were performed during isokinetic tests at a velocity of 90°/s. Results Active legs recovery in both groups was effective in reducing fatigue from evaluated muscles, where a significant decrease in fatigue index was observed. The muscles peak torque, work and power parameters did not change significantly after both modes of active recovery, but in both groups significant decrease was seen after passive recovery. Conclusions We suggest that 20 minutes of post-exercise active recovery involving the same muscles that were active during the fatiguing exercise is more effective in fatigue recovery than active exercise using the muscles that were not involved in the exercise. Active arm exercises were less effective in both groups which indicates a lack of a relationship between the different training regimens and the part of the body which is principally used during training. PMID:27706260

  19. Soil washing using various nonionic surfactants and their recovery by selective adsorption with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ahn, C K; Kim, Y M; Woo, S H; Park, J M

    2008-06-15

    The performance of activated carbon in soil washing and subsequent selective adsorption for surfactant recovery from the washed solution was investigated. Sandy loam soil contaminated with phenanthrene at 200 mg kg(-1) was washed with four different nonionic surfactants: Tween 40, Tween 80, Brij 30 and Brij 35. The efficiency of soil washing was highest when using Brij 30 with the highest solubilizing ability for phenanthrene and low adsorption onto soil. In the selective adsorption step, surfactant recovery was quite effective for all surfactants ranging from 85.0 to 89.0% at 1 g L(-1) of activated carbon (Darco 20-40 mesh). Phenanthrene removal from the solution washed with Brij 30 was only 33.9%, even though it was 54.1-56.4% with other surfactants. The selectivity was larger than 7.02 except for Brij 30 (3.60). The overall performance considering both the washing and surfactant recovery step was effective when using Tween 80 and Brij 35. The results suggest that higher solubilizing ability of surfactants is a requirement for soil washing but causes negative effects on phenanthrene removal in the selective adsorption. Therefore, if a surfactant recovery process by selective adsorption is included in soil remediation by washing, the overall performance including the two steps should be considered for properly choosing the surfactant.

  20. Can cognitive activities during breaks in repetitive manual work accelerate recovery from fatigue? A controlled experiment.

    PubMed

    Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Hallman, David M; Lyskov, Eugene; Hygge, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Neurophysiologic theory and some empirical evidence suggest that fatigue caused by physical work may be more effectively recovered during "diverting" periods of cognitive activity than during passive rest; a phenomenon of great interest in working life. We investigated the extent to which development and recovery of fatigue during repeated bouts of an occupationally relevant reaching task was influenced by the difficulty of a cognitive activity between these bouts. Eighteen male volunteers performed three experimental sessions, consisting of six 7-min bouts of reaching alternating with 3 minutes of a memory test differing in difficulty between sessions. Throughout each session, recordings were made of upper trapezius muscle activity using electromyography (EMG), heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) using electrocardiography, arterial blood pressure, and perceived fatigue (Borg CR10 scale and SOFI). A test battery before, immediately after and 1 hour after the work period included measurements of maximal shoulder elevation strength (MVC), pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the trapezius muscles, and a submaximal isometric contraction. As expected, perceived fatigue and EMG amplitude increased during the physical work bouts. Recovery did occur between the bouts, but fatigue accumulated throughout the work period. Neither EMG changes nor recovery of perceived fatigue during breaks were influenced by cognitive task difficulty, while heart rate and HRV recovered the most during breaks with the most difficult task. Recovery of perceived fatigue after the 1 hour work period was also most pronounced for the most difficult cognitive condition, while MVC and PPT showed ambiguous patterns, and EMG recovered similarly after all three cognitive protocols. Thus, we could confirm that cognitive tasks between bouts of fatiguing physical work can, indeed, accelerate recovery of some factors associated with fatigue, even if benefits may be moderate and some responses may be

  1. Can Cognitive Activities during Breaks in Repetitive Manual Work Accelerate Recovery from Fatigue? A Controlled Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Hallman, David M.; Lyskov, Eugene; Hygge, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Neurophysiologic theory and some empirical evidence suggest that fatigue caused by physical work may be more effectively recovered during “diverting” periods of cognitive activity than during passive rest; a phenomenon of great interest in working life. We investigated the extent to which development and recovery of fatigue during repeated bouts of an occupationally relevant reaching task was influenced by the difficulty of a cognitive activity between these bouts. Eighteen male volunteers performed three experimental sessions, consisting of six 7-min bouts of reaching alternating with 3 minutes of a memory test differing in difficulty between sessions. Throughout each session, recordings were made of upper trapezius muscle activity using electromyography (EMG), heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) using electrocardiography, arterial blood pressure, and perceived fatigue (Borg CR10 scale and SOFI). A test battery before, immediately after and 1 hour after the work period included measurements of maximal shoulder elevation strength (MVC), pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the trapezius muscles, and a submaximal isometric contraction. As expected, perceived fatigue and EMG amplitude increased during the physical work bouts. Recovery did occur between the bouts, but fatigue accumulated throughout the work period. Neither EMG changes nor recovery of perceived fatigue during breaks were influenced by cognitive task difficulty, while heart rate and HRV recovered the most during breaks with the most difficult task. Recovery of perceived fatigue after the 1 hour work period was also most pronounced for the most difficult cognitive condition, while MVC and PPT showed ambiguous patterns, and EMG recovered similarly after all three cognitive protocols. Thus, we could confirm that cognitive tasks between bouts of fatiguing physical work can, indeed, accelerate recovery of some factors associated with fatigue, even if benefits may be moderate and some responses may

  2. Comparing life experiences in active addiction and recovery between veterans and non-veterans: a national study.

    PubMed

    Laudet, Alexandre; Timko, Christine; Hill, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The costs of addiction are well documented, but the potential benefits of recovery are less well known. Similarly, substance use issues among both active duty military personnel and veterans are well known but their recovery experiences remain underinvestigated. Furthermore, little is known about whether and how addiction and recovery experiences differ between veterans and non-veterans. This knowledge can help refine treatment and recovery support services. Capitalizing on a national study of individuals in recovery (N = 3,208), we compare addiction and recovery experiences among veterans (n = 481) and non-veterans. Veterans' addiction phase was 4 years longer than non-veterans and they experienced significantly more financial and legal problems. Dramatic improvements in functioning were observed across the board in recovery with subgroup differences leveling off. We discuss possible strategies to address the specific areas where veterans are most impaired in addiction and note study limitations including the cross-sectional design.

  3. Effect of active recovery on acute strength deficits induced by passive stretching.

    PubMed

    Viale, Fabrice; Nana-Ibrahim, Salim; Martin, Ronan Jean François

    2007-11-01

    We herein examined whether immediate muscular activity (active recovery) after stretching decreased stretch-induced strength deficits in human muscles. Our within-subject study included 8 subjects who were used as their own controls. For each subject, both legs were subjected to the same warm-up and stretching treatments, and then one leg was exposed to active recovery (experimental treatment) while the other was allowed to recover passively (control). Unilateral maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of knee extensors was measured at baseline, poststretching, and postrecovery to monitor strength evolution. Our results revealed that the MVC strength at the baseline time point for control (590.8 +/- 104.2) and treated (602.2 +/- 112.7) legs decreased poststretching by 8.0 and 8.9%, respectively, and further decreased postrecovery by 1.3 and 1.2%, respectively. Maximal voluntary contraction strength tests demonstrated very good reliability, having intraclass coefficients of correlation ranging from 0.92-0.98. Mixed analysis of variance showed that the stretching program yielded significantly increased flexibility (p < 0.01) and significantly decreased MVC (p < 0.001) in both legs. The over-time variability between legs was marginal (1%), and no significant between-leg differences were observed. Indeed, the improvement in strength restoration due to active vs. passive recovery was -0.5 +/- 15 N, which was significantly lower (p < 0.01; 1-tailed t-test) than the amount of strength inhibition (32.6 N), estimated as 60% of the overall strength deficit (54.3 +/- 29.7 N). These results confirm that significant strength is lost poststretching but fail to show greater improvement in strength following active vs. passive recovery. Collectively, the present findings indicate that, contrary to the belief of many coaches, muscular exercises during the poststretching period are unlikely to minimize stretch-induced strength deficits.

  4. Recovery of rhythmic activity in a central pattern generator: analysis of the role of neuromodulator and activity-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yili; Golowasch, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The pyloric network of decapods crustaceans can undergo dramatic rhythmic activity changes. Under normal conditions the network generates low frequency rhythmic activity that depends obligatorily on the presence of neuromodulatory input from the central nervous system. When this input is removed (decentralization) the rhythmic activity ceases. In the continued absence of this input, periodic activity resumes after a few hours in the form of episodic bursting across the entire network that later turns into stable rhythmic activity that is nearly indistinguishable from control (recovery). It has been proposed that an activity-dependent modification of ionic conductance levels in the pyloric pacemaker neuron drives the process of recovery of activity. Previous modeling attempts have captured some aspects of the temporal changes observed experimentally, but key features could not be reproduced. Here we examined a model in which slow activity-dependent regulation of ionic conductances and slower neuromodulator-dependent regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration reproduce all the temporal features of this recovery. Key aspects of these two regulatory mechanisms are their independence and their different kinetics. We also examined the role of variability (noise) in the activity-dependent regulation pathway and observe that it can help to reduce unrealistic constraints that were otherwise required on the neuromodulator-dependent pathway. We conclude that small variations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, a Ca2+ uptake regulation mechanism that is directly targeted by neuromodulator-activated signaling pathways, and variability in the Ca2+ concentration sensing signaling pathway can account for the observed changes in neuronal activity. Our conclusions are all amenable to experimental analysis. PMID:21573963

  5. The influence of self-reported leisure time physical activity and the body mass index on recovery from persistent back pain among men and women: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge about leisure time physical activity and the body mass index (BMI) as prognostic factors for recovery from persistent back pain. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of leisure time physical activity and BMI on recovery from persistent back pain among men and women in a general population. Methods The study population (n=1836) in this longitudinal cohort study consisted of participants reporting persistent back pain in the baseline questionnaire in 2002-2003. Data on leisure time physical activity, BMI and potential confounders were also collected at baseline. Information on recovery from persistent back pain (no back pain periods ≥ 7 days during the last 5 years) was obtained from the follow-up questionnaire in 2007. Log-binomial models were applied to calculate Risk Ratios with 95 percent Confidence Intervals (CI) comparing physically active and normal weight groups versus sedentary and overweight groups. Results Compared to a sedentary leisure time, all measured levels of leisure time physical activity were associated with a greater chance of recovery from persistent back pain among women. The adjusted Risk Ratios was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.01) for low leisure time physical activity, 1.51 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.23) for moderate leisure time physical activity, and 1.67 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.58) for high leisure time physical activity. There were no indications that leisure time physical activity influenced recovery among men, or that BMI was associated with recovery from persistent back pain either among men or among women. Conclusions Regular leisure time physical activity seems to improve recovery from persistent back pain among women. PMID:23617707

  6. Caffeine's effect on intermittent sprint cycling performance with different rest intervals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Lun; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lin, Jung-Charng; Huang, Hsin-Wei

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine ingestion on the performance of an intermittent sprint cycling test (ISCT) with different rest intervals. Fourteen males with team sport experience consumed 6 mg kg(-1) of caffeine or a placebo 60 min prior to completing two sets of an ISCT with 4-min rest intervals. Each set consisted of 12 × 4-s sprints with 20- or 90-s active recovery intervals at 60-70 rpm. Blood lactate was collected at baseline and immediately following the completion of six sprints in each set. At 20-s recovery intervals, peak power and total work were not significantly different between conditions during the ISCT (P > 0.05); but caffeine reduced 6.31% effort for mean power in Sprint 10 of the later stage, as well as an increased fatigue index and elevated blood lactate levels during the ISCT (P < 0.05). At 90-s recovery intervals, peak power, mean power, and total work under caffeine conditions were significantly higher than under placebo conditions during the ISCT (P < 0.05), but no differences were apparent in fatigue index and blood lactate levels (P > 0.05). In conclusion, caffeine ingestion may be ergolytic, affecting performance and fatigue development in the later stage during a prolonged and intermittent sprint test with a short recovery interval. However, caffeine produces an ergogenic effect in the initial stage of an intermittent sprint performance with a longer recovery interval.

  7. The Effect of Active versus Passive Recovery Periods during High Intensity Intermittent Exercise on Local Tissue Oxygenation in 18 – 30 Year Old Sedentary Men

    PubMed Central

    Kerhervé, Hugo A.; Askew, Christopher D.; Solomon, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient format of exercise to reduce the chronic disease burden associated with sedentary behaviour. Changes in oxygen utilisation at the local tissue level during an acute session of HIIT could be the primary stimulus for the health benefits associated with this format of exercise. The recovery periods of HIIT effect the physiological responses that occur during the session. It was hypothesised that in sedentary individuals, local and systemic oxygen utilisation would be higher during HIIT interspersed with active recovery periods, when compared to passive recovery periods. Methods Twelve sedentary males (mean ± SD; age 23 ± 3 yr) completed three conditions on a cycle ergometer: 1) HIIT with passive recovery periods between four bouts (HIITPASS) 2) HIIT with active recovery periods between four bouts (HIITACT) 3) HIITACT with four HIIT bouts replaced with passive periods (REC). Deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb) in the vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GN) muscles and the pre-frontal cortex (FH), oxygen consumption (VO2), power output and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously during the three conditions. Results There was a significant increase in HHb at VL during bouts 2 (p = 0.017), 3 (p = 0.035) and 4 (p = 0.035) in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS. Mean power output was significantly lower in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS (p < 0.001). There was a significant main effect for site in both HIITPASS (p = 0.029) and HIITACT (p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in VO2 and HR between HIITPASS and HIITACT. Conclusions The increase in HHb at VL and the lower mean power output during HIITACT could indicate that a higher level of deoxygenation contributes to decreased mechanical power in sedentary participants. The significant differences in HHb between sites indicates the specificity of oxygen utilisation. PMID:27677081

  8. Acupuncture Improved Neurological Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury by Activating BDNF/TrkB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohong; Chen, Chong; Yang, Xiping; Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Ming-liang; Sun, Hongtao

    2017-01-01

    How to promote neural repair following traumatic brain injury (TBI) has long been an intractable problem. Although acupuncture has been demonstrated to facilitate the neurological recovery, the underlying mechanism is elusive. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerts substantial protective effects for neurological disorders. In this study, we found that the level of BDNF and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) was elevated spontaneously after TBI and reached up to the peak at 12 h. Nevertheless, this enhancement is quickly declined to the normal at 48 h. After combined stimulation at the acupoints of Baihui, Renzhong, Hegu, and Zusanli, we found that BDNF and TrkB were still significantly elevated at 168 h. We also observed that the downstream molecular p-Akt and p-Erk1/2 were significantly increased, suggesting that acupuncture could persistently activate the BDNF/TrkB pathway. To further verify that acupuncture improved recovery through activating BDNF/TrkB pathway, K252a (specific inhibitor of TrkB) was treated by injection stereotaxically into lateral ventricle. We observed that K252a could significantly prevent the acupuncture-induced amelioration of motor, sensation, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. These data indicated that acupuncture promoted the recovery of neurological impairment after TBI by activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway, providing new molecular mechanism for understanding traditional therapy of acupuncture. PMID:28243312

  9. Do compression garments enhance the active recovery process after high-intensity running?

    PubMed

    Lovell, Dale I; Mason, Dale G; Delphinus, Elias M; McLellan, Christopher P

    2011-12-01

    Lovell, DI, Mason, DG, Delphinus, EM, and McLellan, CP. Do compression garments enhance the active recovery process after high-intensity running? J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3264-3268, 2011-This study examined the effect of wearing waist-to-ankle compression garments (CGs) on active recovery after moderate- and high-intensity submaximal treadmill running. Twenty-five male semiprofessional rugby league players performed two 30-minute treadmill runs comprising of six 5-minute stages at 6 km·h, 10 km·h, approximately 85% VO(2)max, 6 km·h as a recovery stage followed by approximately 85% VO(2)max and 6 km·h wearing either CGs or regular running shorts in a randomized counterbalanced order with each person acting as his own control. All stages were followed by 30 seconds of rest during which a blood sample was collected to determine blood pH and blood lactate concentration [La]. Expired gases and heart rate (HR) were measured during the submaximal treadmill tests to determine metabolic variables with the average of the last 2 minutes used for data analysis. The HR and [La] were lower (p ≤ 0.05) after the first and second 6 km·h recovery bouts when wearing CGs compared with when wearing running shorts. The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was higher and [La] lower (p ≤ 0.05) after the 10 km·h stage, and only RER was higher after both 85% VO(2)max stages when wearing CGs compared with when wearing running shorts. There was no difference in blood pH at any exercise stage when wearing the CGs and running shorts. The results of this study indicate that the wearing of CGs may augment the active recovery process in reducing [La] and HR after high-intensity exercise but not effect blood pH. The ability to reduce [La] and HR has important consequences for many sports that are intermittent in nature and consist of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with periods of low-intensity exercise or recovery.

  10. Upper Extremity Muscle Activation during Recovery of Reaching in Subjects with Post-stroke Hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Joanne M.; Dromerick, Alexander W.; Sahrmann, Shirley A.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate upper extremity muscle activation and recovery during the first few months after stroke. Methods Subjects with hemiparesis following stroke were studied performing a reaching task at an acute time point (mean = 9 days post-stroke) and then again at a subacute time point (mean = 109 days post-stroke). We recorded kinematics and electromyographic activity of 6 upper extremity muscles. Results At the acute time point, the hemiparetic group had delayed muscle onsets, lower modulation ratios, and higher relative levels of muscle activation (%MVIC) during reaching than controls. From the acute to the subacute time points, improvements were noted in all three variables. By the subacute phase, muscle onsets were similar to controls, while modulation ratios remained lower than controls and %MVIC showed a trend toward being greater in the hemiparetic group. Changes in muscle activation were differentially related to changes in reaching performance. Conclusions Our data show that improvements in muscle timing and decreases in the relative level of volitional activation may underlie improved reaching performance in the early months after stroke. Significance Given that stroke is one of the leading causes of persistent physical disability, it is important to understand how the ability to activate muscles changes during the early phases of recovery after injury. PMID:17097340

  11. Prolonged interval between fusion and activation impairs embryonic development by inducing chromosome scattering and nuclear aneuploidy in pig somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    You, Jinyoung; Song, Kilyoung; Lee, Eunsong

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of various intervals between electrofusion and activation (FA interval) on the nuclear remodelling and development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos in pigs. Reconstructed oocytes were activated at 0 (simultaneous fusion and activation; SFA), 1, 2 and 3 h (delayed activation) after electrofusion; these groups were designated as DA1, DA2 and DA3, respectively. When oocyte nuclear status was examined at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h after electrofusion, the incidence of chromosome scattering was increased (P < 0.01) as the FA interval was extended (0.0%, 12.0%, 77.3% and 78.0%, respectively). Extending the FA interval led to an increase (P < 0.01) in the percentage of oocytes containing multiple (>or=3) pseudopronuclei (PPN) (0.0% of SFA; 5.3% of DA1; 21.7% of DA2; and 33.5% of DA3). The development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage was decreased (P < 0.05) in DA2 (5.7%) and DA3 (5.0%) compared with SFA (18.1%) and DA1 (19.5%). Our results demonstrate that extending the FA interval impairs the development of SCNT pig embryos by inducing chromosome scattering and the formation of multiple PPN, which may result in increased nuclear aneuploidy.

  12. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity recovery following acute methyl parathion intoxication in two feral rodent species: comparison to laboratory rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.K.; Silvey, N.J.; Bailey, E.M. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    Widespread use of organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) has produced both acute and chronic intoxication among nontarget organisms. Most such studies have included fish and birds as opposed to mammals. However, numerous OP toxicity studies have been conducted on laboratory rodents creating a temptation to apply this data to feral rodents. Chronic OP exposure has been reported to produce cholinergic adaptation which in turn lowers mortality rates following a subsequent acute anticholinesterase exposure. The relevance that these laboratory rodent studies have on feral rodents is subject to debate. Field studies involving OP exposure among nontarget feral mammals have produced contradictory results. Increased mortality as a result of repeated OP application has been reported. This observation may be of considerable importance to nontarget feral rodent populations due to the repetitive nature of OP application protocols. The ability of feral rodents to recover brain AChE activity (BAA) between OP application intervals undoubtedly promotes their survival. This study investigated and compared BAA recovery following acute oral methyl parathion intoxication among 2 feral rodent species and among 2 common laboratory rodent species.

  13. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A

  14. Recovery of network-driven glutamatergic activity in rat hippocampal neurons during chronic glutamate receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Eric; Belousov, Andrei B

    2009-01-28

    Previous studies indicated that a long-term decrease in the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces cholinergic activity in rat and mouse hypothalamic neuronal cultures. Here we studied whether a prolonged inactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors also induces cholinergic activity in hippocampal neurons. Receptor activity was chronically suppressed in rat hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with two proportionally increasing sets of concentrations of NMDA plus non-NMDA receptor antagonists: 100 microM/10 microM AP5/CNQX (1X cultures) and 200 microM/20 microM AP5/CNQX (2X cultures). Using calcium imaging we demonstrate that cholinergic activity does not develop in these cultures. Instead, network-driven glutamate-dependent activity, that normally is detected in hyper-excitable conditions, reappears in each culture group in the presence of these antagonists and can be reversibly suppressed by higher concentrations of AP5/CNQX. This activity is mediated by non-NMDA receptors and is modulated by NMDA receptors. Further, non-NMDA receptors, the general level of glutamate receptor activity and CaMK-dependent signaling are critical for development of this network-driven glutamatergic activity in the presence of receptor antagonists. Using electrophysiology, western blotting and calcium imaging we show that some neuronal parameters are either reduced or not affected by chronic glutamate receptor blockade. However, other parameters (including neuronal excitability, mEPSC frequency, and expression of GluR1, NR1 and betaCaMKII) become up-regulated and, in some cases, proportionally between the non-treated, 1X and 2X cultures. Our data suggest recovery of the network-driven glutamatergic activity after chronic glutamate receptor blockade. This recovery may represent a form of neuronal plasticity that compensates for the prolonged suppression of the activity of glutamate receptors.

  15. Development of, and recovery from, activity-based anorexia in female rats.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Deann P; Ackert, Allison M; Eckel, Lisa A

    2003-11-01

    Activity-based anorexia occurs in rats maintained on a restricted-feeding schedule while given free access to running wheels. These conditions induce high levels of wheel running and rapid weight loss. Although this procedure was developed as an animal model of anorexia nervosa, it has been studied primarily in male rats. Our goal was to examine the development of, and recovery from, activity-based anorexia in female rats. Food intake, wheel running, body weight, and phase of the estrous cycle were monitored daily prior to, during, and after a period of restricted feeding in which access to food was limited to 2 h/day. Food intake, body weight, and estrous cyclicity were also monitored in a control group housed without access to running wheels. Prior to food restriction, rats with wheels displayed high levels of wheel running and consumed more food than rats without wheels. Despite that both groups consumed similar amounts of food during the restricted-feeding phase, only rats with wheels developed symptoms of activity-based anorexia, including increased wheel running, rapid weight loss, and disruptions in estrous cyclicity. Recovery from activity-based anorexia was associated with hypoactivity and hyperphagia. Resumption of estrous cycles occurred when the weight lost during food restriction was regained. Hyperphagia, but not hypoactivity, was maintained following resumption of estrous cycles; however, this hyperphagia was limited to nonestrous phases. Our findings suggest that recovery from activity-based anorexia is mediated primarily by an increase in orexigenic signaling that promotes pronounced hyperphagia, and that the increase in satiogenic signaling during estrus abolishes this compensatory hyperphagia.

  16. The recovery of chlorofluorocarbons and chlorofluorocarbon replacements by surface modified activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Naohito; Tanada, Seiki; Nakamura, Takeo; Abe, Ikuo

    1995-06-15

    The adsorption properties of chlorofluorocarbon CFC113 and CFC replacements (HCFC225cb and 5FP) on activated carbon treated with 6 N nitric acid or hydrogen gas were investigated on the basis of their physicochemical adsorption isotherm and Dubinin-Rudshkevich plot to elucidate the difference between untreated activated carbon (U-AC) and surface modified activated carbon (NT-AC and HT-AC) during interaction with CFCs and CFC replacements. No correlation between the physicochemical properties of the activated carbon surface and the polarity of CFCs or CFC replacements was observed. The adsorption isotherms of CFC113, HCFC225cb, and 5FP on U-AC, NT-AC, and HT-AC have different branch points, that is, selective adsorption (HT-AC) and nonselective adsorption (NT-AC). NT-AC is well suited for the recovery of a mixture of CFCs and CFC replacements, while HT-AC is good for a sample of CFC replacements. Studying the adsorption rate is useful for increasing the recovery efficiency. Therefore, the rate of adsorption of CFCs and CFC replacements onto surface modified activated carbon was investigated. The Sameshima equation fits the adsorption isotherms. The initial rate constants k for CFC113, HCFC225cb, and 5FP onto U-AC, HT-AC, and HT-AC, respectively, were the largest. HT-AC could be adapted for the recover of HCFC225cb and 5FP.

  17. Inhibition, Inactivation, and Recovery of Ammonia-Oxidizing Activity in Cometabolism of Trichloroethylene by Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, M. R.; Russell, S. A.; Ely, R. L.; Williamson, K. J.; Arp, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of the cometabolism of trichloroethylene (TCE) by the ammonia-oxidizing soil bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea in short-term (<10-min) incubations were investigated. Three individual effects of TCE cometabolism on this bacterium were characterized. First, we observed that TCE is a potent competitive inhibitor of ammonia oxidation by N. europaea. The K(infi) value for TCE (30 (mu)M) is similar to the K(infm) for ammonia (40 (mu)M). Second, we examined the toxicity associated with TCE cometabolism by N. europaea. Stationary-phase cells of N. europaea oxidized approximately 60 nmol of TCE per mg of protein before ammonia-oxidizing activity was completely inactivated by reactive intermediates generated during TCE oxidation. At the TCE concentrations used in these experiments, ammonia did not provide significant protection against inactivation. Third, we have determined the ability of cells to recover ammonia-oxidizing activity after exposure to TCE. Cells recovering from TCE inactivation were compared with cells recovering from the specific inactivation of ammonia-oxidizing activity by light. The recovery kinetics were indistinguishable when 40% or less of the activity was inactivated. However, at increased levels of inactivation, TCE-inactivated cells did not recover as rapidly as light-inactivated cells. The kinetics of recovery appear to be dependent on both the extent of inactivation of ammonia-oxidizing activity and the degree of specificity of the inactivating treatment. PMID:16534997

  18. Recovery from activity-stress ulcer by ad lib feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirao, M; Tanaka, M; Emoto, H; Ishii, H; Yokoo, H; Yoshida, M; Tsuda, A

    1997-12-31

    In order to investigate the recovery from activity-stress ulcers by ad lib-feeding and/or cessation of running, male Wistar rats were exposed to the activity-stress paradigm, and the rats that revealed hypothermia (their rectal temperature fell below 36 degrees C) were sacrificed either immediately or after several 24 h periods of healing. Rats that were sacrificed immediately after the appearance of hypothermia and those that were exposed to restricted feeding plus cessation of running revealed severe activity-stress ulcers, whereas few ulcers were observed in rats given ad lib-feeding and those that were given ad lib-feeding plus cessation of running. Although no significant differences in relative weights of spleen and thymus were obtained among the different recovery conditions, the relative weights of the adrenal glands were highest in the restricted feeding plus cessation of running group, whereas, the other animals exposed to the activity-stress paradigm showed no differences. These results indicate that activity-stress ulcers recover under conditions of ad lib-feeding within 24 h, but they are not influenced by cessation of running. These data also suggest that organ weights are not affected by any manipulations employed in the present study.

  19. Physiological Responses to High-Intensity Interval Exercise Differing in Interval Duration.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Wesley J; Sawyer, Brandon J; Jarrett, Catherine L; Bhammar, Dharini M; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2015-12-01

    We determined the oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), heart rate (HR), and blood lactate responses to 2 high-intensity interval exercise protocols differing in interval length. On separate days, 14 recreationally active males performed a 4 × 4 (four 4-minute intervals at 90-95% HRpeak, separated by 3-minute recovery at 50 W) and 16 × 1 (sixteen 1-minute intervals at 90-95% HRpeak, separated by 1-minute recovery at 50 W) protocol on a cycle ergometer. The 4 × 4 elicited a higher mean V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (2.44 ± 0.4 vs. 2.36 ± 0.4 L·min) and "peak" V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (90-99% vs. 76-85% V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak) and HR (95-98% HRpeak vs. 81-95% HRpeak) during the high-intensity intervals. Average power maintained was higher for the 16 × 1 (241 ± 45 vs. 204 ± 37 W), and recovery interval V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and HR were higher during the 16 × 1. No differences were observed for blood lactate concentrations at the midpoint (12.1 ± 2.2 vs. 10.8 ± 3.1 mmol·L) and end (10.6 ± 1.5 vs. 10.6 ± 2.4 mmol·L) of the protocols or ratings of perceived exertion (7.0 ± 1.6 vs. 7.0 ± 1.4) and Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale scores (91 ± 15 vs. 93 ± 12). Despite a 4-fold difference in interval duration that produced greater between-interval transitions in V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and HR and slightly higher mean V[Combining Dot Above]O2 during the 4 × 4, mean HR during each protocol was the same, and both protocols were rated similarly for perceived exertion and enjoyment. The major difference was that power output had to be reduced during the 4 × 4 protocol to maintain the desired HR.

  20. α-Adrenergic effects on low-frequency oscillations in blood pressure and R-R intervals during sympathetic activation.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Frances, Maria F; Tiinanen, Suvi; Craen, Rosemary; Rachinsky, Maxim; Petrella, Robert J; Seppänen, Tapio; Huikuri, Heikki V; Tulppo, Mikko P; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2011-08-01

    The present study was designed to address the contribution of α-adrenergic modulation to the genesis of low-frequency (LF; 0.04-0.15 Hz) oscillations in R-R interval (RRi), blood pressure (BP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during different sympathetic stimuli. Blood pressure and RRi were measured continuously in 12 healthy subjects during 5 min periods each of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -40 mmHg), static handgrip exercise (HG; 20% of maximal force) and postexercise forearm circulatory occlusion (PECO) with and without α-adrenergic blockade by phentolamine. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded in five subjects during LBNP and in six subjects during HG and PECO. Low-frequency powers and median frequencies of BP, RRi and MSNA were calculated from power spectra. Low-frequency power during LBNP was lower with phentolamine versus without for both BP and RRi oscillations (1.6 ± 0.6 versus 1.2 ± 0.7 ln mmHg(2), P = 0.049; and 6.9 ± 0.8 versus 5.4 ± 0.9 ln ms(2), P = 0.001, respectively). In contrast, the LBNP with phentolamine increased the power of high-frequency oscillations (0.15-0.4 Hz) in BP and MSNA (P < 0.01 for both), which was not observed during saline infusion. Phentolamine also blunted the increases in the LBNP-induced increase in frequency of LF oscillations in BP and RRi. Phentolamine decreased the LF power of RRi during HG (P = 0.015) but induced no other changes in LF powers or frequencies during HG. Phentolamine resulted in decreased frequency of LF oscillations in RRi (P = 0.004) during PECO, and a similar tendency was observed in BP and MSNA. The power of LF oscillation in MSNA did not change during any intervention. We conclude that α-adrenergic modulation contributes to LF oscillations in BP and RRi during baroreceptor unloading (LBNP) but not during static exercise. Also, α-adrenergic modulation partly explains the shift to a higher frequency of LF oscillations during baroreceptor unloading and muscle

  1. Recovery of consciousness is mediated by a network of discrete metastable activity states

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Andrew E.; Calderon, Diany Paola; Pfaff, Donald W.; Proekt, Alex

    2014-01-01

    It is not clear how, after a large perturbation, the brain explores the vast space of potential neuronal activity states to recover those compatible with consciousness. Here, we analyze recovery from pharmacologically induced coma to show that neuronal activity en route to consciousness is confined to a low-dimensional subspace. In this subspace, neuronal activity forms discrete metastable states persistent on the scale of minutes. The network of transitions that links these metastable states is structured such that some states form hubs that connect groups of otherwise disconnected states. Although many paths through the network are possible, to ultimately enter the activity state compatible with consciousness, the brain must first pass through these hubs in an orderly fashion. This organization of metastable states, along with dramatic dimensionality reduction, significantly simplifies the task of sampling the parameter space to recover the state consistent with wakefulness on a physiologically relevant timescale. PMID:24927558

  2. Voluntary Exercise Preconditioning Activates Multiple Antiapoptotic Mechanisms and Improves Neurological Recovery after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zaorui; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Physical activity can attenuate neuronal loss, reduce neuroinflammation, and facilitate recovery after brain injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms of exercise-induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or its modulation of post-traumatic neuronal cell death. Voluntary exercise, using a running wheel, was conducted for 4 weeks immediately preceding (preconditioning) moderate-level controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model in mice. Compared to nonexercised controls, exercise preconditioning (pre-exercise) improved recovery of sensorimotor performance in the beam walk task, as well as cognitive/affective functions in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests. Further, pre-exercise reduced lesion size, attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex. In addition, exercise preconditioning activated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway before trauma and amplified the injury-dependent increase in heat shock protein 70 expression, thus attenuating key apoptotic pathways. The latter include reduction in CCI-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-homology 3–only Bcl-2 family molecules (Bid, Puma), decreased mitochondria permeabilization with attenuated release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), reduced AIF translocation to the nucleus, and attenuated caspase activation. Given these neuroprotective actions, voluntary physical exercise may serve to limit the consequences of TBI. PMID:25419789

  3. Voluntary Exercise Preconditioning Activates Multiple Antiapoptotic Mechanisms and Improves Neurological Recovery after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaorui; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I; Stoica, Bogdan A

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity can attenuate neuronal loss, reduce neuroinflammation, and facilitate recovery after brain injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms of exercise-induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or its modulation of post-traumatic neuronal cell death. Voluntary exercise, using a running wheel, was conducted for 4 weeks immediately preceding (preconditioning) moderate-level controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model in mice. Compared to nonexercised controls, exercise preconditioning (pre-exercise) improved recovery of sensorimotor performance in the beam walk task, as well as cognitive/affective functions in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests. Further, pre-exercise reduced lesion size, attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex. In addition, exercise preconditioning activated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway before trauma and amplified the injury-dependent increase in heat shock protein 70 expression, thus attenuating key apoptotic pathways. The latter include reduction in CCI-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-homology 3-only Bcl-2 family molecules (Bid, Puma), decreased mitochondria permeabilization with attenuated release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), reduced AIF translocation to the nucleus, and attenuated caspase activation. Given these neuroprotective actions, voluntary physical exercise may serve to limit the consequences of TBI.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; N. Youssef; T. Fincher; S.K. Maudgalya; M.J. Folmsbee; R. Knapp; D. Nagle

    2004-05-31

    Diverse microorganisms were screened for biosurfactant production and anaerobic growth at elevated salt concentrations to obtain candidates most suitable for microbial oil recovery. Seventy percent of the 205 strains tested, mostly strains of Bacillus mojavensis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus sonorensis, produced biosurfactants aerobically and 41% of the strains had biosurfactant activity greater than Bacillus mojavensis JF-2, the current candidate for oil recovery. Biosurfactant activity varied with the percentage of the 3-hydroxy-tetradecanoate isomers in the fatty acid portion of the biosurfactant. Changing the medium composition by incorporation of different precursors of 3-hydroxy tetradecanoate increased the activity of biosurfactant. The surface tension and critical micelle concentration of 15 different, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus strains was determined individually and in combination with other biosurfactants. Some biosurfactant mixtures were found to have synergistic effect on surface tension (e.g. surface tension was lowered from 41 to 31 mN/m in some cases) while others had a synergistic effect on CMD-1 values. We compared the transport abilities of spores from three Bacillus strains using a model porous system to study spore recovery and transport. Sand-packed columns were used to select for spores or cells with the best transport abilities through brine-saturated sand. Spores of Bacillus mojavensis strains JF-2 and ROB-2 and a natural recombinant, strain C-9, transported through sand at very high efficiencies. The earliest cells/spores that emerged from the column were re-grown, allowed to sporulate, and applied to a second column. This procedure greatly enhanced the transport of strain C-9. Spores with enhanced transport abilities can be easily obtained and that the preparation of inocula for use in MEOR is feasible. Tertiary oil recovery experiments showed that 10 to 40 mg/l of JF-2 biosurfactant in the presence of 0

  5. High intensity interval training in the heat enhances exercise-induced lipid peroxidation, but prevents protein oxidation in physically active men.

    PubMed

    Souza-Silva, Ana Angélica; Moreira, Eduardo; de Melo-Marins, Denise; Schöler, Cinthia M; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of circulating markers of lipid and protein oxidation following an incremental test to exhaustion before and after 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training performed in the heat. Methods. To address this question, 16 physically active men (age = 23 ± 2 years; body mass = 73 ± 12 kg; height = 173 ± 6 cm; % body fat = 12.5 ± 6 %; body mass index = 24 ± 4 kg/m(2)) were allocated into 2 groups: control group (n = 8) performing high-intensity interval training at 22°C, 55% relative humidity and heat group (n = 8) training under 35°C, 55% relative humidity. Both groups performed high-intensity interval training 3 times per week for 4 consecutive weeks, accumulating a total of 12 training sessions. Before and after the completion of 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training, participants performed an incremental cycling test until exhaustion under temperate environment (22°C, 55% relative humidity) where blood samples were collected after the test for determination of exercise-induced changes in oxidative damage biomarkers (thiobarbituric acid reactive species and protein carbonyls). Results. When high-intensity interval training was performed under control conditions, there was an increase in protein carbonyls (p < 0.05) following the incremental test to exhaustion with no changes in thiobarbituric acid reactive species. Conversely, high-intensity interval training performed in high environmental temperature enhanced the incremental exercise-induced increases in thiobarbituric acid reactive species (p < 0.05) with no changes in protein carbonyls. Conclusion. In conclusion, 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training performed in the heat enhances exercise-induced lipid peroxidation, but prevents protein oxidation following a maximal incremental exercise in healthy active men.

  6. High intensity interval training in the heat enhances exercise-induced lipid peroxidation, but prevents protein oxidation in physically active men

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Silva, Ana Angélica; Moreira, Eduardo; de Melo-Marins, Denise; Schöler, Cinthia M.; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of circulating markers of lipid and protein oxidation following an incremental test to exhaustion before and after 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training performed in the heat. Methods. To address this question, 16 physically active men (age = 23 ± 2 years; body mass = 73 ± 12 kg; height = 173 ± 6 cm; % body fat = 12.5 ± 6 %; body mass index = 24 ± 4 kg/m2) were allocated into 2 groups: control group (n = 8) performing high-intensity interval training at 22°C, 55% relative humidity and heat group (n = 8) training under 35°C, 55% relative humidity. Both groups performed high-intensity interval training 3 times per week for 4 consecutive weeks, accumulating a total of 12 training sessions. Before and after the completion of 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training, participants performed an incremental cycling test until exhaustion under temperate environment (22°C, 55% relative humidity) where blood samples were collected after the test for determination of exercise-induced changes in oxidative damage biomarkers (thiobarbituric acid reactive species and protein carbonyls). Results. When high-intensity interval training was performed under control conditions, there was an increase in protein carbonyls (p < 0.05) following the incremental test to exhaustion with no changes in thiobarbituric acid reactive species. Conversely, high-intensity interval training performed in high environmental temperature enhanced the incremental exercise-induced increases in thiobarbituric acid reactive species (p < 0.05) with no changes in protein carbonyls. Conclusion. In conclusion, 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training performed in the heat enhances exercise-induced lipid peroxidation, but prevents protein oxidation following a maximal incremental exercise in healthy active men. PMID:27227083

  7. Dissociation of severity of stroke and aphasia recovery early after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Christine; Kappelin, Johan; Perren, Fabienne

    2014-10-01

    Clinical observation suggested to us that aphasia recovers relatively better than other deficits early after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) treatment in stroke patients with minor deficits, while the reverse seemed the case in those with severe deficits. Retrospective analysis of acute ischemic stroke patients with aphasia admitted within 3 hours from symptom onset and treated with IV-rtPA was carried out. Stroke severity, aphasia and global neurological impairment were assessed at admission and 24 hours after thrombolysis. Improvement of aphasia (gain of ⩾ 1 point on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] aphasia score) and global neurological improvement (gain of ⩾ 4 points on the NIHSS) were compared in minor strokes (NIHSS ⩽ 7), moderate strokes (NIHSS 8-15), and major strokes (NIH ⩾ 16). Sixty-nine of 243 stroke patients suffered from aphasia. Improvement of aphasia occurred in 7/16 minor strokes, 11/25 moderate strokes, and 7/28 severe strokes. Improvement of ⩾ 4 points on the NIHSS occurred in 3/16 minor strokes, 17/25 moderate strokes and 15/28 severe strokes. There is a significant (X(2)=4.073, p<0.05) dissociation of recovery of aphasia and that of other neurological deficits between minor versus severe strokes. This confirms the clinically suspected dissociation between a good early recovery from aphasia in minor strokes relative to recovery of other neurological deficits, as opposed to a better recovery from other neurological deficits than from aphasia in patients with severe strokes.

  8. Effect of Caffeine on near Maximal Blood Pressure and Blood Pressure Recovery in Physically-Active, College-Aged Females

    PubMed Central

    CONNAHAN, LAURA E.; OTT, CHRISTOPHER A.; BARRY, VAUGHN W.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how caffeine affects exercise blood pressure (BP) and active and passive recovery BP after vigorous intensity exercise in physically active college-aged females. Fifteen physically active, ACSM stratified low-risk females (age (y): 23.53 ± 4.07, weight (kg): 60.34 ± 3.67, height (cm): 165.14 ± 7.20, BMI (kg/m2): 22.18 ± 1.55) participated in two Bruce protocol exercise tests. Before each test participants consumed 1) a placebo or 2) 3.3 mg·kg−1 of caffeine at least one hour before exercise in a counterbalanced double-blinded fashion. After reaching 85% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, BP was taken and participants began an active (i.e. walking) recovery phase for 6 minutes followed by a passive (i.e. sitting) recovery phase. BP was assessed every two minutes in each phase. Recovery times were assessed until active and passive BP equaled 20 mmHg and 10 mmHg above resting, respectively. Participants completed each test 1–2 weeks a part. Maximal systolic and diastolic blood pressures were not significantly different between the two trials. Active recovery, passive recovery, and total recovery times were all significantly longer during the caffeine trial than the placebo trial. Furthermore, the time to reach age-predicted maximum heart rate was significantly shorter in the placebo trial than the caffeine trial. While caffeine consumption did not significantly affect maximal blood pressure, it did affect active and passive recovery time following vigorous intensity exercise in physically active females. Exercise endurance also improved after consuming caffeine in this population. PMID:28344739

  9. Effect of Caffeine on near Maximal Blood Pressure and Blood Pressure Recovery in Physically-Active, College-Aged Females.

    PubMed

    Connahan, Laura E; Ott, Christopher A; Barry, Vaughn W

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how caffeine affects exercise blood pressure (BP) and active and passive recovery BP after vigorous intensity exercise in physically active college-aged females. Fifteen physically active, ACSM stratified low-risk females (age (y): 23.53 ± 4.07, weight (kg): 60.34 ± 3.67, height (cm): 165.14 ± 7.20, BMI (kg/m(2)): 22.18 ± 1.55) participated in two Bruce protocol exercise tests. Before each test participants consumed 1) a placebo or 2) 3.3 mg·kg(-1) of caffeine at least one hour before exercise in a counterbalanced double-blinded fashion. After reaching 85% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, BP was taken and participants began an active (i.e. walking) recovery phase for 6 minutes followed by a passive (i.e. sitting) recovery phase. BP was assessed every two minutes in each phase. Recovery times were assessed until active and passive BP equaled 20 mmHg and 10 mmHg above resting, respectively. Participants completed each test 1-2 weeks a part. Maximal systolic and diastolic blood pressures were not significantly different between the two trials. Active recovery, passive recovery, and total recovery times were all significantly longer during the caffeine trial than the placebo trial. Furthermore, the time to reach age-predicted maximum heart rate was significantly shorter in the placebo trial than the caffeine trial. While caffeine consumption did not significantly affect maximal blood pressure, it did affect active and passive recovery time following vigorous intensity exercise in physically active females. Exercise endurance also improved after consuming caffeine in this population.

  10. Social network activation: the role of health discussion partners in recovery from mental illness.

    PubMed

    Perry, Brea L; Pescosolido, Bernice A

    2015-01-01

    In response to health problems, individuals may strategically activate their social network ties to help manage crisis and uncertainty. While it is well-established that social relationships provide a crucial safety net, little is known about who is chosen to help during an episode of illness. Guided by the Network Episode Model, two aspects of consulting others in the face of mental illness are considered. First, we ask who activates ties, and what kinds of ties and networks they attempt to leverage for discussing health matters. Second, we ask about the utility of activating health-focused network ties. Specifically, we examine the consequences of network activation at time of entry into treatment for individuals' quality of life, social satisfaction, ability to perform social roles, and mental health functioning nearly one year later. Using interview data from the longitudinal Indianapolis Network Mental Health Study (INMHS, N = 171), we focus on a sample of new patients with serious mental illness and a group with less severe disorders who are experiencing their first contact with the mental health treatment system. Three findings stand out. First, our results reveal the nature of agency in illness response. Whether under a rational choice or habitus logic, individuals appear to evaluate support needs, identifying the best possible matches among a larger group of potential health discussants. These include members of the core network and those with prior mental health experiences. Second, selective activation processes have implications for recovery. Those who secure adequate network resources report better outcomes than those who injudiciously activate network ties. Individuals who activate weaker relationships and those who are unsupportive of medical care experience poorer functioning, limited success in fulfilling social roles, and lower social satisfaction and quality of life later on. Third, the evidence suggests that social networks matter above and

  11. Therapeutic intraspinal stimulation to generate activity and promote long-term recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, Sarah E.; Kasten, Michael R.; Horner, Philip J.; Moritz, Chet T.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic approaches have tremendous potential for the treatment of injuries to the brain and spinal cord by inducing appropriate neural activity in otherwise disordered circuits. Substantial work has demonstrated that stimulation applied to both the central and peripheral nervous system leads to immediate and in some cases sustained benefits after injury. Here we focus on cervical intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS) as a promising method of activating the spinal cord distal to an injury site, either to directly produce movements or more intriguingly to improve subsequent volitional control of the paretic extremities. Incomplete injuries to the spinal cord are the most commonly observed in human patients, and these injuries spare neural tissue bypassing the lesion that could be influenced by neural devices to promote recovery of function. In fact, recent results have demonstrated that therapeutic ISMS leads to modest but sustained improvements in forelimb function after an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). This therapeutic spinal stimulation may promote long-term recovery of function by providing the necessary electrical activity needed for neuron survival, axon growth, and synaptic stability. PMID:24578680

  12. The RFad Method--a new fatigue recovery time assessment for industrial activities.

    PubMed

    Silva e Santos, Marcello; Vidal, Mario Cesar Rodriguez; Moreira, Sergio Bastos

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study about fatigue recovery time assessment processes in work activities. It came about due to a demand presented by an automotive industry giant, in need of updating existing cycle time sheets and TAKT time parameters. The company decided to hire an Ergonomics Laboratory with ties to a major Brazilian University in order to evaluate current conditions and establish a new method to either calculate recovery times or validate existing assessment criteria, based in the ergonomics evaluation of the work activities. It is clear that there has been evident evolution in the industrial sector in the past two decades. It brought up fast modernization of industrial processes, not only in production but also in terms of management systems. Due to improved computer and robotics systems, combined with overall operational advancements - like the use of lighter hand tools and more effective hoist systems - most work activities have had its physical effort requirements reduced in the past decades. Thus, compensation factors built into production times need to be reviewed in order to avoid unnecessary costs associated to them. By using ergonomics considerations, we prevent simply removing the physical variables built in rest time calculations without taking on account, for example, additional cognitive load represented by the use of more sophisticated pieces of equipment.

