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Sample records for activation slow deactivation

  1. Tyrosine Residues from the S4-S5 Linker of Kv11.1 Channels Are Critical for Slow Deactivation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chai-Ann; Gravel, Andrée E; Perry, Matthew D; Arnold, Alexandre A; Marcotte, Isabelle; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2016-08-12

    Slow deactivation of Kv11.1 channels is critical for its function in the heart. The S4-S5 linker, which joins the voltage sensor and pore domains, plays a critical role in this slow deactivation gating. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to identify the membrane-bound surface of the S4S5 linker, and we show that two highly conserved tyrosine residues within the KCNH subfamily of channels are membrane-associated. Site-directed mutagenesis and electrophysiological analysis indicates that Tyr-542 interacts with both the pore domain and voltage sensor residues to stabilize activated conformations of the channel, whereas Tyr-545 contributes to the slow kinetics of deactivation by primarily stabilizing the transition state between the activated and closed states. Thus, the two tyrosine residues in the Kv11.1 S4S5 linker play critical but distinct roles in the slow deactivation phenotype, which is a hallmark of Kv11.1 channels.

  2. Mechanotransduction in neutrophil activation and deactivation.

    PubMed

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Toepfner, Nicole; Chilvers, Edwin R; Guck, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the processes through which cells sense mechanical stimuli by converting them to biochemical signals and, thus, eliciting specific cellular responses. Cells sense mechanical stimuli from their 3D environment, including the extracellular matrix, neighboring cells and other mechanical forces. Incidentally, the emerging concept of mechanical homeostasis,long term or chronic regulation of mechanical properties, seems to apply to neutrophils in a peculiar manner, owing to neutrophils' ability to dynamically switch between the activated/primed and deactivated/deprimed states. While neutrophil activation has been known for over a century, its deactivation is a relatively recent discovery. Even more intriguing is the reversibility of neutrophil activation and deactivation. We review and critically evaluate recent findings that suggest physiological roles for neutrophil activation and deactivation and discuss possible mechanisms by which mechanical stimuli can drive the oscillation of neutrophils between the activated and resting states. We highlight several molecules that have been identified in neutrophil mechanotransduction, including cell adhesion and transmembrane receptors, cytoskeletal and ion channel molecules. The physiological and pathophysiological implications of such mechanically induced signal transduction in neutrophils are highlighted as a basis for future work. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:26211453

  3. 10 CFR 218.2 - Activation/Deactivation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activation/Deactivation. 218.2 Section 218.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION General Provisions § 218.2 Activation/Deactivation. (a) This rule shall take effect providing: (1) The International Energy Program has...

  4. 10 CFR 218.2 - Activation/Deactivation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Activation/Deactivation. 218.2 Section 218.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION General Provisions § 218.2 Activation/Deactivation. (a) This rule shall take effect providing: (1) The International Energy Program has...

  5. 10 CFR 218.2 - Activation/Deactivation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Activation/Deactivation. 218.2 Section 218.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION General Provisions § 218.2 Activation/Deactivation. (a) This rule shall take effect providing: (1) The International Energy Program has...

  6. 10 CFR 218.2 - Activation/Deactivation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Activation/Deactivation. 218.2 Section 218.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION General Provisions § 218.2 Activation/Deactivation. (a) This rule shall take effect providing: (1) The International Energy Program has...

  7. 10 CFR 218.2 - Activation/Deactivation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Activation/Deactivation. 218.2 Section 218.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION General Provisions § 218.2 Activation/Deactivation. (a) This rule shall take effect providing: (1) The International Energy Program has...

  8. Sequence of Gating Charge Movement and Pore Gating in hERG Activation and Deactivation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Samuel J.; Macdonald, Logan C.; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    KV11.1 voltage-gated K+ channels are noted for unusually slow activation, fast inactivation, and slow deactivation kinetics, which tune channel activity to provide vital repolarizing current during later stages of the cardiac action potential. The bulk of charge movement in human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) is slow, as is return of charge upon repolarization, suggesting that the rates of hERG channel opening and, critically, that of deactivation might be determined by slow voltage sensor movement, and also by a mode-shift after activation. To test these ideas, we compared the kinetics and voltage dependence of ionic activation and deactivation with gating charge movement. At 0 mV, gating charge moved ∼threefold faster than ionic current, which suggests the presence of additional slow transitions downstream of charge movement in the physiological activation pathway. A significant voltage sensor mode-shift was apparent by 24 ms at +60 mV in gating currents, and return of charge closely tracked pore closure after pulses of 100 and 300 ms duration. A deletion of the N-terminus PAS domain, mutation R4AR5A or the LQT2-causing mutation R56Q gave faster-deactivating channels that displayed an attenuated mode-shift of charge. This indicates that charge movement is perturbed by N- and C-terminus interactions, and that these domain interactions stabilize the open state and limit the rate of charge return. We conclude that slow on-gating charge movement can only partly account for slow hERG ionic activation, and that the rate of pore closure has a limiting role in the slow return of gating charges. PMID:25809256

  9. Automated Activation and Deactivation of a System Under Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The MPLM Automated Activation/Deactivation application (MPLM means Multi-Purpose Logistic Module) was created with a three-fold purpose in mind: 1. To reduce the possibility of human error in issuing commands to, or interpreting telemetry from, the MPLM power, computer, and environmental control systems; 2. To reduce the amount of test time required for the repetitive activation/deactivation processes; and 3. To reduce the number of on-console personnel required for activation/ deactivation. All of these have been demonstrated with the release of the software. While some degree of automated end-item commanding had previously been performed for space-station hardware in the test environment, none approached the functionality and flexibility of this application. For MPLM activation, it provides mouse-click selection of the hardware complement to be activated, activates the desired hardware and verifies proper feedbacks, and alerts the user when telemetry indicates an error condition or manual intervention is required. For MPLM deactivation, the product senses which end items are active and deactivates them in the proper sequence. For historical purposes, an on-line log is maintained of commands issued and telemetry points monitored. The benefits of the MPLM Automated Activation/ Deactivation application were demonstrated with its first use in December 2002, when it flawlessly performed MPLM activation in 8 minutes (versus as much as 2.4 hours for previous manual activations), and performed MPLM deactivation in 3 minutes (versus 66 minutes for previous manual deactivations). The number of test team members required has dropped from eight to four, and in actuality the software can be operated by a sole (knowledgeable) system engineer.

  10. The S4-S5 linker acts as a signal integrator for HERG K+ channel activation and deactivation gating.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chai Ann; Perry, Matthew D; Tan, Peter S; Hill, Adam P; Kuchel, Philip W; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2012-01-01

    Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) K(+) channels have unusual gating kinetics. Characterised by slow activation/deactivation but rapid inactivation/recovery from inactivation, the unique gating kinetics underlie the central role hERG channels play in cardiac repolarisation. The slow activation and deactivation kinetics are regulated in part by the S4-S5 linker, which couples movement of the voltage sensor domain to opening of the activation gate at the distal end of the inner helix of the pore domain. It has also been suggested that cytosolic domains may interact with the S4-S5 linker to regulate activation and deactivation kinetics. Here, we show that the solution structure of a peptide corresponding to the S4-S5 linker of hERG contains an amphipathic helix. The effects of mutations at the majority of residues in the S4-S5 linker of hERG were consistent with the previously identified role in coupling voltage sensor movement to the activation gate. However, mutations to Ser543, Tyr545, Gly546 and Ala548 had more complex phenotypes indicating that these residues are involved in additional interactions. We propose a model in which the S4-S5 linker, in addition to coupling VSD movement to the activation gate, also contributes to interactions that stabilise the closed state and a separate set of interactions that stabilise the open state. The S4-S5 linker therefore acts as a signal integrator and plays a crucial role in the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel.

  11. Attention, Emotion, and Deactivation of Default Activity in Inferior Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geday, Jacob; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Attention deactivates the inferior medial prefrontal cortex (IMPC), but it is uncertain if emotions can attenuate this deactivation. To test the extent to which common emotions interfere with attention, we measured changes of a blood flow index of brain activity in key areas of the IMPC with positron emission tomography (PET) of labeled water…

  12. Glut, war slow Mideast activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-20

    Oilpatch activity in the Middle East has been on the slow side recently, and with a heated-up war between Iran and Iraq throwing off violent sparks around the Arabian Gulf, it's difficult to keep one's mind on business-as-usual. The article deals with the rising cost of insurance for shipping because of the war and the effects on drilling, production and the environment (oil spills). The development and production of offshore oil and gas in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates is also discussed.

  13. Working memory encoding and maintenance deficits in schizophrenia: neural evidence for activation and deactivation abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Anticevic, Alan; Repovs, Grega; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence implicates working memory (WM) as a core deficit in schizophrenia (SCZ), purportedly due to primary deficits in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functioning. Recent findings suggest that SCZ is also associated with abnormalities in suppression of certain regions during cognitive engagement--namely the default mode system--that may further contribute to WM pathology. However, no study has systematically examined activation and suppression abnormalities across both encoding and maintenance phases of WM in SCZ. Twenty-eight patients and 24 demographically matched healthy subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while performing a delayed match-to-sample WM task. Groups were accuracy matched to rule out performance effects. Encoding load was identical across subjects to facilitate comparisons across WM phases. We examined activation differences using an assumed model approach at the whole-brain level and within meta-analytically defined WM areas. Despite matched performance, we found regions showing less recruitment during encoding and maintenance for SCZ subjects. Furthermore, we identified 2 areas closely matching the default system, which SCZ subjects failed to deactivate across WM phases. Lastly, activation in prefrontal regions predicted the degree of deactivation for healthy but not SCZ subjects. Current results replicate and extend prefrontal recruitment abnormalities across WM phases in SCZ. Results also indicate deactivation abnormalities across WM phases, possibly due to inefficient prefrontal recruitment. Such regional deactivation may be critical for suppressing sources of interference during WM trace formation. Thus, deactivation deficits may constitute an additional source of impairments, which needs to be further characterized for a complete understanding of WM pathology in SCZ.

  14. Catalytic deactivation of methane steam reforming catalysts. I. Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Demicheli, M.C.; Ponzi, E.N.

    1987-08-01

    An alumina-supported catalyst was studied both in its original state and after activation and sintering. Chemical composition and textural properties were determined, and crystalline compounds were identified. Active-phase and support transformations occurring during activation were determined by differential thermoanalysis (DTA), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst activated by means of various procedures was characterized by measuring crystallite size.

  15. Causes of Activation and Deactivation of Modified Nanogold Catalysts during Prolonged Storage and Redox Treatments.

    PubMed

    Kolobova, Ekaterina; Kotolevich, Yulia; Pakrieva, Ekaterina; Mamontov, Grigory; Farías, Mario H; Bogdanchikova, Nina; Cortés Corberán, Vicente; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic properties of modified Au/TiO₂ catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation are affected by deactivation and reactivation after long-term storage and by redox treatments. The effect of these phenomena on the catalysts was studied by HRTEM, BET, SEM, FTIR CO, XPS and H₂ TPR methods. The main cause for the deactivation and reactivation of catalytic properties is the variation in the electronic state of the supported gold, mainly, the proportion of singly charged ions Au⁺. The most active samples are those with the highest proportion of singly charged gold ions, while catalysts with a high content of trivalent gold ions are inactive at low-temperatures. Active states of gold, resistant to changes caused by the reaction process and storage conditions, can be stabilized by modification of the titanium oxide support with transition metals oxides. The catalyst modified with lanthanum oxide shows the highest stability and activity. PMID:27089310

  16. Causes of Activation and Deactivation of Modified Nanogold Catalysts during Prolonged Storage and Redox Treatments.

    PubMed

    Kolobova, Ekaterina; Kotolevich, Yulia; Pakrieva, Ekaterina; Mamontov, Grigory; Farías, Mario H; Bogdanchikova, Nina; Cortés Corberán, Vicente; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-04-13

    The catalytic properties of modified Au/TiO₂ catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation are affected by deactivation and reactivation after long-term storage and by redox treatments. The effect of these phenomena on the catalysts was studied by HRTEM, BET, SEM, FTIR CO, XPS and H₂ TPR methods. The main cause for the deactivation and reactivation of catalytic properties is the variation in the electronic state of the supported gold, mainly, the proportion of singly charged ions Au⁺. The most active samples are those with the highest proportion of singly charged gold ions, while catalysts with a high content of trivalent gold ions are inactive at low-temperatures. Active states of gold, resistant to changes caused by the reaction process and storage conditions, can be stabilized by modification of the titanium oxide support with transition metals oxides. The catalyst modified with lanthanum oxide shows the highest stability and activity.

  17. Graduates and Active Labour Market Programmes: Evidence of Deactivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of graduates who participated in a range of Active Labour Market Programmes (ALMPs) in Ireland. The paper uses narrative structuring to provide an enhanced understanding of the graduates' experiences. A review of the literature indicates that most empirical studies of the effects of ALMPs are quantitative.…

  18. Mammalian apoptotic signalling pathways: multiple targets of protozoan parasites to activate or deactivate host cell death.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Kristin; Hippe, Diana; Gross, Uwe; Lüder, Carsten G K

    2009-11-01

    Programmed cell death is an essential mechanism of the host to combat infectious agents and to regulate immunity during infection. Consequently, activation and deactivation of the hosts' cell death pathways by protozoan parasites play critical roles in parasite control, pathogenesis, immune evasion and parasite dissemination within the host. Here, we discuss advances in the understanding of these fascinating host-parasite interactions with special emphasis on how protozoa can modulate the cell death apparatus of its host.

  19. Anterior Medial Prefrontal Cortex Exhibits Activation during Task Preparation but Deactivation during Task Execution

    PubMed Central

    Koshino, Hideya; Minamoto, Takehiro; Ikeda, Takashi; Osaka, Mariko; Otsuka, Yuki; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Background The anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC) exhibits activation during some cognitive tasks, including episodic memory, reasoning, attention, multitasking, task sets, decision making, mentalizing, and processing of self-referenced information. However, the medial part of anterior PFC is part of the default mode network (DMN), which shows deactivation during various goal-directed cognitive tasks compared to a resting baseline. One possible factor for this pattern is that activity in the anterior medial PFC (MPFC) is affected by dynamic allocation of attentional resources depending on task demands. We investigated this possibility using an event related fMRI with a face working memory task. Methodology/Principal Findings Sixteen students participated in a single fMRI session. They were asked to form a task set to remember the faces (Face memory condition) or to ignore them (No face memory condition), then they were given 6 seconds of preparation period before the onset of the face stimuli. During this 6-second period, four single digits were presented one at a time at the center of the display, and participants were asked to add them and to remember the final answer. When participants formed a task set to remember faces, the anterior MPFC exhibited activation during a task preparation period but deactivation during a task execution period within a single trial. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that the anterior MPFC plays a role in task set formation but is not involved in execution of the face working memory task. Therefore, when attentional resources are allocated to other brain regions during task execution, the anterior MPFC shows deactivation. The results suggest that activation and deactivation in the anterior MPFC are affected by dynamic allocation of processing resources across different phases of processing. PMID:21829668

  20. Failing to deactivate: the association between brain activity during a working memory task and creativity.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Nagase, Tomomi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-03-15

    Working memory (WM) is an essential component for human higher order cognitive activities. Creativity has been essential to the development of human civilization. Previous studies from different fields have suggested creativity and capacity of WM have opposing characteristics possibly in terms of diffuse attention. However, despite a number of functional imaging studies on creativity, how creativity relates to brain activity during WM has never been investigated. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we investigated this issue using an n-back WM paradigm and a psychometric measure of creativity (a divergent thinking test). A multiple regression analysis revealed that individual creativity was significantly and positively correlated with brain activity in the precuneus during the 2-back task (WM task), but not during the non-WM 0-back task. As the precuneus shows deactivation during cognitive tasks, our findings show that reduced task induced deactivation (TID) in the precuneus is associated with higher creativity measured by divergent thinking. The precuneus is included in the default mode network, which is deactivated during cognitive tasks. The magnitude of TID in the default mode network is considered to reflect the reallocation of cognitive resources from networks irrelevant to the performance of the task. Thus, our findings may indicate that individual creativity, as measured by the divergent thinking test, is related to the inefficient reallocation of attention, congruent with the idea that diffuse attention is associated with individual creativity.

  1. Activation and deactivation of vibronic channels in intact phycocyanin rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganou, C.; David, L.; Meinke, R.; Adir, N.; Maultzsch, J.; Mkandawire, M.; Pouhè, D.; Thomsen, C.

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the excitation modes of the light-harvesting protein phycocyanin (PC) from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the crystalline state using UV and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The spectra revealed the absence of a hydrogen out-of-plane wagging (HOOP) mode in the PC trimer, which suggests that the HOOP mode is activated in the intact PC rod, while it is not active in the PC trimer. Furthermore, in the PC trimer an intense mode at 984 cm-1 is assigned to the C-C stretching vibration while the mode at 454 cm-1 is likely due to ethyl group torsion. In contrast, in the similar chromophore phytochromobilin the C5,10,15-D wag mode at 622 cm-1 does not come from a downshift of the HOOP. Additionally, the absence of modes between 1200 and 1300 cm-1 rules out functional monomerization. A correlation between phycocyanobilin (PCB) and phycoerythrobilin (PEB) suggests that the PCB cofactors of the PC trimer appear in a conformation similar to that of PEB. The conformation of the PC rod is consistent with that of the allophycocyanin (APC) trimer, and thus excitonic flow is facilitated between these two independent light-harvesting compounds. This excitonic flow from the PC rod to APC appears to be modulated by the vibration channels during HOOP wagging, C = C stretching, and the N-H rocking in-plan vibration.

  2. Activation and deactivation of vibronic channels in intact phycocyanin rods.

    PubMed

    Nganou, C; David, L; Meinke, R; Adir, N; Maultzsch, J; Mkandawire, M; Pouhè, D; Thomsen, C

    2014-02-28

    We investigated the excitation modes of the light-harvesting protein phycocyanin (PC) from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the crystalline state using UV and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The spectra revealed the absence of a hydrogen out-of-plane wagging (HOOP) mode in the PC trimer, which suggests that the HOOP mode is activated in the intact PC rod, while it is not active in the PC trimer. Furthermore, in the PC trimer an intense mode at 984 cm(-1) is assigned to the C-C stretching vibration while the mode at 454 cm(-1) is likely due to ethyl group torsion. In contrast, in the similar chromophore phytochromobilin the C5,10,15-D wag mode at 622 cm(-1) does not come from a downshift of the HOOP. Additionally, the absence of modes between 1200 and 1300 cm(-1) rules out functional monomerization. A correlation between phycocyanobilin (PCB) and phycoerythrobilin (PEB) suggests that the PCB cofactors of the PC trimer appear in a conformation similar to that of PEB. The conformation of the PC rod is consistent with that of the allophycocyanin (APC) trimer, and thus excitonic flow is facilitated between these two independent light-harvesting compounds. This excitonic flow from the PC rod to APC appears to be modulated by the vibration channels during HOOP wagging, C = C stretching, and the N-H rocking in-plan vibration. PMID:24588198

  3. Advances in mechanisms of activation and deactivation of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J A; Faletto, M B

    1993-01-01

    Environmental chemicals are both activated and detoxified by phase I and phase II enzymes. The principal enzymes involved in phase I reactions are the cytochrome P-450s. The phase II enzymes include hydrolase and the conjugative enzymes such as glucuronyltransferases, glutathione transferases, N-acetyltransferase, and sulfotransferase. Although other phase I and phase II enzymes exist, the present review is limited to these enzymes. Once thought to be a single enzyme, multiple cytochrome P-450 enzymes have been purified and characterized from many different species across the evolutionary tree. The application of molecular biology techniques to this field has identified more than 150 cytochrome P-450 genes to date. At least 20-30 cytochrome P-450 enzymes appear to exist in each mammalian species, and many polymorphisms in these enzymes are being identified. The cytochrome P-450 enzymes can now be expressed in recombinant form using cDNA expression systems. The phase II conjugative enzymes add a hydrophilic moiety such as sulfate, glucuronide, or acetate to compounds, which increases their water solubility and facilitates their excretion. However, conjugates of a number of compounds also result in more reactive electrophilic species, which appear to be the ultimate carcinogens. Many of these phase II enzymes also represent families of enzymes, and polymorphisms can affect the ability of these enzymes to metabolize chemicals. Whenever possible, we have reviewed knowledge of the human enzymes involved in particular pathways. PMID:8354165

  4. Decoupling HZSM-5 catalyst activity from deactivation during upgrading of pyrolysis oil vapors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shaolong; Waters, Christopher; Stevens, Adam; Gumidyala, Abhishek; Jentoft, Rolf; Lobban, Lance; Resasco, Daniel; Mallinson, Richard; Crossley, Steven

    2015-02-01

    The independent evaluation of catalyst activity and stability during the catalytic pyrolysis of biomass is challenging because of the nature of the reaction system and rapid catalyst deactivation that force the use of excess catalyst. In this contribution we use a modified pyroprobe system in which pulses of pyrolysis vapors are converted over a series of HZSM-5 catalysts in a separate fixed-bed reactor controlled independently. Both the reactor-bed temperature and the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite are varied to evaluate catalyst activity and deactivation rates independently both on a constant surface area and constant acid site basis. Results show that there is an optimum catalyst-bed temperature for the production of aromatics, above which the production of light gases increases and that of aromatics decrease. Zeolites with lower Si/Al ratios give comparable initial rates for aromatics production, but far more rapid catalyst deactivation rates than those with higher Si/Al ratios. PMID:25504857

  5. SPM95 sensitivity to size, intensity and asymmetry of brain activation/deactivation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.V.; Volkow, N.D.; Alexoff, D.

    1996-05-01

    Statistical Parametric Mapping (Friston, SPM95), is used widely to ascertain the statistical significance between different brain patterns induced by functional activation, drug, effects or mental illness. Our purpose is to understand the limitations of applying the SPM95 methodology. We used a group of 8 FDG PET (CTI 931) studies from normal resting human subjects and via software we activated or deactivated the same specific pixel patterns (ROIs), across the group and observed if SPM95 performed correctly. A set of 6 experiments was designed with varying ROI intensities, (from +/-2% to +/-100% of original ROI value), varying ROI sizes, (from 76 to 656 mm{sup 2}) and different locations in the brain, (cortical and/or subcortical). In experiments where the selected activation pattern was spatially symmetric SPM95 identified correctly areas of activation for cortical ROIs as small as 76 mm{sup 2} having as low as a 10% activation with p<0.01; larger areas, 656 mm{sup 2} can be correctly identified even down to only 2%. In activation experiments with left/right cortical or anterior/posterior cortical asymmetry, SPM95 reported Type II errors for levels larger than +/-20% activation/deactivation. In experiments with left/right striatum asymmetry larger than +/-20% SPM95 reported Type I Errors. In experiments where the level of asymmetry was changes while keeping one ROI as a control at the same level of activation, SPM95 erroneously reported different p values for its statistical significance. One of the typical Type I Errors is shown in the figure as an ROI along the brain`s edge; this type of error has been previously observed to be caused by residual spatial registration errors that induce false activation signals. We conclude that while the statistical part of SPM95 performs correctly, the spatial registration method used in SPM95 has residual registration errors sensitive to the type of activation pattern.

  6. Facilitation of epileptic activity during sleep is mediated by high amplitude slow waves.

    PubMed

    Frauscher, Birgit; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Avoli, Massimo; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2015-06-01

    Epileptic discharges in focal epilepsy are frequently activated during non-rapid eye movement sleep. Sleep slow waves are present during this stage and have been shown to include a deactivated ('down', hyperpolarized) and an activated state ('up', depolarized). The 'up' state enhances physiological rhythms, and we hypothesize that sleep slow waves and particularly the 'up' state are the specific components of non-rapid eye movement sleep that mediate the activation of epileptic activity. We investigated eight patients with pharmaco-resistant focal epilepsies who underwent combined scalp-intracerebral electroencephalography for diagnostic evaluation. We analysed 259 frontal electroencephalographic channels, and manually marked 442 epileptic spikes and 8487 high frequency oscillations during high amplitude widespread slow waves, and during matched control segments with low amplitude widespread slow waves, non-widespread slow waves or no slow waves selected during the same sleep stages (total duration of slow wave and control segments: 49 min each). During the slow waves, spikes and high frequency oscillations were more frequent than during control segments (79% of spikes during slow waves and 65% of high frequency oscillations, both P ∼ 0). The spike and high frequency oscillation density also increased for higher amplitude slow waves. We compared the density of spikes and high frequency oscillations between the 'up' and 'down' states. Spike and high frequency oscillation density was highest during the transition from the 'up' to the 'down' state. Interestingly, high frequency oscillations in channels with normal activity expressed a different peak at the transition from the 'down' to the 'up' state. These results show that the apparent activation of epileptic discharges by non-rapid eye movement sleep is not a state-dependent phenomenon but is predominantly associated with specific events, the high amplitude widespread slow waves that are frequent, but not

  7. Brutality under cover of ambiguity: activating, perpetuating, and deactivating covert retributivism.

    PubMed

    Fincher, Katrina M; Tetlock, Philip E

    2015-05-01

    Five studies tested four hypotheses on the drivers of punitive judgments. Study 1 showed that people imposed covertly retributivist physical punishments on extreme norm violators when they could plausibly deny that is what they were doing (attributional ambiguity). Studies 2 and 3 showed that covert retributivism could be suppressed by subtle accountability manipulations that cue people to the possibility that they might be under scrutiny. Studies 4 and 5 showed how covert retributivism can become self-sustaining by biasing the lessons people learn from experience. Covert retributivists did not scale back punitiveness in response to feedback that the justice system makes false-conviction errors but they did ramp up punitiveness in response to feedback that the system makes false-acquittal errors. Taken together, the results underscore the paradoxical nature of covert retributivism: It is easily activated by plausible deniability and persistent in the face of false-conviction feedback but also easily deactivated by minimalist forms of accountability.

  8. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Orton, Llwyd D; Poon, Paul W F; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  9. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Llwyd D.; Poon, Paul W. F.; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  10. Analysis of Slow-Wave Activity and Slow-Wave Oscillations Prior to Somnambulism

    PubMed Central

    Jaar, Olivier; Pilon, Mathieu; Carrier, Julie; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectivies: Several studies have investigated slow wave sleep EEG parameters, including slow-wave activity (SWA) in relation to somnambulism, but results have been both inconsistent and contradictory. The first goal of the present study was to conduct a quantitative analysis of sleepwalkers' sleep EEG by studying fluctuations in spectral power for delta (1-4 Hz) and slow delta (0.5-1 Hz) before the onset of somnambulistic episodes. A secondary aim was to detect slow-wave oscillations to examine changes in their amplitude and density prior to behavioral episodes. Participants: Twenty-two adult sleepwalkers were investigated polysomnographically following 25 h of sleep deprivation. Results: Analysis of patients' sleep EEG over the 200 sec prior to the episodes' onset revealed that the episodes were not preceded by a gradual increase in spectral power for either delta or slow delta over frontal, central, or parietal leads. However, time course comparisons revealed significant changes in the density of slow-wave oscillations as well as in very slow oscillations with significant increases occurring during the final 20 sec immediately preceding episode onset. Conclusions: The specificity of these sleep EEG parameters for the occurrence and diagnosis of NREM parasomnias remains to be determined. Citation: Jaar O; Pilon M; Carrier J; Montplaisir J; Zadra A. Analysis of slow-wave activity and slow-wave oscillations prior to somnambulism. SLEEP 2010;33(11):1511-1516. PMID:21102993

  11. Alterations in activation and deactivation of mutagens in aging rat liver.

    PubMed

    Masuda, M; Nukuzuma, C; Kazusaka, A; Fujita, S

    1995-09-01

    Age-associated alternations in activation and deactivation of benzo[a]pyrene (BP), furylfuramide (AF2), and 2-nitrofluorene (NF) in rat liver were investigated. A modified Ames mutagenicity test system used liver 9000 g supernatant (S-9) from male Fischer 344 rats aged 3, 6, 12, and 24 months fortified with NADPH generating system alone or together with cofactors of conjugating enzymes. The numbers of revertant colonies due to mutagenic activation of BP during preincubation were markedly high in young rats and decreased with aging. They were decreased by the addition of UDP-glucuronic acid (15 mM) or glutathione (30 mM), the cofactors of UDP-glucuronyl transferase and glutathione S-transferase, respectively, in the preincubation mixture. The difference in the BP activation by liver S-9 from different age groups almost disappeared by the addition of reduced glutathione. A direct mutagen, AF2, was not metabolized during preincubation in the absence of cofactors of conjugating enzymes, but detoxified up to about 50% by the addition of glutathione to the preincubation mixture containing liver S-9 from rats of any age group. Another direct mutagen, NF, was partly detoxified during preincubation by liver S-9 from 3-month-old rats more than by that from 24-month-old rats. It is suggested that incidence of chemical carcinogenesis may increase along with aging due to the altered xenobiotics metabolism. PMID:7671022

  12. Maquet Vasoview Hemopro VH-3000 vessel harvesting system may self-activate or fail to deactivate, potentially resulting in injury.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    The Harvesting Tool component of the Maquet Vasoview Hemopro VH-3000 vessel harvesting system may self-activate or may fail to deactivate, increasing the chance of thermal injury to the patient or staff, or of igniting a fire. Users of this product must be aware of the potential for either of the unintended activation problems to occur and must be familiar with Maquet's recommendations for dealing with the issue, which are provided in the system's instructions for use.

  13. Fast and slow activation kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Gilly, W F; Gillette, R; McFarlane, M

    1997-05-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Na current (I(Na)) were made under identical experimental conditions from isolated neurons from cephalopod (Loligo, Octopus) and gastropod (Aplysia, Pleurobranchaea, Doriopsilla) species to compare properties of activation gating. Voltage dependence of peak Na conductance (gNa) is very similar in all cases, but activation kinetics in the gastropod neurons studied are markedly slower. Kinetic differences are very pronounced only over the voltage range spanned by the gNa-voltage relation. At positive and negative extremes of voltage, activation and deactivation kinetics of I(Na) are practically indistinguishable in all species studied. Voltage-dependent rate constants underlying activation of the slow type of Na channel found in gastropods thus appear to be much more voltage dependent than are the equivalent rates in the universally fast type of channel that predominates in cephalopods. Voltage dependence of inactivation kinetics shows a similar pattern and is representative of activation kinetics for the two types of Na channels. Neurons with fast Na channels can thus make much more rapid adjustments in the number of open Na channels at physiologically relevant voltages than would be possible with only slow Na channels. This capability appears to be an adaptation that is highly evolved in cephalopods, which are well known for their high-speed swimming behaviors. Similarities in slow and fast Na channel subtypes in molluscan and mammalian neurons are discussed. PMID:9163364

  14. Nonlinear analysis and modeling of cortical activation and deactivation patterns in the immature fetal electrocorticogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Karin; Groh, Tobias; Schwab, Matthias; Witte, Herbert

    2009-03-01

    An approach combining time-continuous nonlinear stability analysis and a parametric bispectral method was introduced to better describe cortical activation and deactivation patterns in the immature fetal electroencephalogram (EEG). Signal models and data-driven investigations were performed to find optimal parameters of the nonlinear methods and to confirm the occurrence of nonlinear sections in the fetal EEG. The resulting measures were applied to the in utero electrocorticogram (ECoG) of fetal sheep at 0.7 gestation when organized sleep states were not developed and compared to previous results at 0.9 gestation. Cycling of the nonlinear stability of the fetal ECoG occurred already at this early gestational age, suggesting the presence of premature sleep states. This was accompanied by cycling of the time-variant biamplitude which reflected ECoG synchronization effects during premature sleep states associated with nonrapid eye movement sleep later in gestation. Thus, the combined nonlinear and time-variant approach was able to provide important insights into the properties of the immature fetal ECoG.

  15. Mechanical activation in slow and twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Gilly, W F; Hui, C S

    1980-01-01

    1. Slow and twitch muscle fibres of the frog were studied with a two-micro-electrode point voltage-clamp method. Slow fibres were identified in pyriformis and cruralis muscles by their appearance in the light microscope, electrical characteristics, and rate of sarcomere shortening or of tension development. 2. The relation between the amplitude and duration of threshold depolarizing pulses was determined in sartorius twitch and pyriformis slow fibres. Strength-duration relations for contractile activation are very similar in the two fibre types. 3. The effect of a brief subthreshold pulse on the threshold voltage level decays with a half-time of 1-2 msec at 9 degrees C in both slow and twitch fibres. This fast decay, thought to reflect voltage-dependent deactivation of Ca2+ release following repolarization, is followed by a slower decay of greatly different rates in the two fibre types. the slower components of decay might reflect the rate of background Ca2+ removal by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 4. Reducing external Ca2+ levels to about about 0.1 microM with 2.5 mM-EGTA has no effect on the shapes of strength-duration curves for both slow and twitch fibres, suggesting that activator Ca2+ in both fibre types originates entirely from intracellular stores. 5. "Tonic' contractions were studied using voltage-clamped short cruralis slow fibres at 20 degrees C. Reducing external Ca2+ to about 0.1 microM had no effect on the steepness of the steady-state tension-voltage relation or on the ability of slow fibres to maintain maximal tension during long (200 sec) depolarizations to membrane potentials of up to +50 mV. 6. Functional similarities in activation kinetics of slow and twitch fibres are discussed in relation to the sensing of tubular membrane potential by the sarcoplasmic reticulum, to Ca2+ release from it, and to possible mechanisms involved in these processes. Processes leading to the rapid turning on and off of Ca2+ release in response to changes in tubular

  16. Activation and Deactivation of H+-ATPase in Intact Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Shahak, Yosepha

    1982-01-01

    The light activation mechanism of the latent H+-ATPase was investigated in intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea, Hybrid 424) chloroplasts. The following observations were made. (a) Photosystem I electron acceptors such as methyl viologen, nitrite, oxaloacetate, etc., inhibit the light activation of the enzyme. (b) The electron transfer inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) fully inhibits the process. (c) Ascorbate plus diaminodurene or dithionite can restore light activation in DCMU-poisoned chloroplasts. (d) The activated state of the enzyme decays rather slowly (within a few minutes) after illumination of the intact chloroplasts. (e) The rate of dark decay is accelerated by oxidants (H2O2 or ferricyanide) and slowed down by dithiothreitol. It is suggested that the physiological mechanism for regulation of the H+-ATPase involves oxidation and reduction reactions in a manner which resembles the regulation of the light-activated carbon cycle enzymes. PMID:16662486

  17. Deactivation of Building 7602

    SciTech Connect

    Yook, H.R.; Barnett, J.R.; Collins, T.L.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored research and development programs in Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1984. This work focused on development of advanced technology for processing nuclear fuels. Building 7602 was used for engineering-scale tests using depleted and natural uranium to simulate the nuclear fuel. In April 1994 the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sent supplemental FY 1994 guidance to ORNL stating that in FY 1995 and beyond, Building 7602 is considered surplus to NE programs and missions and shall be shut down (deactivated) and maintained in a radiologically and industrially safe condition with minimal surveillance and maintenance (S&M). DOE-NE subsequently provided FY 1995 funding to support the deactivation activities. Deactivation of Building 7602 was initiated on October 1, 1994. The principal activity during the first quarter of FY 1995 was removal of process materials (chemicals and uranium) from the systems. The process systems were operated to achieve chemical solution concentrations needed for reuse or disposal of the solutions prior to removal of the materials from the systems. During this phase of deactivation the process materials processed and removed were: (1) Uranyl nitrate solution 30,178 L containing 4490 kg of uranium; (2) Nitric acid (neutralized) 9850 L containing less than 0.013 kg of uranium; (3) Organic solution 3346 L containing 265 kg of uranium; (4) Uranium oxide powder 95 kg; and (5) Miscellaneous chemicals. At the end of December 1994, the process systems and control systems were shut down and deactivated. Disposition of the process materials removed from the process systems in Building 7602 proved to be the most difficult part of the deactivation. An operational stand down and funding reductions at Y-12 prevented planned conversion of the uranyl nitrate solution to depleted uranium oxide powder. This led to disposal of the uranyl nitrate solution as waste.

  18. Psychosocial versus physiological stress - Meta-analyses on deactivations and activations of the neural correlates of stress reactions.

    PubMed

    Kogler, Lydia; Müller, Veronika I; Chang, Amy; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Gur, Ruben C; Derntl, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    Stress is present in everyday life in various forms and situations. Two stressors frequently investigated are physiological and psychosocial stress. Besides similar subjective and hormonal responses, it has been suggested that they also share common neural substrates. The current study used activation-likelihood-estimation meta-analysis to test this assumption by integrating results of previous neuroimaging studies on stress processing. Reported results are cluster-level FWE corrected. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the anterior insula (AI) were the only regions that demonstrated overlapping activation for both stressors. Analysis of physiological stress showed consistent activation of cognitive and affective components of pain processing such as the insula, striatum, or the middle cingulate cortex. Contrarily, analysis across psychosocial stress revealed consistent activation of the right superior temporal gyrus and deactivation of the striatum. Notably, parts of the striatum appeared to be functionally specified: the dorsal striatum was activated in physiological stress, whereas the ventral striatum was deactivated in psychosocial stress. Additional functional connectivity and decoding analyses further characterized this functional heterogeneity and revealed higher associations of the dorsal striatum with motor regions and of the ventral striatum with reward processing. Based on our meta-analytic approach, activation of the IFG and the AI seems to indicate a global neural stress reaction. While physiological stress activates a motoric fight-or-flight reaction, during psychosocial stress attention is shifted towards emotion regulation and goal-directed behavior, and reward processing is reduced. Our results show the significance of differentiating physiological and psychosocial stress in neural engagement. Furthermore, the assessment of deactivations in addition to activations in stress research is highly recommended. PMID:26123376

  19. Psychosocial versus physiological stress - Meta-analyses on deactivations and activations of the neural correlates of stress reactions.

    PubMed

    Kogler, Lydia; Müller, Veronika I; Chang, Amy; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Gur, Ruben C; Derntl, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    Stress is present in everyday life in various forms and situations. Two stressors frequently investigated are physiological and psychosocial stress. Besides similar subjective and hormonal responses, it has been suggested that they also share common neural substrates. The current study used activation-likelihood-estimation meta-analysis to test this assumption by integrating results of previous neuroimaging studies on stress processing. Reported results are cluster-level FWE corrected. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the anterior insula (AI) were the only regions that demonstrated overlapping activation for both stressors. Analysis of physiological stress showed consistent activation of cognitive and affective components of pain processing such as the insula, striatum, or the middle cingulate cortex. Contrarily, analysis across psychosocial stress revealed consistent activation of the right superior temporal gyrus and deactivation of the striatum. Notably, parts of the striatum appeared to be functionally specified: the dorsal striatum was activated in physiological stress, whereas the ventral striatum was deactivated in psychosocial stress. Additional functional connectivity and decoding analyses further characterized this functional heterogeneity and revealed higher associations of the dorsal striatum with motor regions and of the ventral striatum with reward processing. Based on our meta-analytic approach, activation of the IFG and the AI seems to indicate a global neural stress reaction. While physiological stress activates a motoric fight-or-flight reaction, during psychosocial stress attention is shifted towards emotion regulation and goal-directed behavior, and reward processing is reduced. Our results show the significance of differentiating physiological and psychosocial stress in neural engagement. Furthermore, the assessment of deactivations in addition to activations in stress research is highly recommended.

  20. Psychosocial versus physiological stress – meta-analyses on deactivations and activations of the neural correlates of stress reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kogler, Lydia; Mueller, Veronika I.; Chang, Amy; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Fox, Peter T.; Gur, Ruben C.; Derntl, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Stress is present in everyday life in various forms and situations. Two stressors frequently investigated are physiological and psychosocial stress. Besides similar subjective and hormonal responses, it has been suggested that they also share common neural substrates. The current study used activation-likelihood-estimation meta-analysis to test this assumption by integrating results of previous neuroimaging studies on stress processing. Reported results are cluster-level FWE corrected. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the anterior insula (AI) were the only regions that demonstrated overlapping activation for both stressors. Analysis of physiological stress showed consistent activation of cognitive and affective components of pain processing such as the insula, striatum, or the middle cingulate cortex. Contrarily, analysis across psychosocial stress revealed consistent activation of the right superior temporal gyrus and deactivation of the striatum. Notably, parts of the striatum appeared to be functionally specified: the dorsal striatum was activated in physiological stress, whereas the ventral striatum was deactivated in psychosocial stress. Additional functional connectivity and decoding analyses further characterized this functional heterogeneity and revealed higher associations of the dorsal striatum with motor regions and of the ventral striatum with reward processing. Based on our meta-analytic approach, activation of the IFG and the AI seems to indicate a global neural stress reaction. While physiological stress activates a motoric fight-or-flight reaction, during psychosocial stress attention is shifted towards emotion regulation and goal-directed behavior, and reward processing is reduced. Our results show the significance of differentiating physiological and psychosocial stress in neural engagement. Furthermore, the assessment of deactivations in addition to activations in stress research is highly recommended. PMID:26123376

  1. Probing the Mechanism of the Double C—H (De)Activation Route of a Ru-Based Olefin Metathesis Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi

    A theoretical study of a double C—H activation mechanism that deactivates a family of second generation Ru-based catalysts is presented. DFT calculations are used to rationalize the complex mechanistic pathway from the starting precatalyst to the experimentally characterized decomposition products. In particular, we show that all the intermediates proposed by Grubbs and coworkers are indeed possible intermediates in the deactivation pathway, although the sequence of steps is somewhat different

  2. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    SciTech Connect

    Gemelli, Claudia; Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis

    2013-12-10

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling.

  3. GlialCAM, a CLC-2 Cl- Channel Subunit, Activates the Slow Gate of CLC Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jeworutzki, Elena; Lagostena, Laura; Elorza-Vidal, Xabier; López-Hernández, Tania; Estévez, Raúl; Pusch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    GlialCAM, a glial cell adhesion molecule mutated in megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, targets the CLC-2 Cl- channel to cell contacts in glia and activates CLC-2 currents in vitro and in vivo. We found that GlialCAM clusters all CLC channels at cell contacts in vitro and thus studied GlialCAM interaction with CLC channels to investigate the mechanism of functional activation. GlialCAM slowed deactivation kinetics of CLC-Ka/barttin channels and increased CLC-0 currents opening the common gate and slowing its deactivation. No functional effect was seen for common gate deficient CLC-0 mutants. Similarly, GlialCAM targets the common gate deficient CLC-2 mutant E211V/H816A to cell contacts, without altering its function. Thus, GlialCAM is able to interact with all CLC channels tested, targeting them to cell junctions and activating them by stabilizing the open configuration of the common gate. These results are important to better understand the physiological role of GlialCAM/CLC-2 interaction. PMID:25185546

  4. Laminar analysis of slow wave activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Csercsa, Richárd; Dombovári, Balázs; Fabó, Dániel; Wittner, Lucia; Erőss, Loránd; Entz, László; Sólyom, András; Rásonyi, György; Szűcs, Anna; Kelemen, Anna; Jakus, Rita; Juhos, Vera; Grand, László; Magony, Andor; Halász, Péter; Freund, Tamás F.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Cash, Sydney S.; Papp, László; Karmos, György; Halgren, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Brain electrical activity is largely composed of oscillations at characteristic frequencies. These rhythms are hierarchically organized and are thought to perform important pathological and physiological functions. The slow wave is a fundamental cortical rhythm that emerges in deep non-rapid eye movement sleep. In animals, the slow wave modulates delta, theta, spindle, alpha, beta, gamma and ripple oscillations, thus orchestrating brain electrical rhythms in sleep. While slow wave activity can enhance epileptic manifestations, it is also thought to underlie essential restorative processes and facilitate the consolidation of declarative memories. Animal studies show that slow wave activity is composed of rhythmically recurring phases of widespread, increased cortical cellular and synaptic activity, referred to as active- or up-state, followed by cellular and synaptic inactivation, referred to as silent- or down-state. However, its neural mechanisms in humans are poorly understood, since the traditional intracellular techniques used in animals are inappropriate for investigating the cellular and synaptic/transmembrane events in humans. To elucidate the intracortical neuronal mechanisms of slow wave activity in humans, novel, laminar multichannel microelectrodes were chronically implanted into the cortex of patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy undergoing cortical mapping for seizure focus localization. Intracortical laminar local field potential gradient, multiple-unit and single-unit activities were recorded during slow wave sleep, related to simultaneous electrocorticography, and analysed with current source density and spectral methods. We found that slow wave activity in humans reflects a rhythmic oscillation between widespread cortical activation and silence. Cortical activation was demonstrated as increased wideband (0.3–200 Hz) spectral power including virtually all bands of cortical oscillations, increased multiple- and single-unit activity and

  5. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) slows renal cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takiar, Vinita; Nishio, Saori; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; King, J Darwin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Li; Karihaloo, Anil; Hallows, Kenneth R; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Renal cyst development and expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) involves both fluid secretion and abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells. The chloride channel of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) participates in secretion of cyst fluid, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may drive proliferation of cyst epithelial cells. CFTR and mTOR are both negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin, a drug in wide clinical use, is a pharmacological activator of AMPK. We find that metformin stimulates AMPK, resulting in inhibition of both CFTR and the mTOR pathways. Metformin induces significant arrest of cystic growth in both in vitro and ex vivo models of renal cystogenesis. In addition, metformin administration produces a significant decrease in the cystic index in two mouse models of ADPKD. Our results suggest a possible role for AMPK activation in slowing renal cystogenesis as well as the potential for therapeutic application of metformin in the context of ADPKD. PMID:21262823

  6. Photoluminescence study of time- and spatial-dependent light induced trap de-activation in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Jacobs, Daniel A; Beck, Fiona J; Duong, The; Shen, Heping; Catchpole, Kylie R; White, Thomas P

    2016-08-10

    Organometal halide perovskite-based solar cells have rapidly achieved high efficiency in recent years. However, many fundamental recombination mechanisms underlying the excellent performance are still not well understood. Here we apply confocal photoluminescence microscopy to investigate the time and spatial characteristics of light-induced trap de-activation in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films. Trap de-activation is characterized by a dramatic increase in PL emission during continuous laser illumination accompanied by a lateral expansion of the PL enhancement far beyond the laser spot. These observations are attributed to an oxygen-assisted trap de-activation process associated with carrier diffusion. To model this effect, we add a trap de-activation term to the standard semiconductor carrier recombination and diffusion models. With this approach we are able to reproduce the observed temporal and spatial dependence of laser induced PL enhancement using realistic physical parameters. Furthermore, we experimentally investigate the role of trap diffusion in this process, and demonstrate that the trap de-activation is not permanent, with the traps appearing again once the illumination is turned off. This study provides new insights into recombination and trap dynamics in perovskite films that could offer a better understanding of perovskite solar cell performance. PMID:27472263

  7. Propagated infra-slow intrinsic brain activity reorganizes across wake and slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anish; Snyder, Abraham Z; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Laufs, Helmut; Raichle, Marcus E

    2015-11-09

    Propagation of slow intrinsic brain activity has been widely observed in electrophysiogical studies of slow wave sleep (SWS). However, in human resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI), intrinsic activity has been understood predominantly in terms of zero-lag temporal synchrony (functional connectivity) within systems known as resting state networks (RSNs). Prior rs-fMRI studies have found that RSNs are generally preserved across wake and sleep. Here, we use a recently developed analysis technique to study propagation of infra-slow intrinsic blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in normal adults during wake and SWS. This analysis reveals marked changes in propagation patterns in SWS vs. wake. Broadly, ordered propagation is preserved within traditionally defined RSNs but lost between RSNs. Additionally, propagation between cerebral cortex and subcortical structures reverses directions, and intra-cortical propagation becomes reorganized, especially in visual and sensorimotor cortices. These findings show that propagated rs-fMRI activity informs theoretical accounts of the neural functions of sleep.

  8. Propagated infra-slow intrinsic brain activity reorganizes across wake and slow wave sleep

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Anish; Snyder, Abraham Z; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Laufs, Helmut; Raichle, Marcus E

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of slow intrinsic brain activity has been widely observed in electrophysiogical studies of slow wave sleep (SWS). However, in human resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI), intrinsic activity has been understood predominantly in terms of zero-lag temporal synchrony (functional connectivity) within systems known as resting state networks (RSNs). Prior rs-fMRI studies have found that RSNs are generally preserved across wake and sleep. Here, we use a recently developed analysis technique to study propagation of infra-slow intrinsic blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in normal adults during wake and SWS. This analysis reveals marked changes in propagation patterns in SWS vs. wake. Broadly, ordered propagation is preserved within traditionally defined RSNs but lost between RSNs. Additionally, propagation between cerebral cortex and subcortical structures reverses directions, and intra-cortical propagation becomes reorganized, especially in visual and sensorimotor cortices. These findings show that propagated rs-fMRI activity informs theoretical accounts of the neural functions of sleep. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10781.001 PMID:26551562

  9. PCB regulations and their application to deactivation and decommissioning activities: Technical assistance project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    DOE`s economic development plans involve efforts to deactivate and decommission or refurbish site buildings and operational facilities for other uses. Site personnel must decide on disposition of stored materials, which include increasing numbers of excess and/or unwanted oil-filled equipment (e.g., transformers, hydraulic systems, heat transfer systems) and oil-containing `orphaned` drums. Because oil and these items can also contain polychlorinated biphenyls, it is essential that site personnel become aware of the regulations applicable to PCBs (adherence will minimize DOE hazardous material management liabilities). A recent incident at a DOE facility provides a case in point with important lessons to be learned for all sites within the DOE complex.

  10. Lack of Influence of Suspending Media on Heat Activation of Bacillus subtilis Spores and Absence of Deactivation1

    PubMed Central

    Busta, F. F.; Ordal, Z. John

    1964-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain 5230 endospores suspended in a variety of suspending media at a concentration of ca. 108 per ml were heated at 95 and 75 C. The effect of the heating at 75 C was measured by plate count, and was reported as the heat-activated decimal fraction of the total viable-spore population. Thermal inactivation at 95 C was influenced by the suspending medium. No effects on heat activation at 75 C were noted for suspending media containing glucose, xylose, ribose, NaCl, or sodium phosphate, nor was there any marked effect due to a change in pH from 5 to 8. The heat-activation response was retained during postheating storage at 5 C in water up to 215 days. Postheating storage in several suspending media for 7 days also indicated no deactivation. PMID:14131357

  11. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  12. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  13. ND3, ND1 and 39 kDa subunits are more exposed in the de-active form of bovine mitochondrial complex I

    PubMed Central

    Babot, Marion; Labarbuta, Paola; Birch, Amanda; Kee, Sara; Fuszard, Matthew; Botting, Catherine H.; Wittig, Ilka; Heide, Heinrich; Galkin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    An intriguing feature of mitochondrial complex I from several species is the so-called A/D transition, whereby the idle enzyme spontaneously converts from the active (A) form to the de-active (D) form. The A/D transition plays an important role in tissue response to the lack of oxygen and hypoxic deactivation of the enzyme is one of the key regulatory events that occur in mitochondria during ischaemia. We demonstrate for the first time that the A/D conformational change of complex I does not affect the macromolecular organisation of supercomplexes in vitro as revealed by two types of native electrophoresis. Cysteine 39 of the mitochondrially-encoded ND3 subunit is known to become exposed upon de-activation. Here we show that even if complex I is a constituent of the I + III2 + IV (S1) supercomplex, cysteine 39 is accessible for chemical modification in only the D-form. Using lysine-specific fluorescent labelling and a DIGE-like approach we further identified two new subunits involved in structural rearrangements during the A/D transition: ND1 (MT-ND1) and 39 kDa (NDUFA9). These results clearly show that structural rearrangements during de-activation of complex I include several subunits located at the junction between hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains, in the region of the quinone binding site. De-activation of mitochondrial complex I results in concerted structural rearrangement of membrane subunits which leads to the disruption of the sealed quinone chamber required for catalytic turnover. PMID:24560811

  14. Modeling place field activity with hierarchical slow feature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, Fabian; Wiskott, Laurenz

    2015-01-01

    What are the computational laws of hippocampal activity? In this paper we argue for the slowness principle as a fundamental processing paradigm behind hippocampal place cell firing. We present six different studies from the experimental literature, performed with real-life rats, that we replicated in computer simulations. Each of the chosen studies allows rodents to develop stable place fields and then examines a distinct property of the established spatial encoding: adaptation to cue relocation and removal; directional dependent firing in the linear track and open field; and morphing and scaling the environment itself. Simulations are based on a hierarchical Slow Feature Analysis (SFA) network topped by a principal component analysis (ICA) output layer. The slowness principle is shown to account for the main findings of the presented experimental studies. The SFA network generates its responses using raw visual input only, which adds to its biological plausibility but requires experiments performed in light conditions. Future iterations of the model will thus have to incorporate additional information, such as path integration and grid cell activity, in order to be able to also replicate studies that take place during darkness. PMID:26052279

  15. Report on First Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Stave, Sean; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2011-03-03

    On Feb. 17 and 18 2011, six items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer. After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials, with the exception of silver. We observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours, except for 198Au which has a half-life of 2.7 d.

  16. Concurrent Activation of the Somatosensory Forebrain and Deactivation of Periaqueductal Grey Associated With Diabetes-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Pamela E.; Wiley, John W.; Morrow, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    We combined behavioral testing with brain imaging using 99mTc-HMPAO (Amersham Health), to identify CNS structures reflecting alterations in pain perception in the streptozotocin (STZ) model of Type 1 diabetes. We induced diabetic hyperglycemia (blood glucose >300 mg/dl) by injecting male Sprague-Dawley rats with STZ (45 mg/kg i.p.). Four weeks after STZ, diabetic rats exhibited behaviors indicative of neuropathic pain (hypersensitivity thermal stimuli) and this hypersensitivity persisted for up to six weeks. Imaging data in STZ-diabetic rats revealed significant increases in the activation of brain regions involved in pain processing after six weeks duration of diabetes. These regions included secondary somatosensory cortex, ventrobasal thalamic nuclei and the basolateral amygdala. In contrast, the activation in habenular nuclei and the midbrain periaqueductal gray were markedly decreased in STZ rats. These data suggest that pain in diabetic neuropathy may be due in part to hyperactivity in somatosensory structures coupled with a concurrent deactivation of structures mediating antinociception. PMID:17936273

  17. Single-channel basis for the slow activation of the repolarizing cardiac potassium current, I(Ks).

    PubMed

    Werry, Daniel; Eldstrom, Jodene; Wang, Zhuren; Fedida, David

    2013-03-12

    Coassembly of potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1) with potassium voltage-gated channel, Isk-related family, member 1 (KCNE1) the delayed rectifier potassium channel I(Ks). Its slow activation is critically important for membrane repolarization and for abbreviating the cardiac action potential, especially during sympathetic activation and at high heart rates. Mutations in either gene can cause long QT syndrome, which can lead to fatal arrhythmias. To understand better the elementary behavior of this slowly activating channel complex, we quantitatively analyzed direct measurements of single-channel I(Ks). Single-channel recordings from transiently transfected mouse ltk(-) cells confirm a channel that has long latency periods to opening (1.67 ± 0.073 s at +60 mV) but that flickers rapidly between multiple open and closed states in non-deactivating bursts at positive membrane potentials. Channel activity is cyclic with periods of high activity followed by quiescence, leading to an overall open probability of only ∼0.15 after 4 s under our recording conditions. The mean single-channel conductance was determined to be 3.2 pS, but unlike any other known wild-type human potassium channel, long-lived subconductance levels coupled to activation are a key feature of both the activation and deactivation time courses of the conducting channel complex. Up to five conducting levels ranging from 0.13 to 0.66 pA could be identified in single-channel recordings at 60 mV. Fast closings and overt subconductance behavior of the wild-type I(Ks) channel required modification of existing Markov models to include these features of channel behavior. PMID:23431135

  18. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Punyani, Supriya; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Yang, Hoichang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Kane, Ravi S.

    2008-01-01

    Conjugating proteins onto carbon nanotubes has numerous applications in biosensing, imaging and cellular delivery. However, remotely controlling the activity of proteins in these conjugates has never been demonstrated. Here we show that upon near-infrared irradiation, carbon nanotubes mediate the selective deactivation of proteins in situ by photochemical effects. We designed nanotube-peptide conjugates to selectively destroy the anthrax toxin, and also optically transparent coatings that can self-clean following either visible or near-infrared irradiation. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation may be broadly applicable to the selective destruction of pathogens and cells, and will have applications ranging from antifouling coatings to functional proteomics.

  19. Activation and deactivation of a robust immobilized Cp*Ir-transfer hydrogenation catalyst: a multielement in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Grant J; Chapman, Michael R; Blacker, A John; Bourne, Richard A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Crossley, Benjamin D; Lucas, Stephanie J; McGowan, Patrick C; Newton, Mark A; Screen, Thomas E O; Thompson, Paul; Willans, Charlotte E; Nguyen, Bao N

    2015-04-01

    A highly robust immobilized [Cp*IrCl2]2 precatalyst on Wang resin for transfer hydrogenation, which can be recycled up to 30 times, was studied using a novel combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Ir L3-edge, Cl K-edge, and K K-edge. These culminate in in situ XAS experiments that link structural changes of the Ir complex with its catalytic activity and its deactivation. Mercury poisoning and "hot filtration" experiments ruled out leached Ir as the active catalyst. Spectroscopic evidence indicates the exchange of one chloride ligand with an alkoxide to generate the active precatalyst. The exchange of the second chloride ligand, however, leads to a potassium alkoxide-iridate species as the deactivated form of this immobilized catalyst. These findings could be widely applicable to the many homogeneous transfer hydrogenation catalysts with Cp*IrCl substructure.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide and sodium nitroprusside compete to activate/deactivate MMPs in bone tissue homogenates

    PubMed Central

    Vacek, Thomas P; Qipshidze, Natia; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone microvascular remodeling is the primary predictor of bone structure and function. Remodeling by its very nature implies synthesis and degradation of the extracellular matrix. Normally, 50% of total protein in the vessel wall is elastin. During remodeling, elastin is degraded by specialized matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Because the turnover of elastin is 1000-fold slower than that of collagen, most of the elastin is replaced by stiffer collagen. Stiffer vessels impose pressure on the aortic valve, causing regurgitation and increased pulse pressure. On the other hand, high MMP activity will cause vascular dilatation, leading to aneurysm. Therefore, balanced constitutive remodeling is necessary for adequate bone structure and function. Interestingly, collagen-degrading MMPs are involved in various pathological conditions, including osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and cardiovascular disease. Sodium nitroprusside is a nitric oxide donor that could potentially alter MMP activity via vasodilation in vivo, but can also produce peroxynitrite, which activates MMPs by combining with superoxide. Moreover, hydrogen sulfide is a known antioxidant as well as a vasodilator, and is also speculated to contribute directly to MMP activity. We hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide reduced activity of MMP in ex vivo bone tissue homogenates and that sodium nitroprusside would increase MMP activity in vitro. Methods We surgically removed the tibia and femur from anesthetized mice, and prepared bone tissue homogenates using a mortar and pestle, measured the protein concentration with a spectrophotometer, and detected MMP activity using gelatin gel zymography. Results Our data showed increased MMP activity at a sodium nitroprusside concentration of 1 μM, and MMP activity increased exponentially. There was a decrease in MMP activity with increasing hydrogen sulfide, beginning at 16 μM (P < 0.01) and continuing to 40 μM. Moreover, sodium nitroprusside 3 μM was able to

  1. A balancing act of the brain: activations and deactivations driven by cognitive load

    PubMed Central

    Arsalidou, Marie; Pascual-Leone, Juan; Johnson, Janice; Morris, Drew; Taylor, Margot J

    2013-01-01

    The majority of neuroimaging studies focus on brain activity during performance of cognitive tasks; however, some studies focus on brain areas that activate in the absence of a task. Despite the surge of research comparing these contrasted areas of brain function, their interrelation is not well understood. We systematically manipulated cognitive load in a working memory task to examine concurrently the relation between activity elicited by the task versus activity during control conditions. We presented adults with six levels of task demand, and compared those with three conditions without a task. Using whole-brain analysis, we found positive linear relations between cortical activity and task difficulty in areas including middle frontal gyrus and dorsal cingulate; negative linear relations were found in medial frontal gyrus and posterior cingulate. These findings demonstrated balancing of activation patterns between two mental processes, which were both modulated by task difficulty. Frontal areas followed a graded pattern more closely than other regions. These data also showed that working memory has limited capacity in adults: an upper bound of seven items and a lower bound of four items. Overall, working memory and default-mode processes, when studied concurrently, reveal mutually competing activation patterns. PMID:23785659

  2. Report on Second Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stave, Sean C.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-04-27

    Summary On August 18 and 19 2011, five items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS). After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials. As during the first activation run, we observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation of the samples was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours to days, except for 60Co which has a half-life of 5.3 y.

  3. Biochemical characterization of a halotolerant feruloyl esterase from Actinomyces spp.: refolding and activity following thermal deactivation.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Cameron J; Tanksale, Akshat; Haritos, Victoria S

    2016-02-01

    Ferulic acid esterases (FAE, EC. 3.1.1.73) hydrolyse the linkage between hemicellulose and lignin and thus have potential for use in mild enzymatic pretreatment of biomass as an alternative to thermochemical approaches. Here, we report the characterization of a novel FAE (ActOFaeI) obtained from the bacterium, Actinomyces sp. oral which was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 in two forms: with and without its putative signal peptide. The truncated form was found to have <10 % relative activity compared to the full length and was more prone to aggregation after purification. The enzyme with retained peptide demonstrated 2 to 4-fold higher activity against methyl caffeate and methyl p-coumarate, with specific activities of 477.6 and 174.4 U mg(-1) respectively, than the equivalent activities of the benchmark FAE from Aspergillus niger A and B. ActOFaeI retained activity over a broad pH range with a maximum at 9 but >90 % relative activity at pH 6.5 and an optimum reaction temperature of 30 °C. ActOFaeI increased activity by 15% in high salt conditions (1000 mMNaCl) and its thermal unfolding temperature improved from 41.5 °C in standard buffer to 74 °C in the presence of 2500 mM sodium malonate. ActOFaeI also released ferulic acid from destarched wheat bran when combined with a xylanase preparation. After treatment above the thermal denaturation temperature followed by cooling to room temperature, ActOFaeI demonstrated spontaneous refolding into an active state. ActOFaeI displays many useful characteristics for enzymatic pretreatment of lignocellulose and contributes to our understanding of this important family.

  4. An underwater superoleophobic surface that can be activated/deactivated via external triggers.

    PubMed

    Dunderdale, Gary J; Urata, Chihiro; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2014-11-11

    Poly[(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (pDMAEMA) brush surfaces were prepared using a facile aqueous Activators ReGenerated by Electron Transfer Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ARGET-ATRP) protocol at ambient temperature without any need to purge reaction solutions of oxygen. This produced underwater superoleophobic surfaces, which exhibited high advancing (θA, 164-166°) and receding (θR, 153-165°) contact angles (CAs) and low CA hysteresis (1-11°) with a variety of oils. Both in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and dynamic CA measurements confirmed that pDMAEMA brush surfaces responded to three different external stimuli (pH, ionic strength, and temperature) by changing their thicknesses, degree of hydration, or their chemical composition. Increasing pH resulted in the largest decrease in hydration, followed by increasing temperature, and increasing ionic strength gave the smallest change in hydration. Coincident with these structural changes, stimulus-responsive dynamic dewetting behavior with various oils was observed. Increasing pH or ionic strength drastically reduced the θR values of oil drops and increased CA hysteresis, resulting in a sticky surface on which oil drops were pinned. No noticeable changes in dynamic oleophobicity were observed with increasing temperature. In addition, when oil drops impacted onto the brush surface instead of being gently placed, surfaces did not exhibit stimulus-responsive dewetting properties, being oleophobic under all conditions. PMID:25318101

  5. An underwater superoleophobic surface that can be activated/deactivated via external triggers.

    PubMed

    Dunderdale, Gary J; Urata, Chihiro; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2014-11-11

    Poly[(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (pDMAEMA) brush surfaces were prepared using a facile aqueous Activators ReGenerated by Electron Transfer Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ARGET-ATRP) protocol at ambient temperature without any need to purge reaction solutions of oxygen. This produced underwater superoleophobic surfaces, which exhibited high advancing (θA, 164-166°) and receding (θR, 153-165°) contact angles (CAs) and low CA hysteresis (1-11°) with a variety of oils. Both in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and dynamic CA measurements confirmed that pDMAEMA brush surfaces responded to three different external stimuli (pH, ionic strength, and temperature) by changing their thicknesses, degree of hydration, or their chemical composition. Increasing pH resulted in the largest decrease in hydration, followed by increasing temperature, and increasing ionic strength gave the smallest change in hydration. Coincident with these structural changes, stimulus-responsive dynamic dewetting behavior with various oils was observed. Increasing pH or ionic strength drastically reduced the θR values of oil drops and increased CA hysteresis, resulting in a sticky surface on which oil drops were pinned. No noticeable changes in dynamic oleophobicity were observed with increasing temperature. In addition, when oil drops impacted onto the brush surface instead of being gently placed, surfaces did not exhibit stimulus-responsive dewetting properties, being oleophobic under all conditions.

  6. The Legionella pneumophila GTPase Activating Protein LepB Accelerates Rab1 Deactivation by a Non-canonical Hydrolytic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ashwini K.; Del Campo, Claudia M.; Collins, Robert E.; Roy, Craig R.; Lambright, David G.

    2013-01-01

    GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) from pathogenic bacteria and eukaryotic host organisms deactivate Rab GTPases by supplying catalytic arginine and glutamine fingers in trans and utilizing the cis-glutamine in the DXXGQ motif of the GTPase for binding rather than catalysis. Here, we report the transition state mimetic structure of the Legionella pneumophila GAP LepB in complex with Rab1 and describe a comprehensive structure-based mutational analysis of potential catalytic and recognition determinants. The results demonstrate that LepB does not simply mimic other GAPs but instead deploys an expected arginine finger in conjunction with a novel glutamic acid finger, which forms a salt bridge with an indispensible switch II arginine that effectively locks the cis-glutamine in the DXXGQ motif of Rab1 in a catalytically competent though unprecedented transition state configuration. Surprisingly, a heretofore universal transition state interaction with the cis-glutamine is supplanted by an elaborate polar network involving critical P-loop and switch I serines. LepB further employs an unusual tandem domain architecture to clamp a switch I tyrosine in an open conformation that facilitates access of the arginine finger to the hydrolytic site. Intriguingly, the critical P-loop serine corresponds to an oncogenic substitution in Ras and replaces a conserved glycine essential for the canonical transition state stereochemistry. In addition to expanding GTP hydrolytic paradigms, these observations reveal the unconventional dual finger and non-canonical catalytic network mechanisms of Rab GAPs as necessary alternative solutions to a major impediment imposed by substitution of the conserved P-loop glycine. PMID:23821544

  7. Expanding Targets of DNAzyme-based Sensors through Deactivation and Activation of DNAzymes by Single Uracil Removal: Sensitive Fluorescent Assay of Uracil-DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Although deoxyribozymes (DNAzymes) have been widely used as biosensors for the detection of their cofactors and the targets of related aptazymes, it is desirable to expand their range of analytes to take advantage of the DNAzyme-based signal amplification for more sensitive detections. In this study, the activity of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) was successfully detected and quantified by deoxyuridine-modified DNAzymes that underwent UNG-dependent deactivation or activation. In one design, the indispensable thymidine T2.1 in the 8–17 DNAzyme was replaced with a deoxyuridine, resulting in minimal change of the DNAzyme’s activity. Since UNG is capable of removing uracils from single- or double-stranded DNAs, the modified DNAzyme was deactivated when the uracil at the indispensable thymidine site was eliminated by UNG. In another design, introducing a deoxyuridine to the 3′ position of the deoxycytidine C13 in the catalytic core of the same DNAzyme caused significant decrease of the activity. However, the removal of the interfering deoxyuridine by UNG activated the DNAzyme. By monitoring the activity change of the DNAzymes through the fluorescence enhancement from the DNAzyme-catalyzed cleavage of DNA substrates labeled by a fluorophore and quencher pair, the UNG activity was measured based on UNG-dependent deactivation and activation of the DNAzymes. The method was found to be able to detect UNG activity as low as 0.0034 U/mL. Such a method can be applied to the detection of other nucleotide-modifying enzymes and expand the analyte range of DNAzyme-based biosensors. PMID:23072386

  8. Molecular basis of thrombomodulin activation of slow thrombin

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, T.E.; LI, W.; HUNTINGTON, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Coagulation is a highly regulated process where the ability to prevent blood loss after injury is balanced against the maintenance of blood fluidity. Thrombin is at the center of this balancing act. It is the critical enzyme for producing and stabilizing a clot, but when complexed with thrombomodulin (TM) it is converted to a powerful anticoagulant. Another cofactor that may play a role in determining thrombin function is the monovalent cation Na+. Its apparent affinity suggests that half of the thrombin generated is in a Na+-free ‘slow’ state and half is in a Na+-coordinated ‘fast’ state. While slow thrombin is a poor procoagulant enzyme, when complexed to TM it is an effective anticoagulant. Methods To better understand this molecular transformation we solved a 2.4 Å structure of thrombin complexed with EGF domains 4–6 of TM in the absence of Na+ and other cofactors or inhibitors. Results We find that TM binds as previously observed, and that the thrombin component resembles structures of the fast form. The Na+ binding loop is observed in a conformation identical to the Na+-bound form, with conserved water molecules compensating for the missing ion. Using the fluorescent probe p-aminobenzamidine we show that activation of slow thrombin by TM principally involves the opening of the primary specificity pocket. Conclusions These data show that TM binding alters the conformation of thrombin in a similar manner as Na+ coordination, resulting in an ordering of the Na+ binding loop and an opening of the adjacent S1 pocket. We conclude that other, more subtle subsite changes are unlikely to influence thrombin specificity toward macromolecular substrates. PMID:19656282

  9. Active sites, deactivation and stabilization of Fe-ZSM-5 for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH(3).

    PubMed

    Kröcher, Oliver; Brandenberger, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Fe-ZSM-5 has been systematically investigated as catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH(3), concentrating on the active sites, the deactivation mechanism during hydrothermal aging and the chemical possibilities to stabilize this type of SCR catalyst. Regarding the active SCR sites, it could be shown that monomeric species start to become active at the lowest temperatures (E(a,app) ≈ 36.3 ± 0.2 kJ/mol), followed by dimeric species at intermediate temperatures (E(a,app) ≈ 77 ± 16 kJ/mol) and oligomeric species at high temperatures. Experiments with Fe-ZSM-5 samples, in which the Brønsted acidity was specifically removed, proved that Brønsted acidity is not required for high SCR activity and that NH(3) can also be adsorbed on other acidic sites on the zeolite surface. The hydrothermal deactivation of Fe-ZSM-5 could be explained by the migration of active iron ions from the exchange sites. Parallel to the iron migration dealumination of the zeolite framework occurs, which has to be regarded as an independent process. The migration of iron can be reduced by the targeted reaction of the aluminum hydroxide groups in the lattice with trimethylaluminium followed by calcination. With respect to the application of iron zeolites in the SCR process in diesel vehicles, the most efficient stabilization method would be to switch from the ZSM-5 to the BEA structure type. The addition of NO(2) to the feed gas is another effective measure to increase the activity of even strongly deactivated iron zeolites tremendously.

  10. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, E.N. III

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety.

  11. Investigation of Fast and Slow CMEs Effect on Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Kilcik, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Here we investigate the relationship between the fast (v>800 km/s) and slow (v<400 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and geomagnetic Ap and Dst indices during the last two solar cycles (cycle 23 and 24). In result of our analysis we found following results 1) Fast CMEs show much better relationship with geomagnetic Ap and Dst indices compared to slow ones, 2) Similar to geomagnetic indices, the number of fast CMEs decreased seriously during solar cycle 24th, while the number of slow CMEs are almost the same during the investigated whole time interval (1996 through 2016).

  12. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. In the context of exoplanets, this allows us to derive the true obliquity of a system if the projected stellar spin-planetary orbit angle can measured via the Rossiter-Mclaughlin effect. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than 2-2.5 km.s-1. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 that can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit the activity variation of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. The case of the equator-on star HD189733 will be presented, as well as the case of Alpha Centauri B, which present an inclination of 45+9-19 degrees, implying that the earth-mass orbiting planet is not transiting if aligned with its host star. Other exemples will also demonstrate the power of the technique, that can infer a stellar inclination, even for slow rotators like Alpha Centauri B, that present a projected rotational velocity smaller than 1.15 km.s-1. In addition, the SOAP 2.0 simulation can be used to correct for the effect of activity when one major active region is dominating the RV signal. This could enhance the detection of small mass exoplanets orbiting slightly active stars.This project is funded by ETAEARTH (European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n. 313014), a transnational collaboration between European countries and the US (the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National Astrophysical Institute, the University of St. Andrews, Queens University Belfast, and the University of Edinburgh) setup to optimize the synergy between space-and ground-based data whose scientific potential for the characterization of

  13. Activity, stability and deactivation behavior of Au/CeO 2 catalysts in the water gas shift reaction at increased reaction temperature (300 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Moemen, A.; Karpenko, A.; Denkwitz, Y.; Behm, R. J.

    The effect of increasing the reaction temperature to 300 °C on the activity, stability and deactivation behavior of a 4.5 wt.% Au/CeO 2 catalyst in the water gas shift (WGS) reaction in idealized reformate was studied by kinetic and spectroscopic measurements at 300 °C and comparison with previously reported data for reaction at 180 °C under similar reaction conditions [A. Karpenko, Y. Denkwitz, V. Plzak, J. Cai, R. Leppelt, B. Schumacher, R.J. Behm, Catal. Lett. 116 (2007) 105]. Different procedures for catalyst pretreatment were used, including annealing at 400 °C in oxidative, reductive or inert atmospheres as well as redox processing. The formation/removal of stable adsorbed reaction intermediates and side products (surface carbonates, formates, OH ad, CO ad) was followed by in situ IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS), the presence of differently oxidized surface species (Au 0, Au 0‧, Au 3+, Ce 3+) was evaluated by XPS. The reaction characteristics at 300 °C generally resemble those at 180 °C, including (i) significantly higher reaction rates, (ii) comparable apparent activation energies (44 ± 1/50 ± 1 kJ mol -1 vs. 40 ± 1 kJ mol -1 at 180 °C), (iii) a correlation between deactivation of the catalyst and the build-up of stable surface carbonates, and (iv) a decrease of the initially significant differences in activity after different pretreatment procedures with reaction time. Different than expected, the tendency for deactivation did not decrease with higher temperature, due to enhanced carbonate decomposition, but increases.

  14. ACTIV: Sandwich Detector Activity from In-Pile Slowing-Down Spectra Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    ACTIV calculates the activities of a sandwich detector, to be used for in-pile measurements in slowing-down spectra below a few keV. The effect of scattering with energy degradation in the filter and in the detectors has been included to a first approximation.

  15. Controlled-deactivation cannabinergic ligands.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rishi; Nikas, Spyros P; Paronis, Carol A; Wood, Jodianne T; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Guo, Jason Jianxin; Thakur, Ganesh A; Kulkarni, Shashank; Benchama, Othman; Raghav, Jimit Girish; Gifford, Roger S; Järbe, Torbjörn U C; Bergman, Jack; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-12-27

    We report an approach for obtaining novel cannabinoid analogues with controllable deactivation and improved druggability. Our design involves the incorporation of a metabolically labile ester group at the 2'-position on a series of (-)-Δ(8)-THC analogues. We have sought to introduce benzylic substituents α to the ester group which affect the half-lives of deactivation through enzymatic activity while enhancing the affinities and efficacies of individual ligands for the CB1 and CB2 receptors. The 1'-(S)-methyl, 1'-gem-dimethyl, and 1'-cyclobutyl analogues exhibit remarkably high affinities for both CB receptors. The novel ligands are susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis by plasma esterases in a controllable manner, while their metabolites are inactive at the CB receptors. In further in vitro and in vivo experiments key analogues were shown to be potent CB1 receptor agonists and to exhibit CB1-mediated hypothermic and analgesic effects.

  16. Slow wave activity and slow oscillations in sleepwalkers and controls: effects of 38 h of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Rosemarie; Carrier, Julie; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Sleepwalkers have been shown to have an unusually high number of arousals from slow wave sleep and lower slow wave activity (SWA) power during the night than controls. Because sleep deprivation increases the frequency of slow wave sleep (SWS) arousals in sleepwalkers, it may also affect the expression of the homeostatic process to a greater extent than shown previously. We thus investigated SWA power as well as slow wave oscillation (SWO) density in 10 sleepwalkers and nine controls at baseline and following 38 h of sleep deprivation. There was a significant increase in SWA during participants' recovery sleep, especially during their second non-rapid eye movement (NREM) period. SWO density was similarly increased during recovery sleep's first two NREM periods. A fronto-central gradient in SWA and SWO was also present on both nights. However, no group differences were noted on any of the 2 nights on SWA or SWO. This unexpected result may be related to the heterogeneity of sleepwalkers as a population, as well as our small sample size. SWA pressure after extended sleep deprivation may also result in a ceiling effect in both sleepwalkers and controls. PMID:23398262

  17. Slow wave activity and slow oscillations in sleepwalkers and controls: effects of 38 h of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Rosemarie; Carrier, Julie; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Sleepwalkers have been shown to have an unusually high number of arousals from slow wave sleep and lower slow wave activity (SWA) power during the night than controls. Because sleep deprivation increases the frequency of slow wave sleep (SWS) arousals in sleepwalkers, it may also affect the expression of the homeostatic process to a greater extent than shown previously. We thus investigated SWA power as well as slow wave oscillation (SWO) density in 10 sleepwalkers and nine controls at baseline and following 38 h of sleep deprivation. There was a significant increase in SWA during participants' recovery sleep, especially during their second non-rapid eye movement (NREM) period. SWO density was similarly increased during recovery sleep's first two NREM periods. A fronto-central gradient in SWA and SWO was also present on both nights. However, no group differences were noted on any of the 2 nights on SWA or SWO. This unexpected result may be related to the heterogeneity of sleepwalkers as a population, as well as our small sample size. SWA pressure after extended sleep deprivation may also result in a ceiling effect in both sleepwalkers and controls.

  18. Deactivation of photosynthetic activities is triggered by loss of a small amount of water in a desiccation-tolerant cyanobacterium, Nostoc commune.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Manabu; Yamakawa, Ruriko; Nishio, Junko; Yamaji, Takaharu; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Koike, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Kazuhiko

    2004-07-01

    Changes in photosynthetic activities under hypertonic conditions were studied in a terrestrial, highly desiccation-tolerant cyanobacterium, Nostoc commune, and in some desiccation-sensitive cyanobacteria. The amounts of water sustained in the colony matrix outside the N. commune cells and the cellular solute concentration were estimated by measuring the water potential, and the solute concentration was supposed to correspond to around 0.22 M sorbitol. Incubation of the colonies in 0.8 M sorbitol solution inhibited the energy transfer from the phycobilisome (PBS) anchor to PSII core complexes. At higher sorbitol concentrations, light energy absorbed by PSI, PSII, and PBS was dissipated to heat. PSI and cyclic electron flow around PSI was also deactivated by hypertonic treatment. Fv/Fm and (Fm'-F)/Fm' values started to decrease at 0.6 and 0.3 M sorbitol and reached zero at 1.0 and 0.8 M, respectively. Decreases in these two fluorescence parameters corresponded to the decreases in PSII fluorescence (F695) and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, respectively. The intensity of delayed light emission started to decrease at 1.0 M sorbitol and became negligible at 4.0 M. Comparing these changes in N. commune with those in desiccation-sensitive species, we found that N. commune cells actively deactivates photosynthetic systems on sensing water loss. PMID:15295070

  19. PFP deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, D.M.

    1997-07-28

    This document identifies the overall approach for deactivation of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex, excluding the vaults, and includes a draft set of End Point Criteria for all buildings being deactivated.

  20. Endotoxin Deactivation by Transient Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Melina M.; Xu, Xiumin; Klein, Dagmar; Kenyon, Norma S; Ricordi, Camillo; Felipe, Maria Sueli S.; Pastori, Ricardo L.

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are an important tool for research and therapeutic applications. Therapeutic proteins have been delivered to several cell types and tissues and might be used to improve the outcome of the cell transplantation. Recombinant proteins are propagated in bacteria, which will contaminate them with the lypopolysacharide-endotoxin found in the outer bacterial membrane. Endotoxin could interfere with in vitro biological assays and is the major pathological factor, which must be removed or inactivated before in vivo administration. Here we describe a one-step protocol in which the endotoxin activity on recombinant proteins is remarkably reduced by transient exposure to acidic conditions. Maximum endotoxin deactivation occurs at acidic pH below their respective isoelectric point (pI). This method does not require additional protein purification or separation of the protein from the endotoxin fraction. The endotoxin level was measured both in vitro and in vivo. For in vitro assessment we have utilized Limulus Amebocyte Lysate method for in vivo the pyrogenic test. We have tested the above-mentioned method with 5 different recombinant proteins including a monoclonal antibody clone 5c8 against CD154 produced by hybridomas. More than 99% of endotoxin was deactivated in all of the proteins, the recovery of the protein after deactivation varied between maximum 72.9 and minimum 46.8%. The anti CD154 clone 5c8 activity remained unchanged as verified by the measurement of binding capability to activated lymphocytes. Furthermore, the effectiveness of this method was not significantly altered by urea, commonly used in protein purification. This procedure provides a simple and cost-efficient way to reduce the endotoxin activity in antibodies and recombinant proteins. PMID:20412635

  1. Sequential Reinstatement of Neocortical Activity during Slow Oscillations Depends on Cells’ Global Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peyrache, Adrien; Benchenane, Karim; Khamassi, Mehdi; Wiener, Sidney I.; Battaglia, Francesco P.

    2009-01-01

    During Slow Wave Sleep (SWS), cortical activity is dominated by endogenous processes modulated by slow oscillations (0.1–1 Hz): cell ensembles fluctuate between states of sustained activity (UP states) and silent epochs (DOWN states). We investigate here the temporal structure of ensemble activity during UP states by means of multiple single unit recordings in the prefrontal cortex of naturally sleeping rats. As previously shown, the firing rate of each PFC cell peaks at a distinct time lag after the DOWN/UP transition in a consistent order. We show here that, conversely, the latency of the first spike after the UP state onset depends primarily on the session-averaged firing rates of cells (which can be considered as an indirect measure of their intrinsic excitability). This latency can be explained by a simple homogeneous process (Poisson model) of cell firing, with sleep averaged firing rates employed as parameters. Thus, at DOWN/UP transitions, neurons are affected both by a slow process, possibly originating in the cortical network, modulating the time course of firing for each cell, and by a fast, relatively stereotyped reinstatement of activity, related mostly to global activity levels. PMID:20130754

  2. Graphene-based active slow surface plasmon polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua; Zeng, Chao; Zhang, Qiming; Liu, Xueming; Hossain, Md Muntasir; Reineck, Philipp; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Finding new ways to control and slow down the group velocity of light in media remains a major challenge in the field of optics. For the design of plasmonic slow light structures, graphene represents an attractive alternative to metals due to its strong field confinement, comparably low ohmic loss and versatile tunability. Here we propose a novel nanostructure consisting of a monolayer graphene on a silicon based graded grating structure. An external gate voltage is applied to graphene and silicon, which are separated by a spacer layer of silica. Theoretical and numerical results demonstrate that the structure exhibits an ultra-high slowdown factor above 450 for the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited in graphene, which also enables the spatially resolved trapping of light. Slowdown and trapping occur in the mid-infrared wavelength region within a bandwidth of ~2.1 μm and on a length scale less than 1/6 of the operating wavelength. The slowdown factor can be precisely tuned simply by adjusting the external gate voltage, offering a dynamic pathway for the release of trapped SPPs at room temperature. The presented results will enable the development of highly tunable optoelectronic devices such as plasmonic switches and buffers. PMID:25676462

  3. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  4. Atypical slow waves generated in gastric corpus provide dominant pacemaker activity in guinea pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Hashitani, Hikaru; Garcia-Londoño, A Pilar; Hirst, G David S; Edwards, Frank R

    2005-12-01

    When intracellular recordings were made from the circular layer of the intact muscular wall of the isolated guinea pig gastric corpus, an ongoing regular high frequency discharge of slow waves was detected even though this region lacked myenteric interstitial cells. When slow waves were recorded from preparations consisting of both the antrum and the corpus, slow waves of identical frequency, but with different shapes, were generated in the two regions. Corporal slow waves could be distinguished from antral slow waves by their time courses and amplitudes. Corporal slow waves, like antral slow waves, were abolished by buffering the internal concentration of calcium ions, [Ca2+]i, to low levels, or by caffeine, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate or the chloride channel blocker DIDS. Corporal preparations demonstrated an ongoing discharge of unitary potentials, as has been found in all other tissues containing interstitial cells. The experiments show that the corpus provides the dominant pacemaker activity which entrains activity in other regions of the stomach and it is suggested that this activity is generated by corporal intramuscular interstitial cells.

  5. Reading Strategies: Activities to Stimulate Slow and Reluctant Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiedt, Iris M.

    The activities included in this book are based on the assumption that good readers have excellent command of oral language, that they recognize signals and patterns in words and sentences and are able to guess unknown words based on this information, and that they learn to read by reading. Among the activities included in this collection are those…

  6. 340 Waste handling facility deactivation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stordeur, R.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-27

    This document provides an overview of both the present status of the 340 Complex (within Hanford`s 300 Area), and of tasks associated with the deactivation of segments associated with radioactive, mixed liquid waste receipt, storage, and shipping. The plan also describes activities that will allow portions of the 340 Complex to remain in service.

  7. Influence of explosive volcanic events on the activation versus de-activation of a modern turbidite system: the example of the Dohrn canyon-fan in the continental slope of the Campania volcanic district (Naples Bay, Italy - Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, M.; Budillon, F.; Pappone, G.; Insinga, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between volcanic activity, volcano-clastic yield and activation/deactivation of a turbidite system can be evaluated along the continental margin of Campania region (Tyrrhenian Sea - Italy), an active volcanic area, where three wide canyon-fans occur at short distances one to another. Actually, the Dohrn, Magnaghi and Cuma canyons cut the continental slope and shelf off Ischia and Procida volcanic islands and off the Campania Plain where Phlegraean Field and Mt. Vesuvius active vents are located. This research, partly supported by the Italian Flagship Project Ritmare, is based on single-channel, high-resolution seismic profiles (Sparker-One 16 kJ, 0.5 s twtt), swath-bathymetry and litho- and tephra-stratigraphy of gravity cores. We focused on the stratigraphic constraint of paleo-thalweg features and channel/levees deposits in seismics, debris flow, turbidites and hemipelagites in cores, to learn more on the activation/deactivation stages of the canyon Dohrn, in the frame of relative eustatic sea level variations over the Middle Pleistocene-Holocene time span.Preliminary outcomes suggest that even major volcanic events occurred in the last 300 ky, such as ignimbrite eruptions or large fallouts, have caused the infilling of the canyon head and the cover of pre-existing seabed morphology. As a consequence, the temporary deactivation of the turbidite system has occurred, despite the volcano-clastic overload in the coastal environment. Phases of renewed activities of the thalweg are observed to be in step with falling stages of sea level, which have driven the re-incision of canyon valleys through continuous volcano-clastic debris and turbidites down-flows. Since Holocene, the quiescence of the Dohrn Canyon has been documented, despite the intense volcano-tectonic activity in the area.

  8. PUREX/UO{sub 3} deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Washenfelder, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    From 1955 through 1990, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) provided the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site with nuclear fuel reprocessing capability. It operated in sequence with the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which converted the PUREX liquid uranium nitrate product to solid UO{sub 3} powder. Final UO{sub 3} Plant operation ended in 1993. In December 1992, planning was initiated for the deactivation of PUREX and UO{sub 3} Plant. The objective of deactivation planning was to identify the activities needed to establish a passively safe, environmentally secure configuration at both plants, and ensure that the configuration could be retained during the post-deactivation period. The PUREX/UO{sub 3} Deactivation Project management plan represents completion of the planning efforts. It presents the deactivation approach to be used for the two plants, and the supporting technical, cost, and schedule baselines. Deactivation activities concentrate on removal, reduction, and stabilization of the radioactive and chemical materials remaining at the plants, and the shutdown of the utilities and effluents. When deactivation is completed, the two plants will be left unoccupied and locked, pending eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Deactivation is expected to cost $233.8 million, require 5 years to complete, and yield $36 million in annual surveillance and maintenance cost savings.

  9. Deriving Stellar Inclination of Slow Rotators Using Stellar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than ~2-2.5 km s-1. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 which can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD 189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be i=84+6-20 deg, which implies a star-planet obliquity of \\psi =4+18-4 considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For α Cen B, we derive an inclination of i=45+9-19, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the α Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that α Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of α Cen B can be measured using 40 radial-velocity measurements, which is remarkable given that the projected rotational velocity of the star is smaller than 1.15 km s-1. Based on observations made with the MOST satellite, the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory (Chile), and the SOPHIE instrument at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (France).

  10. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than ∼2-2.5 km s{sup –1}. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 which can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD 189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be i=84{sub −20}{sup +6} deg, which implies a star-planet obliquity of ψ=4{sub −4}{sup +18} considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For α Cen B, we derive an inclination of i=45{sub −19}{sup +9}, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the α Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that α Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of α Cen B can be measured using 40 radial-velocity measurements, which is remarkable given that the projected rotational velocity of the star is smaller than 1.15 km s{sup –1}.

  11. IH activity is increased in populations of slow versus fast motor axons of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Chad; Jones, Kelvin E.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about the electrophysiological variation in motoneuron somata across different motor units. However, comparatively less is known about electrophysiological variation in motor axons and how this could impact function or electrodiagnosis in healthy or diseased states. We performed nerve excitability testing on two groups of motor axons in Sprague–Dawley rats that are known to differ significantly in their chronic daily activity patterns and in the relative proportion of motor unit types: one group innervating the soleus (“slow motor axons”) and the other group innervating the tibialis anterior (“fast motor axons”) muscles. We found that slow motor axons have significantly larger accommodation compared to fast motor axons upon application of a 100 ms hyperpolarizing conditioning stimulus that is 40% of axon threshold (Z = 3.24, p = 0.001) or 20% of axon threshold (Z = 2.67, p = 0.008). Slow motor axons had larger accommodation to hyperpolarizing currents in the current-threshold measurement (-80% Z = 3.07, p = 0.002; -90% Z = 2.98, p = 0.003). In addition, we found that slow motor axons have a significantly smaller rheobase than fast motor axons (Z = -1.99, p = 0.047) accompanied by a lower threshold in stimulus-response curves. The results provide evidence that slow motor axons have greater activity of the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying cation conductance (IH) than fast motor axons. It is possible that this difference between fast and slow axons is caused by an adaptation to their chronic differences in daily activity patterns, and that this adaptation might have a functional effect on the motor unit. Moreover, these findings indicate that slow and fast motor axons may react differently to pathological conditions. PMID:25309406

  12. UVCS Observations of Slow Plasma Flow in the Corona Above Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, R.; Habbal, S. R.

    2005-05-01

    The elusive source of slow solar wind has been the subject of ongoing discussion and debate. Observations of solar wind speed near the Earth orbit, first with IPS (interplanetary scintillation) and later with Ulysses in situ measurements, have suggested that some slow solar wind may be associated with active regions (Kojima & Kakinuma 1987; Woo, Habbal & Feldman 2004). The ability of SOHO UVCS Doppler dimming measurements to provide estimates of solar wind speed in the corona (Kohl et al. 1995) has made it possible to investigate the distribution of flow near the Sun. In this paper, we will present results confirming that active regions are one of the sources of slow wind. Insight into the relationship between coronal streamers, active regions and plasma flow will also be discussed.

  13. Deactivation completed at historic Hanford Fuels Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses deactivation work which was completed as of March 31, 1994 at the 308 Fuels Development Laboratory (FDL) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The decision to deactivate the structure, formerly known as the Plutonium Fabrication Pilot Plant (PFPP), was driven by a 1980s Department of Energy (DOE) decision that plutonium fuels should not be fabricated in areas near the Site`s boundaries, as well as by changing facility structural requirements. Inventory transfer has been followed by the cleanout and stabilization of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and enriched uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) residues and powders in the facility`s equipment and duct work. The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was one of America`s primary arsenals of nuclear defense production for nearly 50 years beginning in World War II. Approximately 53 metric tons of weapons grade plutonium, over half of the national supply and about one quarter of the world`s supply, were produced at Hanford between 1944 and 1989. Today, many Site buildings are undergoing deactivation, a precursor phase to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The primary difference between the two activities is that equipment and structural items are not removed or torn down in deactivation. However, utilities are disconnected, and special nuclear materials (SNM) as well as hazardous and pyrophoric substances are removed from structures undergoing this process.

  14. Rotation sensing with Er3+-doped active ring resonator slow light structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hong; Liu, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-01

    An optical gyroscope, which is constituted by Er3+-doped active ring resonator (EDARR) slow light structure, is presented for the first time. The principle of improving the sensitivity of the detection of angular velocity is analysed in detail. The expression of the rotation phase difference of EDARR between the counter-propagating waves is derived and discussed. At the resonant frequency, the phase shift difference has the maximum value when the light power in the cavity is far greater than the input light power. We designed an experimental scheme of Er3+-doped active ring resonator slow light system. Two additional bias phases ϕb = ±π/2 were introduced in the optical path, by recording the light intensity difference ? and I0 at the resonant frequency ?, the input angular velocity can be obtained. The slow light structure based on EDARR can enhance the sensitivity of the detection of the angular velocity by three orders of magnitude.