  13. Dissociations between behavioural recovery and restoration of vestibular activity in the unilabyrinthectomized guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Ris, L; Capron, B; de Waele, C; Vidal, P P; Godaux, E

    1997-01-01

    1. In the guinea-pig, a unilateral labyrinthectomy induces postural disturbances and an ocular nystagmus which abate or disappear over time. These behavioural changes are accompanied by an initial collapse and a subsequent restoration of the spontaneous activity in the neurones of the ipsilateral vestibular nuclei. Recently, it has been shown that the vestibular neuronal activity remained collapsed over at least 10 h whereas its restoration was complete 1 week after the lesion. The aims of this study were to determine when restoration of spontaneous activity in the partially deafferented vestibular neurones started and to compare the time courses of the behavioural and neuronal recoveries in guinea-pigs that had undergone a unilateral labyrinthectomy. 2. Neuronal discharge measurements were made using chronic extracellular recording of single unit activity. After a left labyrinthectomy, electrodes, were placed on the site of the destroyed labyrinth to enable stimulation of the left vestibular nerve. Behavioural measurements included chronic recording of eye movements by the scleral search coli technique. After a left labyrinthectomy, lateral deviation of the head, twisting of the head, and eye velocity of the slow phases of the nystagmus were measured. 3. The neuronal activity of the rostral part of the vestibular nuclear complex on the lesioned side was recorded in alert guinea-pigs over 4 h recording sessions between 12 and 72 h after the lesion. 4. The criterion used to select vestibular neurones for analysis was their recruitment by an electric shock on the vestibular nerve. In addition, in order to explore a uniform population, we focused on neurones recruited at monosynaptic latencies (0.85-1.15 ms). 5. For each recording period, the mean resting rate was calculated animal by animal and the grand mean of these individual resting rate means was calculated. Previously, a decline in the grand mean resting rate from 35.8 +/- 6.0 spikes s-1 (control state) to 7

  14. Mathematical evaluation of activated carbon adsorption for surfactant recovery in a soil washing process.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chi K; Lee, Min W; Lee, Dae S; Woo, Seung H; Park, Jong M

    2008-12-15

    The performances of various soil washing processes, including surfactant recovery by selective adsorption, were evaluated using a mathematical model for partitioning a target compound and surfactant in water/sorbent system. Phenanthrene was selected as a representative hazardous organic compound and Triton X-100 as a surfactant. Two activated carbons that differed in size (Darco 20-40 mesh and >100 mesh sizes) were used in adsorption experiments. The adsorption isotherms of the chemicals were used in model simulations for various washing scenarios. The optimal process conditions were suggested to minimize the dosage of activated carbon and surfactant and the number of washings. We estimated that the requirement of surfactant could be reduced to 33% of surfactant requirements (from 265 to 86.6g) with a reuse step using 9.1g activated carbon (>100 mesh) to achieve 90% removal of phenanthrene (initially 100mg kg-soil(-1)) with a water/soil ratio of 10.

  15. Establishment of reference intervals for kaolin-activated thromboelastography in dogs including an assessment of the effects of sex and anticoagulant use.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Natali; Eralp, Oya; Moritz, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    Tissue factor (TF)- and kaolin-activated thromboelastography (TEG) have been performed in a small number of healthy dogs, but reference intervals have not been assessed in a larger number of dogs. The goal of the current study was to establish reference intervals and assess intra-assay repeatability for kaolin-activated TEG in dogs. Additionally, the impact of sex and the influence of anticoagulant (native blood vs. recalcified citrate anticoagulated blood) were evaluated. Thromboelastography analyses were performed in 56 healthy dogs including German Shepherd Dogs (n = 19), Beagles (n = 15), and others (n = 22). Median age was 2 years (range: 1-6 years) and sex was evenly distributed (31 males and 25 females). To establish reference intervals, citrated whole-blood samples were collected, and TEG was performed 1 hr after sampling. Five TEG variables (R = reaction time; K = clot formation time; alpha = angle alpha; MA = maximal amplitude; G-value reflecting clot stability) were evaluated, and reference intervals were defined as the mean +/- 1.96-fold standard deviation. Intra-assay repeatability was assessed by calculating the pooled variance estimate in duplicate measurements of 6 healthy dogs. The effect of anticoagulant was assessed in 17 specimens. Reference intervals were as follows: R = 1.8-8.6 min; angle alpha = 36.9-74.6 degrees; K = 1.3-5.7 min; MA = 42.9-67.9 mm, and G = 3.2-9.6 Kdyn/cm(2). Coefficients of variation for R, K, angle alpha, MA, and G were 7.6%, 17.7%, 7.4%, 2.9%, and 6.6%, respectively. There was no significant impact of sex or anticoagulant on results. Interindividual variation was higher in native samples than in citrated whole blood. A limitation of the current study was that most of the samples were obtained from Beagles and German Shepherd Dogs. This study provides useful reference intervals for kaolin-activated TEG.

  16. Post-Exercise Muscle Glycogen Repletion in the Extreme: Effect of Food Absence and Active Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Paul A.; Fairchild, Timothy J.; Ferreira, Luis D.; Bräu, Lambert

    2004-01-01

    Glycogen plays a major role in supporting the energy demands of skeletal muscles during high intensity exercise. Despite its importance, the amount of glycogen stored in skeletal muscles is so small that a large fraction of it can be depleted in response to a single bout of high intensity exercise. For this reason, it is generally recommended to ingest food after exercise to replenish rapidly muscle glycogen stores, otherwise one’s ability to engage in high intensity activity might be compromised. But what if food is not available? It is now well established that, even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. This is facilitated, in part, by the transient dephosphorylation-mediated activation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase. There is also evidence that muscle glycogen synthesis occurs even under conditions conducive to an increased oxidation of lactate post-exercise, such as during active recovery from high intensity exercise. Indeed, although during active recovery glycogen resynthesis is impaired in skeletal muscle as a whole because of increased lactate oxidation, muscle glycogen stores are replenished in Type IIa and IIb fibers while being broken down in Type I fibers of active muscles. This unique ability of Type II fibers to replenish their glycogen stores during exercise should not come as a surprise given the advantages in maintaining adequate muscle glycogen stores in those fibers that play a major role in fight or flight responses. Key Points Even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. During active recovery from exercise, skeletal muscles rich in type II fibers replenish part of their glycogen stores even in the absence of food intake. Post-exercise muscle glycogen synthesis in the

  17. Recovery of N and P from human urine by freezing, struvite precipitation and adsorption to zeolite and active carbon.

    PubMed

    Ganrot, Zsófia; Dave, Göran; Nilsson, Eva

    2007-11-01

    The majority of the nutrients in domestic waste originate from human urine. This study deals with methods for recovery of N and P from urine. Results from a freezing-thawing method (FTM) together with struvite recovery and nitrogen adsorption on zeolite and active carbon (AC) are presented. Various amounts of MgO, zeolite and AC were added to samples of 100ml urine. After 3 days the supernatants were analysed for pH, total-N, total-P and acute toxicity for Daphnia magna. One set of samples was frozen and then thawed and the supernatants collected were tested as before. The FTM method concentrated 60% of the nutrients in 40% of the initial volume and significantly improved the N reduction and D. magna survival. The P recovery was 95-100%, mainly as struvite. No significant effect of AC was found. Zeolite improved the P recovery and in some combinations of MgO also the N recovery.

  18. Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils with and without landfill gas recovery systems.

    PubMed

    Su, Yao; Zhang, Xuan; Xia, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Qi; Kong, Jiao-Yan; Wang, Jing; He, Ruo

    2014-05-01

    Aerobic CH4 oxidation plays an important role in mitigating CH4 release from landfills to the atmosphere. Therefore, in this study, oxidation activity and community of methanotrophs were investigated in a subtropical landfill. Among the three sites investigated, the highest CH4 concentration was detected in the landfill cover soil of the site (A) without a landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, although the refuse in the site had been deposited for a longer time (∼14-15 years) compared to the other two sites (∼6-11 years) where a LFG recovery system was applied. In April and September, the higher CH4 flux was detected in site A with 72.4 and 51.7gm(-2)d(-1), respectively, compared to the other sites. The abundance of methanotrophs assessed by quantification of pmoA varied with location and season. A linear relationship was observed between the abundance of methanotrophs and CH4 concentrations in the landfill cover soils (R=0.827, P<0.001). The key factors influencing the methanotrophic diversity in the landfill cover soils were pH, the water content and the CH4 concentration in the soil, of which pH was the most important factor. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylococcus, Methylosarcina, Methylomicrobium and Methylobacter, and type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis) were all detected in the landfill cover soils, with Methylocystis and Methylosarcina being the dominant genera. Methylocystis was abundant in the slightly acidic landfill cover soil, especially in September, and represented more than 89% of the total terminal-restriction fragment abundance. These findings indicated that the LFG recovery system, as well as physical and chemical parameters, affected the diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils.

  19. Factors associated with the recovery of activities of daily living after hospitalization for acute medical illness: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Ryohei; Watanabe, Hiroki; Tsutsumi, Madoka; Kanamori, Takeshige; Maeno, Tetsuhiro; Yanagi, Hisako

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the factors associated with the recovery rate of activities of daily living of elderly patients hospitalized for acute medical illness. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 238 elderly patients were enrolled in this study. The main outcome measure was the functional independence measure score which was used as an assessment of activities of daily living. The participants were divided into 2 groups based on their activities of daily living before onset: the independent group and the partially dependent group. The participants of each group were further divided into 2 subgroups based on recovery rates of activities of daily living: the high-recovery group (80%) and the low-recovery group (<80%). The factors associated with the recovery rate were examined using multivariate logistic regression analysis. [Results] The factors associated with the recovery rate were: days of inactivity and cognitive status at the start of rehabilitation for the independent group, and days of inactivity and nutritional status at the start of rehabilitation for the partially dependent group. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that the important factors for return to normal activities of daily living are: days of inactivity and cognitive status for the independent group; and days of inactivity and management of nutrition for the partially dependent group. PMID:27821931

  20. TrkB kinase activity is critical for recovery of respiratory function after cervical spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Carlos B; Greising, Sarah M; Stowe, Jessica M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C

    2014-11-01

    Neuroplasticity following spinal cord injury contributes to spontaneous recovery over time. Recent studies highlight the important role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling via the high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptor subtype B (TrkB) in recovery of rhythmic diaphragm activity following unilateral spinal hemisection at C2 (C2SH). We hypothesized that TrkB kinase activity is necessary for spontaneous recovery of diaphragm activity post-C2SH. A chemical-genetic approach employing adult male TrkB(F616A) mice (n=49) was used to determine the impact of inhibiting TrkB kinase activity by the phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 inhibitor derivative 1NMPP1 on recovery of ipsilateral hemidiaphragm EMG activity. In mice, C2SH was localized primarily to white matter tracts comprising the lateral funiculus. The extent of damaged spinal cord (~27%) was similar regardless of the presence of functional recovery, consistent with spontaneous recovery reflecting neuroplasticity primarily of contralateral spared descending pathways to the phrenic motor pools. Ipsilateral hemidiaphragm EMG activity was verified as absent in all mice at 3days post-C2SH. By 2weeks after C2SH, ipsilateral hemidiaphragm EMG activity was present in 39% of vehicle-treated mice compared to 7% of 1NMPP1-treated mice (P=0.03). These data support the hypothesis that BDNF/TrkB signaling involving TrkB kinase activity plays a critical role in spontaneous recovery of diaphragm activity following cervical spinal cord injury.

  1. Protease-Activated Receptor-1 Supports Locomotor Recovery by Biased Agonist Activated Protein C after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Whetstone, William D.; Walker, Breset; Trivedi, Alpa; Lee, Sangmi; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Hsu, Jung-Yu C.

    2017-01-01

    Thrombin-induced secondary injury is mediated through its receptor, protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), by "biased agonism." Activated protein C (APC) acts through the same PAR-1 receptor but functions as an anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory protein, which counteracts many of the effects of thrombin. Although the working mechanism of PAR-1 is becoming clear, the functional role of PAR-1 and its correlation with APC in the injured spinal cord remains to be elucidated. Here we investigated if PAR-1 and APC are determinants of long-term functional recovery after a spinal cord contusive injury using PAR-1 null and wild-type mice. We found that neutrophil infiltration and disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier were significantly reduced in spinal cord injured PAR-1 null mice relative to the wild-type group. Both locomotor recovery and ability to descend an inclined grid were significantly improved in the PAR-1 null group 42 days after injury and this improvement was associated with greater long-term sparing of white matter and a reduction in glial scarring. Wild-type mice treated with APC acutely after injury showed a similar level of improved locomotor recovery to that of PAR-1 null mice. However, improvement of APC-treated PAR-1 null mice was indistinguishable from that of vehicle-treated PAR-1 null mice, suggesting that APC acts through PAR-1. Collectively, our findings define a detrimental role of thrombin-activated PAR-1 in wound healing and further validate APC, also acting through the PAR-1 by biased agonism, as a promising therapeutic target for spinal cord injury. PMID:28122028

  2. Ionic mechanism underlying recovery of rhythmic activity in adult isolated neurons

    PubMed Central

    Haedo, Rodolfo J.; Golowasch, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Neurons exhibit long-term excitability changes necessary for maintaining proper cell and network activity in response to various inputs and perturbations. For instance, the adult crustacean pyloric network can spontaneously recover rhythmic activity after complete shutdown resulting from permanent removal of neuromodulatory inputs. Dissociated lobster stomatogastric ganglion (STG) neurons have been shown to spontaneously develop oscillatory activity via excitability changes. Rhythmic electrical stimulation can eliminate these oscillatory patterns in some cells. The ionic mechanisms underlying these changes are only partially understood. We used dissociated crab STG neurons to study the ionic mechanisms underlying spontaneous recovery of rhythmic activity and stimulation-induced activity changes. Similar to lobster neurons, rhythmic activity spontaneously develops in crab STG neurons. Rhythmic hyperpolarizing stimulation can eliminate, but more commonly accelerate the emergence of stable oscillatory activity depending on Ca++ influx at hyperpolarized voltages. Our main finding is that up-regulation of a Ca++-current and down-regulation of a high-threshold K+-current underlies the spontaneous homeostatic development of oscillatory activity. However, because of a non-linear dependence on stimulus frequency, hyperpolarization-induced oscillations appear to be inconsistent with a homeostatic regulation of activity. We find no difference in the activity patterns or the underlying ionic currents involved between neurons of the fast pyloric and the slow gastric mill networks during the first ten days in isolation. Dynamic-clamp experiments confirm that these conductance modifications can explain the observed activity changes. We conclude that spontaneous and stimulation-induced excitability changes in STG neurons can both result in intrinsic oscillatory activity via regulation of the same two conductances. PMID:16807346

  3. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH2 and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH2-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH2 downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH2 in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  4. Two-stage muscle activity responses in decisions about leg movement adjustments during trip recovery

    PubMed Central

    Potocanac, Zrinka; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Verschueren, Sabine; van Dieën, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Studies on neural decision making mostly investigated fast corrective adjustments of arm movements. However, fast leg movement corrections deserve attention as well, since they are often required to avoid falling after balance perturbations. The present study aimed at elucidating the mechanisms behind fast corrections of tripping responses by analyzing the concomitant leg muscle activity changes. This was investigated in seven young adults who were tripped in between normal walking trials and took a recovery step by elevating the tripped leg over the obstacle. In some trials, a forbidden landing zone (FZ) was presented behind the obstacle, at the subjects' preferred foot landing position, forcing a step correction. Muscle activity of the tripped leg gastrocnemius medialis (iGM), tibialis anterior (iTA), rectus femoris (iRF), and biceps femoris (iBF) muscles was compared between normal trips presented before any FZ appearance, trips with a FZ, and normal trips presented in between trips with a FZ (“catch” trials). When faced with a real or expected (catch trials) FZ, subjects shortened their recovery steps. The underlying changes in muscle activity consisted of two stages. The first stage involved reduced iGM activity, occurring at a latency shorter than voluntary reaction, followed by reduced iTA and increased iBF and iGM activities occurring at longer latencies. The fast response was not related to step shortening, but longer latency responses clearly were functional. We suggest that the initial response possibly acts as a “pause,” allowing the nervous system to integrate the necessary information and prepare the subsequent, functional movement adjustment. PMID:26561597

  5. Cellular recovery of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and thiol status after exposure to hydroperoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, A.E.; Reed, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The activity of the thiol-dependent enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), in vertebrate cells, was modulated by a change in the intracellular thiol:disulfide redox status. Human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were incubated with 1-120 mM H2O2, 1-120 mM t-butyl hydroperoxide, 1-6 mM ethacrynic acid, or 0.1-10 mM N-ethylmaleimide for 5 min. Loss of reduced protein thiols, as measured by binding of the thiol reagent iodoacetic acid to GPD, and loss of GPD enzymatic activity occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of the cells, following oxidative treatment, in saline for 30 min or with 20 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed both changes in GPD. The enzymatic recovery of GPD activity was observed either without addition of thiols to the medium or by incubation of a sonicated cell mixture with 2 mM cysteine, cystine, cysteamine, or glutathione (GSH); GSSG had no effect. Treatment of cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to decrease cellular GSH by varying amounts caused a dose-related increase in sensitivity of GPD activity to inactivation by H2O2 and decreased cellular ability for subsequent recovery. GPD responded in a similar fashion with oxidative treatment of another lung carcinoma cell line (A427) as well as normal lung tissue from human and rat. These findings indicate that the cellular thiol redox status can be important in determining GPD enzymatic activity.

  6. RF probe recovery time reduction with a novel active ringing suppression circuit

    PubMed Central

    Peshkovsky, A.S.; Forguez, J.; Cerioni, L.; Pusiol, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    A simple Q-damper device for active probe recovery time reduction is introduced along with a straightforward technique for the circuit's component value optimization. The device is inductively coupled to a probe through a coupling transformer positioned away from the main coil, which makes the design independent of the coil type being used. The Q-damper is a tuned circuit, which is resonant at the same frequency as the probe and can be actively interrupted. When the circuit is interrupted, it is detuned and, thereby, is uncoupled from the probe, which operates normally. Turning the device on leads to re-coupling of the circuits and causes splitting of the probe's resonance line, which can be observed through its drive port. A resistance of an appropriate value is introduced into the Q-damper circuit, resulting in smoothing of the resonance splitting into one broad line, representing the coupled system's low-Q state, in which the energy stored in the main coil is efficiently dissipated. The circuit's component values are optimized by monitoring the shape of this low-Q state. Probe recovery time reduction by, approximately, an order of magnitude has been obtained with this device. Application of the device during an NQR experiment led to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 4.9. PMID:16111906

  7. RF probe recovery time reduction with a novel active ringing suppression circuit.

    PubMed

    Peshkovsky, A S; Forguez, J; Cerioni, L; Pusiol, D J

    2005-11-01

    A simple Q-damper device for active probe recovery time reduction is introduced along with a straightforward technique for the circuit's component value optimization. The device is inductively coupled to a probe through a coupling transformer positioned away from the main coil, which makes the design independent of the coil type being used. The Q-damper is a tuned circuit, which is resonant at the same frequency as the probe and can be actively interrupted. When the circuit is interrupted, it is detuned and, thereby, is uncoupled from the probe, which operates normally. Turning the device on leads to re-coupling of the circuits and causes splitting of the probe's resonance line, which can be observed through its drive port. A resistance of an appropriate value is introduced into the Q-damper circuit, resulting in smoothing of the resonance splitting into one broad line, representing the coupled system's low-Q state, in which the energy stored in the main coil is efficiently dissipated. The circuit's component values are optimized by monitoring the shape of this low-Q state. Probe recovery time reduction by, approximately, an order of magnitude has been obtained with this device. Application of the device during an NQR experiment led to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 4.9.

  8. Effect of Water Activities of Heating and Recovery Media on Apparent Heat Resistance of Bacillus cereus Spores

    PubMed Central

    Coroller, Louis; Leguérinel, Ivan; Mafart, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus cereus were heated and recovered in order to investigate the effect of water activity of media on the estimated heat resistance (i.e., the D value) of spores. The water activity (ranging from 0.9 to 1) of the heating medium was first successively controlled with three solutes (glycerol, glucose, and sucrose), while the water activity of the recovery medium was kept near 1. Reciprocally, the water activity of the heating medium was then kept at 1, while the water activity of the recovery medium was controlled from 0.9 to 1 with the same depressors. Lastly, in a third set of experiments, the heating medium and the recovery medium were adjusted to the same activity. As expected, added depressors caused an increase of the heat resistance of spores with a greater efficiency of sucrose with respect to glycerol and glucose. In contrast, when solutes were added to the recovery medium, under an optimal water activity close to 0.98, a decrease of water activity caused a decrease in the estimated D values. This effect was more pronounced when sucrose was used as a depressor instead of glycerol or glucose. When the heating and the recovery media were adjusted to the same water activity, a balancing effect was observed between the protective influence of the solutes during heat treatment and their negative effect during the recovery of injured cells, so that the overall effect of water activity was reduced, with an optimal value near 0.96. The difference between the efficiency of depressors was also less pronounced. It may then be concluded that the overall protective effect of a decrease in water activity is generally overestimated. PMID:11133461

  9. Active music therapy in the rehabilitation of severe brain injured patients during coma recovery.

    PubMed

    Formisano, R; Vinicola, V; Penta, F; Matteis, M; Brunelli, S; Weckel, J W

    2001-01-01

    Active improvised music therapy may offer an adjuvant from of treatment in the early rehabilitation of severe brain-injured patients. Active music therapy consists of musical improvisation between patient and therapist by singing or by playing different musical instruments, according to the vital functions, the neurological conditions and the motor abilities of the patients. We studied 34 severe brain-injured patients with a mean coma duration of 52 days +/- 37.21 and a mean interval from coma onset to the beginning of rehabilitation of 154 days on average. Our preliminary results show a significant improvement of the collaboration of the severe brain-injured patients and a reduction of undesired behaviours such as inertia (reduced psychomotor initiative) or psychomotor agitation.

  10. Balance recovery is compromised and trunk muscle activity is increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle D; Chang, Angela T; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Increased respiration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires greater abdominal muscle activation, which may impact on contribution of the trunk to postural control. This study aimed to determine whether recovery of balance from postural perturbations and trunk muscle activity differs in people with and without COPD before and/or after exercise. Electromyography (EMG) of the obliquus internus (OI) and externus (OE) abdominis, rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES) and deltoid muscles was recorded with surface electrodes during rapid shoulder flexion and extension. Time taken to regain baseline centre of pressure velocity (vCOP) and the number of postural adjustments following arm movement was calculated from force plate data. Time to recover balance in the direction of postural disturbance (anteroposterior vCOP) was longer in COPD, particularly more severe COPD, than controls. Mediolateral vCOP (perpendicular to the perturbation) and the number of postural adjustments did not differ between groups, but people with more severe COPD were less successful at returning their mediolateral vCOP to baseline. Abdominal muscle EMG was similar between groups, but controls had greater ES EMG during arm movements. Individuals with more severe COPD had greater OE and RA EMG both before and during arm movement compared to those with less severe COPD and controls. Following exercise, OE and ES EMG increased in people with less severe COPD. This study shows that severe COPD is associated with impaired ability to recover balance and greater trunk muscle activity during postural challenges. Augmented trunk muscle activity may limit the contribution of trunk movements to balance recovery and could contribute to increased falls risk.

  11. Training in the fasted state facilitates re-activation of eEF2 activity during recovery from endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Van Proeyen, K; De Bock, K; Hespel, P

    2011-07-01

    Nutrition is an important co-factor in exercise-induced training adaptations in muscle. We compared the effect of 6 weeks endurance training (3 days/week, 1-2 h at 75% VO(2peak)) in either the fasted state (F; n = 10) or in the high carbohydrate state (CHO, n = 10), on Ca(2+)-dependent intramyocellular signalling in young male volunteers. Subjects in CHO received a carbohydrate-rich breakfast before each training session, as well as ingested carbohydrates during exercise. Before (pretest) and after (posttest) the training period, subjects performed a 2 h constant-load exercise bout (~70% of pretest VO(2peak)) while ingesting carbohydrates (1 g/kg h(-1)). A muscle biopsy was taken from m. vastus lateralis immediately before and after the test, and after 4 h of recovery. Compared with pretest, in the posttest basal eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) phosphorylation was elevated in CHO (P < 0.05), but not in F. In the pretest, exercise increased the degree of eEF2 phosphorylation about twofold (P < 0.05), and values returned to baseline within the 4 h recovery period in each group. However, in the posttest dephosphorylation of eEF2 was negated after recovery in CHO, but not in F. Independent of the dietary condition training enhanced the basal phosphorylation status of Phospholamban at Thr(17), 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα), and Acetyl CoA carboxylase β (ACCβ), and abolished the exercise-induced increase of AMPKα and ACCβ (P < 0.05). In conclusion, training in the fasted state, compared with identical training with ample carbohydrate intake, facilitates post-exercise dephosphorylation of eEF2. This may contribute to rapid re-activation of muscle protein translation following endurance exercise.

  12. The structural coupling between ATPase activation and recovery stroke in the myosin II motor

    SciTech Connect

    Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2007-07-01

    Before the myosin motor head can perform the next power stroke, it undergoes a large conformational transition in which the converter domain, bearing the lever arm, rotates {approx} 65{sup o}. Simultaneous with this 'recovery stroke', myosin activates its ATPase function by closing the Switch-2 loop over the bound ATP. This coupling between the motions of the converter domain and of the 40 {angstrom}-distant Switch-2 loop is essential to avoid unproductive ATP hydrolysis. The coupling mechanism is determined here by finding a series of optimized intermediates between crystallographic end structures of the recovery stroke (Dictyostelium discoideum), yielding movies of the transition at atomic detail. The successive formation of two hydrogen bonds by the Switch-2 loop is correlated with the successive see-saw motions of the relay and SH1 helices that hold the converter domain. SH1 helix and Switch-2 loop communicate via a highly conserved loop that wedges against the SH1-helix upon Switch-2 closing.

  13. Lithium recovery from brine using a λ-MnO2/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoni; Lee, Jaehan; Kang, Jin Soo; Jo, Kyusik; Kim, Seonghwan; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoon, Jeyong

    2015-04-01

    Lithium is one of the most important elements in various fields including energy storage, medicine manufacturing and the glass industry, and demands for lithium are constantly increasing these days. The lime soda evaporation process using brine lake water is the major extraction method for lithium, but this process is not only inefficient and time-consuming but also causes a few environmental problems. Electrochemical recovery processes of lithium ions have been proposed recently, but the better idea for the silver negative electrodes used in these systems is required to reduce its cost or increase long term stability. Here, we report an electrochemical lithium recovery method based on a λ-MnO2/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor system. In this system, lithium ions and counter anions are effectively captured at each electrode with low energy consumption in a salt solution containing various cationic species or simulated Salar de Atacama brine lake water in Chile. Furthermore, we designed this system as a flow process for practical applications. By experimental analyses, we confirmed that this system has high selectivity and long-term stability, with its performance being retained even after repetitive captures and releases of lithium ions.

  14. Reduction in Neural Performance following Recovery from Anoxic Stress Is Mimicked by AMPK Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Money, Tomas G. A.; Sproule, Michael K. J.; Hamour, Amr F.; Robertson, R. Meldrum

    2014-01-01

    Nervous systems are energetically expensive to operate and maintain. Both synaptic and action potential signalling require a significant investment to maintain ion homeostasis. We have investigated the tuning of neural performance following a brief period of anoxia in a well-characterized visual pathway in the locust, the LGMD/DCMD looming motion-sensitive circuit. We hypothesised that the energetic cost of signalling can be dynamically modified by cellular mechanisms in response to metabolic stress. We examined whether recovery from anoxia resulted in a decrease in excitability of the electrophysiological properties in the DCMD neuron. We further examined the effect of these modifications on behavioural output. We show that recovery from anoxia affects metabolic rate, flight steering behaviour, and action potential properties. The effects of anoxia on action potentials can be mimicked by activation of the AMPK metabolic pathway. We suggest this is evidence of a coordinated cellular mechanism to reduce neural energetic demand following an anoxic stress. Together, this represents a dynamically-regulated means to link the energetic demands of neural signaling with the environmental constraints faced by the whole animal. PMID:24533112

  15. Activation of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells following histamine release: a possible role in cell recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, T.; Ferjan, I.; Johansen, T.

    1993-01-01

    1. The activity of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells was measured at various time intervals after induction of cellular histamine release by compound 48/80 or by the antigen-antibody reaction. The Na+/K(+)-pump activity was assessed as the ouabain-sensitive potassium uptake of the cells using 86Rb+ as a tracer for potassium (K+(86Rb+)-uptake). 2. Stimulation of the cells with compound 48/80 induced a time and concentration dependent increase of the Na+/K(+)-pump activity. The pump activity was maximal 2 min after stimulation of the cells. Then, the activity gradually decreased and reached a level not significantly different from the controls after 2 h of incubation. 3. When the cells were stimulated by the antigen-antibody reaction, there was also a rapid (within 5 min) stimulation of the Na+/K(+)-pump. In contrast to the stimulation with compound 48/80, the pump activity returned to the control level after 60 min of incubation with antigen. 4. The ouabain-resistant potassium uptake of the cells was increased after stimulation of the cells, regardless of the secretagogue used. This probably reflects the increased surface area of the cells present after the histamine release. 5. On the basis of the present results, we suggest a role for the Na+/K(+)-pump in the recovery process of the mast cell following histamine release. PMID:7679025

  16. Cardiac arrest in rodents: maximal duration compatible with a recovery of neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Charpak, S; Audinat, E

    1998-04-14

    We report here that during a permanent cardiac arrest, rodent brain tissue is "physiologically" preserved in situ in a particular quiescent state. This state is characterized by the absence of electrical activity and by a critical period of 5-6 hr during which brain tissue can be reactivated upon restoration of a simple energy (glucose/oxygen) supply. In rat brain slices prepared 1-6 hr after cardiac arrest and maintained in vitro for several hours, cells with normal morphological features, intrinsic membrane properties, and spontaneous synaptic activity were recorded from various brain regions. In addition to functional membrane channels, these neurons expressed mRNA, as revealed by single-cell reverse transcription-PCR, and could synthesize proteins de novo. Slices prepared after longer delays did not recover. In a guinea pig isolated whole-brain preparation that was cannulated and perfused with oxygenated saline 1-2 hr after cardiac arrest, cell activity and functional long-range synaptic connections could be restored although the electroencephalogram remained isoelectric. Perfusion of the isolated brain with the gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor antagonist picrotoxin, however, could induce self-sustained temporal lobe epilepsy. Thus, in rodents, the duration of cardiac arrest compatible with a short-term recovery of neuronal activity is much longer than previously expected. The analysis of the parameters that regulate this duration may bring new insights into the prevention of postischemic damages.

  17. Antioxidant activity and nutritional status in anorexia nervosa: effects of weight recovery.

    PubMed

    Oliveras-López, María-Jesús; Ruiz-Prieto, Inmaculada; Bolaños-Ríos, Patricia; De la Cerda, Francisco; Martín, Franz; Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2015-03-30

    Few studies are focused on the antioxidant status and its changes in anorexia nervosa (AN). Based on the hypothesis that renutrition improves that status, the aim was to determine the plasma antioxidant status and the antioxidant enzymes activity at the beginning of a personalized nutritional program (T0) and after recovering normal body mass index (BMI) (T1). The relationship between changes in BMI and biochemical parameters was determined. Nutritional intake, body composition, anthropometric, hematological and biochemical parameters were studied in 25 women with AN (19.20 ± 6.07 years). Plasma antioxidant capacity and antioxidant enzymes activity were measured. Mean time to recover normal weight was 4.1 ± 2.44 months. Energy, macronutrients and micronutrients intake improved. Catalase activity was significantly modified after dietary intake improvement and weight recovery (T0 = 25.04 ± 1.97 vs. T1 = 35.54 ± 2.60 μmol/min/mL; p < 0.01). Total antioxidant capacity increased significantly after gaining weight (T0 = 1033.03 ± 34.38 vs. T1 = 1504.61 ± 99.73 μmol/L; p < 0.01). Superoxide dismutase activity decreased (p < 0.05) and glutathione peroxidase did not change. Our results support an association between nutrition improvement and weight gain in patients with AN, followed by an enhancement of antioxidant capacity and catalase antioxidant system.

  18. Development of Microorganisms with Improved Transport and Biosurfactant Activity for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; K.E. Duncan; N. Youssef; T. Fincher; S.K. Maudgalya; M.J. Folmsbee; R. Knapp; Randy R. Simpson; N.Ravi; D. Nagle

    2005-08-15

    growth at elevated salt concentrations to obtain candidates most suitable for microbial oil recovery. Seventy percent of the 205 strains tested, mostly strains of Bacillus mojavensis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus sonorensis, produced biosurfactants aerobically and 41% of the strains had biosurfactant activity greater than Bacillus mojavensis JF-2, the current candidate for oil recovery. Biosurfactant activity varied with the percentage of the 3-hydroxy-tetradecanoate isomers in the fatty acid portion of the biosurfactant. Changing the medium composition by incorporation of different precursors of 3-hydroxy tetradecanoate increased the activity of biosurfactant. The surface tension and critical micelle concentration of 15 different, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus strains was determined individually and in combination with other biosurfactants. Some biosurfactant mixtures were found to have synergistic effect on surface tension (e.g. surface tension was lowered from 41 to 31 mN/m in some cases) while others had a synergistic effect on CMD-1 values. We compared the transport abilities of spores from three Bacillus strains using a model porous system to study spore recovery and transport. Sand-packed columns were used to select for spores or cells with the best transport abilities through brine-saturated sand. Spores of Bacillus mojavensis strains JF-2 and ROB-2 and a natural recombinant, strain C-9, transported through sand at very high efficiencies. The earliest cells/spores that emerged from the column were regrown, allowed to sporulate, and applied to a second column. This procedure greatly enhanced the transport of strain C-9. Spores with enhanced transport abilities can be easily obtained and that the preparation of inocula for use in MEOR is feasible. We conducted a push-pull test to study in-situ biosurfactant production by exogenous biosurfactant producers to aid in oil recovery from depleted reservoirs. Five wells from the same

  19. ISEE 3 observations during the CDAW 8 intervals - Case studies of the distant geomagnetic tail covering a wide range of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Slavin, J. A.; Owen, C. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Galvin, A. B.; Sanderson, T. R.; Scholer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Observations made by the ISEE 3 spacecraft in the distant geomagnetic tail during the eight CDAW 8 intervals are discussed, along with their relation to concurrent geomagnetic activity. This extensive multiinstrument case study of distant tail data covers a wide range of geomagnetic conditions from extended intervals of magnetic quiet with isolated substorms to prolonged periods of intense disturbance. Plasmoids are observed in the distant tail following disturbance enhancements, the time of their appearance being generally consistent with disconnection from the near-earth region at the time of the enhancement. Their structure is entirely consistent with the neutral line model. However, not all enhancements in geomagnetic activity result in the observation of plasmoids. In particular, the CDAW 8 data suggest that, during extended intervals of strong activity, a continuous neutral line may reside in the near-earth tail and some disturbance enhancements may then relate to an increase in the reconnection rate at a preexisting neutral line, rather than to new neutral line and plasmoid formation.

  20. A global review of past land use, climate, and active vs. passive restoration effects on forest recovery.

    PubMed

    Meli, Paula; Holl, Karen D; Rey Benayas, José María; Jones, Holly P; Jones, Peter C; Montoya, Daniel; Moreno Mateos, David

    2017-01-01

    Global forest restoration targets have been set, yet policy makers and land managers lack guiding principles on how to invest limited resources to achieve them. We conducted a meta-analysis of 166 studies in naturally regenerating and actively restored forests worldwide to answer: (1) To what extent do floral and faunal abundance and diversity and biogeochemical functions recover? (2) Does recovery vary as a function of past land use, time since restoration, forest region, or precipitation? (3) Does active restoration result in more complete or faster recovery than passive restoration? Overall, forests showed a high level of recovery, but the time to recovery depended on the metric type measured, past land use, and region. Abundance recovered quickly and completely, whereas diversity recovered slower in tropical than in temperate forests. Biogeochemical functions recovered more slowly after agriculture than after logging or mining. Formerly logged sites were mostly passively restored and generally recovered quickly. Mined sites were nearly always actively restored using a combination of planting and either soil amendments or recontouring topography, which resulted in rapid recovery of the metrics evaluated. Actively restoring former agricultural land, primarily by planting trees, did not result in consistently faster or more complete recovery than passively restored sites. Our results suggest that simply ending the land use is sufficient for forests to recover in many cases, but more studies are needed that directly compare the value added of active versus passive restoration strategies in the same system. Investments in active restoration should be evaluated relative to the past land use, the natural resilience of the system, and the specific objectives of each project.

  1. A global review of past land use, climate, and active vs. passive restoration effects on forest recovery

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Paula; Holl, Karen D.; Rey Benayas, José María; Jones, Holly P.; Jones, Peter C.; Montoya, Daniel; Moreno Mateos, David

    2017-01-01

    Global forest restoration targets have been set, yet policy makers and land managers lack guiding principles on how to invest limited resources to achieve them. We conducted a meta-analysis of 166 studies in naturally regenerating and actively restored forests worldwide to answer: (1) To what extent do floral and faunal abundance and diversity and biogeochemical functions recover? (2) Does recovery vary as a function of past land use, time since restoration, forest region, or precipitation? (3) Does active restoration result in more complete or faster recovery than passive restoration? Overall, forests showed a high level of recovery, but the time to recovery depended on the metric type measured, past land use, and region. Abundance recovered quickly and completely, whereas diversity recovered slower in tropical than in temperate forests. Biogeochemical functions recovered more slowly after agriculture than after logging or mining. Formerly logged sites were mostly passively restored and generally recovered quickly. Mined sites were nearly always actively restored using a combination of planting and either soil amendments or recontouring topography, which resulted in rapid recovery of the metrics evaluated. Actively restoring former agricultural land, primarily by planting trees, did not result in consistently faster or more complete recovery than passively restored sites. Our results suggest that simply ending the land use is sufficient for forests to recover in many cases, but more studies are needed that directly compare the value added of active versus passive restoration strategies in the same system. Investments in active restoration should be evaluated relative to the past land use, the natural resilience of the system, and the specific objectives of each project. PMID:28158256

  2. Explorations in Statistics: Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This third installment of "Explorations in Statistics" investigates confidence intervals. A confidence interval is a range that we expect, with some level of confidence, to include the true value of a population parameter…

  3. Dendrimer-Linked Antifreeze Proteins Have Superior Activity and Thermal Recovery.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Corey A; Drori, Ran; Zalis, Shiran; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2015-09-16

    By binding to ice, antifreeze proteins (AFPs) depress the freezing point of a solution and inhibit ice recrystallization if freezing does occur. Previous work showed that the activity of an AFP was incrementally increased by fusing it to another protein. Even larger increases in activity were achieved by doubling the number of ice-binding sites by dimerization. Here, we have combined the two strategies by linking multiple outward-facing AFPs to a dendrimer to significantly increase both the size of the molecule and the number of ice-binding sites. Using a heterobifunctional cross-linker, we attached between 6 and 11 type III AFPs to a second-generation polyamidoamine (G2-PAMAM) dendrimer with 16 reactive termini. This heterogeneous sample of dendrimer-linked type III constructs showed a greater than 4-fold increase in freezing point depression over that of monomeric type III AFP. This multimerized AFP was particularly effective at ice recrystallization inhibition activity, likely because it can simultaneously bind multiple ice surfaces. Additionally, attachment to the dendrimer has afforded the AFP superior recovery from heat denaturation. Linking AFPs together via polymers can generate novel reagents for controlling ice growth and recrystallization.

  4. 8-Prenylnaringenin promotes recovery from immobilization-induced disuse muscle atrophy through activation of the Akt phosphorylation pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Rie; Horikawa, Hitomi; Lin, Pei-Yi; Tsukumo, Nao; Nikawa, Takeshi; Kawamura, Tomoyuki; Nemoto, Hisao; Terao, Junji

    2016-12-01

    8-Prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is a prenylflavonoid that originates from hop extracts and is thought to help prevent disuse muscle atrophy. We hypothesized that 8-PN affects muscle plasticity by promoting muscle recovery under disuse muscle atrophy. To test the promoting effect of 8-PN on muscle recovery, we administered an 8-PN mixed diet to mice that had been immobilized with a cast to one leg for 14 days. Intake of the 8-PN mixed diet accelerated recovery from muscle atrophy, and prevented reductions in Akt phosphorylation. Studies on cell cultures of mouse myotubes in vitro demonstrated that 8-PN activated the PI3K/Akt/P70S6K1 pathway at physiological concentrations. A cell-culture study using an inhibitor of estrogen receptors and an in vivo experiment with ovariectomized mice suggested that the estrogenic activity of 8-PN contributed to recovery from disuse muscle atrophy through activation of an Akt phosphorylation pathway. These data strongly suggest that 8-PN is a naturally occurring compound that could be used as a nutritional supplement to aid recovery from disuse muscle atrophy.

  5. Nodule activity and allocation of photosynthate of soybean during recovery from water stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellows, R. J.; Patterson, R. P.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Harris, D.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    Nodulated soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) in a growth-chamber study were subjected to a leaf water potential (psi w) of -2.0 megapascal during vegetative growth. Changes in nonstructural carbohydrate contents of leaves, stems, roots, and nodules, allocation of dry matter among plant parts, in situ specific nodule activity, and in situ canopy apparent photosynthetic rate were measured in stressed and nonstressed plants during a 7-day period following rewatering. Leaf and nodule psi w also were determined. At the time of maximum stress, concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had declined in leaves of stressed, relative to nonstressed, plants, and the concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had increased in stems, roots, and nodules. Sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants were 1.5 and 3 times greater, respectively, than those of nonstressed plants. Within 12 hours after rewatering, leaf and nodule psi w of stressed plants had returned to values of nonstressed plants. Canopy apparent photosynthesis and specific nodule activity of stressed plants recovered to levels for nonstressed plants within 2 days after rewatering. The elevated sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants also declined rapidly upon rehydration. The increase in sucrose concentration in nodules, as well as the increase of carbohydrates in roots and stems, during water stress and the rapid disappearance upon rewatering indicates that inhibition of carbohydrate utilization within the nodule may be associated with loss of nodule activity. Availability of carbohydrates within the nodules and from photosynthetic activity following rehydration of nodules may mediate the rate of recovery of N2-fixation activity.

  6. Sequencing biological acidification of waste-activated sludge aiming to optimize phosphorus dissolution and recovery.

    PubMed

    Guilayn, Felipe; Braak, Etienne; Piveteau, Simon; Daumer, Marie-Line

    2016-09-20

    Phosphorus (P) recovery in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) as pure crystals such as struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O), potassium struvite (KMgPO4.6H2O) and calcium phosphates (e.g. Ca3(PO4)2) is an already feasible technique that permits the production of green and marketable fertilizers and the reduction of operational costs. Commercial crystallizers can recovery more than 90% of soluble P. However, most of the P in WWTP sludge is unavailable for the processes (not dissolved). P solubilization and separation are thus the limiting steps in P-crystallization. With an innovative two-step sequencing acidification strategy, the current study has aimed to improve biological P solubilization on waste-activated sludge (WAS) from a full-scale plant. In the first step (P-release), low charges of organic waste were used as co-substrates of WAS pre-fermentation, seeking to produce volatile fatty acids to feed the P-release by Polyphosphate-accumulating organisms, while keeping its optimal metabolic pH (6-7). In this phase, milk serum, WWTP grease, urban organic waste and collective restaurant waste were individually applied as co-substrates. In the second step (P-dissolution), pH 4 was aimed at as it allows the dissolution of the most common precipitated species of P. Biological acidification was performed by white sugar addition, as a carbohydrate-rich organic waste model, which was compared to chemical acidification by HCl (12M) addition. With short retention times (48-96 h) and without inoculum application, all experiences succeeded on P solubilization (37-55% of soluble P), principally when carbohydrate-rich co-substrates were applied. Concentrations from 270 to 450 mg [Formula: see text] were achieved.

  7. Granular biochar compared with activated carbon for wastewater treatment and resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Tyler M; Haeger, Alexander; Biffinger, Justin C; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-05-01

    Granular wood-derived biochar (BC) was compared to granular activated carbon (GAC) for the treatment and nutrient recovery of real wastewater in both batch and column studies. Batch adsorption studies showed that BC material had a greater adsorption capacity at the high initial concentrations of total chemical oxygen demand (COD-T) (1200 mg L(-1)), PO4 (18 mg L(-1)), and NH4 (50 mg L(-1)) compared to GAC. Conversely the BC material showed a lower adsorption capacity for all concentrations of dissolved chemical oxygen demand (COD-D) and the lower concentrations of PO4 (5 mg L(-1)) and NH4 (10 mg L(-1)). Packed bed column studies showed similar average COD-T removal rate for BC with 0.27 ± 0.01 kg m(-3) d(-1) and GAC with 0.24 ± 0.01 kg m(-3) d(-1), but BC had nearly twice the average removal rate (0.41 ± 0.08 kg m(-3) d(-3)) compared to GAC during high COD-T concentrations (>500 mg L(-1)). Elemental analysis showed that both materials accumulated phosphorous during wastewater treatment (2.6 ± 0.4 g kg(-1) and 1.9 ± 0.1 g kg(-1) for BC and GAC respectively). They also contained high concentrations of other macronutrients (K, Ca, and Mg) and low concentrations of metals (As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Zn, and Cu). The good performance of BC is attributed to its macroporous structure compared with the microporous GAC. These favorable treatment data for high strength wastewater, coupled with additional life-cycle benefits, helps support the use of BC in packed bed column filters for enhanced wastewater treatment and nutrient recovery.