  15. Outcome of Children with Hyperventilation-Induced High-Amplitude Rhythmic Slow Activity with Altered Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Alexander; Ng, Joanne; Rittey, Christopher D. C.; Kandler, Rosalind H.; Mordekar, Santosh R.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperventilation-induced high-amplitude rhythmic slow activity with altered awareness (HIHARS) is increasingly being identified in children and is thought to be an age-related non-epileptic electrographic phenomenon. We retrospectively investigated the clinical outcome in 15 children (six males, nine females) with HIHARS (mean age 7y, SD 1y 11mo;…

  16. Pharmaceutically active compounds: Their removal during slow sand filtration and their impact on slow sand filtration bacterial removal.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Yoneyama, Bunnie; Kirs, Marek; Kisand, Veljo; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2015-08-15

    Slow sand filtration (SSF) has been widely used as a means of providing potable water due to its efficacy, low cost, and minimal maintenance. Advances in analytical instrumentation have revealed the occurrence of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in surface water as well as in groundwater. It is unclear if the presence of these compounds in the feed water can interfere with the performances of an SSF unit. The aim of this work was to examine i) the ability of two SSF units to remove six PhACs (caffeine, carbamazepine, 17-β estradiol [E2], estrone [E1], gemfibrozil, and phenazone), and ii) the impact of these PhACs on the removal of bacteria by two SSF units. The presence of PhACs in feed water for SSF can occur in surface waters impacted by wastewater or leakage from sewers and septic tanks, as well as in developing countries where unregulated use and improper disposal are prevalent. Two pilot-scale SSF units were used during the study. Unit B1 was fed with stream water with 1% of primary effluent added, while unit B2 was fed with stream water alone. Although limited removal (<10%) of carbamazepine, gemfibrozil, and phenazone occurred, the complete removal of caffeine, and the partial removal (11-92%) of E2 and E1 were observed in the two SSF units. The results of this study suggest that the occurrence of the selected PhACs, probably estrogens and caffeine, in the feed water at 50 μg L(-1) affected the ability of the schmutzdecke to remove total coliform and Escherichia coli. The bacterial removal achieved within the schmutzdecke dropped from 95% to less than 20% by the end of the study. This decrease in removal may be related to the change in the microbial community within the schmutzdecke. A diverse microbial community, including Bacteroidetes and several classes of Proteobacteria, was replaced by a microbial community in which Gammaproteobacteria was the predominant phylum (99%). Despite the low removal achieved within the schmutzdecke, removal of

  17. Proposed new reactor-activated positron source for intense slow e + beam production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalsey, M.; Van House, J.

    1988-03-01

    A novel method is suggested for producing a new positron (e +) emitting isotope in a nuclear reactor with application to slow e + beams. The initial radiated sample is 124Xe which is transformed to 126I by two neutron absorptions and an intermediate decay. Over 25 Ci of positrons with a specific activity of 25 {Ci}/{gm} can be produced by this technique, allowing the generation of a slow e + beam of over 4 × 10 7{e +}/{cm 2} -s. As discussed in the conclusion, specific activities approaching 200 {Ci}/{gm} should be for activation cells are presented, one with Xe in the gas phase, the other with solid Xe. Both designs allow the easy separation of the 126I from other contaminants, permitting the production of a pure, high specific activity source.

  18. 340 waste handling complex: Deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stordeur, R.T.

    1998-06-25

    This document provides an overview of the strategy for deactivating the 340 Waste Handling Complex within Hanford`s 300 Area. The plan covers the period from the pending September 30, 1998 cessation of voluntary radioactive liquid waste (RLW) transfers to the 340 Complex, until such time that those portions of the 340 Complex that remain active beyond September 30, 1998, specifically, the Retention Process Sewer (RPS), can also be shut down and deactivated. Specific activities are detailed and divided into two phases. Phase 1 ends in 2001 after the core RLW systems have been deactivated. Phase 2 covers the subsequent interim surveillance of deactivated and stand-by components during the period of continued RPS operation, through the final transfer of the entire 340 Complex to the Environmental Restoration Contractor. One of several possible scenarios was postulated and developed as a budget and schedule planning case.

  19. Lens hexokinase deactivation by near-UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tung, W H; Chylack, L T; Andley, U P

    1988-03-01

    Photodamage to lens hexokinase has been investigated by exposing the lenses of rat, rabbit and calf eyes to 300 nm irradiation. Hexokinase activity was diminished by 15.9% +/- 5.4 and 23.4% +/- 5.0 upon irradiation of the isolated rat lens for 1 and 2 hours respectively. Irradiation of the whole eye for 2 hours resulted in hexokinase deactivation of 13.6% +/- 5.8 and 19.2% +/- 6.2 for rat and rabbit lens homogenates and 55% +/- 7 for calf lens capsule plus epithelium. Enzyme deactivation was prevented when the isolated lens was irradiated with the vitreous attached. Glucose, catalase or ascorbate added to the medium prior to irradiation, each had a protective effect on hexokinase deactivation. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which photochemical generation of active species of oxygen, via the photosensitizing action of tryptophan photoproducts, plays a significant role in enzyme deactivation. PMID:3359812

  20. The calcineurin-NFAT pathway controls activity-dependent circadian gene expression in slow skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dyar, Kenneth A.; Ciciliot, Stefano; Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio Malagoli; Pallafacchina, Giorgia; Tothova, Jana; Argentini, Carla; Agatea, Lisa; Abraham, Reimar; Ahdesmäki, Miika; Forcato, Mattia; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Blaauw, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical activity and circadian rhythms are well-established determinants of human health and disease, but the relationship between muscle activity and the circadian regulation of muscle genes is a relatively new area of research. It is unknown whether muscle activity and muscle clock rhythms are coupled together, nor whether activity rhythms can drive circadian gene expression in skeletal muscle. Methods We compared the circadian transcriptomes of two mouse hindlimb muscles with vastly different circadian activity patterns, the continuously active slow soleus and the sporadically active fast tibialis anterior, in the presence or absence of a functional skeletal muscle clock (skeletal muscle-specific Bmal1 KO). In addition, we compared the effect of denervation on muscle circadian gene expression. Results We found that different skeletal muscles exhibit major differences in their circadian transcriptomes, yet core clock gene oscillations were essentially identical in fast and slow muscles. Furthermore, denervation caused relatively minor changes in circadian expression of most core clock genes, yet major differences in expression level, phase and amplitude of many muscle circadian genes. Conclusions We report that activity controls the oscillation of around 15% of skeletal muscle circadian genes independently of the core muscle clock, and we have identified the Ca2+-dependent calcineurin-NFAT pathway as an important mediator of activity-dependent circadian gene expression, showing that circadian locomotor activity rhythms drive circadian rhythms of NFAT nuclear translocation and target gene expression. PMID:26629406

  1. Selective inhibition of deactivated mitochondrial complex I by biguanides.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi; Humphries, Kenneth M

    2015-03-24

    Biguanides are widely used antihyperglycemic agents for diabetes mellitus and prediabetes treatment. Complex I is the rate-limiting step of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), a major source of mitochondrial free radical production, and a known target of biguanides. Complex I has two reversible conformational states, active and de-active. The deactivated state is promoted in the absence of substrates but is rapidly and fully reversed to the active state in the presence of NADH. The objective of this study was to determine the relative sensitivity of active/de-active complex I to biguanide-mediated inhibition and resulting superoxide radical (O₂(•⁻)) production. Using isolated rat heart mitochondria, we show that deactivation of complex I sensitizes it to metformin and phenformin (4- and 3-fold, respectively), but not to other known complex I inhibitors, such as rotenone. Mitochondrial O₂(•⁻) production by deactivated complex I was measured fluorescently by NADH-dependent 2-hydroxyethidium formation at alkaline pH to impede reactivation. Superoxide production was 260.4% higher than in active complex I at pH 9.4. However, phenformin treatment of de-active complex I decreased O₂(•⁻) production by 14.9%, while rotenone increased production by 42.9%. Mitochondria isolated from rat hearts subjected to cardiac ischemia, a condition known to induce complex I deactivation, were sensitized to phenformin-mediated complex I inhibition. This supports the idea that the effects of biguanides are likely to be influenced by the complex I state in vivo. These results demonstrate that the complex I active and de-active states are a determinant in biguanide-mediated inhibition.

  2. Coordinated Action of Fast and Slow Reserves for Optimal Sequential and Dynamic Emergency Reserve Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkuti, Surender Reddy; Bijwe, P. R.; Abhyankar, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an optimal dynamic reserve activation plan after the occurrence of an emergency situation (generator/transmission line outage, load increase or both). An optimal plan is developed to handle the emergency situation, using coordinated action of fast and slow reserves, for secure operation with minimum overall cost. This paper considers the reserves supplied by generators (spinning reserves) and loads (demand-side reserves). The optimal backing down of costly/fast reserves and bringing up of slow reserves in each sub-interval in an integrated manner is proposed. The simulation studies are performed on IEEE 30, 57 and 300 bus test systems to demonstrate the advantage of proposed integrated/dynamic reserve activation plan over the conventional/sequential approach.

  3. Phase advancement and nucleus-specific timing of thalamocortical activity during slow cortical oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Slézia, Andrea; Hangya, Balázs; Ulbert, István; Acsády, László

    2011-01-01

    The exact timing of cortical afferent activity is instrumental for the correct coding and retrieval of internal and external stimuli. Thalamocortical inputs represent the most significant subcortical pathway to the cortex, but the precise timing and temporal variability of thalamocortical activity is not known. To examine this question, we studied the phase of thalamic action potentials relative to cortical oscillations and established correlations among phase, the nuclear location of the thalamocortical neurons and the frequency of cortical activity. The phase of thalamic action potentials depended on the exact frequency of the slow cortical oscillation both on long (minutes) and short (single wave) time scales. Faster waves were accompanied by phase advancement in both cases. Thalamocortical neurons located in different nuclei fired at significantly different phases of the slow waves but were active at similar phase of spindle oscillations. Different thalamic nuclei displayed distinct burst patterns. Bursts with higher number of action potentials displayed progressive phase advancement in a nucleus-specific manner. Thalamic neurons located along nuclear borders were characterized by mixed burst and phase properties. Our data demonstrate that the temporal relationship between cortical and thalamic activity is not fixed but displays dynamic changes during oscillatory activity. The timing depends on the precise location and exact activity of thalamocortical cells and the ongoing cortical network pattern. This variability of thalamic output and its coupling to cortical activity can enable thalamocortical neurons to actively participate in the coding and retrieval of complex cortical signals. PMID:21228169

  4. Prolonged activity evokes potentiation and the "sag" phenomenon in slow motor units of rat soleus.

    PubMed

    Drzymała-Celichowska, Hanna; Raikova, Rositsa; Krutki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Slow motor units (MUs) have no sag in their unfused tetani. This study in anesthetized rats shows that the sag can be observed in slow soleus MUs after prolonged activity. Twitches and unfused tetanic contractions were recorded from male (n=35) and female (n=39) MUs before and after the four minutes of the fatigue test (trains of 13 pulses at 40 Hz repeated every second). After this activity twitch contractions potentiated and a shift in the steep part of the force-frequency curve towards lower frequencies was observed in both sexes. Initially no sag was visible in unfused tetani, but after the fatigue test the phenomenon was observed in 77% of male, while in 13% of female MUs, the result consistent with the previously reported higher content of IIa myosin and faster contraction of MUs in male soleus. The decomposition of tetani with sag into trains of twitch-shape responses to consecutive stimuli revealed higher forces of initial decomposed twitches than later. The revealed alterations the force development due to long-lasting activation of slow MUs were sex-related and more pronounced in male soleus. PMID:27373952

  5. HEU Measurements of Holdup and Recovered Residue in the Deactivation and Decommissioning Activities of the 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    DEWBERRY, RAYMOND; SALAYMEH, SALEEM R.; CASELLA, VITO R.; MOORE, FRANK S.

    2005-03-11

    This paper contains a summary of the holdup and material control and accountability (MC&A) assays conducted for the determination of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 321-M at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 321-M facility was the Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at SRS and was used to fabricate HEU fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the SRS production reactors. The facility operated for more than 35 years. During this time thousands of uranium-aluminum-alloy (U-Al) production reactor fuel tubes were produced. After the facility ceased operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The bulk of this residue was located in the equipment that generated and handled small U-Al particles and in the exhaust systems for this equipment (e.g., Chip compactor, casting furnaces, log saw, lathes A & B, cyclone separator, Freon{trademark} cart, riser crusher, ...etc). The D&D project is likely to represent an important example for D&D activities across SRS and across the Department of Energy weapons complex. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked to conduct holdup assays to quantify the amount of HEU on all components removed from the facility prior to placing in solid waste containers. The U-235 holdup in any single component of process equipment must not exceed 50 g in order to meet the container limit. This limit was imposed to meet criticality requirements of the low level solid waste storage vaults. Thus the holdup measurements were used as guidance to determine if further decontamination of equipment was needed to ensure that the quantity of U-235 did not exceed the 50 g limit and to ensure that the waste met the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) of the solid waste storage vaults. Since HEU is an accountable nuclear material, the holdup assays and assays of recovered

  6. Synaptic refinement during development and its effect on slow-wave activity: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Hoel, Erik P; Albantakis, Larissa; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that synaptic refinement, the reorganization of synapses and connections without significant change in their number or strength, is important for the development of the visual system of juvenile rodents. Other evidence in rodents and humans shows that there is a marked drop in sleep slow-wave activity (SWA) during adolescence. Slow waves reflect synchronous transitions of neuronal populations between active and inactive states, and the amount of SWA is influenced by the connection strength and organization of cortical neurons. In this study, we investigated whether synaptic refinement could account for the observed developmental drop in SWA. To this end, we employed a large-scale neural model of primary visual cortex and sections of the thalamus, capable of producing realistic slow waves. In this model, we reorganized intralaminar connections according to experimental data on synaptic refinement: during prerefinement, local connections between neurons were homogenous, whereas in postrefinement, neurons connected preferentially to neurons with similar receptive fields and preferred orientations. Synaptic refinement led to a drop in SWA and to changes in slow-wave morphology, consistent with experimental data. To test whether learning can induce synaptic refinement, intralaminar connections were equipped with spike timing-dependent plasticity. Oriented stimuli were presented during a learning period, followed by homeostatic synaptic renormalization. This led to activity-dependent refinement accompanied again by a decline in SWA. Together, these modeling results show that synaptic refinement can account for developmental changes in SWA. Thus sleep SWA may be used to track noninvasively the reorganization of cortical connections during development. PMID:26843602

  7. Anatomical markers of sleep slow wave activity derived from structural magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Andreas; Kurth, Salomé; Ringli, Maya; Geiger, Anja; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2011-12-01

    Sleep studies often observe differences in slow wave activity (SWA) during non-rapid eye movement sleep between subjects. This study investigates to what extent these absolute differences in SWA can be explained with differences in grey matter volume, white matter volume or the thickness of skull and outer liquor rooms. To do this, we selected the 10-min interval showing maximal SWA of 20 young adult subjects and correlated these values lobe-wise with grey matter, skull and liquor thickness and globally with white matter as well as segments of the corpus callosum. Whereas grey matter, skull thickness and liquor did not correlate significantly with maximal slow wave activity, there were significant correlations with the anterior parts of the corpus callosum and with one other white matter region. In contrast, electroencephalogram power of higher frequencies correlates positively with grey matter volumes and cortical surface area. We discuss the possible role of white matter tracts on the synchronization of slow waves across the cortex.

  8. Evaluation of serum prolidase activity in patients with slow coronary flow

    PubMed Central

    Nurdag, Abdullah; Polat, Mustafa; Kaya, Hakan; Koroglu, Sedat; Acar, Gurkan; Sezen, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Slow coronary flow (SCF) is described as the slow passage of contrast to distal coronaries despite anatomically normal coronary arteries. It has been shown that increased serum prolidase activity (SPA) correlates with collagen turnover. Increased collagen turnover might be associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Aim To investigate the relationship between serum prolidase activity and slow coronary flow. Material and methods This cross-sectional study included 40 SCF patients (mean age: 55.0 ±9.5 years, 20 females) and 40 controls (mean age: 53.9 ±8.2 years, 21 females) with normal coronary anatomy and normal coronary flow. The Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) frame-count (TFC) method was used for SCF diagnosis. Serum prolidase activity was measured spectrophotometrically, and the relevant parameters were compared between the groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the SCF and control groups in terms of basic demographic, clinical, and laboratory data. However, the SPA was significantly higher in the SCF group compared to the control (702.7 ±13.8 and 683.9 ±13.2 respectively, p<0.001). Serum prolidase activity was significantly correlated with the mean TFC (r=0.463, p<0.001). The overall findings of this study support the predictive accuracy of the serum prolidase activity in our cohort, with a statistically significant ROC value of 681.3. Conclusions Our study showed that SPA was increased in SCF patients. The activity of this enzyme was significantly correlated with the mean TFC. PMID:26677361

  9. [Soil biological activities at maize seedling stage under application of slow/controlled release nitrogen fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Li, Dongpo; Wu, Zhijie; Chen, Lijun; Liang, Chenghua; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Weicheng; Yang, Defu

    2006-06-01

    With pot experiment and simulating field ecological environment, this paper studied the effects of different slow/ controlled release N fertilizers on the soil nitrate - reductase and urease activities and microbial biomass C and N at maize seedling stage. The results showed that granular urea amended with dicyandiamide (DCD) and N-(n-bultyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) induced the highest soil nitrate-reductase activity, granular urea brought about the highest soil urease activity and microbial biomass C and N, while starch acetate (SA)-coated granular urea, SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD, methyl methacrylate (MMA) -coated granular urea amended with DCD, and no N fertilization gave a higher soil urease activity. Soil microbial C and N had a similar variation trend after applying various kinds of test slow/controlled release N fertilizers, and were the lowest after applying SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD and NBPT. Coated granular urea amended with inhibitors had a stronger effect on soil biological activities than coated granular urea, and MMA-coating had a better effect than SA-coating. PMID:16964940

  10. [Soil biological activities at maize seedling stage under application of slow/controlled release nitrogen fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Li, Dongpo; Wu, Zhijie; Chen, Lijun; Liang, Chenghua; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Weicheng; Yang, Defu

    2006-06-01

    With pot experiment and simulating field ecological environment, this paper studied the effects of different slow/ controlled release N fertilizers on the soil nitrate - reductase and urease activities and microbial biomass C and N at maize seedling stage. The results showed that granular urea amended with dicyandiamide (DCD) and N-(n-bultyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) induced the highest soil nitrate-reductase activity, granular urea brought about the highest soil urease activity and microbial biomass C and N, while starch acetate (SA)-coated granular urea, SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD, methyl methacrylate (MMA) -coated granular urea amended with DCD, and no N fertilization gave a higher soil urease activity. Soil microbial C and N had a similar variation trend after applying various kinds of test slow/controlled release N fertilizers, and were the lowest after applying SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD and NBPT. Coated granular urea amended with inhibitors had a stronger effect on soil biological activities than coated granular urea, and MMA-coating had a better effect than SA-coating.

  11. Slow-light Airy wave packets and their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2013-07-01

    We propose a scheme to generate (3+1)-dimensional slow-light Airy wave packets in a resonant Λ-type three-level atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that in the absence of dispersion the Airy wave packets formed by a probe field consist of two Airy wave packets accelerated in transverse directions and a longitudinal Gaussian pulse with a constant propagating velocity lowered to 10-5c (c is the light speed in vacuum). We also show that in the presence of dispersion it is possible to generate another type of slow-light Airy wave packet consisting of two Airy beams in transverse directions and an Airy wave packet in the longitudinal direction. In this case, the longitudinal velocity of the Airy wave packet can be further reduced during propagation. Additionally, we further show that the transverse accelerations (or bending) of the both types of slow-light Airy wave packets can be completely eliminated and the motional trajectories of them can be actively manipulated and controlled by using a Stern-Gerlach gradient magnetic field.

  12. Implementing RCRA during facility deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Lebaron, G.J.

    1997-09-07

    RCRA regulations require closure of permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations, and this may essentially necessitate decommissioning to complete closure. A more cost effective way to handle the facility would be to significantly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by taking it from its operational status to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to decommissioning. This paper presents an innovative approach to the cost effective deactivation of a large, complex chemical processing facility permitted under RCRA. The approach takes into account risks to the environment posed by this facility in comparison to risks posed by neighboring facilities at the site. The paper addresses the manner in which: 1) stakeholders and regulators were involved; 2) identifies a process by which the project proceeds and regulators and stakeholders were involved; 3) end points were developed so completion of deactivation was clearly identified at the beginning of the project, and 4) innovative practices were used to deactivate more quickly and cost effectively.

  13. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy Results and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights the inclusion of Mode Deactivation Therapy as a treatment modality for families in crisis. As an empirically validated treatment, Mode Deactivation Therapy has been effective in treating a wide variety of psychological issues. Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) was developed to treat adolescents with disorders of conduct…

  14. ["Fast" and "slow" components of psychotropic activity of the drugs with nootropic effects].

    PubMed

    Neznamov, G G; Siuniakov, S A; Davydova, I A; Teleshova, E S

    2000-01-01

    A clinical-pharmacological study was carried out to evaluate correlation of "fast" (nonspecific) and "slow" (specific) components of the action of the drugs with nootropic properties (piracetam, mexidol, tanacan) and to estimate their contribution to achieving therapeutic efficacy. The study was performed during 28 days using standard quantitative assay techniques in 79 patients with "Organic emotional-liable (asthenic) disorders" (F06.6, ICD-10). It was found that "fast" component of the psychotropic action of the drugs tested was presented by stimulating and anxiolytic effects, while a "slow" one--by specific nootropic activity. All these effects were fully independent with no correlation found, and this could, probably, be attributed to different mechanisms of their realization. It is shown that nootropic activity of piracetam was most significant in its therapeutic effect; and anxiolytic effect was most important for mexidol action. Meanwhile, stimulating and anxiolytic activities as well as positive influence on long-term memory were main components of tanacan effect. The results obtained show an important role of both specific and nonspecific ("fast") effects in realization of therapeutic action of the drugs with nootropic effects in patients with cognitive-mnestic and neurosis-like disorders.

  15. Signatures of Slow Solar Wind Streams from Active Regions in the Inner Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, V.; Harra, L.; Urnov, A.; Kuzin, S.; Goryaev, F.; Berghmans, D.

    2013-08-01

    The identification of solar-wind sources is an important question in solar physics. The existing solar-wind models ( e.g., the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model) provide the approximate locations of the solar wind sources based on magnetic field extrapolations. It has been suggested recently that plasma outflows observed at the edges of active regions may be a source of the slow solar wind. To explore this we analyze an isolated active region (AR) adjacent to small coronal hole (CH) in July/August 2009. On 1 August, Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observations showed two compact outflow regions in the corona. Coronal rays were observed above the active-region coronal hole (ARCH) region on the eastern limb on 31 July by STEREO-A/EUVI and at the western limb on 7 August by CORONAS- Photon/TESIS telescopes. In both cases the coronal rays were co-aligned with open magnetic-field lines given by the potential field source surface model, which expanded into the streamer. The solar-wind parameters measured by STEREO-B, ACE, Wind, and STEREO-A confirmed the identification of the ARCH as a source region of the slow solar wind. The results of the study support the suggestion that coronal rays can represent signatures of outflows from ARs propagating in the inner corona along open field lines into the heliosphere.

  16. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C H

    1991-02-14

    Progress is reported for a four-year fundamental investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which were to (1) determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation and (2) model the global rates of deactivation at the surface of the catalyst for the same catalysts. A computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was designed, constructed and tested. Kinetic data for CO hydrogenation on unsupported, unpromoted iron, 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K-promoted 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were obtained as functions of temperature, reactant particle pressures and time. The activity/selectivity and kinetic data are consistent with those previously reported for supported, unpromoted and promoted iron. Two kinds of deactivation were observed during FT synthesis on these samples: (1) loss of surface area after reduction of unsupported, unpromoted iron at 400{degree}C and (2) loss of activity with time due to carbon deposition, especially in the case of K-promoted 99% Fe/1% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deactivation rate data were obtained for CO hydrogenation on promoted Fe as a function of time, temperature, and H{sub 2}/CO ratio. 50 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Changes in contractile activation characteristics of rat fast and slow skeletal muscle fibres during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Plant, David R; Stupka, Nicole; Lynch, Gordon S

    2004-01-01

    Damaged skeletal muscle fibres are replaced with new contractile units via muscle regeneration. Regenerating muscle fibres synthesize functionally distinct isoforms of contractile and regulatory proteins but little is known of their functional properties during the regeneration process. An advantage of utilizing single muscle fibre preparations is that assessment of their function is based on the overall characteristics of the contractile apparatus and regulatory system and as such, these preparations are sensitive in revealing not only coarse, but also subtle functional differences between muscle fibres. We examined the Ca2+- and Sr2+-activated contractile characteristics of permeabilized fibres from rat fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles at 7, 14 and 21 days following myotoxic injury, to test the hypothesis that fibres from regenerating fast and slow muscles have different functional characteristics to fibres from uninjured muscles. Regenerating muscle fibres had ∼10% of the maximal force producing capacity (Po) of control (uninjured) fibres, and an altered sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ at 7 days post-injury. Increased force production and a shift in Ca2+ sensitivity consistent with fibre maturation were observed during regeneration such that Po was restored to 36–45% of that in control fibres by 21 days, and sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was similar to that of control (uninjured) fibres. The findings support the hypothesis that regenerating muscle fibres have different contractile activation characteristics compared with mature fibres, and that they adopt properties of mature fast- or slow-twitch muscle fibres in a progressive manner as the regeneration process is completed. PMID:15181161

  18. Solid-state enzyme deactivation in air and in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Toscano, G.; Pirozzi, D.; Maremonti, M.; Greco, G. Jr. . Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica)

    1994-09-05

    Thermal deactivation of solid-state acid phosphatase is analyzed, both in the presence and in the absence of organic solvents. The thermal deactivation profile departs from first order kinetics and shows an unusual, temperature-dependent, asymptotic value of residual activity. The process is described by a phenomenological equation, whose theoretical implications are also discussed. The total amount of buffer salts in the enzyme powder dramatically affects enzyme stability in the range 70 to 105 C. The higher salt/protein ratio increases the rate of thermal deactivation. The deactivation rate is virtually unaffected by the presence of organic solvents, independent of their hydrophilicity.

  19. Deactivating a major nuclear fuels reprocessing facility cost effectively

    SciTech Connect

    LeBaron, G.J.

    1997-08-15

    This paper describes three key processes used in deactivating the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, a large, complex nuclear reprocessing facility, 15 months ahead of schedule and $77 million under budget. The organization was reengineered to refine its business processes and more effectively organize around the deactivation work scope. Multi-disciplined work teams were formed to be self-sufficient and empowered to make decisions and perform work. A number of benefits were realized by reengineering. A comprehensive process to develop end points which clearly identified specific results and the post-project facility configuration was developed so all areas of a facility were addressed. Clear and specific end points allowed teams to focus on completing deactivation activities and helped ensure there were no unfulfilled end-of-project expectations. The RCRA regulations require closure of permitted facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations which may essentially necessitate decommissioning. A more cost effective approach was adopted which significantly reduced risk to human health and the environment by taking the facility to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to disposition. PUREX thus became the first large reprocessing facility with active TSD [treatment, storage, and disposal] units to be deactivated under the RCRA regulations.

  20. Hydrothermal activity at slow-spreading ridges: variability and importance of magmatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity along mid-ocean ridge axes is ubiquitous, associated with mass, chemical, and heat exchanges between the deep lithosphere and the overlying envelopes, and sustaining chemiosynthetic ecosystems at the seafloor. Compared with hydrothermal fields at fast-spreading ridges, those at slow spreading ones show a large variability as their location and nature is controlled or influenced by several parameters that are inter-related: a) tectonic setting, ranging from 'volcanic systems' (along the rift valley floor, volcanic ridges, seamounts), to 'tectonic' ones (rift-bounding faults, oceanic detachment faults); b) the nature of the host rock, owing to compositional heterogeneity of slow-spreading lithosphere (basalt, gabbro, peridotite); c) the type of heat source (magmatic bodies at depth, hot lithosphere, serpentinization reactions); d) and the associated temperature of outflow fluids (high- vs.- low temperature venting and their relative proportion). A systematic review of the distribution and characteristics of hydrothermal fields along the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity is concentrated either at oceanic detachment faults, or along volcanic segments with evidence of robust magma supply to the axis. A detailed study of the magmatically robust Lucky Strike segment suggests that all present and past hydrothermal activity is found at the center of the segment. The association of these fields to central volcanos, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the remaining of the ridge segment, suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity in these volcanic systems is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build these volcanic edifices. In this setting, hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal fluids in the shallow crust exploit permeable fault zones to circulate. While

  1. A slow-release system of bacterial cellulose gel and nanoparticles for hydrophobic active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Numata, Yukari; Mazzarino, Leticia; Borsali, Redouane

    2015-01-01

    A combination of bacterial cellulose (BC) gel and amphiphilic block copolymer nanoparticles was investigated as a drug delivery system (DDS) for hydrophobic active ingredients. Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) and retinol were used as the block copolymer and hydrophobic active ingredient, respectively. The BC gel was capable of incorporating copolymer nanoparticles and releasing them in an acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer solution (pH 5.2) at 37 °C. The percentage of released copolymer reached a maximum value of approximately 60% after 6h and remained constant after 24h. The percentage of retinol released from the copolymer-containing BC gel reached a maximum value at 4h. These results show that the combination of BC gel and nanoparticles is a slow-release system that may be useful in the cosmetic and biomedical fields for skin treatment and preparation. PMID:25840273

  2. A slow-release system of bacterial cellulose gel and nanoparticles for hydrophobic active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Numata, Yukari; Mazzarino, Leticia; Borsali, Redouane

    2015-01-01

    A combination of bacterial cellulose (BC) gel and amphiphilic block copolymer nanoparticles was investigated as a drug delivery system (DDS) for hydrophobic active ingredients. Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) and retinol were used as the block copolymer and hydrophobic active ingredient, respectively. The BC gel was capable of incorporating copolymer nanoparticles and releasing them in an acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer solution (pH 5.2) at 37 °C. The percentage of released copolymer reached a maximum value of approximately 60% after 6h and remained constant after 24h. The percentage of retinol released from the copolymer-containing BC gel reached a maximum value at 4h. These results show that the combination of BC gel and nanoparticles is a slow-release system that may be useful in the cosmetic and biomedical fields for skin treatment and preparation.

  3. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  4. Slow Conductances Could Underlie Intrinsic Phase-Maintaining Properties of Isolated Lobster (Panulirus interruptus) Pyloric Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Buchman, Einat; Weaver, Adam L.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.; Hobbs, Kevin H.

    2009-01-01

    The rhythmic pyloric network of the lobster stomatogastric system approximately maintains phase (that is, the burst durations and durations between the bursts of its neurons change proportionally) when network cycle period is altered by current injection into the network pacemaker (Hooper, 1997a,b). When isolated from the network and driven by rhythmic hyperpolarizing current pulses, the delay to firing after each pulse of at least one network neuron type (Pyloric, PY) varies in a phase-maintaining manner when cycle period is varied (Hooper, 1998). These variations require PY neurons to have intrinsic mechanisms that respond to changes in neuron activity on time scales at least as long as two seconds. Slowly activating and deactivating conductances could provide such a mechanism. We tested this possibility by building models containing various slow conductances. This work showed that such conductances could indeed support intrinsic phase-maintenance and we show here results for one such conductance, a slow potassium conductance. These conductances supported phase maintenance because their mean activation level changed, hence altering neuron post-inhibition firing delay, when the rhythmic input to the neuron changed. Switching the sign of the dependence of slow conductance activation and deactivation on membrane potential resulted in neuron delays switching to change in an anti-phase maintaining manner. These data suggest that slow conductances or similar slow processes such as changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could underlie phase maintenance in pyloric network neurons. PMID:19211890

  5. Remembering the past with slow breathing associated with activity in the parahippocampus and amygdala.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Yuri; Sugiyama, Haruko; Katayama, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Mitsuyoshi; Homma, Ikuo

    2012-07-19

    Breathing plays an important role in perception of odors and the experience of emotions. We used the dipole tracing method to analyze brain areas related to odor-induced autobiographical memory and emotions estimated from averaged electroencephalograms triggered by inspiration onset during odor presentation. Odor stimuli were perfumes subjects named that elicited a specific, pleasant and personal memory as well as two pleasant odors for controls. The perfumes induced specific emotional responses during memory retrieval, arousal level of the memory, feelings of pleasantness and a sense of familiarity with the odor. Respiration measurement indicated that tidal volume increased and respiratory frequency decreased during presentation of perfume stimuli, showing a deep and slow breathing pattern. Throughout the olfactory stimulation, electroencephalograms and respiration were simultaneously recorded. In the averaged potentials, low frequency oscillation was phase-locked to inspiration. Dipole analysis showed that perfumes activated more widespread areas of the right parahippocampal cortex and converged in the right amygdala compared to control odors. Slow breathing synchronized with odor-induced autobiographical memory and emotions may be subconsciously stored in the parahippocampal cortex and amygdala.

  6. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Slow potentials and spike unit activity of the cerebral cortex of rabbits exposed to microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhenkova, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Unanesthetized rabbits exposed to 12.5-cm microwaves at a field intensity of 40 mW/cm/sup 2/ in the region of the head showed an increase in the number of slow waves and spindle-shaped firings in the EEG and a change in the discharge frequency of neurons in the visual cortex in 41-52% of the cases. An enhancement of the evoked response of visual cortex neurons to light was observed in 61% of the cases and a facilitation of the driving response in 80% of all cases. It is concluded that the evoked response is a more sensitive indicator of the microwave effect than background activity. The effects of the fields were most distinctly observed with the driving response.

  8. Self-deactivation of water vapor - Role of the dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    A phenomenological multiple-relaxation theory of the deactivation rate constant for the nu-2 (1 - 0) bending mode of water vapor is presented which incorporates the role not only of the excited monomer but also of the bound molecular complex, in particular the dimer. The deactivation takes place by means of three parallel processes: (1) collisional deexcitation of the excited monomer, (2) a two-step reaction involving association and spontaneous redissociation of an H2O collision complex, and (3) spontaneous dissociation of the stably bound H2O dimer. Oxygen, but not nitrogen or argon, serves as an effective chaperon for the formation of the activated complex. This observation explains the impurity dependence of the self-deactivation rate constant of water vapor. Analysis of an ultrasonic absorption peak based on the third process yields values for the standard entropy and enthalpy of dissociation of the stably bound H2O dimer.

  9. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-11-25

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

  10. Deactivation kinetics of the transduction cascade of vision.

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, T M; Chabre, M

    1991-01-01

    The response of the retinal rod cell to a dim flash lasts less than a second. This phototransduction is mediated by a guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein cascade in which rhodopsin is the receptor, transducin is the G-protein, and the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) is the effector. Photoexcited rhodopsin activates transducin which in turn activates PDE. For this underlying biochemistry to be kinetically compatible with the photoresponse, both transducin and PDE must be deactivated in subsecond times. We report here direct measurements of their deactivation kinetics. The rate of heat release when transducin and PDE hydrolyze, respectively, GTP and cGMP was measured using time-resolved microcalorimetry. With only GTP present, the heat pulse comes from the activation of transducin and its subsequent deactivation by endogenous GTP hydrolysis. The nonhydrolyzable analog guanine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate was used to distinguish between these two processes: about 40% of the total heat is due to activation. From the time course of the deactivation heat, the active lifetime of transducin is less than 1 s at 22 degrees C. With both GTP and cGMP present, the highly amplified hydrolytic activity of the PDE is responsible for most of the heat produced; its rate of release is directly proportional to the amount of activated PDE. Measurements of this rate at low photoexcitation levels (e.g., 30 molecules of photoexcited rhodopsin per rod) provide much kinetic information about the cascade. Notably, deactivation of the PDE takes 0.6 s (at 23 degrees C) and absolutely requires GTP hydrolysis. This concurs with the subsecond lifetime of active transducin and means that, once GTP hydrolysis has occurred, the hitherto active PDE is quickly inhibited. PMID:1658789

  11. Suppression of NADPH Oxidase Activity May Slow the Expansion of Osteolytic Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Mark F.; DiNicolantonio, James

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), generated in the microenvironment of cancer cells, can drive the proliferation, invasion, and migration of cancer cells by activating G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Moreover, in cancer cells that have metastasized to bone, LPA signaling can promote osteolysis by inducing cancer cell production of cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8, which can stimulate osteoblasts to secrete RANKL, a key promoter of osteoclastogenesis. Indeed, in cancers prone to metastasize to bone, LPA appears to be a major driver of the expansion of osteolytic bone metastases. Activation of NADPH oxidase has been shown to play a mediating role in the signaling pathways by which LPA, as well as RANKL, promote osteolysis. In addition, there is reason to suspect that Nox4 activation is a mediator of the feed-forward mechanism whereby release of TGF-beta from bone matrix by osteolysis promotes expression of PTHrP in cancer cells, and thereby induces further osteolysis. Hence, measures which can down-regulate NADPH oxidase activity may have potential for slowing the expansion of osteolytic bone metastases in cancer patients. Phycocyanin and high-dose statins may have utility in this regard, and could be contemplated as complements to bisphosphonates or denosumab for the prevention and control of osteolytic lesions. Ingestion of omega-3-rich flaxseed or fish oil may also have potential for controlling osteolysis in cancer patients. PMID:27571113

  12. Active region plasma outflows as sources of slow/intermediate solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia M.

    2015-08-01

    L. van Driel-Gesztelyi (1,2,3), D. Baker (1), P. Démoulin (2), Culhane, J.L. (1), M.L. DeRosa (4) C.H. Mandrini (5,6), D.H. Brooks (7), A.N. Fazakerley (1), L.K. Harra (1), L. Zhao (7), T.H. Zurbuchen (7), F.A. Nuevo (5,6), A.M. Vásquez (5,6), G.D. Cristiani (5,6) M. Pick (2)1) UCL/MSSL, UK, (2) Paris Observatory, LESIA, CNRS, France, (3) Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, (4) Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, USA, (5) IAFE, CONICET-UBA, Argentina (6) FCEN, UBA, Argentina (7) Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Earth Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, USAWe analyse plasma upflows of tens of km/s from the edges of solar active regions discovered by Hinode/EIS and investigate whether or not they become outflows, i.e. find their way into the solar wind. We analyse two magnetic configurations: bipolar and quadrupolar and find that the active region plasma may be directly channeled into the solar wind via interchange reconnection at a high-altitude null point above the active region especially when active regions are located besides coronal holes or in a more complex way via multiple reconnections even from under a closed helmet streamer. We relate the solar observations to in-situ slow/intermediate solar wind streams.

  13. Suppression of NADPH Oxidase Activity May Slow the Expansion of Osteolytic Bone Metastases.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), generated in the microenvironment of cancer cells, can drive the proliferation, invasion, and migration of cancer cells by activating G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Moreover, in cancer cells that have metastasized to bone, LPA signaling can promote osteolysis by inducing cancer cell production of cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8, which can stimulate osteoblasts to secrete RANKL, a key promoter of osteoclastogenesis. Indeed, in cancers prone to metastasize to bone, LPA appears to be a major driver of the expansion of osteolytic bone metastases. Activation of NADPH oxidase has been shown to play a mediating role in the signaling pathways by which LPA, as well as RANKL, promote osteolysis. In addition, there is reason to suspect that Nox4 activation is a mediator of the feed-forward mechanism whereby release of TGF-beta from bone matrix by osteolysis promotes expression of PTHrP in cancer cells, and thereby induces further osteolysis. Hence, measures which can down-regulate NADPH oxidase activity may have potential for slowing the expansion of osteolytic bone metastases in cancer patients. Phycocyanin and high-dose statins may have utility in this regard, and could be contemplated as complements to bisphosphonates or denosumab for the prevention and control of osteolytic lesions. Ingestion of omega-3-rich flaxseed or fish oil may also have potential for controlling osteolysis in cancer patients. PMID:27571113

  14. Skin Sympathetic Nerve Activity is Modulated during Slow Sinusoidal Linear Displacements in Supine Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Philip S.; Hammam, Elie; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency sinusoidal linear acceleration (0.08 Hz, ±4 mG) modulates skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) in seated subjects (head vertical), suggesting that activation of the utricle in the peripheral vestibular labyrinth modulates SSNA. The aim of the current study was to determine whether SSNA is also modulated by input from the saccule. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted into the common peroneal nerve to record oligounitary SSNA in 8 subjects laying supine on a motorized platform with the head aligned with the longitudinal axis of the body. Slow sinusoidal (0.08 Hz, 100 cycles) linear acceleration-decelerations (peak ±4 mG) were applied rostrocaudally to predominately activate the saccules, or mediolaterally to predominately activate the utricles. Cross-correlation histograms were constructed between the negative-going sympathetic spikes and the positive peaks of the sinusoidal stimuli. Sinusoidal linear acceleration along the rostrocaudal axis or mediolateral axis both resulted in sinusoidal modulation of SSNA (Median, IQR 27.0, 22–33% and 24.8, 17–39%, respectively). This suggests that both otolith organs act on sympathetic outflow to skin and muscle in a similar manner during supine displacements. PMID:26909019

  15. Antioxidant Deactivation on Graphenic Nanocarbon Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xinyuan; Sen, Sujat; Liu, Jingyu; Kulaots, Indrek; Geohegan, David B; Kane, Agnes; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; More, Karren Leslie; Palmore, G. Tayhas R.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a direct chemical pathway for antioxidant deactivation on the surfaces of carbon nanomaterials. In the absence of cells, carbon nanotubes are shown to deplete the key physiological antioxidant glutathione (GSH) in a reaction involving dissolved dioxygen that yields the oxidized dimer, GSSG, as the primary product. In both chemical and electrochemical experiments, oxygen is only consumed at a significant steady-state rate in the presence of both nanotubes and GSH. GSH deactivation occurs for single- and multi-walled nanotubes, graphene oxide, nanohorns, and carbon black at varying rates that are characteristic of the material. The GSH depletion rates can be partially unified by surface area normalization, are accelerated by nitrogen doping, and suppressed by defect annealing or addition of proteins or surfactants. It is proposed that dioxygen reacts with active sites on graphenic carbon surfaces to produce surface-bound oxygen intermediates that react heterogeneously with glutathione to restore the carbon surface and complete a catalytic cycle. The direct catalytic reaction between nanomaterial surfaces and antioxidants may contribute to oxidative stress pathways in nanotoxicity, and the dependence on surface area and structural defects suggest strategies for safe material design.

  16. Antioxidant deactivation on graphenic nanocarbon surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyuan; Sen, Sujat; Liu, Jingyu; Kulaots, Indrek; Geohegan, David; Kane, Agnes; Puretzky, Alex A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; More, Karren L.; Palmore, G. Tayhas R.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports a direct chemical pathway for antioxidant deactivation on the surfaces of carbon nanomaterials. In the absence of cells, carbon nanotubes are shown to deplete the key physiological antioxidant glutathione (GSH) in a reaction involving dissolved dioxygen that yields the oxidized dimer, GSSG, as the primary product. In both chemical and electrochemical experiments, oxygen is only consumed at a significant steady-state rate in the presence of both nanotubes and GSH. GSH deactivation occurs for single- and multi-walled nanotubes, graphene oxide, nanohorns, and carbon black at varying rates that are characteristic of the material. The GSH depletion rates can be partially unified by surface area normalization, are accelerated by nitrogen doping, and suppressed by defect annealing or addition of proteins or surfactants. We propose that dioxygen reacts with active sites on graphenic carbon surfaces to produce surface-bound oxygen intermediates that react heterogeneously with glutathione to restore the carbon surface and complete a catalytic cycle. The direct catalytic reaction between nanomaterial surfaces and antioxidants may contribute to oxidative stress pathways in nanotoxicity, and the dependence on surface area and structural defects suggest strategies for safe material design. PMID:21818846

  17. Visualizing in situ translational activity for identifying and sorting slow-growing archaeal−bacterial consortia

    PubMed Central

    Hatzenpichler, Roland; Connon, Stephanie A.; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Woyke, Tanja; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the biogeochemical roles of microorganisms in the environment, it is important to determine when and under which conditions they are metabolically active. Bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) can reveal active cells by tracking the incorporation of synthetic amino acids into newly synthesized proteins. The phylogenetic identity of translationally active cells can be determined by combining BONCAT with rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (BONCAT-FISH). In theory, BONCAT-labeled cells could be isolated with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (BONCAT-FACS) for subsequent genetic analyses. Here, in the first application, to our knowledge, of BONCAT-FISH and BONCAT-FACS within an environmental context, we probe the translational activity of microbial consortia catalyzing the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a dominant sink of methane in the ocean. These consortia, which typically are composed of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria, have been difficult to study due to their slow in situ growth rates, and fundamental questions remain about their ecology and diversity of interactions occurring between ANME and associated partners. Our activity-correlated analyses of >16,400 microbial aggregates provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that AOM consortia affiliated with all five major ANME clades are concurrently active under controlled conditions. Surprisingly, sorting of individual BONCAT-labeled consortia followed by whole-genome amplification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed previously unrecognized interactions of ANME with members of the poorly understood phylum Verrucomicrobia. This finding, together with our observation that ANME-associated Verrucomicrobia are found in a variety of geographically distinct methane seep environments, suggests a broader range of symbiotic relationships within AOM consortia than previously thought. PMID:27357680

  18. Visualizing in situ translational activity for identifying and sorting slow-growing archaeal-bacterial consortia.

    PubMed

    Hatzenpichler, Roland; Connon, Stephanie A; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex R; Woyke, Tanja; Orphan, Victoria J

    2016-07-12

    To understand the biogeochemical roles of microorganisms in the environment, it is important to determine when and under which conditions they are metabolically active. Bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) can reveal active cells by tracking the incorporation of synthetic amino acids into newly synthesized proteins. The phylogenetic identity of translationally active cells can be determined by combining BONCAT with rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (BONCAT-FISH). In theory, BONCAT-labeled cells could be isolated with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (BONCAT-FACS) for subsequent genetic analyses. Here, in the first application, to our knowledge, of BONCAT-FISH and BONCAT-FACS within an environmental context, we probe the translational activity of microbial consortia catalyzing the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a dominant sink of methane in the ocean. These consortia, which typically are composed of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria, have been difficult to study due to their slow in situ growth rates, and fundamental questions remain about their ecology and diversity of interactions occurring between ANME and associated partners. Our activity-correlated analyses of >16,400 microbial aggregates provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that AOM consortia affiliated with all five major ANME clades are concurrently active under controlled conditions. Surprisingly, sorting of individual BONCAT-labeled consortia followed by whole-genome amplification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed previously unrecognized interactions of ANME with members of the poorly understood phylum Verrucomicrobia This finding, together with our observation that ANME-associated Verrucomicrobia are found in a variety of geographically distinct methane seep environments, suggests a broader range of symbiotic relationships within AOM consortia than previously thought. PMID:27357680

  19. Topographic measures of cerebral activity during reading of text at fast- and slow-paced rates.

    PubMed

    Breznitz, Z; DeMarco, A; Hakerem, G

    1993-01-01

    Eight college level readers were given short paragraphs for reading, presented on a computer terminal in units of 2 or 3 words at a time. Two conditions were presented, a fast reading session with an inter-stimulus interval (ISI) of 1.1 seconds, and a slower session with an ISI of 1.2 seconds. EEG and ERP measures were obtained. ERP findings revealed a late central-posterior negativity which was sensitive to the effect of varying ISI by showing shorter latencies, of about 110 msec, to the smaller interval. An earlier component complex consisting of a bi-temporal-occipital negativity and frontal positivity was observed between 155 and 175 msec. This component was not observed to be sensitive to variation of ISI. Analysis of the unaveraged EEG activity by FFT and absolute power measures revealed that the activity was primarily slow wave (0-7.5 HZ), and right-sided. Findings suggested that the brain functions as an integrated whole during reading, activating a diffuse set of neural generators.

  20. Simplified greywater treatment systems: Slow filters of sand and slate waste followed by granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zipf, Mariah Siebert; Pinheiro, Ivone Gohr; Conegero, Mariana Garcia

    2016-07-01

    One of the main actions of sustainability that is applicable to residential, commercial, and public buildings is the rational use of water that contemplates the reuse of greywater as one of the main options for reducing the consumption of drinking water. Therefore, this research aimed to study the efficiencies of simplified treatments for greywater reuse using slow sand and slow slate waste filtration, both followed by granular activated carbon filters. The system monitoring was conducted over 28 weeks, using analyses of the following parameters: pH, turbidity, apparent color, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), surfactants, total coliforms, and thermotolerant coliforms. The system was run at two different filtration rates: 6 and 2 m(3)/m(2)/day. Statistical analyses showed no significant differences in the majority of the results when filtration rate changed from 6 to 2 m(3)/m(2)/day. The average removal efficiencies with regard to the turbidity, apparent color, COD and BOD were 61, 54, 56, and 56%, respectively, for the sand filter, and 66, 61, 60, and 51%, respectively, for the slate waste filter. Both systems showed good efficiencies in removing surfactants, around 70%, while the pH reached values of around 7.80. The average removal efficiencies of the total and thermotolerant coliforms were of 61 and 90%, respectively, for the sand filter, and 67 and 80%, respectively, for the slate waste filter. The statistical analysis found no significant differences between the responses of the two systems, which attest to the fact that the slate waste can be a substitute for sand. The maximum levels of efficiency were high, indicating the potential of the systems, and suggesting their optimization in order to achieve much higher average efficiencies.

  1. Extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields disrupt rhythmic slow activity in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Bawin, S M; Satmary, W M; Jones, R A; Adey, W R; Zimmerman, G

    1996-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that weak, extremely-low-frequency (ELF; 1-100 Hz) magnetic fields affect brain electrical activity and memory processes in man and laboratory animals. Our studies sought to determine whether ELF magnetic fields could couple directly with brain tissue and affect neuronal activity in vitro. We used rat hippocampal slices to study field effects on a specific brain activity known as rhythmic slow activity (RSA), or theta rhythm, which occurs in 7-15 s bursts in the hippocampus during memory functions. RSA, which, in vivo, is a cholinergic activity, is induced in hippocampal slices by perfusion of the tissue with carbachol, a stable analog of acetylcholine. We previously demonstrated that the free radical nitric oxide (NO), synthesized in carbachol-treated hippocampal slices, lengthened and destabilized the intervals between successive RSA episodes. Here, we investigate the possibility that sinusoidal ELF magnetic fields could trigger the NO-dependent perturbation of the rate of occurrence of the RSA episodes. Carbachol-treated slices were exposed for 10 min epochs to 1 or 60 Hz magnetic fields with field intensities of 5.6, 56, or 560 microT (rms), or they were sham exposed. All exposures took place in the presence of an ambient DC field of 45 microT, with an angle of -66 degrees from the horizontal plane. Sinusoidal 1 Hz fields at 56 and 560 microT, but not at 5.6 microT, triggered the irreversible destabilization of RSA intervals. Fields at 60 Hz resulted in similar, but not statistically significant, trends. Fields had no effects on RSA when NO synthesis was pharmacologically inhibited. However, field effects could take place when extracellular NO, diffusing from its cell of origin to the extracellular space,was chelated by hemoglobin. These results suggest that ELF magnetic fields exert a strong influence on NO systems in the brain; therefore, they could modulate the functional state of a variety of neuronal ensembles. PMID:8915548

  2. Slow active potentials in ventral inhibitory motor neurons of the nematode Ascaris.

    PubMed

    Angstadt, J D; Stretton, A O

    1989-12-01

    The ability of ventral inhibitory motor neurons of the nematode Ascaris to generate slow depolarizing potentials was investigated using intracellular recording and current injection. In quiescent cells, regenerative depolarizations with peak amplitudes of approximately 20 mV and durations of several 100 ms were evoked in response to brief depolarizing current pulses. Repetitive slow potentials were produced in response to sustained depolarizing currents in a threshold-dependent manner. Repetitive slow potentials also occurred spontaneously, exhibiting cycle periods of about 700 ms. The ability of inhibitory motor neurons to generate slow potentials was blocked by addition of Co++, Cd++, or other Ca-channel blockers to the saline but not by TTX or substitution of Na+ with Tris. The amplitude and duration of slow potentials were increased in the presence of Ba++, Sr++, and TEA. Spontaneous slow potentials exhibited characteristics expected of intrinsically generated oscillations, including frequency modulation by injection of prolonged offset currents, phase resetting by brief current pulses, and suppression by strong hyperpolarization. Slow potentials appear to be generated in the ventral nerve cord processes and/or cell body of the motor neuron, and they produce rhythmic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in ventral muscle cells. Slow potentials may therefore contribute to locomotory or other motor behaviors of the animal. PMID:2607486

  3. Visinin-like neuronal calcium sensor proteins regulate the slow calcium-activated afterhyperpolarizing current in the rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Claudio; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2010-10-27

    Many neurons in the nervous systems express afterhyperpolarizations that are mediated by a slow calcium-activated potassium current. This current shapes neuronal firing and is inhibited by neuromodulators, suggesting an important role in the regulation of neuronal function. Surprisingly, very little is currently known about the molecular basis for this current or how it is gated by calcium. Recently, the neuronal calcium sensor protein hippocalcin was identified as a calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current in the hippocampus. However, while hippocalcin is very strongly expressed in the hippocampus, this protein shows a relatively restricted distribution in the brain. Furthermore, the genetic deletion of this protein only partly reduces the slow hyperpolarizing current in hippocampus. These considerations question whether hippocalcin can be the sole calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current. Here we use loss of function and overexpression strategies to show that hippocalcin functions as a calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current in the cerebral cortex, an area where hippocalcin is expressed at much lower levels than in hippocampus. In addition we show that neurocalcin δ, but not VILIP-2, can also act as a calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current. Finally we show that hippocalcin and neurocalcin δ both increase the calcium sensitivity of the afterhyperpolarizing current but do not alter its sensitivity to inhibition by carbachol acting through the Gαq-11-PLCβ signaling cascade. These results point to a general role for a subgroup of visinin-like neuronal calcium sensor proteins in the activation of the slow calcium-activated afterhyperpolarizing current.

  4. F-Canyon Suspension and Deactivation Safety Analysis Reports

    SciTech Connect

    LOW, JM

    2004-04-30

    This paper describes Savannah River Site's compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) direction to suspend current operations, transition to accommodate revised facility missions, and initiate operations to deactivate F-Canyon using a suspension and deactivation safety basis. This paper integrates multiple Workshop theme topics - Lessons Learned from the Safety Analysis Process, Improvements in Documenting Hazard and Accident Analysis, and Closure Issues - Decontamination and Decommissioning. The paper describes the process used to develop safety documentation to support suspension and deactivation activities for F-Canyon. Embodied are descriptive efforts that include development of intermediate and final ''end states'' (e.g., transitional operations), preparation of safety bases documents to support transition, performance of suspension and deactivation activities (e.g. solvent washing, tank/sump flushing, and laboratory waste processing), and downgrade of Safety Class and Safety Significant equipment. The reduction and/or removal of hazards in the facility result in significant risk (frequency times consequence) reduction to the public, site workers, and the environment. Risk reduction then allows the downgrade of safety class and safety significant systems (e.g., ventilation system) and elimination of associated surveillances. The downgrade of safety systems results in significant cost savings.

  5. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing.

    PubMed

    Kist, Andreas M; Sagafos, Dagrun; Rush, Anthony M; Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Lampert, Angelika; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient's peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences.

  6. Increased frontal sleep slow wave activity in adolescents with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Tesler, Noemi; Gerstenberg, Miriam; Franscini, Maurizia; Jenni, Oskar G.; Walitza, Susanne; Huber, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Sleep slow wave activity (SWA), the major electrophysiological characteristic of deep sleep, mirrors both cortical restructuring and functioning. The incidence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) substantially rises during the vulnerable developmental phase of adolescence, where essential cortical restructuring is taking place. The goal of this study was to assess characteristics of SWA topography in adolescents with MDD, in order to assess abnormalities in both cortical restructuring and functioning on a local level. All night high-density EEG was recorded in 15 patients meeting DSM-5 criteria for MDD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The actual symptom severity was assessed using the Children's Depression Rating Scale—Revised (CDRS-R). Topographical power maps were calculated based on the average SWA of the first non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep episode. Depressed adolescents exhibited significantly more SWA in a cluster of frontal electrodes compared to controls. SWA over frontal brain regions correlated positively with the CDRS-R subscore “morbid thoughts”. Self-reported sleep latency was significantly higher in depressed adolescents compared to controls whereas sleep architecture did not differ between the groups. Higher frontal SWA in depressed adolescents may represent a promising biomarker tracing cortical regions of intense use and/or restructuring. PMID:26870661

  7. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing

    PubMed Central

    Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient’s peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences. PMID:27598514

  8. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing.

    PubMed

    Kist, Andreas M; Sagafos, Dagrun; Rush, Anthony M; Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Lampert, Angelika; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient's peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences. PMID:27598514

  9. Increased frontal sleep slow wave activity in adolescents with major depression.

    PubMed

    Tesler, Noemi; Gerstenberg, Miriam; Franscini, Maurizia; Jenni, Oskar G; Walitza, Susanne; Huber, Reto

    2016-01-01

    Sleep slow wave activity (SWA), the major electrophysiological characteristic of deep sleep, mirrors both cortical restructuring and functioning. The incidence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) substantially rises during the vulnerable developmental phase of adolescence, where essential cortical restructuring is taking place. The goal of this study was to assess characteristics of SWA topography in adolescents with MDD, in order to assess abnormalities in both cortical restructuring and functioning on a local level. All night high-density EEG was recorded in 15 patients meeting DSM-5 criteria for MDD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The actual symptom severity was assessed using the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R). Topographical power maps were calculated based on the average SWA of the first non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep episode. Depressed adolescents exhibited significantly more SWA in a cluster of frontal electrodes compared to controls. SWA over frontal brain regions correlated positively with the CDRS-R subscore "morbid thoughts". Self-reported sleep latency was significantly higher in depressed adolescents compared to controls whereas sleep architecture did not differ between the groups. Higher frontal SWA in depressed adolescents may represent a promising biomarker tracing cortical regions of intense use and/or restructuring.

  10. A non-mitotic CENP-E homolog in Dictyostelium discoideum with slow motor activity.

    PubMed

    Kösem, Süleyman; Ökten, Zeynep; Ho, Thi-Hieu; Trommler, Gudrun; Koonce, Michael P; Samereier, Matthias; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette

    2013-02-15

    Kinesins are ATP-dependent molecular motors that mediate unidirectional intracellular transport along microtubules. Dictyostelium discoideum has 13 different kinesin isoforms including two members of the kinesin-7 family, Kif4 and Kif11. While Kif4 is structurally and functionally related to centromere-associated CENP-E proteins involved in the transport of chromosomes to the poles during mitosis, the function of the unusually short CENP-E variant Kif11 is unclear. Here we show that orthologs of short CENP-E variants are present in plants and fungi, and analyze functional properties of the Dictyostelium CENP-E version, Kif11. Gene knockout mutants reveal that Kif11 is not required for mitosis or development. Imaging of GFP-labeled Kif11 expressing Dictyostelium cells indicates that Kif11 is a plus-end directed motor that accumulates at microtubule plus ends. By multiple motor gliding assays, we show that Kif11 moves with an average velocity of 38nm/s, thus defining Kif11 as a very slow motor. The activity of the Kif11 motor appears to be modulated via interactions with the non-catalytic tail region. Our work highlights a subclass of kinesin-7-like motors that function outside of a role in mitosis.

  11. Data quality objectives for PUREX deactivation flushing

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, R.K.

    1995-04-01

    This Data Quality Objection (DQO) defines the sampling and analysis requirements necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated by WAC 173-303. Specifically, sampling and analysis requirements are identified for the flushing operations that are a major element of PUREX deactivation.

  12. Single channel currents of different amplitude activated by glutamate in a tonic (slow) crayfish muscle.

    PubMed

    Finger, W; Pareto, A

    1987-09-11

    Single channel currents were recorded by means of the patch-clamp technique from a tonic (slow) crayfish muscle in the presence of 5 mM glutamate. The experiments were carried out with 'Gigaohm-seals' in the 'cell-attached' mode at 15-17 degrees C. Five classes of single channel currents with different mean amplitudes were resolved: i1 = -0.75 +/- 0.43 (S.D.) pA, i2 = -1.4 +/- 0.4 pA, i3 = -3.5 +/- 0.63 pA, i4 = -8.5 +/- 0.92 pA and i5 approximately equal to 2 X i4, i2, i3 and i4 were recorded at resting membrane potential, Eo approximately equal to -80 mV (pipette potential Vp = 0), while i1 and i5 were recorded at 40 mV hyperpolarized to Eo (Vp = +40 mV). The current most frequently seen was i4 which is the excitatory glutamate-activated single channel current recorded previously by Franke et al. The membrane reversal potentials and channel conductances for i2 and i4 were estimated to be +60 mV (Eo + 140 mV), 13 pS for i2 and +40 mV (Eo + 120 mV), 80 pS for i4. It was assumed that up to 40 i1 currents could superpose in a single patch to generate a DC current of up to -30 pA with current fluctuations the intensity of which increased with the DC current amplitude. Often variable combinations of i1 to i4 currents could be recorded simultaneously in a single patch. In particular, simultaneous activity of i1, i4; i2, i4 and i3, i4 currents was observed in different single patches.

  13. An Active Learning Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Lab Demonstrating Contractile and Kinetic Properties of Fast- and Slow-Twitch Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, S. I.; Arber, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that humans possess fast and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of approximately 50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic…

  14. Fitness-driven deactivation in network evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin-Jian; Peng, Xiao-Long; Small, Michael; Fu, Xin-Chu

    2010-12-01

    Individual nodes in evolving real-world networks typically experience growth and decay—that is, the popularity and influence of individuals peaks and then fades. In this paper, we study this phenomenon via an intrinsic nodal fitness function and an intuitive ageing mechanism. Each node of the network is endowed with a fitness which represents its activity. All the nodes have two discrete stages: active and inactive. The evolution of the network combines the addition of new active nodes randomly connected to existing active ones and the deactivation of old active nodes with a possibility inversely proportional to their fitnesses. We obtain a structured exponential network when the fitness distribution of the individuals is homogeneous and a structured scale-free network with heterogeneous fitness distributions. Furthermore, we recover two universal scaling laws of the clustering coefficient for both cases, C(k) ~ k - 1 and C ~ n - 1, where k and n refer to the node degree and the number of active individuals, respectively. These results offer a new simple description of the growth and ageing of networks where intrinsic features of individual nodes drive their popularity, and hence degree.

  15. Solar-like oscillations and magnetic activity of the slow rotator EK Eridani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall, T. H.; Bruntt, H.; Stello, D.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We aim to understand the interplay between non-radial oscillations and stellar magnetic activity and test the feasibility of doing asteroseismology of magnetically active stars. We investigate the active slow rotator EK Eri which is the likely descendant of an Ap star. Methods: We analyze 30 years of photometric time-series data, 3 years of HARPS radial velocity monitoring, and 3 nights of high-cadence HARPS asteroseismic data. We construct a high-S/N HARPS spectrum that we use to determine atmospheric parameters and chemical composition. Spectra observed at different rotation phases are analyzed to search for signs of temperature or abundance variations. An upper limit on the projected rotational velocity is derived from very high-resolution CES spectra. Results: We detect oscillations in EK Eri with a frequency of the maximum power of ν_max = 320 ± 32 μHz, and we derive a peak amplitude per radial mode of ≈0.15 m s-1, which is a factor of ≈3 lower than expected. We suggest that the magnetic field may act to suppress low-degree modes. Individual frequencies can not be extracted from the available data. We derive accurate atmospheric parameters, refining our previous analysis, finding T_eff = 5135 ± 80 K, log g = 3.39 ± 0.12, and metallicity [M/H] = + 0.02 ± 0.04. Mass and radius estimates from the seismic analysis are not accurate enough to constrain the position in the HR diagram and the evolutionary state. We confirm that the main light variation is due to cool spots, but that other contributions may need to be taken into account. We tentatively suggest that the rotation period is twice the photometric period, i.e., P_rot = 2P_phot = 617.6 d, and that the star is a dipole-dominated oblique rotator viewed close to equator-on. We conclude from our derived parameters that v sin i < 0.40 km s-1 and we show that the value is too low to be reliably measured. We also link the time series of direct magnetic field measurements available in the literature

  16. Tri-modal regulation of cardiac muscle relaxation; intracellular calcium decline, thin filament deactivation, and cross-bridge cycling kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Ziolo, Mark T.; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac muscle relaxation is an essential step in the cardiac cycle. Even when the contraction of the heart is normal and forceful, a relaxation phase that is too slow will limit proper filling of the ventricles. Relaxation is too often thought of as a mere passive process that follows contraction. However, many decades of advancements in our understanding of cardiac muscle relaxation have shown it is a highly complex and well-regulated process. In this review, we will discuss three distinct events that can limit the rate of cardiac muscle relaxation: the rate of intracellular calcium decline, the rate of thin-filament de-activation, and the rate of cross-bridge cycling. Each of these processes are directly impacted by a plethora of molecular events. In addition, these three processes interact with each other, further complicating our understanding of relaxation. Each of these processes is continuously modulated by the need to couple bodily oxygen demand to cardiac output by the major cardiac physiological regulators. Length-dependent activation, frequency-dependent activation, and β-adrenergic regulation all directly and indirectly modulate calcium decline, thin-filament deactivation, and cross-bridge kinetics. We hope to convey our conclusion that cardiac muscle relaxation is a process of intricate checks and balances, and should not be thought of as a single rate-limiting step that is regulated at a single protein level. Cardiac muscle relaxation is a system level property that requires fundamental integration of three governing systems: intracellular calcium decline, thin filament deactivation, and cross-bridge cycling kinetics. PMID:25484996

  17. Mild Airflow Limitation during N2 Sleep Increases K-complex Frequency and Slows Electroencephalographic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chinh D.; Wellman, Andrew; Jordan, Amy S.; Eckert, Danny J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the effects of mild airflow limitation on K-complex frequency and morphology and electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral power. Methods: Transient reductions in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during stable N2 sleep were performed to induce mild airflow limitation in 20 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and 10 healthy controls aged 44 ± 13 y. EEG at C3 and airflow were measured in 1-min windows to quantify K-complex properties and EEG spectral power immediately before and during transient reductions in CPAP. The frequency and morphology (amplitude and latency of P200, N550 and N900 components) of K-complexes and EEG spectral power were compared between conditions. Results: During mild airflow limitation (18% reduction in peak inspiratory airflow from baseline, 0.38 ± 0.11 versus 0.31 ± 0.1 L/sec) insufficient to cause American Academy of Sleep Medicine-defined cortical arousal, K-complex frequency (9.5 ± 4.5 versus 13.7 ± 6.4 per min, P < 0.01), N550 amplitude (25 ± 3 versus 27 ± 3 μV, P < 0.01) and EEG spectral power (delta: 147 ± 48 versus 230 ± 99 μV2, P < 0.01 and theta bands: 31 ± 14 versus 34 ± 13 μV2, P < 0.01) significantly increased whereas beta band power decreased (14 ± 5 versus 11 ± 4 μV2, P < 0.01) compared to the preceding non flow-limited period on CPAP. K-complex frequency, morphology, and timing did not differ between patients and controls. Conclusion: Mild airflow limitation increases K-complex frequency, N550 amplitude, and spectral power of delta and theta bands. In addition to providing mechanistic insight into the role of mild airflow limitation on K-complex characteristics and EEG activity, these findings may have important implications for respiratory conditions in which airflow limitation during sleep is common (e.g., snoring and OSA). Citation: Nguyen CD, Wellman A, Jordan AS, Eckert DJ. Mild airflow limitation during N2 sleep increases k-complex frequency and slows

  18. Deactivating Cochlear Implant Electrodes Based on Pitch Information for Users of the ACE Strategy.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Deborah; Degun, Aneeka; Canas, Angela; Stainsby, Thomas; Vanpoucke, Filiep

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide range in performance for cochlear implant (CI) users and there is some evidence to suggest that implant fitting can be modified to improve performance if electrodes that do not provide distinct pitch information are de-activated. However, improvements in performance may not be the same for users of all CI devices; in particular for those with Cochlear devices using n-of-m strategies (ACE or SPEAK).The goal of this research was to determine for users of Cochlear devices (CP810 or CP900 series processors) if speech perception could be improved when indiscriminable electrodes were de-activated and this was also compared to when the same number of discriminable electrodes were de-activated.A cross-over study was conducted with 13 adult CI users who received experimental maps with de-activated channels for a minimum of 2 months and these were compared to optimised clinical maps.The findings showed that there were no significant benefits of electrode de-activation on speech perception and that there was a significant deterioration in spectro-temporal ripple perception when electrodes were switched off. There were no significant differences between de-activation of discriminable or indiscriminable electrodes.These findings suggest that electrode de-activation with n-of-m strategies may not be beneficial. PMID:27080652

  19. Deactivating Cochlear Implant Electrodes Based on Pitch Information for Users of the ACE Strategy.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Deborah; Degun, Aneeka; Canas, Angela; Stainsby, Thomas; Vanpoucke, Filiep

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide range in performance for cochlear implant (CI) users and there is some evidence to suggest that implant fitting can be modified to improve performance if electrodes that do not provide distinct pitch information are de-activated. However, improvements in performance may not be the same for users of all CI devices; in particular for those with Cochlear devices using n-of-m strategies (ACE or SPEAK).The goal of this research was to determine for users of Cochlear devices (CP810 or CP900 series processors) if speech perception could be improved when indiscriminable electrodes were de-activated and this was also compared to when the same number of discriminable electrodes were de-activated.A cross-over study was conducted with 13 adult CI users who received experimental maps with de-activated channels for a minimum of 2 months and these were compared to optimised clinical maps.The findings showed that there were no significant benefits of electrode de-activation on speech perception and that there was a significant deterioration in spectro-temporal ripple perception when electrodes were switched off. There were no significant differences between de-activation of discriminable or indiscriminable electrodes.These findings suggest that electrode de-activation with n-of-m strategies may not be beneficial.

  20. Rhythmic dendritic Ca2+ oscillations in thalamocortical neurons during slow non-REM sleep-related activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Errington, Adam C; Hughes, Stuart W; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2012-08-15

    The distribution of T-type Ca2+ channels along the entire somatodendritic axis of sensory thalamocortical (TC) neurons permits regenerative propagation of low threshold spikes (LTS) accompanied by global dendritic Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, T-type Ca2+ channels play an integral role in low frequency oscillatory activity (<1–4 Hz) that is a defining feature of TC neurons. Nonetheless, the dynamics of T-type Ca2+ channel-dependent dendritic Ca2+ signalling during slow sleep-associated oscillations remains unknown. Here we demonstrate using patch clamp recording and two-photon Ca2+ imaging of dendrites from cat TC neurons undergoing spontaneous slow oscillatory activity that somatically recorded δ (1–4 Hz) and slow (<1 Hz) oscillations are associated with rhythmic and sustained global oscillations in dendritic Ca2+. In addition, our data reveal the presence of LTS-dependent Ca2+ transients (Δ[Ca2+]) in dendritic spine-like structures on proximal TC neuron dendrites during slow (<1 Hz) oscillations whose amplitudes are similar to those observed in the dendritic shaft. We find that the amplitude of oscillation associated Δ[Ca2+] do not vary significantly with distance from the soma whereas the decay time constant (τdecay) of Δ[Ca2+] decreases significantly in more distal dendrites. Furthermore, τdecay of dendritic Δ[Ca2+] increases significantly as oscillation frequency decreases from δ to slow frequencies where pronounced depolarised UP states are observed. Such rhythmic dendritic Ca2+ entry in TC neurons during sleep-related firing patterns could be an important factor in maintaining the oscillatory activity and associated biochemical signalling processes, such as synaptic downscaling, that occur in non-REM sleep.

  1. Gamification of Learning Deactivates the Default Mode Network.

    PubMed

    Howard-Jones, Paul A; Jay, Tim; Mason, Alice; Jones, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that embedding educational learning in a game would improve learning outcomes, with increased engagement and recruitment of cognitive resources evidenced by increased activation of working memory network (WMN) and deactivation of default mode network (DMN) regions. In an fMRI study, we compared activity during periods of learning in three conditions that were increasingly game-like: Study-only (when periods of learning were followed by an exemplar question together with its correct answer), Self-quizzing (when periods of learning were followed by a multiple choice question in return for a fixed number of points) and Game-based (when, following each period of learning, participants competed with a peer to answer the question for escalating, uncertain rewards). DMN hubs deactivated as conditions became more game-like, alongside greater self-reported engagement and, in the Game-based condition, higher learning scores. These changes did not occur with any detectable increase in WMN activity. Additionally, ventral striatal activation was associated with responding to questions and receiving positive question feedback. Results support the significance of DMN deactivation for educational learning, and are aligned with recent evidence suggesting DMN and WMN activity may not always be anti-correlated. PMID:26779054

  2. Gamification of Learning Deactivates the Default Mode Network

    PubMed Central

    Howard-Jones, Paul A.; Jay, Tim; Mason, Alice; Jones, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that embedding educational learning in a game would improve learning outcomes, with increased engagement and recruitment of cognitive resources evidenced by increased activation of working memory network (WMN) and deactivation of default mode network (DMN) regions. In an fMRI study, we compared activity during periods of learning in three conditions that were increasingly game-like: Study-only (when periods of learning were followed by an exemplar question together with its correct answer), Self-quizzing (when periods of learning were followed by a multiple choice question in return for a fixed number of points) and Game-based (when, following each period of learning, participants competed with a peer to answer the question for escalating, uncertain rewards). DMN hubs deactivated as conditions became more game-like, alongside greater self-reported engagement and, in the Game-based condition, higher learning scores. These changes did not occur with any detectable increase in WMN activity. Additionally, ventral striatal activation was associated with responding to questions and receiving positive question feedback. Results support the significance of DMN deactivation for educational learning, and are aligned with recent evidence suggesting DMN and WMN activity may not always be anti-correlated. PMID:26779054

  3. Mechanochemical approach for selective deactivation of external surface acidity of ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Satoshi; Sato, Koki; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Tatami, Junichi; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Wakihara, Toru

    2015-03-01

    The acid sites associated with the external surface of zeolite particles are responsible for undesirable consecutive reactions, such as isomerization, alkylation, and oligomerization, resulting in a lower selectivity to a target product; therefore, the selective modification (deactivation) of the external surface of zeolite particles has been an important issue in zeolite science. Here, a new method for surface deactivation of zeolite catalyst was tested via a mechanochemical approach using powder composer. Postsynthetic mechanochemical treatment of ZSM-5 zeolite causes a selective deactivation of catalytically active sites existing only on the external surface, as a potentially useful catalyst for highly selective production of p-xylene.

  4. Activated Very Low Frequency Earthquakes By the Slow Slip Events in the Ryukyu Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Sunagawa, N.

    2014-12-01

    The Ryukyu Trench (RT), where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting, has had no known thrust earthquakes with a Mw>8.0 in the last 300 years. However, the rupture source of the 1771 tsunami has been proposed as an Mw > 8.0 earthquake in the south RT. Based on the dating of tsunami boulders, it has been estimated that large tsunamis occur at intervals of 150-400 years in the south Ryukyu arc (RA) (Araoka et al., 2013), although they have not occurred for several thousand years in the central and northern Ryukyu areas (Goto et al., 2014). To address the discrepancy between recent low moment releases by earthquakes and occurrence of paleo-tsunamis in the RT, we focus on the long-term activity of the very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs), which are good indicators of the stress release in the shallow plate interface. VLFEs have been detected along the RT (Ando et al., 2012), which occur on the plate interface or at the accretionary prism. We used broadband data from the F-net of NIED along the RT and from the IRIS network. We applied two filters to all the raw broadband seismograms: a 0.02-0.05 Hz band-pass filter and a 1 Hz high-pass filter. After identification of the low-frequency events from the band-pass-filtered seismograms, the local and teleseismic events were removed. Then we picked the arrival time of the maximum amplitude of the surface wave of the VLFEs and determined the epicenters. VLFEs occurred on the RA side within 100 km from the trench axis along the RT. Distribution of the 6670 VLFEs from 2002 to 2013 could be divided to several clusters. Principal large clusters were located at 27.1°-29.0°N, 25.5°-26.6°N, and 122.1°-122.4°E (YA). We found that the VLFEs of the YA are modulated by repeating slow slip events (SSEs) which occur beneath south RA. The activity of the VLFEs increased to two times of its ordinary rate in 15 days after the onset of the SSEs. Activation of the VLFEs could be generated by low stress change of 0.02-20 kPa increase in

  5. Final deactivation project report on the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility, Building 7602 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility (Building 7602) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities by the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP). This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This report provides a history and description of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous and radioactive materials inventory, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed.

  6. Plasma flux-dependent lipid A deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hung-Wen; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Ahmed, Musahid; Liu, Suet Yi; Fang, Yigang; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the influence of gas plasma flux on endotoxin lipid A film deactivation. To study the effect of the flux magnitude of reactive species, a modified low-pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with O radical flux ˜1016 cm-2 s-1 was used. After ICP exposures, it was observed that while the Fourier transform infrared absorbance of fatty chains responsible for the toxicity drops by 80% through the film, no obvious film endotoxin deactivation is seen. This is in contrast to that previously observed under low flux exposure conducted in a vacuum beam system: near-surface only loss of fatty chains led to significant film deactivation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization of changes at the film surface did not appear to correlate with the degree of deactivation. Lipid A films need to be nearly completely removed in order to detect significant deactivation under high flux conditions. Additional high reactive species flux experiments were conducted using an atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet and a UV/ozone device. Exposure of lipid A films to reactive species with these devices showed similar deactivation behaviour. The causes for the difference between low and high flux exposures may be due to the nature of near-surface structural modifications as a function of the rate of film removal.

  7. Experimental evidence for shallow, slow-moving landslides activated by a decrease in ground temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, Tatsuya; Matsuura, Sumio; Okamoto, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    In order to understand the trigger mechanism of slow-moving landslides occurring in the early cold season from late autumn to winter, we investigated the effect of temperature on the shear strength of slip surface soils. Displacement-controlled and shear stress-controlled box shear experiments were performed on undisturbed slip zone soils under residual strength conditions. Test results conducted at temperatures from 9 to 25°C showed remarkable shear strength reductions with decreasing temperature. Creep-like slow shear displacements were induced by a decrease in temperature. These temperature-dependent shear behaviors are attributed to the rheological properties of hydrous smectite that dominantly compose the soil material along the failure surface. Our experimental results imply that ground temperature conditions influence slope instability, especially for shallow landslides occurring in smectite-bearing rock areas.

  8. Odors enhance slow-wave activity in non-rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Perl, Ofer; Arzi, Anat; Sela, Lee; Secundo, Lavi; Holtzman, Yael; Samnon, Perry; Oksenberg, Arie; Sobel, Noam; Hairston, Ilana S

    2016-05-01

    Most forms of suprathreshold sensory stimulation perturb sleep. In contrast, presentation of pure olfactory or mild trigeminal odorants does not lead to behavioral or physiological arousal. In fact, some odors promote objective and subjective measures of sleep quality in humans and rodents. The brain mechanisms underlying these sleep-protective properties of olfaction remain unclear. Slow oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) are a marker of deep sleep, and K complexes (KCs) are an EEG marker of cortical response to sensory interference. We therefore hypothesized that odorants presented during sleep will increase power in slow EEG oscillations. Moreover, given that odorants do not drive sleep interruption, we hypothesized that unlike other sensory stimuli odorants would not drive KCs. To test these hypotheses we used polysomnography to measure sleep in 34 healthy subjects (19 women, 15 men; mean age 26.5 ± 2.5 yr) who were repeatedly presented with odor stimuli via a computer-controlled air-dilution olfactometer over the course of a single night. Each participant was exposed to one of four odorants, lavender oil (n = 13), vetiver oil (n = 5), vanillin (n = 12), or ammonium sulfide (n = 4), for durations of 5, 10, and 20 s every 9-15 min. Consistent with our hypotheses, we found that odor presentation during sleep enhanced the power of delta (0.5-4 Hz) and slow spindle (9-12 Hz) frequencies during non-rapid eye movement sleep. The increase was proportionate to odor duration. In addition, odor presentation did not modulate the occurrence of KCs. These findings imply a sleep-promoting olfactory mechanism that may deepen sleep through driving increased slow-frequency oscillations. PMID:26888107

  9. Odors enhance slow-wave activity in non-rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Perl, Ofer; Arzi, Anat; Sela, Lee; Secundo, Lavi; Holtzman, Yael; Samnon, Perry; Oksenberg, Arie; Sobel, Noam; Hairston, Ilana S

    2016-05-01

    Most forms of suprathreshold sensory stimulation perturb sleep. In contrast, presentation of pure olfactory or mild trigeminal odorants does not lead to behavioral or physiological arousal. In fact, some odors promote objective and subjective measures of sleep quality in humans and rodents. The brain mechanisms underlying these sleep-protective properties of olfaction remain unclear. Slow oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) are a marker of deep sleep, and K complexes (KCs) are an EEG marker of cortical response to sensory interference. We therefore hypothesized that odorants presented during sleep will increase power in slow EEG oscillations. Moreover, given that odorants do not drive sleep interruption, we hypothesized that unlike other sensory stimuli odorants would not drive KCs. To test these hypotheses we used polysomnography to measure sleep in 34 healthy subjects (19 women, 15 men; mean age 26.5 ± 2.5 yr) who were repeatedly presented with odor stimuli via a computer-controlled air-dilution olfactometer over the course of a single night. Each participant was exposed to one of four odorants, lavender oil (n = 13), vetiver oil (n = 5), vanillin (n = 12), or ammonium sulfide (n = 4), for durations of 5, 10, and 20 s every 9-15 min. Consistent with our hypotheses, we found that odor presentation during sleep enhanced the power of delta (0.5-4 Hz) and slow spindle (9-12 Hz) frequencies during non-rapid eye movement sleep. The increase was proportionate to odor duration. In addition, odor presentation did not modulate the occurrence of KCs. These findings imply a sleep-promoting olfactory mechanism that may deepen sleep through driving increased slow-frequency oscillations.

  10. Deactivation of metastable single-crystal silicon hyperdoped with sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C. B.; Akey, Austin J.; Sullivan, Joseph T.; Buonassisi, Tonio; Krich, Jacob J.; Recht, Daniel; Aziz, Michael J.

    2013-12-28

    Silicon supersaturated with sulfur by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting exhibits broadband optical absorption of photons with energies less than silicon's band gap. However, this metastable, hyperdoped material loses its ability to absorb sub-band gap light after subsequent thermal treatment. We explore this deactivation process through optical absorption and electronic transport measurements of sulfur-hyperdoped silicon subject to anneals at a range of durations and temperatures. The deactivation process is well described by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov framework for the diffusion-mediated transformation of a metastable supersaturated solid solution, and we find that this transformation is characterized by an apparent activation energy of E{sub A}=1.7 ± 0.1 eV. Using this activation energy, the evolution of the optical and electronic properties for all anneal duration-temperature combinations collapse onto distinct curves as a function of the extent of reaction. We provide a mechanistic interpretation of this deactivation based on short-range thermally activated atomic movements of the dopants to form sulfur complexes.

  11. Conversion of Biomass-Derived Small Oxygenates over HZSM-5 and its Deactivation Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Flake, Matthew D.; Zhang, He; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-28

    HZSM-5 catalyst deactivation was studied using aqueous feed mixtures containing ethanol, ethanol+ acetic acid, ethanol+ethyl acetate, or ethanol+acetaldehyde in a fixed bed reactor at 360°C and 300psig. Compared to ethanol alone experiment, addition of other oxygenates reduced catalyst life in the order of: ethyl acetatedeactivate the catalyst through a pore-blocking mechanism. Acetic acid deactivates the catalyst through an active site poisoning mechanism or strong adsorption of acetate intermediates on the active sites (hydroxyl groups). Ethanol deactivates the catalyst primarily through its pore-blocking mechanism, but the rate of ethanol deactivation is orders of magnitude slower than that of acetaldehyde. Ethyl acetate hydrolyzes to form acetic acid and ethanol which deactivate the catalyst through its respective mechanisms. In addition, each functional group of oxygenates requires different active sites/catalysts and different operating conditions due to competitive adsorptions on active sites for their conversion to the desired products. Therefore, it is necessary to pre-treat the mixture of oxygenates to produce a feed stream containing the same or similar functional group compounds before converting the feed stream to hydrocarbon compounds over HZSM-5 catalyst.

  12. Effects of age on calcium transport activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum in fast- and slow-twitch rat muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, L; Salviati, G

    1989-01-01

    1. The calcium transport activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was measured in chemically skinned single fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres from young (3 months) and old (23-24 months) rats. Contractile properties, the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition and enzyme histochemical features were studied in relation to the SR characteristics. 2. In fast-twitch single motor units, the contraction time of the isometric twitch increased (P less than 0.001) from 13 +/- 1 ms in young animals to 18 +/- 2 ms in old ones. In the slow-twitch soleus, the contraction (P less than 0.001) and half-relaxation (P less than 0.05) times increased from 30 +/- 5 and 45 +/- 10 ms, respectively, in the young animals to 43 +/- 3 and 55 +/- 4 ms in the old ones. The proportion of slow-twitch (type I) fibres increased (P less than 0.05) with age in the soleus from 92 +/- 6 to 98 +/- 2% and the proportion of fast-twitch fibres (type IIA) decreased (P less than 0.01) from 6 +/- 5 to 0 +/- 0%. 3. The Ca2+ accumulation capacity (an index of SR volume), the rate of Ca2+ uptake and the fractional rate of SR filling (an estimate of the specific activity of the Ca2+ pump) were decreased by 18 (P less than 0.05), 32 (P less than 0.01) and 32% (P less than 0.001), respectively, in the old fast-twitch muscle fibres. In the slow-twitch muscle fibres, on the other hand, no significant age-related changes were observed in the Ca2+ transport activity of the SR. Thus, ageing exerts a differential influence on SR volume and function in fast- and slow-twitch fibres. 4. It is concluded that an age-related impairment of intrinsic SR function and a decrease in SR volume are probable factors underlying the decreased speed of contraction of fast-twitch muscle fibres in old age. In the slow-twitch soleus, on the other hand, one or more other mechanisms are responsible for the age-related decrease in the speed of contraction. The loss of fast-twitch muscle fibres in old soleus is one mechanism, but not the

  13. Na channel activation gate modulates slow recovery from use-dependent block by local anesthetics in squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, J Z; Tanguy, J

    1985-01-01

    The time course of recovery from use-dependent block of sodium channels caused by local anesthetics was studied in squid axons. In the presence of lidocaine or its quaternary derivatives, QX-222 and QX-314, or 9-aminoacridine (9-AA), recovery from use-dependent block occurred in two phases: a fast phase and a slow phase. Only the fast phase was observed in the presence of benzocaine. The fast phase had a time constant of several milliseconds and resembled recovery from the fast Na inactivation in the absence of drug. Depending on the drug present, the magnitude of the time constant of the slow phase varied (for example at -80 mV): lidocaine, 270 ms; QX-222, 4.4 s; QX-314, 17 s; and 9-AA, 14 s. The two phases differed in the voltage dependence of recovery time constants. When the membrane was hyperpolarized, the recovery time constant for the fast phase was decreased, whereas that for the slow phase was increased for QX-compounds and 9-AA or unchanged for lidocaine. The fast phase is interpreted as representing the unblocked channels recovering from the fast Na inactivation, and the slow phase as representing the bound and blocked channels recovering from the use-dependent block accumulated by repetitive depolarizing pulse. The voltage dependence of time constants for the slow recovery is consistent with the m-gate trapping hypothesis. According to this hypothesis, the drug molecule is trapped by the activation gate (the m-gate) of the channel. The cationic form of drug molecule leaves the channel through the hydrophilic pathway, when the channel is open. However, lidocaine, after losing its proton, may leave the closed channel rapidly through the hydrophobic pathway. PMID:2410043

  14. Object category classification of fMRI data using support vector machine combined with deactivation voxel selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Caifeng; Song, Sutao; Li, Yao; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2012-03-01

    Support Vector Machine (SVM) is an accurate pattern recognition method which has been widely used in functional MRI (fMRI) data classification. Voxel selection is a very important part in classification. In general, voxel selection is based on brain regions associated with activation caused by different experiment conditions or stimulations. However, negative blood oxygenation level-dependent responses (deactivation) which have also been found in humans or animals contribute to the classification of different cognitive tasks. Different from traditional studies which focused merely on the activation voxel selection methods, our aim is to investigate the deactivation voxel selection methods in the classification of fMRI data using SVM. In this study, three different voxel selection methods (deactivation, activation, the combination of deactivation and activation) are applied to decide which voxel is included in SVM classifier with linear kernel in classifying 4-category objects on fMRI data. The average accuracies of deactivation classification were 73.36%(house vs. face), 60.34%(house vs. car), 60.94%(house vs. cat), 71.43%(face vs. car), 63.17%(face vs. cat) and 61.61%(car vs. cat). The classification results of deactivation were significantly above the chance level which implies the deactivation is informative. The accuracies of combination of activation and deactivation method were close to that of activation method, and it was even better for some representative subjects. These results suggest deactivation provides useful information in the object category classification on fMRI data and the method of voxel selection based on both activation and deactivation will be a significant method in classification in the future.

  15. The interaction of a metal deactivator with metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schreifels, J.A. ); Morris, R.E.; Turner, N.H.; Mowery, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In modern aircraft fuel systems, the fuel is used as a heat transfer medium to dissipate heat from the avionics and hydraulic systems. Under these conditions, the fuel can undergo autooxidations. Autooxidations of net fuel can result in the formation of insoluble gum and sediment which can impair operation of the jet engine. Metal deactivator additives (MDA) were developed to counteract the catalytic activity of dissolved metals. The authors have directed their efforts at ascertaining the various mechanisms by which MDA can act, particularly in accelerated stability testing. One objective of this study was to determine to what extent interactions with metal surfaces of the test apparent govern the effectiveness of metal deactivators. This paper describes an examination of metal surfaces exposed to MDA solutions to determine under what, if any, conditions metal passivation can occur.

  16. Targeting Mortalin by Embelin Causes Activation of Tumor Suppressor p53 and Deactivation of Metastatic Signaling in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Nupur; Grover, Abhinav; Goyal, Sukriti; Katiyar, Shashank P.; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Wang, Pi-Chao; Sundar, Durai; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Embelin, a natural quinone found in the fruits of Embelia ribes, is commonly used in Ayurvedic home medicine for a variety of therapeutic potentials including anti-inflammation, anti-fever, anti-bacteria and anti-cancer. Molecular mechanisms of these activities and cellular targets have not been clarified to-date. We demonstrate that the embelin inhibits mortalin-p53 interactions, and activates p53 protein in tumor cells. We provide bioinformatics, molecular docking and experimental evidence to the binding affinity of embelin with mortalin and p53. Binding of embelin with mortalin/p53 abrogates their complex resulted in nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation function of p53 causing growth arrest in cancer cells. Furthermore, analyses of growth factors and metastatic signaling using antibody membrane array revealed their downregulation in embelin-treated cells. We also found that the embelin causes transcriptional attenuation of mortalin and several other proteins involved in metastatic signaling in cancer cells. Based on these molecular dynamics and experimental data, it is concluded that the anticancer activity of embelin involves targeting of mortalin, activation of p53 and inactivation of metastatic signaling. PMID:26376435

  17. The slow relaxation dynamics in active pharmaceutical ingredients studied by DSC and TSDC: Voriconazole, miconazole and itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Joaquim J Moura; Diogo, Hermínio P

    2016-03-30

    The slow molecular mobility of three active pharmaceutical drugs (voriconazole, miconazole and itraconazole) has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC). This study yielded the main kinetic features of the secondary relaxations and of the main (glass transition) relaxation, in particular their distribution of relaxation times. The dynamic fragility of the three glass formers was determined from DSC data (using two different procedures) and from TSDC data. According to our results voriconazole behaves as a relatively strong liquid, while miconazole is moderately fragile and itraconazole is a very fragile liquid. There are no studies in this area published in the literature relating to voriconazole. Also not available in the literature is a slow mobility study by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the amorphous miconazole. Apart from that, the results obtained are in reasonable agreement with published works using different experimental techniques.

  18. Dopamine Transporters in Striatum Correlated with Deactivation in the Default Mode Network during Visuospatial Attention

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, D.; Fowler, J.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.L.; Telang, F.; Wang, Chang, L.; Ernst, T.; /Fowler, J.S.

    2009-06-01

    Dopamine and dopamine transporters (DAT, which regulate extracellular dopamine in the brain) are implicated in the modulation of attention but their specific roles are not well understood. Here we hypothesized that dopamine modulates attention by facilitation of brain deactivation in the default mode network (DMN). Thus, higher striatal DAT levels, which would result in an enhanced clearance of dopamine and hence weaker dopamine signals, would be associated to lower deactivation in the DMN during an attention task. For this purpose we assessed the relationship between DAT in striatum (measured with positron emission tomography and [{sup 11}C]cocaine used as DAT radiotracer) and brain activation and deactivation during a parametric visual attention task (measured with blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging) in healthy controls. We show that DAT availability in caudate and putamen had a negative correlation with deactivation in ventral parietal regions of the DMN (precuneus, BA 7) and a positive correlation with deactivation in a small region in the ventral anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24/32). With increasing attentional load, DAT in caudate showed a negative correlation with load-related deactivation increases in precuneus. These findings provide evidence that dopamine transporters modulate neural activity in the DMN and anterior cingulate gyrus during visuospatial attention. Our findings suggest that dopamine modulates attention in part by regulating neuronal activity in posterior parietal cortex including precuneus (region involved in alertness) and cingulate gyrus (region deactivated in proportion to emotional interference). These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of stimulant medications (increase dopamine by blocking DAT) in inattention reflect in part their ability to facilitate the deactivation of the DMN.