  8. The PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway activates recovery from general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-Hui; Zhang, Jin; Song, Jian-Nan; Xu, Xue; Cai, Jin-Song; Zhou, Yang; Gao, Jin-Gui

    2016-01-01

    We investigated roles of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway in recovery from general anesthesia. Sprague-Dawley rats divided into five groups: saline+artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF; Group A), ketamine+ACSF (Group B), ketamine+IGF-1 (Group C), ketamine+PI3K inhibitor (Group D), and PI3K/Akt agonists (Group E). Proportion of δ waves on ECoGs was recorded. Rats were tested for duration of loss of righting reflex (LORR), ataxic period and behavior in Morris water maze. mRNA and protein expression of members of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway were measured by RT-qPCR and Western blots. Histopathologic changes in hippocampal tissues observed by HE staining. We found that the proportion of δ waves decreased in Group C, while increased in Group D compared with Group B; the durations of LORR and ataxic period were shorter in Group C, but longer in Group D. In Morris water maze, escape latency (EL) and duration and frequency of staying on platform was shorter in Group C and longer in Group D than in Group B. Group A exhibited low expression of proteins in PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, while p-AKT, p-mTOR and p-P70S6K expression increased in cerebral cortex, brain stem, and thalamus in Group C. By contrast, expression of those proteins was lower in Group D than Group B. Those proteins expressions were higher in Group E than in Group A. HE staining showed that anesthesia may induce cell apoptosis in rat hippocampal CA1 areas, and PI3K/Akt agonists could inhibit apoptosis. Our results suggest that activation of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway may promote recovery from general anesthesia and enhance spatial learning and memory. PMID:27340771

  9. Effect of active and passive recovery on blood lactate and performance during simulated competition in high level gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Jemni, Monèm; Sands, William A; Friemel, Françoise; Delamarche, Paul

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of two recovery strategies between men's gymnastics events on blood lactate removal (BL) and performance as rated by expert "blind" judges. Twelve male gymnasts (21.8 +/- 2.4 years) participated. The sessions were composed of routine performances in the six Olympic events, which were separated by 10 min of recovery. All gymnasts performed two recovery protocols between events on separate days: Rest protocol, 10 min rest in a sitting position; Combined protocol, 5 min rest and 5 min self-selected active recovery. Three blood samples were taken at 2, 5, and 10 min following each event. Gymnasts produced moderate values of BL following each of the six events (2.2 to 11.6 mmol.L-1). There was moderate variability in BL values between events that could not be accounted for by the athlete's event performance. Gymnasts showed higher BL concentration (p > .05) and significantly (p < .05) higher scoring performances (as rated by a panel of certified judges) when they used a combined recovery between gymnastics events rather than a passive recovery (delta BL = 40.51% vs. 28.76% of maximal BL, p < .05, and total score = 47.28 +/- 6.82 vs. 38.39 +/- 7.55, p < .05, respectively).

  10. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  11. Surface rupture of the 1950 Assam earthquake: active faults and recurrence interval along the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudurier Curveur, Aurelie; Kali, Elise; Tapponnier, Paul; Karakaş, Çaǧıl; Ildefonso, Sorvigenaleon; van der Woerd, Jerome; Baruah, Saurabh; Choudhury, Swapnamita; Okal, Emile; Banerjee, Paramesh

    2016-04-01

    The great Assam earthquake (08/15/1950, Mw.8.7) shook border regions between northeastern Indian, Tibet, and China for several minutes, triggering large landslides and numerous aftershocks over a wide area in the Abor and Mishmi Hills. Using morpho-tectonic field observations and high-resolution satellite images analysis we show that the earthquake produced a >200 km-long surface rupture along the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis. It ruptured both the Main Himalayan Frontal Thrust (MFT) and the Mishmi Thrust (MST) all the way to the surface, producing clear tectonic scarps cutting Quaternary alluvial terrace risers at high angle. We analyse the geometry, height, shape, and slopes of these scarps with high-resolution topographic profiles levelled using Total Station and kinematic GPS, to document 1950 co-seismic and older cumulative surface uplifts. The co-seismic vertical throws differ between the two thrusts from ≈ 7 m and ≈ 3 m, along the MST and MFT, respectively. We stack series of parallel topographic profiles extracted from high-resolution data (eg. ALOS and Pleiades) to document the morphology of uplifted Quaternary alluvial terraces in order to identify past earthquakes. Our results show occurrence of 2 and 6 past earthquakes, along the MST and the MFT, respectively. We combine these results with radiocarbon and cosmogenic dating to assess the ages of these uplifted surfaces and constrain uplift rates of 3 ± 1 mm/yr on both thrusts and a recurrence interval of 1500 ± 300 yr between large events along the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis. We discuss the possibility that our results suggest characteristic slip along both thrusts through Quaternary time scale.

  12. Femtosecond laser fabricated microfluorescence-activated cell sorter for single cell recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragheri, F.; Paiè, P.; Nava, G.; Yang, T.; Minzioni, P.; Martinez Vazquez, R.; Bellini, N.; Ramponi, R.; Cristiani, I.; Osellame, R.

    2014-03-01

    Manipulation, sorting and recovering of specific live cells from samples containing less than a few thousand cells is becoming a major hurdle in rare cell exploration such as stem cell research or cell based diagnostics. Moreover the possibility of recovering single specific cells for culturing and further analysis would be of great impact in many biological fields ranging from regenerative medicine to cancer therapy. In recent years considerable effort has been devoted to the development of integrated and low-cost optofluidic devices able to handle single cells, which usually rely on microfluidic circuits that guarantee a controlled flow of the cells. Among the different microfabrication technologies, femtosecond laser micromachining (FLM) is ideally suited for this purpose as it provides the integration of both microfluidic and optical functions on the same glass chip leading to monolithic, robust and portable devices. Here a new optofluidic device is presented, which is capable of sorting and recovering of single cells, through optical forces, on the basis of their fluorescence and. Both fluorescence detection and single cell sorting functions are integrated in the microfluidic chip by FLM. The device, which is specifically designed to operate with a limited amount of cells but with a very high selectivity, is fabricated by a two-step process that includes femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. The capability of the device to act as a micro fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been tested on polystyrene beads and on tumor cells and the results on the single live cell recovery are reported.

  13. Recovery of an environmental Chlamydia strain from activated sludge by co-cultivation with Acanthamoeba sp.

    PubMed

    Collingro, Astrid; Poppert, Sven; Heinz, Eva; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Essig, Andreas; Schweikert, Michael; Wagner, Michael; Horn, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Chlamydiae are a unique group of obligate intracellular bacteria comprising important pathogens of vertebrates as well as symbionts of free-living amoebae. Although there is ample molecular evidence for a huge diversity and wide distribution of chlamydiae in nature, environmental chlamydiae are currently represented by only few isolates. This paper reports the recovery of a novel environmental chlamydia strain from activated sludge by co-cultivation with Acanthamoeba sp. The recovered environmental chlamydia strain UV-7 showed the characteristic morphology of chlamydial developmental stages as revealed by electron microscopy and was identified as a new member of the family Parachlamydiaceae (98.7 % 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Parachlamydia acanthamoebae). Infection studies suggested that Parachlamydia sp. UV-7 is not confined to amoeba hosts but is also able to invade mammalian cells. These findings outline a new straightforward approach to retrieving environmental chlamydiae from nature without prior, tedious isolation and cultivation of their natural host cells, and lend further support to suggested implications of environmental chlamydiae for public health.

  14. Efficient recovery of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinguang; Zheng, Xiong; Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus need to be recovered to reduce the environmental impact of waste activated sludge (WAS). In this study the improved short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production from WAS by the addition of kitchen waste to adjust the ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C/N), and the efficient recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus from the fermentation liquid were reported. Firstly, the optimum conditions for SCFA production were found to be pH 8, temperature 35 °C, C/N ratio 21 mg-C/1 mg-N, and fermentation time 6 d, using the response surface methodology. After alkaline fermentation, the struvite precipitation method was applied to efficiently and simultaneously recover the released ammonia and phosphorus from the fermentation liquid. Finally, the fermentation liquid was used as the additional carbon source for biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal. It was observed that, compared with acetic acid, the use of fermentation liquid as carbon source showed greater removal efficiencies of total nitrogen and total phosphorus.

  15. Shortening amplitude affects the incomplete force recovery after active shortening in mouse soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2009-12-11

    Compared to isometric contraction, the force producing capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD) after a work producing shortening phase. It has been suggested that FD results from an inhibition of cross-bridge binding. Because the rate constants of the exponential force (re)development are thought to be primarily determined by cross-bridge attachment/detachment rate, we aimed to investigate the components of force redevelopment (REDEV) after 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm shortening, resulting in varying amounts of FD (from about 5% to about 16%), in mouse soleus muscle (n=11). Compared to isometric force development (DEV), the time to reach steady-state during REDEV was about 3 times longer (370 versus 1261ms) increasing with increasing amplitude. Contrary to a single, a double exponential function with one component set equal to the rate constant of DEV (14.3s(-1)), accurately described REDEV (RMS<0.8%). The rate constant of the additional slow component decreased with increasing shortening amplitude and was associated with work delivered during shortening (R(2)=0.75) and FD (R(2)=0.77). We concluded that a work related slow exponential component is induced to the trajectory of incomplete force recovery after shortening, causing FD. These results suggest that after shortening, aside from cross-bridges with normal attachment/detachment rate, cross-bridges with reduced cycling rate are active.

  16. Physical activity, heart rate variability-based stress and recovery, and subjective stress during a 9-month study period.

    PubMed

    Föhr, T; Tolvanen, A; Myllymäki, T; Järvelä-Reijonen, E; Peuhkuri, K; Rantala, S; Kolehmainen, M; Korpela, R; Lappalainen, R; Ermes, M; Puttonen, S; Rusko, H; Kujala, U M

    2016-03-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and objective heart rate variability (HRV)-based stress and recovery with subjective stress in a longitudinal setting. Working-age participants (n = 221; 185 women, 36 men) were overweight (body mass index, 25.3-40.1 kg/m(2) ) and psychologically distressed (≥3/12 points on the General Health Questionnaire). Objective stress and recovery were based on HRV recordings over 1-3 work days. Subjective stress was assessed with the Perceived Stress Scale and PA level with a questionnaire. Data were collected at three time points: baseline, 10 weeks post intervention, and at the 36-week follow-up. We adopted a latent growth model to investigate the initial level and change in PA, objective stress and recovery, and subjective stress at the three measurement time points. The results showed that initial levels of PA (P < 0.001) and objective stress (P = 0.001) and recovery (P < 0.01) were associated with the change in subjective stress. The results persisted after adjustment for intervention group. The present results suggest that high PA and objectively assessed low stress and good recovery have positive effects on changes in subjective stress in the long-term.

  17. Effects of music on the recovery of autonomic and electrocortical activity after stress induced by aversive visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Sokhadze, Estate M

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of music and white noise on the recovery of physiological measures after stressful visual stimulation. Twenty-nine participants took part in the experiment. Visual stimulation with slides eliciting disgust was followed by subjectively pleasant music, sad music, and white noise in three consecutive sessions. The spectral power of the frontal and temporal EEG, skin conductance, heart rate, heart period variability, facial capillary blood flow, and respiration rate were recorded and analyzed. Aversive visual stimulation evoked heart rate deceleration, increased high frequency component of heart period variability, increased skin conductance level and skin conductance response frequency, decreased facial blood flow and velocity, decreased temporal slow alpha and increased frontal fast beta power in all three sessions. Both subjectively pleasant and sad music led to the restoration of baseline levels on most parameters; while white noise did not enhance the recovery process. The effects of pleasant music on post-stress recovery, when compared to white noise, were significantly different on heart rate, respiration rate, and peripheral blood flow. Both positive and negative music exerted positive modulatory effects on cardiovascular and respiratory activity, namely increased heart rate, balanced heart period variability, increased vascular blood flow and respiration rate during the post-stress recovery. Data only partially supported the "undoing" hypothesis, which states that positive emotions may facilitate the process of physiological recovery following negative emotions.

  18. Fentanyl, but not haloperidol, entrains persisting circadian activity episodes when administered at 24- and 31-hour intervals

    PubMed Central

    Leffel, Joseph K.; Kosobud, Ann E; Timberlake, William

    2009-01-01

    Administration of several drugs of abuse on a 24-hour schedule has been shown to entrain both pre-drug (anticipatory) and post-drug (evoked) circadian activity episodes that persist for several days when the drug is withheld. The present tested the entrainment effects of fentanyl, an opioid agonist with a noted abuse liability, and haloperidol, an antipsychotic dopamine antagonist without apparent abuse liability. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats housed under constant light in cages with attached running wheels received repeated low, medium, or high doses of either fentanyl or haloperidol on a 24-hour administration schedule followed by a 31-hour schedule (Experiment 1) or solely on a 31-hour schedule (Experiment 2). The results showed that all three doses of fentanyl entrained both pre-drug and post-drug episodes of wheel running when administered every 24░hours, and the combined pre- and post-fentanyl activity episodes persist for at least 3 days when the drug is withheld during test days. On the 31-hour schedule, fentanyl produced an ``ensuing" activity episode approximately 24░hours post-administration, but failed to produce an anticipatory episode 29–31░hours post-administration. In contrast, haloperidol injections failed to produce both pre-drug episodes on the 24-hour schedule and circadian ensuing episodes on the 31-hour schedule, and post-haloperidol suppression of activity appeared to mask the freerunning activity rhythm. Taken together, these results provide additional evidence that drugs of abuse share a common ability to entrain circadian activity episodes. PMID:19595707

  19. Interval hypoxic training.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, L

    2001-01-01

    Interval hypoxic training (IHT) is a technique developed in the former Soviet Union, that consists of repeated exposures to 5-7 minutes of steady or progressive hypoxia, interrupted by equal periods of recovery. It has been proposed for training in sports, to acclimatize to high altitude, and to treat a variety of clinical conditions, spanning from coronary heart disease to Cesarean delivery. Some of these results may originate by the different effects of continuous vs. intermittent hypoxia (IH), which can be obtained by manipulating the repetition rate, the duration and the intensity of the hypoxic stimulus. The present article will attempt to examine some of the effects of IH, and, whenever possible, compare them to those of typical IHT. IH can modify oxygen transport and energy utilization, alter respiratory and blood pressure control mechanisms, induce permanent modifications in the cardiovascular system. IHT increases the hypoxic ventilatory response, increase red blood cell count and increase aerobic capacity. Some of these effects might be potentially beneficial in specific physiologic or pathologic conditions. At this stage, this technique appears interesting for its possible applications, but still largely to be explored for its mechanisms, potentials and limitations.

  20. Interval arithmetic in calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairbekova, Gaziza; Mazakov, Talgat; Djomartova, Sholpan; Nugmanova, Salima

    2016-10-01

    Interval arithmetic is the mathematical structure, which for real intervals defines operations analogous to ordinary arithmetic ones. This field of mathematics is also called interval analysis or interval calculations. The given math model is convenient for investigating various applied objects: the quantities, the approximate values of which are known; the quantities obtained during calculations, the values of which are not exact because of rounding errors; random quantities. As a whole, the idea of interval calculations is the use of intervals as basic data objects. In this paper, we considered the definition of interval mathematics, investigated its properties, proved a theorem, and showed the efficiency of the new interval arithmetic. Besides, we briefly reviewed the works devoted to interval analysis and observed basic tendencies of development of integral analysis and interval calculations.

  1. Coarse-grained simulation of molecular mechanisms of recovery in thermally activated shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abberton, Brendan C.; Liu, Wing Kam; Keten, Sinan

    2013-12-01

    Thermally actuated shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are capable of being programmed into a temporary shape and then recovering their permanent reference shape upon exposure to heat, which facilitates a phase transition that allows dramatic increase in molecular mobility. Experimental, analytical, and computational studies have established empirical relations of the thermomechanical behavior of SMPs that have been instrumental in device design. However, the underlying mechanisms of the recovery behavior and dependence on polymer microstructure remain to be fully understood for copolymer systems. This presents an opportunity for bottom-up studies through molecular modeling; however, the limited time-scales of atomistic simulations prohibit the study of key performance metrics pertaining to recovery. In order to elucidate the effects of phase fraction, recovery temperature, and deformation temperature on shape recovery, here we investigate the shape-memory behavior in a copolymer model with coarse-grained potentials using a two-phase molecular model that reproduces physical crosslinking. Our simulation protocol allows observation of upwards of 90% strain recovery in some cases, at time-scales that are on the order of the timescale of the relevant relaxation mechanism (stress relaxation in the unentangled soft-phase). Partial disintegration of the glassy phase during mechanical deformation is found to contribute to irrecoverable strain. Temperature dependence of the recovery indicates nearly full elastic recovery above the trigger temperature, which is near the glass-transition temperature of the rubbery switching matrix. We find that the trigger temperature is also directly correlated with the deformation temperature, indicating that deformation temperature influences the recovery temperatures required to obtain a given amount of shape recovery, until the plateau regions overlap above the transition region. Increasing the fraction of glassy phase results in higher strain

  2. Effect of Different Obturation Materials on Residual Antimicrobial Activity of 2% Chlorhexidine in Dentin at Different Time Intervals: An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Bolhari, Behnam; Dehghan, Somayyeh; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Bahador, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE on residual antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (CHX) in human root dentin and suggest the best filling material when CHX is used as final irrigant. Materials and Methods: One-hundred and forty-four single-rooted human teeth were selected for this study. Canals were instrumented to the apical size #35. Smear layer was removed using 5.25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA and then 108 teeth were irrigated with 2% CHX and randomly divided into three groups of gutta percha/AH26, Resilon/RealSeal SE and positive controls. Each group was divided into three subgroups for different time intervals (one, three and six weeks). Thirty-six teeth, as negative controls, were irrigated with saline and obturated with gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE. Dentin powder was prepared at the afore-mentioned intervals. After exposure to Enterococcus faecalis for 24 hours, colony forming units (CFUs) were counted and residual antimicrobial activity was calculated. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis test and one-way ANOVA. The significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: The antimicrobial activity of CHX gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner but it maintained over 95% of its antimicrobial activity after six weeks. Moreover, Resilon/RealSeal SE significantly decreased the antimicrobial activity of CHX in comparison with gutta-percha/AH26 (P<0.05). Conclusion: After a final irrigation with CHX, gutta-percha/AH26 is a better choice for root canal obturation. PMID:27252755

  3. Observations of long-period oscillations of the solar active regions in the visible and UV spectral intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Chernov, Ya. O.

    2016-12-01

    The variation of intensity in spectral line wings, which was obtained from observations of the patrol telescope at the Kislovodsk Mountain Astronomical Station of the Pulkovo Observatory, Russian Academy of Science (KMAS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) space observatory, are considered. A series of observations lasting a few hours near the solar active regions, in which both short- and longperiod oscillations were observed simultaneously during 2014-2015, are analyzed. It is found out that oscillations with a period of 3-5 min can exist at one time and in one place with oscillations with a period of about 100 min. The amplitude of long-period oscillations can be comparable with that for short-period oscillations. The conditions for excitation of the wave processes are considered. Oscillations with a period of 100 min have a weak dependence on the area of the active region.

  4. Enhanced Photoelectrocatalytic Decomplexation of Cu-EDTA and Cu Recovery by Persulfate Activated by UV and Cathodic Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huabin; Liu, Shanshan; Chai, Buyu; Cao, Di; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xu

    2016-06-21

    In order to enhance Cu-EDTA decomplexation and copper cathodic recovery via the photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) process, S2O8(2-) was introduced into the PEC system with a TiO2/Ti photoanode. At a current density of 0.2 mA/cm(2) and initial solution pH of 3.0, the decomplexation ratio of Cu complexes was increased from 47.5% in the PEC process to 98.4% with 5 mM S2O8(2-) addition into the PEC process (PEC/S2O8(2-)). Correspondently, recovery percentage of Cu was increased to 98.3% from 47.4% within 60 min. It was observed that nearly no copper recovery occurred within the initial reaction period of 10 min. Combined with the analysis of ESR and electrochemical LSV curves, it was concluded that activation of S2O8(2-) into SO4(·-) radicals by cathodic reduction occurred, which was prior to the reduction of liberated Cu(2+) ions. UV irradiation of S2O8(2-) also led to the production of SO4(·-). The generated SO4(·-) radicals enhanced the oxidation of Cu-EDTA. After the consumption of S2O8(2-), the Cu recovery via cathodic reduction proceeded quickly. Acidification induced by the transformation of SO4(·-) to OH· favored the copper cathodic recovery. The combined PEC/S2O8(2-) process was also efficient for the TOC removal from a real electroplating wastewater with the Cu recovery efficiency higher than 80%.

  5. Post-stroke recovery: the role of activity-dependent release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Antonio; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2014-11-01

    Stroke remains the leading cause of long-term disability with no pharmacological approaches available to limit the degree of damage or aid in recovery. Considerable effort has been made to minimize neuronal damage using neuroprotective compounds. However, attempts have so far failed to translate into the clinic. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase type B are actively produced throughout the brain and are involved in regulating neuronal activity and normal day-to-day function. Further, BDNF has been shown to play a role in both protection and recovery of functions after stroke. This review focuses on the endogenous release of BDNF as well as activity-induced (pharmacological and physical) elevation in BDNF, and the role this plays during both acute (hours to days) and subacute (days to weeks) periods after stroke. Exogenous administration has previously been shown not to cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore, we have focused this review on approaches that allow us to directly stimulate, using pharmacological therapies and mimetics, physical activity and potential drug delivery systems that can be used to administer BDNF. Finally, we also discuss the role of BDNF polymorphisms and the influence of epigenetic regulation of BDNF on post-stroke recovery.

  6. Decline in the Recovery from Synaptic Depression in Heavier Aplysia Results from Decreased Serotonin-Induced Novel PKC Activation.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Tyler William; Sossin, Wayne S

    2015-01-01

    The defensive withdrawal reflexes of Aplysia are important behaviors for protecting the animal from predation. Habituation and dishabituation allow for experience-dependent tuning of these reflexes and the mechanisms underlying these forms of behavioral plasticity involve changes in transmitter release from the sensory to motor neuron synapses through homosynaptic depression and the serotonin-mediated recovery from depression, respectively. Interestingly, dishabituation is reduced in older animals with no corresponding change in habituation. Here we show that the cultured sensory neurons of heavier animals (greater than 120 g) that form synaptic connections with motor neurons have both reduced recovery from depression and reduced novel PKC Apl II activation with 5HT. The decrease in the recovery from depression correlated better with the size of the animal than the age of the animal. Much of this change in PKC activation and synaptic facilitation following depression can be rescued by direct activation of PKC Apl II with phorbol dibutyrate, suggesting a change in the signal transduction pathway upstream of PKC Apl II activation in the sensory neurons of larger animals.

  7. Effects of recipient oocyte age and interval from fusion to activation on development of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) nuclear transfer embryos derived from fetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lu, F; Jiang, J; Li, N; Zhang, S; Sun, H; Luo, C; Wei, Y; Shi, D

    2011-09-15

    The objective was to investigate the effect of recipient oocyte age and the interval from activation to fusion on developmental competence of buffalo nuclear transfer (NT) embryos. Buffalo oocytes matured in vitro for 22 h were enucleated by micromanipulation under the spindle view system, and a fetal fibroblast (pretreated with 0.1 μg/mL aphidicolin for 24 h, followed by culture for 48 h in 0.5% fetal bovine serum) was introduced into the enucleated oocyte, followed by electrofusion. Both oocytes and NT embryos were activated by exposure to 5 μM ionomycin for 5 min, followed by culture in 2 mM 6-dimethyl-aminopurine for 3 h. When oocytes matured in vitro for 28, 29, 30, 31, or 32 h were activated, more oocytes matured in vitro for 30 h developed into blastocysts in comparison with oocytes matured in vitro for 32 h (31.3 vs 19.9%, P < 0.05). When electrofusion was induced 27 h after the onset of oocyte maturation, the cleavage rate (78.0%) was higher than that of electrofusion induced at 28 h (67.2%, P < 0.05), and the blastocyst yield (18.1%) was higher (P < 0.05) than that of electrofusion induced at 25 or 26 h (7.4 and 8.5%, respectively). A higher proportion of NT embryos activated at 3 h after electrofusion developed to the blastocyst stage (18.6%) in comparison with NT embryos activated at 1 h (6.0%), 2 h (8.3%), or 4 h (10.6%) after fusion (P < 0.05). No recipient was pregnant 60 d after transfer of blastocysts developed from NT embryos activated at 1 h (0/8), 2 h (0/10), or 4 h (0/9) after fusion. However, 3 of 16 recipients were pregnant following transfer of blastocysts developed from the NT embryos activated at 3 h after fusion, and two of these recipients maintained pregnancy to term. We concluded that the developmental potential of buffalo NT embryos was related to recipient oocyte age and the interval from fusion to activation.

  8. Recovery of glycols, sugars, and Related Multiple -OH Compounds from Dilute-Aqueous Solution by Regenerable Adsorption onto Activated Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, Daniel

    1999-06-01

    The present research explores the use of adsorption onto activated carbons as a means of recover glycerol, glycols, and sugars from dilute-aqueous solution. Our work is focused on understanding the mechanisms of adsorption onto carbons, assessing the degree of adsorption reversibility with precision, and implementing a bench-scale recovery process that results in a higher product concentration and reduction of the energy load for final purification.

  9. Recovery of valuable metals from cathodic active material of spent lithium ion batteries: Leaching and kinetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Pratima; Pandey, B D; Mankhand, T R

    2015-11-01

    This work is focussed on the processing of cathodic active material of spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs) to ensure resource recovery and minimize environmental degradation. The sulfuric acid leaching of metals was carried out for the recovery of all the valuable metals including nickel and manganese along with the frequently targeted metals like lithium and cobalt. The process parameters such as acid concentration, pulp density, time and temperature for the leaching of metals from the cathode powder containing 35.8% Co, 6.5% Li, 11.6% Mn and 10.06% Ni, were optimized. Results show the optimized leach recovery of 93.4% Li, 66.2% Co, 96.3% Ni and 50.2% Mn when the material was leached in 1M H2SO4 at 368 K and 50 g/L pulp density for 240 min. The need of a reductant for improved recovery of cobalt and manganese has been explained by the thermodynamic analysis (Eh-pH diagram) for these metals. Leaching of the valuable metals was found to follow the logarithmic rate law controlled by surface layer diffusion of the lixiviant reacting with the particles. The mode of leaching of the metals from the spent LIBs was further examined by chemical analysis of the samples at various stage of processing which was further corroborated by characterizing the untreated sample and the leach residues by XRD phase identification and the SEM-EDS studies.

  10. Feeling of Pleasure to High-Intensity Interval Exercise Is Dependent of the Number of Work Bouts and Physical Activity Status

    PubMed Central

    Frazão, Danniel Thiago; de Farias Junior, Luiz Fernando; Dantas, Teresa Cristina Batista; Krinski, Kleverton; Elsangedy, Hassan Mohamed; Prestes, Jonato; Hardcastle, Sarah J.; Costa, Eduardo Caldas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the affective responses during a single bout of a low-volume HIIE in active and insufficiently active men. Materials and methods Fifty-eight men (aged 25.3 ± 3.6 years) volunteered to participate in this study: i) active (n = 29) and ii) insufficiently active (n = 29). Each subject undertook i) initial screening and physical evaluation, ii) maximal exercise test, and iii) a single bout of a low-volume HIIE. The HIIE protocol consisted of 10 x 60s work bouts at 90% of maximal treadmill velocity (MTV) interspersed with 60s of active recovery at 30% of MTV. Affective responses (Feeling Scale, -5/+5), rating of perceived exertion (Borg’s RPE, 6–20), and heart rate (HR) were recorded during the last 10s of each work bout. A two-factor mixed-model repeated measures ANOVA, independent-samples t test, and chi-squared test were used to data analysis. Results There were similar positive affective responses to the first three work bouts between insufficiently active and active men (p > 0.05). However, insufficiently active group displayed lower affective responses over time (work bout 4 to 10) than the active group (p < 0.01). Also, the insufficiently active group displayed lower values of mean, lowest, and highest affective response, as well as lower values of affective response at the highest RPE than the active group (p < 0.001). There were no differences in the RPE and HR between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions Insufficiently active and active men report feelings of pleasure to few work bouts (i.e., 3–4) during low-volume HIIE, while the affective responses become more unpleasant over time for insufficiently active subjects. Investigations on the effects of low-volume HIIE protocols including a fewer number of work bouts on health status and fitness of less active subjects would be interesting, especially in the first training weeks. PMID:27028191

  11. Practitioners' Experiences Creating and Implementing an Emotional Recovery and Physical Activity Program Following a Natural Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl-Alexander, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    On April 27, 2011 a series of tornadoes tore through the southeast United States. Sixty-four percent of the counties in the state of Alabama were directly affected by these storms. After a natural disaster, children who are directly or indirectly affected show numerous intense emotional reactions. Recovery programs can be set up to enable them to…

  12. Active recovery of the finger flexors enhances intermittent handgrip performance in rock climbers.

    PubMed

    Baláš, Jiří; Michailov, Michail; Giles, David; Kodejška, Jan; Panáčková, Michaela; Fryer, Simon

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effect of hand shaking during recovery phases of intermittent testing on the time-force characteristics of performance and muscle oxygenation, and (2) assess inter-individual variability in the time to achieve the target force during intermittent testing in rock climbers. Twenty-two participants undertook three finger flexor endurance tests at 60% of their maximal voluntary contraction until failure. Performances of a sustained contraction and two intermittent contractions, each with different recovery strategies, were analysed by time-force parameters and near-infrared spectroscopy. Recovery with shaking of the forearm beside the body led to a significantly greater intermittent test time (↑ 22%, P < .05), force-time integral (↑ 28%, P < .05) and faster muscle re-oxygenation (↑ 32%, P < .05), when compared to the hand over hold condition. Further, the ratio of intermittent to continuous test time distinguished specific aerobic muscular adaptations among sport climbers (2.02), boulderers (1.74) and lower grade climbers (1.25). Lower grade climbers and boulderers produced shorter duration contractions due to the slower development of target force during the intermittent test, indicating worse kinaesthetic differentiation. Both the type of recovery and climbing discipline determined muscle re-oxygenation and intermittent performance in rock climbers.

  13. Microbial Activation of Bacillus subtilis-Immobilized Microgel Particles for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Son, Han Am; Choi, Sang Koo; Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Bohyun; Kim, Hyun Tae; Sung, Won Mo; Kim, Jin Woong

    2016-09-06

    Microbially enhanced oil recovery involves the use of microorganisms to extract oil remaining in reservoirs. Here, we report fabrication of microgel particles with immobilized Bacillus subtilis for application to microbially enhanced oil recovery. Using B. subtilis isolated from oil-contaminated soils in Myanmar, we evaluated the ability of this microbe to reduce the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface via production of biosurfactant molecules, eventually yielding excellent emulsification across a broad range of the medium pH and ionic strength. To safely deliver B. subtilis into a permeable porous medium, in this study, these bacteria were physically immobilized in a hydrogel mesh of microgel particles. In a core flooding experiment, in which the microgel particles were injected into a column packed with silica beads, we found that these particles significantly increased oil recovery in a concentration-dependent manner. This result shows that a mesh of microgel particles encapsulating biosurfactant-producing microorganisms holds promise for recovery of oil from porous media.

  14. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedemann, H.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

  15. Plasma and urine renalase levels and activity during the recovery of renal function in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Quelhas-Santos, Janete; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Ferreira, Inês; Carvalho, Catarina; Coentrão, Luís; Vaz, Raquel; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Pestana, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    Renalase is a recently described enzyme secreted by the kidney into both plasma and urine, where it was suggested to degrade catecholamines contributing to blood pressure control. While there is a controversy regarding the relationship between renal function and plasma renalase levels, there is virtually no data in humans on plasma renalase activity as well as on both urine renalase levels and activity. We prospectively examined the time course of plasma and urine renalase levels and activity in 26 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving a cadaver kidney transplant (cadaver kidney recipients [CKR]) before surgery and during the recovery of renal function up to day 90 post transplant. The relationship with sympathetic and renal dopaminergic activities was also evaluated. The recovery of renal function in CKR closely predicted decreases in plasma renalase levels (r = 0.88; P < 0.0001), urine renalase levels (r = 0.75; P < 0.0001) and urine renalase activity (r = 0.56; P < 0.03), but did not predict changes in plasma renalase activity (r = -0.02; NS). Plasma norepinephrine levels positively correlated with plasma renalase levels (r = 0.64, P < 0.002) as well as with urine renalase levels and activity (r = 0.47 P < 0.02; r = 0.71, P < 0.0005, respectively) and negatively correlated with plasma renalase activity (r = -0.57, P < 0.002). By contrast, plasma epinephrine levels positively correlated with plasma renalase activity (r = 0.67, P < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with plasma renalase levels (r = -0.62, P < 0.003). A significant negative relationship was observed between urine dopamine output and urine renalase levels (r = -0.48; P < 0.03) but not with urine renalase activity (r = -0.33, NS). We conclude that plasma and urine renalase levels closely depend on renal function and sympathetic nervous system activity. It is suggested that epinephrine-mediated activation of circulating renalase may occur in renal transplant recipients with good recovery of

  16. White Matter Damage Impairs Adaptive Recovery More than Cortical Damage in an in silico Model of Activity-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Follett, Pamela L.; Roth, Cassandra; Follett, David; Dammann, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Little is understood of how damaged white matter interacts with developmental plasticity. We propose that computational neuroscience methods are underutilized in this problem. In this paper we present a non-deterministic, in silico model of activity-dependent plasticity. Using this model we compared the impact of neuronal cell loss or axonal dysfunction on the ability of the system to generate, maintain, and recover synapses. The results suggest the axonal dysfunction seen in white matter injury is a greater burden to adaptive plasticity and recovery than is the neuronal loss of cortical injury. Better understanding of the interaction between features of preterm brain injury and developmental plasticity is an essential component for improving recovery. PMID:19745092

  17. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

  18. Recovery of active N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase from inclusion bodies by solubilization with non-denaturing buffers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shih-Chin; Lin, Sung-Chyr

    2012-01-05

    Overexpression of recombinant N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase, one of the key enzymes for the synthesis of N-acetylneuraminic acid, in E. coli led to the formation of protein inclusion bodies. In this study we report the recovery of active epimerase from inclusion bodies by direct solubilization with Tris buffer. At pH 7.0, 25% of the inclusion bodies were solubilized with Tris buffer. The specific activity of the solubilized proteins, 2.08±0.02 U/mg, was similar to that of the native protein, 2.13±0.01 U/mg. The result of circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis indicated that the structure of the solubilized epimerase obtained with pH 7.0 Tris buffer was similar to that of the native epimerase purified from the clarified cell lysate. As expected, the extent of deviation in CD spectra increased with buffer pH. The total enzyme activity recovered by solubilization from inclusion bodies, 170.41±10.06 U/l, was more than 2.5 times higher than that from the clarified cell lysate, 67.32±5.53 U/l. The results reported in this study confirm the hypothesis that the aggregation of proteins into inclusion bodies is reversible and suggest that direct solubilization with non-denaturing buffers is a promising approach for the recovery of active proteins from inclusion bodies, especially for aggregation-prone multisubunit proteins.

  19. Musical intervals in speech.

    PubMed

    Ross, Deborah; Choi, Jonathan; Purves, Dale

    2007-06-05

    Throughout history and across cultures, humans have created music using pitch intervals that divide octaves into the 12 tones of the chromatic scale. Why these specific intervals in music are preferred, however, is not known. In the present study, we analyzed a database of individually spoken English vowel phones to examine the hypothesis that musical intervals arise from the relationships of the formants in speech spectra that determine the perceptions of distinct vowels. Expressed as ratios, the frequency relationships of the first two formants in vowel phones represent all 12 intervals of the chromatic scale. Were the formants to fall outside the ranges found in the human voice, their relationships would generate either a less complete or a more dilute representation of these specific intervals. These results imply that human preference for the intervals of the chromatic scale arises from experience with the way speech formants modulate laryngeal harmonics to create different phonemes.

  20. Recovery and reuse of sludge from active and passive treatment of mine drainage-impacted waters: a review.

    PubMed

    Rakotonimaro, Tsiverihasina V; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Bussière, Bruno; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Zagury, Gérald J

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of mine drainage-impacted waters generates considerable amounts of sludge, which raises several concerns, such as storage and disposal, stability, and potential social and environmental impacts. To alleviate the storage and management costs, as well as to give the mine sludge a second life, recovery and reuse have recently become interesting options. In this review, different recovery and reuse options of sludge originating from active and passive treatment of mine drainage are identified and thoroughly discussed, based on available laboratory and field studies. The most valuable products presently recovered from the mine sludge are the iron oxy-hydroxides (ochre). Other by-products include metals, elemental sulfur, and calcium carbonate. Mine sludge reuse includes the removal of contaminants, such as As, P, dye, and rare earth elements. Mine sludge can also be reused as stabilizer for contaminated soil, as fertilizer in agriculture/horticulture, as substitute material in construction, as cover over tailings for acid mine drainage prevention and control, as material to sequester carbon dioxide, and in cement and pigment industries. The review also stresses out some of the current challenges and research needs. Finally, in order to move forward, studies are needed to better estimate the contribution of sludge recovery/reuse to the overall costs of mine water treatment.

  1. Effect of free ammonia concentration on monochloramine penetration within a nitrifying biofilm and its effect on activity, viability, and recovery.

    PubMed

    Pressman, Jonathan G; Lee, Woo Hyoung; Bishop, Paul L; Wahman, David G

    2012-03-01

    Chloramine has replaced free chorine for secondary disinfection at many water utilities because of disinfection by-product (DBP) regulations. Because chloramination provides a source of ammonia, there is a potential for nitrification when using chloramines. Nitrification in drinking water distribution systems is undesirable and may result in degradation of water quality and subsequent non-compliance with existing regulations. Thus, nitrification control is a major issue and likely to become increasingly important as chloramine use increases. In this study, monochloramine penetration and its effect on nitrifying biofilm activity, viability, and recovery was investigated and evaluated using microelectrodes and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Monochloramine was applied to nitrifying biofilm for 24 h at two different chlorine to nitrogen (Cl(2):N) mass ratios (4:1 [4.4 mg Cl(2)/L] or 1:1 Cl(2):N [5.3 mg Cl(2)/L]), resulting in either a low (0.23 mg N/L) or high (4.2 mg N/L) free ammonia concentration. Subsequently, these biofilm samples were allowed to recover without monochloramine and receiving 4.2 mg N/L free ammonia. Under both monochloramine application conditions, monochloramine fully penetrated into the nitrifying biofilm within 24 h. Despite this complete monochloramine penetration, complete viability loss did not occur, and both biofilm samples subsequently recovered aerobic activity when fed only free ammonia. When monochloramine was applied with a low free ammonia concentration, dissolved oxygen (DO) fully penetrated, but with a high free ammonia concentration, complete cessation of aerobic activity (i.e., oxygen utilization) did not occur and subsequent analysis indicated that oxygen consumption still remained near the substratum. During the ammonia only recovery phase, different spatial recoveries were seen in each of the samples, based on oxygen utilization. It appears that the presence of higher free ammonia concentration allowed a

  2. Change of ascending reticular activating system with recovery from vegetative state to minimally conscious state in a stroke patient

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Chul Hoon; Jung, Young Jin; Seo, You Sung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We report on a stroke patient who showed change of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) concurrent with recovery from a vegetative state (VS) to a minimally conscious state (MCS), which was demonstrated on diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Patient concerns: A 59-year-old male patient underwent CT-guided stereotactic drainage 3 times for management of intracerebral hemorrhage and intraventricular hemorrhage. Diagnosis: After 4 months from onset, when starting rehabilitation, the patient showed impaired consciousness, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 6 and a Coma Recovery Scale-Revised score of 2. At 10 months after onset, his GCS score had recovered to 11 with a GRS-R score of 20, and he was able to perform rock–scissors–paper using his right hand according to verbal command. Interventions: On 10-month DTT, marked increased neural connectivity of the thalamic intralaminar nucleus (ILN) to the cerebral cortex was observed in both prefrontal cortexes and the right thalamus compared with 4-month DTT. However, no significant change was observed in the lower dorsal ARAS between the pontine reticular formation (PRF) and the thalamic ILN. In addition, the reconstructed lower ventral ARAS between the PRF and hypothalamus had disappeared in both hemispheres on 10-month DTT. Outcomes: Change of the ARAS was demonstrated in a stroke patient who showed recovery from a VS to an MCS. Lessons: It appeared that the prefrontal cortex and thalamus, which showed increased neural connectivity, contributed to recovery from a VS to an MCS in this patient. PMID:27930506

  3. Programming with Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakis, Nicholas D.; Gross, Thomas R.

    Intervals are a new, higher-level primitive for parallel programming with which programmers directly construct the program schedule. Programs using intervals can be statically analyzed to ensure that they do not deadlock or contain data races. In this paper, we demonstrate the flexibility of intervals by showing how to use them to emulate common parallel control-flow constructs like barriers and signals, as well as higher-level patterns such as bounded-buffer producer-consumer. We have implemented intervals as a publicly available library for Java and Scala.

  4. Light-induced hysteresis and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed metal-oxide thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Jeong-Wan; Park, Sung Kyu E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Hoon E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr

    2014-07-28

    In this report, photo-induced hysteresis, threshold voltage (V{sub T}) shift, and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are investigated. It was observed that a white light illumination caused negative V{sub T} shift along with creation of clockwise hysteresis in electrical characteristics which can be attributed to photo-generated doubly ionized oxygen vacancies at the semiconductor/gate dielectric interface. More importantly, the photochemically activated IGZO TFTs showed much reduced overall V{sub T} shift compared to thermally annealed TFTs. Reduced number of donor-like interface states creation under light illumination and more facile neutralization of ionized oxygen vacancies by electron capture under positive gate potential are claimed to be the origin of the less V{sub T} shift in photochemically activated TFTs.

  5. Unique photoluminescence degradation/recovery phenomena in trivalent ion-activated phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Kenji; Adachi, Sadao

    2015-09-14

    Photo-induced luminescence intensity degradation in red-emitting Tb{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Eu{sup 3+} (TGG:Eu{sup 3+}) phosphor is observed and studied using x-ray diffraction measurement, photoluminescence (PL) analysis, PL excitation spectroscopy, and PL decay analysis. The red-emitting TGG:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor exhibits remarkable degradation in the PL intensity under weak UV light (λ < 350 nm) exposure in the seconds time scale. The PL degradation characteristics can be well expressed by the exponential formulation with respect to exposure time. Interestingly, the PL intensity recovers after a few minutes when the phosphor is stored in a dark room or exposed to the long-wavelength (λ > 350 nm) light. The luminescence decay dynamics measured by excitation at λ{sub ex} = 355 and 266 nm suggest that the present degradation/recovery processes are caused by the electron traps formed in the TGG:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor. The Tb{sup 3+} emission in TGG shows the essentially same degradation characteristics as those observed in the TGG:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor. The present luminescence degradation/recovery phenomena of the trivalent ions (4f → 4f transitions) may universally occur in various oxide phosphors such as TGG (Tb{sup 3+} emission) and CaTiO{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}.

  6. Recovery of soil unicellular eukaryotes: an efficiency and activity analysis on the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Lentendu, Guillaume; Hübschmann, Thomas; Müller, Susann; Dunker, Susanne; Buscot, François; Wilhelm, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Eukaryotic unicellular organisms are an important part of the soil microbial community, but they are often neglected in soil functional microbial diversity analysis, principally due to the absence of specific investigation methods in the special soil environment. In this study we used a method based on high-density centrifugation to specifically isolate intact algal and yeast cells, with the aim to analyze them with flow cytometry and sort them for further molecular analysis such as deep sequencing. Recovery efficiency was tested at low abundance levels that fit those in natural environments (10(4) to 10(6) cells per g soil). Five algae and five yeast morphospecies isolated from soil were used for the testing. Recovery efficiency was between 1.5 to 43.16% and 2 to 30.2%, respectively, and was dependent on soil type for three of the algae. Control treatments without soil showed that the majority of cells were lost due to the method itself (58% and 55.8% respectively). However, the cell extraction technique did not much compromise cell vitality because a fluorescein di-acetate assay indicated high viability percentages (73.3% and 97.2% of cells, respectively). The low abundant algae and yeast morphospecies recovered from soil were cytometrically analyzed and sorted. Following, their DNA was isolated and amplified using specific primers. The developed workflow enables isolation and enrichment of intact autotrophic and heterotrophic soil unicellular eukaryotes from natural environments for subsequent application of deep sequencing technologies.

  7. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for ``data frac`` stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  8. Modified sprint interval training protocols. Part I. Physiological responses.

    PubMed

    Islam, Hashim; Townsend, Logan K; Hazell, Tom J

    2017-04-01

    Adaptations to sprint interval training (SIT) are observed with brief (≤15-s) work bouts highlighting peak power generation as an important metabolic stimulus. This study examined the effects of manipulating SIT work bout and recovery period duration on energy expenditure (EE) during and postexercise, as well as postexercise fat oxidation rates. Nine active males completed a resting control session (CTRL) and 3 SIT sessions in randomized order: (i) 30:240 (4 × 30-s bouts, 240-s recovery); (ii) 15:120 (8 × 15-s bouts, 120-s recovery); (3) 5:40 (24 × 5-s bouts, 40-s recovery). Protocols were matched for the total duration of work (2 min) and recovery (16 min), as well as the work-to-recovery ratio (1:8 s). EE and fat oxidation rates were derived from gas exchange measured before, during, and for 3 h postexercise. All protocols increased EE versus CTRL (P < 0.001). Exercise EE was greater (P < 0.001) with 5:40 (209 kcal) versus both 15:120 (163 kcal) and 30:240 (138 kcal), while 15:120 was also greater (P < 0.001) than 30:240. Postexercise EE was greater (P = 0.014) with 15:120 (313 kcal) versus 5:40 (294 kcal), though both were similar (P > 0.077) to 30:240 (309 kcal). Postexercise fat oxidation was similar (P = 0.650) after 15:120 (0.104 g·min(-1)) and 30:240 (0.116 g·min(-1)) and both were greater (P < 0.030) than 5:40 (0.072 g·min(-1)) and CTRL (0.049 g·min(-1)). In conclusion, shorter SIT work bouts that target peak power generation increase exercise EE without compromising postexercise EE, though longer bouts promote greater postexercise fat utilization.

  9. Interval estimations in metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates interval estimation for a measurand that is known to be positive. Both the Neyman and Bayesian procedures are considered and the difference between the two, not always perceived, is discussed in detail. A solution is proposed to a paradox originated by the frequentist assessment of the long-run success rate of Bayesian intervals.

  10. Direct interval volume visualization.

    PubMed

    Ament, Marco; Weiskopf, Daniel; Carr, Hamish

    2010-01-01

    We extend direct volume rendering with a unified model for generalized isosurfaces, also called interval volumes, allowing a wider spectrum of visual classification. We generalize the concept of scale-invariant opacity—typical for isosurface rendering—to semi-transparent interval volumes. Scale-invariant rendering is independent of physical space dimensions and therefore directly facilitates the analysis of data characteristics. Our model represents sharp isosurfaces as limits of interval volumes and combines them with features of direct volume rendering. Our objective is accurate rendering, guaranteeing that all isosurfaces and interval volumes are visualized in a crack-free way with correct spatial ordering. We achieve simultaneous direct and interval volume rendering by extending preintegration and explicit peak finding with data-driven splitting of ray integration and hybrid computation in physical and data domains. Our algorithm is suitable for efficient parallel processing for interactive applications as demonstrated by our CUDA implementation.