  19. Separate activation of fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in rat neocortex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Benardo, L S

    1994-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition was investigated by stimulating inhibitory neurones with focal microapplications of glutamate, while recording from layer V pyramidal neurones of rat somatosensory cortical slices. One class of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) thus elicited was characterized as a fast, chloride-mediated, GABAA IPSP in part by its fast time-to-peak (mean 2.5 ms) and brief duration, but primarily on the basis of its reversal potential at -68 mV, and its blockade by picrotoxin. The average peak amplitude for these fast IPSPs was -1.5 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance calculated for these events was about 10 nS. The conductance change associated with the maximal fast inhibitory postsynaptic potential resulting from electrical stimulation of afferent pathways ranged up to 116 nS. A second class of IPSP was encountered much less frequently. These glutamate-triggered events were characterized as slow, potassium-mediated GABAB IPSPs partly because of their longer times-to-peak (mean, 45 ms) and duration, but especially because of their extrapolated equilibrium potential at about -89 mV and blockade by 2-hydroxysaclofen. The average peak amplitude for these slow IPSPs was -2.3 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance for these events was about 8 nS. IPSPs resulting from the excitation of individual inhibitory interneurones were elicited by glutamate microapplication at particular locations relative to recording sites. Both fast and slow IPSPs were generated, but these occurred as separate events, and mixed responses were never seen. Thus, the two mechanistically distinct types of IPSPs which result from GABA interaction at GABAA and GABAB receptors on neocortical neurones may be mediated by separate classes of inhibitory neurones. PMID:7913968

  20. Brain activity modeling in general anesthesia: Enhancing local mean-field models using a slow adaptive firing rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaee-Ardekani, B.; Senhadji, L.; Shamsollahi, M. B.; Vosoughi-Vahdat, B.; Wodey, E.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, an enhanced local mean-field model that is suitable for simulating the electroencephalogram (EEG) in different depths of anesthesia is presented. The main building elements of the model (e.g., excitatory and inhibitory populations) are taken from Steyn-Ross [M. L. Steyn-Ross , Phys. Rev. E 64, 011917 (2001), D. A. Steyn-Ross , Phys. Rev. E 64, 011918 (2001)] and Bojak and Liley [I. Bojak and D. T. Liley, Phys. Rev. E 71, 041902 (2005)] mean-field models and a new slow ionic mechanism is included in the main model. Generally, in mean-field models, some sigmoid-shape functions determine firing rates of neural populations according to their mean membrane potentials. In the enhanced model, the sigmoid function corresponding to excitatory population is redefined to be also a function of the slow ionic mechanism. This modification adapts the firing rate of neural populations to slow ionic activities of the brain. When an anesthetic drug is administered, the slow mechanism may induce neural cells to alternate between two levels of activity referred to as up and down states. Basically, the frequency of up-down switching is in the delta band (0-4Hz) and this is the main reason behind high amplitude, low frequency fluctuations of EEG signals in anesthesia. Our analyses show that the enhanced model may have different working states driven by anesthetic drug concentration. The model is settled in the up state in the waking period, it may switch to up and down states in moderate anesthesia while in deep anesthesia it remains in the down state.

  1. Characterization of a heat-resistant extracellular protease from Pseudomonas fluorescens 07A shows that low temperature treatments are more effective in deactivating its proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maura P; Salgado, Rafael L; Eller, Monique R; Vidigal, Pedro Marcus P; Fernandes de Carvalho, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    This work discusses the biological and biochemical characterization of an extracellular protease produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 49.486 kDa and hydrolyzes gelatin, casein, and azocasein, but not BSA. Its maximum activity is found at 37°C and pH 7.5, but it retained almost 70% activity at pH 10.0. It was shown to be a metalloprotease inhibited by Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Fe(2+), and Mg(2+), but induced by Mn(2+). After incubation at 100°C for 5min, the enzyme presented over 40% activity, but only 14 to 30% when submitted to milder heat treatments. This behavior may cause significant problems under conditions commonly used for the processing and storage of milk and dairy products, particularly UHT milk. A specific peptide sequenced by mass spectrometer analysis allowed the identification of gene that encodes this extracellular protease in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens 07A strain. The enzyme has 477 AA and highly conserved Ca(2+)- and Zn(2+)-binding domains, indicating that Ca(2+), the main ion in milk, is also a cofactor. This work contributes to the understanding of the biochemical aspects of enzyme activity and associates them with its sequence and structure. These findings are essential for the full understanding and control of these enzymes and the technological problems they cause in the dairy industry. PMID:27497896

  2. Activity budget and positional behavior of the Mysore slender loris (Loris tardigradus lydekkerianus): implications for slow climbing locomotion.

    PubMed

    Nekaris, K A

    2001-01-01

    Both predator defense and feeding ecology models have been proposed to explain the relatively slow climbing locomotion of the Lorisinae. During a study of the socioecology of the Mysore slender loris (Loris tardigradus lydekkerianus) in Tamil Nadu, India, six categories of behavior and eleven different postures were recorded to estimate a general activity budget for the slender loris, and are examined here particularly in relation to slow climbing locomotor strategies. Reactions to potential predators are also described. The main study population was composed of 15 animals. Activity budgets were compiled in three ways: all instantaneous point samples collected over 1,173 h pooled (n = 13,717), the means of individual lorises (n = 15) and behavior at the moment of first contact (n = 357). No significant difference was found between these three data sets. Approximately 45% of the activity budget was spent in inactive behaviors including sitting vigilant, resting and sleeping. Foraging and traveling comprised nearly half the activity budget, with the rest of the time spent grooming. The most common postures assumed by lorises were sitting and quadrupedal walking. Individual lorises were relatively gregarious and spent up to half their activity budget with other animals. Unlike pottos and angwantibos, lorises did not freeze, head butt or drop from branches in reaction to potential predators, but either ignored them, fled or made loud calls. Cryptic and slow climbing locomotion were used before traveling on open ground between discontinuous substrates, thereby supporting hypotheses relating to predator pressure, and also before capturing fast moving insect prey, supporting hypotheses relating to diet. It is proposed that a divergence in foraging strategies between bushbabies and lorisines may be the best adaptive explanation for their behavioral and morphological differences, including predator defense mechanisms.

  3. Rational exploration of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) palladacycle diversity: a highly active and versatile precatalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions of deactivated aryl and alkyl substrates.

    PubMed

    Peh, Guang-Rong; Kantchev, Eric Assen B; Er, Jun-Cheng; Ying, Jackie Y

    2010-04-01

    As less attention has been focussed on the design of highly efficient palladium precatalysts to ensure the smooth formation of the active catalyst for metal-mediated cross coupling reactions, we herein demonstrate that combining the bulky N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (IPr) with cyclopalladated acetanilide as the optimal palladium precatalyst leads to superior catalytic activity compared with the state-of-the-art NHC-Pd catalysts. The complex was discovered through the evaluation of a small, rationally designed library of NHC-palladacycles prepared by a novel, practical and atom-economic method, the direct reaction of IPrHCl with palladacycle acetate dimers. PMID:20175159

  4. Reflections of hunger and satiation in the structure of temporal organization of slow electrical and spike activities of fundal and antral stomach muscles in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Zenina, O Yu

    2012-11-01

    Manifestations of hunger and satiation in myoelectric activity patterns in different portions of the stomach were studied in chronic experiments. The state of hunger manifested in the structure of temporal organization of slow electric activity of muscles in the stomach body and antrum in the form of bimodal distributions of slow electric wave periods, while satiation as unimodal distribution. In hunger-specific bimodal distribution of slow electric wave periods generated by muscles of the stomach body and antrum, the position of the first maximum carries the information about oncoming food reinforcement, since this particular range of slow wave fluctuations determines temporal parameters of slow electric activity of muscles in all stomach regions in the course of subsequent successive food-procuring behavior. Under conditions of hunger, the pacemaker features of muscles in the lesser curvature are realized incompletely. Complete realization is achieved in the course of food intake and at the state of satiation.

  5. Lignocellulosic hydrolysate inhibitors selectively inhibit/deactivate cellulase performance.

    PubMed

    Mhlongo, Sizwe I; den Haan, Riaan; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda; van Zyl, Willem H

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we monitored the inhibition and deactivation effects of various compounds associated with lignocellulosic hydrolysates on individual and combinations of cellulases. Tannic acid representing polymeric lignin residues strongly inhibited cellobiohydrolase 1 (CBH1) and β-glucosidase 1 (BGL1), but had a moderate inhibitory effect on endoglucanase 2 (EG2). Individual monomeric lignin residues had little or no inhibitory effect on hydrolytic enzymes. However, coniferyl aldehyde and syringaldehyde substantially decreased the activity of CBH1 and deactivated BGL1. Acetic and formic acids also showed strong inhibition of BGL1 but not CBH1 and EG2, whereas tannic, acetic and formic acid strongly inhibited a combination of CBH1 and EG2 during Avicel hydrolysis. Diminishing enzymatic hydrolysis is largely a function of inhibitor concentration and the enzyme-inhibitor relationship, rather than contact time during the hydrolysis process (i.e. deactivation). This suggests that decreased rates of hydrolysis during the enzymatic depolymerisation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates may be imparted by other factors related to substrate crystallinity and accessibility.

  6. Lignocellulosic hydrolysate inhibitors selectively inhibit/deactivate cellulase performance.

    PubMed

    Mhlongo, Sizwe I; den Haan, Riaan; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda; van Zyl, Willem H

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we monitored the inhibition and deactivation effects of various compounds associated with lignocellulosic hydrolysates on individual and combinations of cellulases. Tannic acid representing polymeric lignin residues strongly inhibited cellobiohydrolase 1 (CBH1) and β-glucosidase 1 (BGL1), but had a moderate inhibitory effect on endoglucanase 2 (EG2). Individual monomeric lignin residues had little or no inhibitory effect on hydrolytic enzymes. However, coniferyl aldehyde and syringaldehyde substantially decreased the activity of CBH1 and deactivated BGL1. Acetic and formic acids also showed strong inhibition of BGL1 but not CBH1 and EG2, whereas tannic, acetic and formic acid strongly inhibited a combination of CBH1 and EG2 during Avicel hydrolysis. Diminishing enzymatic hydrolysis is largely a function of inhibitor concentration and the enzyme-inhibitor relationship, rather than contact time during the hydrolysis process (i.e. deactivation). This suggests that decreased rates of hydrolysis during the enzymatic depolymerisation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates may be imparted by other factors related to substrate crystallinity and accessibility. PMID:26453468

  7. Deactivation Mechanisms of Pt/Pd-based Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebenga, Michelle H.; Kim, Chang H.; Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Brown, David B.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-04-30

    Currently precious metal-based diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) containing platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) are most commonly used for the oxidation of hydrocarbon and NO in diesel exhaust hydrocarbon oxidation. The present work has been carried out to investigate the deactivation mechanisms of the DOC from its real-world vehicle operation by coupling its catalytic activity measurements with surface characterization including x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A production Pt-Pd DOC was obtained after being aged on a vehicle driven for 135,000 miles in order to study its deactivation behavior. The performance of the vehicle-aged part was correlated with that of the simulated hydrothermal lab aged sample assuming that Pt-Pd sintering plays a major role in irreversible catalyst deactivation. In addition to the hydrothermal sintering, the deterioration of hydrocarbon and NO oxidation performance was caused by surface poisoning. The role of the various aging factors in determining long-term performance in mobile applications will be discussed.

  8. Low-temperature activation and deactivation of high-Curie-temperature ferromagnetism in a new diluted magnetic semiconductor: Ni2+-Doped SnO2

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Paul I.; Radovanovic, Pavle; Heald, Steve M.; Gamelin, Daniel R.

    2005-10-19

    We report the synthesis of colloidal Ni2+-doped SnO2 (Ni2+:SnO2) nanocrystals and their characterization by electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, X-ray absorption, magnetic susceptibility, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction measurements. The Ni2+ dopants are found to occupy pseudo-octahedral Sn4+ cation sites of rutile SnO2 without local charge compensation. The paramagnetic nanocrystals exhibit robust high-TC ferromagnetism (Ms (300 K) = 0.8 μB/Ni2+) when spin-coated into films, attributed to the formation of interfacial fusion defects. Facile reversibility of the paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition is also observed. This magnetic phase transition is studied as a function of temperature, time, and atmospheric composition, from which the barrier to ferromagnetic activation is estimated to be Ea = 1200 cm-1. This energy is associated with ligand mobility on the surfaces of the Ni2+:SnO2 nanocrystals. The phase transition is reversed under air but not under N2, from which the microscopic identity of the activating defect is proposed to be interfacial oxygen vacancies.

  9. Effects of minimal exposures to atmospheric pressure plasma on the activity of Salmonella Typhimurium: Deactivation of bacterial motility and suppression of host-cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Kim, Kijung; Han, Je-Hyun; Gweon, Bomi; Ko, Ung Hyun; Yoo, Suk Jae; Choe, Wonho; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) has been shown effective in sterilization by reducing the number of viable microbes during surface cleaning, food processing, or human tissue treatment. For safe conduct, the majority of previous research focused on complete abolition of microbes, which may require severe treatments. Our aim is to investigate the minimal treatment conditions necessary for effective inactivation of bacteria in such a manner that the APP treated bacteria would not be able to harm the host cells. For this, we ought to identify the objective criteria to make the bacteria dysfunctional. We choose the motile properties and the host-cell invasion capability as two measures to quantify the pathogenic state of bacteria. In this paper, we investigated how the APP treatment in a minimal dosage affects the activity of Salmonella Typhimurium. At 100 W and 15 kHz for 20 s, the APP treatment effectively suppressed active "run and tumble" type motility and induced formation of abnormally long structures. With 20 s exposure, the bacterial cells failed to cause pyroptosis in the host cells with >90% survival after 12 h of co-incubation. Our results suggest novel measures to evaluate the functional pathogenic state for identifying safe APP treatment conditions.

  10. Effects of minimal exposures to atmospheric pressure plasma on the activity of Salmonella Typhimurium: Deactivation of bacterial motility and suppression of host-cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Kim, Kijung; Han, Je-Hyun; Gweon, Bomi; Ko, Ung Hyun; Yoo, Suk Jae; Choe, Wonho; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) has been shown effective in sterilization by reducing the number of viable microbes during surface cleaning, food processing, or human tissue treatment. For safe conduct, the majority of previous research focused on complete abolition of microbes, which may require severe treatments. Our aim is to investigate the minimal treatment conditions necessary for effective inactivation of bacteria in such a manner that the APP treated bacteria would not be able to harm the host cells. For this, we ought to identify the objective criteria to make the bacteria dysfunctional. We choose the motile properties and the host-cell invasion capability as two measures to quantify the pathogenic state of bacteria. In this paper, we investigated how the APP treatment in a minimal dosage affects the activity of Salmonella Typhimurium. At 100 W and 15 kHz for 20 s, the APP treatment effectively suppressed active "run and tumble" type motility and induced formation of abnormally long structures. With 20 s exposure, the bacterial cells failed to cause pyroptosis in the host cells with >90% survival after 12 h of co-incubation. Our results suggest novel measures to evaluate the functional pathogenic state for identifying safe APP treatment conditions. PMID:27345896

  11. Deactivation of photocatalytically active ZnO nanoparticle and enhancement of its compatibility with organic compounds by surface-capping with organically modified silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhi; Zhang, Zhijun

    2011-02-01

    Tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and dimethyldiethoxysilane (DEDMS) were used as co-precursors to prepare organically modified silica (ormosil) via sol-gel process. The resultant ormosil was adopted for surface-capping of ZnO nanoparticle, where methyl (organic functional group) and silica (inorganic component) were simultaneously introduced onto the surface of the nanoparticles for realizing dual surface-modification. The ormosil-capped ZnO nanoparticle showed strong hydrophobicity and good compatibility with organic phases, as well as effectively decreased photocatalytic activity and almost unchanged ultraviolet (UV)-shielding ability. More importantly, the comprehensive properties of ormosil-capped ZnO nanoparticle could be manipulated by adjusting the molar ratio of TEOS to DEDMS during sol-gel process. This should help to open a wider window to better utilizing the unique and highly attractive properties such as high UV-shielding ability and high-visible light transparency of ZnO nanoparticle in sunscreen cosmetics.

  12. The role of fast and slow EEG activity during sleep in males and females with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Philip; Goldschmied, Jennifer; Deldin, Patricia; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne

    2015-01-01

    Sleep difficulties are highly prevalent in depression, and appears to be a contributing factor in the development and maintenance of symptoms. However, despite the generally acknowledged relationship between sleep and depression, the neurophysiological substrates underlying this relationship still remain unclear. Two main hypotheses were tested in this study. The first hypothesis states that sleep in depression is characterized by inadequate generation of restorative sleep, as indexed by reduced amounts of slow-wave activity. Conversely, the second hypothesis states that poor sleep in depression is due to intrusions of fast-frequency activity that may be reflective of a hyperaroused central nervous system. This study aimed to test both hypotheses in a large sample of individuals with clinically validated depression, as well as examine sex as a moderator. Results suggest that depression is better characterized by an overall decrease in slow-wave activity, which is related to elevated anxious and depressed mood the following morning. Results also suggest that females may be more likely to experience fast frequency activity related to depression symptom severity. PMID:26175101

  13. Initial deactivation of residue hydrometallation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gualda, G.; Kasztelan, S.

    1995-12-31

    A strong deactivation of residue hydrodemetallization catalysts is usually observed in the first days of a run. We report in this work a comparative study of the deactivation of a NiMo/alumina catalyst with a special pore structure so-called {open_quotes}chestnut burr{close_quotes} by coke and metal+coke deposits. The former set of samples were prepared in batch reactor by varying operating conditions and the latter set of samples were prepared in continuous flow reactor in both cases using a Safaniya atmospheric residue. Various methods were employed to characterize the deposits (TEM, XPS, EPMA, Surface area measurements, porosimetry, etc...) including catalytic tests of the used catalyst with various model reactants, it has been found that metal deposits are responsible for the initial deactivation of the residue hydrodametallation catalyst used in this work.

  14. Zn(2+) modulation of neuronal transient K(+) current: fast and selective binding to the deactivated channels

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, CC; Chen, FP

    1999-01-01

    Modulation of voltage-dependent transient K(+) currents (A type K(+) or K(A) current) by Zn(2+) was studied in rat hippocampal neurons by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. It is found that Zn(2+) selectively binds to the resting (deactivated or closed) K(A) channels with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of approximately 3 &mgr;M, whereas the affinity between Zn(2+) and the inactivated K(A) channels is 1000-fold lower. Zn(2+) therefore produces a concentration-dependent shift of the K(A) channel inactivation curve and enhances the K(A) current elicited from relatively positive holding potentials. It is also found that the kinetics of Zn(2+) action are fast enough to compete with the transition rates between different gating states of the channel. The rapid and selective binding of Zn(2+) to the closed K(A) channels keeps the channel in the closed state and explains the ion's concentration-dependent slowing effect on the activation of K(A) current. This in turn accounts for the inhibitory effect of Zn(2+) on the K(A) current elicited from hyperpolarized holding potentials. Because the molecular mechanisms underlying these gating changes are kinetic interactions between the binding-unbinding of Zn(2+) and the intrinsic gating processes of the channel, the shift of the inactivation curve and slowing of K(A) channel activation are quantitatively correlated with ambient Zn(2+) over a wide concentration range without "saturation"; i.e., The effects are already manifest in micromolar Zn(2+), yet are not saturated even in millimolar Zn(2+). Because the physiological concentration of Zn(2+) could vary over a similarly wide range according to neural activities, Zn(2+) may be a faithful physiological "fine tuner," controlling and controlled by neural activities through its effect on the K(A) current. PMID:10545356

  15. Anticancer activity of a cis-dichloridoplatinum(ii) complex of a chelating nitrogen mustard: insight into unusual guanine binding mode and low deactivation by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Subhendu; Purkait, Kallol; Chatterjee, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Arindam

    2016-02-28

    A pyridine ring containing a chelating nitrogen mustard ligand bis(2-chloroethyl)pyridylmethylamine hydrochloride (L2·HCl) was synthesized from bis(2-hydroxyethyl)pyridylmethylamine (L1) on reaction with thionyl chloride. Both the ligands upon reaction with cis-[PtCl2(DMSO)2] afforded square planar complexes cis-[PtCl2(L1)] (1) and cis-[PtCl2(L2)] (2) respectively. Both the complexes were characterized by NMR, IR, UV and elemental analysis. 2 crystallized in the P21/c space group. 2 shows greater solution stability than 1 in kinetic studies by 1H NMR. Both 1 and 2 bind the model nucleobase 9-ethylguanine (9-EtG) and form multiple mono-adducts. Existence of unusual N7,O6 chelated guanine bound 2 (2e) was traced. Binding studies of 2 with glutathione (GSH) show formation of a mono-adduct cis-[PtCl(L2)SG] (2c), which transformed within a day to give an aziridinium ion of L2 (2b) after loss of L2. In vitro cytotoxicity of ligands, complexes and the clinical anticancer drug cisplatin show that 2 is the most potent against MCF-7, A549 and MIA PaCa2 exhibiting IC50 values of 12.6 ± 0.8, 18.2 ± 1.8 and 4.2 ± 1.0 μM respectively. The in vitro cytotoxicity of 2 against MCF-7, A549 and MIA PaCa2 was also probed in hypoxia and in the presence and absence of added GSH. Even in the presence of excess GSH in hypoxia, 2 exhibits significant cytotoxicity against MIA PaCa2 and MCF-7 with IC50 of 4.4 ± 0.8 and 12.5 ± 1.1 μM respectively. Metal accumulation studies by ICP-MS display greater cellular internalization of 2, than 1 and cisplatin in MCF-7 cells. 2 arrests the cell cycle at sub G1 and G2/M phases in MCF-7 whereas cisplatin exhibits S phase arrest to be dominant with increase in concentration. Complex 2 exhibits a change in mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase activity and suggests apoptotic cell death through the intrinsic pathway. Moreover it is encouraging to find that 2 also restricts angiogenesis in chick embryo.

  16. “Stepping Up” Activity Poststroke: Ankle-Positioned Accelerometer Can Accurately Record Steps During Slow Walking

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Tara D.; Simpson, Lisa A.; Lim, Shannon B.; Louie, Dennis R.; Parappilly, Beena; Sakakibara, Brodie M.; Zbogar, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Background As physical activity in people poststroke is low, devices that monitor and provide feedback of walking activity provide motivation to engage in exercise and may assist rehabilitation professionals in auditing walking activity. However, most feedback devices are not accurate at slow walking speeds. Objective This study assessed the accuracy of one accelerometer to measure walking steps of community-dwelling individuals poststroke. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Methods Two accelerometers were positioned on the nonparetic waist and ankle of participants (N=43), and walking steps from these devices were recorded at 7 speeds (0.3–0.9 m/s) and compared with video recordings (gold standard). Results When positioned at the waist, the accelerometer had more than 10% error at all speeds, except 0.8 and 0.9 m/s, and numerous participants recorded zero steps at 0.3 to 0.5 m/s. The device had 10% or less error when positioned at the ankle for all speeds between 0.4 and 0.9 m/s. Limitations Some participants were unable to complete the faster walking speeds due to their walking impairments and inability to maintain the requested walking speed. Conclusions Although not recommended by the manufacturer, positioning the accelerometer at the ankle (compared with the waist) may fill a long-standing need for a readily available device that provides accurate feedback for the altered and slow walking patterns that occur with stroke. PMID:26251478

  17. Modulation of Starch Digestion for Slow Glucose Release through “Toggling” of Activities of Mucosal α-Glucosidases*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Hoo; Eskandari, Razieh; Jones, Kyra; Reddy, Kongara Ravinder; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Nichols, Buford L.; Rose, David R.; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Pinto, B. Mario

    2012-01-01

    Starch digestion involves the breakdown by α-amylase to small linear and branched malto-oligosaccharides, which are in turn hydrolyzed to glucose by the mucosal α-glucosidases, maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI). MGAM and SI are anchored to the small intestinal brush-border epithelial cells, and each contains a catalytic N- and C-terminal subunit. All four subunits have α-1,4-exohydrolytic glucosidase activity, and the SI N-terminal subunit has an additional exo-debranching activity on the α-1,6-linkage. Inhibition of α-amylase and/or α-glucosidases is a strategy for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We illustrate here the concept of “toggling”: differential inhibition of subunits to examine more refined control of glucogenesis of the α-amylolyzed starch malto-oligosaccharides with the aim of slow glucose delivery. Recombinant MGAM and SI subunits were individually assayed with α-amylolyzed waxy corn starch, consisting mainly of maltose, maltotriose, and branched α-limit dextrins, as substrate in the presence of four different inhibitors: acarbose and three sulfonium ion compounds. The IC50 values show that the four α-glucosidase subunits could be differentially inhibited. The results support the prospect of controlling starch digestion rates to induce slow glucose release through the toggling of activities of the mucosal α-glucosidases by selective enzyme inhibition. This approach could also be used to probe associated metabolic diseases. PMID:22851177

  18. Modulation of starch digestion for slow glucose release through "toggling" of activities of mucosal α-glucosidases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hoo; Eskandari, Razieh; Jones, Kyra; Reddy, Kongara Ravinder; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Nichols, Buford L; Rose, David R; Hamaker, Bruce R; Pinto, B Mario

    2012-09-14

    Starch digestion involves the breakdown by α-amylase to small linear and branched malto-oligosaccharides, which are in turn hydrolyzed to glucose by the mucosal α-glucosidases, maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI). MGAM and SI are anchored to the small intestinal brush-border epithelial cells, and each contains a catalytic N- and C-terminal subunit. All four subunits have α-1,4-exohydrolytic glucosidase activity, and the SI N-terminal subunit has an additional exo-debranching activity on the α-1,6-linkage. Inhibition of α-amylase and/or α-glucosidases is a strategy for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We illustrate here the concept of "toggling": differential inhibition of subunits to examine more refined control of glucogenesis of the α-amylolyzed starch malto-oligosaccharides with the aim of slow glucose delivery. Recombinant MGAM and SI subunits were individually assayed with α-amylolyzed waxy corn starch, consisting mainly of maltose, maltotriose, and branched α-limit dextrins, as substrate in the presence of four different inhibitors: acarbose and three sulfonium ion compounds. The IC(50) values show that the four α-glucosidase subunits could be differentially inhibited. The results support the prospect of controlling starch digestion rates to induce slow glucose release through the toggling of activities of the mucosal α-glucosidases by selective enzyme inhibition. This approach could also be used to probe associated metabolic diseases.

  19. Effects of slow-release urea fertilizers on urease activity, microbial biomass, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wenju; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Haijun; Li, Qi; Wang, Peng; Wen, Dazhong

    2005-05-01

    A field experiment was carried out at the Shenyang Experimental Station of Ecology (CAS) in order to study the effects of slow-release urea fertilizers high polymer-coated urea (SRU1), SRU1 mixed with dicyandiamide DCD (SRU2), and SRU1 mixed with calcium carbide CaC2 (SRU3) on urease activity, microbial biomass C and N, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil during the maize growth period. The results demonstrated that the application of slow-release urea fertilizers inhibits soil urease activity and increases the soil NH4+-N content. Soil available N increment could promote its immobilization by microorganisms. Determination of soil microbial biomass N indicated that a combined application of coated urea and nitrification inhibitors increased the soil active N pool. The population of predators/omnivores indicated that treatment with SRU2 could provide enough soil NH4+-N to promote maize growth and increased the food resource for the soil fauna compared with the other treatments. PMID:16089326

  20. Effects of slow-release urea fertilizers on urease activity, microbial biomass, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wenju; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Haijun; Li, Qi; Wang, Peng; Wen, Dazhong

    2005-05-01

    A field experiment was carried out at the Shenyang Experimental Station of Ecology (CAS) in order to study the effects of slow-release urea fertilizers high polymer-coated urea (SRU1), SRU1 mixed with dicyandiamide DCD (SRU2), and SRU1 mixed with calcium carbide CaC2 (SRU3) on urease activity, microbial biomass C and N, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil during the maize growth period. The results demonstrated that the application of slow-release urea fertilizers inhibits soil urease activity and increases the soil NH4+-N content. Soil available N increment could promote its immobilization by microorganisms. Determination of soil microbial biomass N indicated that a combined application of coated urea and nitrification inhibitors increased the soil active N pool. The population of predators/omnivores indicated that treatment with SRU2 could provide enough soil NH4+-N to promote maize growth and increased the food resource for the soil fauna compared with the other treatments.

  1. Acute Cocaine Induces Fast Activation of D1 Receptor and Progressive Deactivation of D2 Receptor Strial Neurons: In Vivo Optical Microprobe [Ca(superscript)2+]subscript)i Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Heintz, N.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2011-09-14

    Cocaine induces fast dopamine increases in brain striatal regions, which are recognized to underlie its rewarding effects. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are involved in cocaine's reward but the dynamic downstream consequences of cocaine effects in striatum are not fully understood. Here we used transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of either the D1 receptor (D1R) or the D2 receptor (D2R) gene and microprobe optical imaging to assess the dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} ) responses (used as marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in vivo separately for D1R- versus D2R-expressing neurons in striatum. Acute cocaine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) rapidly increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D1R-expressing neurons (10.6 {+-} 3.2%) in striatum within 8.3 {+-} 2.3 min after cocaine administration after which the increases plateaued; these fast [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases were blocked by pretreatment with a D1R antagonist (SCH23390). In contrast, cocaine induced progressive decreases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D2R-expressing neurons (10.4 {+-} 5.8%) continuously throughout the 30 min that followed cocaine administration; these slower [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} decreases were blocked by pretreatment with a D2R antagonist (raclopride). Since activation of striatal D1R-expressing neurons (direct-pathway) enhances cocaine reward, whereas activation of D2R expressing neurons suppresses it (indirect-pathway) (Lobo et al., 2010), this suggests that cocaine's rewarding effects entail both its fast stimulation ofD1R (resulting in abrupt activation of direct-pathway neurons) and a slower stimulation of D2R (resulting in longer-lasting deactivation of indirect-pathway neurons). We also provide direct in vivo evidence of D2R and D1R interactions in the striatal responses to acute cocaine administration.

  2. Nuclear fuel reprocessing deactivation plan for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, M.W.

    1994-10-01

    The decision was announced on April 28, 1992 to cease all United States Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels. This decision leads to the deactivation of all fuels dissolution, solvent extraction, krypton gas recovery operations, and product denitration at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The reprocessing facilities will be converted to a safe and stable shutdown condition awaiting future alternate uses or decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This ICPP Deactivation Plan includes the scope of work, schedule, costs, and associated staffing levels necessary to achieve a safe and orderly deactivation of reprocessing activities and the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). Deactivation activities primarily involve shutdown of operating systems and buildings, fissile and hazardous material removal, and related activities. A minimum required level of continued surveillance and maintenance is planned for each facility/process system to ensure necessary environmental, health, and safety margins are maintained and to support ongoing operations for ICPP facilities that are not being deactivated. Management of the ICPP was transferred from Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) to Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on October 1, 1994 as part of the INEL consolidated contract. This revision of the deactivation plan (formerly the Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Phaseout Plan for the ICPP) is being published during the consolidation of the INEL site-wide contract and the information presented here is current as of October 31, 1994. LITCO has adopted the existing plans for the deactivation of ICPP reprocessing facilities and the plans developed under WINCO are still being actively pursued, although the change in management may result in changes which have not yet been identified. Accordingly, the contents of this plan are subject to revision.

  3. Characterization of K-complexes and slow wave activity in a neural mass model.

    PubMed

    Weigenand, Arne; Schellenberger Costa, Michael; Ngo, Hong-Viet Victor; Claussen, Jens Christian; Martinetz, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    NREM sleep is characterized by two hallmarks, namely K-complexes (KCs) during sleep stage N2 and cortical slow oscillations (SOs) during sleep stage N3. While the underlying dynamics on the neuronal level is well known and can be easily measured, the resulting behavior on the macroscopic population level remains unclear. On the basis of an extended neural mass model of the cortex, we suggest a new interpretation of the mechanisms responsible for the generation of KCs and SOs. As the cortex transitions from wake to deep sleep, in our model it approaches an oscillatory regime via a Hopf bifurcation. Importantly, there is a canard phenomenon arising from a homoclinic bifurcation, whose orbit determines the shape of large amplitude SOs. A KC corresponds to a single excursion along the homoclinic orbit, while SOs are noise-driven oscillations around a stable focus. The model generates both time series and spectra that strikingly resemble real electroencephalogram data and points out possible differences between the different stages of natural sleep.

  4. Characterization of K-complexes and slow wave activity in a neural mass model.

    PubMed

    Weigenand, Arne; Schellenberger Costa, Michael; Ngo, Hong-Viet Victor; Claussen, Jens Christian; Martinetz, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    NREM sleep is characterized by two hallmarks, namely K-complexes (KCs) during sleep stage N2 and cortical slow oscillations (SOs) during sleep stage N3. While the underlying dynamics on the neuronal level is well known and can be easily measured, the resulting behavior on the macroscopic population level remains unclear. On the basis of an extended neural mass model of the cortex, we suggest a new interpretation of the mechanisms responsible for the generation of KCs and SOs. As the cortex transitions from wake to deep sleep, in our model it approaches an oscillatory regime via a Hopf bifurcation. Importantly, there is a canard phenomenon arising from a homoclinic bifurcation, whose orbit determines the shape of large amplitude SOs. A KC corresponds to a single excursion along the homoclinic orbit, while SOs are noise-driven oscillations around a stable focus. The model generates both time series and spectra that strikingly resemble real electroencephalogram data and points out possible differences between the different stages of natural sleep. PMID:25392991

  5. Characterization of K-Complexes and Slow Wave Activity in a Neural Mass Model

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Hong-Viet Victor; Claussen, Jens Christian; Martinetz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    NREM sleep is characterized by two hallmarks, namely K-complexes (KCs) during sleep stage N2 and cortical slow oscillations (SOs) during sleep stage N3. While the underlying dynamics on the neuronal level is well known and can be easily measured, the resulting behavior on the macroscopic population level remains unclear. On the basis of an extended neural mass model of the cortex, we suggest a new interpretation of the mechanisms responsible for the generation of KCs and SOs. As the cortex transitions from wake to deep sleep, in our model it approaches an oscillatory regime via a Hopf bifurcation. Importantly, there is a canard phenomenon arising from a homoclinic bifurcation, whose orbit determines the shape of large amplitude SOs. A KC corresponds to a single excursion along the homoclinic orbit, while SOs are noise-driven oscillations around a stable focus. The model generates both time series and spectra that strikingly resemble real electroencephalogram data and points out possible differences between the different stages of natural sleep. PMID:25392991

  6. Calcium-activated force responses in fast- and slow-twitch skinned muscle fibres of the rat at different temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, D G; Williams, D A

    1981-01-01

    1. Force responses from mechanically skinned fibres of rat skeletal muscles (extensor digitorum longus and soleus) were measured at different temperatures in the range 3-35 degrees C following sudden changes in Ca2+ concentration in the preparations. 2. At all temperatures there were characteristic differences between the slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres with respect to the relative steady-state force-[Ca2+] relation: such as a lower [Ca2+] threshold for activation and a less steep force-pCa curve in slow-twitch muscle fibres. 3. At 3-5 degrees C the force changes in both types of muscle fibres lagged considerably behind the estimated changes in [Ca2+] within the preparations and this enabled us to perform a comparative analysis of the Ca2+ kinetics in the process of force development in both muscle fibre types. This analysis suggest that two and six Ca2+ ions are involved in the regulatory unit for contraction of slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres respectively. 4. The rate of relaxation following a sudden decrease in [Ca2+] was much lower in the slow-twitch than in the fast-twitch muscle at 5 degrees C, suggesting that properties of the contractile apparatus could play an essential role in determining the rate of relaxation in vivo. 5. There was substantial variation in Ca2+ sensitivity between muscle fibres of the same type from different animals at each temperature. However the steepness of the force-[Ca2+] relation was essentially the same for all fibres of the same type. 6. A change in temperature from 5 to 25 degrees C had a statistically significant effect on the sensitivity of the fast-twitch muscle fibres, rendering them less sensitive to Ca2+ by a factor of 2. However a further increase in temperature from 25 to 35 degrees C did not have any statistically significant effect on the force-[Ca2+] relation in fast-twitch muscle fibres. 7. The effect of temperature on the Ca2+ sensitivity of slow-twitch muscle fibres was not statistically significant

  7. Imaging transcription in vivo: distinct regulatory effects of fast and slow activity patterns on promoter elements from vertebrate troponin I isoform genes

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Zaheer A; Gundersen, Kristian; Buonanno, Andres; Vullhorst, Detlef

    2005-01-01

    Firing patterns typical of slow motor units activate genes for slow isoforms of contractile proteins, but it remains unclear if there is a distinct pathway for fast isoforms or if their expression simply occurs in the absence of slow activity. Here we first show that denervation in adult soleus and EDL muscles reverses the postnatal increase in expression of troponin I (TnI) isoforms, suggesting that high-level transcription of both genes in mature muscles is under neural control. We then use a combination of in vivo transfection, live muscle imaging and fluorescence quantification to investigate the role of patterned electrical activity in the transcriptional control of troponin I slow (TnIs) and fast (TnIf) regulatory sequences by directly stimulating denervated muscles with pattern that mimic fast and slow motor units. Rat soleus muscles were electroporated with green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter constructs harbouring 2.7 and 2.1 kb of TnIs and TnIf regulatory sequences, respectively. One week later, electrodes were implanted and muscles stimulated for 12 days. The change in GFP fluorescence of individual muscle fibres before and after the stimulation was used as a measure for transcriptional responses to different patterns of action potentials. Our results indicate that the response of TnI promoter sequences to electrical stimulation is consistent with the regulation of the endogenous genes. The TnIf and TnIs enhancers were activated by matching fast and slow activity patterns, respectively. Removal of nerve-evoked activity by denervation, or stimulation with a mismatching pattern reduced transcriptional activity of both enhancers. These results strongly suggest that distinct signalling pathways couple both fast and slow patterns of activity to enhancers that regulate transcription from the fast and slow troponin I isoforms. PMID:15528243

  8. The Role of Sleep Spindles and Slow-Wave Activity in Integrating New Information in Semantic Memory

    PubMed Central

    Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.; Lewis, Penelope A.

    2013-01-01

    Assimilating new information into existing knowledge is a fundamental part of consolidating new memories and allowing them to guide behavior optimally and is vital for conceptual knowledge (semantic memory), which is accrued over many years. Sleep is important for memory consolidation, but its impact upon assimilation of new information into existing semantic knowledge has received minimal examination. Here, we examined the integration process by training human participants on novel words with meanings that fell into densely or sparsely populated areas of semantic memory in two separate sessions. Overnight sleep was polysomnographically monitored after each training session and recall was tested immediately after training, after a night of sleep, and 1 week later. Results showed that participants learned equal numbers of both word types, thus equating amount and difficulty of learning across the conditions. Measures of word recognition speed showed a disadvantage for novel words in dense semantic neighborhoods, presumably due to interference from many semantically related concepts, suggesting that the novel words had been successfully integrated into semantic memory. Most critically, semantic neighborhood density influenced sleep architecture, with participants exhibiting more sleep spindles and slow-wave activity after learning the sparse compared with the dense neighborhood words. These findings provide the first evidence that spindles and slow-wave activity mediate integration of new information into existing semantic networks. PMID:24068804

  9. The Approach of Emotional Deactivation of Prejudice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Jean-Nil

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the approach of emotional deactivation is to help students reduce the prejudice they may feel towards diverse social groups. Be those groups homosexuals, people living with a disability or immigrants, the victims of prejudice are invited to come into classrooms and to confront the preconceptions that students have in their respect.…

  10. EDITORIAL: Slow light Slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert; Hess, Ortwin; Denz, Cornelia; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    Research into slow light began theoretically in 1880 with the paper [1] of H A Lorentz, who is best known for his work on relativity and the speed of light. Experimental work started some 60 years later with the work of S L McCall and E L Hahn [2] who explored non-linear self-induced transparency in ruby. This field of research has burgeoned in the last 10 years, starting with the work of L Vestergaard Hau and coworkers on slow light via electromagnetically induced transparency in a Bose-Einstein condensate [3]. Many groups are now able to slow light down to a few metres per second or even stop the motion of light entirely [4]. Today, slow light - or more often `slow and fast light' - has become its own vibrant field with a strongly increasing number of publications. In broad scope, slow light research can be categorized in terms of the sort of physical mechanism used to slow down the light. One sort of slow light makes use of material dispersion. This dispersion can be the natural dispersion of the ordinary refractive index or can be the frequency dependence of some nonlinear optical process, such as electromagnetically induced transparency, coherent population oscillations, stimulated light scattering, or four-wave mixing processes. The second sort of slow light makes use of the wavelength dependence of artificially structured materials, such as photonic crystals, optical waveguides, and collections of microresonators. Material systems in which slow light has been observed include metal vapours, rare-earth-doped materials, Raman and Brillioun gain media, photonic crystals, microresonators and, more recently, metamaterials. A common feature of all of these schemes is the presence of a sharp single resonance or multiple resonances produced by an atomic transition, a resonance in a photonic structure, or in a nonlinear optical process. Current applications of slow light include a series of attractive topics in optical information processing, such as optical data

  11. Novel method of determination of the internal enzyme distribution within porous solid supports and the deactivation rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Do, D.D.; Hossain, M.M.

    1986-04-01

    This article presents a method for determining the rate constant for deactivation and the internal distribution of immobilized enzyme. This method makes use of the parallel deactivation process in a diffusion-controlled regime, in which the internal activity profile behaves like a penetration front. This front basically traces through the initial active enzymatic profile, and one can determine the internal profile and the rate constant for deactivation from the experimentally observable bulk concentration versus time. This method is applied to the experimental data of the system of hydrogen peroxide-immobilized catalase on controlled pore glas and Si-Al particles. 26 references.

  12. Synaptic depression and slow oscillatory activity in a biophysical network model of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Benita, Jose M.; Guillamon, Antoni; Deco, Gustavo; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.

    2012-01-01

    Short-term synaptic depression (STD) is a form of synaptic plasticity that has a large impact on network computations. Experimental results suggest that STD is modulated by cortical activity, decreasing with activity in the network and increasing during silent states. Here, we explored different activity-modulation protocols in a biophysical network model for which the model displayed less STD when the network was active than when it was silent, in agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we studied how trains of synaptic potentials had lesser decay during periods of activity (UP states) than during silent periods (DOWN states), providing new experimental predictions. We next tackled the inverse question of what is the impact of modifying STD parameters on the emergent activity of the network, a question difficult to answer experimentally. We found that synaptic depression of cortical connections had a critical role to determine the regime of rhythmic cortical activity. While low STD resulted in an emergent rhythmic activity with short UP states and long DOWN states, increasing STD resulted in longer and more frequent UP states interleaved with short silent periods. A still higher synaptic depression set the network into a non-oscillatory firing regime where DOWN states no longer occurred. The speed of propagation of UP states along the network was not found to be modulated by STD during the oscillatory regime; it remained relatively stable over a range of values of STD. Overall, we found that the mutual interactions between synaptic depression and ongoing network activity are critical to determine the mechanisms that modulate cortical emergent patterns. PMID:22973221

  13. 49 CFR 192.727 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. 192.727... Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. (a) Each operator shall conduct abandonment or deactivation of... commercially navigable waterway, the last operator of that facility must file a report upon abandonment of...

  14. 49 CFR 192.727 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. 192.727... Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. (a) Each operator shall conduct abandonment or deactivation of... commercially navigable waterway, the last operator of that facility must file a report upon abandonment of...

  15. 49 CFR 192.727 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. 192.727... Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. (a) Each operator shall conduct abandonment or deactivation of... commercially navigable waterway, the last operator of that facility must file a report upon abandonment of...

  16. 49 CFR 192.727 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. 192.727... Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. (a) Each operator shall conduct abandonment or deactivation of... commercially navigable waterway, the last operator of that facility must file a report upon abandonment of...

  17. Phase coupling between rhythmic slow activity and gamma characterizes mesiotemporal rapid-eye-movement sleep in humans.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Z; Weiss, B; Szucs, A; Eross, L; Rásonyi, G; Halász, P

    2009-09-29

    In the human sleep literature there is much controversy regarding the existence and the characteristics of hippocampal rhythmic slow activity (RSA). Generally the human RSA is believed to occur in short bursts of theta activity. An earlier study, however, reported mesiotemporal RSA during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep that instead of theta fell in the delta frequency band. We conjectured that if this RSA activity is indeed a human analogue of the animal hippocampal theta then characteristics associated with the animal theta should also be reflected in the human recordings. Here our aim was to examine possible phase coupling between mesiotemporal RSA and gamma activity during REM sleep. The study relied on nine epilepsy surgery candidates implanted with foramen ovale electrodes. Positive half-waves of the 1.5-3 Hz RSA were identified by an automatic algorithm during REM sleep. High-frequency activity was assessed for 11 consecutive 20 Hz-wide frequency bands between 20 and 240 Hz. Increase in high frequency activity was phase coupled with RSA in most frequency bands and patients. Such a phase coupling closely resembles that seen between theta and gamma in rodents. We consider this commonality to be an additional reason for regarding delta rather than theta as the human analogue of RSA in animals.

  18. Final Deactivation Project report on the Alpha Powder Facility, Building 3028, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the condition of the Alpha Powder Facility (APF), Building 3028, after completion of deactivation activities. Activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) program are outlined. A history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities are provided. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S&M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided for in the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) turnover package are discussed.

  19. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-03-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery.