  11. Slow recovery of tropical old-field rainforest regrowth and the value and limitations of active restoration.

    PubMed

    Shoo, Luke P; Freebody, Kylie; Kanowski, John; Catterall, Carla P

    2016-02-01

    There is current debate about the potential for secondary regrowth to rescue tropical forests from an otherwise inevitable cascade of biodiversity loss due to land clearing and scant evidence to test how well active restoration may accelerate recovery. We used site chronosequences to compare developmental trajectories of vegetation between self-organized (i.e., spontaneous) forest regrowth and biodiversity plantings (established for ecological restoration, with many locally native tree species at high density) in the Australian wet tropics uplands. Across 28 regrowth sites aged 1-59 years, some structural attributes reached reference rainforest levels within 40 years, whereas wood volume and most tested components of native plant species richness (classified by species' origins, family, and ecological functions) reached less than 50% of reference rainforest values. Development of native tree and shrub richness was particularly slow among species that were wind dispersed or animal dispersed with large (>10 mm) seeds. Many species with animal-dispersed seeds were from near-basal evolutionary lineages that contribute to recognized World Heritage values of the study region. Faster recovery was recorded in 25 biodiversity plantings of 1-25 years in which wood volume developed more rapidly; native woody plant species richness reached values similar to reference rainforest and was better represented across all dispersal modes; and species from near-basal plant families were better (although incompletely) represented. Plantings and regrowth showed slow recovery in species richness of vines and epiphytes and in overall resemblance to forest in species composition. Our results can inform decision making about when and where to invest in active restoration and provide strong evidence that protecting old-growth forest is crucially important for sustaining tropical biodiversity.

  12. Biogenesis of mitochondria in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) curds subjected to temperature stress and recovery involves regulation of the complexome, respiratory chain activity, organellar translation and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Rurek, Michal; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cauliflower curd mitochondrial proteome was investigated under cold, heat and the recovery. For the first time, two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was used to study the plant mitochondrial complexome in heat and heat recovery. Particularly, changes in the complex I and complex III subunits and import proteins, and the partial disintegration of matrix complexes were observed. The presence of unassembled subunits of ATP synthase was accompanied by impairment in mitochondrial translation of its subunit. In cold and heat, the transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were uncorrelated. The in-gel activities of respiratory complexes were particularly affected after stress recovery. Despite a general stability of respiratory chain complexes in heat, functional studies showed that their activity and the ATP synthesis yield were affected. Contrary to cold stress, heat stress resulted in a reduced efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation likely due to changes in alternative oxidase (AOX) activity. Stress and stress recovery differently modulated the protein level and activity of AOX. Heat stress induced an increase in AOX activity and protein level, and AOX1a and AOX1d transcript level, while heat recovery reversed the AOX protein and activity changes. Conversely, cold stress led to a decrease in AOX activity (and protein level), which was reversed after cold recovery. Thus, cauliflower AOX is only induced by heat stress. In heat, contrary to the AOX activity, the activity of rotenone-insensitive internal NADH dehydrogenase was diminished. The relevance of various steps of plant mitochondrial biogenesis to temperature stress response and recovery is discussed.

  13. The Comparative Effects of Sports Massage, Active Recovery, and Rest in Promoting Blood Lactate Clearance After Supramaximal Leg Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Nancy A.; Zoeller, Robert F.; Robertson, Robert J.; Lephart, Scott M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the comparative effect of sports massage, active recovery, and rest on promoting blood lactate clearance after maximal anaerobic (supramaximal) leg exercise. Design and Setting: A counterbalanced experimental design with repeated measures was used. The repeated measures were the three treatment conditions. The order of the conditions was determined by random assignment to a counterbalanced test sequence. All data were collected in the Human Energy Research Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh. Subjects: Ten male competitive cyclists volunteered for this investigation. Measurements: Serial venous blood samples were drawn and analyzed for blood lactate concentration for each test condition. Results: There were significant main effects for both absolute and relative values of blood lactate concentration between the three treatment groups and across time within groups. Conclusions: After supramaximal leg exercise, active recovery produced significant decreases in both absolute and relative measures of blood lactate concentration when compared with the sports massage and rest conditions. No significant difference was found between sports massage and rest for either absolute or relative changes in blood lactate concentration. PMID:16558481

  14. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced during dark fermentation of food waste by adsorption on Amberlite IRA-67 and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Ahasa; Bonk, Fabian; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2016-10-01

    Amberlite IRA-67 and activated carbon were tested as promising candidates for carboxylic acid recovery by adsorption. Dark fermentation was performed without pH control and without addition of external inoculum at 37°C in batch mode. Lactic, acetic and butyric acids, were obtained, after 7days of fermentation. The maximum acid removal, 74%, from the Amberlite IRA-67 and 63% from activated carbon was obtained from clarified fermentation broth using 200gadsorbent/Lbroth at pH 3.3. The pH has significant effect and pH below the carboxylic acids pKa showed to be beneficial for both the adsorbents. The un-controlled pH fermentation creates acidic environment, aiding in adsorption by eliminating use of chemicals for efficient removal. This study proposes simple and easy valorization of waste to valuable chemicals.

  15. Methylprednisolone promotes recovery of neurological function after spinal cord injury: association with Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Gong-biao; Niu, Fu-wen; Zhang, Ying-chun; Du, Lin; Liang, Zhi-yuan; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Ting-zhen; Nie, Zhi-kui; Gao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Some studies have indicated that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is activated following spinal cord injury, and expression levels of specific proteins, including low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-6 phosphorylation, β-catenin, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β, are significantly altered. We hypothesized that methylprednisolone treatment contributes to functional recovery after spinal cord injury by inhibiting apoptosis and activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In the current study, 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone was injected into rats with spinal cord injury immediately post-injury and at 1 and 2 days post-injury. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores showed that methylprednisolone treatment significantly promoted locomotor functional recovery between 2 and 6 weeks post-injury. The number of surviving motor neurons increased, whereas the lesion size significantly decreased following methylprednisolone treatment at 7 days post-injury. Additionally, caspase-3, caspase-9, and Bax protein expression levels and the number of apoptotic cells were reduced at 3 and 7 days post-injury, while Bcl-2 levels at 7 days post-injury were higher in methylprednisolone-treated rats compared with saline-treated rats. At 3 and 7 days post-injury, methylprednisolone up-regulated expression and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-6 phosphorylation, β-catenin, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation. These results indicate that methylprednisolone-induced neuroprotection may correlate with activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:28123427

  16. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, December 1990--February 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedemann, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Oil Implementation Task Force was appointed to implement the US DOE's new oil research program directed toward increasing domestic oil production by expanded research on near- or mid-term enhanced oil recovery methods. An added priority is to preserve access to reservoirs that have the largest potential for oil recovery, but that are threatened by the large number of wells abandoned each year. This report describes the progress of research activities in the following areas: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; microbial technology; geoscience technology; and environmental technology. (CK)

  17. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  18. Apollo Recovery Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives include: a) Describe the organization of recovery force command and control and landing areas; b) Describe the function and timeline use of the Earth Landing System (ELS); c) Describe Stable 1 vs Stable 2 landing configurations and the function of the Command Module Uprighting System; d) Explain the activities of the helicopter and swimmer teams in egress and recovery of the crew; e)Explain the activities of the swimmer teams and primary recovery ship in recovery of the Command Module; and f) Describe several landing incidents that occurred during Apollo.

  19. The Effect of Immediate Post-Training Active and Passive Recovery Interventions on Anaerobic Performance and Lower Limb Flexibility in Professional Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Ezequiel; Lago-Peñas, Carlos; Casáis, Luis; Lago-Ballesteros, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    The capacity to recover from intense training, competition and matches is considered an important determinant in soccer performance. At present, there is no consensus on the effect of post-training recovery interventions on subsequent training session. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of active (12 min submaximal running and 8 min of static stretching) and passive recovery (20 min sitting on a bench) interventions performed immediately after a training session on anaerobic performances (CMJ, 20 m sprint and Balsom agility test) and lower limb flexibility 24 h after the training. During two experimental sessions, 31 professional soccer players participated in a randomized fully controlled trial design. The first session was designed to evaluate the player’s anaerobic performances and lower limb flexibility (pretest). After baseline measurements, participants performed a standardized soccer training during which heart rate and RPE were recorded to evaluate the training load. At the end of the training unit all players were randomly assigned to the active recovery group and the passive recovery group. A second experimental session was organized to obtain the posttest values. Players performed the same test, administered in the same order than in the first trial. No significant differences between groups were observed in heart rate and RPE. No significant effect due to recovery interventions was found on lower limb flexibility and anaerobic performances except CMJ that posttest value was significantly greater in the active recovery group than in the passive group (p < 0.05). PMID:23486836

  20. The effect of immediate post-training active and passive recovery interventions on anaerobic performance and lower limb flexibility in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Rey, Ezequiel; Lago-Peñas, Carlos; Casáis, Luis; Lago-Ballesteros, Joaquín

    2012-03-01

    The capacity to recover from intense training, competition and matches is considered an important determinant in soccer performance. At present, there is no consensus on the effect of post-training recovery interventions on subsequent training session. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of active (12 min submaximal running and 8 min of static stretching) and passive recovery (20 min sitting on a bench) interventions performed immediately after a training session on anaerobic performances (CMJ, 20 m sprint and Balsom agility test) and lower limb flexibility 24 h after the training. During two experimental sessions, 31 professional soccer players participated in a randomized fully controlled trial design. The first session was designed to evaluate the player's anaerobic performances and lower limb flexibility (pretest). After baseline measurements, participants performed a standardized soccer training during which heart rate and RPE were recorded to evaluate the training load. At the end of the training unit all players were randomly assigned to the active recovery group and the passive recovery group. A second experimental session was organized to obtain the posttest values. Players performed the same test, administered in the same order than in the first trial. No significant differences between groups were observed in heart rate and RPE. No significant effect due to recovery interventions was found on lower limb flexibility and anaerobic performances except CMJ that posttest value was significantly greater in the active recovery group than in the passive group (p < 0.05).

  1. Effects of active and passive recovery on blood lactate and blood pH after a repeated sprint protocol in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Kappenstein, Jennifer; Engel, Florian; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of active (AR) and passive recovery (PR) after a high-intensive repeated sprint running protocol on physiological parameters in children and adults. Blood lactate (La) and blood pH were obtained during two sets of 5 × 5 s all-out sprints and several times during subsequent 30-min recovery in 16 children and 16 adults. End-exercise La was significantly lower and pH significantly higher in children (La: 5.21 ± 2.73 mmol·L-1; pH: 7.37 ± 0.06) compared with adults (La: 10.35 ± 5.76 mmol·L-1; pH: 7.27 ± 0.10) (p < .01). La half-life during postexercise recovery was significantly shorter in children (AR: 436 ± 371 s, PR: 830 ± 349 s) than in adults (AR: 733 ± 371 s, PR: 1361 ± 372 s), as well as in active compared with passive recovery for both age groups (p < .01). The age x recovery interaction for La half-life only approached statistical significance (p = .06). The results suggest a faster lactate disappearance and an earlier return to resting pH after a repeated sprint running protocol in children compared with adults and a less pronounced advantage of active recovery in children.

  2. The cyanobacterial Fluorescence Recovery Protein has two distinct activities: Orange Carotenoid Protein amino acids involved in FRP interaction.

    PubMed

    Thurotte, Adrien; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Wilson, Adjélé; Talbot, Léa; Cot, Sandrine; López-Igual, Rocio; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2017-04-01

    To deal with fluctuating light condition, cyanobacteria have developed a photoprotective mechanism which, under high light conditions, decreases the energy arriving at the photochemical centers. It relies on a photoswitch, the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP). Once photoactivated, OCP binds to the light harvesting antenna, the phycobilisome (PBS), and triggers the thermal dissipation of the excess energy absorbed. Deactivation of the photoprotective mechanism requires the intervention of a third partner, the Fluorescence Recovery Protein (FRP). FRP by interacting with the photoactivated OCP accelerates its conversion to the non-active form and its detachment from the phycobilisome. We have studied the interaction of FRP with free and phycobilisome-bound OCP. Several OCP variants were constructed and characterized. In this article we show that OCP amino acid F299 is essential and D220 important for OCP deactivation mediated by FRP. Mutations of these amino acids did not affect FRP activity as helper to detach OCP from phycobilisomes. In addition, while mutated R60L FRP is inactive on OCP deactivation, its activity on the detachment of the OCP from the phycobilisomes is not affected. Thus, our results demonstrate that FRP has two distinct activities: it accelerates OCP detachment from phycobilisomes and then it helps deactivation of the OCP. They also suggest that different OCP and FRP amino acids could be involved in these two activities.

  3. Fluvoxamine moderates reduced voluntary activity following chronic dexamethasone infusion in mice via recovery of BDNF signal cascades.

    PubMed

    Terada, Kazuki; Izumo, Nobuo; Suzuki, Biora; Karube, Yoshiharu; Morikawa, Tomomi; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Kameyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Koji; Sasaki, Noriko; Iwata, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Manabe, Takayuki

    2014-04-01

    Major depression is a complex disorder characterized by genetic and environmental interactions. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) effectively treat depression. Neurogenesis following chronic antidepressant treatment activates brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the SSRI fluvoxamine (Flu) on locomotor activity and forced-swim behavior using chronic dexamethasone (cDEX) infusions in mice, which engenders depression-like behavior. Infusion of cDEX decreased body weight and produced a trend towards lower locomotor activity during darkness. In the forced-swim test, cDEX-mice exhibited increased immobility times compared with mice administered saline. Flu treatment reversed decreased locomotor activity and mitigated forced-swim test immobility. Real-time polymerase chain reactions using brain RNA samples yielded significantly lower BDNF mRNA levels in cDEX-mice compared with the saline group. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) gene expression was lower in cDEX-mice compared with the saline group. However, marked expression of the XBP1 gene was observed in cDEX-mice treated with Flu compared with mice given saline and untreated cDEX-mice. Expression of 5-HT2A and Sigma-1 receptors decreased after cDEX infusion compared with the saline group, and these decreases normalized to control levels upon Flu treatment. Our results indicate that the Flu moderates reductions in voluntary activity following chronic dexamethasone infusions in mice via recovery of BDNF signal cascades.

  4. Protein kinase C activator, bryostatin-1, promotes exercise-dependent functional recovery in rats with cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Kenmei; Sonoda, Shigeru; Wakita, Hideaki; Shimpo, Kan

    2015-03-01

    Recently, it has become widely known that neuronal reorganization in the perilesional cortex contributes to some improvement of hemiparesis after stroke. Here, the authors examined in vivo the effects of administration of bryostatin-1, an activator of protein kinase C, combined with voluntary exercise on functional recovery and on cortical phosphorylation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor subunit GluR1 after infarction.In behavioral evaluation, the mean latency until falling from a rotating rod in the group with exercise and administered agent at 8 days after infarction was significantly longer than that in the other groups. Although there were no significant changes in GluR1 phosphorylation between bryostatin-1 administration alone and the untreated groups, exercise induced an increase in phosphorylated-Ser845-GluR1. Moreover, combining exercise with administration led to increased phosphorylated-Ser831-GluR1.These results suggest that bryostatin-1 facilitated exercise-induced paralysis recovery, which is possibly mediated by synaptic plasticity related to an increase in synaptic transmission efficiency.

  5. Accelerated recovery of renal mitochondrial and tubule homeostasis with SIRT1/PGC-1α activation following ischemia–reperfusion injury

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Jason A.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2013-12-01

    Kidney ischemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury elicits cellular injury in the proximal tubule, and mitochondrial dysfunction is a pathological consequence of I/R. Promoting mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) as a repair mechanism after injury may offer a unique strategy to restore both mitochondrial and organ function. Rats subjected to bilateral renal pedicle ligation for 22 min were treated once daily with the SIRT1 activator SRT1720 (5 mg/kg) starting 24 h after reperfusion until 72 h–144 h. SIRT1 expression was elevated in the renal cortex of rats after I/R + vehicle treatment (IRV), but was associated with less nuclear localization. SIRT1 expression was even further augmented and nuclear localization was restored in the kidneys of rats after I/R + SRT1720 treatment (IRS). PGC-1α was elevated at 72 h–144 h in IRV and IRS kidneys; however, SRT1720 treatment induced deacetylation of PGC-1α, a marker of activation. Mitochondrial proteins ATP synthase β, COX I, and NDUFB8, as well as mitochondrial respiration, were diminished 24 h–144 h in IRV rats, but were partially or fully restored in IRS rats. Urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) was persistently elevated in both IRV and IRS rats; however, KIM-1 tissue expression was attenuated in IRS rats. Additionally, sustained loss of Na{sup +},K{sup +}–ATPase expression and basolateral localization and elevated vimentin in IRV rats was normalized in IRS rats, suggesting restoration of a differentiated, polarized tubule epithelium. The results suggest that SRT1720 treatment expedited recovery of mitochondrial protein expression and function by enhancing MB, which was associated with faster proximal tubule repair. Targeting MB may offer unique therapeutic strategy following ischemic injury. - Highlights: • We examined recovery of mitochondrial and renal function after ischemia–reperfusion. • SRT1720 treatment after I/R induced mitochondrial biogenesis via SIRT1/PGC-1α. • Recovery of mitochondrial function was

  6. Spontaneous electrical activities at myofascial trigger points at different stages of recovery from injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiang-Min; Lv, Jiao-Jiao; Ruanshi, Qiong-Mei; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous electrical activity (SEA) is a feature of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs), which can either be latent or active. However, SEA at different stages of recovery from MTrPs remains unclear. Objective To investigate the temporal changes in the nature of SEA after generation of MTrPs in a rat model. Methods 32 rats were divided into four groups: 24 rats were assigned to experimental groups (EGs), which underwent the MTrP modelling intervention and 8 were allocated to a control group (CG). All EG rats received a blunt strike to the left vastus medialis combined with eccentric exercise for 8 weeks. After modelling, the EG rats were subdivided into three groups with total recovery times of 4, 8 and 12 weeks (EG-4w, EG-8w and EG-12w, respectively). Taut bands (TBs) with and without the presence of active MTrPs were identified in the left hind limb muscles of all rats, verified by SEA and further examined with electromyography recordings. Myoelectrical signals were also categorised into one of five types. Results CG rats had fewer TBs than EG rats and EGs showed variable frequencies of SEA. SEA frequencies were higher in EG-4w than in EG-8w and EG-12w groups (240.57±72.9 vs 168.14±64.5 and 151.63±65.4, respectively, p<0.05) and were significantly greater in all EGs than in the CG (55.75±21.9). Relative to CG rats, amplitudes and durations of electrical potentials in the EG were only increased in the EG-8w and EG-12w groups. Types IV and V myoelectrical signals were never seen in latent MTrPs and type V signals did not occur in EG-4w rats. Conclusions Increasing recovery periods following a MTrP modelling intervention in rats are characterised by different frequencies and amplitudes of SEA from TBs. Trial registration number 2014012. PMID:25971282

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; D.P. Nagle, Jr.; Kathleen Duncan; N. Youssef; M.J. Folmsbee; S. Maudgakya

    2003-06-26

    Biosurfactants enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation by increasing apparent aqueous solubility or affecting the association of the cell with poorly soluble hydrocarbon. Here, we show that a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon from sand-packed columns when a viscosifying agent and a low molecular weight alcohol were present. The amount of residual hydrocarbon mobilized depended on the biosurfactant concentration. One pore volume of cell-free culture fluid with 900 mg/l of the biosurfactant, 10 mM 2,3-butanediol and 1000 mg/l of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer mobilized 82% of the residual hydrocarbon. Consistent with the high residual oil recoveries, we found that the bio-surfactant lowered the interfacial tension (IFT) between oil and water by nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared to typical IFT values of 28-29 mN/m. Increasing the salinity increased the IFT with or without 2,3-butanediol present. The lowest interfacial tension observed was 0.1 mN/m. The lipopeptide biosurfactant system may be effective in removing hydrocarbon contamination sources in soils and aquifers and for the recovery of entrapped oil from low production oil reservoirs. Previously, we reported that Proteose peptone was necessary for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production by B. mojavensis JF-2. The data gathered from crude purification of the growth-enhancing factor in Proteose peptone suggested that it consisted of nucleic acids; however, nucleic acid bases, nucleotides or nucleosides did not replace the requirement for Proteose Peptone. Further studies revealed that salmon sperm DNA, herring sperm DNA, Echerichia coli DNA and synthetic DNA replaced the requirement for Proteose peptone. In addition to DNA, amino acids and nitrate were required for anaerobic growth and vitamins further improved growth. We now have a defined medium that can be used to manipulate growth and biosurfactant

  8. Interpretation of Confidence Interval Facing the Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Luisa; Fernández, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    As literature has reported, it is usual that university students in statistics courses, and even statistics teachers, interpret the confidence level associated with a confidence interval as the probability that the parameter value will be between the lower and upper interval limits. To confront this misconception, class activities have been…

  9. Heterogeneous Niche Activity of Ex-Vivo Expanded MSCs as Factor for Variable Outcomes in Hematopoietic Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Lee, Ho-Sun; Choi, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Jin-A; Chu, In-Sun; Leem, Sun-Hee; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2016-01-01

    Ex-vivo expanded mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly used for paracrine support of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regeneration, but inconsistent outcomes have hindered ongoing clinical trials. Here, we show that significant heterogeneity in the niche activity of MSCs is created during their culture in various serum-supplemented media. The MSCs cultured under stimulatory or non-stimulatory culture conditions exhibited differences in colony forming unit-fibroblast contents, expression levels of cross-talk molecules (Jagged-1 and CXCL-12) and their support for HSC self-renewal. Accordingly, the enhancing effects of MSCs on hematopoietic engraftment were only visible when HSCs were co-transplanted with MSCs under stimulatory conditions. Of note, these differences in MSCs and their effects on HSCs were readily reversed by switching the cultures, indicating that the difference in niche activity can be caused by distinct functional state, rather than by clonal heterogeneity. Supporting the findings, transcriptomic analysis showed distinct upstream signaling pathways such as inhibition of P53 and activation of ER-stress response gene ATF4 for MSCs under stimulatory conditions. Taken together, our study shows that the niche activity of MSCs can vary rapidly by the extrinsic cues during culture causing variable outcomes in hematopoietic recoveries, and point to the possibility that MSCs can be pre-screened for more predictable efficacy in various cell therapy trials. PMID:28030562

  10. Mutagenic activity in disinfected waters and recovery of the potent bacterial mutagen "MX" from water by XAD resin adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backlund, Peter; Wondergem, Erik; Kronberg, Leif

    Chlorination of humic water generated mutagenic activity in the Ames test. The formation of the potent bacterial mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and mutagenic activity were favoured by acidic chlorination conditions and high chlorine doses. Chlorinated humic waters from different locations differed slightly in the level of mutagenicity as well as in the proportion of activity derived from MX. Chlorination of an industrially polluted surface water with a low content of humic material generated an approximately equal level of mutagenicity (per mg of DOC) as that of chlorinated humic water, but only a minor part (26%) of the activity could be explained by the presence of MX. The mutagenicity and the amount of MX generated were substantially lower when using combined treatment methods (ClO2+Cl2, O3+Cl2) or when substituting chlorine by monochloramine or chlorine dioxide. The recovery of MX by XAD adsorption from water acidified to pH 2 was found to be quantitative.

  11. Reverting p53 activation after recovery of cellular stress to resume with cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Pedro A

    2017-05-01

    The activation of p53 in response to different types of cellular stress induces several protective reactions including cell cycle arrest, senescence or cell death. These protective effects are a consequence of the activation of p53 by specific phosphorylation performed by several kinases. The reversion of the cell cycle arrest, induced by p53, is a consequence of the phosphorylated and activated p53, which triggers its own downregulation and that of its positive regulators. The different down-regulatory processes have a sequential and temporal order of events. The mechanisms implicated in p53 down-regulation include phosphatases, deacetylases, and protein degradation by the proteasome or autophagy, which also affect different p53 protein targets and functions. The necessary first step is the dephosphorylation of p53 to make it available for interaction with mdm2 ubiquitin-ligase, which requires the activation of phosphatases targeting both p53 and p53-activating kinases. In addition, deacetylation of p53 is required to make lysine residues accessible to ubiquitin ligases. The combined action of these downregulatory mechanisms brings p53 protein back to its basal levels, and cell cycle progression can resume if cells have overcome the stress or damage situation. The specific targeting of these down-regulatory mechanisms can be exploited for therapeutic purposes in cancers harbouring wild-type p53.

  12. The influence of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity and beta-1 receptor selectivity on the recovery of finger skin temperature after finger cooling in normotensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Lenders, J W; Salemans, J; de Boo, T; Lemmens, W A; Thien, T; van't Laar, A

    1986-03-01

    A double-blind randomized study was designed to investigate differences in the recovery of finger skin temperature after finger cooling during dosing with placebo or one of four beta-blockers: propranolol, atenolol, pindolol, and acebutolol. In 11 normotensive nonsmoking subjects, finger skin temperature was measured with a thermocouple before and 20 minutes after immersion of one hand in a water bath at 16 degrees C. This finger cooling test caused no significant changes in systemic hemodynamics such as arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and forearm blood flow. The recovery of finger skin temperature during propranolol dosing was better than that during pindolol and atenolol dosing. There were no differences between the recoveries of skin temperature during pindolol, atenolol, and acebutolol dosing. Thus we could demonstrate no favorable effect of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity or beta 1-selectivity on the recovery of finger skin temperature after finger cooling.

  13. Group cohesion and between session homework activities predict self-reported cognitive-behavioral skill use amongst participants of SMART Recovery groups.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Peter J; Deane, Frank P; Baker, Amanda L

    2015-04-01

    SMART Recovery groups are cognitive-behaviorally oriented mutual support groups for individuals with addictions. The aim of the study was to assess the extent to which the quality of group facilitation, group cohesion and the use of between session homework activities contribute to self-rated use of cognitive-behavioral skills amongst group participants. Participants attending SMART Recovery groups in Australia completed a cross sectional survey (N=124). The survey included measures of cognitive and behavioral skill utilization, group cohesion, quality of group facilitation and a rating of how frequently participants leave group meetings with an achievable between session homework plan. On average, participants had been attending SMART Recovery meetings for 9 months. Participants were most likely to attend SMART Recovery for problematic alcohol use. Regression analyses indicated that group cohesion significantly predicted use of cognitive restructuring, but that only provision of homework at the end of each group session predicted self-reported behavioral activation. Both group cohesion and leaving a group with an achievable homework plan predicted participant use of cognitive behavioral skills. The concrete actions associated with homework activities may facilitate behavioral activation. There is a need for longitudinal research to examine the relationship between the utilization of cognitive and behavioral skills and participant outcomes (e.g. substance use, mental health) for people attending SMART Recovery groups.

  14. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, K.; Wickner, W.T. )

    1989-11-01

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl {beta}-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure ({sup 35}S)pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components.

  15. Testing Predictions of the Interactive Activation Model in Recovery from Aphasia after Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokel, Regina; Rochon, Elizabeth; Leonard, Carol

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of pre- and post-treatment error analysis from an aphasic patient with anomia. The Interactive Activation (IA) model of word production (Dell, Schwartz, Martin, Saffran, & Gagnon, 1997) is utilized to make predictions about the anticipated changes on a picture naming task and to explain emerging patterns.…

  16. The effectiveness of a work style intervention and a lifestyle physical activity intervention on the recovery from neck and upper limb symptoms in computer workers.

    PubMed

    Bernaards, Claire M; Ariëns, Geertje A M; Knol, Dirk L; Hildebrandt, Vincent H

    2007-11-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a single intervention targeting work style and a combined intervention targeting work style and physical activity on the recovery from neck and upper limb symptoms. Computer workers with frequent or long-term neck and upper limb symptoms were randomised into the work style group (WS, n=152), work style and physical activity group (WSPA, n=156), or usual care group (n=158). The WS and WSPA group attended six group meetings. All meetings focused on behavioural change with regard to body posture, workplace adjustment, breaks and coping with high work demands (WS and WSPA group) and physical activity (WSPA group). Pain, disability at work, days with symptoms and months without symptoms were measured at baseline and after 6 (T1) and 12 months (T2). Self-reported recovery was assessed at T1/T2. Both interventions were ineffective in improving recovery. The work style intervention but not the combined intervention was effective in reducing all pain measures. These effects were present in the neck/shoulder, not in the arm/wrist/hand. For the neck/shoulder, the work style intervention group also showed an increased recovery-rate. Total physical activity increased in all study groups but no differences between groups were observed. To conclude, a group-based work style intervention focused on behavioural change was effective in improving recovery from neck/shoulder symptoms and reducing pain on the long-term. The combined intervention was ineffective in increasing total physical activity. Therefore we cannot draw conclusions on the effect of increasing physical activity on the recovery from neck and upper limb symptoms.

  17. Enzyme-dependent fluorescence recovery of NADH after photobleaching to assess dehydrogenase activity of isolated perfused hearts

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Angel; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Jaimes, Rafael; Kay, Matthew W.

    2017-01-01

    Reduction of NAD+ by dehydrogenase enzymes to form NADH is a key component of cellular metabolism. In cellular preparations and isolated mitochondria suspensions, enzyme-dependent fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (ED-FRAP) of NADH has been shown to be an effective approach for measuring the rate of NADH production to assess dehydrogenase enzyme activity. Our objective was to demonstrate how dehydrogenase activity could be assessed within the myocardium of perfused hearts using NADH ED-FRAP. This was accomplished using a combination of high intensity UV pulses to photobleach epicardial NADH. Replenishment of epicardial NADH fluorescence was then imaged using low intensity UV illumination. NADH ED-FRAP parameters were optimized to deliver 23.8 mJ of photobleaching light energy at a pulse width of 6 msec and a duty cycle of 50%. These parameters provided repeatable measurements of NADH production rate during multiple metabolic perturbations, including changes in perfusate temperature, electromechanical uncoupling, and acute ischemia/reperfusion injury. NADH production rate was significantly higher in every perturbation where the energy demand was either higher or uncompromised. We also found that NADH production rate remained significantly impaired after 10 min of reperfusion after global ischemia. Overall, our results indicate that myocardial NADH ED-FRAP is a useful optical non-destructive approach for assessing dehydrogenase activity. PMID:28361886

  18. Leisure as a context for active living, recovery, health and life quality for persons with mental illness in a global context

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Coyle, Catherine P.; Shank, John W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Globally, the mental health system is being transformed into a strengths-based, recovery-oriented system of care, to which the concept of active living is central. Based on an integrative review of the literature, this paper presents a heuristic conceptual framework of the potential contribution that enjoyable and meaningful leisure experiences can have in active living, recovery, health and life quality among persons with mental illness. This framework is holistic and reflects the humanistic approach to mental illness endorsed by the United Nations and the World Health Organization. It also includes ecological factors such as health care systems and environmental factors as well as cultural influences that can facilitate and/or hamper recovery, active living and health/life quality. Unique to this framework is our conceptualization of active living from a broad-based and meaning-oriented perspective rather than the traditional, narrower conceptualization which focuses on physical activity and exercise. Conceptualizing active living in this manner suggests a unique and culturally sensitive potential for leisure experiences to contribute to recovery, health and life quality. In particular, this paper highlights the potential of leisure engagements as a positive, strengths-based and potentially cost-effective means for helping people better deal with the challenges of living with mental illness. PMID:20543204

  19. Effect of fire on soil microbial composition and activity in a Pinus canariensis forest and over time recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez Rojas, Irene; Fernández Lugo, Silvia; Arévalo Sierra, Jose Ramon; Pérez Fernández, María

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires are recurrent disturbances to forest ecosystems of Pinus canariensis, but their effects on soil microbial communities are not well characterized and have not previously been compared directly. Effects of fires on soil biotic properties are strongly dependent on the intensity of the fire, as well as on the type of soil and vegetation cover. This study aims at developing a comprehensive picture of the soil and vegetation dynamics to natural fries in an experiment comprising prescribed burning. The study was conducted at sites with similar soil, climatic, and other properties in a Canary pine forest in the Canary Islands, Spain. Soil microbial communities were assessed following four treatments: control, burnt soil the day after the fire, burnt soil three months after the fire and burnt soil six months after the. Burn treatments were conducted by the stuff from Cabildo de Canarias (Spain) on the 4th and 5th of June 2014. As a general rule, the organic carbon and the microbial biomass tend to decrease in the surface horizon after the fire, but the system responds increasing microbial activities and restoring soil variables in the subsequent months after the burning. Microbial biomass carbon significantly decreased in the burnt soils with their maximum negative effect immediately after the fire and during autumn, six months after the fire. Microbial biomass nitrogen also decreased in the burnt site immediately after the fire but increased in the following months, probably because of microbial assimilation of the increased amounts of available NH4+ and NO3- due to burning. Bacterial community composition was analyzed by metagenomics analyses Illumina showing strong variations amongst horizons and burning treatment both in total numbers and their composition. Changes in plant community were also monitored at the level of germination and plant recovery. Although fire negatively affects germination, seedling survival improves by increased growth rates of seedlings

  20. Blockade and recovery of spontaneous rhythmic activity after application of neurotransmitter antagonists to spinal networks of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Chub, N; O'Donovan, M J

    1998-01-01

    We studied the regulation of spontaneous activity in the embryonic (day 10-11) chick spinal cord. After bath application of either an excitatory amino acid (AP-5 or CNQX) and a nicotinic cholinergic (DHbetaE or mecamylamine) antagonist, or glycine and GABA receptor (bicuculline, 2-hydroxysaclofen, and strychnine) antagonists, spontaneous activity was blocked for a period (30-90 min) but then reappeared in the presence of the drugs. The efficacy of the antagonists was assessed by their continued ability to block spinal reflex pathways during the reappearance of spontaneous activity. Spontaneous activity ceased over the 4-5 hour monitoring period when both sets of antagonists were applied together. After application of glycine and GABA receptor antagonists, the frequency of occurrence of spontaneous episodes slowed and became highly variable. By contrast, during glutamatergic and nicotinic cholinergic blockade, the frequency of occurrence of spontaneous episodes initially slowed and then recovered to stabilize near the predrug level of activity. Whole-cell recordings made from ventral spinal neurons revealed that this recovery was accompanied by an increase in the amplitude of spontaneously occurring synaptic events. We also measured changes in the apparent equilibrium potential of the rhythmic, synaptic drive of ventral spinal neurons using voltage or discontinuous current clamp. After excitatory blockade, the apparent equilibrium potential of the rhythmic synaptic drive shifted approximately 10 mV more negative to approximately -30 mV. In the presence of bicuculline, the apparent equilibrium potential of the synaptic drive shifted toward the glutamate equilibrium potential. Considered with other evidence, these findings suggest that spontaneous rhythmic output is a general property of developing spinal networks, and that GABA and glycinergic networks alter their function to compensate for the blockade of excitatory transmission.

  1. Reading Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joanna R., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the Arizona Reading Journal focuses on the theme "reading recovery" and includes the following articles: "Why Is an Inservice Programme for Reading Recovery Teachers Necessary?" (Marie M. Clay); "What Is Reading Recovery?" (Gay Su Pinnell); "Teaching a Hard To Teach Child" (Constance A.…

  2. Adsorption of arsenic from water and its recovery as a highly active photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Hott, Rodrigo C; Andrade, Thaina G; Santos, Mayra S; Lima, Anne C F; Faria, Márcia C S; Bomfeti, Cleide A; Barbosa, Fernando; Maia, Luiz F O; Oliveira, Luiz C A; Pereira, Márcio C; Rodrigues, Jairo L

    2016-11-01

    The contamination of water with arsenic has aroused concern around the world due to its toxic effects. Thus, the development of low-cost technologies for treating water contaminated with toxic metals is highly advisable. Adsorption is an attractive technology for purification of contaminated water, but it only transfers the contaminant from water to the solid adsorbent, which provokes another problem related to solid residue disposal. In this work, we developed a sustainable method for purifying water contaminated with arsenic by using δ-FeOOH nanoparticles. The adsorption capacities of nanomaterial for As(3+) and As(5+) species were 40 and 41 mg g(-1), respectively, and were highly efficient to purify arsenic-contaminated water from a Brazilian river. The concentration of arsenic in water was close to zero after the water treatment by δ-FeOOH. Once the arsenic is adsorbed, it can be recovered by treatment with NaOH solutions. Approximately 85 % of the total adsorbed arsenic could be recovered and used as a precursor to produce useful material (Ag3AsO4) with excellent photocatalytic activity. It was active under visible light and had a high recyclability for oxidation of rhodamine B. Finally, the simple method described is promising to design sustainable process of environmental remediation with minimum residue generation.

  3. Biosynthesis and recovery of rod-shaped tellurium nanoparticles and their bactericidal activities

    SciTech Connect

    Zare, Bijan; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Shakibaie, Mojtaba; Rezaie, Sassan; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Biosynthesis of rod shape tellurium nanoparticles with a hexagonal crystal structure. ► Extraction procedure for isolation of tellurium nanoparticles from Bacillus sp. BZ. ► Extracted tellurium nanoparticles have good bactericidal activity against some bacteria. -- Abstract: In this study, a tellurium-transforming Bacillus sp. BZ was isolated from the Caspian Sea in northern Iran. The isolate was identified by various tests and 16S rDNA analysis, and then used to prepare elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The isolate was subsequently used for the intracellular biosynthesis of elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The biogenic nanoparticles were released by liquid nitrogen and purified by an n-octyl alcohol water extraction system. The shape, size, and composition of the extracted nanoparticles were characterized. The transmission electron micrograph showed rod-shaped nanoparticles with dimensions of about 20 nm × 180 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction spectra respectively demonstrated that the extracted nanoparticles consisted of only tellurium and have a hexagonal crystal structure. This is the first study to demonstrate a biological method for synthesizing rod-shaped elemental tellurium by a Bacillus sp., its extraction and its antibacterial activity against different clinical isolates.

  4. Beryllium implant activation and damage recovery study in n-type GaSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, N.; Behzadirad, M.; Renteria, Emma J.; Shima, D. M.; Muniz, Ayse J.; Busani, T.; Lavrova, Olga; Balakrishnan, G.; Lester, L. F.

    2014-03-01

    Damage induced by the implantation of beryllium in n-type GaSb and its removal by Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) are studied in detail by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Cross Sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (XTEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). RTA has been implemented with different times and temperatures in order to optimize ion activation and to avoid Sb outdiffusion during the process. Results indicate a lattice quality that is close to pristine GaSb for samples annealed at 600 °C for 10s using a thick Si3N4 capping layer. Electrical response of the implanted diodes is measured and characterized as function of different annealing conditions.

  5. An intelligent active force control algorithm to control an upper extremity exoskeleton for motor recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbullah Mohd Isa, Wan; Taha, Zahari; Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Fikri Muhammad, Khairul; Abdo Hashem, Mohammed; Mahmud, Jamaluddin; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton by means of an intelligent active force control (AFC) mechanism. The Newton-Euler formulation was used in deriving the dynamic modelling of both the anthropometry based human upper extremity as well as the exoskeleton that consists of the upper arm and the forearm. A proportional-derivative (PD) architecture is employed in this study to investigate its efficacy performing joint-space control objectives. An intelligent AFC algorithm is also incorporated into the PD to investigate the effectiveness of this hybrid system in compensating disturbances. The Mamdani Fuzzy based rule is employed to approximate the estimated inertial properties of the system to ensure the AFC loop responds efficiently. It is found that the IAFC-PD performed well against the disturbances introduced into the system as compared to the conventional PD control architecture in performing the desired trajectory tracking.

  6. Is physical activity beneficial for recovery in temporal lobe epilepsy? Evidences from animal studies.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão

    2009-03-01

    Exposure to different physical and cognitive stimulus have been shown to induce extensive neuronal plasticity in both undamaged and injured central nervous system, such as enhanced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, up-regulation of neurotrophic factors and improved learning and memory. Neuronal plasticity also is found during certain neurodegenerative conditions, including the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). TLE is the most common form of partial epilepsy, characterized by atrophy of mesial temporal structures, mossy fiber sprouting, spontaneous recurrent seizures and cognitive deficits. In view of the fact that physical activity has been found to be beneficial for treating animal models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases, there is considerable interest in determining the efficacy of this strategy for preventing or treating chronic TLE. This review discusses the positive effects of program of physical exercise in experimental models of epilepsy. Thus, considerations of the potential application of physical exercise strategy for preventing or treating TLE are highlighted.

  7. Autonomic characteristics of defensive hostility: reactivity and recovery to active and passive stressors.

    PubMed

    Vella, Elizabeth J; Friedman, Bruce H

    2007-11-01

    The autonomic characteristics of hostility and defensiveness were assessed in 55 male undergraduates based on composite Cook Medley Hostility (Chost) and Marlowe Crowne Social Desirability (MC) scores to create 4 groups: Defensive Hostile (DH; high MC, high Chost), High Hostile (HH; low MC, high Chost), Defensive (Def; high MC, low Chost) and Low Hostile (LH; low MC, low Chost). All subjects engaged in a video game (VG) and hand cold pressor (CP) task. Cardiovascular responses in DH subjects were predicted to show enhanced sympathetic alpha and beta-adrenergic activity and the least vagal control compared to others across tasks. DH and LH men showed significant heart rate reactivity to the CP task compared to HH men. LH men showed significant reductions in high frequency power (vagal assessment) to the tasks compared to HH men. Future studies may employ harassment techniques and include the factors of gender and ethnicity in their assessments.

  8. Electroacupuncture treatment partly promotes the recovery time of postoperative ileus by activating the vagus nerve but not regulating local inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jun-fan; Fang, Jian-qiao; Shao, Xiao-mei; Du, Jun-ying; Liang, Yi; Wang, Wen; Liu, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) after abdominal surgery significantly lowers the life quality of patients and increase hospital costs. However, few treatment strategies have successfully shortened the duration of POI. Electroacupuncture (EA) is a modern way of administering acupuncture and widely used in various gastrointestinal (GI) diseases in the world. Here, we studied the effect of EA on POI and its underlying mechanisms. Intestinal manipulation resulted in significant delays of GI transit, colonic transit and gastric emptying. Surgery also up-regulated c-fos in nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and induced inflammation response in the small intestine. Further, operation and inhale anesthesia inhibited NTS neuron excitation duration for the whole observation time. EA administered at ST36 indeed shortened the recovery time of GI and colonic transit, and significantly increased the gastric emptying. EA also significantly activated the NTS neurons after operation. However, there was no anti-inflammation effect of EA during the whole experiment. Finally, atropine blocked the regulatory effect of EA on GI function, when it was injected after surgery, but not before surgery. Thus, the regulatory effect of EA on POI was mainly mediated by exciting NTS neurons to improve the GI tract transit function but not by activating cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:28051128

  9. The development of the Be Active & Relax “Vitality in Practice” (VIP) project and design of an RCT to reduce the need for recovery in office employees

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence to suggest that multiple work-related health problems are preceded by a higher need for recovery. Physical activity and relaxation are helpful in decreasing the need for recovery. This article aims to describe (1) the development and (2) the design of the evaluation of a daily physical activity and relaxation intervention to reduce the need for recovery in office employees. Methods/Design The study population will consist of employees of a Dutch financial service provider. The intervention was systematically developed, based on parts of the Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol. Assessment of employees needs was done by combining results of face-to-face interviews, a questionnaire and focus group interviews. A set of theoretical methods and practical strategies were selected which resulted in an intervention program consisting of Group Motivational Interviewing (GMI) supported by a social media platform, and environmental modifications. The Be Active & Relax program will be evaluated in a modified 2 X 2 factorial design. The environmental modifications will be pre-stratified and GMI will be randomised on department level. The program will be evaluated, using 4 arms: (1) GMI and environmental modifications; (2) environmental modifications; (3) GMI; (4) no intervention (control group). Questionnaire data on the primary outcome (need for recovery) and secondary outcomes (daily physical activity, sedentary behaviour, relaxation/detachment, work- and health-related factors) will be gathered at baseline (T0), at 6 months (T1), and at 12 months (T2) follow-up. In addition, an economic and a process evaluation will be performed. Discussion Reducing the need for recovery is hypothesized to be beneficial for employees, employers and society. It is assumed that there will be a reduction in need for recovery after 6 months and 12 months in the intervention group, compared to the control group. Results are expected in 2013. Trial

  10. Effect of prolonged freezing of semen on exosome recovery and biologic activity.

    PubMed

    Welch, Jennifer L; Madison, Marisa N; Margolick, Joseph B; Galvin, Shannon; Gupta, Phalguni; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Dash, Chandravanu; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2017-03-24

    Exosomes are important vehicles of intercellular communication that shape host responses to physiologic, tumorigenic, and pathogenic conditions. The composition and function of exosomes are dynamic and depends on the state and condition of the cellular source. In prior work, we found that semen exosomes (SE) from healthy donors who do not use illicit drugs potently inhibit HIV-1. Following semen donation, specimens are either used immediately or frozen for use at a later time. It has been shown that short-term freezing of semen has no effect on SE-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. However, the effect of illicit drugs and prolonged freezing on SE bioactivity is unknown. Here, we show preservation of SE physical properties, (morphology, concentration, intensity/size) irrespective of illicit drug use or duration of semen freezing. Interestingly, illicit drugs and prolonged freezing decreased the levels of SE-bound CD63/CD9 and acetylcholinesterase activity respectively. Furthermore, we show differential effects of illicit drug use and prolonged freezing on SE-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. Our results highlight the importance of the source of SE and condition of semen storage on SE content and function. In-depth evaluation of donor drug-use and duration of semen storage on SE cargo and bioactivity will advance our understanding of SE composition and function.

  11. Magnetic recovery of modified activated carbon powder used for removal of endocrine disruptors present in water.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Chiara Caterina; Fabbri, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    This paper was aimed at studying sustainable solutions for the treatment of water polluted by octylphenols and nonylphenols that are xenoextrogen compounds affecting human health and dangerous for the aquatic environment. We studied the removal of 4-octylphenol and 4-n-nonylphenol with concentrations of the order of 5-10 mg/l on a laboratory scale. A mixing time of 10 min with 0.1 g/l of magnetic-activated carbons (MACs) was enough to obtain 95 +/- 5% adsorption of both 4-octylphenol and 4-n-nonylphenol. The adsorption of the surfactants IGEPAL CO-630 and TRITON X-100, which are precursors of branched 4-nonylphenol and the carcinogenic 4-tert-octylphenol, respectively, was also studied using the same technique. For concentrations between 2 and 10mg/l of these alkylphenols ethoxylated, after 10min mixing with 0.5 g/l of MACs, a 95 +/- 5% adsorption was obtained. A 97 +/- 1% removal of MACs was achieved after 10min of continuous-flow magnetic filtration (14.5 l/min). The filter used was made of SUS440C magnetic steel spheres. Srm-Co permanent magnets provided a uniform flux density field of about 500 mT.

  12. Psychophysiological activation during preparation, performance, and recovery in high- and low-anxious music students.

    PubMed

    Studer, Regina Katharina; Danuser, Brigitta; Wild, Pascal; Hildebrandt, Horst; Gomez, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive view of (a) the time dynamics of the psychophysiological responding in performing music students (n = 66) before, during, and after a private and a public performance and (b) the moderating effect of music performance anxiety (MPA). Heart rate (HR), minute ventilation (VE), and all affective and somatic self-report variables increased in the public session compared to the private session. Furthermore, the activation of all variables was stronger during the performances than before or after. Differences between phases were larger in the public than in the private session for HR, VE, total breath duration, anxiety, and trembling. Furthermore, while higher MPA scores were associated with higher scores and with larger changes between sessions and phases for self-reports, this association was less coherent for physiological variables. Finally, self-reported intra-individual performance improvements or deteriorations were not associated with MPA. This study makes a novel contribution by showing how the presence of an audience influences low- and high-anxious musicians' psychophysiological responding before, during and after performing. Overall, the findings are more consistent with models of anxiety that emphasize the importance of cognitive rather than physiological factors in MPA.