  20. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  1. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  2. Cathepsin activities and membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Rawson, D M; Tosti, L; Carnevali, O

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated enzymatic activity of cathepsins and the membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling. Stage III oocytes (>0.5mm), obtained through dissection of anaesthetised female fish and desegregation of ovarian cumulus, were exposed to 2M methanol or 2M DMSO (both prepared in Hank's medium) for 30min at 22 degrees C before being loaded into 0.5ml plastic straws and placed into a programmable cooler. After controlled slow freezing, samples were plunged into liquid nitrogen (LN) and held for at least 10min, and thawed by immersing straws into a 27 degrees C water bath for 10s. Thawed oocytes were washed twice in Hank's medium. Cathepsin activity and membrane integrity of oocytes were assessed both after cryoprotectant treatment at 22 degrees C and after freezing in LN. Cathepsin B and L colorimetric analyses were performed using substrates Z-Arg-ArgNNap and Z-Phe-Arg-4MbetaNA-HCl, respectively, and 2-naphthylamine and 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine were used as standards. Cathepsin D activity was performed by analysing the level of hydrolytic action on haemoglobin. Oocytes membrane integrity was assessed using 0.2% Trypan blue staining for 5min. Analysis of cathepsin activities showed that whilst the activity of cathepsin B and D was not affected by 2M DMSO treatment, their activity was lowered when treated with 2M methanol. Following freezing to -196 degrees C, the activity of all cathepsins (B, D and L) was significantly decreased in both 2M DMSO and 2M methanol. Trypan blue staining showed that 63.0+/-11.3% and 72.7+/-5.2% oocytes membrane stayed intact after DMSO and methanol treatment for 30min at 22 degrees C, respectively, whilst 14.9+/-2.6% and 1.4+/-0.8% stayed intact after freezing in DMSO and methanol to -196 degrees C. The results indicate that cryoprotectant treatment and freezing modified the activities of lysosomal enzymes involved in oocyte maturation and yolk

  3. Dopaminergic Modulation of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Parkinson Depression

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Anders H.; Smith, Charles D.; Slevin, John T.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Martin, Catherine A.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Blonder, Lee X.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with emotional abnormalities. Dopaminergic medications ameliorate Parkinsonian motor symptoms, but less is known regarding the impact of dopaminergic agents on affective processing, particularly in depressed PD (dPD) patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on brain activation to emotional stimuli in depressed versus nondepressed Parkinson disease (ndPD) patients. Participants included 18 ndPD patients (11 men, 7 women) and 10 dPD patients (7 men, 3 women). Patients viewed photographs of emotional faces during functional MRI. Scans were performed while the patient was taking anti-Parkinson medication and the day after medication had been temporarily discontinued. Results indicate that dopaminergic medications have opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex depending upon depression status. DPD patients show greater deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) on dopaminergic medications than off, while ndPD patients show greater deactivation in this region off drugs. The VMPFC is in the default-mode network (DMN). DMN activity is negatively correlated with activity in brain systems used for external visual attention. Thus dopaminergic medications may promote increased attention to external visual stimuli among dPD patients but impede normal suppression of DMN activity during external stimulation among ndPD patients. PMID:26793404

  4. Routes for deactivation of different autothermal reforming catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasel, Joachim; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Kreft, Stefanie; Rotov, Mikhail; Löhken, Katrin; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    Fuel cell systems with integrated autothermal reforming units require active and robust catalysts for H2 production. In pursuit of this, an experimental screening of catalysts utilized in the autothermal reforming of commercial diesel fuels is performed. The catalysts incorporate a monolithic cordierite substrate, an oxide support (γ-Al2O3, La-Al2O3, CeO2, Gd-CeO2, ZrO2, Y-ZrO2) and Rh as the active phase. Experiments are run by widely varying the O2/C and H2O/C molar ratios at different gas hourly space velocities. In most cases, this provokes accelerated catalyst deactivation and permits an informative comparison of the catalysts. Fresh and aged catalysts are characterized by temperature-programmed methods, thermogravimetry and transmission electron microscopy to find correlations with catalytic activity and stability. Using this approach, routes for catalyst deactivation are identified, together with causes of different catalytic activities. Suitable reaction conditions can be derived from our results for the operation of reactors for autothermal reforming at steady-state and under transient reaction conditions, which helps improve the efficiency and the stability of fuel cell systems.

  5. Schwann cells expressing dismutase active mutant SOD1 unexpectedly slow disease progression in ALS mice

    PubMed Central

    Lobsiger, Christian S.; Boillee, Severine; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Khan, Amir M.; Feltri, M. Laura; Yamanaka, Koji; Cleveland, Don W.

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in an inherited form of ALS is non-cell-autonomous, with ALS-causing mutant SOD1 damage developed within multiple cell types. Selective inactivation within motor neurons of an ubiquitously expressed mutant SOD1 gene has demonstrated that mutant damage within motor neurons is a determinant of disease initiation, whereas mutant synthesis within neighboring astrocytes or microglia accelerates disease progression. We now report the surprising finding that diminished synthesis (by 70%) within Schwann cells of a fully dismutase active ALS-linked mutant (SOD1G37R) significantly accelerates disease progression, accompanied by reduction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in nerves. Coupled with shorter disease duration in mouse models caused by dismutase inactive versus dismutase active SOD1 mutants, our findings implicate an oxidative cascade during disease progression that is triggered within axon ensheathing Schwann cells and that can be ameliorated by elevated dismutase activity. Thus, therapeutic down-regulation of dismutase active mutant SOD1 in familial forms of ALS should be targeted away from Schwann cells. PMID:19251638

  6. Deactivation of Ni2P/SiO2 catalyst in hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jixiang; Ci, Donghui; Yang, Qing; Li, Kelun

    2014-11-01

    The deactivation of the Ni2P/SiO2 catalyst in the hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene was studied. To better illuminate the reasons for the deactivation, the effect of HCl on the structure and activity of Ni2P/SiO2 was investigated. For comparison, the deactivation of the Ni/SiO2 catalyst was also involved. It was found that the Ni2P particles possessed good resistance to HCl poison and to sintering, which is ascribed to the electron-deficiency of Niδ+(0 < δ < 1) site in Ni2P. Acted as the Lewis and Brönsted acid site, the Niδ+ site and the Psbnd OH group on Ni2P/SiO2 catalyzed the formation of the carbonaceous deposit that was difficultly eliminated by hydrogenation. The carbonaceous deposit covered the active sites and might also induce a decrease in the Ni2P crystallinity, subsequently leading to the Ni2P/SiO2 deactivation. Different from Ni2P/SiO2, Ni/SiO2 was mainly deactivated by the chlorine poison and the sintering of nickel crystallites.

  7. Slow recovery of tropical old-field rainforest regrowth and the value and limitations of active restoration.

    PubMed

    Shoo, Luke P; Freebody, Kylie; Kanowski, John; Catterall, Carla P

    2016-02-01

    There is current debate about the potential for secondary regrowth to rescue tropical forests from an otherwise inevitable cascade of biodiversity loss due to land clearing and scant evidence to test how well active restoration may accelerate recovery. We used site chronosequences to compare developmental trajectories of vegetation between self-organized (i.e., spontaneous) forest regrowth and biodiversity plantings (established for ecological restoration, with many locally native tree species at high density) in the Australian wet tropics uplands. Across 28 regrowth sites aged 1-59 years, some structural attributes reached reference rainforest levels within 40 years, whereas wood volume and most tested components of native plant species richness (classified by species' origins, family, and ecological functions) reached less than 50% of reference rainforest values. Development of native tree and shrub richness was particularly slow among species that were wind dispersed or animal dispersed with large (>10 mm) seeds. Many species with animal-dispersed seeds were from near-basal evolutionary lineages that contribute to recognized World Heritage values of the study region. Faster recovery was recorded in 25 biodiversity plantings of 1-25 years in which wood volume developed more rapidly; native woody plant species richness reached values similar to reference rainforest and was better represented across all dispersal modes; and species from near-basal plant families were better (although incompletely) represented. Plantings and regrowth showed slow recovery in species richness of vines and epiphytes and in overall resemblance to forest in species composition. Our results can inform decision making about when and where to invest in active restoration and provide strong evidence that protecting old-growth forest is crucially important for sustaining tropical biodiversity.

  8. Slow recovery of tropical old-field rainforest regrowth and the value and limitations of active restoration.

    PubMed

    Shoo, Luke P; Freebody, Kylie; Kanowski, John; Catterall, Carla P

    2016-02-01

    There is current debate about the potential for secondary regrowth to rescue tropical forests from an otherwise inevitable cascade of biodiversity loss due to land clearing and scant evidence to test how well active restoration may accelerate recovery. We used site chronosequences to compare developmental trajectories of vegetation between self-organized (i.e., spontaneous) forest regrowth and biodiversity plantings (established for ecological restoration, with many locally native tree species at high density) in the Australian wet tropics uplands. Across 28 regrowth sites aged 1-59 years, some structural attributes reached reference rainforest levels within 40 years, whereas wood volume and most tested components of native plant species richness (classified by species' origins, family, and ecological functions) reached less than 50% of reference rainforest values. Development of native tree and shrub richness was particularly slow among species that were wind dispersed or animal dispersed with large (>10 mm) seeds. Many species with animal-dispersed seeds were from near-basal evolutionary lineages that contribute to recognized World Heritage values of the study region. Faster recovery was recorded in 25 biodiversity plantings of 1-25 years in which wood volume developed more rapidly; native woody plant species richness reached values similar to reference rainforest and was better represented across all dispersal modes; and species from near-basal plant families were better (although incompletely) represented. Plantings and regrowth showed slow recovery in species richness of vines and epiphytes and in overall resemblance to forest in species composition. Our results can inform decision making about when and where to invest in active restoration and provide strong evidence that protecting old-growth forest is crucially important for sustaining tropical biodiversity. PMID:26310383

  9. Regional differences in cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) slow wave activity and interhemispheric EEG asymmetry in the fur seal.

    PubMed

    Lyamin, Oleg I; Pavlova, Ivetta F; Kosenko, Peter O; Mukhametov, Lev M; Siegel, Jerome M

    2012-12-01

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) in the northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) is characterized by a highly expressed interhemispheric electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry, called 'unihemispheric' or 'asymmetrical' SWS. The aim of this study was to examine the regional differences in slow wave activity (SWA; power in the range of 1.2-4.0 Hz) within one hemisphere and differences in the degree of interhemispheric EEG asymmetry within this species. Three seals were implanted with 10 EEG electrodes, positioned bilaterally (five in each hemisphere) over the frontal, occipital and parietal cortex. The expression of interhemispheric SWA asymmetry between symmetrical monopolar recordings was estimated based on the asymmetry index [AI = (L-R)/(L+R), where L and R are the power in the left and right hemispheres, respectively]. Our findings indicate an anterior-posterior gradient in SWA during asymmetrical SWS in fur seals, which is opposite to that described for other mammals, including humans, with a larger SWA recorded in the parietal and occipital cortex. Interhemispheric EEG asymmetry in fur seals was recorded across the entire dorsal cerebral cortex, including sensory (visual and somatosensory), motor and associative (parietal or suprasylvian) cortical areas. The expression of asymmetry was greatest in occipital-lateral and parietal derivations and smallest in frontal-medial derivations. Regardless of regional differences in SWA, the majority (90%) of SWS episodes with interhemispheric EEG asymmetry meet the criteria for 'unihemispheric SWS' (one hemisphere is asleep while the other is awake). The remaining episodes can be described as episodes of bilateral SWS with a local activation in one cerebral hemisphere.

  10. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Engels, Marjolein M A; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using "virtual MEG electrodes". We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19-28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p < 0.01] whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p < 0.01]. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.43; p < 0.05]. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the other

  11. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Engels, Marjolein M A; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using "virtual MEG electrodes". We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19-28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p < 0.01] whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p < 0.01]. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.43; p < 0.05]. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the other

  12. A pilot study of active rehabilitation for adolescents who are slow to recover from sport-related concussion.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, I; Grilli, L; Friedman, D; Iverson, G L

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an active rehabilitation intervention for adolescents who are slow-to-recover after a sport-related concussion. Ten adolescents (three girls and seven boys) seen at the Montreal Children's Hospital Concussion Clinic participated in this case series. Adolescents who were symptomatic more than 4 weeks after the injury were provided with an active rehabilitation intervention (M = 7.9 weeks following injury; range = 3.7 to 26.2 weeks). The rehabilitation program includes gradual, closely monitored light aerobic exercise, general coordination exercises, mental imagery, as well as reassurance, normalization of recovery, and stress/anxiety reduction strategies. The program continued until complete symptom resolution and readiness to begin stepwise return to activities. The primary outcome of the study was evolution of post-concussion symptoms. Secondary outcomes included mood, energy, balance, and cognition. After the intervention, post-concussion symptoms significantly decreased for the group of participants. They also had decreased fatigue and improved mood after 6 weeks of initiating the rehabilitation intervention. This case series shows that postconcussive symptoms and functioning in adolescents following sports-related concussion can be improved after participation in an active rehabilitation intervention. The introduction of graded light intensity exercise in the post-acute period following concussion is safe, feasible and appears to have a positive impact on adolescents' functioning.

  13. Final deactivation report on the radioisotope area services, Building 3034, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Bldg. 3034, after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) Program. This report provides a history and profile of Bldg. 3034 before commencement of deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover, items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance & Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, an supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover Package, are discussed. Building 3034 will require access to facilitate required surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3034 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. In addition to the minimal S&M activities, the building will be occupied by the maintenance coordinator and the S&M supervisor for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project. The exterior doors are locked when unoccupied to prevent unauthorized access. All materials have been removed from the building. Piping and alarms have been deactivated.

  14. Peripheral Inflammation is Associated with Altered Substantia Nigra Activity and Psychomotor Slowing in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Brydon, Lena; Harrison, Neil A.; Walker, Cicely; Steptoe, Andrew; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic infections commonly cause sickness symptoms including psychomotor retardation. Inflammatory cytokines released during the innate immune response are implicated in the communication of peripheral inflammatory signals to the brain. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural effects of peripheral inflammation following typhoid vaccination in 16 healthy men, using a double-blind, randomized, crossover-controlled design. Results Vaccination had no global effect on neurovascular coupling but markedly perturbed neural reactivity within substantia nigra during low-level visual stimulation. During a cognitive task, individuals in whom typhoid vaccination engendered higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 had significantly slower reaction time responses. Prolonged reaction times and larger interleukin-6 responses were associated with evoked neural activity within substantia nigra. Conclusions Our findings provide mechanistic insights into the interaction between inflammation and neurocognitive performance, specifically implicating circulating cytokines and midbrain dopaminergic nuclei in mediating the psychomotor consequences of systemic infection. PMID:18242584

  15. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  16. Reduced tonoplast fast-activating and slow-activating channel activity is essential for conferring salinity tolerance in a facultative halophyte, quinoa.

    PubMed

    Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Shabala, Sergey; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Pottosin, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Halophyte species implement a "salt-including" strategy, sequestering significant amounts of Na(+) to cell vacuoles. This requires a reduction of passive Na(+) leak from the vacuole. In this work, we used quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) to investigate the ability of halophytes to regulate Na(+)-permeable slow-activating (SV) and fast-activating (FV) tonoplast channels, linking it with Na(+) accumulation in mesophyll cells and salt bladders as well as leaf photosynthetic efficiency under salt stress. Our data indicate that young leaves rely on Na(+) exclusion to salt bladders, whereas old ones, possessing far fewer salt bladders, depend almost exclusively on Na(+) sequestration to mesophyll vacuoles. Moreover, although old leaves accumulate more Na(+), this does not compromise their leaf photochemistry. FV and SV channels are slightly more permeable for K(+) than for Na(+), and vacuoles in young leaves express less FV current and with a density unchanged in plants subjected to high (400 mm NaCl) salinity. In old leaves, with an intrinsically lower density of the FV current, FV channel density decreases about 2-fold in plants grown under high salinity. In contrast, intrinsic activity of SV channels in vacuoles from young leaves is unchanged under salt stress. In vacuoles of old leaves, however, it is 2- and 7-fold lower in older compared with young leaves in control- and salt-grown plants, respectively. We conclude that the negative control of SV and FV tonoplast channel activity in old leaves reduces Na(+) leak, thus enabling efficient sequestration of Na(+) to their vacuoles. This enables optimal photosynthetic performance, conferring salinity tolerance in quinoa species.

  17. Active tectonics, paleoseismology and associated methodological challenges posed by the slow moving Alhama de Murcia fault (SE Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrater, Marta; Ortuño, Maria; Masana, Eulàlia; Pallàs, Raimon; Perea, Hector; Baize, Stephane; García-Meléndez, Eduardo; Martínez-Díaz, José J.; Echeverria, Anna; Rockwell, Thomas; Sharp, Warren D.; Arrowsmith, Ramon; Medialdea, Alicia; Rhodes, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The Alhama de Murcia fault (AMF) is a 87 km-long left-lateral slow moving fault and is responsible for the 5.1 Mw 2011 Lorca earthquake. The characterization of the seismic potential of seismogenic strike-slip slow moving faults is necessary but raises huge methodological challenges, as most paleoseismological and active tectonic techniques have been designed on and for fast moving faults. The AMF is used here as a pilot study area to adapt the traditional geomorphological and trenching analyses, especially concerning the precise quantification of offset channels. We: 1) adapted methodologies to slow moving faults, 2) obtained, for the first time, the slip rate of the AMF, and 3) updated its recurrence period and maximum expected magnitude. Morphotectonic studies aim to use the measured tectonic offset of surface channels to calculate seismic parameters. However, these studies lack a standard criterion to score the analysed features. We improved this by differentiating between subjective and objective qualities, and determining up to three objective parameters (lithological changes, associated morphotectonics and shape, and three shape sub-parameters; all ranging from 0 to 1). By applying this methodology to the AMF, we identified and characterized 138 offset features that we mapped on a high-resolution (0.5 × 0.5 m pixel size) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) from a point cloud acquired in 2013 by airborne light detection and ranging (lidar). The identified offsets, together with the ongoing datings, are going to be used to calculate the lateral slip rate of the AMF. In three-dimensional trenches, we measured the offsets of a buried channel by projecting the far-field tendency of the channel onto the fault. This procedure is inspired by the widespread geomorphological procedure and aims to avoid the diffuse deformation in the fault zone associated with slow moving faults. The calculation of the 3D tendency of the channel and its projection onto the fault permitted

  18. Final deactivation report on the Radioisotope Production Lab-E, Building 3032, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Bldg. 3032, after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration Program (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of Bldg. 3032 prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance & Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the EM-60 turnover package are discussed. Building 3032 will be used as the Health Physics Office for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Program area and will require access for these offices and to facilitate required surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Bldg. 3032 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. All materials have been removed from the building, and all utility systems, piping, and alarms have been deactivated except electricity and steam needed for the office areas.

  19. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  20. Memory-reliant Post-error Slowing Is Associated with Successful Learning and Fronto-occipital Activity.

    PubMed

    Schiffler, Björn C; Almeida, Rita; Granqvist, Mathias; Bengtsson, Sara L

    2016-10-01

    Negative feedback after an action in a cognitive task can lead to devaluing that action on future trials as well as to more cautious responding when encountering that same choice again. These phenomena have been explored in the past by reinforcement learning theories and cognitive control accounts, respectively. Yet, how cognitive control interacts with value updating to give rise to adequate adaptations under uncertainty is less clear. In this fMRI study, we investigated cognitive control-based behavioral adjustments during a probabilistic reinforcement learning task and studied their influence on performance in a later test phase in which the learned value of items is tested. We provide support for the idea that functionally relevant and memory-reliant behavioral adjustments in the form of post-error slowing during reinforcement learning are associated with test performance. Adjusting response speed after negative feedback was correlated with BOLD activity in right inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle occipital cortex during the event of receiving the feedback. Bilateral middle occipital cortex activity overlapped partly with activity reflecting feedback deviance from expectations as measured by unsigned prediction error. These results suggest that cognitive control and feature processing cortical regions interact to implement feedback-congruent adaptations beneficial to learning. PMID:27243614

  1. Memory-reliant Post-error Slowing Is Associated with Successful Learning and Fronto-occipital Activity.

    PubMed

    Schiffler, Björn C; Almeida, Rita; Granqvist, Mathias; Bengtsson, Sara L

    2016-10-01

    Negative feedback after an action in a cognitive task can lead to devaluing that action on future trials as well as to more cautious responding when encountering that same choice again. These phenomena have been explored in the past by reinforcement learning theories and cognitive control accounts, respectively. Yet, how cognitive control interacts with value updating to give rise to adequate adaptations under uncertainty is less clear. In this fMRI study, we investigated cognitive control-based behavioral adjustments during a probabilistic reinforcement learning task and studied their influence on performance in a later test phase in which the learned value of items is tested. We provide support for the idea that functionally relevant and memory-reliant behavioral adjustments in the form of post-error slowing during reinforcement learning are associated with test performance. Adjusting response speed after negative feedback was correlated with BOLD activity in right inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle occipital cortex during the event of receiving the feedback. Bilateral middle occipital cortex activity overlapped partly with activity reflecting feedback deviance from expectations as measured by unsigned prediction error. These results suggest that cognitive control and feature processing cortical regions interact to implement feedback-congruent adaptations beneficial to learning.

  2. Sulfur-deactivated steam reforming of gasified biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Koningen, J.; Sjoestroem, K.

    1998-02-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide on the stream reforming of methane has been studied. Methane is the most difficult component to convert by steam reforming in the mixture of hydrocarbons, which is produced in biomass gasification. Two catalysts were subjected to hydrogen sulfide levels up to 300 ppm so as to study the effect of sulfur on their deactivation. These catalysts were the C11-9-061, from United Catalyst Inc., and the HTSR1, from Haldor Topsoee. The activation energy of the sulfur-deactivated steam-reforming reaction was calculated to be 280 and 260 kJ/mol, for each catalyst, respectively. The high values most probably originate from the fact that the degree of sulfur coverage of the nickel surface is close to 1 for these experiments. Even under these severe conditions, steam reforming of methane is possible without any carbon formation. The HTSR1 catalyst exhibits a very high sulfur-free activity, resulting in a performance in the presence of hydrogen sulfide higher than that for the C11-9-061 catalyst. By using the HTSR1 catalyst, the reactor temperature can be lowered by 60 C in order to reach comparable levels of conversion.

  3. Donor deactivation in silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björk, Mikael T.; Schmid, Heinz; Knoch, Joachim; Riel, Heike; Riess, Walter

    2009-02-01

    The operation of electronic devices relies on the density of free charge carriers available in the semiconductor; in most semiconductor devices this density is controlled by the addition of doping atoms. As dimensions are scaled down to achieve economic and performance benefits, the presence of interfaces and materials adjacent to the semiconductor will become more important and will eventually completely determine the electronic properties of the device. To sustain further improvements in performance, novel field-effect transistor architectures, such as FinFETs and nanowire field-effect transistors, have been proposed as replacements for the planar devices used today, and also for applications in biosensing and power generation. The successful operation of such devices will depend on our ability to precisely control the location and number of active impurity atoms in the host semiconductor during the fabrication process. Here, we demonstrate that the free carrier density in semiconductor nanowires is dependent on the size of the nanowires. By measuring the electrical conduction of doped silicon nanowires as a function of nanowire radius, temperature and dielectric surrounding, we show that the donor ionization energy increases with decreasing nanowire radius, and that it profoundly modifies the attainable free carrier density at values of the radius much larger than those at which quantum and dopant surface segregation effects set in. At a nanowire radius of 15 nm the carrier density is already 50% lower than in bulk silicon due to the dielectric mismatch between the conducting channel and its surroundings.

  4. Looking for a precursor of spontaneous Sleep Slow Oscillations in human sleep: The role of the sigma activity

    PubMed Central

    Allegrini, Paolo; Bedini, Remo; Bergamasco, Massimo; Laurino, Marco; Sebastiani, Laura; Gemignani, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Sleep Slow Oscillations (SSOs), paradigmatic EEG markers of cortical bistability (alternation between cellular downstates and upstates), and sleep spindles, paradigmatic EEG markers of thalamic rhythm, are two hallmarks of sleeping brain. Selective thalamic lesions are reportedly associated to reductions of spindle activity and its spectrum ~14 Hz (sigma), and to alterations of SSO features. This apparent, parallel behavior suggests that thalamo-cortical entrainment favors cortical bistability. Here we investigate temporally-causal associations between thalamic sigma activity and shape, topology, and dynamics of SSOs. We recorded sleep EEG and studied whether spatio-temporal variability of SSO amplitude, negative slope (synchronization in downstate falling) and detection rate are driven by cortical-sigma-activity expression (12–18 Hz), in 3 consecutive 1 s-EEG-epochs preceding each SSO event (Baselines). We analyzed: (i) spatial variability, comparing maps of baseline sigma power and of SSO features, averaged over the first sleep cycle; (ii) event-by-event shape variability, computing for each electrode correlations between baseline sigma power and amplitude/slope of related SSOs; (iii) event-by-event spreading variability, comparing baseline sigma power in electrodes showing an SSO event with the homologous ones, spared by the event. The scalp distribution of baseline sigma power mirrored those of SSO amplitude and slope; event-by-event variability in baseline sigma power was associated with that in SSO amplitude in fronto-central areas; within each SSO event, electrodes involved in cortical bistability presented higher baseline sigma activity than those free of SSO. In conclusion, spatio-temporal variability of thalamocortical entrainment, measured by background sigma activity, is a reliable estimate of the cortical proneness to bistability. PMID:26003553

  5. Slow Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Speck, A.; Storry, C.H.; Le Sage, D.; Guise, N.; Larochelle, P.C.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Pittner, H.; Herrmann, M.; Walz, J.; Haensch, T.W.

    2004-10-20

    Slow antihydrogen is now produced by two different production methods. In Method I, large numbers of H atoms are produced during positron-cooling of antiprotons within a nested Penning trap. In a just-demonstrated Method II, lasers control the production of antihydrogen atoms via charge exchange collisions. Field ionization detection makes it possible to probe the internal structure of the antihydrogen atoms being produced - most recently revealing atoms that are too tightly bound to be well described by the guiding center atom approximation. The speed of antihydrogen atoms has recently been measured for the first time. After the requested overview, the recent developments are surveyed.

  6. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    Disconnecting the criticality alarm permanently in June 1996 signified that the hazards in the PUREX (plutonium-uranium extraction) plant had been so removed and reduced that criticality was no longer a credible event. Turning off the PUREX criticality alarm also marked a salient point in a historic deactivation project, 1 year before its anticipated conclusion. The PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project began in October 1993 as a 5-year, $222.5- million project. As a result of innovations implemented during 1994 and 1995, the project schedule was shortened by over a year, with concomitant savings. In 1994, the innovations included arranging to send contaminated nitric acid from the PUREX Plant to British Nuclear Fuels, Limited (BNFL) for reuse and sending metal solutions containing plutonium and uranium from PUREX to the Hanford Site tank farms. These two steps saved the project $36.9- million. In 1995, reductions in overhead rate, work scope, and budget, along with curtailed capital equipment expenditures, reduced the cost another $25.6 million. These savings were achieved by using activity-based cost estimating and applying technical schedule enhancements. In 1996, a series of changes brought about under the general concept of ``reengineering`` reduced the cost approximately another $15 million, and moved the completion date to May 1997. With the total savings projected at about $75 million, or 33.7 percent of the originally projected cost, understanding how the changes came about, what decisions were made, and why they were made becomes important. At the same time sweeping changes in the cultural of the Hanford Site were taking place. These changes included shifting employee relations and work structures, introducing new philosophies and methods in maintaining safety and complying with regulations, using electronic technology to manage information, and, adopting new methods and bases for evaluating progress. Because these changes helped generate cost savings and were

  7. The slow and the quick anion conductance in whole guard cells: their voltage-dependent alternation, and the modulation of their activities by abscisic acid and CO2.

    PubMed

    Raschke, Klaus; Shabahang, Mahbobeh; Wolf, Rupert

    2003-08-01

    We explored the functioning of the slowly activating anion conductance, S-type or SLAC, and of the quickly activating anion conductance, R-type or QUAC, in whole guard cells of Vicia faba L.; details of QUAC activity had not previously been demonstrated in guard cells possessing their walls. The discontinuous single-electrode voltage-clamp method was used to record current responses to voltage pulses and voltage ramps as well as the free-running membrane voltage. At all voltages tested between -200 and 60 mV, SLAC activated with two components, one had a time constant similar to 7 s, the other similar to 40 s. The current-voltage relationship resembled that obtained by patch-clamp experiments. In pulse experiments and 1-s ramps, QUAC activity appeared with half-maximum activation near -50 mV and full activation above -10 mV; it inactivated with a half-time of approximately 10 s. Inactivation of QUAC at -40 mV led to the appearance of SLAC. After deactivation of SLAC at -200 mV, QUAC could be activated again. We concluded that voltage-dependent interchanges between SLAC and QUAC had occurred. Frequently, SLAC and QUAC were active simultaneously in the same cell. Abscisic acid (ABA, 20 microM) activated SLAC as well as QUAC. External Ca2+ was not required, but enhanced the activation of QUAC. Rises in the partial pressure of CO2, in the range between 0 and 700 microbar, caused rapid and reversible increases in the activity of SLAC (and outward currents of K+). QUAC also responded to CO2, however in an unpredictable manner (either by increased or by decreased activity). Oscillations in the free-running membrane voltage arose either spontaneously or after changes in CO2. They were correlated with periodic activations and inactivations of QUAC and required the simultaneous activity of an electrogenic pump.

  8. Dendritic Slow Dynamics Enables Localized Cortical Activity to Switch between Mobile and Immobile Modes with Noisy Background Input

    PubMed Central

    Kurashige, Hiroki; Câteau, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    Mounting lines of evidence suggest the significant computational ability of a single neuron empowered by active dendritic dynamics. This motivates us to study what functionality can be acquired by a network of such neurons. The present paper studies how such rich single-neuron dendritic dynamics affects the network dynamics, a question which has scarcely been specifically studied to date. We simulate neurons with active dendrites networked locally like cortical pyramidal neurons, and find that naturally arising localized activity – called a bump – can be in two distinct modes, mobile or immobile. The mode can be switched back and forth by transient input to the cortical network. Interestingly, this functionality arises only if each neuron is equipped with the observed slow dendritic dynamics and with in vivo-like noisy background input. If the bump activity is considered to indicate a point of attention in the sensory areas or to indicate a representation of memory in the storage areas of the cortex, this would imply that the flexible mode switching would be of great potential use for the brain as an information processing device. We derive these conclusions using a natural extension of the conventional field model, which is defined by combining two distinct fields, one representing the somatic population and the other representing the dendritic population. With this tool, we analyze the spatial distribution of the degree of after-spike adaptation and explain how we can understand the presence of the two distinct modes and switching between the modes. We also discuss the possible functional impact of this mode-switching ability. PMID:21931635

  9. A Reduction in Ribonucleotide Reductase Activity Slows Down the Chromosome Replication Fork but Does Not Change Its Localization

    PubMed Central

    Odsbu, Ingvild; Morigen; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that the enzymes of nucleotide biosynthesis may be compartmentalized or concentrated in a structure affecting the organization of newly replicated DNA. Here we have investigated the effect of changes in ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) activity on chromosome replication and organization of replication forks in Escherichia coli. Methodology/Principal Findings Reduced concentrations of deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs) obtained by reducing the activity of wild type RNR by treatment with hydroxyurea or by mutation, resulted in a lengthening of the replication period. The replication fork speed was found to be gradually reduced proportionately to moderate reductions in nucleotide availability. Cells with highly extended C periods showed a “delay” in cell division i.e. had a higher cell mass. Visualization of SeqA structures by immunofluorescence indicated no change in organization of the new DNA upon moderate limitation of RNR activity. Severe nucleotide limitation led to replication fork stalling and reversal. Well defined SeqA structures were not found in situations of extensive replication fork repair. In cells with stalled forks obtained by UV irradiation, considerable DNA compaction was observed, possibly indicating a reorganization of the DNA into a “repair structure” during the initial phase of the SOS response. Conclusion/Significance The results indicate that the replication fork is slowed down in a controlled manner during moderate nucleotide depletion and that a change in the activity of RNR does not lead to a change in the organization of newly replicated DNA. Control of cell division but not control of initiation was affected by the changes in replication elongation. PMID:19898675

  10. Epidemics with temporary link deactivation in scale-free networks.

    PubMed

    Shkarayev, Maxim S; Tunc, Ilker; Shaw, Leah B

    2014-11-14

    During an epidemic, people may adapt or alter their social contacts to avoid infection. Various adaptation mechanisms have been studied previously. Recently, a new adaptation mechanism was presented in [1], where susceptible nodes temporarily deactivate their links to infected neighbors and reactivate when their neighbors recover. Considering the same adaptation mechanism on a scale-free network, we find that the topology of the subnetwork consisting of active links is fundamentally different from the original network topology. We predict the scaling exponent of the active degree distribution and derive mean-field equations by using improved moment closure approximations based on the conditional distribution of active degree given the total degree. These mean field equations show better agreement with numerical simulation results than the standard mean field equations based on a homogeneity assumption.

  11. Epidemics with temporary link deactivation in scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Tunc, Ilker; Shaw, Leah B.

    2014-11-01

    During an epidemic, people may adapt or alter their social contacts to avoid infection. Various adaptation mechanisms have been studied previously. Recently, a new adaptation mechanism was presented in (Tunc et al 2013 J. Stat. Phys. 151 355), where susceptible nodes temporarily deactivate their links to infected neighbors and reactivate when their neighbors recover. Considering the same adaptation mechanism on a scale-free network, we find that the topology of the subnetwork consisting of active links is fundamentally different from the original network topology. We predict the scaling exponent of the active degree distribution and derive mean field equations by using improved moment closure approximations based on the conditional distribution of active degree given the total degree. These mean field equations show better agreement with numerical simulation results than the standard mean field equations based on a homogeneity assumption.

  12. Epidemics with temporary link deactivation in scale-free networks

    PubMed Central

    Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Tunc, Ilker; Shaw, Leah B.

    2014-01-01

    During an epidemic, people may adapt or alter their social contacts to avoid infection. Various adaptation mechanisms have been studied previously. Recently, a new adaptation mechanism was presented in [1], where susceptible nodes temporarily deactivate their links to infected neighbors and reactivate when their neighbors recover. Considering the same adaptation mechanism on a scale-free network, we find that the topology of the subnetwork consisting of active links is fundamentally different from the original network topology. We predict the scaling exponent of the active degree distribution and derive mean-field equations by using improved moment closure approximations based on the conditional distribution of active degree given the total degree. These mean field equations show better agreement with numerical simulation results than the standard mean field equations based on a homogeneity assumption. PMID:25419231

  13. Importance of counterion reactivity on the deactivation of Co-salen catalysts in the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Surbhi; Zheng, Xiaolai; Jones, Christopher W; Weck, Marcus; Davis, Robert J

    2007-10-15

    Possible modes of deactivation of Jacobsen's Co-salen catalyst during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epichlorohydrin were explored by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, combined with recycling studies. Although an active Co(III)-salen catalyst deactivated substantially after multiple cycles without regeneration, the catalyst maintained its +3 oxidation state throughout the runs. Thus, deactivation of Co-salen during HKR was not the result of Co reduction. The mass spectrum of a deactivated material showed that catalyst dimerization does not account for the loss of activity. Results from various catalyst pretreatment tests, as well as from catalysts containing various counterions (acetate, tosylate, chloride, iodide) indicated that the rate of addition of the Co-salen counterions to epoxide forming Co-OH during the reaction correlated with deactivation. The extent of counterion addition to epoxide was influenced by the exposure time and the nucleophilicity of the counterion. An oligo(cyclooctene)-supported Co-OAc salen catalyst, which was 25 times more active than the standard Co-salen catalyst, was recycled multiple times with negligible deactivation. PMID:17850142

  14. Importance of Counterion Reactivity on the Deactivation of Co-Salen Catalysts in the Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution of Epichlorohydrin

    SciTech Connect

    Jain,S.; Zheng, X.; Jones, C.; Weck, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Possible modes of deactivation of Jacobsen's Co-salen catalyst during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epichlorohydrin were explored by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, combined with recycling studies. Although an active Co(III)-salen catalyst deactivated substantially after multiple cycles without regeneration, the catalyst maintained its +3 oxidation state throughout the runs. Thus, deactivation of Co-salen during HKR was not the result of Co reduction. The mass spectrum of a deactivated material showed that catalyst dimerization does not account for the loss of activity. Results from various catalyst pretreatment tests, as well as from catalysts containing various counterions (acetate, tosylate, chloride, iodide) indicated that the rate of addition of the Co-salen counterions to epoxide forming Co-OH during the reaction correlated with deactivation. The extent of counterion addition to epoxide was influenced by the exposure time and the nucleophilicity of the counterion. An oligo(cyclooctene)-supported Co-OAc salen catalyst, which was 25 times more active than the standard Co-salen catalyst, was recycled multiple times with negligible deactivation.

  15. Voltage-clamp analysis of the potentiation of the slow Ca2+-activated K+ current in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Borde, M; Bonansco, C; Fernández de Sevilla, D; Le Ray, D; Buño, W

    2000-01-01

    Exploring the principles that govern activity-dependent changes in excitability is an essential step to understand the function of the nervous system, because they act as a general postsynaptic control mechanism that modulates the flow of synaptic signals. We show an activity-dependent potentiation of the slow Ca2+-activated K+ current (sl(AHP)) which induces sustained decreases in the excitability in CA1 pyramidal neurons. We analyzed the sl(AHP) using the slice technique and voltage-clamp recordings with sharp or patch-electrodes. Using sharp electrodes-repeated activation with depolarizing pulses evoked a prolonged (8-min) potentiation of the amplitude (171%) and duration (208%) of the sl(AHP). Using patch electrodes, early after entering the whole-cell configuration (<20 min), responses were as those reported above. However, although the sl(AHP) remained unchanged, its potentiation was markedly reduced in later recordings, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms were rapidly eliminated by intracellular dialysis. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ current by nifedipine (20 microM) markedly reduced the sl(AHP) (79%) and its potentiation (55%). Ryanodine (20 microM) that blocks the release of intracellular Ca2+ also reduced sl(AHP) (29%) and its potentiation (25%). The potentiation of the sl(AHP) induced a marked and prolonged (>50%; approximately equals 8 min) decrease in excitability. The results suggest that sl(AHP) is potentiated as a result of an increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) following activation of voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels, aided by the subsequent release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Another possibility is that repeated activation increases the Ca2+-binding capacity of the channels mediating the sl(AHP). This potentiation of the sl(AHP) could be relevant in hippocampal physiology, because the changes in excitability it causes may regulate the induction threshold of the long-term potentiation of synaptic efficacy. Moreover, the

  16. Substance P and the neurokinin-1 receptor regulate electroencephalogram non-rapid eye movement sleep slow-wave activity locally

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Mark R.; Karpova, Svetlana A.; Yang, Xiaomei; Gerashchenko, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P is an excitatory neurotransmitter produced by various cells including neurons and microglia that is involved in regulating inflammation and cerebral blood flow—functions that affect sleep and slow-wave activity (SWA). Substance P is the major ligand for the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R), which is found throughout the brain including the cortex. The NK-1R is found on sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase whose activity is associated with SWA. We determined the effects of local cortical administration of a NK-1R agonist (substance P-fragment 1, 7) and a NK-1R antagonist (CP96345) on sleep and SWA in mice. The NK-1R agonist significantly enhanced SWA for several hours when applied locally to the cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere as the electroencephalogram (EEG) electrode but not after application to the contralateral hemisphere when compared to saline vehicle control injections. In addition, a significant compensatory reduction in SWA was found after the NK-1R agonist-induced enhancements in SWA. Conversely, injections of the NK-1R antagonist into the cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere of the EEG electrode attenuated SWA compared to vehicle injections but this effect was not found after injections of the NK-1R antagonist into contralateral hemisphere as the EEG electrode. Non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep duration responses after NK-1R agonist and antagonist injections were not significantly different from the responses to the vehicle. Our findings indicate that the substance P and the NK-1R are involved in regulating SWA locally. PMID:25301750

  17. Self-Related Processing and Deactivation of Cortical Midline Regions in Disorders of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Julia Sophia; Höller, Yvonne; Bergmann, Jürgen; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Kronbichler, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Self-related stimuli activate anterior parts of cortical midline regions, which normally show task-induced deactivation. Deactivation in medial posterior and frontal regions is associated with the ability to focus attention on the demands of the task, and therefore, with consciousness. Studies investigating patients with impaired consciousness, that is, patients in minimally conscious state and patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (formerly vegetative state), demonstrate that these patients show responses to self-related content in the anterior cingulate cortex. However, it remains unclear if these responses are an indication for conscious processing of stimuli or are due to automatic processing. To shed further light on this issue, we investigated responses of cortical midline regions to the own and another name in 27 patients with a disorder of consciousness and compared them to task-induced deactivation. While almost all of the control subjects responding to the own name demonstrated higher activation due to the self-related content in anterior midline regions and additional deactivation, none of the responding patients did so. Differences between groups showed a similar pattern of findings. Despite the relation between behavioral responsiveness in patients and activation in response to the own name, the findings of this study do not provide evidence for a direct association of activation in anterior midline regions and conscious processing. The deficits in processing of self-referential content in anterior midline regions may rather be due to general impairments in cognitive processing and not particularly linked to impaired consciousness. PMID:23986685

  18. Slow modulations of high-frequency activity (40-140-Hz) discriminate preictal changes in human focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Rojas, C; Valderrama, M; Fouad-Ahmed, A; Feldwisch-Drentrup, H; Ihle, M; Teixeira, C A; Sales, F; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Adam, C; Dourado, A; Charpier, S; Navarro, V; Le Van Quyen, M

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that some seizures are preceded by preictal changes that start from minutes to hours before an ictal event. Nevertheless an adequate statistical evaluation in a large database of continuous multiday recordings is still missing. Here, we investigated the existence of preictal changes in long-term intracranial recordings from 53 patients with intractable partial epilepsy (in total 531 days and 558 clinical seizures). We describe a measure of brain excitability based on the slow modulation of high-frequency gamma activities (40-140 Hz) in ensembles of intracranial contacts. In prospective tests, we found that this index identified preictal changes at levels above chance in 13.2% of the patients (7/53), suggesting that results may be significant for the whole group (p < 0.05). These results provide a demonstration that preictal states can be detected prospectively from EEG data. They advance understanding of the network dynamics leading to seizure and may help develop novel seizure prediction algorithms. PMID:24686330

  19. Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S&M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S&M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the IFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of IFDP facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 1999. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $36M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S&M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year.

  20. Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S and M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S and M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the EFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of EFDP Facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 2000. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $51M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S and M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year.

  1. OBSCURED GOODS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THEIR HOST GALAXIES AT z < 1.25: THE SLOW BLACK HOLE GROWTH PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, B. D.; Urry, C. M.; Van Duyne, J.; Treister, E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Grogin, N. A.

    2011-06-20

    We compute black hole masses and bolometric luminosities for 87 obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 0.25 {<=} z {<=} 1.25, selected from the GOODS deep multi-wavelength survey fields via their X-ray emission. We fit the optical images and obtain morphological parameters for the host galaxy, separating the galaxy from its central point source, thereby obtaining a four-band optical spectral energy distribution (SED) for each active nucleus. We calculate bolometric luminosities for these AGNs by reddening a normalized mean SED of GOODS broad-line AGNs to match the observed central point-source SED of each obscured AGN. This estimate of L{sub bol} has a smaller spread than simple bolometric corrections to the X-ray luminosity or direct integration of the observed multi-wavelength SED, suggesting it is a better measure. We estimate central black hole masses from the bulge luminosities. The black hole masses span a wide range, 7 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} to 6 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}; the median black hole mass is 5 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}. The majority of these AGNs have L/L{sub Edd} {<=} 0.01, and we detect no significant evolution of the mean Eddington ratio to z = 1.25. This implies that the bulk of black hole growth in these obscured AGNs must have occurred at z {approx}> 1 and that we are observing these AGNs in a slow- or no-growth state.

  2. Combined effect of hydrodynamic and interfacial flow parameters on lysozyme deactivation in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ghadge, Rajaram S; Patwardhan, Ashwin W; Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic environment within a bioreactor and in the purification equipment is known to affect the activity and yield of enzyme production. The present research focuses on the effect of hydrodynamic flow parameters (average energy dissipation rate, maximum energy dissipation rate, average shear rate, and average normal stress) and the interfacial flow parameters (specific interfacial area and mass transfer coefficient) on the activity of lysozyme. Flow parameters were estimated using CFD simulation based on the k-epsilon approach. Enzyme deactivation was investigated in 0.1, 0.3, 0.57, and 1 m i.d. vessels. Enzyme solution was subjected to hydrodynamic stress using various types of impellers and impeller combinations over a wide range of power consumption (0.03 < P(G)/V < 7, kW/m3). The effects of tank diameter, impeller diameter, blade width, blade angle, and the number of blades on the extent of deactivation were investigated. At equal value of P(G)/V, epsilon(max), and gamma(avg), the extent of deactivation was dramatically different for different impeller types. The extent of deactivation was found to correlate well with the average turbulent normal stress and the mass transfer coefficient.

  3. Activation of a GH43 ß-xylosidase by divalent metal cations: Slow binding of divalent metal and high substrate specificity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RS223-BX of glycoside hydrolase family 43 is a ß-xylosidase that is strongly activated (kcat/Km as much as 116-fold) by the addition of divalent metal cations, Ca2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Mn2+and Ni2+. Slow activation by Mg2+ was demonstrated (kon 0.0130 s-1 mM-1, koff 0.00789 s-1) at pH 7.0 and 25 °C....

  4. 49 CFR 195.59 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. 195.59... Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. For each abandoned offshore pipeline facility or each abandoned... operator of that facility must file a report upon abandonment of that facility. (a) The preferred method...

  5. 49 CFR 195.59 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. 195.59... Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. For each abandoned offshore pipeline facility or each abandoned... operator of that facility must file a report upon abandonment of that facility. (a) The preferred method...

  6. 49 CFR 195.59 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. 195.59... Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. For each abandoned offshore pipeline facility or each abandoned... operator of that facility must file a report upon abandonment of that facility. (a) The preferred method...

  7. 49 CFR 195.59 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. 195.59... Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. For each abandoned offshore pipeline facility or each abandoned... operator of that facility must file a report upon abandonment of that facility. (a) The preferred method...

  8. Regeneration of commercial selective catalyst reduction catalysts deactivated by Pb and other inorganic elements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanke; Wang, Jinxiu; Chen, Jinsheng; He, Xinjiang; Wang, Yujing; Song, Kai; Xie, Zongli

    2016-09-01

    The regeneration of commercial SCR (Selective Catalyst Reduction) catalysts deactivated by Pb and other elements was studied. The deactivated catalyst samples were prepared by chemical impregnation with mixed solution containing K2SO4, Na2SO4, CaSO4, Pb(NO3)2 and NH4H2PO4. A novel method combining Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA-2Na) and H2SO4 solution (viz. catalysts treated by dilute EDTA-2Na and H2SO4 solution in sequence) was used to recover the activity of deactivated samples, and the effect was compared with single H2SO4, oxalic acid, acetic acid, EDTA or HNO3 solutions. The surface structure, acidity and reducibility of samples were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), H2-temperature programmed section (H2-TPR), NH3-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and in situ DRIFTS. Impurities caused a decrease of specific surface area and surface reducibility, as well as Brønsted acid sites, and therefore led to severe deactivation of the SCR catalyst. The use of an acid solution alone possibly eliminated the impurities on the deactivated catalyst to some extent, and also increased the specific surface area and Brønsted acid sites and promoted the surface reducibility, thus recovered the activity partially. The combination of EDTA-2Na and H2SO4 could remove most of the impurities and improve the activity significantly. The removal of Pb should be an important factor for regeneration. Due to a high removal rate for Pb and other impurities, the combination of EDTA-2Na and H2SO4 solutions provided the best efficiency. PMID:27593277

  9. Regeneration of commercial selective catalyst reduction catalysts deactivated by Pb and other inorganic elements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanke; Wang, Jinxiu; Chen, Jinsheng; He, Xinjiang; Wang, Yujing; Song, Kai; Xie, Zongli

    2016-09-01

    The regeneration of commercial SCR (Selective Catalyst Reduction) catalysts deactivated by Pb and other elements was studied. The deactivated catalyst samples were prepared by chemical impregnation with mixed solution containing K2SO4, Na2SO4, CaSO4, Pb(NO3)2 and NH4H2PO4. A novel method combining Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA-2Na) and H2SO4 solution (viz. catalysts treated by dilute EDTA-2Na and H2SO4 solution in sequence) was used to recover the activity of deactivated samples, and the effect was compared with single H2SO4, oxalic acid, acetic acid, EDTA or HNO3 solutions. The surface structure, acidity and reducibility of samples were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), H2-temperature programmed section (H2-TPR), NH3-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and in situ DRIFTS. Impurities caused a decrease of specific surface area and surface reducibility, as well as Brønsted acid sites, and therefore led to severe deactivation of the SCR catalyst. The use of an acid solution alone possibly eliminated the impurities on the deactivated catalyst to some extent, and also increased the specific surface area and Brønsted acid sites and promoted the surface reducibility, thus recovered the activity partially. The combination of EDTA-2Na and H2SO4 could remove most of the impurities and improve the activity significantly. The removal of Pb should be an important factor for regeneration. Due to a high removal rate for Pb and other impurities, the combination of EDTA-2Na and H2SO4 solutions provided the best efficiency.