  13. Effect of prolonged freezing of semen on exosome recovery and biologic activity

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Jennifer L.; Madison, Marisa N.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Galvin, Shannon; Gupta, Phalguni; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Dash, Chandravanu; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are important vehicles of intercellular communication that shape host responses to physiologic, tumorigenic, and pathogenic conditions. The composition and function of exosomes are dynamic and depends on the state and condition of the cellular source. In prior work, we found that semen exosomes (SE) from healthy donors who do not use illicit drugs potently inhibit HIV-1. Following semen donation, specimens are either used immediately or frozen for use at a later time. It has been shown that short-term freezing of semen has no effect on SE-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. However, the effect of illicit drugs and prolonged freezing on SE bioactivity is unknown. Here, we show preservation of SE physical properties, (morphology, concentration, intensity/size) irrespective of illicit drug use or duration of semen freezing. Interestingly, illicit drugs and prolonged freezing decreased the levels of SE-bound CD63/CD9 and acetylcholinesterase activity respectively. Furthermore, we show differential effects of illicit drug use and prolonged freezing on SE-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. Our results highlight the importance of the source of SE and condition of semen storage on SE content and function. In-depth evaluation of donor drug-use and duration of semen storage on SE cargo and bioactivity will advance our understanding of SE composition and function. PMID:28338013

  14. Ozone-biological activated carbon as a pretreatment process for reverse osmosis brine treatment and recovery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lai Yoke; Ng, How Yong; Ong, Say Leong; Hu, Jiang Yong; Tao, Guihe; Kekre, Kiran; Viswanath, Balakrishnan; Lay, Winson; Seah, Harry

    2009-09-01

    Ozonation was used in this study to improve biodegradability of RO brine from water reclamation facilities. An ozone dosage ranging from 3 to 10 mg O(3)/L and contact times of 10 and 20 min in batch studies were found to increase the biodegradability (BOD(5)/TOC ratio) of the RO brine by 1.8-3.5 times. At the same time, total organic carbon (TOC) removal was in the range of 5.3-24.5%. The lab-scale ozone-biological activated carbon (BAC) at an ozone dosage of 6.0mg O(3)/L with 20-min contact time was able to achieve 3 times higher TOC removal compared to using BAC alone. Further processing with Capacitive Deionization (CDI) process was able to generate a product water with better water quality than the RO feed water, i.e., with more than 80% ions removal and a lower TOC concentration. The ozone-BAC pretreatment has the potential of reducing fouling in the CDI process.

  15. Recovery of cellulase activity after ethanol stripping in a novel pilot-scale unit.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Pernille Anastasia; Christensen, Børge Holm; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Henning

    2014-04-01

    Recycling of enzymes has a potential interest during cellulosic bioethanol production as purchasing enzymes is one of the largest expenses in the process. By recycling enzymes after distillation, loss of sugars and ethanol are avoided, but depending on the distillation temperature, there is a potential risk of enzyme degradation. Studies of the rate of enzyme denaturation based on estimation of the denaturation constant K D was performed using a novel distillation setup allowing stripping of ethanol at 50-65 °C. Experiments were performed in a pilot-scale stripper, where the effect of temperature (55-65 °C) and exposure to gas-liquid and liquid-heat transmission interfaces were tested on a mesophilic and thermostable enzyme mixture in fiber beer and buffer. Lab-scale tests were included in addition to the pilot-scale experiments to study the effect of shear, ethanol concentration, and PEG on enzyme stability. When increasing the temperature (up to 65 °C) or ethanol content (up to 7.5 % w/v), the denaturation rate of the enzymes increased. Enzyme denaturation occurred slower when the experiments were performed in fiber beer compared to buffer only, which could be due to PEG or other stabilizing substances in fiber beer. However, at extreme conditions with high temperature (65 °C) and ethanol content (7.5 % w/v), PEG had no enzyme stabilizing effect. The novel distillation setup proved to be useful for maintaining enzyme activity during ethanol extraction.

  16. Effects of 14 days of spaceflight and nine days of recovery on cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The cross-sectional areas and succinate dehydrogenase activities of L5 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after nine days of recovery. The mean and distribution of the cross-sectional areas were similar to age-matched, ground-based controls for both the spaceflight and for the spaceflight plus recovery groups. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in spaceflight compared to aged-matched control rats, whereas the mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was similar in age-matched control and spaceflight plus recovery rats. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity of neurons with cross-sectional areas between 1000 and 2000 microns2 was lower (between 7 and 10%) in both the spaceflight and the spaceflight plus recovery groups compared to the appropriate control groups. The reduction in the oxidative capacity of a subpopulation of sensory neurons having relatively large cross-sectional areas immediately following spaceflight and the sustained depression for nine days after returning to 1 g suggest that the 0 g environment induced significant alterations in proprioceptive function.

  17. Activation of Akt/FKHR in the medulla oblongata contributes to spontaneous respiratory recovery after incomplete spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Felix, M S; Bauer, S; Darlot, F; Muscatelli, F; Kastner, A; Gauthier, P; Matarazzo, V

    2014-09-01

    After incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), patients and animals may exhibit some spontaneous functional recovery which can be partly attributed to remodeling of injured neural circuitry. This post-lesion plasticity implies spinal remodeling but increasing evidences suggest that supraspinal structures contribute also to the functional recovery. Here we tested the hypothesis that partial SCI may activate cell-signaling pathway(s) at the supraspinal level and that this molecular response may contribute to spontaneous recovery. With this aim, we used a rat model of partial cervical hemisection which injures the bulbospinal respiratory tract originating from the medulla oblongata of the brainstem but leads to a time-dependent spontaneous functional recovery of the paralyzed hemidiaphragm. We first demonstrate that after SCI the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is activated in the medulla oblongata of the brainstem, resulting in an inactivation of its pro-apoptotic downstream target, forkhead transcription factor (FKHR/FOXO1A). Retrograde labeling of medullary premotoneurons including respiratory ones which project to phrenic motoneurons reveals an increased FKHR phosphorylation in their cell bodies together with an unchanged cell number. Medulla infusion of the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, prevents the SCI-induced Akt and FKHR phosphorylations and activates one of its death-promoting downstream targets, Fas ligand. Quantitative EMG analyses of diaphragmatic contractility demonstrate that the inhibition of medulla PI3K/Akt signaling prevents spontaneous respiratory recovery normally observed after partial cervical SCI. Such inhibition does not however affect either baseline contractile frequency or the ventilatory reactivity under acute respiratory challenge. Together, these findings provide novel evidence of supraspinal cellular contribution to the spontaneous respiratory recovery after partial SCI.

  18. Modified sprint interval training protocols. Part II. Psychological responses.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Logan K; Islam, Hashim; Dunn, Emily; Eys, Mark; Robertson-Wilson, Jennifer; Hazell, Tom J

    2017-04-01

    Sprint-interval training (SIT) is a viable method to improve health and fitness. However, researchers have questioned the utility of SIT because of its strenuous nature. The current study aimed to determine if manipulating the sprint and recovery duration, while maintaining the 1:8 work to rest ratio, could uncover a more favourable SIT protocol. Nine healthy active males (age, 23.3 ± 3.0 years; body mass index, 22.4 ± 2.2 kg·m(-2); maximal oxygen consumption, 48.9 ± 5.3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) participated in 3 experimental running SIT sessions: (i) 30:240 (4 × 30-s efforts, 240-s recovery), (ii) 15:120 (8 × 15-s efforts, 120-s recovery), (iii) 5:40 (24 × 5-s efforts, 40-s recovery), and (iv) a final behavioural choice follow-up session. Affect, intentions, task self-efficacy, enjoyment, and preference were evaluated. Midway through exercise, affect became more positive for 5:40 compared with 30:240 (p < 0.05) and postexercise affect was greater for both 5:40 (p = 0.014) and 15:120 (p = 0.015) compared with 30:240. Participants expressed greater intentions to perform 5:40 3 and 5 times/week compared with 15:120 and 30:240 (p < 0.05). Participants felt more confident in their ability to perform 5:40 (p = 0.001) and 15:120 (p = 0.008) compared with 30:240. The 5:40 session was also rated as more enjoyable than 15:120 (p = 0.025) and 30:240 (p = 0.026). All participants preferred the 5:40 protocol. These data suggest that shorter sprints with more repetitions are perceived as more enjoyable and lead to greater intentions to engage in SIT.

  19. Further investigation of the spontaneous and evoked activity of the primary neurons of statoreceptors (and other receptors) of the labyrinth of the bullfrog before, during and after an extended period of weightlessness, including alternative intervals of artificial gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Vestibular neuron activity was examined by studying nerve stimulation and evoked response. A cooling element, applied to the nerve consisted of a silver hook through which a coolant fluid flowed. Temperature changes were recorded via microtermistors on an eight channel brush recorder, together with response. Diffusion of the cooling effect was measured, recovery time was assessed, and the nerve was then studied hystologically and ultrastructurally. Problems in frog preparation were discussed along with problems in maintaining healthy specimens and bacteria controlled aquaria.

  20. Direct imaging of dehydrogenase activity within living cells using enzyme-dependent fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (ED-FRAP).

    PubMed Central

    Combs, C A; Balaban, R S

    2001-01-01

    Reduced nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a key metabolite involved in cellular energy conversion and many redox reactions. We describe the use of confocal microscopy in conjunction with enzyme-dependent fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (ED-FRAP) of NADH as a topological assay of NADH generation capacity within living cardiac myocytes. Quantitative validation of this approach was performed using a dehydrogenase system, in vitro. In intact cells the NADH ED-FRAP was sensitive to temperature (Q(10) of 2.5) and to dehydrogenase activation by dichloroacetate or cAMP (twofold increase for each). In addition, NADH ED-FRAP was correlated with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD(+)) fluorescence. These data, coupled with the cellular patterns of NADH ED-FRAP changes with dehydrogenase stimulation, suggest that NADH ED-FRAP is localized to the mitochondria. These results suggest that ED-FRAP enables measurement of regional dynamics of mitochondrial NADH production in intact cells, thus providing information regarding region-specific intracellular redox reactions and energy metabolism. PMID:11259315

  1. Comparison of Blood Lactate Elimination in Individuals With Paraplegia and Able-Bodied Individuals During Active Recovery From Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Leicht, Christof; Perret, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare blood lactate elimination between individuals with paraplegia (P) and able-bodied (AB) individuals after strenuous arm exercise. Methods: Eight P and 8 AB men (matched for age, height, and weight) participated in this study. Average weekly arm-training volume for P participants (eg, hand bike, wheelchair basketball) and AB participants (eg, swimming, rowing, cross-country skiing) was 4.1 ± 1.6 vs 2.8 ± 0.8 h. A maximal-arm-cranking intensity-graded exercise test to volitional exhaustion was performed by all test participants. Immediately after the exercise test, the participants performed arm cranking for another 30 minutes at a workload of one third of the maximally achieved power output. During this active recovery, mixed-capillary blood samples were taken for lactate analysis. Results: The lactate accumulation constant was significantly higher for P individuals, whereas the lactate elimination constant showed no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: Individuals with paraplegia seem to have no disadvantages in lactate elimination after exhaustive arm exercise compared with able-bodied individuals. PMID:18533413

  2. Separation and recovery of nucleic acids with improved biological activity by acid-degradable polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Kwon, Young Jik

    2010-05-01

    One of the fundamental challenges in studying biomacromolecules (e.g. nucleic acids and proteins) and their complexes in a biological system is isolating them in their structurally and functionally intact forms. Electrophoresis offers convenient and efficient separation and analysis of biomacromolecules but recovery of separated biomacromolecules is a significant challenge. In this study, DNAs of various sizes were separated by electrophoresis in an acid-degradable polyacrylamide gel. Almost 100% of the nucleic acids were recovered after the identified gel bands were hydrolyzed under a mildly acidic condition and purified using anion exchange resin. Further concentration by centrifugal filtration and a second purification using ion exchange column chromatography yielded 44-84% of DNA. The second conventional (non-degradable) gel electrophoresis confirmed that the nucleic acids recovered from acid-degradable gel bands preserved their electrophoretic properties through acidic gel hydrolysis, purification, and concentration processes. The plasmid DNA recovered from acid-degradable gel transfected cells significantly more efficiently than the starting plasmid DNA (i.e. improved biological activity via acid-degradable PAGE). Separation of other types of nucleic acids such as small interfering RNA using this convenient and efficient technique was also demonstrated.

  3. Recovery from drought stress in tobacco: an active process associated with the reversal of senescence in some plant parts and the sacrifice of others.

    PubMed

    Vanková, Radomíra; Dobrá, Jana; Storchová, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Plant response to water deficit and subsequent re-watering is fine tuned at the whole plant level. It differs not only between shoot and root, but also among particular leaves along a plant axis. We estimated the expression of proline metabolism-related genes and the activity of senescence-related promoter in roots and individual leaves of tobacco plants in the course of drought stress and recovery. Proline plays the dual role of an osmoprotectant and an antioxidant under water deficit. High proline concentration in the youngest uppermost leaves contributed to their protection from drought, which was associated with low degree of senescence. During recovery, elevated proline concentrations persisted and the senescence-related promoter was switched off in all surviving leaves. Two mutually exclusive scenarios were followed by tobacco leaves on recovery--restoration of photosynthesis and metabolism, or death, depending on the progress of senescence.

  4. Recovery of post stroke proximal arm function, driven by complex neuroplastic bilateral brain activation patterns and predicted by baseline motor dysfunction severity

    PubMed Central

    Pundik, Svetlana; McCabe, Jessica P.; Hrovat, Ken; Fredrickson, Alice Erica; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Feng, I Jung; Daly, Janis J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Neuroplastic changes that drive recovery of shoulder/elbow function after stroke have been poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between neuroplastic brain changes related to shoulder/elbow movement control in response to treatment and recovery of arm motor function in chronic stroke survivors.Methods: Twenty-three chronic stroke survivors were treated with 12 weeks of arm rehabilitation. Outcome measures included functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) for the shoulder/elbow components of reach and a skilled motor function test (Arm Motor Abilities Test, AMAT), collected before and after treatment.Results: We observed two patterns of neuroplastic changes that were associated with gains in motor function: decreased or increased task-related brain activation. Those with significantly better motor function at baseline exhibited a decrease in brain activation in response to treatment, evident in the ipsilesional primary motor and contralesional supplementary motor regions; in contrast, those with greater baseline motor impairment, exhibited increased brain activation in response to treatment. There was a linear relationship between greater functional gain (AMAT) and increased activation in bilateral primary motor, contralesional primary and secondary sensory regions, and contralesional lateral premotor area, after adjusting for baseline AMAT, age, and time since stroke.Conclusions: Recovery of functional reach involves recruitment of several contralesional and bilateral primary motor regions. In response to intensive therapy, the direction of functional brain change (i.e., increase or decrease in task-related brain recruitment) for shoulder/elbow reach components depends on baseline level of motor function and may represent either different phases of recovery or different patterns of neuroplasticity that drive functional recovery. PMID:26257623

  5. Effectiveness of a Worksite Social & Physical Environment Intervention on Need for Recovery, Physical Activity and Relaxation; Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Coffeng, Jennifer K.; Boot, Cécile R. L.; Duijts, Saskia F. A.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; van Mechelen, Willem; Hendriksen, Ingrid J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of a worksite social and physical environment intervention on need for recovery (i.e., early symptoms of work-related mental and physical fatigue), physical activity and relaxation. Also, the effectiveness of the separate interventions was investigated. Methods In this 2×2 factorial design study, 412 office employees from a financial service provider participated. Participants were allocated to the combined social and physical intervention, to the social intervention only, to the physical intervention only or to the control group. The primary outcome measure was need for recovery. Secondary outcomes were work-related stress (i.e., exhaustion, detachment and relaxation), small breaks, physical activity (i.e., stair climbing, active commuting, sport activities, light/moderate/vigorous physical activity) and sedentary behavior. Outcomes were measured by questionnaires at baseline, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Multilevel analyses were performed to investigate the effects of the three interventions. Results In all intervention groups, a non-significant reduction was found in need for recovery. In the combined intervention (n = 92), exhaustion and vigorous physical activities decreased significantly, and small breaks at work and active commuting increased significantly compared to the control group. The social intervention (n = 118) showed a significant reduction in exhaustion, sedentary behavior at work and a significant increase in small breaks at work and leisure activities. In the physical intervention (n = 96), stair climbing at work and active commuting significantly increased, and sedentary behavior at work decreased significantly compared to the control group. Conclusion None of the interventions was effective in improving the need for recovery. It is recommended to implement the social and physical intervention among a population with higher baseline values of need for recovery. Furthermore, the intervention

  6. Recovery Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Since the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in 1935, programs offering opportunity for recovery from alcoholism and other addictions have undergone vast changes. The Internet has created nearly limitless opportunities for recovering people and those seeking recovery to find both meetings and places where they can gather virtually and discuss…

  7. Restoration of blood pH between repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise: effects of various active-recovery protocols.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Hamouti, Nassim; Aguado-Jimenez, Roberto; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2010-02-01

    To determine which active-recovery protocol would reduce faster the high blood H(+) and lactate concentrations produced by repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise (HIE). On three occasions, 11 moderately trained males performed 4 bouts (1.5 min) at 163% of their respiratory compensation threshold (RCT) interspersed with active-recovery: (1) 4.5 min pedalling at 24% RCT (S(HORT)); (2) 6 min at 18% RCT (M(EDIUM)); (3) 9 min at 12% RCT (L(ONG)). The total work completed during recovery was the same in all three trials. Respiratory gases and arterialized-blood samples were obtained during exercise. At the end of exercise, L(ONG) in comparison to S(HORT) and M(EDIUM) increased plasma pH (7.32 +/- 0.02 vs. approximately 7.22 +/- 0.03; P < 0.05), while reduced lactate concentration (8.5 +/- 0.9 vs. approximately 10.9 +/- 0.8 mM; P < 0.05). Ventilatory equivalent for CO(2) was higher in L(ONG) than S(HORT) and M(EDIUM) (31.4 +/- 0.5 vs. approximately 29.6 +/- 0.5; P < 0.05). Low-intensity prolonged recovery between repeated bouts of HIE maximized H(+) and lactate removal likely by enhancing CO(2) unloading.

  8. The effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for class III correction. Part II: electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of early physical rehabilitation by comparing the differences of surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles after surgical correction of skeletal class III malocclusion. The prospective study included 63 patients; the experimental groups contained 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation; the control group (32 patients) did not receive physiotherapy. The amplitude of sEMG in the masticatory muscles reached 72.6-121.3% and 37.5-64.6% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively at 6 weeks after orthognathic surgery (OGS). At 6 months after OGS, the sEMG reached 135.1-233.4% and 89.6-122.5% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively. Most variables in the sEMG examination indicated that recovery of the masticatory muscles in the experimental group was better than the control group as estimated in the early phase (T1 to T2) and the total phase (T1 to T3); there were no significant differences between the mean recovery percentages in the later phase (T2 to T3). Early physical rehabilitative therapy is helpful for early recovery of muscle activity in masticatory muscles after OGS. After termination of physical therapy, no significant difference in recovery was indicated in patients with or without early physiotherapy.

  9. Performance test results of noninvasive characterization of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act surrogate waste by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, R.J.; Streier, G.G.

    1997-03-01

    During FY-96, a performance test was carried out with funding from the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the noninvasive elemental assay capabilities of commercial companies for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals present in 8-gal drums containing surrogate waste. Commercial companies were required to be experienced in the use of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) techniques and to have a prototype assay system with which to conduct the test assays. Potential participants were identified through responses to a call for proposals advertised in the Commerce Business Daily and through personal contacts. Six companies were originally identified. Two of these six were willing and able to participate in the performance test, as described in the test plan, with some subsidizing from the DOE MWFA. The tests were conducted with surrogate sludge waste because (1) a large volume of this type of waste awaits final disposition and (2) sludge tends to be somewhat homogeneous. The surrogate concentrations of the above RCRA metals ranged from {approximately} 300 ppm to {approximately} 20,000 ppm. The lower limit was chosen as an estimate of the expected sensitivity of detection required by noninvasive, pretreatment elemental assay systems to be of value for operational and compliance purposes and to still be achievable with state-of-the-art methods of analysis. The upper limit of {approximately} 20,000 ppm was chosen because it is the opinion of the author that assay above this concentration level is within current state-of-the-art methods for most RCRA constituents. This report is organized into three parts: Part 1, Test Plan to Evaluate the Technical Status of Noninvasive Elemental Assay Techniques for Hazardous Waste; Part 2, Participants` Results; and Part 3, Evaluation of and Comments on Participants` Results.

  10. Targeted delivery of TrkB receptor to phrenic motoneurons enhances functional recovery of rhythmic phrenic activity after cervical spinal hemisection.

    PubMed

    Gransee, Heather M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2013-01-01

    Progressive recovery of rhythmic phrenic activity occurs over time after a spinal cord hemisection involving unilateral transection of anterolateral funiculi at C2 (SH). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acting through its full-length tropomyosin related kinase receptor subtype B (TrkB.FL) contributes to neuroplasticity after spinal cord injury, but the specific cellular substrates remain unclear. We hypothesized that selectively targeting increased TrkB.FL expression to phrenic motoneurons would be sufficient to enhance recovery of rhythmic phrenic activity after SH. Several adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes expressing GFP were screened to determine specificity for phrenic motoneuron transduction via intrapleural injection in adult rats. GFP expression was present in the cervical spinal cord 3 weeks after treatment with AAV serotypes 7, 8, and 9, but not with AAV2, 6, or rhesus-10. Overall, AAV7 produced the most consistent GFP expression in phrenic motoneurons. SH was performed 3 weeks after intrapleural injection of AAV7 expressing human TrkB.FL-FLAG or saline. Delivery of TrkB.FL-FLAG to phrenic motoneurons was confirmed by FLAG protein expression in the phrenic motor nucleus and human TrkB.FL mRNA expression in microdissected phrenic motoneurons. In all SH rats, absence of ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity was confirmed at 3 days post-SH, verifying complete interruption of ipsilateral descending drive to phrenic motoneurons. At 14 days post-SH, all AAV7-TrkB.FL treated rats (n = 11) displayed recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity compared to 3 out of 8 untreated SH rats (p<0.01). During eupnea, AAV7-TrkB.FL treated rats exhibited 73±7% of pre-SH root mean squared EMG vs. only 31±11% in untreated SH rats displaying recovery (p<0.01). This study provides direct evidence that increased TrkB.FL expression in phrenic motoneurons is sufficient to enhance recovery of ipsilateral rhythmic phrenic activity after SH, indicating that

  11. A Clinical Trial of Optimal Time Interval Between Ablation and Diagnostic Activity When a Pretherapy RAI Scanning Is Performed on Patients With Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yafu; Mao, Qiufen; Chen, Song; Li, Na; Li, Xuena; Li, Yaming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article investigates the association of the time interval between the diagnostic dose and ablation with the stunning effect, when a 74 MBq 131I pretherapy scanning was performed on patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC); the patients who were diagnosed as DTC and would be performed radioiodine (RAI) ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases were recruited during January 2011 and May 2012 in our hospital. Thirty-seven patients with DTC who had the RAI ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases for the first time were recruited. All the patients received a dose of 1850 to 7400 MBq of 131I for ablation and a diagnostic scan was performed 24 hours after the administration of 74 MBq 131I before ablation. A posttherapy scan was performed 2 to 7 days after the ablation. The patients were broken down into 3 groups (G1, G2, and G3) according to the interval time between the diagnostic dose and therapy (1–3, 4–7, and >7 days). The fractional concentrations of 131I in remnants or functional metastases were quantified and expressed as therapeutic/diagnostic (Rx/Dx). The level of significance was set at 0.05. Sixty-seven foci were found both on pretherapy and posttherapy scans, the mean ratio of Rx/Dx was 0.43 ± 0.29, and the ratio of 49 foci (73.13%) was <0.6. The ratios in G1, G2, and G3 were 0.46 ± 0.29, 0.29 ± 0.18, and 0.55 ± 0.33, respectively. The differences between G1 and G2, and G2 and G3 were statistically significant (t = 2.40, P = 0.021 and t = 3.28, P = 0.002), whereas the difference between G1 and G3 was not significant (t = 1.01, P = 0.319). By a diagnostic scan of 74 MBq 131I, stunning prominently occurs with a time of 4 to 7 days between the diagnostic dose and ablation. We recommend that for less stunning effect, RAI ablation should be performed within 3 days or postponed until 1 week after the diagnostic dose administrated. PMID:26252311

  12. Recovery of consciousness and an injured ascending reticular activating system in a patient who survived cardiac arrest: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Hyun, Yi Ji; Lee, Han Do

    2016-06-01

    We report on a patient who survived cardiac arrest and showed recovery of consciousness and an injured ARAS at the early stage of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI- BI) for 3 weeks, which was demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT).A 52-year-old male patient who had suffered cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome was resuscitated immediately by a layman and paramedics for ∼25 minutes. He was then transferred immediately to the emergency room of a local medical center. When starting rehabilitation at 2 weeks after onset, his consciousness was impaired, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (GRS-R) score of 8. He underwent comprehensive rehabilitative therapy, including drugs for recovery of consciousness. He recovered well and rapidly so that his consciousness had recovered to full scores in terms of GCS:15 and GRS-R:23 at 5 weeks after onset.The left lower dorsal and right lower ventral ARAS had become thicker on 5-week DTT compared with 2-week DTT (Fig. 1B). Regarding the change of neural connectivity of the thalamic ILN, increased neural connectivity to the basal forebrain and prefrontal cortex was observed in both hemispheres on 5-week DTT compared with 2-week DTT.Recovery of an injured ARAS was demonstrated in a patient who survived cardiac arrest and his consciousness showed rapid and good recovery for 3 weeks at the early stage of HI-BI.

  13. Multiple-satellite studies of magnetospheric substorms: Plasma sheet recovery and the poleward leap of auroral-zone activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pytte, T.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Kivelson, M. G.; West, H. I., Jr.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Particle observations from pairs of satellites (Ogo 5, Vela 4A and 5B, Imp 3) during the recovery of plasma sheet thickness late in substorms were examined. Six of the nine events occurred within about 5 min in locations near the estimated position of the neutral sheet, but over wide ranges of east-west and radial separations. The time of occurrence and spatial extent of the recovery were related to the onset (defined by ground Pi 2 pulsations) and approximate location (estimated from ground mid-latitude magnetic signatures) of substorm expansions. It was found that the plasma sheet recovery occurred 10 - 30 min after the last in a series of Pi bursts, which were interpreted to indicate that the recovery was not due directly to a late, high latitude substorm expansion. The recovery was also observed to occur after the substorm current wedge had moved into the evening sector and to extend far to the east of the center of the last preceding substorm expansion.

  14. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  15. Residual Antimicrobial Activity of MTAD® in Human Dentin After Obturation with Gutta-Percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE at Different Time Intervals; An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Bolhari, Behnam; Bahador, Abbas; Assadian, Hadi; Dehghan, Somayyeh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To eliminate microorganisms that are responsible for pulpal and periapical infections and to prevent reinfection of the root canal system an effective chemomechanical preparation by irrigants with sustained antimicrobial activity is beneficial. Hereby, we evaluated the residual antibacterial activity of MTAD after canal obturation at different time intervals. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 human single-canalled anterior teeth were selected. The root canals were instrumented to a standardized apical size. Among all, 90 teeth received final irrigation with MTAD and were divided into three groups according to their obturation materials; i.e. gutta-percha/AH26, Resilon/RealSeal SE and positive controls. All these groups were divided into three 1-, 3- and 6-week time interval subgroups. Thirty teeth as negative control had no final irrigation with MTAD, but were obturated with gutta-percha/AH26 or Resilon/RealSealSE. Dentin powder was prepared after 1, 3 and 6 weeks. Dentin powder was exposed to Enterococcus faecalis for 24h and then cultured. Colony Forming Unit (CFU) was counted. Results: Residual antimicrobial activity of MTAD in the teeth obturated with guttapercha/AH26 was significantly higher than the teeth obturated with Resilon/RealSeal SE (p<0.001). It also showed a time dependent decrease in MTAD antimicrobial activity for all groups. The highest antimicrobial activity of MTAD was found in the 1-week positive control and 1-week gutta-percha/AH26 specimens. The lowest antimicrobial activity of MTAD was found in 6-week Resilon/RealSeal SE samples and then the negative controls. Conclusion: MTAD had antimicrobial activity even at the sixth week, although it had a time-dependent decrease. Resilon/Epiphany SE significantly decreased antimicrobial activity of MTAD at all time points. PMID:24910674

  16. Donor lymphocyte count and thymic activity predict lymphocyte recovery and outcomes after matched-sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    McIver, Zachariah; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; Wu, Colin; Grim, Andrew; Ito, Sawa; Cho, Irene; Hensel, Nancy; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, Austin John

    2013-03-01

    Delayed immune recovery is a characteristic feature of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult recipients. Although recipient thymic T-cell neogenesis contributes to T-cell regeneration after transplantation, thymic recovery in the transplant recipient decreases with increasing age, and is diminished by intensive preconditioning regimens and graft-versus-host disease. In adult recipients, most events that determine transplant success or failure occur during the period when the majority of circulating T cells is derived from the donor's post thymic T-cell repertoire. As a result, the make-up of the donor lymphocyte compartment may strongly influence immune recovery and transplant outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine donor lymphocyte counts in a series of patients undergoing an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant to identify the potential contribution of donor regulatory and conventional T lymphocyte populations to immune recovery and transplant outcomes. We examined donor lymphocyte subset counts in relation to post-transplant lymphocyte recovery and transplant events in 220 consecutive myeloablative, T-cell-depleted, HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with hematologic malignancies. In a multivariate analysis, absolute numbers of donor CD4(+) recent thymic emigrants were associated with overall survival (P=0.032). The donors' absolute lymphocyte count and thymic production of regulatory T cells were both associated with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (P=0.002 and P=0.022, respectively). In conclusion, these results identify donor immune characteristics that are associated with lymphocyte recovery, extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease, and survival in the recipient following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study reported here was performed using peripheral blood samples drawn from donors and patients enrolled in the ClinicalTrials.gov-registered trials

  17. The effect of on-hill active recovery performed between runs on blood lactate concentration and fatigue in alpine ski racers.

    PubMed

    White, Gillian E; Wells, Greg D

    2015-03-01

    Alpine skiing is a high-intensity intermittent sport that results in lactate accumulation and muscle acidosis, which has been shown to contribute to peripheral neuromuscular fatigue. Active recovery influences the removal of lactate from the muscle and blood by maintaining blood flow to fatigued muscles and enhancing aerobic utilization of lactate by nonfatigued tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of on-hill active recovery on blood lactate concentration in alpine skiers. Fourteen highly trained alpine skiers (7 women, 7 men) completed 8 training runs in a 45-gate slalom or a 25-gate giant slalom corridor at 2,600 m above sea level. Skiers were randomized to active (ACT) or static recovery (CON) performed at the top of each run. Blood lactate concentration and perceived fatigue were recorded at the top and bottom of each run. Performance was measured by time to complete each training run and rate of incomplete runs. A significant time (p < 0.01) and interaction (p = 0.001) effect was observed for blood lactate concentration measured at the top, with ACT being associated with significantly lower values. A significant time effect (p < 0.001) was observed for blood lactate concentration measured at the bottom. Training run completion time was longer (p ≤ 0.05), and higher rate of incomplete runs were observed in the CON group, despite no between-group differences in rating of perceived fatigue. On-hill active recovery performed between runs promotes blood lactate clearance in alpine skiers and is associated with delayed fatigue as indicated by faster training runs and fewer incomplete runs.

  18. Interval Estimation of Seismic Hazard Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanislaw

    2017-03-01

    The paper considers Poisson temporal occurrence of earthquakes and presents a way to integrate uncertainties of the estimates of mean activity rate and magnitude cumulative distribution function in the interval estimation of the most widely used seismic hazard functions, such as the exceedance probability and the mean return period. The proposed algorithm can be used either when the Gutenberg-Richter model of magnitude distribution is accepted or when the nonparametric estimation is in use. When the Gutenberg-Richter model of magnitude distribution is used the interval estimation of its parameters is based on the asymptotic normality of the maximum likelihood estimator. When the nonparametric kernel estimation of magnitude distribution is used, we propose the iterated bias corrected and accelerated method for interval estimation based on the smoothed bootstrap and second-order bootstrap samples. The changes resulted from the integrated approach in the interval estimation of the seismic hazard functions with respect to the approach, which neglects the uncertainty of the mean activity rate estimates have been studied using Monte Carlo simulations and two real dataset examples. The results indicate that the uncertainty of mean activity rate affects significantly the interval estimates of hazard functions only when the product of activity rate and the time period, for which the hazard is estimated, is no more than 5.0. When this product becomes greater than 5.0, the impact of the uncertainty of cumulative distribution function of magnitude dominates the impact of the uncertainty of mean activity rate in the aggregated uncertainty of the hazard functions. Following, the interval estimates with and without inclusion of the uncertainty of mean activity rate converge. The presented algorithm is generic and can be applied also to capture the propagation of uncertainty of estimates, which are parameters of a multiparameter function, onto this function.

  19. A comparative study of Solar-Heliospheric Observations during very active Sun intervals in the 21st and 23rd solar cycles (April 1979 and March-April, 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.; Farrugia, C. J.; Lepping, R. P.; Richardson, I. G.; Galvin, A. B.; Schwenn, R.; Reames, D. V.

    2002-05-01

    On March 24, 2001, the largest sun spot group in 10 years, consisting of three or more active regions (ARs) centered near AR 9393, emerged from behind the eastern limb of the Sun and began a 2-week passage across the visible hemisphere. During the same time, the Sun showed several other ARs so this period constituted a phase of unusually intense solar activity that continued almost 18 days beyond the disk passage of the largest sun spot group and included possibly the most energetic solar flare event in modern records (a > X20 flare in soft X-rays). We shall present an overview of the associated solar energetic particle events and an analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of the shocks observed in the Earth's vicinity. The investigation includes cross-correlation analysis of interplanetary plasma and magnetic field observations at ACE (SWEPAM/MAG level-2 data) situated 250 Re upstream of Earth and at Wind (SWE/MFI data), which was ahead of Earth and executing a distant prograde orbit with large Y-coordinate. The interval under study bears a close resemblance to a similar active period during April 1979 (i.e., 2 solar cycles earlier) observed by the Helios 1/2 probes and Earth solar wind monitors (ISEE-3, IMP). The similarities and differences between the two intervals are examined further.

  20. Job Characteristics and Off-Job Activities as Predictors of Need for Recovery, Well-Being, and Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnentag, Sabine; Zijlstra, Fred R. H.

    2006-01-01

    Two empirical studies examined need for recovery (i.e., a person's desire to be temporarily relieved from demands in order to restore his or her resources) as a mediator in the relationship between poor job characteristics (high job demands, low job control) and high off-job demands, on the one hand, and fatigue and poor individual well-being, on…

  1. Topography of retinal recovery processes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mazinani, Babac E; Merx, Elke; Plange, Niklas; Walter, Peter; Roessler, Gernot F

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine retinal recovery processes to pographically by the application of three flash sequences with specific interstimulus intervals. Methods Twelve healthy subjects underwent multifocal electroretinography with a light-emitting diode stimulator. Every flash sequence consisted of three flashes with 25 msec between the first and the second flash and 35 msec between the second and the third flash. The interval between the third and the first flash of the next step was 85 msec. The interstimulus interval-dependent amplitude reductions of the multifocal electroretinographic response for these three intervals yielded three data points that were used to determine the complete curve of the recovery kinetics. Results Amplitude reductions were higher with shorter interstimulus intervals. The mean half-life periods of the recovery kinetics for the different concentric rings and all subjects were: ring 1, 29.3±5.9 msec; ring 2, 24.2±6.4 msec; ring 3, 23±4.1 msec; ring 4, 23.1±4.6 msec; and ring 5, 22.3±4.4 msec. The differences between the first and all other rings were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The kinetics of the amplitude recovery after short interstimulus intervals showed a spatial distribution, with faster recovery toward the macular periphery. PMID:25349472

  2. Comparison of cell body size and oxidative enzyme activity in motoneurons between the cervical and lumbar segments in the rat spinal cord after spaceflight and recovery.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, A; Yamashiro, J; Matsumoto, A; Higashibata, A; Ishioka, N; Shimazu, T; Ohira, Y

    2006-03-01

    The cell body sizes and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities of motoneurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn at the cervical and lumbar segments in the rat spinal cord were determined following 9 days of spaceflight with or without 10 days of recovery on Earth. The motoneurons were divided into three types based on their cell body sizes; small-, medium-, and large-sized motoneurons. In control rats, there was no difference in the cell body size or SDH activity of small- and large-sized motoneurons between the cervical and lumbar segments. The SDH activity of medium-sized motoneurons in control rats was higher in the lumbar segment than in the cervical segment, while the cell body sizes of medium-sized motoneurons were identical. The SDH activity of medium-sized motoneurons in the lumbar segment decreased to a level similar to that in the cervical segment of control rats following spaceflight. In addition, the decreased SDH activity of medium-sized motoneurons persisted for at least 10 days of recovery on Earth. It is concluded that spaceflight selectively affects the SDH activity of medium-sized motoneurons in the lumbar segment of the spinal cord, which presumably innervate skeletal muscles having an antigravity function.

  3. Effect of Novel, School-Based High-Intensity Interval Training (HIT) on Cardiometabolic Health in Adolescents: Project FFAB (Fun Fast Activity Blasts) - An Exploratory Controlled Before-And-After Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-volume high-intensity interval training holds promise for cardiometabolic health promotion in adolescents, but sustainable interventions must be practical and engaging. We examined the effect of a school-based multi-activity low-volume high-intensity interval training intervention on adolescents’ cardiometabolic health. Methods In an exploratory controlled before-and-after design, 101 adolescents (mean age ± standard deviation [SD] 14.0 ± 0.3 years) were recruited from four schools; two were designated as intervention sites (n = 41), and two as control (n = 60). The intervention comprised 4 to 7 repetitions of 45 s maximal effort exercise (basketball, boxing, dance and soccer drills) interspersed with 90-s rest, thrice weekly for 10 weeks. Outcomes were non-fasting blood lipids and glucose, waist circumference, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, resting blood pressure, physical activity, twenty-metre shuttle-run test performance and carotid artery intima-media thickness. The difference in the change from baseline (intervention minus control) was estimated for each outcome. Using magnitude-based inferences, we calculated the probability that the true population effect was beneficial, trivial, and harmful against a threshold for the minimum clinically important difference of 0.2 between-subject SDs. Results and Discussion Mean (± SD) attendance for the intervention (expressed as percentage of available intervention sessions [n = 30]) was 77 ± 13%. Post-intervention, there were likely beneficial effects for triglycerides (-26%; 90% confidence interval -46% to 0%), waist circumference (-3.9 cm; -6.1 cm to -1.6 cm) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (+16 min; -5 to 38 min), and a possibly beneficial effect for twenty-metre shuttle-run test performance (+5 shuttles; -1 to 11 shuttles) in intervention participants (vs controls). The role of elevated triglycerides and waist circumference in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome

  4. Antistress effect of Semax in the course of recovery of spleen lymphoid structures after the stress in rats with different behavioral activity.

    PubMed

    Bakhmet, A A; Koplik, E V

    2012-09-01

    We studied the effect of antistress peptide Semax, an ACTH4-10 analogue, on the cellular composition of spleen lymphoid structures in Wistar rats with different stress tolerance in the course of post-stress recovery (days 1, 3, 14, and 30). Preliminary administration of Semax alleviates stress-induced proliferation of macrophages and destructive processes in functionally active zones of the rat spleen on days 1, 3, and 14 after the stress exposure, which attests to its capacity to reduce the adverse effects of 1-h stress load on proliferation of macrophages and destructive processes in functionally active zones of this organ.

  5. Effects of a Strength Training Session After an Exercise Inducing Muscle Damage on Recovery Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Abaïdia, Abd-Elbasset; Delecroix, Barthélémy; Leduc, Cédric; Lamblin, Julien; McCall, Alan; Baquet, Georges; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    Abaïdia, A-E, Delecroix, B, Leduc, C, Lamblin, J, McCall, A, Baquet, G, and Dupont, G. Effects of a strength training session after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery kinetics. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 115-125, 2017-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an upper-limb strength training session the day after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery of performance. In a randomized crossover design, subjects performed the day after the exercise, on 2 separate occasions (passive vs. active recovery conditions) a single-leg exercise (dominant in one condition and nondominant in the other condition) consisting of 5 sets of 15 eccentric contractions of the knee flexors. Active recovery consisted of performing an upper-body strength training session the day after the exercise. Creatine kinase, hamstring strength, and muscle soreness were assessed immediately and 20, 24, and 48 hours after exercise-induced muscle damage. The upper-body strength session, after muscle-damaging exercise accelerated the recovery of slow concentric force (effect size = 0.65; 90% confidence interval = -0.06 to 1.32), but did not affect the recovery kinetics for the other outcomes. The addition of an upper-body strength training session the day after muscle-damaging activity does not negatively affect the recovery kinetics. Upper-body strength training may be programmed the day after a competition.

  6. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism.

  7. Superoxide dismutase and total peroxidase activities in relation to drought recovery performance of mycorrhizal shrub seedlings grown in an amended semiarid soil.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Antonio; Díaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Hernández, José Antonio; Carrasco, Lucía; Caravaca, Fuensanta

    2008-05-05

    We studied the effect of inoculation with a mixture of three arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith, Glomus deserticola (Trappe, Bloss. & Menge) and Glomus mosseae (Nicol & Gerd.) Gerd. & Trappe) and addition of a composted organic residue on plant growth, nutrient uptake, mycorrhizal colonisation and superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and total peroxidase (POX, EC 1.11.1.7) activities in shoots of Juniperus oxycedrus seedlings after well-watered, drought and recovery periods. The mycorrhizal inoculation and composted residue addition significantly increased the growth, foliar nutrients (N, P, K) and shoot water content of the plants, independent of the water regime. POX activity in control plants increased during drought (about 250% higher than under well-watered conditions) and returned to initial levels after re-watering. The seedlings inoculated with AM fungi showed the highest values of POX activity, followed by the plants grown in the amended soil, which varied little during the drought and recovery periods. Drought decreased the SOD activity in shoots of both J. oxycedrus seedlings inoculated with AM fungi and those grown with composted residue, but did not affect that of control plants. After re-watering, the SOD activity in mycorrhizal or residue-amended plants increased, showing values similar to control plants.

  8. Minimax confidence intervals in geomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Philip B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper uses theory of Donoho (1989) to find lower bounds on the lengths of optimally short fixed-length confidence intervals (minimax confidence intervals) for Gauss coefficients of the field of degree 1-12 using the heat flow constraint. The bounds on optimal minimax intervals are about 40 percent shorter than Backus' intervals: no procedure for producing fixed-length confidence intervals, linear or nonlinear, can give intervals shorter than about 60 percent the length of Backus' in this problem. While both methods rigorously account for the fact that core field models are infinite-dimensional, the application of the techniques to the geomagnetic problem involves approximations and counterfactual assumptions about the data errors, and so these results are likely to be extremely optimistic estimates of the actual uncertainty in Gauss coefficients.

  9. Long-Term Maintenance of Immediate or Delayed Extinction Is Determined by the Extinction-Test Interval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Justin S.; Escobar, Martha; Kimble, Whitney L.

    2010-01-01

    Short acquisition-extinction intervals (immediate extinction) can lead to either more or less spontaneous recovery than long acquisition-extinction intervals (delayed extinction). Using rat subjects, we observed less spontaneous recovery following immediate than delayed extinction (Experiment 1). However, this was the case only if a relatively…

  10. Tonic nanomolar dopamine enables an activity-dependent phase recovery mechanism that persistently alters the maximal conductance of the hyperpolarization-activated current in a rhythmically active neuron.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Edmund W; Fu, Jing Jing; Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C; Baro, Deborah J

    2011-11-09

    The phases at which network neurons fire in rhythmic motor outputs are critically important for the proper generation of motor behaviors. The pyloric network in the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion generates a rhythmic motor output wherein neuronal phase relationships are remarkably invariant across individuals and throughout lifetimes. The mechanisms for maintaining these robust phase relationships over the long-term are not well described. Here we show that tonic nanomolar dopamine (DA) acts at type 1 DA receptors (D1Rs) to enable an activity-dependent mechanism that can contribute to phase maintenance in the lateral pyloric (LP) neuron. The LP displays continuous rhythmic bursting. The activity-dependent mechanism was triggered by a prolonged decrease in LP burst duration, and it generated a persistent increase in the maximal conductance (G(max)) of the LP hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)), but only in the presence of steady-state DA. Interestingly, micromolar DA produces an LP phase advance accompanied by a decrease in LP burst duration that abolishes normal LP network function. During a 1 h application of micromolar DA, LP phase recovered over tens of minutes because, the activity-dependent mechanism enabled by steady-state DA was triggered by the micromolar DA-induced decrease in LP burst duration. Presumably, this mechanism restored normal LP network function. These data suggest steady-state DA may enable homeostatic mechanisms that maintain motor network output during protracted neuromodulation. This DA-enabled, activity-dependent mechanism to preserve phase may be broadly relevant, as diminished dopaminergic tone has recently been shown to reduce I(h) in rhythmically active neurons in the mammalian brain.

  11. Tonic Nanomolar Dopamine Enables an Activity-Dependent Phase Recovery Mechanism That Persistently Alters the Maximal Conductance of the Hyperpolarization-Activated Current in a Rhythmically Active Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Edmund W.; Fu, Jing Jing; Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C.

    2011-01-01

    The phases at which network neurons fire in rhythmic motor outputs are critically important for the proper generation of motor behaviors. The pyloric network in the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion generates a rhythmic motor output wherein neuronal phase relationships are remarkably invariant across individuals and throughout lifetimes. The mechanisms for maintaining these robust phase relationships over the long-term are not well described. Here we show that tonic nanomolar dopamine (DA) acts at type 1 DA receptors (D1Rs) to enable an activity-dependent mechanism that can contribute to phase maintenance in the lateral pyloric (LP) neuron. The LP displays continuous rhythmic bursting. The activity-dependent mechanism was triggered by a prolonged decrease in LP burst duration, and it generated a persistent increase in the maximal conductance (Gmax) of the LP hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih), but only in the presence of steady-state DA. Interestingly, micromolar DA produces an LP phase advance accompanied by a decrease in LP burst duration that abolishes normal LP network function. During a 1 h application of micromolar DA, LP phase recovered over tens of minutes because, the activity-dependent mechanism enabled by steady-state DA was triggered by the micromolar DA-induced decrease in LP burst duration. Presumably, this mechanism restored normal LP network function. These data suggest steady-state DA may enable homeostatic mechanisms that maintain motor network output during protracted neuromodulation. This DA-enabled, activity-dependent mechanism to preserve phase may be broadly relevant, as diminished dopaminergic tone has recently been shown to reduce Ih in rhythmically active neurons in the mammalian brain. PMID:22072689

  12. Temporal binding of interval markers

    PubMed Central

    Derichs, Christina; Zimmermann, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    How we estimate the passage of time is an unsolved mystery in neuroscience. Illusions of subjective time provide an experimental access to this question. Here we show that time compression and expansion of visually marked intervals result from a binding of temporal interval markers. Interval markers whose onset signals were artificially weakened by briefly flashing a whole-field mask were bound in time towards markers with a strong onset signal. We explain temporal compression as the consequence of summing response distributions of weak and strong onset signals. Crucially, temporal binding occurred irrespective of the temporal order of weak and strong onset markers, thus ruling out processing latencies as an explanation for changes in interval duration judgments. If both interval markers were presented together with a mask or the mask was shown in the temporal interval center, no compression occurred. In a sequence of two intervals, masking the middle marker led to time compression for the first and time expansion for the second interval. All these results are consistent with a model view of temporal binding that serves a functional role by reducing uncertainty in the final estimate of interval duration. PMID:27958311

  13. Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on (a) effect sizes, (b) confidence intervals, and (c) confidence intervals for effect sizes. Additionally, various admonitions for reformed statistical practice are presented. For example, a very important implication of the realization that there are dozens of effect size statistics is that "authors must…

  14. 47 CFR 52.35 - Porting Intervals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Portability § 52.35 Porting Intervals. (a) All telecommunications carriers required by the Commission to port telephone numbers must complete a simple wireline-to-wireline or simple intermodal port request within one... p.m. local time for a simple port request to be eligible for activation at midnight on the same...

  15. 47 CFR 52.35 - Porting Intervals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Portability § 52.35 Porting Intervals. (a) All telecommunications carriers required by the Commission to port telephone numbers must complete a simple wireline-to-wireline or simple intermodal port request within one... p.m. local time for a simple port request to be eligible for activation at midnight on the same...

  16. 47 CFR 52.35 - Porting Intervals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Portability § 52.35 Porting Intervals. (a) All telecommunications carriers required by the Commission to port telephone numbers must complete a simple wireline-to-wireline or simple intermodal port request within one... p.m. local time for a simple port request to be eligible for activation at midnight on the same...

  17. 47 CFR 52.35 - Porting Intervals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Portability § 52.35 Porting Intervals. (a) All telecommunications carriers required by the Commission to port telephone numbers must complete a simple wireline-to-wireline or simple intermodal port request within one... p.m. local time for a simple port request to be eligible for activation at midnight on the same...

  18. 47 CFR 52.35 - Porting Intervals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Portability § 52.35 Porting Intervals. (a) All telecommunications carriers required by the Commission to port telephone numbers must complete a simple wireline-to-wireline or simple intermodal port request within one... p.m. local time for a simple port request to be eligible for activation at midnight on the same...

  19. Optimisation of ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil from papaya seed by response surface methodology: oil recovery, radical scavenging antioxidant activity, and oxidation stability.

    PubMed

    Samaram, Shadi; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Bordbar, Sara; Serjouie, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) condition on the yield, antioxidant activity and stability of the oil from papaya seed. The studied ultrasound variables were time, temperature, ultrasound power and solvent to sample ratio. The main goal was to optimise UAE condition providing the highest recovery of papaya seed oil with the most desirable antioxidant activity and stability. The interaction of ultrasound variables had the most and least significant effects on the antioxidant activity and stability, respectively. Ultrasound-assisted extraction provided a relatively high oil recovery (∼ 73%) from papaya seed. The strongest antioxidant activity was achieved by the extraction at the elevated temperature using low solvent to sample ratio. The optimum ultrasound extraction was set at the elevated temperature (62.5 °C) for 38.5 min at high ultrasound power (700 W) using medium solvent to sample ratio (∼ 7:1 v/w). The optimum point was practically validated.

  20. Sustained elevation of NF-κB activity sensitizes offspring of maternal inflammation to hypertension via impairing PGC-1α recovery

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Luo, Hongqin; Chen, Xianhua; Han, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Huang, Pei; Lai, Wenjing; Guan, Xiao; Pan, Xiaodong; Ji, Yan; Guo, Wei; Che, Ling; Tang, Yuan; Gu, Liangqi; Yu, Jianhua; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Youcai; Li, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence has demonstrated that maternal detrimental factors, including inflammation, contribute to the development of hypertension in the offspring. The current study found that offspring subjected to prenatal exposure of inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge during the second semester showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure. In addition, these offspring also displayed augmented vascular damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in thoracic aortas when challenged with deoxycorticosterone acetate and high-salt diet (DOCA-salt). Interestingly, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine markedly reversed these changes. Mechanistically, prenatal LPS exposure led to pre-existing elevated peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-γ co-activator (PGC)-1α, a critical master of ROS metabolism, which up-regulated the ROS defense capacity and maintained the balance of ROS generation and elimination under resting state. However, continued elevation of NF-κB activity significantly suppressed the rapid recovery of PGC-1α expression response to DOCA-salt challenge in offspring that underwent prenatal inflammatory stimulation. This was further confirmed by using a NF-κB inhibitor (N-p-Tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone) that restored PGC-1α recovery and prevented blood pressure elevation induced by DOCA-salt. Our results suggest that maternal inflammation programmed proneness to NF-κB over-activation which impaired PGC-1α-mediated anti-oxidant capacity resulting in the increased sensitivity of offspring to hypertensive damage. PMID:27616627

  1. Sustained elevation of NF-κB activity sensitizes offspring of maternal inflammation to hypertension via impairing PGC-1α recovery.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Luo, Hongqin; Chen, Xianhua; Han, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Huang, Pei; Lai, Wenjing; Guan, Xiao; Pan, Xiaodong; Ji, Yan; Guo, Wei; Che, Ling; Tang, Yuan; Gu, Liangqi; Yu, Jianhua; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Youcai; Li, Xiaohui

    2016-09-12

    Growing evidence has demonstrated that maternal detrimental factors, including inflammation, contribute to the development of hypertension in the offspring. The current study found that offspring subjected to prenatal exposure of inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge during the second semester showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure. In addition, these offspring also displayed augmented vascular damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in thoracic aortas when challenged with deoxycorticosterone acetate and high-salt diet (DOCA-salt). Interestingly, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine markedly reversed these changes. Mechanistically, prenatal LPS exposure led to pre-existing elevated peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-γ co-activator (PGC)-1α, a critical master of ROS metabolism, which up-regulated the ROS defense capacity and maintained the balance of ROS generation and elimination under resting state. However, continued elevation of NF-κB activity significantly suppressed the rapid recovery of PGC-1α expression response to DOCA-salt challenge in offspring that underwent prenatal inflammatory stimulation. This was further confirmed by using a NF-κB inhibitor (N-p-Tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone) that restored PGC-1α recovery and prevented blood pressure elevation induced by DOCA-salt. Our results suggest that maternal inflammation programmed proneness to NF-κB over-activation which impaired PGC-1α-mediated anti-oxidant capacity resulting in the increased sensitivity of offspring to hypertensive damage.

  2. Increased cerebral matrix metalloprotease-9 activity is associated with compromised recovery in the diabetic db/db mouse following a stroke.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Willing, Lisa B; Patel, Shyama D; Baskerville, Karen A; Simpson, Ian A

    2011-12-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor of stroke and is associated with increased frequency of stroke and a poorer prognosis for recovery. In earlier studies we have utilized type 2 diabetic mouse models of stroke and demonstrated that diabetic db/db and ob/ob mice experience larger infarct volumes and impaired recovery associated with greater infiltration of macrophage following hypoxic-ischemic (H/I) insult than their heterozygous non-diabetic db/+ and ob/+ littermates. To obtain a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the impaired recovery, we have investigated the role of matrix metalloproteases and their endogenous inhibitors in the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following H/I. Diabetic db/db mice showed a significant and more rapid increase in matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 mRNA, protein and gelatinolytic activity compared with db/+, which resulted in an increased degradation of occludin and collagen IV and subsequently, an increased BBB permeability and greater infiltration of neutrophils into the infarct area. The expression of the MMPs, especially in the db/+ mice, is preceded by an elevated expression of their endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs) 1, 2, and 3, whereas in the db/db mice, a lower expression of the TIMPs is associated with greater MMP 3 and 9 expression. These results suggest that an imbalance in the MMPs/TIMPs cascade in the diabetic mouse, particularly MMP-9, results in a greater neutrophil invasion, a compromised BBB and consequently a greater insult.

  3. Effect of acute interval sprinting exercise on postprandial lipemia of sedentary young men

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Aaron; Boutcher, Yati N; Boutcher, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Postprandial lipemia (PPL) contributesto the development of atherosclerosis. In females, repeated 8-second bouts of interval sprinting exercise reduced PPL, however, the effect of 8-second bouts of interval sprinting on PPL of overweight males is undetermined. Thus, the effect of 8-secondsof interval sprinting for 20 min, the night before ingestion of a high-fat meal (HFM), on plasma triacylglycerol(TG) levelswas examined. [Methods] Ten overweight males acted as participants (BMI = 26±3.0kg/m2, age 22 ± 2.5 years). A crossover design was employed withinterval sprinting and a noexercise condition separated by 7days. Participants consumed a milkshake (high-fat meal;HFM = 4170 kJ/993 Kcal) the morning after an overnight fast, followed by 4 hourly blood samples. Participants performedone bout of interval sprinting (8seconds sprinting at 110-115rpm, 12seconds active recovery at ~60rpm for 20 minutes) the evening before the consumption of the HFM. [Results] Postprandial TG was 22.5% lower in the interval sprinting compared to the noexercise condition when comparing the change in total area under the curve (ΔAUCT): ISE(7.15±1.90mmolL-1h-1) versus noexercise (9.22±3.44mmolL-1h-1), p=.014. The correlation between fasting TG levels in the noexercise condition and total reduction in AUCT between the conditions was significant (r=.87, p=.001). [Conclusion] One 20-min bout of interval sprinting,the night before consumption of a HFM,significantly attenuated the PPL response of sedentary males. PMID:27298807

  4. Excess Postexercise Oxygen Consumption After High-Intensity and Sprint Interval Exercise, and Continuous Steady-State Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Wesley J; Angadi, Siddhartha S; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2016-11-01

    Tucker, WJ, Angadi, SS, and Gaesser, GA. Excess postexercise oxygen consumption after high-intensity and sprint interval exercise, and continuous steady-state exercise. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3090-3097, 2016-Higher excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after high-intensity interval exercise (HIE) and sprint interval exercise (SIE) may contribute to greater fat loss sometimes reported after interval training compared with continuous steady-state exercise (SSE) training. We compared EPOC after HIE, SIE, and SSE. Ten recreationally active men (age 24 ± 4 years) participated in this randomized crossover study. On separate days, subjects completed a resting control trial and 3 exercise conditions on a cycle ergometer: HIE (four 4-minute intervals at 95% peak heart rate (HRpeak), separated by 3 minutes of active recovery), SIE (six 30-second Wingate sprints, separated by 4 minutes of active recovery), and SSE (30 minutes at 80% of HRpeak). Oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) was measured continuously during and for 3 hours after exercise. For all conditions, V[Combining Dot Above]O2 was higher than resting control only during the first hour postexercise. Although 3-hour EPOC and total net exercise energy expenditure (EE) after exercise were higher (p = 0.01) for SIE (22.0 ± 9.3 L; 110 ± 47 kcal) compared with SSE (12.8 ± 8.5 L; 64 ± 43 kcal), total (exercise + postexercise) net O2 consumed and net EE were greater (p = 0.03) for SSE (69.5 ± 18.4 L; 348 ± 92 kcal) than those for SIE (54.2 ± 12.0 L; 271 ± 60 kcal). Corresponding values for HIE were not significantly different from SSE or SIE. Excess postexercise oxygen consumption after SIE and HIE is unlikely to account for the greater fat loss per unit EE associated with SIE and HIE training reported in the literature.

  5. Automatic Error Analysis Using Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, E. J.; Cloud, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for automatic error analysis using interval mathematics is introduced. A comparison to standard error propagation methods shows that in cases involving complicated formulas, the interval approach gives comparable error estimates with much less effort. Several examples are considered, and numerical errors are computed using the INTLAB…

  6. Children's Discrimination of Melodic Intervals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellenberg, E. Glenn; Trehub, Sandra E.

    1996-01-01

    Adults and children listened to tone sequences and were required to detect changes either from intervals with simple frequency ratios to intervals with complex ratios or vice versa. Adults performed better on changes from simple to complex ratios than on the reverse changes. Similar performance was observed for 6-year olds who had never taken…

  7. Interval Recognition in Minimal Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shatzkin, Merton

    1984-01-01

    Music majors were asked to identify interval when it was either preceded or followed by a tone moving in the same direction. Difficulties in interval recognition in context appear to be an effect not just of placement within the context or of tonality, but of particular combinations of these aspects. (RM)

  8. Teaching Confidence Intervals Using Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagtvedt, Reidar; Jones, Gregory Todd; Jones, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Confidence intervals are difficult to teach, in part because most students appear to believe they understand how to interpret them intuitively. They rarely do. To help them abandon their misconception and achieve understanding, we have developed a simulation tool that encourages experimentation with multiple confidence intervals derived from the…

  9. VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gross, J.E.

    1959-10-31

    This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

  10. A simple and rapid technique for recovery of (99m)Tc from low specific activity (n,gamma)(99)Mo based on solvent extraction and column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sankha; Das, Sujata Saha; Barua, Luna

    2010-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method of separation of (99m)Tc from (99)Mo produced by neutron activation of (98)Mo via the (98)Mo(n,gamma)(99)Mo nuclear reaction is described. The recovery of (99m)Tc was performed by solvent extraction technique followed by column (active alumina) chromatography. The overall radiochemical yield for the complete separation of (99m)Tc was 85-95% (n=10). The separated Na[(99m)Tc]TcO(4) was of high radionuclidic, radiochemical, and chemical purities. The method can be adopted for routine use of (99m)Tc in hospital radio-pharmacies utilizing low-medium specific activity (n,gamma)(99)Mo produced in a research reactor.

  11. Comparison of various urine collection intervals for caffeine and dextromethorphan phenotyping in children.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Mary Jayne; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Kashuba, Angela D M; Leeder, J Steven

    2004-07-01

    Caffeine and dextromethorphan have been used successfully both alone and in combination to assess phenotype and enzyme activity in children of various ages. Previous pediatric phenotyping studies with these agents have used varying durations of urine collection. However, the minimum duration required for accurate phenotypic assessment with these compounds in children remains unknown. We calculated the cumulative metabolite recoveries and molar ratios in urine collected from children for 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours after caffeine and dextromethorphan administration to determine when respective urinary molar ratios stabilize and thus likely accurately reflect enzyme activity. Subjects (n = 24, ages 3-8 years) were given 4 oz of Coca-Cola(R) ( approximately 11.5 mg caffeine) and a single oral dose of dextromethorphan (0.5 mg/kg). Urine was collected at discrete intervals (0-2, 2-4, 4-6, and 6-8 h) during an 8-hour period, and the cumulative metabolite recoveries and urinary molar ratios were calculated. CYP2D6 genotyping was also performed in 21 of 24 subjects. In CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers, the extent of recovery for relevant metabolites was equivalent by 4 hours and represented 45% to 60% of the total amount recovered in the 8-hour period. The 2-hour CYP1A2 ratio was significantly different from those of longer collection intervals. Metabolite ratios for all other enzymes (i.e., NAT-2, XO, and CYP2D6) were independent of the duration of urine collection. These data suggest that a 4-hour urine collection is adequate for the concurrent assessment of hepatic CYP1A2, NAT-2, XO, and CYP2D6 activity in children ages 3 to 8 years who are CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers, using standard caffeine and dextromethorphan phenotyping methods. Longer collection periods may be required, however, in younger children or CYP2D6 poor metabolizers.

  12. Early inhibition of MMP activity in ischemic rat brain promotes expression of tight junction proteins and angiogenesis during recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Thompson, Jeffrey F; Taheri, Saeid; Salayandia, Victor M; McAvoy, Thera A; Hill, Jeff W; Yang, Yirong; Estrada, Eduardo Y; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2013-07-01

    In cerebral ischemia, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have a dual role by acutely disrupting tight junction proteins (TJPs) in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and chronically promoting angiogenesis. Since TJP remodeling of the neurovascular unit (NVU) is important in recovery and early inhibition of MMPs is neuroprotective, we hypothesized that short-term MMP inhibition would reduce infarct size and promote angiogenesis after ischemia. Adult spontaneously hypertensive rats had a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion. At the onset of ischemia, they received a single dose of the MMP inhibitor, GM6001. They were studied at multiple times up to 4 weeks with immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We observed newly formed vessels in peri-infarct regions at 3 weeks after reperfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI showed BBB opening in new vessels. Along with the new vessels, pericytes expressed zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and MMP-3, astrocytes expressed ZO-1, occludin, and MMP-2, while endothelial cells expressed claudin-5. The GM6001, which reduced tissue loss at 3 to 4 weeks, significantly increased new vessel formation with expression of TJPs and MMPs. Our results show that pericytes and astrocytes act spatiotemporally, contributing to extraendothelial TJP formation, and that MMPs are involved in BBB restoration during recovery. Early MMP inhibition benefits neurovascular remodeling after stroke.

  13. Early inhibition of MMP activity in ischemic rat brain promotes expression of tight junction proteins and angiogenesis during recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Thompson, Jeffrey F; Taheri, Saeid; Salayandia, Victor M; McAvoy, Thera A; Hill, Jeff W; Yang, Yirong; Estrada, Eduardo Y; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2013-01-01

    In cerebral ischemia, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have a dual role by acutely disrupting tight junction proteins (TJPs) in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and chronically promoting angiogenesis. Since TJP remodeling of the neurovascular unit (NVU) is important in recovery and early inhibition of MMPs is neuroprotective, we hypothesized that short-term MMP inhibition would reduce infarct size and promote angiogenesis after ischemia. Adult spontaneously hypertensive rats had a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion. At the onset of ischemia, they received a single dose of the MMP inhibitor, GM6001. They were studied at multiple times up to 4 weeks with immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We observed newly formed vessels in peri-infarct regions at 3 weeks after reperfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI showed BBB opening in new vessels. Along with the new vessels, pericytes expressed zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and MMP-3, astrocytes expressed ZO-1, occludin, and MMP-2, while endothelial cells expressed claudin-5. The GM6001, which reduced tissue loss at 3 to 4 weeks, significantly increased new vessel formation with expression of TJPs and MMPs. Our results show that pericytes and astrocytes act spatiotemporally, contributing to extraendothelial TJP formation, and that MMPs are involved in BBB restoration during recovery. Early MMP inhibition benefits neurovascular remodeling after stroke. PMID:23571276

  14. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Recovery from rapamycin: drug-insensitive activity of yeast target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) supports residual proliferation that dilutes rapamycin among progeny cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephanie K; Burgess, Karl E V; Gray, Joseph V

    2014-09-19

    The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is a key conserved regulator of eukaryotic cell growth. The xenobiotic rapamycin is a potent inhibitor of the yeast complex. Surprisingly, the EGO complex, a nonessential in vivo activator of TORC1, is somehow required for yeast cells to recover efficiently from a period of treatment with rapamycin. Why? Here, we found that rapamycin is only a partial inhibitor of TORC1. We confirmed that saturating amounts of rapamycin do not fully inhibit proliferation of wild-type cells, and we found that the residual proliferation in the presence of the drug is dependent on the EGO complex and on the activity of TORC1. We found that this residual TORC1-dependent proliferation is key to recovery from rapamycin treatment. First, the residual proliferation rate correlates with the ability of cells to recover from treatment. Second, the residual proliferation rate persists long after washout of the drug and until cells recover. Third, the total observable pool of cell-associated rapamycin is extremely stable and decreases only with increasing cell number after washout of the drug. Finally, consideration of the residual proliferation rate alone accurately and quantitatively accounts for the kinetics of recovery of wild-type cells and for the nature and severity of the ego- mutant defect. Overall, our results revealed that rapamycin is a partial inhibitor of yeast TORC1, that persistence of the drug limits recovery, and that rapamycin is not detoxified by yeast but is passively diluted among progeny cells because of residual proliferation.

  16. The effect of three recovery protocols on blood lactate clearance after race-paced swimming.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the impact of 3 recovery protocols on blood lactate clearance after maximal intensity swimming. Thirty-three regional standard swimmers were tested throughout the course a year and were required to complete a race-paced 200-m swim in their main stroke or individual medley. After the race-paced swim, swimmers were assigned a self-paced continuous steady rate swim of 20 minutes (self-prescribed); a 20-minute coach-administered modified warm-up consisting of various swimming modes, intensities, and rest intervals (coach prescribed); or a 20-minute land-based recovery consisting of light-intensity walking, skipping, and stretching (land based). Blood lactate concentration was measured from the fingertip before and after the race-paced swim and after the recovery activity. The concentration of blood lactate was higher (p < 0.01) after race-paced swimming (range of 10.5-11.0 mmol·L(-1)) compared with baseline (range 1.3-1.4 mmol·L(-1)). However, there were no differences (p > 0.05) between the groups (recovery protocols) at these time points. Conversely, differences were observed between groups after the recovery activities (p < 0.01). Specifically, blood lactate concentration was higher after the land-based activity (3.7 ± 1.8 mmol·L(-1)) than either the self-prescribed (2.0 ± 1.2 mmol·L(-1)) or coach-prescribed (1.8 ± 0.9 mmol·L(-1)) swimming protocols. The results of the present study suggest that it does not matter whether a self-paced continuous steady rate swimming velocity or a swimming recovery consisting of various strokes, intensities, and rest intervals is adopted as a recovery activity. As both swimming recoveries removed more blood lactate than the land-based recovery, swimmers should therefore be advised to undertake a swimming-based recovery rather than a land-based recovery.

  17. Physiologically adaptive changes of the L5 afferent neurogram and of the rat soleus EMG activity during 14 days of hindlimb unloading and recovery.

    PubMed

    De-Doncker, L; Kasri, M; Picquet, F; Falempin, M

    2005-12-01

    The hindlimb unloading rat model (HU, Morey's model) is usually used to mimic and study neuromuscular changes that develop during spaceflights. This Earth-based model of microgravity induces a muscular atrophy of the slow postural muscle of hindlimbs, such as the soleus, a loss of strength, modifications of contraction kinetics, changes in histochemical and electrophoretical profiles and modifications of the tonic EMG activity. It has been suggested in the literature that some of these neuromuscular effects were due to a reduction of afferent feedback during HU. However, no direct data have confirmed this hypothesis. The aim of this study was to clearly establish if changes of the L5 afferent neurogram are closely related to the soleus EMG activity during and after 14 days of HU. Immediately after HU, the EMG activity of the soleus muscle disappeared and was associated with a decrease in the afferent neurogram. The soleus electromyographic and afferent activities remained lower than the pre-suspension levels until the sixth day of HU and were recovered between the sixth and the ninth day. On the twelfth and fourteenth days, they were increased beyond the pre-suspension levels. During the first recovery day, these activities were significantly higher than those on the fourteenth HU day and returned to the pre-suspension levels between the third and sixth recovery days. To conclude, our study directly demonstrates that the HU conditions cannot be considered as a functional deafferentation, as suggested in the literature, but only as a reduction of afferent information at the beginning of the HU period.

  18. High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Improves Functional Recovery by Enhancing Neurogenesis and Activating BDNF/TrkB Signaling in Ischemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Zheng, Haiqing; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Qingjie; Li, Lili; Pei, Zhong; Hu, Xiquan

    2017-02-20

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has rapidly become an attractive therapeutic approach for stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying this remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate whether high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery mediated by enhanced neurogenesis and activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) pathway and to compare the effect of conventional 20 Hz rTMS and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) on ischemic rats. Rats after rTMS were sacrificed seven and 14 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), following evaluation of neurological function. Neurogenesis was measured using specific markers: Ki67, Nestin, doublecortin (DCX), NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the expression levels of BDNF were visualized by Western blotting and RT-PCR analysis. Both high-frequency rTMS methods significantly improved neurological function and reduced infarct volume. Moreover, 20 Hz rTMS and iTBS significantly promoted neurogenesis, shown by an increase of Ki67/DCX, Ki67/Nestin, and Ki67/NeuN-positive cells in the peri-infarct striatum. These beneficial effects were accompanied by elevated protein levels of BDNF and phosphorylated-TrkB. In conclusion, high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery possibly by enhancing neurogenesis and activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway and conventional 20 Hz rTMS is better than iTBS at enhancing neurogenesis in ischemic rats.

  19. High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Improves Functional Recovery by Enhancing Neurogenesis and Activating BDNF/TrkB Signaling in Ischemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Zheng, Haiqing; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Qingjie; Li, Lili; Pei, Zhong; Hu, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has rapidly become an attractive therapeutic approach for stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying this remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate whether high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery mediated by enhanced neurogenesis and activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) pathway and to compare the effect of conventional 20 Hz rTMS and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) on ischemic rats. Rats after rTMS were sacrificed seven and 14 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), following evaluation of neurological function. Neurogenesis was measured using specific markers: Ki67, Nestin, doublecortin (DCX), NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the expression levels of BDNF were visualized by Western blotting and RT-PCR analysis. Both high-frequency rTMS methods significantly improved neurological function and reduced infarct volume. Moreover, 20 Hz rTMS and iTBS significantly promoted neurogenesis, shown by an increase of Ki67/DCX, Ki67/Nestin, and Ki67/NeuN-positive cells in the peri-infarct striatum. These beneficial effects were accompanied by elevated protein levels of BDNF and phosphorylated-TrkB. In conclusion, high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery possibly by enhancing neurogenesis and activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway and conventional 20 Hz rTMS is better than iTBS at enhancing neurogenesis in ischemic rats. PMID:28230741

  20. TIME-INTERVAL MEASURING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gross, J.E.

    1958-04-15

    An electronic device for measuring the time interval between two control pulses is presented. The device incorporates part of a previous approach for time measurement, in that pulses from a constant-frequency oscillator are counted during the interval between the control pulses. To reduce the possible error in counting caused by the operation of the counter gating circuit at various points in the pulse cycle, the described device provides means for successively delaying the pulses for a fraction of the pulse period so that a final delay of one period is obtained and means for counting the pulses before and after each stage of delay during the time interval whereby a plurality of totals is obtained which may be averaged and multplied by the pulse period to obtain an accurate time- Interval measurement.

  1. Inductively-Activated Short-Interval Timer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Gordon A.; Wells, George H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Timing circuit in pneumatically launched projectile triggers explosive charge in projectile at specified delay after launch. Both power and control signals coupled inductively to timer from stationary launcher circuitry. Eliminates need for direct electrical contacts, which are unreliable and generate sparks that trigger explosive accidentally. Inductive coupling also provides higher reliability in field operation than contacts. Concept useful in such other safety-related applications as remotely or automatically controlling flow of bottled flammable gas.

  2. Simvastatin inhibits neural cell apoptosis and promotes locomotor recovery via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Shen, Zhaoliang; Yuan, Yajiang; Han, Donghe; Song, Changwei; Guo, Yue; Mei, Xifan

    2016-07-01

    Statins exhibit neuroprotective effects after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the molecular mechanism underlying these effects remains unknown. This study demonstrates that the hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor simvastatin (Simv) exhibits neuroprotective effects on neuronal apoptosis and supports functional recovery in a rat SCI model by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In specific, Simv administration after SCI significantly up-regulated the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 phosphorylation and β-catenin protein, increased the mRNA expression of lymphoid enhancer factor-1 and T-cell factor-1, and suppressed the expression of β-catenin phosphorylation in the spinal cord neurons. Simv enhanced motor neuronal survival in the spinal cord anterior horn and decreased the lesion of spinal cord tissues after SCI. Simv administration after SCI also evidently reduced the expression levels of Bax, active caspase-3, and active caspase-9 in the spinal cord neurons and the proportion of transferase UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive neuron cells, but increased the expression level of Bcl-2 in the spinal cord neurons. However, the anti-apoptotic effects of Simv were reduced in cultured spinal cord nerve cells when the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was suppressed in the lipopolysaccharide-induced model. Furthermore, the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores indicated that Simv treatment significantly improved the locomotor functions of rats after SCI. This study is the first to report that Simv exerts neuroprotective effects by reducing neuronal apoptosis, and promoting functional and pathological recovery after SCI by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We verified the neuroprotective properties associated with simvastatin following spinal cord injury (SCI). Simvastatin reduced neuronal apoptosis, improved the functional and pathological recovery via activating Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway

  3. Sprint vs. interval training in football.

    PubMed

    Ferrari Bravo, D; Impellizzeri, F M; Rampinini, E; Castagna, C; Bishop, D; Wisloff, U

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of high-intensity aerobic interval and repeated-sprint ability (RSA) training on aerobic and anaerobic physiological variables in male football players. Forty-two participants were randomly assigned to either the interval training group (ITG, 4 x 4 min running at 90 - 95 % of HRmax; n = 21) or repeated-sprint training group (RSG, 3 x 6 maximal shuttle sprints of 40 m; n = 21). The following outcomes were measured at baseline and after 7 weeks of training: maximum oxygen uptake, respiratory compensation point, football-specific endurance (Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test, YYIRT), 10-m sprint time, jump height and power, and RSA. Significant group x time interaction was found for YYIRT (p = 0.003) with RSG showing greater improvement (from 1917 +/- 439 to 2455 +/- 488 m) than ITG (from 1846 +/- 329 to 2077 +/- 300 m). Similarly, a significant interaction was found in RSA mean time (p = 0.006) with only the RSG group showing an improvement after training (from 7.53 +/- 0.21 to 7.37 +/- 0.17 s). No other group x time interactions were found. Significant pre-post changes were found for absolute and relative maximum oxygen uptake and respiratory compensation point (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that the RSA training protocol used in this study can be an effective training strategy for inducing aerobic and football-specific training adaptations.

  4. Sequential Processing and the Matching-Stimulus Interval Effect in ERP Components: An Exploration of the Mechanism Using Multiple Regression

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Genevieve Z.; Barry, Robert J.; Gonsalvez, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    In oddball tasks, increasing the time between stimuli within a particular condition (target-to-target interval, TTI; nontarget-to-nontarget interval, NNI) systematically enhances N1, P2, and P300 event-related potential (ERP) component amplitudes. This study examined the mechanism underpinning these effects in ERP components recorded from 28 adults who completed a conventional three-tone oddball task. Bivariate correlations, partial correlations and multiple regression explored component changes due to preceding ERP component amplitudes and intervals found within the stimulus series, rather than constraining the task with experimentally constructed intervals, which has been adequately explored in prior studies. Multiple regression showed that for targets, N1 and TTI predicted N2, TTI predicted P3a and P3b, and Processing Negativity (PN), P3b, and TTI predicted reaction time. For rare nontargets, P1 predicted N1, NNI predicted N2, and N1 predicted Slow Wave (SW). Findings show that the mechanism is operating on separate stages of stimulus-processing, suggestive of either increased activation within a number of stimulus-specific pathways, or very long component generator recovery cycles. These results demonstrate the extent to which matching-stimulus intervals influence ERP component amplitudes and behavior in a three-tone oddball task, and should be taken into account when designing similar studies. PMID:27445774

  5. [Alpha-bursts and K-complex: phasic activation pattern during spontaneous recovery of correct psychomotor performance at difference stages of drowsiness].

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, V B

    2003-01-01

    It is known that phasic activation processes reveal themselves by different electrophysiological patterns depending on the sleep depth. Alpha bursts are an electrophysiological manifestation of arousal at the initial stage of sleep, whereas at the II stage K-complex becomes the main arousal pattern. We have shown earlier that during light drowsiness spontaneous recovery of correct psychomotor test performance (after an error) by a sitting subject is accompanied by EEG alpha bursts. The aim of this work was to study the EEG phasic activation pattern at deeper drowsiness during test performance by a subject in a lying position. Subjects had to press sensitive button in a lying position with closed eyes with self-paced oral counting of pressings. The experiment lasted for 40 min; EEG, EOG, and button pressing were recorded. It was shown that recovery of correct performance after errors at deeper drowsiness was accompanied by two types of EEG phasic activation patterns (PAP-1 and PAP-2). The alpha frequency component was always present in both PAP-1 and PAP-2. PAP-1 were observed at early stages of drowsiness and consisted of high-amplitude alpha bursts and EEG activity of higher frequency. PAP-2 were recorded at deeper stages and consisted of K-complexes with superposition of PAP-1. At first (medium level of drowsiness) the alpha bursts were superposed on the late slow K-complex components. With further deepening of drowsiness the early fast components of K-complex were also observed. The early appearance of K-complex during test performance at drowsiness seems to be associated with the urgent run of brain arousal systems, which at spontaneous falling asleep are in operation at the II sleep stage.

  6. Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari; Frank, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning (CAIP), a paradigm for representing and reasoning about plans. The paradigm enables the description of planning domains with time, resources, concurrent activities, mutual exclusions among sets of activities, disjunctive preconditions and conditional effects. We provide a theoretical foundation for the paradigm, based on temporal intervals and attributes. We then show how the plans are naturally expressed by networks of constraints, and show that the process of planning maps directly to dynamic constraint reasoning. In addition, we de ne compatibilities, a compact mechanism for describing planning domains. We describe how this framework can incorporate the use of constraint reasoning technology to improve planning. Finally, we describe EUROPA, an implementation of the CAIP framework.

  7. Six sessions of sprint interval training increases muscle oxidative potential and cycle endurance capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Burgomaster, Kirsten A; Hughes, Scott C; Heigenhauser, George J F; Bradwell, Suzanne N; Gibala, Martin J

    2005-06-01

    Parra et al. (Acta Physiol. Scand 169: 157-165, 2000) showed that 2 wk of daily sprint interval training (SIT) increased citrate synthase (CS) maximal activity but did not change "anaerobic" work capacity, possibly because of chronic fatigue induced by daily training. The effect of fewer SIT sessions on muscle oxidative potential is unknown, and aside from changes in peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2 peak)), no study has examined the effect of SIT on "aerobic" exercise capacity. We tested the hypothesis that six sessions of SIT, performed over 2 wk with 1-2 days rest between sessions to promote recovery, would increase CS maximal activity and endurance capacity during cycling at approximately 80% Vo(2 peak). Eight recreationally active subjects [age = 22 +/- 1 yr; Vo(2 peak) = 45 +/- 3 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) (mean +/- SE)] were studied before and 3 days after SIT. Each training session consisted of four to seven "all-out" 30-s Wingate tests with 4 min of recovery. After SIT, CS maximal activity increased by 38% (5.5 +/- 1.0 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.7 mmol.kg protein(-1).h(-1)) and resting muscle glycogen content increased by 26% (614 +/- 39 vs. 489 +/- 57 mmol/kg dry wt) (both P < 0.05). Most strikingly, cycle endurance capacity increased by 100% after SIT (51 +/- 11 vs. 26 +/- 5 min; P < 0.05), despite no change in Vo(2 peak). The coefficient of variation for the cycle test was 12.0%, and a control group (n = 8) showed no change in performance when tested approximately 2 wk apart without SIT. We conclude that short sprint interval training (approximately 15 min of intense exercise over 2 wk) increased muscle oxidative potential and doubled endurance capacity during intense aerobic cycling in recreationally active individuals.

  8. Physiological adjustments to intensive interval treadmill training

    PubMed Central

    Pyke, F. S.; Elliott, B. C.; Morton, A. R.; Roberts, A. D.

    1974-01-01

    During a one month training period, eight active men, aged 23-35 years, completed sixteen 30 minute sessions of high intensity interval (5 second work bouts at 16.9 km/hr up 20-25% grade alternated with 10 second rest intervals) treadmill work. In this training period, V̇O2, V̇E and blood lactate in a 10 minute run at 12.9 km/hr on a level treadmill were unchanged but heart rate during this work decreased by an average of 9 beats/min. During a 4 minute interval work effort at the training intensity, blood lactate accumulation decreased by 40.4%. In exhausting work, mean values of V̇O2, V̇E and blood lactate increased by 6.2%, 8.2% and 31.6% respectively. Maximal heart rate decreased by an average of 4 beats/min. The average work production of the men in the training sessions improved by 64.5% from 28,160 kgm to 43,685 kgm. No significant improvements were observed in either a short sprint or a stair climbing test which assessed the ability to generate mechanical power from alactacid anaerobic sources. It was concluded that the training regime is an effective method of producing a high total work output in competitive athletes and results in improvements in aerobic power, glycolytic capacity and ability to tolerate the short duration interval work encountered in many games.

  9. Analysis of backward error recovery for concurrent processes with recovery blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.; Lee, Y. H.

    1982-01-01

    Three different methods of implementing recovery blocks (RB's). These are the asynchronous, synchronous, and the pseudo recovery point implementations. Pseudo recovery points so that unbounded rollback may be avoided while maintaining process autonomy are proposed. Probabilistic models for analyzing these three methods under standard assumptions in computer performance analysis, i.e., exponential distributions for related random variables were developed. The interval between two successive recovery lines for asynchronous RB's mean loss in computation power for the synchronized method, and additional overhead and rollback distance in case PRP's are used were estimated.

  10. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R D-1 project titled Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.'' The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  11. Moderate rest intervals are superior to short intervals for improving PAI-1 following exhaustive exercise in recreational weightlifters

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Fabrício Eduardo; Gerosa-Neto, Jose; Diniz, Tiego Aparecido; Freitas, Ismael F.; Lira, Fabio Santos; Cholewa, Jason Michael

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of short and moderate recovery intervals on lipid profiles and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) following exhaustive strength exercise in recreational weightlifters. Seven subjects performed two conditions in a randomized order: short, 90% of one maximum repetition (1RM) and 30-sec rest allowed between sets; moderate, 90% of 1RM and 90-sec rest allowed between sets. Total cholesterol (Chol), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), triacylglycerol (TAG), Chol/HDL-c ratio and PAI-1 concentrations were assessed at baseline, immediately postexercise, and 15- and 30-min postexercise (post-15 and post-30). The LDL-c concentrations decreased and HDL-c concentrations increased in both conditions but without significant differences (LDL-c: 30 sec: pre, 82.0±19.5 mg/dL, immediately, 73.9±16.4 mg/dL, 90 sec: pre, 75.9±30.8 mg/dL, immediately, 66.2±35.5 mg/dL, P=0.423; HDL-c: 30 sec: pre, 53.5±9.2 mg/dL, immediately, 61.4±11.4 mg/dL; 90 sec: pre, 55.8±11.1 mg/dL, immediately, 84.9±27.8, mg/dL; P=0.146). On the other hand, PAI-1 had a tendency to decrease only in the 90-sec condition (pre, 7,754.9±2,927.7 pg/mL; immediately, 5,313.1±4,637.4 pg/mL; P=0.085). There was a positive correlation between PAI-1 and Chol (30 sec: r=0.83, 90 sec: r=0.91; P<0.05), PAI-1 and fat-free mass in both conditions (30 sec post-15: r=0.79, post-30: r=081, P<0.05; 90 sec immediately: r=0.77, post-15: r=0.81; P<0.05), and PAI-1 and TAG only in 30 sec (r=0.87, P<0.05). Short and moderate intervals of recovery improve lipid profiles after heavy strength exercise but only 90 sec induced greater improved in PAI-1 concentration in recreational weightlifters. PMID:28119878

  12. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  13. Finding Nested Common Intervals Efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin, Guillaume; Stoye, Jens

    In this paper, we study the problem of efficiently finding gene clusters formalized by nested common intervals between two genomes represented either as permutations or as sequences. Considering permutations, we give several algorithms whose running time depends on the size of the actual output rather than the output in the worst case. Indeed, we first provide a straightforward O(n 3) time algorithm for finding all nested common intervals. We reduce this complexity by providing an O(n 2) time algorithm computing an irredundant output. Finally, we show, by providing a third algorithm, that finding only the maximal nested common intervals can be done in linear time. Considering sequences, we provide solutions (modifications of previously defined algorithms and a new algorithm) for different variants of the problem, depending on the treatment one wants to apply to duplicated genes.

  14. EBP2R - an innovative enhanced biological nutrient recovery activated sludge system to produce growth medium for green microalgae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Pérez, Borja; Ramin, Elham; Smets, Barth F; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-01-01

    Current research considers wastewater as a source of energy, nutrients and water and not just a source of pollution. So far, mainly energy intensive physical and chemical unit processes have been developed to recover some of these resources, and less energy and resource demanding alternatives are needed. Here, we present a modified enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery system (referred to as EBP2R) that can produce optimal culture media for downstream micro-algal growth in terms of N and P content. Phosphorus is recovered as a P-stream by diversion of some of the effluent from the upstream anaerobic reactor. By operating the process at comparably low solids retention times (SRT), the nitrogen content of wastewater is retained as free and saline ammonia, the preferred form of nitrogen for most micro-algae. Scenario simulations were carried out to assess the capacity of the EBP2R system to produce nutrient rich organic-carbon depleted algal cultivation media of target composition. Via SRT control, the quality of the constructed cultivation media can be optimized to support a wide range of green micro-algal growth requirements. Up to 75% of the influent phosphorus can be recovered, by diverting 30% of the influent flow as a P-stream at an SRT of 5 days. Through global sensitivity analysis we find that the effluent N-to-P ratio and the P recovered are mainly dependent on the influent quality rather than on biokinetics or stoichiometry. Further research is needed to demonstrate that the system performance predicted through the model-based design can be achieved in reality.

  15. A neural mechanism for sensing and reproducing a time interval

    PubMed Central

    Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Shadlen, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Timing plays a crucial role in sensorimotor function. The neural mechanisms that enable the brain to flexibly measure and reproduce time intervals are however not known. We recorded neural activity in parietal cortex of monkeys in a time reproduction task. Monkeys were trained to measure and immediately afterwards reproduce different sample intervals. While measuring an interval, neural responses had a nonlinear profile that increased with the duration of the sample interval. Activity was reset during the transition from measurement to production, and was followed by a ramping activity whose slope encoded the previously measured sample interval. We found that firing rates at the end of the measurement epoch were correlated with both the slope of the ramp and the monkey’s corresponding production interval on a trial-by-trial basis. Analysis of response dynamics further linked the rate of change of firing rates in the measurement epoch to the slope of the ramp in the production epoch. These observations suggest that, during time reproduction, an interval is measured prospectively in relation to the desired motor plan to reproduce that interval. PMID:26455307

  16. Soil microbiological properties and enzymatic activities of long-term post-fire recovery in dry and semiarid Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.) forest stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedo, J.; Lucas-Borja, M. E.; Wic, C.; Andrés-Abellán, M.; de Las Heras, J.

    2015-02-01

    Wildfires affecting forest ecosystems and post-fire silvicultural treatments may cause considerable changes in soil properties. The capacity of different microbial groups to recolonise soil after disturbances is crucial for proper soil functioning. The aim of this work was to investigate some microbial soil properties and enzyme activities in semiarid and dry Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.) forest stands. Different plots affected by a wildfire event 17 years ago without or with post-fire silvicultural treatments 5 years after the fire event were selected. A mature Aleppo pine stand, unaffected by wildfire and not thinned was used as a control. Physicochemical soil properties (soil texture, pH, carbonates, organic matter, electrical conductivity, total N and P), soil enzymes (urease, phosphatase, β-glucosidase and dehydrogenase activities), soil respiration and soil microbial biomass carbon were analysed in the selected forests areas and plots. The main finding was that long time after this fire event produces no differences in the microbiological soil properties and enzyme activities of soil after comparing burned and thinned, burned and not thinned, and mature plots. Moreover, significant site variation was generally seen in soil enzyme activities and microbiological parameters. We conclude that total vegetation recovery normalises post-fire soil microbial parameters, and that wildfire and post-fire silvicultural treatments are not significant factors affecting soil properties after 17 years.

  17. Soil microbiological properties and enzymatic activities of long-term post-fire recovery in dry and semiarid Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.) forest stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedo, J.; Lucas-Borja, M. E.; Wic, C.; Andrés Abellán, M.; de Las Heras, J.

    2014-10-01

    Wildfires affecting forest ecosystems and post-fire silvicultural treatments may cause considerable changes in soil properties. The capacity of different microbial groups to recolonize soil after disturbances is crucial for proper soil functioning. The aim of this work was to investigate some microbial soil properties and enzyme activities in semiarid and dry Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.) forest stands. Different plots affected by a wildfire event 17 years ago without or with post-fire silvicultural treatments five years after the fire event were selected. A mature Aleppo pine stand unaffected by wildfire and not thinned was used as a control. Physicochemical soil properties (soil texture, pH, carbonates, organic matter, electrical conductivity, total N and P), soil enzymes (urease, phosphatase, β-glucosidase and dehydrogenase activities), soil respiration and soil microbial biomass carbon were analysed in the selected forests areas and plots. The main finding was that long time after this fire event produces no differences in the microbiological soil properties and enzyme activities of soil after comparing burned and thinned, burned and not thinned, and mature plots. Thus, the long-term consequences and post-fire silvicultural management in the form of thinning have a significant effect on the site recovery after fire. Moreover, significant site variation was generally seen in soil enzyme activities and microbiological parameters. We conclude that total vegetation restoration normalises microbial parameters, and that wildfire and post-fire silvicultural treatments are not significant factors of soil properties after 17 years.

  18. Recovery in soccer : part ii-recovery strategies.

    PubMed

    Nédélec, Mathieu; McCall, Alan; Carling, Chris; Legall, Franck; Berthoin, Serge; Dupont, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    In the formerly published part I of this two-part review, we examined fatigue after soccer matchplay and recovery kinetics of physical performance, and cognitive, subjective and biological markers. To reduce the magnitude of fatigue and to accelerate the time to fully recover after completion, several recovery strategies are now used in professional soccer teams. During congested fixture schedules, recovery strategies are highly required to alleviate post-match fatigue, and then to regain performance faster and reduce the risk of injury. Fatigue following competition is multifactorial and mainly related to dehydration, glycogen depletion, muscle damage and mental fatigue. Recovery strategies should consequently be targeted against the major causes of fatigue. Strategies reviewed in part II of this article were nutritional intake, cold water immersion, sleeping, active recovery, stretching, compression garments, massage and electrical stimulation. Some strategies such as hydration, diet and sleep are effective in their ability to counteract the fatigue mechanisms. Providing milk drinks to players at the end of competition and a meal containing high-glycaemic index carbohydrate and protein within the hour following the match are effective in replenishing substrate stores and optimizing muscle-damage repair. Sleep is an essential part of recovery management. Sleep disturbance after a match is common and can negatively impact on the recovery process. Cold water immersion is effective during acute periods of match congestion in order to regain performance levels faster and repress the acute inflammatory process. Scientific evidence for other strategies reviewed in their ability to accelerate the return to the initial level of performance is still lacking. These include active recovery, stretching, compression garments, massage and electrical stimulation. While this does not mean that these strategies do not aid the recovery process, the protocols implemented up until

  19. Phosphorus and short-chain fatty acids recovery from waste activated sludge by anaerobic fermentation: Effect of acid or alkali pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Zhang, Cheng; Hu, Hui; Liu, Jianyong; Duan, Tengfei; Luo, Jinghuan; Qian, Guangren

    2017-03-06

    Waste activated sludge (WAS) was pretreated by acid or alkali to enhance the anaerobic fermentation (AF) for phosphorus (P) and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) release into the liquid simultaneously. With acid pretreatment, the released total P concentration achieved 120mg/L, which was 71.4% higher than that with alkali pretreatment. In addition, alkali pretreatment enhanced organic P release with about 35.3% of organic P in the solid being converted to inorganic P, while little had changed with acid pretreatment. The results also showed that acid and alkali pretreatment enhanced SCFAs production by 15.3 and 12.5times, respectively. Acid pretreatment could be preferred for simultaneous recovery of P and SCFAs by AF.