  10. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    SciTech Connect

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P.

    1997-12-31

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D&D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively {open_quotes}solder{close_quotes} components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible.

  11. Initial deactivation of residue hydrodemetallization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gualda, G.; Kasztelan, S.

    1996-06-01

    Used NiMo/alumina residue hydrodemetallization catalysts with bimodal pore size distribution have been prepared in batch and continuous flow reactors using a Safanyia atmospheric residue. The batch reactor provided used catalysts containing carbon deposits with almost no metal deposits (less than 200 ppm V and 4 to 15 wt% C), whereas the continuous flow reactor provided used catalysts containing both metal and carbon deposits (up to 1.3 wt% V and 11 to 14 wt% C). Used catalyst elemental analysis indicates that within experimental uncertainties the carbon deposits have a density of 1.5 {plus_minus} 0.2 g/cm{sup 3} and contain sulfur, nitrogen, and hydrogen, with different H/C ratio, the latter of depending on both the experimental conditions and the amount of carbon. Characterization of the used catalysts by electron probe microanalysis, secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and porosimetry show that V and C were well distributed in the catalyst grain in most of the samples and that carbon deposits are best described by three-dimensional patches of amorphous carbon (young coke) which generate pore size restrictions. Both carbon and vanadium have a deactivating effect on toluene hydrogenation, cyclohexane isomerization, and thiophene hydrodesulfurization performed on used catalysts under 6 MPa hydrogen pressure. However, a small amount of vanadium well dispersed inside the catalyst grain has been found to be more deactivating than a large amount of carbon. 71 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. TiO2 Nanotubes with Open Channels as Deactivation-Resistant Photocatalyst for the Degradation of Volatile Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Weon, Seunghyun; Choi, Wonyong

    2016-03-01

    We synthesized ordered TiO2 nanotubes (TNT) and compared their photocatalytic activity with that of TiO2 nanoparticles (TNP) film during the repeated cycles of photocatalytic degradation of gaseous toluene and acetaldehyde to test the durability of TNT as an air-purifying photocatalyst. The photocatalytic activity of TNT showed only moderate reduction after the five cycles of toluene degradation, whereas TNP underwent rapid deactivation as the photocatalysis cycles were repeated. Dynamic SIMS analysis showed that carbonaceous deposits were formed on the surface of TNP during the photocatalytic degradation of toluene, which implies that the photocatalyst deactivation should be ascribed to the accumulation of recalcitrant degradation intermediates (carbonaceous residues). In more oxidizing atmosphere (100% O2 under which less carbonaceous residues should form), the photocatalytic activity of TNP still decreased with repeating cycles of toluene degradation, whereas TNT showed no sign of deactivation. Because TNT has a highly ordered open channel structure, O2 molecules can be more easily supplied to the active sites with less mass transfer limitation, which subsequently hinders the accumulation of carbonaceous residues on TNT surface. Contrary to the case of toluene degradation, both TNT and TNP did not exhibit any significant deactivation during the photocatalytic degradation of acetaldehyde, because the generation of recalcitrant intermediates from acetaldehyde degradation is insignificant. The structural characteristics of TNT is highly advantageous in preventing the catalyst deactivation during the photocatalytic degradation of aromatic compounds.

  13. What Does Ipsilateral Delay Activity Reflect? Inferences from Slow Potentials in a Lateralized Visual Working Memory Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arend, Anna M.; Zimmer, Hubert D.

    2011-01-01

    In the lateralized change detection task, two item arrays are presented, one on each side of the display. Participants have to remember the items in the relevant hemifield and ignore the items in the irrelevant hemifield. A difference wave between contralateral and ipsilateral slow potentials with respect to the relevant items, the contralateral…

  14. Slow Pseudotachylites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, M.; Stunitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.

    2011-12-01

    Tectonic pseudotachylites as solidified, friction induced melts are believed to be the only unequivocal evidence for paleo-earthquakes. Earthquakes occur when fast slip (1 - 3 m/s) propagates on a localized failure plane and are always related with stress drops. The mechanical work expended, together with the rock composition and the efficiency of thermal dissipation, controls whether the temperature increase on a localized slip plane will be sufficient to induce fusion. We report the formation of pseudotachylites during steady-state plastic flow at slow bulk shear strain rates (~10^-3 to ~10^-5 /s corresponding to slip rates of ~10^-6 to ~10^-8 m/s) in experiments performed at high confining pressures (500 MPa) and temperatures (300°C) corresponding to a depth of ~15 km. Crushed granitioid rock (Verzasca gneiss), grain size ≤ 200 μm, with 0.2 wt% water added was placed between alumina forcing blocks pre-cut at 45°, weld-sealed in platinum jackets and deformed with a constant displacement rate in a solid medium deformation apparatus (modified Griggs rig). Microstructural observations show the development of a S-C-C' fabric with C' slip zones being the dominant feature. Strain hardening in the beginning of the experiment is accompanied with compaction which is achieved by closely spaced R1 shears pervasively cutting the whole gouge zone and containing fine-grained material (d < 100 nm). The peak strength is achieved at γ ~ 2 at shear stress levels of 1350-1450 MPa when compaction ceases. During further deformation, large local displacements (γ > 10) are localized in less densely spaced, ~10 μm thick C'-C slip zones which develop predominantly in feldspars and often contain micas. In TEM, they appear to have no porosity consisting of partly amorphous material and small crystalline fragments with the average grain size of 20 nm. After the peak strength, the samples weaken by ~20 MPa and continue deforming up to γ ~ 4 without any stress drops. Strain

  15. The effect of fast and slow motor unit activation on whole-muscle mechanical performance: the size principle may not pose a mechanical paradox

    PubMed Central

    Holt, N. C.; Wakeling, J. M.; Biewener, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The output of skeletal muscle can be varied by selectively recruiting different motor units. However, our knowledge of muscle function is largely derived from muscle in which all motor units are activated. This discrepancy may limit our understanding of in vivo muscle function. Hence, this study aimed to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle with different motor unit activation. We determined the isometric properties and isotonic force–velocity relationship of rat plantaris muscles in situ with all of the muscle active, 30% of the muscle containing predominately slower motor units active or 20% of the muscle containing predominately faster motor units active. There was a significant effect of active motor unit type on isometric force rise time (p < 0.001) and the force–velocity relationship (p < 0.001). Surprisingly, force rise time was longer and maximum shortening velocity higher when all motor units were active than when either fast or slow motor units were selectively activated. We propose this is due to the greater relative effects of factors such as series compliance and muscle resistance to shortening during sub-maximal contractions. The findings presented here suggest that recruitment according to the size principle, where slow motor units are activated first and faster ones recruited as demand increases, may not pose a mechanical paradox, as has been previously suggested. PMID:24695429

  16. Planning for closure and deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    SciTech Connect

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; Poland, H.F.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-07-01

    In January 1994, DOE terminated the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program. Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a detailed plan to put Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a safe condition, including removal of irradiated fueled subassemblies from the plant, transfer of subassemblies, and removal and stabilization of primary and secondary sodium liquid heat transfer metal. The goal of deactivation is to stabilize the EBR-II complex until decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) is implemented, thereby minimizing maintenance and surveillance. Deactivation of a sodium cooled reactor presents unique concerns. Residual sodium in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude concerns with explosive sodium-air reactions. Also, residual sodium on components will effectively solder these items in place, making removal unfeasible. Several special cases reside in the primary system, including primary cold traps, a cesium trap, a cover gas condenser, and systems containing sodium-potassium alloy. The sodium or sodium-potassium alloy in these components must be reacted in place or the components removed. The Sodium Components Maintenance Shop at ANL-W provides the capability for washing primary components, removing residual quantities of sodium while providing some decontamination capacity. Considerations need to be given to component removal necessary for providing access to primary tank internals for D&D activities, removal of hazardous materials, and removal of stored energy sources. ANL-W`s plan for the deactivation of EBR-II addresses these issues, providing for an industrially and radiologically safe complex, requiring minimal surveillance during the interim period between deactivation and D&D. Throughout the deactivation and closure of the EBR-II complex, federal environmental concerns will be addressed, including obtaining the proper permits for facility condition and waste processing and disposal. 2 figs.

  17. Direct Interaction between the Voltage Sensors Produces Cooperative Sustained Deactivation in Voltage-gated H+ Channel Dimers.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Hiroko; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Takano, Yu; Okamura, Yasushi; Fujiwara, Yuichiro

    2016-03-11

    The voltage-gated H(+) channel (Hv) is a voltage sensor domain-like protein consisting of four transmembrane segments (S1-S4). The native Hv structure is a homodimer, with the two channel subunits functioning cooperatively. Here we show that the two voltage sensor S4 helices within the dimer directly cooperate via a π-stacking interaction between Trp residues at the middle of each segment. Scanning mutagenesis showed that Trp situated around the original position provides the slow gating kinetics characteristic of the dimer's cooperativity. Analyses of the Trp mutation on the dimeric and monomeric channel backgrounds and analyses with tandem channel constructs suggested that the two Trp residues within the dimer are functionally coupled during Hv deactivation but are less so during activation. Molecular dynamics simulation also showed direct π-stacking of the two Trp residues. These results provide new insight into the cooperative function of voltage-gated channels, where adjacent voltage sensor helices make direct physical contact and work as a single unit according to the gating process. PMID:26755722

  18. Effects of electric stimulation of the hunger center in the lateral hypothalamus on slow electric activity and spike activity of fundal and antral stomach muscles in rabbits under conditions of hunger and satiation.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Zenina, O Yu

    2013-09-01

    In chronic experiments on rabbits, the effect of electric stimulation of the hunger center in the lateral hypothalamus on myoelectric activity of the fundal and antral parts of the stomach was studied under conditions of hunger and satiation in the absence of food. Stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation and in previously fed rabbits produced incessant seeking behavior, which was followed by reorganization of the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of muscles of the stomach body and antrum specific for hungry and satiated animals. Increased hunger motivation during electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus manifested in the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of the stomach body and antrum muscles in rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the replacement of bimodal distribution of slow wave periods to a trimodal type typical of 2-day deprivation, while transition from satiation to hunger caused by electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus was associated with a shift from monomodal distributions of slow wave periods to a bimodal type typical of 24-h deprivation. Reorganization of the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of the stomach body and antrum muscles during electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus was determined by descending inhibitory influences of food motivational excitation on activity of the myogenic pacemaker of the lesser curvature of the stomach.

  19. Influence of circulating cytokines on prolactin during slow vs. fast exertional heat stress followed by active or passive recovery.

    PubMed

    Wright, Heather E; McLellan, Tom M; Friesen, Brian J; Casa, Douglas J; Kenny, Glen P

    2012-08-15

    Prolactin (PRL) has been suggested as an indicator of fatigue during exertional heat stress (EHS), given its strong relationship with body core temperature (T(c)); however, the strength of this relationship during different rates of T(c) increase and subsequent recovery is unknown. In addition, given the influence that systemic cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, have on the pituitary gland, it would be of interest to determine the relationship between PRL, IL-6, and TNF-α during EHS. The purpose was to examine the PRL, IL-6, and TNF-α heat stress responses during slow and fast heating and subsequent resting or cold water immersion recovery. On 4 days, nine individuals walked at ≈ 45% (slow heating) or ran at ≈ 65% (fast heating) maximal oxygen consumption on a treadmill in the heat (40°C, 30% relative humidity) until rectal temperature (T(re)) reached 39.5°C (esophageal temperature; fast = 39.41 ± 0.04°C, slow = 39.82 ± 0.09°C). Post-EHS, subjects were either immersed in 2°C water or rested seated until T(re) returned to 38.0°C. Venous blood, analyzed for PRL, IL-6, and TNF-α, was obtained at rest, during exercise (T(re) 38.0, 39.0, 39.5°C), the start of recovery (≈ 5 min after 39.5°C), and subsequent recovery (T(re) 39.0, 38.0°C). IL-6 exhibited myokine properties, given the greater increases with slow heating and lack of increase in TNF-α. A strong temperature-dependent PRL response during slow and fast heating provides additional support for the use of PRL as a peripheral marker of impending fatigue, which is independent of IL-6 and TNF-α cytokine responses.

  20. Brief and Rare Mental "Breaks" Keep You Focused: Deactivation and Reactivation of Task Goals Preempt Vigilance Decrements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariga, Atsunori; Lleras, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    We newly propose that the vigilance decrement occurs because the cognitive control system fails to maintain active the goal of the vigilance task over prolonged periods of time (goal habituation). Further, we hypothesized that momentarily deactivating this goal (via a switch in tasks) would prevent the activation level of the vigilance goal from…

  1. Expertise-related deactivation of the right temporoparietal junction during musical improvisation.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Aaron L; Ansari, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Musical training has been associated with structural changes in the brain as well as functional differences in brain activity when musicians are compared to nonmusicians on both perceptual and motor tasks. Previous neuroimaging comparisons of musicians and nonmusicians in the motor domain have used tasks involving prelearned motor sequences or synchronization with an auditorily presented sequence during the experiment. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine expertise-related differences in brain activity between musicians and nonmusicians during improvisation--the generation of novel musical-motor sequences--using a paradigm that we previously used in musicians alone. Despite behaviorally matched performance, the two groups showed significant differences in functional brain activity during improvisation. Specifically, musicians deactivated the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) during melodic improvisation, while nonmusicians showed no change in activity in this region. The rTPJ is thought to be part of a ventral attentional network for bottom-up stimulus-driven processing, and it has been postulated that deactivation of this region occurs in order to inhibit attentional shifts toward task-irrelevant stimuli during top-down, goal-driven behavior. We propose that the musicians' deactivation of the rTPJ during melodic improvisation may represent a training-induced shift toward inhibition of stimulus-driven attention, allowing for a more goal-directed performance state that aids in creative thought.

  2. Deactivation mechanism and feasible regeneration approaches for the used commercial NH3-SCR catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanke; Meng, Xiaoran; Chen, Jinsheng; Yin, Liqian; Qiu, Tianxue; He, Chi

    2016-01-01

    The deactivation and regeneration of selective catalytic reduction catalysts which have been used for about 37,000 h in a coal power plant are studied. The formation of Al2(SO4)3, surface deposition of K, Mg and Ca are primary reasons for the deactivation of the studied Selective catalytic reduction catalysts. Other factors such as activated V valence alteration also contribute to the deactivation. Reactivation of used catalysts via environment-friendly and finance-feasibly approaches, that is, dilute acid or alkali solution washing, would be of great interest. Three regeneration pathways were studied in the present work, and dilute nitric acid or sodium hydroxide solution could remove most of the contaminants over the catalyst surface and partly recover the catalytic performance. Notably, the acid-alkali combination washing, namely, catalysts treated by dilute sodium hydroxide and nitric acid solutions orderly, was much more effective than single washing approach in recovering the activity, and NO conversion increased from 23.6% to 89.5% at 380°C. The higher removal efficiency of contaminants, the lower dissolution of activated V, and promoting the formation of polymeric vanadate should be the main reason for recovery of the activity.

  3. 1997 project of the year, PUREX deactivation project

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.W.

    1998-02-13

    At the end of 1992, the PUREX and UO{sub 3} plants were deemed no longer necessary for the defense needs of the United States. Although no longer necessary, they were very costly to maintain in their post-operation state. The DOE embarked on a deactivation strategy for these plants to reduce the costs of providing continuous surveillance of the facilities and their hazards. Deactivation of the PUREX and UO{sub 3} plants was estimated to take 5 years and cost $222.5 million and result in an annual surveillance and maintenance cost of $2 million. Deactivation of the PUREX/UO{sub 3} plants officially began on October 1, 1993. The deactivation was 15 months ahead of the original schedule and $75 million under the original cost estimate. The annual cost of surveillance and maintenance of the plants was reduced to less than $1 million.

  4. Deactivation of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Daniel B.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Brock, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIEDs), including pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), are the most effective treatment for life-threatening arrhythmias. Patients or their surrogates may request device deactivation to avoid prolongation of the dying process or in other settings, such as after device-related complications or with changes in their health care goals. Despite published guidelines outlining theoretical and practical aspects of this common clinical scenario, significant uncertainty remains for both patients and health care providers regarding the ethical and legal status of CIED deactivation. This review outlines the ethical and legal principles supporting CIED deactivation at patients’ request, centered upon patient autonomy and authority over their own medical treatment. The empirical literature describing stakeholder views and experiences surrounding CIED deactivation is described, along with lessons for future research and practice guidance surrounding the care of patients with CIEDs. PMID:23217433

  5. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    MedlinePlus

    Dystonia; Involuntary slow and twisting movements; Choreoathetosis; Leg and arm movements - uncontrollable; Arm and leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements

  6. Source modeling sleep slow waves

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael; Riedner, Brady A.; Huber, Reto; Massimini, Marcello; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Tononi, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    Slow waves are the most prominent electroencephalographic (EEG) feature of sleep. These waves arise from the synchronization of slow oscillations in the membrane potentials of millions of neurons. Scalp-level studies have indicated that slow waves are not instantaneous events, but rather they travel across the brain. Previous studies of EEG slow waves were limited by the poor spatial resolution of EEGs and by the difficulty of relating scalp potentials to the activity of the underlying cortex. Here we use high-density EEG (hd-EEG) source modeling to show that individual spontaneous slow waves have distinct cortical origins, propagate uniquely across the cortex, and involve unique subsets of cortical structures. However, when the waves are examined en masse, we find that there are diffuse hot spots of slow wave origins centered on the lateral sulci. Furthermore, slow wave propagation along the anterior−posterior axis of the brain is largely mediated by a cingulate highway. As a group, slow waves are associated with large currents in the medial frontal gyrus, the middle frontal gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus, the anterior cingulate, the precuneus, and the posterior cingulate. These areas overlap with the major connectional backbone of the cortex and with many parts of the default network. PMID:19164756

  7. Catalyst deactivation in hydrotreating of residua: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1994-12-31

    Hydrotreating of petroleum residua feedstocks involves three important reactions: hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), and hydrodemetallization (HDM) for removal of organically-bound sulfur, nitrogen, and metals respectively. Sulfided resid hydrotreating catalysts are deactivated over a period of months by coke, metals and nitrogen compounds. The deactivation process involves a combination of uniform poisoning, pore mouth poisoning and pore blockage by (i) decomposition of organometallic compounds and (ii) buildup of soft coke and its transformation over a period of time to hard, crystalline coke. These problems are minimized by careful selection of guard beds, reactor design, and catalyst design; moreover, it is possible to regenerate coked catalysts with an oxygen burn. An updated overview of the key aspects of residua hydrotreating deactivation, including coke formation chemistry, metals deposition chemistry, catalyst and reactor design, and the use of mathematical models to simulate the deactivation process may be timely. This review focuses on the deactivation of sulfided Mo, CoMo, and NiMo catalysts in hydrotreating of heavy residuum feedstocks. Coke formation, metals deposition, the roles of catalyst and reactor design in minimizing catalyst decline, and the application of modeling to design and prediction of deactivation rates are discussed in this review in the sections which follow. 42 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Preceding seismic activity and slow slip events in the source area of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Yoshida, Keisuke

    2015-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake ruptured a large area of the megathrust east of NE Japan. The earthquake's magnitude was 9.0, substantially larger than predicted. It is important to know what occurred in the source area prior to this great megathrust earthquake to improve understanding of the nucleation processes of large earthquakes and risk assessments in subduction zones. Seafloor observation data revealed the existence of two extremely large slip patches: one just updip of the mainshock hypocenter and the other 80-100 km to the north near the trench axis. For 70-90 years before 2003, M > 6 events and slips of M > c. 7 events on the megathrust occurred in the areas surrounding these two large slip patches. Seismic activity had increased since at least 2003 in the downdip portion of the source area of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. In addition, long-term accelerated slow slip occurred in this downdip portion of the source area in the decades before the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. About 1 month before the earthquake, a slow slip event (SSE) took place at relatively shallow depths between the two large slip patches, accompanied by foreshock activity. Both the slow slip and foreshocks propagated from north to south toward the southern large slip patch. Two days before the earthquake, an M 7.3 foreshock and an associated postseismic slip began at relatively deep depths in the megathrust between the two large slip patches. In addition, a slow slip type event seems to have occurred approximately half a day after the M 7.3 foreshock near the mainshock hypocenter. This slow slip event and the foreshock activity again propagated from north to south toward the mainshock hypocenter. These long- and short-term preceding seismic and aseismic slip gradually reduced the interplate coupling, increased shear stresses at the two large slip patches (i.e., two strong asperity patches), and finally led to the rupture of the great Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

  9. Spontaneous Slow Fluctuation of EEG Alpha Rhythm Reflects Activity in Deep-Brain Structures: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Kei; Hanakawa, Takashi; Morimoto, Masako; Honda, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the occipital alpha rhythm on brain electroencephalogram (EEG) is associated with brain activity in the cerebral neocortex and deep brain structures. To further understand the mechanisms of alpha rhythm power fluctuation, we performed simultaneous EEGs and functional magnetic resonance imaging recordings in human subjects during a resting state and explored the dynamic relationship between alpha power fluctuation and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the brain. Based on the frequency characteristics of the alpha power time series (APTS) during 20-minute EEG recordings, we divided the APTS into two components: fast fluctuation (0.04–0.167 Hz) and slow fluctuation (0–0.04 Hz). Analysis of the correlation between the MRI signal and each component revealed that the slow fluctuation component of alpha power was positively correlated with BOLD signal changes in the brain stem and the medial part of the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex, while the fast fluctuation component was correlated with the lateral part of the thalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, but not the brain stem. In summary, these data suggest that different subcortical structures contribute to slow and fast modulations of alpha spectra on brain EEG. PMID:23824708

  10. Working memory-related hippocampal deactivation interferes with long-term memory formation.

    PubMed

    Axmacher, Nikolai; Elger, Christian E; Fell, Juergen

    2009-01-28

    Previous findings indicate that the hippocampus does not only play a role in long-term memory (LTM) encoding, but is important for working memory (WM) as well, in particular when multiple items are being processed. A recent study showed that maintenance of multiple items was associated with hippocampal activation (hippocampus-dependent WM), while maintenance of individual items induced hippocampal deactivations (hippocampus-independent WM). Here, we used two complimentary approaches to investigate whether WM-related activity patterns occur also during LTM encoding of sequentially presented items and whether they are related to the primacy effect, i.e., improved LTM encoding of items presented at the beginning of the list. Intracranial electroencephalogram in epilepsy patients and functional MRI in healthy subjects were recorded during a word-list learning task. As expected, the proportion of successfully encoded items was higher at the beginning of the list than at later list positions. Items at the beginning of the list which were subsequently forgotten were associated with negative blood oxygen level dependent responses and positive direct current slopes, corresponding to hippocampal deactivations, suggesting that they were not processed in hippocampus-dependent WM. These deactivations were absent for items later in the list and for subsequently remembered items. These data show that if processing of items at the beginning of the list is accompanied by hippocampal activity patterns previously observed during hippocampus-dependent WM, these items are subsequently remembered. However, deactivations of the hippocampus as previously observed during WM maintenance of individual items predicts failure of LTM encoding.

  11. Soluble inhibitors/deactivators of cellulase enzymes from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmi; Ximenes, Eduardo; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R

    2011-04-01

    Liquid hot water, steam explosion, and dilute acid pretreatments of lignocellulose generate soluble inhibitors which hamper enzymatic hydrolysis as well as fermentation of sugars to ethanol. Toxic and inhibitory compounds will vary with pretreatment and include soluble sugars, furan derivatives (hydroxymethyl fulfural, furfural), organic acids (acetic, formic and, levulinic acid), and phenolic compounds. Their effect is seen when an increase in the concentration of pretreated biomass in a hydrolysis slurry results in decreased cellulose conversion, even though the ratio of enzyme to cellulose is kept constant. We used lignin-free cellulose, Solka Floc, combined with mixtures of soluble components released during pretreatment of wood, to prove that the decrease in the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis is due to a combination of enzyme inhibition and deactivation. The causative agents were extracted from wood pretreatment liquid using PEG surfactant, activated charcoal or ethyl acetate and then desorbed, recovered, and added back to a mixture of enzyme and cellulose. At enzyme loadings of either 1 or 25mg protein/g glucan, the most inhibitory components, later identified as phenolics, decreased the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis by half due to both inhibition and precipitation of the enzymes. Full enzyme activity occurred when the phenols were removed. Hence detoxification of pretreated woods through phenol removal is expected to reduce enzyme loadings, and therefore reduce enzyme costs, for a given level of cellulose conversion.

  12. Use and disuse and the control of acetylcholinesterase activity in fast and slow twitch muscle of rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Groswald, D.; Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    The role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in neuromuscular transmission is relatively well established, little is known, however, of the mechanisms that regulate its synthesis and control its specific distribution in fast and slow muscle. Innervation plays an important role in the regulation of AChE and elimination of the influence of the nerve by surgical denervation results in a loss of AChE. The influences of the nerve and how they are mediated was investigated. It is suggested that muscle usage and other factors such as materials carried by axonal transport may participate in the regulation of this enzyme. The mechanisms that regulate AChE and its molecular forms in two functionally different forms are studied.

  13. PARK2/Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance contributes to proteasome activation during slow-twitch muscle atrophy via NFE2L1 nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Norihiko; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Shigeto; Soma, Sanae; Ezaki, Junji; Trejo, Juan Alejandro Oliva; Takeda-Ezaki, Mitsue; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Tada, Norihiro; Komatsu, Masaaki; Tanaka, Keiji; Kominami, Eiki; Hattori, Nobutaka; Ueno, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is thought to result from hyperactivation of intracellular protein degradation pathways, including autophagy and the ubiquitin–proteasome system. However, the precise contributions of these pathways to muscle atrophy are unclear. Here, we show that an autophagy deficiency in denervated slow-twitch soleus muscles delayed skeletal muscle atrophy, reduced mitochondrial activity, and induced oxidative stress and accumulation of PARK2/Parkin, which participates in mitochondrial quality control (PARK2-mediated mitophagy), in mitochondria. Soleus muscles from denervated Park2 knockout mice also showed resistance to denervation, reduced mitochondrial activities, and increased oxidative stress. In both autophagy-deficient and Park2-deficient soleus muscles, denervation caused the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Denervation induced proteasomal activation via NFE2L1 nuclear translocation in control mice, whereas it had little effect in autophagy-deficient and Park2-deficient mice. These results suggest that PARK2-mediated mitophagy plays an essential role in the activation of proteasomes during denervation atrophy in slow-twitch muscles. PMID:24451648

  14. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Belinda; Kronbichler, Martin; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN) activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret. Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs) and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs) matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection). During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval.

  15. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks

    PubMed Central

    Pletzer, Belinda; Kronbichler, Martin; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Kerschbaum, Hubert H.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN) activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret. Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs) and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs) matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection). During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval. PMID:25954179

  16. Epigallocatechin Gallate Reduces Slow-Twitch Muscle Fiber Formation and Mitochondrial Biosynthesis in C2C12 Cells by Repressing AMPK Activity and PGC-1α Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Kelin; Shu, Gang; Wang, Songbo; Gao, Ping; Zhu, Xiaotong; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-08-31

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a major active compound in green tea polyphenols. EGCG acts as an antioxidant to prevent the cell damage caused by free radicals and their derivatives. In skeletal muscle, exercise causes the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and promotes the formation of slow-type muscle fiber. To determine whether EGCG, as a ROS scavenger, has any effect on skeletal muscle fiber type, we applied different concentrations (0, 5, 25, and 50 μM) of EGCG in the culture medium of differentiated C2C12 cells for 2 days. The fiber-type composition, mitochondrial biogenesis-related gene expression, antioxidant and glucose metabolism enzyme activity, and ROS levels in C2C12 cells were then detected. According to our results, 5 μM EGCG significantly decreased the cellular activity of SDH, 25 μM EGCG significantly downregulated the MyHC I, PGC-1α, NRF-1, and p-AMPK levels and SDH activity while enhancing the CAT and GSH-Px activity and decreasing the intracellular ROS levels, and 50 μM EGCG significantly downregulated MyHC I, PGC-1α, and NRF-1 expression and HK and SDH activity while increasing LDH activity. Furthermore, 300 μM H2O2 and 0.5 mM AMPK agonist (AICAR) improved the expression of MyHC I, PGC-1α, and p-AMPK, which were all reversed by 25 μM EGCG. In conclusion, the effect of EGCG on C2C12 cells may occur through the reduction of the ROS level, thereby decreasing both AMPK activity and PGC-1α expression and eventually reducing slow-twitch muscle fiber formation and mitochondrial biosynthesis. PMID:27420899

  17. Isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Eversole, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    The production and distribution of radioisotopes for medical, scientific, and industrial applications has been a major activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since the late 1940s. As the demand for many of these isotopes grew and their sale became profitable, the technology for the production of the isotopes was transferred to private industry, and thus, many of the production facilities at ORNL became underutilized. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to identify and prepare various isotopes production facilities for safe shutdown. In response, ORNL identified 19 candidate facilities for shutdown and established the Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program. In 1993, responsibility for the program was transitioned from the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to the DOE Office of Environmental Management and Uranium Enrichment Operation`s Office of Facility Transition and Management. The program was retitled the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP), and implementation responsibility was transferred from ORNL to the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

  18. A biphasic daily pattern of slow wave activity during a two-day 90-minute sleep wake schedule.

    PubMed

    Duncan, W C; Barbato, G; Fagioli, I; Garcia-Borreguero, D; Wehr, T A

    2009-12-01

    Twenty-four hour sleep patterns were measured in six healthy male volunteers during a 90-minute short sleep-wake (SW 30:60) cycle protocol for 48 hours. Sleep pressure estimates (amount of Slow Wave Sleep [SWS], SWA, and Rate of Synchronization [RoS: the rate of SWA build-up at the beginning of the NREM period]) were compared with the 24-hour patterns of body temperature (Tb24) and sleep propensity. A moderate sleep debt was incurred over the 48 hour study as indicated by decreased levels of 24 hour sleep. On day 1, ultradian patterns of REM and SWS sleep were prominent; on day 2, more prominent were circadian patterns of REM sleep, SWS, Sleep Latency, TST and Tb24. Also on Day 2, biphasic patterns of SWA and RoS were expressed, with peaks occurring during the falling and rising limbs of Tb24. The biphasic peaks in SWA and RoS may be associated with phase-specific interactions of the circadian pacemaker with the sleep homeostat during conditions of moderate sleep pressure. Further research is needed to replicate the finding and to identify biological factors that may underlie the twelve hour pattern in SWA. PMID:20162861

  19. FOXO/DAF-16 Activation Slows Down Turnover of the Majority of Proteins in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Ineke; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Cai, Huaihan; Vandemeulebroucke, Lieselot; Vierstraete, Andy; Smith, Richard D; Depuydt, Geert; Braeckman, Bart P

    2016-09-13

    Most aging hypotheses assume the accumulation of damage, resulting in gradual physiological decline and, ultimately, death. Avoiding protein damage accumulation by enhanced turnover should slow down the aging process and extend the lifespan. However, lowering translational efficiency extends rather than shortens the lifespan in C. elegans. We studied turnover of individual proteins in the long-lived daf-2 mutant by combining SILeNCe (stable isotope labeling by nitrogen in Caenorhabditiselegans) and mass spectrometry. Intriguingly, the majority of proteins displayed prolonged half-lives in daf-2, whereas others remained unchanged, signifying that longevity is not supported by high protein turnover. This slowdown was most prominent for translation-related and mitochondrial proteins. In contrast, the high turnover of lysosomal hydrolases and very low turnover of cytoskeletal proteins remained largely unchanged. The slowdown of protein dynamics and decreased abundance of the translational machinery may point to the importance of anabolic attenuation in lifespan extension, as suggested by the hyperfunction theory. PMID:27626670

  20. Diagnosis of industrial catalyst deactivation by surface characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, P.G. . Lab. voor Petrochemische Techniek Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg . Dept. of Engineering Chemistry)

    1994-06-01

    The exact nature of the catalyst surface and the various ways of catalyst deactivation are subjects of great scientific interest and enormous economic importance. A brief review like the present one has to be very selective, giving only the underlying principles and representative examples. The focus of this review is on industrial catalysts, in particular, on the most commonly used supported metal and mixed-oxide type catalysts. Here again, only typical examples are chosen and cited to illustrate the specific types of problems involved in catalyst deactivation and how these problems wee diagnosed by a judicious application of the experimental techniques available today. Of the types of catalyst deactivation caused by coking, poisoning, and solid-state transformations, the emphasis in this review is on the last type. Changes in the chemical composition of the catalyst surface, restructuring or reconstruction of the surface, phase transformations, gradual enrichment/depletion of a particular catalyst component on/from the catalyst surface, these are the topics of prominence in this review. Even here, emphasis is on normally unexpected or unsuspected types of deactivation and the catalyst metamorphosis produced by the catalytic reaction itself, as distinct from the purely thermal effects at the reaction temperature. This review is aimed to provide some essential background information and possibly to serve as a reference guide for trouble-shooting when a catalyst is deactivated for rather mysterious reasons. 147 refs.

  1. Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Monkeys Reduces Preparatory Beta and Gamma Power in the Superior Colliculus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jason L; Koval, Michael J; Womelsdorf, Thilo; Lomber, Stephen G; Everling, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive control requires the selection and maintenance of task-relevant stimulus-response associations, or rules. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has been implicated by lesion, functional imaging, and neurophysiological studies to be involved in encoding rules, but the mechanisms by which it modulates other brain areas are poorly understood. Here, the functional relationship of the DLPFC with the superior colliculus (SC) was investigated by bilaterally deactivating the DLPFC while recording local field potentials (LFPs) in the SC in monkeys performing an interleaved pro- and antisaccade task. Event-related LFPs showed differences between pro- and antisaccades and responded prominently to stimulus presentation. LFP power after stimulus onset was higher for correct saccades than erroneous saccades. Deactivation of the DLPFC did not affect stimulus onset related LFP activity, but reduced high beta (20-30 Hz) and high gamma (60-150 Hz) power during the preparatory period for both pro- and antisaccades. Spike rate during the preparatory period was positively correlated with gamma power and this relationship was attenuated by DLPFC deactivation. These results suggest that top-down control of the SC by the DLPFC may be mediated by beta oscillations.

  2. Results of 24-h manometric recording of colonic motor activity with endoluminal instillation of bisacodyl in patients with severe chronic slow transit constipation.

    PubMed

    Hervé, S; Savoye, G; Behbahani, A; Leroi, A M; Denis, P; Ducrotté, P

    2004-08-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of manometric colonic abnormalities and to evaluate the motor effect of intraluminal bisacodyl in a cohort of refractory constipated patients. Twenty-four hour colonic motility recordings were performed in 40 patients referred for a severe intractable chronic constipation. At the end of each recording session the motor effects of the endoluminal instillation of 10 mg bisacodyl were assessed. These patients were compared with 20 healthy subjects. The number of high-amplitude propagating contractions (HAPC) was significantly decreased in patients with slow transit constipation (12 +/- 11.6 vs 1 +/- 8.6, P < 0.001). Based on manometric patterns four groups of patients were isolated. Ten patients had no spontaneous HAPC, no food-induced colonic motor response and significantly lower colonic activity in transverse colon (374 +/- 1220 vs 3249 +/- 3458, P < 0.05). Five patients had significantly increased sigmoid segmental motility (20298 +/- 6364 vs 88780 +/- 3643, P < 0.001) and eight patients had significantly lower number of HAPC without other manometric abnormalities while 17 patients had normal colonic motility recordings. Endoluminal bisacodyl was able to induce HAPCs in all groups of patients. Patients with severe slow transit refractory constipation represented a heterogeneous group and endoluminal bisacodyl was able to promote a propagated motor activity in a majority of patients even in those suspected of having an inert colon.

  3. Human gene therapy for RPE65 isomerase deficiency activates the retinoid cycle of vision but with slow rod kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Aleman, Tomas S; Boye, Sanford L; Schwartz, Sharon B; Kaushal, Shalesh; Roman, Alejandro J; Pang, Ji-Jing; Sumaroka, Alexander; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; Wilson, James M; Flotte, Terence R; Fishman, Gerald A; Heon, Elise; Stone, Edwin M; Byrne, Barry J; Jacobson, Samuel G; Hauswirth, William W

    2008-09-30

    The RPE65 gene encodes the isomerase of the retinoid cycle, the enzymatic pathway that underlies mammalian vision. Mutations in RPE65 disrupt the retinoid cycle and cause a congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). We used adeno-associated virus-2-based RPE65 gene replacement therapy to treat three young adults with RPE65-LCA and measured their vision before and up to 90 days after the intervention. All three patients showed a statistically significant increase in visual sensitivity at 30 days after treatment localized to retinal areas that had received the vector. There were no changes in the effect between 30 and 90 days. Both cone- and rod-photoreceptor-based vision could be demonstrated in treated areas. For cones, there were increases of up to 1.7 log units (i.e., 50 fold); and for rods, there were gains of up to 4.8 log units (i.e., 63,000 fold). To assess what fraction of full vision potential was restored by gene therapy, we related the degree of light sensitivity to the level of remaining photoreceptors within the treatment area. We found that the intervention could overcome nearly all of the loss of light sensitivity resulting from the biochemical blockade. However, this reconstituted retinoid cycle was not completely normal. Resensitization kinetics of the newly treated rods were remarkably slow and required 8 h or more for the attainment of full sensitivity, compared with <1 h in normal eyes. Cone-sensitivity recovery time was rapid. These results demonstrate dramatic, albeit imperfect, recovery of rod- and cone-photoreceptor-based vision after RPE65 gene therapy.

  4. Activation of a GH43 β-xylosidase by divalent metal cations: slow binding of divalent metal and high substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Lee, Charles C; Wagschal, Kurt; Braker, Jay D

    2013-05-01

    RS223-BX of glycoside hydrolase family 43 is a β-d-xylosidase that is strongly activated (k(cat)/K(m) as much as 116-fold) by the addition of divalent metal cations, Ca(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Ni(2+). Slow activation by Mg(2+) was demonstrated (k(on) 0.013 s(-1) mM(-1), k(off) 0.008 s(-1)) at pH 7.0 and 25 °C. k(off) and k(on) values are independent of Mg(2+) concentration, but k(off) and k(on) are slower in the presence of increasing levels of substrate 4-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside. The kinetics strongly suggest that M(2+) binds to the enzyme rapidly, forming E M(2+), followed by slow isomerization to the activated enzyme, E* M(2+). Moderately high values of kcat (7-30 s(-1)) were found for M(2+)-activated RS223-BX acting on xylobiose (natural substrate) at pH 7.0 and 25 °C. Certain M(2+)-activated RS223-BX exhibit the highest reported values of k(cat)/K(m) of any β-xylosidase acting on natural substrates: for example, at pH 7.0 and 25°C, xylobiose (Mn(2+), 190 s(-1) mM(-1)), xylotriose (Ca(2+), 150 s(-1) mM(-1)) and xylotetraose (Ca(2+), 260 s(-1) mM(-1)). There is potential for the enzyme to add value to industrial saccharification operations at low substrate and high d-glucose and high d-xylose concentrations.

  5. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, D.G.; Gerber, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility`s life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994).

  6. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M until decommissioning activities begin.

  7. Slow starch digestion redefined at limit dextrin level by mucosal maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucosal maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) digest free glucose from food starches. Amylase (AMY) amplifies these mucosal activities by production of soluble limit dextrins (LDx). This network of enzyme activities determines rate of LDx entry into either the glycemic or the ferme...

  8. Jets, Coronal “Puffs,” and a Slow Coronal Mass Ejection Caused by an Opposite-polarity Region within an Active Region Footpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, N.; Morgan, H.

    2016-06-01

    During a period of three days beginning 2013 January 17, twelve recurrent reconnection events occur within a small region of opposing flux embedded within one footpoint of an active region, accompanied by flares and jets observed in EUV and fast and faint structureless “puffs” observed by coronagraphs. During the same period a slow structured CME gradually erupts, with one end anchored close to, or within, the jetting region. Four of the jet events occur in pairs—a narrow, primary jet followed within a few tens of minutes by a wider, more massive, jet. All the jets are slow, with an apparent speed of ˜100 km s-1. The speed of the wide puffs in the coronagraph data is ˜300 km s-1, and the timing of their appearance rules out a direct association with the EUV jetting material. The jet material propagates along large-scale closed-field loops and does not escape to the extended corona. The rapid reconfiguration of the closed loops following reconnection causes an outwardly propagating disturbance, or wave front, which manifests as puffs in coronagraph data. Furthermore, the newly expanded closed flux tube forms a pressure imbalance, which can result in a secondary jet. The reconnection events, through recurrent field reconfiguration, also leads to the gradual eruption of the structured flux tube appearing as the slow CME. Faint propagating coronal disturbances resulting from flares/jets may be common, but are usually obscured by associated ejections. Occasionally, the associated material ejections are absent, and coronal puffs may be clearly observed.

  9. Robot Work Platform for Large Hot Cell Deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    BITTEN, E.J.

    2000-05-01

    The 324 Building, located at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is being deactivated to meet state and federal cleanup commitments. The facility is currently in its third year of a nine-year project to complete deactivation and closure for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The 324 building contains large hot cells that were used for high-radiation, high-contamination chemical process development and demonstrations. A major obstacle for the 324 deactivation project is the inability to effectively perform deactivation tasks within highly radioactive, contaminated environments. Current strategies use inefficient, resource intensive technologies that significantly impact the cost and schedule for deactivation. To meet mandated cleanup commitments, there is a need to deploy rapid, more efficient remote/robot technologies to minimize worker exposure, accelerate work tasks, and eliminate the need for multiple specialized tool design and procurement efforts. This paper describes the functions and performance requirements for a crane-deployed remote/robot Work Platform possessing full access capabilities. The remote/robot Work Platform will deploy commercially available off-the-shelf tools and end effectors to support Project cleanup goals and reduce overall project risk and cost. The intent of this system is to maximize the use of off-the-shelf technologies that minimize additional new, unproven, or novel designs. This paper further describes procurement strategy, the selection process, the selected technology, and the current status of the procurement and lessons learned. Funding, in part, has been provided by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area.

  10. Deactivation of singlet oxygen by single-wall carbon nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Okazaki, Toshiya; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2006-11-01

    The deactivation rate constant of singlet oxygen 1O 2 by single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) was determined. The estimated rate constant by SWNHs, 8 × 10 4 L g -1 s -1, was significantly larger than the physical quenching rate constant by α-Tocopherol, 0.9 × 10 4 L g -1 s -1. The origin of this remarkable efficiency of SWNHs for 1O 2 deactivation is ascribed to the unique curvature of the graphitic tube in their horn shaped structure.

  11. Systems and methods for deactivating a matrix converter

    DOEpatents

    Ransom, Ray M.

    2013-04-02

    Systems and methods are provided for deactivating a matrix conversion module. An electrical system comprises an alternating current (AC) interface, a matrix conversion module coupled to the AC interface, an inductive element coupled between the AC interface and the matrix conversion module, and a control module. The control module is coupled to the matrix conversion module, and in response to a shutdown condition, the control module is configured to operate the matrix conversion module to deactivate the first conversion module when a magnitude of a current through the inductive element is less than a threshold value.

  12. Deactivation of titanium dioxide photocatalyst by oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane and silicon sealant off-gas in a recirculating batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Chemweno, Maurice K; Cernohlavek, Leemer G; Jacoby, William A

    2008-01-01

    We have studied deactivation of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst by oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane and silicone sealant off-gas in a recirculating batch reactor. Polydimethylsiloxane vapor is a model indoor air pollutant. It does not adsorb strongly on TiO2 in the dark, but undergoes oxidation when the ultraviolet (UV) photons are also present. Commercial silicone (room-temperature vulcanizing) sealant off-gas is an actual indoor air pollutant subject to short-term spikes in concentration. It does adsorb on the TiO2 surface in the dark, but UV photons also catalyze its oxidation. The oxidation of the Si-containing vapors was monitored using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscope equipped with a gas cell. Subsequent to each incremental exposure, a hexane oxidation reaction was performed to track the titania catalyst's activity. The exposures were repeated until substantial deactivation was achieved. We have also documented the regenerative effect of washing the catalyst surface with water. Surface science techniques were used to view the topography of the catalyst and to identify the elements causing the deactivation. Procedural observations of interest in the context of our recirculating batch reactor include the following: the rate of oxidation of hexane was used to assess the activity of a photocatalyst sample; hexane is an appropriate choice of a probe molecule because it does not adsorb in the dark and it undergoes photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) completely, forming CO2; and hexane does not deactivate the photocatalyst surface.

  13. A slow-slipping active fold and thrust system at the SE corner of the Atacama basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Shyu, J. H.; González, G.