  20. Feedback functions for variable-interval reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, John A.; Baum, William M.

    1980-01-01

    On a given variable-interval schedule, the average obtained rate of reinforcement depends on the average rate of responding. An expression for this feedback effect is derived from the assumptions that free-operant responding occurs in bursts with a constant tempo, alternating with periods of engagement in other activities; that the durations of bursts and other activities are exponentially distributed; and that the rates of initiating and terminating bursts are inversely related. The expression provides a satisfactory account of the data of three experiments. PMID:16812187

  1. New Madrid seismic zone recurrence intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Schweig, E.S. Center for Earthquake Research and Information, Memphis, TN ); Ellis, M.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Frequency-magnitude relations in the New Madrid seismic zone suggest that great earthquakes should occur every 700--1,200 yrs, implying relatively high strain rates. These estimates are supported by some geological and GPS results. Recurrence intervals of this order should have produced about 50 km of strike-slip offset since Miocene time. No subsurface evidence for such large displacements is known within the seismic zone. Moreover, the irregular fault pattern forming a compressive step that one sees today is not compatible with large displacements. There are at least three possible interpretations of the observations of short recurrence intervals and high strain rates, but apparently youthful fault geometry and lack of major post-Miocene deformation. One is that the seismological and geodetic evidence are misleading. A second possibility is that activity in the region is cyclic. That is, the geological and geodetic observations that suggest relatively short recurrence intervals reflect a time of high, but geologically temporary, pore-fluid pressure. Zoback and Zoback have suggested such a model for intraplate seismicity in general. Alternatively, the New Madrid seismic zone is geologically young feature that has been active for only the last few tens of thousands of years. In support of this, observe an irregular fault geometry associated with a unstable compressive step, a series of en echelon and discontinuous lineaments that may define the position of a youthful linking fault, and the general absence of significant post-Eocene faulting or topography.

  2. Silicate application increases the photosynthesis and its associated metabolic activities in Kentucky bluegrass under drought stress and post-drought recovery.

    PubMed

    Saud, Shah; Yajun, Chen; Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Na, Li; Xin, Li; Alhussien, Safa Abd Alaleem Fadal Elseed

    2016-09-01

    Drought stress is the most pervasive threat to plant growth, which disrupts the photosynthesis and its associated metabolic activities, while silicate (Si) application may have the potential to alleviate the damaging effects of drought on plant growth. In present study, the role of Si in regulating the photosynthesis and its associated metabolic events in Kentucky bluegrass (cv. Arcadia) were investigated under drought stress. Drought stress and four levels (0, 200, 400, 800 mg L(-1)) of Si (Na2SiO3.9H2O) were imposed on 1-year-old plants removed from field and cultured under glasshouse conditions. After 20 days of drought stress, the plants were re-watered to reach soil field capacity for the examination of recovery on the second and the seventh day. The experiment was arranged in completely randomized design replicated four times. Drought stress severely decreased the photosynthesis, water use efficiency, stomatal conductance, cholorophyll contents, Rubisco activity, and Rubisco activation state in Kentucky bluegrass. Nevertheless, application of Si had a positive influence on all these attributes, particularly under stress conditions. As compared to control, Si application at 400 mg L(-1) recorded 78, 64, and 48 % increase in photosynthesis, Rubisco initial activity, and Rubisco total activity, respectively, at 20 days of drought. Higher photosynthesis and higher Rubisco activity in Si-applied treatments suggest that Si may have possible (direct or indirect) role in maintenance of more active Rubisco enzyme and Rubisco activase and more stable proteins for carbon assimilation under stress conditions, which needs to be elucidated in further studies.

  3. Effects of Olig2-overexpressing neural stem cells and myelin basic protein-activated T cells on recovery from spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian-Guo; Shen, Lin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Qi-Yi; Zhang, Chen; Xi, Jin; Ma, Shan-Feng; Zhou, Jian-Sheng; Lü, He-Zuo

    2012-04-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation is a major focus of current research for treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). However, it is very important to promote the survival and differentiation of NSCs into myelinating oligodendrocytes (OLs). In this study, myelin basic protein-activated T (MBP-T) cells were passively immunized to improve the SCI microenvironment. Olig2-overexpressing NSCs were infected with a lentivirus carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene to generate Olig2-GFP-NSCs that were transplanted into the injured site to differentiate into OLs. Transferred MBP-T cells infiltrated the injured spinal cord, produced neurotrophic factors, and induced the differentiation of resident microglia and/or infiltrating blood monocytes into an "alternatively activated" anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype by producing interleukin-13. As a result, the survival of transplanted NSCs increased fivefold in MBP-T cell-transferred rats compared with that of the vehicle-treated control. In addition, the differentiation of MBP-positive OLs increased 12-fold in Olig2-GFP-NSC-transplanted rats compared with that of GFP-NSC-transplanted controls. In the MBP-T cell and Olig2-GFP-NSC combined group, the number of OL-remyelinated axons significantly increased compared with those of all other groups. However, a significant decrease in spinal cord lesion volume and an increase in spared myelin and behavioral recovery were observed in Olig2-NSC- and NSC-transplanted MBP-T cell groups. Collectively, these results suggest that MBP-T cell adoptive immunotherapy combined with NSC transplantation has a synergistic effect on histological and behavioral improvement after traumatic SCI. Although Olig2 overexpression enhances OL differentiation and myelination, the effect on functional recovery may be surpassed by MBP-T cells.

  4. MASTL(Greatwall) regulates DNA damage responses by coordinating mitotic entry after checkpoint recovery and APC/C activation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Po Yee; Ma, Hoi Tang; Lee, Hyun-jung; Poon, Randy Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    The G2 DNA damage checkpoint is one of the most important mechanisms controlling G2–mitosis transition. The kinase Greatwall (MASTL in human) promotes normal G2–mitosis transition by inhibiting PP2A via ARPP19 and ENSA. In this study, we demonstrate that MASTL is critical for maintaining genome integrity after DNA damage. Although MASTL did not affect the activation of DNA damage responses and subsequent repair, it determined the timing of entry into mitosis and the subsequent fate of the recovering cells. Constitutively active MASTL promoted dephosphorylation of CDK1Tyr15 and accelerated mitotic entry after DNA damage. Conversely, downregulation of MASTL or ARPP19/ENSA delayed mitotic entry. Remarkably, APC/C was activated precociously, resulting in the damaged cells progressing from G2 directly to G1 and skipping mitosis all together. Collectively, these results established that precise control of MASTL is essential to couple DNA damage to mitosis through the rate of mitotic entry and APC/C activation. PMID:26923777

  5. Active Science as a Contribution to the Trauma Recovery Process: Preliminary Indications with Orphans from the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrier, Frederic; Nsengiyumva, Jean-Baptiste

    2003-01-01

    Constructivist, hands-on, inquiry-based, science activities may have a curative potential that could be valuable in a psychological assistance programme for child victims of violence and war. To investigate this idea, pilot sessions were performed in an orphanage located in Ruhengeri, Rwanda, with seven young adults and two groups of 11 children…

  6. High resolution time interval counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Victor S.; Davis, Dick D.; Lombardi, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, we have developed two types of high resolution, multi-channel time interval counters. In the NIST two-way time transfer MODEM application, the counter is designed for operating primarily in the interrupt-driven mode, with 3 start channels and 3 stop channels. The intended start and stop signals are 1 PPS, although other frequencies can also be applied to start and stop the count. The time interval counters used in the NIST Frequency Measurement and Analysis System are implemented with 7 start channels and 7 stop channels. Four of the 7 start channels are devoted to the frequencies of 1 MHz, 5 MHz or 10 MHz, while triggering signals to all other start and stop channels can range from 1 PPS to 100 kHz. Time interval interpolation plays a key role in achieving the high resolution time interval measurements for both counters. With a 10 MHz time base, both counters demonstrate a single-shot resolution of better than 40 ps, and a stability of better than 5 x 10(exp -12) (sigma(sub chi)(tau)) after self test of 1000 seconds). The maximum rate of time interval measurements (with no dead time) is 1.0 kHz for the counter used in the MODEM application and is 2.0 kHz for the counter used in the Frequency Measurement and Analysis System. The counters are implemented as plug-in units for an AT-compatible personal computer. This configuration provides an efficient way of using a computer not only to control and operate the counters, but also to store and process measured data.

  7. Slow recovery from inactivation of Na+ channels underlies the activity-dependent attenuation of dendritic action potentials in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Colbert, C M; Magee, J C; Hoffman, D A; Johnston, D

    1997-09-01

    Na+ action potentials propagate into the dendrites of pyramidal neurons driving an influx of Ca2+ that seems to be important for associative synaptic plasticity. During repetitive (10-50 Hz) firing, dendritic action potentials display a marked and prolonged voltage-dependent decrease in amplitude. Such a decrease is not apparent in somatic action potentials. We investigated the mechanisms of the different activity dependence of somatic and dendritic action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons of adult rats using whole-cell and cell-attached patch-clamp methods. There were three main findings. First, dendritic Na+ currents decreased in amplitude when repeatedly activated by brief (2 msec) depolarizations. Recovery was slow and voltage-dependent. Second, Na+ currents decreased much less in somatic than in dendritic patches. Third, although K+ currents remained constant during trains, K+ currents were necessary for dendritic action potential amplitude to decrease in whole-cell experiments. These results suggest that regional differences in Na+ and K+ channels determine the differences in the activity dependence of somatic and dendritic action potential amplitudes.

  8. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of pectinase enzyme from guava (Psidium guajava) peel: Enzyme recovery, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Murshid, Fara Syazana; Manap, Mohd Yazid; Islam Sarker, Zaidul

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions on the yield, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability of the pectinase enzyme from guava peel. The ultrasound variables studied were sonication time (10-30 min), ultrasound temperature (30-50 °C), pH (2.0-8.0), and solvent-to-sample ratio (2:1 mL/g to 6:1 mL/g). The main goal was to optimize the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions to maximize the recovery of pectinase from guava peel with the most desirable enzyme-specific activity and stability. Under the optimum conditions, a high yield (96.2%), good specific activity (18.2 U/mg), temperature stability (88.3%), and storage stability (90.3%) of the extracted enzyme were achieved. The optimal conditions were 20 min sonication time, 40 °C temperature, at pH 5.0, using a 4:1 mL/g solvent-to-sample ratio. The study demonstrated that optimization of ultrasound-assisted process conditions for the enzyme extraction could improve the enzymatic characteristics and yield of the enzyme.

  9. Active science as a contribution to the trauma recovery process: preliminary indications with orphans from the 1994 genocide in Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Nsengiyumva, Jean-Baptiste

    2003-09-01

    Constructivist, hands-on, inquiry-based, science activities may have a curative potential that could be valuable in a psychological assistance programme for child victims of violence and war. To investigate this idea, pilot sessions were performed in an orphanage located in Ruhengeri, Rwanda, with seven young adults and two groups of 11 children aged from 9 to 16 years. Despite a number of imperfections in this attempt, significant observations have been made. First, a sound communication was established with all, even with the young adults who at the beginning were not as enthusiastic as the children. Furthermore, some children, originally isolated, silent and sad, displayed a high degree of happiness during the activities, and an overall increasing positive change of attitude. In addition, they appropriated well some principles of experimental science. This suggests that a joint development of science literacy and joy may be an interesting approach, both in education and therapy.

  10. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  11. Content of total iron, copper and manganese in liver of animals during hypokinesia, muscle activity and process of recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapovich, G. M.; Taneyeva, G. V.; Uteshev, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the content of total iron, copper and manganese in the liver of animals is altered depending on the intensity and duration of their swimming. Hypodynamia for 7 days does not alter the concentration of iron, but sufficiently increases the content of copper and manganese. The barometric factor effectively influences the maintenance of constancy in the content of microelements accumulated in the liver after intensive muscle activity.

  12. Constraint checking during error recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Robyn R.; Wong, Johnny S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The system-level software onboard a spacecraft is responsible for recovery from communication, power, thermal, and computer-health anomalies that may occur. The recovery must occur without disrupting any critical scientific or engineering activity that is executing at the time of the error. Thus, the error-recovery software may have to execute concurrently with the ongoing acquisition of scientific data or with spacecraft maneuvers. This work provides a technique by which the rules that constrain the concurrent execution of these processes can be modeled in a graph. An algorithm is described that uses this model to validate that the constraints hold for all concurrent executions of the error-recovery software with the software that controls the science and engineering activities of the spacecraft. The results are applicable to a variety of control systems with critical constraints on the timing and ordering of the events they control.

  13. Effects of physical and mental task demands on cervical and upper limb muscle activity and physiological responses during computer tasks and recovery periods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuling; Szeto, Grace P Y; Chan, Chetwyn C H

    2011-11-01

    The present study examined the effects of physical and mental workload during computer tasks on muscle activity and physiological measures. Activity in cervical postural muscles and distal forearm muscles, heart rate and blood pressure were compared among three tasks and rest periods of 15 min each in an experimental study design. Fourteen healthy pain-free adults participated (7 males, mean age = 23.2 ± 3.0 years) and the tasks were: (1) copy-typing ("typing"), (2) typing at progressively faster speed ("pacing"), (3) mental arithmetic plus fast typing ("subtraction"). Typing task was performed first, followed by the other two tasks in a random order. Median muscle activity (50th percentile) was examined in 5-min intervals during each task and each rest period, and statistically significant differences in the "time" factor (within task) and time × task factors was found in bilateral cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius muscles. In contrast, distal forearm muscle activity did not show any significant differences among three tasks. All muscles showed reduced activity to about the baseline level within first 5 min of the rest periods. Heart rate and blood pressure showed significant differences during tasks compared to baseline, and diastolic pressure was significantly higher in the subtraction than pacing task. The results suggest that cervical postural muscles had higher reactivity than forearm muscles to high mental workload tasks, and cervical muscles were also more reactive to tasks with high physical demand compared to high mental workload. Heart rate and blood pressure seemed to respond similarly to high physical and mental workloads.

  14. Ginsenoside Metabolite Compound K Promotes Recovery of Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis and Inhibits Inflammatory Responses by Suppressing NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Zhong, Wei; Wang, Weiwei; Hu, Shaoping; Yuan, Jiahui; Zhang, Bing; Hu, Tianhui; Song, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Phytogenic compounds with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, such as ginsenoside metabolite compound K (CK) or berberine (BBR), are currently discussed as promising complementary agents in the prevention and treatment of cancer and inflammation. The latest study showed that ginsenoside Rb1 and its metabolites could inhibit TNBS-induced colitis injury. However, the functional mechanisms of anti-inflammation effects of ginsenoside, particularly its metabolite CK are still not clear. Here, using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, clinical parameters, intestinal integrity, pro-inflammatory cytokines production, and signaling pathways in colonic tissues were determined. In mild and sever colitis mice, CK and BBR (as a positive agent) alleviated colitis histopathology injury, ameliorated myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines production, such as, IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in both mice colon tissues and blood. Nevertheless, the results revealed that CK and BBR inhibited NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, downregulated p-IκBα and upregulated IκBα, indicating that CK, as well as BBR, suppressed the activation of the NF-κB pathway in the progression of colitis with immunofluorescence, immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis. Furthermore, CK inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokines production in LPS-activated macrophages via down-regulation of NF-κB signaling pathway. Taken together, our results not only reveal that CK promotes the recovery of the progression of colitis and inhibits the inflammatory responses by suppressing NF-κB activation, but also suggest that CK downregulates intestinal inflammation through regulating the activation of macrophages and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. PMID:24504372

  15. Increased Natural Killer Cell Activation in HIV-Infected Immunologic Non-Responders Correlates with CD4+ T Cell Recovery after Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhenwu; Li, Zhen; Martin, Lisa; Hu, Zhiliang; Wu, Hao; Wan, Zhuang; Kilby, Michael; Heath, Sonya L.; Huang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The role of natural killer (NK) cell function in HIV disease especially in the setting of long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) and viral suppression is not fully understood. In the current study, we have investigated NK cell activation in healthy controls and aviremic ART-treated HIV+ subjects with different degrees of immune restoration. We performed a cross sectional study in 12 healthy controls and 24 aviremic ART-treated HIV-infected subjects including 13 HIV+ subjects with CD4+ T cells above 500 cells/μL defined as “immunologic responders” and 11 HIV+ subjects with CD4+ T cells below 350 cells/μL defined as “immunologic non-responders”. We analyzed NK cell number, subset, and activation by expression of CD107a and NKG2D and co-expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against uninfected CD4+ T cells was tested in vitro. We found that NK cell absolute number, percentage of NK cells, and percentage of NK cell subsets were similar in the three study groups. The increased NK cell activation was found predominantly in CD56dimCD16+ subset of immunologic non-responders but not immunologic responders compared to healthy controls. The activation of NK cells was inversely correlated with the peripheral CD4+ T cell count in HIV+ subjects, even after controlling for chronic T cell activation, sex, and age, potential contributors for CD4+ T cell counts in HIV disease. Interestingly, NK cells from immunologic non-responders mediated cytotoxicity against uninfected CD4+ T cells ex vivo. NK cells may play a role in blunted CD4+ T cell recovery in ART-treated HIV disease. PMID:28076376

  16. Association of immune recovery with hyperlipidaemia and apolipoprotein gene polymorphisms following highly active antiretroviral therapy in a cohort of Chinese HIV patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Denise Pui-Chung; Lee, Man-Po; Wong, Ngai-Sze; Leung, Ross Ka-Kit; Naftalin, Claire Melinda; Lee, Shui-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between CD4 recovery, dyslipidaemia and apolipoprotein (APO) gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Design Retrospective observational cohort study. Setting A major HIV care clinic in Hong Kong. Participants 197 Chinese treatment-naïve HIV patients. Outcome measures Maximum CD4 count and its rise 2–3 years after HAART initiation and their association with abnormal total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and 8 selected APO SNP at multiple time points. Results Before HAART, abnormal levels of TC, TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were detected in 13%, 26%, 59% and 19% of the recruited patients, respectively. APOA5 −1131T>C and c.553G>T were significantly associated with high pre-HAART TG while APOE 2198C>T was correlated with high TG at baseline and/or a rise 2–3 years following HAART initiation. Poor CD4 achievement, defined as the highest CD4 count <350/μL and a net gain of <100/μL, was associated with a low CD4 count ≤200/μL at baseline and a rise of TC beyond 5.17 mmol/L following HAART with or without the use of antilipid agents. Conversely, satisfactory CD4 achievement was associated with APOC3 3238GG genotype. Applying a linear generalised estimating equation, APOA5 −1131T>C was shown to be a predictor of a weaker temporal trend for CD4 response in the presence of a low baseline CD4≤200/μL. Conclusions Dyslipidaemia plays a predictive role in impacting immunological recovery following HAART, which could be partly explained by the APO gene SNP. PMID:27067897

  17. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  18. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  19. Optimisation of the recovery of carotenoids from tomato processing wastes: application on textile dyeing and assessment of its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Baaka, Noureddine; El Ksibi, Imen; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk

    2017-01-01

    The present study has been focused on the extraction of natural pigments from tomato industry waste. At first, different solvents and solvents mixture were compared to determine which one is the best for extracting carotenoids compounds from tomato by-products. A mixture of hexane and acetone gave the highest carotenoids extraction yield among the others examined. The extraction conditions were optimised using a five-level-five-factor central composite design. Under optimal conditions, solvent solid ratio 90, hexane percentage in the solvent mixture 60, extraction duration 50, number of extractions 4 and extraction temperature 35 °C, the yield of carotenoids was 80.7 μg/g. The coloured extract of tomato by-products was applied on textile fabrics to investigate the dyeing characteristics and antioxidant activities. The results indicate that extract can be applied on textile fabrics (wool, silk and polyamide) to produce coloured clothing with acceptable antioxidant properties.

  20. Coma recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimancescu, M. D.

    1978-01-01

    Arousal from coma is defined as a function of the reticular activating system that is located between the spinal cord and the diencephalon core of the brain stem. This system receives information from all the sensory functions of the body for distribution to the various parts of the cortex in order to maintain normal activities. Multimodal, neurosensory stimulation techniques are outlined that are designed to help the patient recover from the comatose state.

  1. Recovery position - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR, the victim should be placed in the recovery position. The recovery position helps keep the victim's airway open. To put the victim in the recovery position grab the victim's leg and shoulder and ...

  2. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Sep 19,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  3. Complete inactivation of photosynthetic activity during desiccation and rapid recovery by rehydration in the aerial microalga Trentepohlia jolithus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Li, Y; Liu, J

    2016-11-01

    Aerial microalgae are more exposed to harsh and rapidly changing environmental conditions, including desiccation and radiation. Under high light, aerial algae in the desiccated state would be highly subject to photodamage. Therefore, aerial algae need effective protective mechanisms to dissipate excess excitation energy. In this study, the changes in photosynthetic behaviors during desiccation and after rehydration in Trentepohlia jolithus were confirmed using chlorophyll a fluorescence (OJIP) transient, allowing determination of the photoprotection mechanisms of this aerial alga. The filaments of T. jolithus cells at 25% relative air humidity (RH) are significantly shrunken compared with those at 100% and 87% RH, decreasing the surface area for light absorption. At 25% RH, the shape and intensity of the OJIP transient disappeared, but recovered rapidly to the level at 100% RH after 5 s of rehydration. Compared with 100% RH, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (φPo ), phenomenological energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/CSm) and active PSII reaction centers (RCs) at 25% RH decreased significantly, the specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) increased significantly, but the specific energy fluxes for trapping (TRo/RC) at 25% RH did not change. These parameters at 25% RH recovered rapidly to the level at 100% RH after 5 s of rehydration. These results suggest that the efficiency of PSII light absorption and activities of PSII RCs were reversibly down-regulated in desiccated T. jolithus, which may be a special adaptive mechanism for the survivability of aerial microalgae in habitats with rapidly changing water availability.

  4. Recovery from muscle weakness by exercise and FES: lessons from Masters, active or sedentary seniors and SCI patients.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Gava, Paolo; Hofer, Christian; Loefler, Stefan; Gargiulo, Paolo; Edmunds, Kyle; Árnadóttir, Íris Dröfn; Zampieri, Sandra; Ravara, Barbara; Gava, Francesco; Nori, Alessandra; Gobbo, Valerio; Masiero, Stefano; Marcante, Andrea; Baba, Alfonc; Piccione, Francesco; Schils, Sheila; Pond, Amber; Mosole, Simone

    2016-09-03

    Many factors contribute to the decline of skeletal muscle that occurs as we age. This is a reality that we may combat, but not prevent because it is written into our genome. The series of records from World Master Athletes reveals that skeletal muscle power begins to decline at the age of 30 years and continues, almost linearly, to zero at the age of 110 years. Here we discuss evidence that denervation contributes to the atrophy and slowness of aged muscle. We compared muscle from lifelong active seniors to that of sedentary elderly people and found that the sportsmen have more muscle bulk and slow fiber type groupings, providing evidence that physical activity maintains slow motoneurons which reinnervate muscle fibers. Further, accelerated muscle atrophy/degeneration occurs with irreversible Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a spinal cord injury in which the human leg muscles may be permanently disconnected from the nervous system with complete loss of muscle fibers within 5-8 years. We used histological morphometry and Muscle Color Computed Tomography to evaluate muscle from these peculiar persons and reveal that contraction produced by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES) recovers muscle size and function which is reversed if h-bFES is discontinued. FES also reverses muscle atrophy in sedentary seniors and modulates mitochondria in horse muscles. All together these observations indicate that FES modifies muscle fibers by increasing contractions per day. Thus, FES should be considered in critical care units, rehabilitation centers and nursing facilities when patients are unable or reluctant to exercise.

  5. Netrin-1 Improves Functional Recovery through Autophagy Regulation by Activating the AMPK/mTOR Signaling Pathway in Rats with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Liangjie; Mei, Xifan; Shen, Zhaoliang; Bi, Yunlong; Yuan, Yajiang; Guo, Zhanpeng; Wang, Hongyu; Zhao, Haosen; Zhou, Zipeng; Wang, Chen; Zhu, Kunming; Li, Gang; Lv, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an process for the degradation of cytoplasmic aggregated proteins and damaged organelles and plays an important role in the development of SCI. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of Netrin-1 and its potential mechanism for autophagy regulation after SCI. A rat model of SCI was established and used for analysis. Results showed that administration of Netrin-1 not only significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but also reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and P70S6K. In addition, the expression of Beclin-1 and the ratio of the light-chain 3B-II (LC3B-II)/LC3B-I in the injured spinal cord significantly increased in Netrin-1 group than those in SCI group. Moreover, the ratio of apoptotic neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and the cavity area of spinal cord significantly decreased in Netrin-1 group compared with those in SCI group. In addition, Netrin-1 not only preserved motor neurons but also significantly improved motor fuction of injured rats. These results suggest that Netrin-1 improved functional recovery through autophagy stimulation by activating the AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway in rats with SCI. Thus, Netrin-1 treatment could be a novel therapeutic strategy for SCI. PMID:28186165

  6. Prolonged deficits in parvalbumin neuron stimulation-evoked network activity despite recovery of dendritic structure and excitability in the somatosensory cortex following global ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yicheng; Chen, Shangbin; Wu, Yujin; Murphy, Timothy H

    2014-11-05

    Relatively few studies have examined plasticity of inhibitory neuronal networks following stroke in vivo, primarily due to the inability to selectively monitor inhibition. We assessed the structure of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons during a 5 min period of global ischemia and reperfusion in mice, which mimicked cerebral ischemia during cardiac arrest or forms of transient ischemic attack. The dendritic structure of PV-neurons in cortical superficial layers was rapidly swollen and beaded during global ischemia, but recovered within 5-10 min following reperfusion. Using optogenetics and a multichannel optrode, we investigated the function of PV-neurons in mouse forelimb somatosensory cortex. We demonstrated pharmacologically that PV-channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) stimulation evoked activation in layer IV/V, which resulted in rapid current sinks mediated by photocurrent and action potentials (a measure of PV-neuron excitability), which was then followed by current sources mediated by network GABAergic synaptic activity. During ischemic depolarization, the PV-ChR2-evoked current sinks (excitability) were suppressed, but recovered rapidly following reperfusion concurrent with repolarization of the DC-EEG. In contrast, the current sources reflecting GABAergic synaptic network activity recovered slowly and incompletely, and was coincident with the partial recovery of the forepaw stimulation-evoked current sinks in layer IV/V 30 min post reperfusion. Our in vivo data suggest that the excitability of PV inhibitory neurons was suppressed during global ischemia and rapidly recovered during reperfusion. In contrast, PV-ChR2 stimulation-evoked GABAergic synaptic network activity exhibited a prolonged suppression even ∼1 h after reperfusion, which could contribute to the dysfunction of sensation and cognition following transient global ischemia.

  7. Recovery from blocking between outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2005-10-01

    Contemporary associative learning research largely focuses on cue competition phenomena that occur when 2 cues are paired with a common outcome. Little research has been conducted to investigate similar phenomena occurring when a single cue is trained with 2 outcomes. Three conditioned lick suppression experiments with rats assessed whether treatments known to alleviate blocking between cues would also attenuate blocking between outcomes. In Experiment 1, conditioned responding recovered from blocking between outcomes when a long retention interval was interposed between training and testing. Experiment 2 obtained recovery from blocking between outcomes when the blocking outcome was extinguished after the blocking treatment. In Experiment 3, a recovery from blocking between outcomes occurred when a reminder stimulus was presented in a novel context prior to testing. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that blocking of outcomes, like blocking of cues, appears to be caused by a deficit in the expression of an acquired association.

  8. Short-interval cortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation during submaximal voluntary contractions changes with fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Sandra K; McNeil, Chris J; Butler, Jane E; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2016-09-01

    This study determined whether short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) change during a sustained submaximal isometric contraction. On 2 days, 12 participants (6 men, 6 women) performed brief (7-s) elbow flexor contractions before and after a 10-min fatiguing contraction; all contractions were performed at the level of integrated electromyographic activity (EMG) which produced 25 % maximal unfatigued torque. During the brief 7-s and 10-min submaximal contractions, single (test) and paired (conditioning-test) transcranial magnetic stimuli were applied over the motor cortex (5 s apart) to elicit motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in biceps brachii. SICI and ICF were elicited on separate days, with a conditioning-test interstimulus interval of 2.5 and 15 ms, respectively. On both days, integrated EMG remained constant while torque fell during the sustained contraction by ~51.5 % from control contractions, perceived effort increased threefold, and MVC declined by 21-22 %. For SICI, the conditioned MEP during control contractions (74.1 ± 2.5 % of unconditioned MEP) increased (less inhibition) during the sustained contraction (last 2.5 min: 86.0 ± 5.1 %; P < 0.05). It remained elevated in recovery contractions at 2 min (82.0 ± 3.8 %; P < 0.05) and returned toward control at 7-min recovery (76.3 ± 3.2 %). ICF during control contractions (conditioned MEP 129.7 ± 4.8 % of unconditioned MEP) decreased (less facilitation) during the sustained contraction (last 2.5 min: 107.6 ± 6.8 %; P < 0.05) and recovered to 122.8 ± 4.3 % during contractions after 2 min of recovery. Both intracortical inhibitory and facilitatory circuits become less excitable with fatigue when assessed during voluntary activity, but their different time courses of recovery suggest different mechanisms for the fatigue-related changes of SICI and ICF.

  9. Ischemic post-conditioning facilitates brain recovery after stroke by promoting Akt/mTOR activity in nude rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rong; Wang, Peng; Ji, Xunming; Zhao, Heng

    2013-12-01

    While pre-conditioning is induced before stroke onset, ischemic post-conditioning (IPostC) is performed after reperfusion, which typically refers to a series of mechanical interruption of blood reperfusion after stroke. IPostC is known to reduce infarction in wild-type animals. We investigated if IPostC protects against brain injury induced by focal ischemia in Tcell-deficient nude rats and to examine its effects on Akt and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Although IPostC reduced infarct size at 2 days post-stroke in wild-type rats, it did not attenuate infarction in nude rats. Despite the unaltered infarct size in nude rats, IPostC increased levels of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) and Akt isoforms (Akt1, Akt2, Akt3), and p-mTOR, p-S6K and p-4EBP1 in the mTOR pathway, as well as growth associated Protein 43 (GAP43), both in the peri-infarct area and core, 24 h after stroke. IPostC improved neurological function in nude rats 1-30 days after stroke and reduced the extent of brain damage 30 days after stroke. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abolished the long-term protective effects of IPostC. We determined that IPostC did not inhibit acute infarction in nude rats but did provide long-term protection by enhancing Akt and mTOR activity during the acute post-stroke phase. Post-conditioning did not attenuate infarction in nude rats measured 2 days post-stroke, but improved neurological function in nude rats and reduced brain damage 30 days after stroke. It resulted in increased-activities of Akt and mTOR, S6K and p-4EBP1. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abolished the long-term protective effects of IPostC.

  10. An Event Restriction Interval Theory of Tense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamer, Brandon Robert

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents a novel theory of tense and tense-like constructions. It is named after a key theoretical component of the theory, the event restriction interval. In Event Restriction Interval (ERI) Theory, sentences are semantically evaluated relative to an index which contains two key intervals, the evaluation interval and the event…

  11. Expression and recovery of biologically active recombinant Apolipoprotein AI(Milano) from transgenic safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) seeds.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Cory L; Shen, Yin; Murray, Elizabeth W; Boothe, Joseph G; Busseuil, David; Rhéaume, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Reid, Alexandra; Moloney, Maurice M

    2011-02-01

    Apolipoprotein AI Milano (ApoAI(Milano) ) was expressed as a fusion protein in transgenic safflower seeds. High levels of expression corresponding to 7 g of ApoAI(Milano) per kilogram of seed have been identified in a line selected for commercialization. The ApoAI(Milano) fusion protein was extracted from seed using an oilbody-based process and matured in vitro prior to final purification. This yielded a Des-1,2-ApoAI(Milano) product which was confirmed by biochemical characterization including immunoreactivity against ApoAI antibodies, isoelectric point, N-terminal sequencing and electrospray mass spectrometry. Purified Des-1,2-ApoAI(Milano) readily associated with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine in clearance assays comparable to Human ApoAI. Its biological activity was assessed by cholesterol efflux assays using Des-1,2-ApoAI(Milano) :1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine complexes in vitro and in vivo. This study has established that high levels of biologically functional ApoAI(Milano) can be produced using a plant-based expression system.

  12. Recovery comparisons--hot nitrogen Vs steam regeneration of toxic dichloromethane from activated carbon beds in oil sands process.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Shivaji G; Pré, Pascaline; Giraudet, Sylvain; Le Coq, Laurence; Le Cloirec, Pierre; Baudouin, Olivier; Déchelotte, Stéphane

    2012-02-29

    The regeneration experiments of dichloromethane from activated carbon bed had been carried out by both hot nitrogen and steam to evaluate the regeneration performance and the operating cost of the regeneration step. Factorial Experimental Design (FED) tool had been implemented to optimize the temperature of nitrogen and the superficial velocity of the nitrogen to achieve maximum regeneration at an optimized operating cost. All the experimental results of adsorption step, hot nitrogen and steam regeneration step had been validated by the simulation model PROSIM. The average error percentage between the simulation and experiment based on the mass of adsorption of dichloromethane was 2.6%. The average error percentages between the simulations and experiments based on the mass of dichloromethane regenerated by nitrogen regeneration and steam regeneration were 3 and 12%, respectively. From the experiments, it had been shown that both the hot nitrogen and steam regeneration had regenerated 84% of dichloromethane. But the choice of hot nitrogen or steam regeneration depends on the regeneration time, operating costs, and purity of dichloromethane regenerated. A thorough investigation had been made about the advantages and limitations of both the hot nitrogen and steam regeneration of dichloromethane.

  13. Differences in Physiological Responses to Interval Training in Cyclists With and Without Interval Training Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hebisz, Rafal; Borkowski, Jacek; Zatoń, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine differences in glycolytic metabolite concentrations and work output in response to an all-out interval training session in 23 cyclists with at least 2 years of interval training experience (E) and those inexperienced (IE) in this form of training. The intervention involved subsequent sets of maximal intensity exercise on a cycle ergometer. Each set comprised four 30 s repetitions interspersed with 90 s recovery periods; sets were repeated when blood pH returned to 7.3. Measurements of post-exercise hydrogen (H+) and lactate ion (LA-) concentrations and work output were taken. The experienced cyclists performed significantly more sets of maximal efforts than the inexperienced athletes (5.8 ± 1.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.9 sets, respectively). Work output decreased in each subsequent set in the IE group and only in the last set in the E group. Distribution of power output changed only in the E group; power decreased in the initial repetitions of set only to increase in the final repetitions. H+ concentration decreased in the third, penultimate, and last sets in the E group and in each subsequent set in the IE group. LA- decreased in the last set in both groups. In conclusion, the experienced cyclists were able to repeatedly induce elevated levels of lactic acidosis. Power output distribution changed with decreased acid–base imbalance. In this way, this group could compensate for a decreased anaerobic metabolism. The above factors allowed cyclists experienced in interval training to perform more sets of maximal exercise without a decrease in power output compared with inexperienced cyclists. PMID:28149346

  14. Differences in Physiological Responses to Interval Training in Cyclists With and Without Interval Training Experience.

    PubMed

    Hebisz, Rafal; Hebisz, Paulina; Borkowski, Jacek; Zatoń, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine differences in glycolytic metabolite concentrations and work output in response to an all-out interval training session in 23 cyclists with at least 2 years of interval training experience (E) and those inexperienced (IE) in this form of training. The intervention involved subsequent sets of maximal intensity exercise on a cycle ergometer. Each set comprised four 30 s repetitions interspersed with 90 s recovery periods; sets were repeated when blood pH returned to 7.3. Measurements of post-exercise hydrogen (H+) and lactate ion (LA-) concentrations and work output were taken. The experienced cyclists performed significantly more sets of maximal efforts than the inexperienced athletes (5.8 ± 1.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.9 sets, respectively). Work output decreased in each subsequent set in the IE group and only in the last set in the E group. Distribution of power output changed only in the E group; power decreased in the initial repetitions of set only to increase in the final repetitions. H+ concentration decreased in the third, penultimate, and last sets in the E group and in each subsequent set in the IE group. LA- decreased in the last set in both groups. In conclusion, the experienced cyclists were able to repeatedly induce elevated levels of lactic acidosis. Power output distribution changed with decreased acid-base imbalance. In this way, this group could compensate for a decreased anaerobic metabolism. The above factors allowed cyclists experienced in interval training to perform more sets of maximal exercise without a decrease in power output compared with inexperienced cyclists.

  15. Leaf Stable Isotope and Nutrient Status of Temperate Mangroves As Ecological Indicators to Assess Anthropogenic Activity and Recovery from Eutrophication

    PubMed Central

    Gritcan, Iana; Duxbury, Mark; Leuzinger, Sebastian; Alfaro, Andrea C.

    2016-01-01

    We measured nitrogen stable isotope values (δ15N), and total phosphorus (%P) and total nitrogen (%N) contents in leaves of the temperate mangrove (Avicennia marina sp. australasica) from three coastal ecosystems exposed to various levels of human impact (Manukau, high; Mangawhai, low; and Waitemata, intermediate) in northern New Zealand. We measured δ15N values around 10‰ in environments where the major terrestrial water inputs are sewage. The highest average total nitrogen contents and δ15N values were found in the Auckland city region (Manukau Harbour) at 2.2%N and 9.9‰, respectively. The lowest values were found in Mangawhai Harbour, situated about 80 km north of Auckland city, at 2.0%N and 5.2‰, respectively. In the Waitemata Harbour, also located in Auckland city but with less exposure to human derived sewage inputs, both parameters were intermediate, at 2.1%N and 6.4‰. Total phosphorus contents did not vary significantly. Additionally, analysis of historical mangrove leaf herbarium samples obtained from the Auckland War Memorial Museum indicated that a reduction in both leaf total nitrogen and δ15N content has occurred over the past 100 years in Auckland’s harbors. Collectively, these results suggest that anthropogenically derived nitrogen has had a significant impact on mangrove nutrient status in Auckland harbors over the last 100 years. The observed decrease in nitrogenous nutrients probably occurred due to sewage system improvements. We suggest that mangrove plant physiological response to nutrient excess could be used as an indicator of long-term eutrophication trends. Monitoring leaf nutrient status in mangroves can be used to assess environmental stress (sewage, eutrophication) on coastal ecosystems heavily impacted by human activities. Moreover, nitrogen and phosphorus leaf contents can be used to assess levels of available nutrients in the surrounding environments. PMID:28066477

  16. CD4+ T cell recovery beyond the first year of complete suppression of viral replication during highly active antiretroviral therapy is not influenced by CD8+ T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Benito, Jose M; Lopez, Mariola; Lozano, Sara; Ballesteros, Celia; Capa, Laura; Martinez, Pilar; Gonzalez-Lahoz, Juan; Soriano, Vincent

    2005-12-15

    CD38 expression on CD8(+) T cells was longitudinally assessed in 31 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons with undetectable plasma viremia who had undergone highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for 12 months and were followed for a mean of 30 months thereafter. Overall, CD4(+)T cell counts increased during follow-up, whereas CD38 expression remained stable. However, a subset of patients showed declines in CD38 expression, and, conversely, another subset showed increases in CD38 expression. No association could be found between long-term gains in CD4(+) T cells and evolution of CD38 expression. Thus, activation of CD8(+) T cells does not seem to be associated with the extent of CD4(+) T cell recovery beyond the first year of successful HAART.

  17. 75 FR 7448 - Species Recovery Grants to Tribes Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-ZC15 Species Recovery Grants to Tribes Program... Recovery Grants to Tribes Program. The principal objective of the Program is to support recovery efforts... species. Recovery efforts may involve management, research, monitoring, and outreach activities or...

  18. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  19. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  20. Iodine release and recovery, influence of polyiodide anions on electrical conductivity and nonlinear optical activity in an interdigitated and interpenetrated bipillared-bilayer metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zheng; Wang, Qiang-Xin; Zeng, Ming-Hua

    2012-03-14

    {[Cu6(pybz)8(OH)2]·I5(–)·I7(–)}n (1), obtained hydrothermally by using iodine molecules as a versatile precursor template, consists of a cationic framework with two types of zigzag channels, which segregate I5(–) and I7(–) anions. The framework exhibits the first observed bipillared-bilayer structure featuring both interdigitation and interpenetration. 1 displays high framework stability in both acidic (HCl) and alkaline (NaOH) solutions. 1 slowly releases iodine in dry methanol to give [Cu6(pybz)8(OH)2](I–)2·3.5CH3OH (1′) and partially recovers iodine from cyclohexane to form [Cu6(pybz)8(OH)2](I–)2·xI2 (1″). Differences of up to 100 times in electrical conductivity and of 4 times in nonlinear optical activity (NLO) have been measured between 1 and 1′. This compound is one of few displaying multifunctionality, electrical conductivity, NLO, and crystal–crystal stability upon release and recovery of iodine. It is also unique in the iodine release from polyiodide anions in a metal–organic framework.

  1. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)-Related Hypertriglyceridemia Is Associated With Failure of Recovery of CD14lowCD16+ Monocyte Subsets in AIDS Patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Zhao, Hongxin; Ma, Yaluan; Zhou, Haiwei; Hao, Yu; Li, Yanmei; Song, Chuan; Han, Ning; Liu, Xiangyi; Zeng, Hui; Qin, Mingzhao

    2015-07-01

    As cellular reservoirs, CD16 monocyte subsets play important roles in the progression of HIV infection. Previous studies have shown that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduced the percentages of CD14CD16 monocyte subsets, but did not recover the percentages of CD14CD16 subsets. Eighty-four chronic HIV-infected, HAART-naïve individuals and 55 HIV-negative subjects (31 without hyperlipidemia and 24 with hypertriglyceridemia) were enrolled. Plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, CD4 T-cell counts, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein were followed up for 48 weeks during HAART treatment in the longitudinal study. We found that mild hypertriglyceridemia in HIV-negative subjects and HIV-infected patients, naïve to HAART, did not affect the percentage of monocyte subsets. However, a failure of CD14CD16 subset recovery was observed in patients with HAART-related hypertriglyceridemia at 48 weeks. Thus, HAART-related hypertriglyceridemia altered homeostasis of monocyte subsets to antiviral therapy, which might further affect immune reconstitution.

  2. Manned Spacecraft Landing and Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, Don

    2004-01-01

    As recent history has tragically demonstrated, a successful space mission is not complete until the crew has safely returned to earth and has been successfully recovered. It is noted that a safe return to earth does not guarantee a successful recovery. The focus of this presentation will be a discussion of the ground operation assets involved in a successful recovery. The author's experience in land and water-based recovery of crewed vehicles and flight hardware at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Edwards Air Force Base, international landing sites, and the Atlantic Ocean provides for some unique insight into this topic. He has participated in many aspects of Space Shuttle landing and recovery operations including activation of Transatlantic Abort Landing (TAL) sites and Emergency Landing Sites (ELS) as an Operations Test Director, execution of post landing convoy operations as an Orbiter Move Director, Operations Test Director, and Landing and Recovery Director, and recovery of solid rocket boosters, frustum and their parachutes 140 miles offshore in a wide range of sea states as a Retrieval Diver/Engineer. The recovery operations for the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo were similar from a landing and recovery perspective in th t they all were capsules with limited "flying" capability and had a planned End of Mission (EOM) in an ocean with a descent slowed by parachutes. The general process was to deploy swim teams via helicopters to prepare the capsule for recovery and assist with crew extraction when required. The capsule was then hoisted onto the deck of a naval vessel. This approach required the extensive use and deployment of military assets to support the primary landing zone as well as alternate and contingency locations. The Russian Soyuz capsule also has limited "flying" capability; however, the planned EOM is terrestrial. In addition to use of parachutes to slow the reentry descent, soft-landing rockets on the bottom of the vehicle are employed to cushion the

  3. Equilibrium uptake, sorption dynamics, process optimization, and column operations for the removal and recovery of malachite green from wastewater using activated carbon and activated slag

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V.K.; Srivastava, S.K.; Mohan, D.

    1997-06-01

    The waste slurry generated in fertilizer plants and slag (blast furnace waste) have been converted into low-cost adsorbents, activated carbon and activated slag, respectively, and these are utilized for the removal of malachite green (a basic dye) from wastewater. In the batch experiments, parameters studied include the effect of pH, sorbent dosage, adsorbate concentration, temperature, and contact time. Kinetic studies have been performed to have an idea of the mechanistic aspects and to obtain the thermodynamic parameters of the process. The uptake of the dye is greater on carbonaceous material than on activated slag. Sorption data have been correlated with both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The presence of anionic surfactants does not affect the uptake of dye significantly. The mass transfer kinetic approach has been applied for the determination of various parameters necessary for the designing of fixed-bed contactors. Chemical regeneration has been achieved with acetone in order to recover the loaded dye and restore the column to its original capacity without dismantling the same.

  4. 5'-AMP activated protein kinase α2 controls substrate metabolism during post-exercise recovery via regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Fritzen, Andreas Maechel; Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Jeppesen, Jacob; Christiansen, Mette Landau Brabaek; Biensø, Rasmus; Dyck, Jason R B; Pilegaard, Henriette; Kiens, Bente

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that exercise has a major impact on substrate metabolism for many hours after exercise. However, the regulatory mechanisms increasing lipid oxidation and facilitating glycogen resynthesis in the post-exercise period are unknown. To address this, substrate oxidation was measured after prolonged exercise and during the following 6 h post-exercise in 5´-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2 and α1 knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice with free access to food. Substrate oxidation was similar during exercise at the same relative intensity between genotypes. During post-exercise recovery, a lower lipid oxidation (P < 0.05) and higher glucose oxidation were observed in AMPKα2 KO (respiratory exchange ratio (RER) = 0.84 ± 0.02) than in WT and AMPKα1 KO (average RER = 0.80 ± 0.01) without genotype differences in muscle malonyl-CoA or free-carnitine concentrations. A similar increase in muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) mRNA expression in WT and AMPKα2 KO was observed following exercise, which is consistent with AMPKα2 deficiency not affecting the exercise-induced activation of the PDK4 transcriptional regulators HDAC4 and SIRT1. Interestingly, PDK4 protein content increased (63%, P < 0.001) in WT but remained unchanged in AMPKα2 KO. In accordance with the lack of increase in PDK4 protein content, lower (P < 0.01) inhibitory pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-E1α Ser(293) phosphorylation was observed in AMPKα2 KO muscle compared to WT. These findings indicate that AMPKα2 regulates muscle metabolism post-exercise through inhibition of the PDH complex and hence glucose oxidation, subsequently creating conditions for increased fatty acid oxidation.

  5. Orders on Intervals Over Partially Ordered Sets: Extending Allen's Algebra and Interval Graph Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Francisco; Kreinovich, Vladik; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.

    2013-08-01

    To make a decision, we need to compare the values of quantities. In many practical situations, we know the values with interval uncertainty. In such situations, we need to compare intervals. Allen’s algebra describes all possible relations between intervals on the real line, and ordering relations between such intervals are well studied. In this paper, we extend this description to intervals in an arbitrary partially ordered set (poset). In particular, we explicitly describe ordering relations between intervals that generalize relation between points. As auxiliary results, we provide a logical interpretation of the relation between intervals, and extend the results about interval graphs to intervals over posets.

  6. No Differences Between Alter G-Trainer And Active And Passive Recovery Strategies On Isokinetic Strength, Systemic Oxidative Stress And Perceived Muscle Soreness After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Matthew B; Nix, Carrie; Greenwood, Lori; Greenwood, Mike

    2016-11-28

    The incidence of muscle injuries is prevalent in elite sport athletes as well as weekend warriors and strategies that safely and effectively hasten recovery are highly desirable. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between three recovery methods after eliciting muscle damage in recreationally active men relative to maximal isokinetic contractions, perceived muscle soreness and psychological mood states. Twenty-five recreationally active men (22.15±3.53yrs, 75.75±11.91kg, 180.52±7.3cm) were randomly matched by VO2 peak (53.86±6.65ml·kg·min) and assigned to one of three recovery methods: Anti-gravity Treadmill (G-Trainer) (N = 8), Conventional Treadmill (N = 8) or Static Stretching (N = 9). Recovery methods were performed 30 minutes, 24, 48 and 72 hours following a 45 minute downhill run. Following eccentrically-biased running, no significant differences were noted in isokinetic knee flexion and extension peak torque, systemic markers of muscle damage, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation such as serum creatine kinase (CK), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA), respectively, and subjective ratings of perceived muscle soreness between recovery methods. The G-Trainer group did however display a higher mood state as indicated by the Profile of Mood State global scores at 24 hours post-exercise when compared to the conventional treadmill recovery group (p=0.035). The improved mood state following the use of the anti-gravity treadmill may provide clinical relevance to other populations.

  7. High-intensity interval running is perceived to be more enjoyable than moderate-intensity continuous exercise: implications for exercise adherence.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Close, Graeme L; MacLaren, Don P M; Gregson, Warren; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively quantify ratings of perceived enjoyment using the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale following high-intensity interval running versus moderate-intensity continuous running. Eight recreationally active men performed two running protocols consisting of high-intensity interval running (6 × 3 min at 90% VO(2max) interspersed with 6 × 3 min active recovery at 50% VO(2max) with a 7-min warm-up and cool down at 70% VO(2max)) or 50 min moderate-intensity continuous running at 70% VO(2max). Ratings of perceived enjoyment after exercise were higher (P < 0.05) following interval running compared with continuous running (88 ± 6 vs. 61 ± 12) despite higher (P < 0.05) ratings of perceived exertion (14 ± 1 vs. 13 ± 1). There was no difference (P < 0.05) in average heart rate (88 ± 3 vs. 87 ± 3% maximum heart rate), average VO(2) (71 ± 6 vs. 73 ± 4%VO(2max)), total VO(2) (162 ± 16 vs. 166 ± 27 L) or energy expenditure (811 ± 83 vs. 832 ± 136 kcal) between protocols. The greater enjoyment associated with high-intensity interval running may be relevant for improving exercise adherence, since running is a low-cost exercise intervention requiring no exercise equipment and similar relative exercise intensities have previously induced health benefits in patient populations.

  8. Pigeons' Choices between Fixed-Interval and Random-Interval Schedules: Utility of Variability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrzejewski, Matthew E.; Cardinal, Claudia D.; Field, Douglas P.; Flannery, Barbara A.; Johnson, Michael; Bailey, Kathleen; Hineline, Philip N.

    2005-01-01

    Pigeons' choosing between fixed-interval and random-interval schedules of reinforcement was investigated in three experiments using a discrete-trial procedure. In all three experiments, the random-interval schedule was generated by sampling a probability distribution at an interval (and in multiples of the interval) equal to that of the…

  9. Evaluation of the effectiveness of compression garments on autonomic nervous system recovery following exercise.

    PubMed

    Piras, Alessandro; Gatta, Giorgio

    2016-08-19

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the recovery pattern of a whole body compression garment on hemodynamic parameters and on ANS activity following a swimming performance. Ten young male athletes were recruited and tested in two different days, with and without wearing the garment during the recovery phase. After a warm-up of 15 minutes, athletes were instructed to perform a maximal 400m freestyle swimming event, and then time series of beat-to-beat intervals for heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and hemodynamic parameters were recorded for 90 minutes of recovery. The vagally mediated HF power of R-R intervals, NN50, and pNN50 showed a faster recovery due to the costume, meanwhile, the LFRR index of sympathetic modulation of the heart, as well as LF:HF ratio and BRS alpha index (αLF) were augmented in control than in garment condition. When athletes wore the swimsuit, cardiac output was increased and the returning of the blood to the heart, investigated as stroke volume, was kept constant due to the reduction of the total peripheral resistances. During control condition, HR was restored back to baseline value 20 minutes later with respect to garment condition, confirming that the swimsuit recover faster. The effectiveness of the swimsuit on ANS activity after a maximal aerobic performance has been shown with a greater recovery in terms of HRV and hemodynamic parameters. BRS was reduced in both conditions, maybe due to prolonged vasodilatation that may have also influenced the post-exercise hypotension.

  10. Viewing nature scenes positively affects recovery of autonomic function following acute-mental stress.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel K; Barton, Jo L; Gladwell, Valerie F

    2013-06-04

    A randomized crossover study explored whether viewing different scenes prior to a stressor altered autonomic function during the recovery from the stressor. The two scenes were (a) nature (composed of trees, grass, fields) or (b) built (composed of man-made, urban scenes lacking natural characteristics) environments. Autonomic function was assessed using noninvasive techniques of heart rate variability; in particular, time domain analyses evaluated parasympathetic activity, using root-mean-square of successive differences (RMSSD). During stress, secondary cardiovascular markers (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) showed significant increases from baseline which did not differ between the two viewing conditions. Parasympathetic activity, however, was significantly higher in recovery following the stressor in the viewing scenes of nature condition compared to viewing scenes depicting built environments (RMSSD; 50.0 ± 31.3 vs 34.8 ± 14.8 ms). Thus, viewing nature scenes prior to a stressor alters autonomic activity in the recovery period. The secondary aim was to examine autonomic function during viewing of the two scenes. Standard deviation of R-R intervals (SDRR), as change from baseline, during the first 5 min of viewing nature scenes was greater than during built scenes. Overall, this suggests that nature can elicit improvements in the recovery process following a stressor.

  11. Rhythmicity, Recurrence, and Recovery of Flagellar Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty Y.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-12-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the alga C. reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating.

  12. Teaching Resource Recovery in Social Studies. Resource Recovery Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide, one component of the Resource Recovery Education Kit (see SO 007 866 for a description), contains ideas and activities for teaching about solid waste disposal in secondary level social studies classes. Among the course objectives are the following: (1) to explore the impact of our society on the problem of solid waste and the need for…

  13. Teaching Resource Recovery in Industrial Arts. Resource Recovery Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide, one component of the Resource Recovery Education Kit (See SO 007 866 for a description), contains ideas and activities for teaching about solid waste disposal in secondary level industrial arts classes. Among the course objectives are the following: (1) to understand that litter represents a small but highly visible portion of our…

  14. Teaching Resource Recovery in Science. Resource Recovery Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide, one component of the Resource Recovery Education Kit (see SO 007 866 for a description), contains ideas and activities for teaching about solid waste disposal in secondary level science classes. Among the course objectives are the following: (1) to understand that sufficient technology exists to recover a greater segment of the…

  15. Min and Max Extreme Interval Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jance, Marsha L.; Thomopoulos, Nick T.

    2011-01-01

    The paper shows how to find the min and max extreme interval values for the exponential and triangular distributions from the min and max uniform extreme interval values. Tables are provided to show the min and max extreme interval values for the uniform, exponential, and triangular distributions for different probabilities and observation sizes.

  16. Familiarity-Frequency Ratings of Melodic Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Thomas B.

    1972-01-01

    Objective of this study was to determine subjects' reliability in rating randomly played ascending and descending melodic intervals within the octave on the basis of their familiarity with each type of interval and the frequency of their having experienced each type of interval in music. (Author/CB)

  17. H-REFLEX UP-CONDITIONING ENCOURAGES RECOVERY OF EMG ACTIVITY AND H-REFLEXES AFTER SCIATIC NERVE TRANSECTION AND REPAIR IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Yu; Chen, Lu; Sun, Chenyuo; English, Arthur W.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2010-01-01

    Operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or its electrical analog, the H-reflex, produces spinal cord plasticity and can thereby affect motoneuron responses to primary afferent input. To explore whether this conditioning can affect the functional outcome after peripheral nerve injury, we assessed the effect of up-conditioning soleus (SOL) H-reflex on SOL and tibialis anterior (TA) function after sciatic nerve transection and repair. Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with EMG electrodes in SOL and TA and stimulating cuffs on the posterior tibial nerve. After control data collection, the sciatic nerve was transected and repaired and the rat was exposed for 120 days to continued control data collection (TC rats) or SOL H-reflex up-conditioning (TU rats). At the end of data collection, motoneurons that had reinnervated SOL and TA were labeled retrogradely. Putative primary afferent terminals (i.e., terminals containing vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1)) on SOL motoneurons were studied immunohistochemically. SOL (and probably TA) background EMG activity recovered faster in TU rats than in TC rats, and the final recovered SOL H-reflex was significantly larger in TU than in TC rats. TU and TC rats had significantly fewer labeled motoneurons and higher proportions of double-labeled motoneurons than untransected rats. VGLUT1 terminals were significantly more numerous on SOL motoneurons of TU than TC rats. Combined with the larger H-reflexes in TU rats, this anatomical finding supports the hypothesis that SOL H-reflex up-conditioning strengthened primary afferent reinnervation of SOL motoneurons. These results suggest that H-reflex up-conditioning may improve functional recovery after nerve injury and repair. PMID:21123559

  18. H-reflex up-conditioning encourages recovery of EMG activity and H-reflexes after sciatic nerve transection and repair in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Yu; Chen, Lu; Sun, Chenyou; English, Arthur W; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2010-12-01

    Operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or its electrical analog, the H-reflex, produces spinal cord plasticity and can thereby affect motoneuron responses to primary afferent input. To explore whether this conditioning can affect the functional outcome after peripheral nerve injury, we assessed the effect of up-conditioning soleus (SOL) H-reflex on SOL and tibialis anterior (TA) function after sciatic nerve transection and repair. Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with EMG electrodes in SOL and TA and stimulating cuffs on the posterior tibial nerve. After control data collection, the sciatic nerve was transected and repaired and the rat was exposed for 120 d to continued control data collection (TC rats) or SOL H-reflex up-conditioning (TU rats). At the end of data collection, motoneurons that had reinnervated SOL and TA were labeled retrogradely. Putative primary afferent terminals [i.e., terminals containing vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1)] on SOL motoneurons were studied immunohistochemically. SOL (and probably TA) background EMG activity recovered faster in TU rats than in TC rats, and the final recovered SOL H-reflex was significantly larger in TU than in TC rats. TU and TC rats had significantly fewer labeled motoneurons and higher proportions of double-labeled motoneurons than untransected rats. VGLUT1 terminals were significantly more numerous on SOL motoneurons of TU than TC rats. Combined with the larger H-reflexes in TU rats, this anatomical finding supports the hypothesis that SOL H-reflex up-conditioning strengthened primary afferent reinnervation of SOL motoneurons. These results suggest that H-reflex up-conditioning may improve functional recovery after nerve injury and repair.

  19. Changes in heart rate, arrhythmia frequency, and cardiac biomarker values in horses during recovery after a long-distance endurance ride.

    PubMed

    Flethøj, Mette; Kanters, Jørgen K; Haugaard, Maria M; Pedersen, Philip J; Carstensen, Helena; Balling, Johanne D; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Buhl, Rikke

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmia frequency as well as changes in cardiac biomarker values and their association with heart rate in horses before and after an endurance ride. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. ANIMALS 28 Arabian horses competing in a 120- or 160-km endurance ride. PROCEDURES ECG recordings were obtained from each horse before (preride) and after (recovery) an endurance ride to evaluate changes in heart rate and the SD of normal R-R intervals (SDNN) during the initial 12 hours of recovery. Frequencies of supraventricular and ventricular premature complexes before and after the ride were evaluated. Blood samples were obtained before the ride and twice during recovery. Hematologic analyses included measurement of serum cardiac troponin I concentration and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB activity. RESULTS Heart rate was significantly increased and SDNN was decreased during the recovery versus preride period. Frequency of ventricular premature complexes increased during recovery, albeit not significantly, whereas frequency of supraventricular premature complexes was not significantly different between preride and recovery periods. Serum cardiac troponin I concentration and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB activity were significantly increased in the recovery versus preride period. No associations were identified between cardiac biomarkers and velocity, distance, or mean heart rate. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Heart rate increased and SDNN decreased in horses after completion of an endurance ride. These and other cardiac changes suggested that prolonged exercise such as endurance riding might have cardiac effects in horses. Additional studies are needed to clarify the clinical relevance of the findings.

  20. Interpregnancy interval and obstetrical complications.

    PubMed

    Shachar, Bat Zion; Lyell, Deirdre J

    2012-09-01

    Obstetricians are often presented with questions regarding the optimal interpregnancy interval (IPI). Short IPI has been associated with adverse perinatal and maternal outcomes, ranging from preterm birth and low birth weight to neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Long IPI has in turn been associated with increased risk for preeclampsia and labor dystocia. In this review, we discuss the data regarding these associations along with recent studies revealing associations of short IPI with birth defects, schizophrenia, and autism. The optimal IPI may vary for different subgroups. We discuss the consequences of short IPI in women with a prior cesarean section, in particular the increased risk for uterine rupture and the considerations regarding a trial of labor in this subgroup. We review studies examining the interaction between short IPI and advanced maternal age and discuss the risk-benefit assessment for these women. Finally, we turn our attention to women after a stillbirth or an abortion, who often desire to conceive again with minimal delay. We discuss studies speaking in favor of a shorter IPI in this group. The accumulated data allow for the reevaluation of current IPI recommendations and management guidelines for women in general and among subpopulations with special circumstances. In particular, we suggest lowering the current minimal IPI recommendation to only 18 months (vs 24 months according to the latest World Health Organization recommendations), with even shorter recommended minimal IPI for women of advanced age and those who conceive after a spontaneous or induced abortion.

  1. Absence of Respiratory Muscle Fatigue in High-Intensity Continuous or Interval Cycling Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kurti, Stephanie P; Smith, Joshua R; Emerson, Sam R; Castinado, Kenneth M; Harms, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue (RMF) occurs during prolonged exercise (∼15-20 minutes) at >85% V[Combining Dot Above]O2max. However, RMF has been reported to occur in ∼3-6 minutes in various modes of exercise at a high intensity. It is not known if continuous cycling exercise vs. repeated bouts of high-intensity interval training (HIT) at >85% V[Combining Dot Above]O2max will lead to RMF. We hypothesized that RMF would occur after a constant load test and would be present before end exercise in an HIT protocol. Eight moderately active healthy men (21.7 ± 1.7 years; 181.3 ± 5.2 cm; 81.3 ± 2.3 kg) completed a V[Combining Dot Above]O2max test on a cycle ergometer. Subjects then completed 2 bouts of HIT (7 × 1 minute, 2-minute recovery between intervals) and 3 bouts of continuous exercise (CE) tests at 90% of peak power (determined from an incremental exercise test to exhaustion). Maximal inspiratory pressure (PIMAX) and expiratory pressure (PEMAX) were measured pre- and post-exercise for both HIT and CE and after each interval during HIT. Decreases in postexercise PIMAX and PEMAX compared with baseline were used to determine RMF. There were no differences (p > 0.05) in PIMAX or PEMAX pre- to post-exercise for HIT (PIMAX pre: 134 ± 51, post: 135 ± 50 cmH2O; PEMAX pre: 143 ± 41, post: 148 ± 46 cmH2O) or CE (PIMAX pre: 135 ± 54, post: 133 ± 52 cmH2O; PEMAX pre: 146 ± 46, post: 148 ± 46 cmH2O) indicating RMF was not present following CE and HIT. These data suggest that repeated high-intensity cycling exercise at 90% peak power in a CE or HIT protocol does not lead to RMF.

  2. Dissimilar Physiological and Perceptual Responses Between Sprint Interval Training and High-Intensity Interval Training.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kimberly M; Olive, Brittany; LaValle, Kaylyn; Thompson, Heather; Greer, Kevin; Astorino, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) and sprint interval training (SIT) elicit similar cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations vs. endurance training. No study, however, has investigated acute physiological changes during HIIT vs. SIT. This study compared acute changes in heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration (BLa), oxygen uptake (VO2), affect, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during HIIT and SIT. Active adults (4 women and 8 men, age = 24.2 ± 6.2 years) initially performed a VO2max test to determine workload for both sessions on the cycle ergometer, whose order was randomized. Sprint interval training consisted of 8 bouts of 30 seconds of all-out cycling at 130% of maximum Watts (Wmax). High-intensity interval training consisted of eight 60-second bouts at 85% Wmax. Heart rate, VO2, BLa, affect, and RPE were continuously assessed throughout exercise. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between HIIT and SIT for VO2 (p < 0.001), HR (p < 0.001), RPE (p = 0.03), and BLa (p = 0.049). Conversely, there was no significant difference between regimens for affect (p = 0.12). Energy expenditure was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in HIIT (209.3 ± 40.3 kcal) vs. SIT (193.5 ± 39.6 kcal). During HIIT, subjects burned significantly more calories and reported lower perceived exertion than SIT. The higher VO2 and lower BLa in HIIT vs. SIT reflected dissimilar metabolic perturbation between regimens, which may elicit unique long-term adaptations. If an individual is seeking to burn slightly more calories, maintain a higher oxygen uptake, and perceive less exertion during exercise, HIIT is the recommended routine.

  3. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2016-07-12

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  4. Recovery Act Milestones

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  5. Electroencephalogram signatures of loss and recovery of consciousness from propofol.

    PubMed

    Purdon, Patrick L; Pierce, Eric T; Mukamel, Eran A; Prerau, Michael J; Walsh, John L; Wong, Kin Foon K; Salazar-Gomez, Andres F; Harrell, Priscilla G; Sampson, Aaron L; Cimenser, Aylin; Ching, ShiNung; Kopell, Nancy J; Tavares-Stoeckel, Casie; Habeeb, Kathleen; Merhar, Rebecca; Brown, Emery N

    2013-03-19

    Unconsciousness is a fundamental component of general anesthesia (GA), but anesthesiologists have no reliable ways to be certain that a patient is unconscious. To develop EEG signatures that track loss and recovery of consciousness under GA, we recorded high-density EEGs in humans during gradual induction of and emergence from unconsciousness with propofol. The subjects executed an auditory task at 4-s intervals consisting of interleaved verbal and click stimuli to identify loss and recovery of consciousness. During induction, subjects lost responsiveness to the less salient clicks before losing responsiveness to the more salient verbal stimuli; during emergence they recovered responsiveness to the verbal stimuli before recovering responsiveness to the clicks. The median frequency and bandwidth of the frontal EEG power tracked the probability of response to the verbal stimuli during the transitions in consciousness. Loss of consciousness was marked simultaneously by an increase in low-frequency EEG power (<1 Hz), the loss of spatially coherent occipital alpha oscillations (8-12 Hz), and the appearance of spatially coherent frontal alpha oscillations. These dynamics reversed with recovery of consciousness. The low-frequency phase modulated alpha amplitude in two distinct patterns. During profound unconsciousness, alpha amplitudes were maximal at low-frequency peaks, whereas during the transition into and out of unconsciousness, alpha amplitudes were maximal at low-frequency nadirs. This latter phase-amplitude relationship predicted recovery of consciousness. Our results provide insights into the mechanisms of propofol-induced unconsciousness, establish EEG signatures of this brain state that track transitions in consciousness precisely, and suggest strategies for monitoring the brain activity of patients receiving GA.

  6. 30 CFR 817.59 - Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal recovery. 817.59 Section 817.59 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM... recovery. Underground mining activities shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization...

  7. 30 CFR 817.59 - Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal recovery. 817.59 Section 817.59 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM... recovery. Underground mining activities shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization...

  8. Resource Recovery. Energy and Environment. Teacher's Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Inc., Jacksonville, FL.

    Designed to assist students in understanding solid waste resource recovery, this teaching aid package aims to get students involved in practical activities that require participation, observation, and interpretation. Provided in this package are definitions, methods, causes and effects, costs, and benefits of resource recovery presented in the…

  9. 30 CFR 816.59 - Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal recovery. 816.59 Section 816.59 Mineral... PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.59 Coal recovery... coal, while utilizing the best appropriate technology currently available to maintain...

  10. 30 CFR 816.59 - Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal recovery. 816.59 Section 816.59 Mineral... PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.59 Coal recovery... coal, while utilizing the best appropriate technology currently available to maintain...

  11. 30 CFR 816.59 - Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal recovery. 816.59 Section 816.59 Mineral... PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.59 Coal recovery... coal, while utilizing the best appropriate technology currently available to maintain...

  12. Recovery in Scotland: beyond service development.

    PubMed

    Bradstreet, Simon; McBrierty, Rona

    2012-02-01

    Over the last ten years there has been significant activity related to the promotion and support of recovery in Scotland, much of it linked to the work of the Scottish Recovery Network. A range of government policies have consistently identified recovery as a guiding principle of both service design and mental health improvement efforts. New learning has been developed and shared, workforce competencies reviewed and training developed, and a range of national initiatives put in place. In Scotland, as elsewhere, these efforts have tended to focus primarily on ensuring that mental health services offer environments and practices that support personal recovery. While service improvement is crucial, a wider challenge is ensuring that opportunities and support for self-directed recovery are enhanced outside statutory services. Providing examples, this paper will look at the development of recovery in Scotland - including the work of the Scottish Recovery Network - and consider the potential for building on progress made by rebalancing efforts to support personal recovery, highlighting the importance of public attitudes and community-based learning approaches. We will also touch on the role of identity in personal recovery and consider cultural issues related to the promotion of recovery in Scotland.

  13. Recovery and neurological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fàbregas, Neus; Bruder, Nicolas

    2007-12-01

    Recovery from general anaesthesia is a period of intense stress for patients: there is sympathetic activation, catecholamine release, and increase in blood pressure or heart rate. Stressful events increase cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen consumption, potentially producing elevation of intracranial pressure and thus, favouring cerebral insults. Measures to prevent agitation, hypertension, shivering, and coughing are therefore very well justified in neurosurgical patients. The rationale for a "rapid-awakening-strategy" after craniotomy with general anaesthesia is that an early diagnosis of postoperative neurological complications is essential to limit potentially devastating consequences and finally improve patient outcome. A trial of early recovery may always be attempted to perform a neurological evaluation. An awake patient is the best and the cheapest neuromonitoring available. If, after surgery, a patient does not rapidly recover consciousness, or a focal neurological deficit becomes apparent, a head CT-scan should be performed as soon as possible to rule out a neurosurgical complication. Close monitoring during the first 24 hours after craniotomy is mandatory.

  14. Limited Effects of Endurance or Interval Training on Visceral Adipose Tissue and Systemic Inflammation in Sedentary Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Joshua H. F.; Collins, Blake E. G.; Adams, David R.; Robergs, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Limited data exists for the effects of sprint-interval training (SIT) and endurance training (ET) on total body composition, abdominal visceral adipose tissue, and plasma inflammation. Moreover, whether “active” or “passive” recovery in SIT provides a differential effect on these measures remains uncertain. Methods. Sedentary middle-aged men (n = 62; 49.5 ± 5.8 y; 29.7 ± 3.7 kg·m2) underwent abdominal computed tomography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, venepuncture, and exercise testing before and after the interventions, which included the following: 12 wks 3 d·wk−1 ET (n = 15; 50–60 min cycling; 80% HRmax), SIT (4–10 × 30 s sprint efforts) with passive (P-SIT; n = 15) or active recovery (A-SIT; n = 15); or nonexercise control condition (CON; n = 14). Changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, whole-body and visceral fat mass, and plasma systemic inflammation were examined. Results. Compared to CON, significant increases in interpolated power output (P-SIT, P < 0.001; ET, P = 0.012; A-SIT, P = 0.041) and test duration (P-SIT, P = 0.001; ET, P = 0.012; A-SIT, P = 0.046) occurred after training. Final VO2 consumption was increased after P-SIT only (P < 0.001). Despite >90% exercise compliance, there was no change in whole-body or visceral fat mass or plasma inflammation (P > 0.05). Conclusion. In sedentary middle-aged men, SIT was a time-effective alternative to ET in facilitating conditioning responses yet was ineffective in altering body composition and plasma inflammation, and compared to passive recovery, evidenced diminished conditioning responses when employing active recovery. PMID:27777795

  15. Youth in Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Miranda, John; Williams, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Young people are entering long-term recovery probably in greater numbers than ever before. A key word here is "probably" because we know precious little about the phenomenon of young people who recover from alcohol and drug addition. This article is a preliminary exploration of youth in recovery. It reviews several types of recovery support…

  16. What Is "No Recovery?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Thanatologists, as Balk recently commented (Balk, 2004), have been saying that there is no recovery from bereavement, or that we should not speak of bereavement as leading to a recovery. The term recovery has a high level of plasticity and can be shaped to fit diverse meanings, including contradictory meanings. We will sort our way through some of…

  17. Enhanced oil recovery update

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.V

    1989-03-01

    Technology continues to grow in the realm of enhanced oil recovery. Since 1950 several processes have proven economic for oil recovery. Others are still in their infancy and must be custom designed for each reservoir. This paper gives a general overview of these processes. The author focuses on the latest technology and the outlook for enhanced oil recovery operations.

  18. Intervals in evolutionary algorithms for global optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    Optimization is of central concern to a number of disciplines. Interval Arithmetic methods for global optimization provide us with (guaranteed) verified results. These methods are mainly restricted to the classes of objective functions that are twice differentiable and use a simple strategy of eliminating a splitting larger regions of search space in the global optimization process. An efficient approach that combines the efficient strategy from Interval Global Optimization Methods and robustness of the Evolutionary Algorithms is proposed. In the proposed approach, search begins with randomly created interval vectors with interval widths equal to the whole domain. Before the beginning of the evolutionary process, fitness of these interval parameter vectors is defined by evaluating the objective function at the center of the initial interval vectors. In the subsequent evolutionary process the local optimization process returns an estimate of the bounds of the objective function over the interval vectors. Though these bounds may not be correct at the beginning due to large interval widths and complicated function properties, the process of reducing interval widths over time and a selection approach similar to simulated annealing helps in estimating reasonably correct bounds as the population evolves. The interval parameter vectors at these estimated bounds (local optima) are then subjected to crossover and mutation operators. This evolutionary process continues for predetermined number of generations in the search of the global optimum.

  19. Analysis and machine mapping of the distribution of band recoveries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cowardin, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method of calculating distance and bearing from banding site to recovery location based on the solution of a spherical triangle is presented. X and Y distances on an ordinate grid were applied to computer plotting of recoveries on a map. The advantages and disadvantages of tables of recoveries by State or degree block, axial lines, and distance of recovery from banding site for presentation and comparison of the spatial distribution of band recoveries are discussed. A special web-shaped partition formed by concentric circles about the point of banding and great circles at 30-degree intervals through the point of banding has certain advantages over other methods. Comparison of distributions by means of a X? contingency test is illustrated. The statistic V = X?/N can be used as a measure of difference between two distributions of band recoveries and its possible use is illustrated as a measure of the degree of migrational homing.

  20. Off-site source recovery project case study: disposal of high activity cobalt 60 sources at the Nevada test site 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Cocina, Frank G; Stewart, William C; Wald - Hopkins, Mark; Hageman, John P

    2009-01-01

    The Off-Site Source Recovery Project has been operating at Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1998 to address the U.S. Department of Energy responsibility for collection and management of orphaned or disused radioactive sealed sources which may represent a risk to public health and national security if not properly managed.

  1. Hurricane Recovery Report 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Joseph P.

    2005-01-01

    During August and September 2004, four hurricanes tested the mettle of Space Coast residents and the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) leadership and workforce. These threats underscored two important points: the very real vulnerability of KSC and its valuable space program assets to the devastating power of a hurricane, and the planning required to effectively deal with such threats. The damage was significant even though KSC did not experience sustained hurricane-force winds. To better understand and appreciate these points, this report provides an overview of the meteorological history of the Space Coast and what is involved in the planning, preparation, and recovery activities, as well as addressing the impacts of the 2004 hurricane season.

  2. Recovery of Extracellular Lipolytic Enzymes from Macrophomina phaseolina by Foam Fractionation with Air

    PubMed Central

    Germani, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina was cultivated in complex and simple media for the production of extracellular lipolytic enzymes. Culture supernatants were batch foam fractionated for the recovery of these enzymes, and column design and operation included the use of P 2 frit (porosity 40 to 100 μm), air as sparging gas at variable flow rates, and Triton X-100 added at the beginning or gradually in aliquots. Samples taken at intervals showed the progress of the kinetic and the efficiency parameters. Best results were obtained with the simple medium supernatant by combining the stepwise addition of small amounts of the surfactant with the variation of the air flow rates along the separation. Inert proteins were foamed out first, and the subsequent foamate was enriched in the enzymes, showing estimated activity recovery (R), enrichment ratio (E), and purification factor (P) of 45%, 34.7, and 2.9, respectively. Lipases were present in the enriched foamate. PMID:23738054

  3. Changes in mitochondrial function and mitochondria associated protein expression in response to 2-weeks of high intensity interval training

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Grace; Lamon, Séverine; Gant, Nicholas; Vincent, Peter J.; MacDonald, Julia R.; Markworth, James F.; Edge, Johann A.; Hickey, Anthony J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: High-intensity short-duration interval training (HIT) stimulates functional and metabolic adaptation in skeletal muscle, but the influence of HIT on mitochondrial function remains poorly studied in humans. Mitochondrial metabolism as well as mitochondrial-associated protein expression were tested in untrained participants performing HIT over a 2-week period. Methods: Eight males performed a single-leg cycling protocol (12 × 1 min intervals at 120% peak power output, 90 s recovery, 4 days/week). Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken pre- and post-HIT. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, citrate synthase (CS) activity and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) and respiratory complex components were measured. Results: HIT training improved peak power and time to fatigue. Increases in absolute oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacities and CS activity were observed, but not in the ratio of CCO to the electron transport system (CCO/ETS), the respiratory control ratios (RCR-1 and RCR-2) or mitochondrial-associated protein expression. Specific increases in OXPHOS flux were not apparent after normalization to CS, indicating that gross changes mainly resulted from increased mitochondrial mass. Conclusion: Over only 2 weeks HIT significantly increased mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle independently of detectable changes in mitochondrial-associated and mitogenic protein expression. PMID:25759671

  4. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, Daniel

    2011-12-31

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  5. Prognostic value of late heart rate recovery after treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nils P; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2012-07-01

    Recovery from exercise can be divided into an early, rapid period and a late, slower period. Although early heart rate (HR) recovery 1 minute after treadmill exercise independently predicts survival, the prognostic value of late HR recovery has not been well studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the independent prognostic value of late HR recovery for all-cause mortality. A total of 2,082 patients referred to the nuclear cardiology laboratory of an urban academic medical center for treadmill exercise with imaging from August 1998 to December 2003 were followed for all-cause mortality. During 9.9 ± 1.5 years of follow-up, 196 deaths (9%) occurred. To avoid overlap with early HR recovery or the baseline HR, late HR recovery was defined as the percentage of the cycle length change between rest and peak exercise that had been recovered after 5 minutes. Lower values represent impaired recovery, by analogy with 1-minute HR recovery. Impaired late HR recovery was a significant univariate predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.28 per percentage, 95% confidence interval 0.17 to 0.46, p <0.001). It significantly improved a nested, multivariate model (change in chi-square 8.66, p = 0.003), including 1-minute HR recovery, with independent prognostic value (adjusted hazard ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.41 to 0.84, p = 0.004). In conclusion, late HR recovery after treadmill exercise stress adds prognostic value for all-cause mortality to a multivariate model including early, 1-minute HR recovery.

  6. Capacitated max -Batching with Interval Graph Compatibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonner, Tim

    We consider the problem of partitioning interval graphs into cliques of bounded size. Each interval has a weight, and the weight of a clique is the maximum weight of any interval in the clique. This natural graph problem can be interpreted as a batch scheduling problem. Solving a long-standing open problem, we show NP-hardness, even if the bound on the clique sizes is constant. Moreover, we give a PTAS based on a novel dynamic programming technique for this case.

  7. Encoding of temporal intervals in the rat hindlimb sensorimotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Eric B; Flint, Robert D; Moxon, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    The gradual buildup of neural activity over experimentally imposed delay periods, termed climbing activity, is well documented and is a potential mechanism by which interval time is encoded by distributed cortico-thalamico-striatal networks in the brain. Additionally, when multiple delay periods are incorporated, this activity has been shown to scale its rate of climbing proportional to the delay period. However, it remains unclear whether these patterns of activity occur within areas of motor cortex dedicated to hindlimb movement. Moreover, the effects of behavioral training (e.g., motor tasks) under different reward conditions but with similar behavioral output are not well addressed. To address this, we recorded activity from the hindlimb sensorimotor cortex (HLSMC) of two groups of rats performing a skilled hindlimb press task. In one group, rats were trained only to a make a valid press within a finite window after cue presentation for reward (non-interval trained, nIT; n = 5), while rats in the second group were given duration-specific cues in which they had to make presses of either short or long duration to receive reward (interval trained, IT; n = 6). Using perievent time histogram (PETH) analyses, we show that cells recorded from both groups showed climbing activity during the task in similar proportions (35% IT and 47% nIT), however, only climbing activity from IT rats was temporally scaled to press duration. Furthermore, using single trial decoding techniques (Wiener filter), we show that press duration can be inferred using climbing activity from IT animals (R = 0.61) significantly better than nIT animals (R = 0.507, p < 0.01), suggesting IT animals encode press duration through temporally scaled climbing activity. Thus, if temporal intervals are behaviorally relevant then the activity of climbing neurons is temporally scaled to encode the passage of time.

  8. Encoding of temporal intervals in the rat hindlimb sensorimotor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Eric B.; Flint, Robert D.; Moxon, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    The gradual buildup of neural activity over experimentally imposed delay periods, termed climbing activity, is well documented and is a potential mechanism by which interval time is encoded by distributed cortico-thalamico-striatal networks in the brain. Additionally, when multiple delay periods are incorporated, this activity has been shown to scale its rate of climbing proportional to the delay period. However, it remains unclear whether these patterns of activity occur within areas of motor cortex dedicated to hindlimb movement. Moreover, the effects of behavioral training (e.g., motor tasks) under different reward conditions but with similar behavioral output are not well addressed. To address this, we recorded activity from the hindlimb sensorimotor cortex (HLSMC) of two groups of rats performing a skilled hindlimb press task. In one group, rats were trained only to a make a valid press within a finite window after cue presentation for reward (non-interval trained, nIT; n = 5), while rats in the second group were given duration-specific cues in which they had to make presses of either short or long duration to receive reward (interval trained, IT; n = 6). Using perievent time histogram (PETH) analyses, we show that cells recorded from both groups showed climbing activity during the task in similar proportions (35% IT and 47% nIT), however, only climbing activity from IT rats was temporally scaled to press duration. Furthermore, using single trial decoding techniques (Wiener filter), we show that press duration can be inferred using climbing activity from IT animals (R = 0.61) significantly better than nIT animals (R = 0.507, p < 0.01), suggesting IT animals encode press duration through temporally scaled climbing activity. Thus, if temporal intervals are behaviorally relevant then the activity of climbing neurons is temporally scaled to encode the passage of time. PMID:23055956

  9. Confidence Interval Procedures for Reliability Growth Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    Plj2s tSAA - TECHNICAL RPORT NO. 197 CONFIDENCE INTERVAL PROCEDURES FOR RELIABILITY, GROWTH ANALYSIS LARRY H. CROW JUNE 1977 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC...dence Intervals for M(T). ¶-. fl [ ] 1 Siion IIS0III0N/AVAI Ale ITY ClOtS Next page is blank. So3 CONFIDENCE INTERVAL PROCIEDURIS• FOR RELTABILITY...and confidence interval procedures for the parameters B and P = X are presented in [l , [2], [4]. In the application of the Weibull process model to

  10. QT-Interval Duration and Mortality Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Post, Wendy S.; Dalal, Darshan; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Guallar, Eliseo

    2012-01-01

    Background Extreme prolongation or reduction of the QT interval predisposes patients to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the association of variations in the QT interval within a reference range with mortality end points in the general population is unclear. Methods We included 7828 men and women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Baseline QT interval was measured via standard 12-lead electrocardiographic readings. Mortality end points were assessed through December 31, 2006 (2291 deaths). Results After an average follow-up of 13.7 years, the association between QT interval and mortality end points was U-shaped. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios comparing participants at or above the 95th percentile of age-, sex-, race-, and R-R interval–corrected QT interval (≥439 milliseconds) with participants in the middle quintile (401 to <410 milliseconds) were 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.81) for total mortality, 2.55 (1.59-4.09) for mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), 1.63 (0.96-2.75) for mortality due to coronary heart disease, and 1.65 (1.16-2.35) for non-CVD mortality. The corresponding hazard ratios comparing participants with a corrected QT interval below the fifth percentile (<377 milliseconds) with those in the middle quintile were 1.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.88) for total mortality, 1.35 (0.77-2.36) for CVD mortality, 1.02 (0.44-2.38) for coronary heart disease mortality, and 1.42 (0.97-2.08) for non-CVD mortality. Increased mortality also was observed with less extreme deviations of QT-interval duration. Similar, albeit weaker, associations also were observed with Bazett-corrected QT intervals. Conclusion Shortened and prolonged QT-interval durations, even within a reference range, are associated with increased mortality risk in the general population. PMID:22025428

  11. The Effect of Temporal Intervals of Reinforcement upon Deductive and Inductive Generalizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Jack J.

    Using verbal material, this study explored the effect of the temporal interval of feedback as it interacted with two other variables: (1) method of presenting learning material (inductive or deductive), and (2) activity of the learner during the delay interval (activity relevant or irrelevant to the material). The major objective was to compare…

  12. Chronic and acute inspiratory muscle loading augment the effect of a 6-week interval program on tolerance of high-intensity intermittent bouts of running.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tom K; Fu, Frank H; Eston, Roger; Chung, Pak-Kwong; Quach, Binh; Lu, Kui

    2010-11-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that chronic (training) and acute (warm-up) loaded ventilatory activities applied to the inspiratory muscles (IM) in an integrated manner would augment the training volume of an interval running program. This in turn would result in additional improvement in the maximum performance of the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test in comparison with interval training alone. Eighteen male nonprofessional athletes were allocated to either an inspiratory muscle loading (IML) group or control group. Both groups participated in a 6-week interval running program consisting of 3-4 workouts (1-3 sets of various repetitions of selected distance [100-2,400 m] per workout) per week. For the IML group, 4-week IM training (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets·d-1, 6 d·wk-1) was applied before the interval program. Specific IM warm-up (2 sets of 30 inspiratory efforts at 40% P0) was performed before each workout of the program. For the control group, neither IML was applied. In comparison with the control group, the interval training volume as indicated by the repeatability of running bouts at high intensity was approximately 27% greater in the IML group. Greater increase in the maximum performance of the Yo-Yo test (control: 16.9 ± 5.5%; IML: 30.7 ± 4.7% baseline value) was also observed after training. The enhanced exercise performance was partly attributable to the greater reductions in the sensation of breathlessness and whole-body metabolic stress during the Yo-Yo test. These findings show that the combination of chronic and acute IML into a high-intensity interval running program is a beneficial training strategy for enhancing the tolerance to high-intensity intermittent bouts of running.

  13. Emerging evidence of the association between cognitive deficits and arm motor recovery after stroke: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mullick, Aditi A.; Subramanian, Sandeep K.; Levin, Mindy F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Motor and cognitive impairments are common and often coexist in patients with stroke. Although evidence is emerging about specific relationships between cognitive deficits and upper-limb motor recovery, the practical implication of these relationships for rehabilitation is unclear. Using a structured review and meta-analyses, we examined the nature and strength of the associations between cognitive deficits and upper-limb motor recovery in studies of patients with stroke. Methods: Motor recovery was defined using measures of upper limb motor impairment and/or activity limitations. Studies were included if they reported on at least one measure of cognitive function and one measure of upper limb motor impairment or function. Results: Six studies met the selection criteria. There was a moderate association (r = 0.43; confidence interval; CI:0.09– 0.68, p = 0.014) between cognition and overall arm motor recovery. Separate meta-analyses showed a moderately strong association between executive function and motor recovery (r = 0.48; CI:0.26– 0.65; p <  0.001), a weak positive correlation between attention and motor recovery (r = 0.25; CI:0.04– 0.45; p = 0.023), and no correlation between memory and motor recovery (r = 0.42; CI:0.16– 0.79; p = 0.14). Conclusion: These results imply that information on the presence of cognitive deficits should be considered while planning interventions for clients in order to design more personalized interventions tailored to the individual for maximizing upper-limb recovery. PMID:26410581

  14. Effects of resistance exercise combined with essential amino acid supplementation and energy deficit on markers of skeletal muscle atrophy and regeneration during bed rest and active recovery

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Naomi E.; Cadena, Samuel M.; Vannier, Edouard; Cloutier, Gregory; Carambula, Silvia; Myburgh, Kathryn H.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Space flight and bed rest (BR) lead to muscle atrophy. This study assessed the effect of essential amino acid supplementation (EAA) and resistance training with decreased energy intake on molecular changes in skeletal muscle after 28d BR and 14d recovery. METHODS Thirty-one men (31–55yr) subjected to an 8±6% energy deficit were randomized to receive EAA without resistance training (AA, n=7), EAA 3 h after (RT, n=12), or 5 min before (AART, n=12) resistance training. RESULTS During BR, myostatin transcript levels increased 2-fold in the AA group. During recovery, IGF1 mRNA increased in all groups while Pax7, MyoD, myogenin and MRF4 transcripts increased in AA only (all p<0.05). MAFbx transcripts decreased 2-fold with AA and RT. Satellite cells did not change during BR or recovery. DISCUSSION This suggests that EAA alone is the least protective countermeasure to muscle loss, and several molecular mechanisms are proposed by which exercise attenuates muscle atrophy during bed rest with energy deficit. PMID:20928906

  15. Interval and Contour Processing in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    High functioning children with autism and age and intelligence matched controls participated in experiments testing perception of pitch intervals and musical contours. The finding from the interval study showed superior detection of pitch direction over small pitch distances in the autism group. On the test of contour discrimination no group…

  16. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  17. Real-time correction of heart interbeat interval data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J.; Hoover, A.; Pappas, J.; Moss, J.; Fishel, S.; Muth, E.

    2005-05-01

    Measuring heart rate variability is an important component of developing human monitoring systems for soldiers of the next century. Unfortunately, even the best sensors are prone to error in active situations. We have developed a system that detects and corrects errors in interbeat interval data in real time. A six to ten second buffer is used to provide context for a set of rules designed to simulate the way a human expert corrects data offline. Interbeat interval data was gathered from a pool of eighteen subjects with three detection devices used on each subject. Results of the automated correction were compared with human experts to determine the validity of the method. As expected, success varied based on the number of errors in a neighborhood. Isolated errors were corrected with high accuracy, while severely damaged data streams were totally unrecoverable by human or machine. This technique could serve as a crucial component of interbeat interval based monitoring technologies.

  18. Recovery and Money Management

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Michael; Serowik, Kristin L.; Ablondi, Karen; Wilbur, Charles; Rosen, Marc I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Social recovery and external money management are important approaches in contemporary mental health care, but little research has been done on the relationship between the two or on application of recovery principles to money management for people at risk of being assigned a representative payee or conservator. Methods Twenty-five transcripts out of forty-nine total qualitative interviews with persons receiving SSI or SSDI who were at risk of being assigned a money manager were analyzed to assess the presence of recognized recovery themes. Results The recovery principles of self-direction and responsibility were strong themes in participant comments related to money management. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Money management interventions should incorporate peoples’ recovery-related motivations to acquire financial management skills as a means to direct and assume responsibility for one’s finances. Staff involved in money management should receive training to support client’s recovery-related goals. PMID:23750764

  19. Biomathematics and Interval Analysis: A Prosperous Marriage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, S. M.

    2010-11-01

    In this survey paper we focus our attention on dynamical bio-systems involving uncertainties and the use of interval methods for the modelling study of such systems. The kind of envisioned uncertain systems are those described by a dynamical model with parameters bounded in intervals. We point out to a fruitful symbiosis between dynamical modelling in biology and computational methods of interval analysis. Both fields are presently in the stage of rapid development and can benefit from each other. We point out on recent studies in the field of interval arithmetic from a new perspective—the midpoint-radius arithmetic which explores the properties of error bounds and approximate numbers. The midpoint-radius approach provides a bridge between interval methods and the "uncertain but bounded" approach used for model estimation and identification. We briefly discuss certain recently obtained algebraic properties of errors and approximate numbers.

  20. Recovery of prostacyclin synthesis by rabbit aortic endothelium and other tissues after inhibition by aspirin.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, C. E.; Ritter, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of aspirin on prostacyclin (PGI2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) synthesis was studied in rabbits. Tissues were removed from animals killed at intervals after injection of aspirin, and incubated with Hanks' solution. PGI2 synthesis was monitored by radioimmunoassay of its hydrolysis product, 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-oxo-PGF1 alpha). TXB2 production in clotted blood, also measured by radioimmunoassay, was determined as an index of platelet cyclo-oxygenase activity. 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha and TXB2 production 0.5 h after aspirin were similarly inhibited to less than 5% of control in all incubations. Subsequent recovery of PGI2 synthesis occurred more rapidly in aortic endothelium than in other tissues, including aorta denuded of endothelium. Recovery of TXB2 production was slower than that of PGI2. Intravenous cycloheximide prevented the partial recovery of PGI2 synthesis that otherwise occurred 6 h after aspirin, while intravenous epidermal growth factor increased recovery. It is concluded that in the rabbit, cyclo-oxygenase is synthesized more rapidly in aortic endothelium than in deep layers of aorta, or in the other tissues studied. PMID:3297227

  1. Control of interval-force relation in canine ventricular myocardium studied with ryanodine.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, D.; Hryshko, L. V.; King, B. W.; Chau, T.

    1988-01-01

    1. The mechanism of post-extrasystolic, rest and frequency potentiation was studied in canine isolated ventricular muscle. 2. Ryanodine, which impairs Ca availability from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), reduced the amplitude of the extrasystole less than that of the steady state contraction. Ryanodine also inhibited post-extrasystolic potentiation and converted rest-potentiation into rest depression. Rest-potentiation was blocked preferentially by ryanodine compared to post-extrasystolic potentiation. An increase in the contribution of extracellular Ca to the extrasystolic contraction could not entirely account for the post-extrasystolic potentiation. 3. Prolonged rest, by itself, also caused depression of the first po