    2009-12-01

    The western South American offshore is one of the major active convergent plate boundaries in the world, where the Nazca plate is subducting northeastward beneath the South American plate at a rate of about 84 mm/yr. Despite of this rapid plate convergence, the forearc region of western Andes does not seem to undergo large deformation at present. In order to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of active forearc deformation related to the plate convergence, we investigated tectono-geomorphic features in the area of Tilocalar, near the SE margin of the Atacama Basin in northern Chile, where active structures have been previously identified. To map topographic features produced by active structures, we used a combination of several remote-sensing data sets, including digital elevation models (DEM) made from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM), as well as higher resolution ASTER and QuickBird satellite images. Detailed geomorphic surveys using real time kinematic (RTK) GPS are carried out in the field to obtain high-resolution topographic profiles across these features. We also performed 40Ar/39Ar dating of deformed volcanic rocks in order to determine the long-term slip rates of the active structures. The hyper-aridity of the Atacama Basin results in extremely low erosion and sedimentation rates in the area. As a result, the present relief of land surface is mostly produced by neotectonic activity, and can be used as deformation marker. In the Tilocalar area, several N-S trending ridges are present. These ridges, generally several tens of meters high, are likely formed by asymmetric anticlines or monoclines with steep forelimbs facing east, and these folds are likely fault-propagation folds produced by underlying thrust faults. We suggest that these faults merge at depth to become a major active thrust system. From 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages, we found that the surface ignimbrites mostly deposited in latest Pliocene (2.3~4.3 Ma). If the structures have been

  14. Effects of allocryptopine on outward potassium current and slow delayed rectifier potassium current in rabbit myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Cheng; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Liu-Yang; Li, Nan; Chen, Xi; Cai, Zhong-Qi; Zhu, Chao; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Allocryptopine (ALL) is an effective alkaloid of Corydalis decumbens (Thunb.) Pers. Papaveraceae and has proved to be anti-arrhythmic. The purpose of our study is to investigate the effects of ALL on transmural repolarizing ionic ingredients of outward potassium current (Ito) and slow delayed rectifier potassium current (IKs). Methods The monophasic action potential (MAP) technique was used to record the MAP duration of the epicardium (Epi), myocardium (M) and endocardium (Endo) of the rabbit heart and the whole cell patch clamp was used to record Ito and IKs in cardiomyocytes of Epi, M and Endo layers that were isolated from rabbit ventricles. Results The effects of ALL on MAP of Epi, M and Endo layers were disequilibrium. ALL could effectively reduce the transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) in rabbit transmural ventricular wall. ALL decreased the current densities of Ito and IKs in a voltage and concentration dependent way and narrowed the repolarizing differences among three layers. The analysis of gating kinetics showed ALL accelerated the channel activation of Ito in M layers and partly inhibit the channel openings of Ito in Epi, M and Endo cells. On the other hand, ALL mainly slowed channel deactivation of IKs channel in Epi and Endo layers without affecting its activation. Conclusions Our study gives partially explanation about the mechanisms of transmural inhibition of Ito and IKs channels by ALL in rabbit myocardium. These findings provide novel perspective regarding the anti-arrhythmogenesis application of ALL in clinical settings. PMID:27403141

  15. Active upper plate thrust faulting in regions of low plate interface coupling, repeated slow slip events, and coastal uplift: Example from the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Joshu J.; Barnes, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Contractional fore-arc faulting and deformation is a characteristic feature of many subduction systems. Definition of the three-dimensional geometry and displacement rates of active, upper plate, out-of-sequence thrust faults along ˜250 km of the upper Hikurangi Margin enables us to examine the relationship between fore-arc deformation and the subduction interface in light of interseismic coupling estimates and distribution of slow slip events, both modeled from GPS measurements. These mid-fore-arc structures include the seaward vergent, outer shelf Lachlan and Ariel faults, with vertical separation rates up to 5 mm/yr, and several other major inner shelf faults with rates that are up to 3.8 mm/yr and comparable with Holocene coastal uplift rates. Seismic reflection imaging and geometric projection of these faults at depth indicate that they splay from the region of the plate interface where geodetic inversions for interseismic coupling and slow slip events suggest that the plate boundary undergoes aseismic slip. This observation may indicate either (1) that frictional properties and interseismic coupling on the plate interface are independent and unrelated to the active splay fault deformation in the inner-middle fore arc or (2) that the active splay faulting reflects long-term mechanical coupling related to higher shear stress, or the relative yield strength of the plate interface to the overriding plate, and that the current pattern of interseismic coupling may not be persistent over geological time scales of 20 ka. We compare structure and processes on the northern Hikurangi and Costa Rican margins and find similarities and significant differences astride these subduction systems.

  16. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P.-M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment, to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. We have identified a new on-axis site with diffuse flow, Ewan, and an active vent structure ∼1.2 km from the axis, Capelinhos. These sites are minor relative to the Main field, and our total heatflux estimate for all active sites (200-1200 MW) is only slightly higher than previously published estimates. We also identify fossil sites W of the main Lucky Strike field. A circular feature ∼200 m in diameter located on the flanks of a rifted off-axis central volcano is likely a large and inactive hydrothermal edifice, named Grunnus. We find no indicator of focused hydrothermal activity elsewhere along the segment, suggesting that the enhanced melt supply and the associated melt lenses, required to form central volcanoes, also sustain hydrothermal circulation to form and maintain large and long-lived hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal discharge to the seafloor occurs along fault traces, suggesting focusing of hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust along permeable fault zones.

  17. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P. M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. The Lucky Strike segment hosts three active hydrothermal fields: Capelinhos, Ewan, and the known Main Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field (MLSHF). Capelinhos is located 1.3 km E of the axis and the MLSHF, and consists of a ~20 m sulfide mound with black smoker vents. Ewan is located ~1.8 km south from the MLSHF along the axial graben, and displays only diffuse flow along and around scarps of collapse structures associated with fault scarps. At the MLSHF we have identified an inactive site, thus broadening the extent of this field. Heat flux estimates from these new sites are relatively low and correspond to ~10% of the heat flux estimated for the Main field, with an integrated heatflux of 200-1200 MW. Overall, most of the flux (up to 80-90%) is associated with diffuse outflow, with the Ewan site showing solely diffuse flow and Capelinhos mostly focused flow. Microbathymetry also reveals a large, off-axis (~2.4 km) hydrothermal field, similar to the TAG mound in size, on the flanks of a rifted volcano. The association of these fields to a central volcano, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the ridge segment, suggest that sustained hydrothermal activity is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build central volcanoes. Hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust exploits permeable fault zones. Central volcanoes are thus associated with long-lived hydrothermal activity, and these sites may play a major role in the distribution and biogeography of vent communities.

  18. Hydrothermal activity in Tertiary Icelandic crust: Implication for cooling processes along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pałgan, D.; Devey, C. W.; Yeo, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Known hydrothermal activity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is mostly high-temperature venting, controlled by volcano-tectonic processes confined to ridge axes and neotectonic zones ~15km wide on each side of the axis (e.g. TAG or Snake Pit). However, extensive exploration and discoveries of new hydrothermal fields in off-axis regions (e.g. Lost City, MAR) show that hydrothermalism may, in some areas, be dominated by off-axis venting. Little is known about nature of such systems, including whether low-temperature "diffuse" venting dominates rather than high-temperature black-smokers. This is particularly interesting since such systems may transport up to 90% of the hydrothermal heat to the oceans. In this study we use Icelandic hot springs as onshore analogues for off-shore hydrothermal activity along the MAR to better understand volcano-tectonic controls on their occurrence, along with processes supporting fluid circulation. Iceland is a unique laboratory to study how new oceanic crust cools and suggests that old crust may not be as inactive as previously thought. Our results show that Tertiary (>3.3 Myr) crust of Iceland (Westfjords) has widespread low-temperature hydrothermal activity. Lack of tectonism (indicated by lack of seismicity), along with field research suggest that faults in Westfjords are no longer active and that once sealed, can no longer support hydrothermal circulation, i.e. none of the hot springs in the area occur along faults. Instead, dyke margins provide open and permeable fluid migration pathways. Furthermore, we suggest that the Reykjanes Ridge (south of Iceland) may be similar to Westfjords with hydrothermalism dominated by off-axis venting. Using bathymetric data we infer dyke positions and suggest potential sites for future exploration located away from neotectonic zone. We also emphasise the importance of biological observations in seeking for low-temperature hydrothermal activity, since chemical or optical methods are not sufficient.

  19. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 activity limited and further inhibited by slowing down the rate of dissociation of ADP.

    PubMed

    Bao, Haiying; Kasten, Shane A; Yan, Xiaohua; Roche, Thomas E

    2004-10-26

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) activity is enhanced by the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase core (E2 60mer) that binds PDK2 and a large number of its pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) substrate. With E2-activated PDK2, K(+) at approximately 90 mM and Cl(-) at approximately 60 mM decreased the K(m) of PDK2 for ATP and competitive K(i) for ADP by approximately 3-fold and enhanced pyruvate inhibition. Comparing PDK2 catalysis +/- E2, E2 increased the K(m) of PDK2 for ATP by nearly 8-fold (from 5 to 39 microM), increased k(cat) by approximately 4-fold, and decreased the requirement for E1 by at least 400-fold. ATP binding, measured by a cold-trapping technique, occurred at two active sites with a K(d) of 5 microM, which equals the K(m) and K(d) of PDK2 for ATP measured in the absence of E2. During E2-aided catalysis, PDK2 had approximately 3 times more ADP than ATP bound at its active site, and the pyruvate analogue, dichloroacetate, led to 16-fold more ADP than ATP being bound (no added ADP). Pyruvate functioned as an uncompetitive inhibitor versus ATP, and inclusion of ADP transformed pyruvate inhibition to noncompetitive. At high pyruvate levels, pyruvate was a partial inhibitor but also induced substrate inhibition at high ATP levels. Our results indicate that, at physiological salt levels, ADP dissociation is a limiting step in E2-activated PDK2 catalysis, that PDK2.[ADP or ATP].pyruvate complexes form, and that PDK2.ATP.pyruvate.E1 reacts with PDK2.ADP.pyruvate accumulating. PMID:15491150

  20. Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells (for WM'03 - abstract included)

    SciTech Connect

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2003-01-28

    Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. This paper highlights the application of several remotely deployed technologies enabling the deactivation tasks.

  1. Inhibition of histone deacetylase in cancer cells slows down replication forks, activates dormant origins and induces DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Chiara; Leo, Elisabetta; Eichler, Gabriel S.; Sordet, Olivier; Martin, Melvenia M.; Fan, Angela; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Pommier, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Protein acetylation is a reversible process regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) that is often altered in human cancers. SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) is the first histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) to be approved for clinical use as an anticancer agent. Given that histone acetylation is a key determinant of chromatin structure, we investigated how SAHA may affect DNA replication and integrity to gain deeper insights into the basis for its anticancer activity. Nuclear replication factories were visualized with confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and with single-replicon analyses conducted by genome-wide molecular combing after pulse labeling with two thymidine-analogues. Additionally, nascent strand real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the human β-globin locus was used to assess the effects of SAHA on replication fork origin firing. We found that pharmacological concentrations of SAHA induce replication-mediated DNA damage, on the basis of single-cell and single-DNA molecule analyses. Molecular combing indicated slowdown in replication speed along with activation of dormant replication origins in response to SAHA. Similar results were obtained using siRNA-mediated depletion of HDAC3 expression, implicating this HDAC member as a likely target in the SAHA response. Activation of dormant origins was confirmed by molecular analyses of the β-globin locus control region. Our findings indicate that SAHA produces profound alterations in DNA replication that cause DNA damage, establishing a critical link between robust chromatin acetylation and DNA replication in human cancer cells. PMID:20460513

  2. Features of deactivation of industrial catalysts in the Claus process

    SciTech Connect

    Kasumov, F.B.; Dzhafarova, E.M.; Dzhafarova, S.A.; Nadalieva, Yu.R.; Kerimov, I.Ya.

    1993-10-20

    The deactivation degree of samples of industrial alumina Claus catalyst after 3 yr usage has been determined. The samples have been selected from certain layers at four points of the catalyst volume under the continuous converter operation by the specially constructed device.

  3. A Comprehensive Literature Review of Mode Deactivation Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Marsha Ann; Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.

    2007-01-01

    In this article literature published on Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) was reviewed in depth. Several studies were identified that used a common outcome measure of reduction of physical and sexual aggression, other risk related behaviors. Comparisons of MDT and, other standardized approaches typically used in treating aggression in juveniles,…

  4. Mediation Analysis of Mode Deactivation Therapy (Reanalysis and Interpretation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Christopher K.; Apsche, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    A key component of Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) is the development of self-awareness and regulatory skills by the client with the aim of helping adolescent males with conduct disordered behaviors, including sexually inappropriate behaviors and emotional dysregulation. The goal includes altering specific behaviors to fall within socially…

  5. A Summary of Published Mode Deactivation Therapy Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.

    2006-01-01

    This article summarizes all of the Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) articles published to date. MDT has shown to be more effective than Cognitive Behavior Therapy, (CBT), Social Skills Training, (SST), and Dialectical Behavior Therapy, (DBT), Apsche, Bass, Jennings, Murphy, Hunter, and Siv, (2005); Apsche & Bass, (2005); Apsche, Bass & Murphy,…

  6. 42 CFR 424.540 - Deactivation of Medicare billing privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deactivation of Medicare billing privileges. 424.540 Section 424.540 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM CONDITIONS FOR MEDICARE PAYMENT Requirements...

  7. Compassionate deactivation of ventricular assist devices in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Seth A; Axelrod, David M; Bernstein, Daniel; Cohen, Harvey J; Sourkes, Barbara; Reddy, Sushma; Magnus, David; Rosenthal, David N; Kaufman, Beth D

    2016-05-01

    Despite greatly improved survival in pediatric patients with end-stage heart failure through the use of ventricular assist devices (VADs), heart failure ultimately remains a life-threatening disease with a significant symptom burden. With increased demand for donor organs, liberalizing the boundaries of case complexity, and the introduction of destination therapy in children, more children can be expected to die while on mechanical support. Despite this trend, guidelines on the ethical and pragmatic issues of compassionate deactivation of VAD support in children are strikingly absent. As VAD support for pediatric patients increases in frequency, the pediatric heart failure and palliative care communities must work toward establishing guidelines to clarify the complex issues surrounding compassionate deactivation. Patient, family and clinician attitudes must be ascertained and education regarding the psychological, legal and ethical issues should be provided. Furthermore, pediatric-specific planning documents for use before VAD implantation as well as deactivation checklists should be developed to assist with decision-making at critical points during the illness trajectory. Herein we review the relevant literature regarding compassionate deactivation with a specific focus on issues related to children. PMID:27197773

  8. FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, J; William Austin, W; Cathy Sizemore, C

    2007-01-31

    In February 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated actions to expedite Cleanup, focus on significant and early risk reduction, and reduce costs at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In response SRS started on a project focused on completing the decommissioning of inactive facilities in T, D, and M Areas, areas that on the perimeter of the Site, by the end of 2006. In June 2003, the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), and the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 (EPA-4) endorsed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) concerning cleanup at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The vision of the Agreement is that SRS will reduce its operations footprint to establish a buffer zone at the perimeter if the Site, while the central core area of the Site will be reserved for continuing or future long-term operations. DOE-SR, EPA-4, and SCDHEC agreed that establishing this buffer zone and appropriately sequencing environmental restoration and decommissioning activities can lead to greater efficiency and accelerate completion of entire site areas. This vision is embodied in the concept of Area Completion--which integrated operations, deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), and soils and groundwater cleanup into a time-phased approach to completing all the work necessary to address the Cold War legacy. D&D addresses the ''footprint'' of the building or structure, while the soils and groundwater project addresses any environmental remediation that may be required in the underlying and surrounding soils and groundwater. Since then, {approx}250 facilities have been decommissioned at the SRS, ranging from guard stations to nuclear fuel production facilities.

  9. Extended Catalyst Longevity Via Supercritical Isobutane Regeneration of a Partially Deactivated USY Alkylation Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Thompson; Kyle C. Burch; David J. Zalewski

    2005-05-01

    Off-line, in situ activity recovery of a partially deactivated USY zeolite catalyst used for isobutane/butene alkylation was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical isobutane. Catalyst samples were deactivated in a controlled manner by running them to either to a fixed butene conversion level of 95% or a fixed time on stream of three hours, and then exposing the catalyst to supercritical isobutane to restore activity. Activity recovery was determined by comparing alkylation activity before and after the regeneration step. Both single and multiple regenerations were performed. Use of a 95% butene conversion level criterion to terminate the reaction step afforded 86% activity recovery for a single regeneration and provided nine sequential reaction steps for the multiple regeneration studies. Employing a fixed 3 h time on stream criterion resulted in nearly complete activity recovery for a single regeneration, and 24 reaction steps were demonstrated in sequence for the multiple regeneration process, producing only minor product yield declines per step. This resulted in a 12-fold increase in catalyst longevity versus unregenerated catalyst.

  10. Intensity of activation and timing of deactivation modulate elastic energy storage and release in a pennate muscle and account for gait-specific initiation of limb protraction in the horse.

    PubMed

    Lichtwark, Glen A; Watson, Johanna C; Mavrommatis, Sophia; Wilson, Alan M

    2009-08-01

    The equine biceps brachii (biceps) initiates rapid limb protraction through a catapult mechanism. Elastic strain energy is slowly stored in an internal tendon and is then rapidly released to protract the forelimb. The muscle fibres are short, have little scope for length change and can therefore only shorten slowly compared with the speed at which the whole muscle must shorten, which makes them poor candidates for driving rapid limb protraction. We suggest that the muscle fibres in the biceps act to modulate the elastic energy output of the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) to meet the demands of locomotion under different conditions. We hypothesise that more elastic strain energy is stored and released from the biceps MTU during higher speed locomotion to accommodate the increase in energy required to protract the limb and that this can be achieved by varying the length change and activation conditions of the muscle. We examined the work performed by the biceps during trot and canter using an inverse dynamics analysis (IDA). We then used excised biceps muscles to determine how much work could be performed by the muscle in active and passive stretch-shorten cycles. A muscle model was developed to investigate the influence of changes in activation parameters on energy storage and energy return from the biceps MTU. Increased biceps MTU length change and increased work performed by the biceps MTU were found at canter compared with at trot. More work was performed by the ex vivo biceps MTU following activation of the muscle and by increasing muscle length change. However, the ratio of active to passive work diminished with increasing length change. The muscle model demonstrated that duration and timing of activation during stretch-shorten cycles could modulate the elastic energy storage and return from the biceps. We conclude that the equine biceps MTU acts as a tuneable spring and the contractile component functions to modulate the energy required for rapid forelimb

  11. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Marjolein M. A.; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Stam, Cornelis J.; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using “virtual MEG electrodes”. We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19–28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p < 0.01] whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p < 0.01]. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.43; p < 0.05]. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the

  12. A new active method for the measurement of slow-neutron fluence in modern radiotherapy treatment rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Sánchez Doblado, F.

    2010-02-01

    This work focuses on neutron monitoring at clinical linac facilities during high-energy modality radiotherapy treatments. Active in-room measurement of neutron fluence is a complex problem due to the pulsed nature of the fluence and the presence of high photon background, and only passive methods have been considered reliable until now. In this paper we present a new active method to perform real-time measurement of neutron production around a medical linac. The device readout is being investigated as an estimate of patient neutron dose exposure on each radiotherapy session. The new instrument was developed based on neutron interaction effects in microelectronic memory devices, in particular using neutron-sensitive SRAM devices. This paper is devoted to the description of the instrument and measurement techniques, presenting the results obtained together with their comparison and discussion. Measurements were performed in several standard clinical linac facilities, showing high reliability, being insensitive to the photon fluence and EM pulse present inside the radiotherapy room, and having detector readout statistical relative uncertainties of about 2% on measurement of neutron fluence produced by 1000 monitor units irradiation runs.

  13. Positioning Commercial Pedometers to Measure Activity of Older Adults with Slow Gait: At the Wrist or at the Waist?

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frederic; Weber, Chloe; Lovis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary behaviour is a major risk factor for chronic disease morbidity and mortality in aging. Measuring people activity through devices such as pedometers is a recognized intervention to motivate them for more physical activity. However, the feedback provided by these devices must be accurate in order to avoid overtraining and keep users' motivation alive. If the accuracy of pedometers has been validated for healthy people, their lack of accuracy for elderly people walking at slower pace has been reported in several studies. The emergence on the consumer's market of new devices that can be worn indifferently at the wrist or at the waist raises once more this concern. In order to evaluate whether pedometers' location influences their accuracy, we have tested three pedometers at different locations, and for several paces in a comparative study. Beyond confirming the decrease of pedometers' accuracy with speed reduction, our study reveals that pedometers should be worn at the waist rather than at the wrist. This leads us to recommend wearing pedometers at the waist when monitoring population with reduced mobility. PMID:27071868

  14. Linking Sleep Slow Oscillations with consciousness theories: new vistas on Slow Wave Sleep unconsciousness.

    PubMed

    Gemignani, Angelo; Menicucci, Danilo; Laurino, Marco; Piarulli, Andrea; Mastorci, Francesca; Sebastiani, Laura; Allegrini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We review current models of consciousness in the context of wakefulness and sleep. We show that recent results on Slow Wave Sleep, including our own works, naturally fit within consciousness models. In particular, Sleep Slow Oscillations, namely low-frequency (<1Hz) oscillations, contain electrophysiological properties (up and down states) able to elicit and quench neural integration during Slow Wave Sleep. The physiological unconsciousness related to the Sleep Slow Oscillation derives from the interplay between spontaneous or evoked wake-like activities (up states) and half-a-second's electrical silences (down states). Sleep Slow Oscillation induces unconsciousness via the formation of parallel and segregated neural activities. PMID:26742667

  15. Slow positron studies of hydrogen activation/passivation on SiO sub 2 /Si(100) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Asoka-Kumar, P.

    1991-01-01

    The hydrogen atoms are one of the most common impurity species found in semiconductor systems owing to its large diffusivity, and are easily incorporated either in a controlled process like in ion implantation or in an uncontrolled process like the one at the fabrication stage. Hydrogen can passivate dangling bonds and dislocations in these systems and hence can be used to enhance the electrical properties. In a SiO{sub 2}/Si system, hydrogen can passivate electronic states at the interface and can alter the fixed or mobile charges in the oxide layer. Since hydrogen is present in almost all of the environments of SiO{sub 2}/Si wafer fabrication, the activation energy of hydrogen atoms is of paramount importance to a proper understanding of SiO{sub 2}/Si based devices and has not been measured on the technologically most important Si(100) face. There are no direct, nondestructive methods available to observe hydrogen injection into the oxide layer and subsequent diffusion. This study uses the positrons as a sensitive'', nondestructive probe to observe hydrogen interaction in the oxide layer and the interface region. We also describe a new way of characterizing the changes in the density of the interface states under a low-temperature annealing using positrons. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Multiple representations of information in the primary auditory cortex of cats. I. Stability and change in slow components of unit activity after conditioning with a click conditioned stimulus.

    PubMed

    Woody, C D; Zotova, E; Gruen, E

    2000-06-16

    Recordings of activity were made from 647 single units of the A(I) cortex of awake cats to evaluate behavioral state-dependent changes in the population response to a 70-dB click. Averages of PST histograms of unit activity were used to assess the changes in response. This report focuses on slow components of the responses disclosed by averages employing bin widths of 16 ms. Responses were compared before and after a Pavlovian blink CR was produced by forward pairing of click conditioned stimuli (CSs) with USs. A backward-paired 70-dB hiss was presented as a discriminative stimulus. Studies were also done after backward pairing of the click CSs (backward conditioning) that produced weak sensitization instead of a conditioned response. There were four main findings. First, components of activity elicited 32-160 ms after presenting the hiss decreased significantly after conditioning and after backward conditioning. The decreases after conditioning represented the most pronounced changes in activity evoked by either clicks or hisses in this behavioral state. Second, baseline firing decreased after both conditioning and backward conditioning. The direction of baseline change was opposite that found in adjacent cortical regions and in A(I) cortex after operant conditioning employing an acoustic cue. Third, prior to conditioning, unit activity in response to the hiss declined before the sound of the hiss reached its peak or terminated. This decrease was thought to represent a habituatory adaptation of response to a prolonged acoustic stimulus. This type of habituation to a lengthy stimulus has been recognized, behaviorally, but has not been observed previously in the activity of units of the auditory receptive cortex. Fourth, the percentage of click responsive units did not change significantly after the click was used as a CS for conditioning, and despite the accompanying changes in baseline activity, the absolute levels of activity summed in the first 16 ms after click

  17. The effect of nanofiber based filter morphology on bacteria deactivation during water filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmer, Dusan; Vincent, Ivo; Lev, Jaroslav; Kalhotka, Libor; Mikula, Premysl; Korinkova, Radka; Sambaer, Wannes; Zatloukal, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Procedures permitting to prepare homogeneous functionalized nanofibre structures based on polyurethanes modified by phthalocyanines (PCs) by employing a suitable combination of variables during the electrospinning process are presented. Compared are filtration and bacteria deactivation properties of open and planar nanostructures with PCs embedded into polyurethane chain by a covalent bond protecting the release of active organic compound during the filtration process. Finding that the morphology of functionalized nanofibre structures have an effect on bacterial growth was confirmed by microbiological and physico-chemical analyses, such as the inoculation in a nutrient agar culture medium and flow cytometry.

  18. AZD3293: A Novel, Orally Active BACE1 Inhibitor with High Potency and Permeability and Markedly Slow Off-Rate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Eketjäll, Susanna; Janson, Juliette; Kaspersson, Karin; Bogstedt, Anna; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Fälting, Johanna; Haeberlein, Samantha Budd; Kugler, Alan R.; Alexander, Robert C.; Cebers, Gvido

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of pathological, biomarker, genetic, and mechanistic data suggests that amyloid accumulation, as a result of changes in production, processing, and/or clearance of brain amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) concentrations, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Beta-secretase 1 (BACE1) mediates the first step in the processing of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) to Aβ peptides, with the soluble N terminal fragment of AβPP (sAβPPβ) as a direct product, and BACE1 inhibition is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention to reduce the production of Aβ. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of AZD3293, a potent, highly permeable, orally active, blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetrating, BACE1 inhibitor with unique slow off-rate kinetics. The in vitro potency of AZD3293 was demonstrated in several cellular models, including primary cortical neurons. In vivo in mice, guinea pigs, and dogs, AZD3293 displayed significant dose- and time-dependent reductions in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain concentrations of Aβ40, Aβ42, and sAβPPβ. The in vitro potency of AZD3293 in mouse and guinea pig primary cortical neuronal cells was correlated to the in vivo potency expressed as free AZD3293 concentrations in mouse and guinea pig brains. In mice and dogs, the slow off-rate from BACE1 may have translated into a prolongation of the observed effect beyond the turnover rate of Aβ. The preclinical data strongly support the clinical development of AZD3293, and patients with AD are currently being recruited into a combined Phase 2/3 study to test the disease-modifying properties of AZD3293. PMID:26890753

  19. Insight into deactivation of commercial SCR catalyst by arsenic: an experiment and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Si, Wenzhe; Luo, Jinming; Dai, Qizhou; Luo, Xubiao; Liu, Xin; Hao, Jiming

    2014-12-01

    Fresh and arsenic-poisoned V2O5–WO3/TiO2 catalysts are investigated by experiments and DFT calculations for SCR activity and the deactivation mechanism. Poisoned catalyst (1.40% of arsenic) presents lower NO conversion and more N2O formation than fresh. Stream (5%) could further decrease the activity of poisoned catalyst above 350 °C. The deactivation is not attributed to the loss of surface area or phase transformation of TiO2 at a certain arsenic content, but due to the coverage of the V2O5 cluster and the decrease in the surface acidity: the number of Lewis acid sites and the stability of Brønsted acid sites. Large amounts of surface hydroxyl induced by H2O molecules provide more unreactive As–OH groups and give rise to a further decrease in the SCR activity. N2O is mainly from NH3 unselective oxidation at high temperatures since the reducibility of catalysts and the number of surface-active oxygens are improved by As2O5. Finally, the reaction pathway seems unchanged after poisoning: NH3 adsorbed on both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites is reactive.

  20. Insight into deactivation of commercial SCR catalyst by arsenic: an experiment and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Si, Wenzhe; Luo, Jinming; Dai, Qizhou; Luo, Xubiao; Liu, Xin; Hao, Jiming

    2014-12-01

    Fresh and arsenic-poisoned V2O5–WO3/TiO2 catalysts are investigated by experiments and DFT calculations for SCR activity and the deactivation mechanism. Poisoned catalyst (1.40% of arsenic) presents lower NO conversion and more N2O formation than fresh. Stream (5%) could further decrease the activity of poisoned catalyst above 350 °C. The deactivation is not attributed to the loss of surface area or phase transformation of TiO2 at a certain arsenic content, but due to the coverage of the V2O5 cluster and the decrease in the surface acidity: the number of Lewis acid sites and the stability of Brønsted acid sites. Large amounts of surface hydroxyl induced by H2O molecules provide more unreactive As–OH groups and give rise to a further decrease in the SCR activity. N2O is mainly from NH3 unselective oxidation at high temperatures since the reducibility of catalysts and the number of surface-active oxygens are improved by As2O5. Finally, the reaction pathway seems unchanged after poisoning: NH3 adsorbed on both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites is reactive. PMID:25380546

  1. Study on the thermal deactivation of motorcycle catalytic converters by laboratory aging tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chi; Chen, Lu-Yen; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jeng, Fu-Tien

    2010-03-01

    Catalytic converters are used to curb exhaust pollution from motorcycles in Taiwan. A number of factors, including the length of time the converter is used for and driving conditions, affect the catalysts' properties during periods of use. The goal of this study is to resolve the thermal deactivation mechanism of motorcycle catalytic converters. Fresh catalysts were treated under different aging conditions by laboratory-scale aging tests to simulate the operation conditions of motorcycle catalytic converters. The aged catalysts were characterized by analytical techniques in order to provide information for investigating deactivation phenomena. The time-dependent data of specific surface areas were subsequently used to construct kinetics of sintering at the specific temperature. According to the analytical results of the catalysts' properties, the increase in aging temperature causes an increase in pore size of the catalysts and a decrease in the specific surface area. The aged catalysts all exhibited lower performances than the fresh ones. The reduction in catalytic activity is consistent with the reduction in the loss of specific surface area. The finding of catalytic properties' dependence on temperature is consistent with the thermally activated theory. In contrast, the effect of the aging time on the specific surface area was only significant during the initial few hours. The high correlation between specific surface areas measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and predicted by the constructed model verifies that the prediction models can predict the sintering rate reasonably under the aging conditions discussed in this study. As compared to automobile catalytic converters, the differences of structures and aging conditions are made less obvious by the deactivation phenomena of motorcycles.

  2. Knockout of the BK β2 subunit abolishes inactivation of BK currents in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells and results in slow-wave burst activity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Espinosa, Pedro L; Yang, Chengtao; Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J

    2014-10-01

    Rat and mouse adrenal medullary chromaffin cells (CCs) express an inactivating BK current. This inactivation is thought to arise from the assembly of up to four β2 auxiliary subunits (encoded by the kcnmb2 gene) with a tetramer of pore-forming Slo1 α subunits. Although the physiological consequences of inactivation remain unclear, differences in depolarization-evoked firing among CCs have been proposed to arise from the ability of β2 subunits to shift the range of BK channel activation. To investigate the role of BK channels containing β2 subunits, we generated mice in which the gene encoding β2 was deleted (β2 knockout [KO]). Comparison of proteins from wild-type (WT) and β2 KO mice allowed unambiguous demonstration of the presence of β2 subunit in various tissues and its coassembly with the Slo1 α subunit. We compared current properties and cell firing properties of WT and β2 KO CCs in slices and found that β2 KO abolished inactivation, slowed action potential (AP) repolarization, and, during constant current injection, decreased AP firing. These results support the idea that the β2-mediated shift of the BK channel activation range affects repetitive firing and AP properties. Unexpectedly, CCs from β2 KO mice show an increased tendency toward spontaneous burst firing, suggesting that the particular properties of BK channels in the absence of β2 subunits may predispose to burst firing.

  3. Essential Roles of GABA Transporter-1 in Controlling Rapid Eye Movement Sleep and in Increased Slow Wave Activity after Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin-Hong; Qu, Wei-Min; Bian, Min-Juan; Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2013-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of sleep. GABA transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) constructs high affinity reuptake sites for GABA and regulates GABAergic transmission in the brain. However, the role of GAT1 in sleep-wake regulation remains elusive. In the current study, we characterized the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and responses to sleep deprivation in GAT1 knock-out (KO) mice. GAT1 KO mice exhibited dominant theta-activity and a remarkable reduction of EEG power in low frequencies across all vigilance stages. Under baseline conditions, spontaneous rapid eye movement (REM) sleep of KO mice was elevated both during the light and dark periods, and non-REM (NREM) sleep was reduced during the light period only. KO mice also showed more state transitions from NREM to REM sleep and from REM sleep to wakefulness, as well as more number of REM and NREM sleep bouts than WT mice. During the dark period, KO mice exhibited more REM sleep bouts only. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREM and REM sleep in both genotypes. However, slow wave activity, the intensity component of NREM sleep was briefly elevated in WT mice but remained completely unchanged in KO mice, compared with their respective baselines. These results indicate that GAT1 plays a critical role in the regulation of REM sleep and homeostasis of NREM sleep. PMID:24155871

  4. Essential roles of GABA transporter-1 in controlling rapid eye movement sleep and in increased slow wave activity after sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Hong; Qu, Wei-Min; Bian, Min-Juan; Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2013-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of sleep. GABA transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) constructs high affinity reuptake sites for GABA and regulates GABAergic transmission in the brain. However, the role of GAT1 in sleep-wake regulation remains elusive. In the current study, we characterized the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and responses to sleep deprivation in GAT1 knock-out (KO) mice. GAT1 KO mice exhibited dominant theta-activity and a remarkable reduction of EEG power in low frequencies across all vigilance stages. Under baseline conditions, spontaneous rapid eye movement (REM) sleep of KO mice was elevated both during the light and dark periods, and non-REM (NREM) sleep was reduced during the light period only. KO mice also showed more state transitions from NREM to REM sleep and from REM sleep to wakefulness, as well as more number of REM and NREM sleep bouts than WT mice. During the dark period, KO mice exhibited more REM sleep bouts only. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREM and REM sleep in both genotypes. However, slow wave activity, the intensity component of NREM sleep was briefly elevated in WT mice but remained completely unchanged in KO mice, compared with their respective baselines. These results indicate that GAT1 plays a critical role in the regulation of REM sleep and homeostasis of NREM sleep.

  5. Simultaneous deactivation of FAK and Src improves the pathology of hypertrophic scar

    PubMed Central

    Su, Linlin; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Xue; Hui, Bo; Han, Shichao; Gao, Jianxin; Li, Yan; Shi, Jihong; Zhu, Huayu; Zhao, Bin; Hu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) is a serious fibrotic skin condition with currently no satisfactory therapy due to undefined molecular mechanism. FAK and Src are two important non-receptor tyrosine kinases that have been indicated in HS pathogenesis. Here we found both FAK and Src were activated in HS vs. normal skin (NS), NS fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1 also exhibited FAK/Src activation. Co-immunoprecipitation and dual-labelled immunofluorescence revealed an enhanced FAK-Src association and co-localization in HS vs. NS. To examine effects of FAK/Src activation and their interplay on HS pathogenesis, site-directed mutagenesis followed by gene overexpression was conducted. Results showed only simultaneous overexpression of non-phosphorylatable mutant FAK Y407F and phosphomimetic mutant Src Y529E remarkably down-regulated the expression of Col I, Col III and α-SMA in cultured HS fibroblasts, alleviated extracellular matrix deposition and made collagen fibers more orderly in HS tissue vs. the effect from single transfection with wild-type or mutational FAK/Src. Glabridin, a chemical found to block FAK-Src complex formation in cancers, exhibited therapeutic effects on HS pathology probably through co-deactivation of FAK/Src which further resulted in FAK-Src de-association. This study suggests FAK-Src complex could serve as a potential molecular target, and FAK/Src double deactivation might be a novel strategy for HS therapy. PMID:27181267

  6. Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration in Low Temperature Ethanol Steam Reforming with Rh/CeO2-ZrO2 Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, Hyun-Seog; Platon, Alex; Wang, Yong; King, David L.

    2006-08-01

    Rh/CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts with various CeO2/ZrO2 ratios have been applied to H2 production from ethanol steam reforming at low temperatures. The catalysts all deactivated with time on stream (TOS) at 350 C. The addition of 0.5% K has a beneficial effect on catalyst stability, while 5% K has a negative effect on catalytic activity. The catalyst could be regenerated considerably even at ambient temperature and could recover its initial activity after regeneration above 200 C with 1% O2. The results are most consistent with catalyst deactivation due to carbonaceous deposition on the catalyst.

  7. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition prevents activity-induced calcineurin-NFATc1 signalling and fast-to-slow skeletal muscle fibre type conversions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen J B; St-Louis, Mathieu; Murdoch, Gordon K; MacLean, Ian M; McDonald, Pamela; Dixon, Walter T; Putman, Charles T; Michel, Robin N

    2012-03-15

    The calcineurin–NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) signalling pathway is involved in the regulation of activity-dependent skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform type expression. Emerging evidence indicates that nitric oxide (NO) may play a critical role in this regulatory pathway. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the role of NO in activity-induced calcineurin–NFATc1 signalling leading to skeletal muscle faster-to-slower fibre type transformations in vivo. Endogenous NO production was blocked by administering L-NAME (0.75 mg ml(−1)) in drinking water throughout 0, 1, 2, 5 or 10 days of chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS; 10 Hz, 12 h day(−1)) of rat fast-twitch muscles (L+Stim; n = 30) and outcomes were compared with control rats receiving only CLFS (Stim; n = 30). Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that CLFS induced an increase in NFATc1 dephosphorylation and nuclear localisation, sustained by glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation in Stim, which were all abolished in L+Stim. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR revealed that CLFS induced an increased expression of MHC-I, -IIa and -IId(x) mRNAs in Stim that was abolished in L+Stim. SDS-PAGE and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that CLFS induced faster-to-slower MHC protein and fibre type transformations, respectively, within the fast fibre population of both Stim and L+Stim groups. The final fast type IIA to slow type I transformation, however, was prevented in L+Stim. It is concluded that NO regulates activity-induced MHC-based faster-to-slower fibre type transformations at the transcriptional level via inhibitory GSK-3β-induced facilitation of calcineurin–NFATc1 nuclear accumulation in vivo, whereas transformations within the fast fibre population may also involve translational control mechanisms independent of NO signalling.

  8. On the puzzling deactivation mechanism of thymine after light irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Leticia; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Jesus; Samoylova, Elena; Schultz, Thomas

    2008-12-08

    The possible deactivation mechanisms of thymine after UV light irradiation are reviewed in the light of theoretical calculations. Recent experiments reveal that three transient species with lifetimes in the fs, ps, and ns regime are present in thymine. The possibility of ground or excited state tautomerization is explored and discarded. The role of {pi}{sigma}* states, as well as of the proposed minimum of the {pi}{pi}* excited state surface are assessed. In view of the obtained calculations and results available from the literature, the measured time scales can be tentatively attributed to a model involving different conical intersections between the {pi}{pi}*, n{pi}*, and the electronic ground state, as well as deactivation via the triplet states. Time-resolved photoelectron experiments supported by theoretical calculations are proposed to appraise the validity of this model.

  9. Delayed fluorescence during the deactivation of highly excited triplet states

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, V.I.; Alfimov, M.V.

    1987-06-01

    It has been suggested that the T state may be not only an electron donor but an acceptor, i.e., it may give a charge transfer state in a photoreduction reaction: A(T) + M ..-->.. /sup 3/(A/sup .-/M/sup +./). In this connection, it may be assumed that the quenching may also be connected with the nonradiative deactivation of excitation energy in charge transfer states (A/sup .-/M/sup +./). Aromatic molecules are characterized by an extremely low quantum yield for intramolecular intersystem crossing. However, in charge-transfer states the efficiency of intersystem crossing may be enhanced. The authors have investigated the laws governing DF in conditions where the deactivation of T states occurs. The systems studied were frozen (77 K) solutions of the aromatic additives naphthalene, diphenyl, and chrysene in toluene, MCH, and ethanol.

  10. Novel C-Ring-Hydroxy-Substituted Controlled Deactivation Cannabinergic Analogues.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Shashank; Nikas, Spyros P; Sharma, Rishi; Jiang, Shan; Paronis, Carol A; Leonard, Michael Z; Zhang, Bin; Honrao, Chandrashekhar; Mallipeddi, Srikrishnan; Raghav, Jimit Girish; Benchama, Othman; Järbe, Torbjörn U C; Bergman, Jack; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2016-07-28

    In pursuit of safer controlled-deactivation cannabinoids with high potency and short duration of action, we report the design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of novel C9- and C11-hydroxy-substituted hexahydrocannabinol (HHC) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) analogues in which a seven atom long side chain, with or without 1'-substituents, carries a metabolically labile 2',3'-ester group. Importantly, in vivo studies validated our controlled deactivation approach in rodents and non-human primates. The lead molecule identified here, namely, butyl-2-[(6aR,9R,10aR)-1-hydroxy-9-(hydroxymethyl)-6,6-dimethyl-6a,7,8,9,10,10a-hexahydro-6H-benzo[c]chromen-3-yl]-2-methylpropanoate (AM7499), was found to exhibit remarkably high in vitro and in vivo potency with shorter duration of action than the currently existing classical cannabinoid agonists. PMID:27367336

  11. Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.; Walton, T.

    2003-02-25

    Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. These technologies offer improved methods for accessing difficult-to-reach spaces and performing tasks such as visual inspection, radiological characterization, decontamination, waste handling, and size reduction. This paper is focused on the application of remote systems in support of deactivation work being performed in several legacy facilities at Hanford (i.e., the 324 and 327 Buildings). These facilities were previously used for fuel fabrication, materials examination, and the development of waste treatment processes. The technologies described in this paper represent significant improvements to Hanford's baseline methods, and may offer benefits to other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and commercial operations.

  12. ZnS nano-architectures: photocatalysis, deactivation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dagui; Huang, Feng; Ren, Guoqiang; Li, Dongsong; Zheng, Meng; Wang, Yongjing; Lin, Zhang

    2010-10-01

    An "infinite recycling" method for enhancing the durable applications of a ZnS nano-photocatalyst is shown. Based on the finding of thermodynamic stable nanophase of ZnS, we designed a strategy in which the deactivated ZnS nano-photocatalyst could be recovered into its original state. This ZnS photocatalyst can be used repeatedly without being released into environment as nano-waste. The strategy uses material highly efficiently and is environmentally friendly.

  13. Reducing the deactivation of Ni-metal during the catalytic partial oxidation of a surrogate diesel fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Daniel J.; Campos, Andrew; Smith, Mark W.; Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Spivey, James J.

    2010-09-01

    Ni catalysts are active and selective for the conversion of hydrocarbon into synthesis gas. However, conventional supported Ni catalysts rapidly deactivate at the high temperatures required for partial oxidation of diesel fuel by sintering and metal vaporization, as well as by carbon deposition and sulfur poisoning. Thus, to reduce deactivation Ni (3 wt%) was substituted into the structures of Ba-hexaaluminate (BNHA) and La–Sr–Zr pyrochlore (LSZN), and their activity was compared to a supported Ni/Al2O3 for the catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of a surrogate diesel fuel. Characterization by XRD showed a single phase -alumina for the hexaaluminate, while LSZN had a pyrochlore structure with a defect SrZrO3 perovskite phase. Temperature programmed reduction experiments confirmed Ni was reducible in all catalysts. XANES results confirmed that Ni atoms were substituted into the hexaaluminate and pyrochlore structures, as spectra for each catalyst showed different coordination environments for Ni compared to a NiO standard. During CPOX activity tests (T = 900°C and WHSV= 50,000 scc/gcat/h), the LSZN pyrochlore produced stable H2 and CO yields in the presence of 5 wt% 1-methylnaphthalene and 50ppmw dibenzothiophene/n-tetradecane for 2 h, while both Ni/Al2O3 and BNHA catalysts were irreversibly deactivated by this mixture over the same time. Activity loss was strongly linked to carbon formation

  14. Inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptors mediate activity-induced synaptic Ca2+ signals in muscle fibers and Ca2+ overload in slow-channel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Roberto; Groshong, Jason S; Gomez, Christopher M

    2007-04-01

    Strict control of calcium entry through excitatory synaptic receptors is important for shaping synaptic responses, gene expression, and cell survival. Disruption of this control may lead to pathological accumulation of Ca2+. The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS), due to mutations in muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR), perturbs the kinetics of synaptic currents, leading to post-synaptic Ca2+ accumulation. To understand the regulation of calcium signaling at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and the etiology of Ca2+ overload in SCS we studied the role of sarcoplasmic Ca2+ stores in SCS. Using fura-2 loaded dissociated fibers activated with acetylcholine puffs, we confirmed that Ca2+ accumulates around wild type NMJ and discovered that Ca2+ accumulates significantly faster around the NMJ of SCS transgenic dissociated muscle fibers. Additionally, we determined that this process is dependant on the activation, altered kinetics, and movement of Ca2+ ions through the AChR, although, surprisingly, depletion of intracellular stores also prevents the accumulation of this cation around the NMJ. Finally, we concluded that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is the main source of Ca2+ and that inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3R), and to a lesser degree L-type voltage gated Ca2+ channels, are responsible for the efflux of this cation from intracellular stores. These results suggest that a signaling system mediated by the activation of AChR, Ca2+, and IP3R is responsible for localized Ca2+ signals observed in muscle fibers and the Ca2+ overload observed in SCS.

  15. Influence of slow oscillation on hippocampal activity and ripples through cortico-hippocampal synaptic interactions, analyzed by a cortical-CA3-CA1 network model

    PubMed Central

    Taxidis, Jiannis; Mizuseki, Kenji; Mason, Robert; Owen, Markus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes (SWRs) involve the synchronous discharge of thousands of cells throughout the CA3-CA1-subiculum-entorhinal cortex axis. Their strong transient output affects cortical targets, rendering SWRs a possible means for memory transfer from the hippocampus to the neocortex for long-term storage. Neurophysiological observations of hippocampal activity modulation by the cortical slow oscillation (SO) during deep sleep and anesthesia, and correlations between ripples and UP states, support the role of SWRs in memory consolidation through a cortico-hippocampal feedback loop. We couple a cortical network exhibiting SO with a hippocampal CA3-CA1 computational network model exhibiting SWRs, in order to model such cortico-hippocampal correlations and uncover important parameters and coupling mechanisms controlling them. The cortical oscillatory output entrains the CA3 network via connections representing the mossy fiber input, and the CA1 network via the temporoammonic pathway (TA). The spiking activity in CA3 and CA1 is shown to depend on the excitation-to-inhibition ratio, induced by combining the two hippocampal inputs, with mossy fiber input controlling the UP-state correlation of CA3 population bursts and corresponding SWRs, whereas the temporoammonic input affects the overall CA1 spiking activity. Ripple characteristics and pyramidal spiking participation to SWRs are shaped by the strength of the Schaffer collateral drive. A set of in vivo recordings from the rat hippocampus confirms a model-predicted segregation of pyramidal cells into subgroups according to the SO state where they preferentially fire and their response to SWRs. These groups can potentially play distinct functional roles in the replay of spike sequences. PMID:23386827

  16. Leu85 in the beta1-beta2 linker of ASIC1 slows activation and decreases the apparent proton affinity by stabilizing a closed conformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianbo; Yang, Youshan; Canessa, Cecilia M

    2010-07-16

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-activated channels expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems where they modulate neuronal activity in response to external increases in proton concentration. The size of ASIC1 currents evoked by a given local acidification is determined by the number of channels in the plasma membrane and by the apparent proton affinities for activation and steady-state desensitization of the channel. Thus, the magnitude of the pH drop and the value of the baseline pH both are functionally important. Recent characterization of ASIC1s from an increasing number of species has made evident that proton affinities of these channels vary across vertebrates. We found that in species with high baseline plasma pH, e.g. frog, shark, and fish, ASIC1 has high proton affinity compared with the mammalian channel. The beta1-beta2 linker in the extracellular domain, specifically by the substitution M85L, determines the interspecies differences in proton affinities and also the time course of ASIC1 macroscopic currents. The mechanism underlying these observations is a delay in channel opening after application of protons, most likely by stabilizing a closed conformation that decreases the apparent affinity to protons and also slows the rise and decay phases of the current. Together, the results suggest evolutionary adaptation of ASIC1 to match the value of the species-specific plasma pH. At the molecular level, adaptation is achieved by substitutions of nonionizable residues rather than by modification of the channel proton sensor. PMID:20479002

  17. A redox hydrogel protects hydrogenase from high-potential deactivation and oxygen damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumeré, Nicolas; Rüdiger, Olaf; Oughli, Alaa Alsheikh; Williams, Rhodri; Vivekananthan, Jeevanthi; Pöller, Sascha; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogenases are nature's efficient catalysts for both the generation of energy via oxidation of molecular hydrogen and the production of hydrogen via the reduction of protons. However, their O2 sensitivity and deactivation at high potential limit their applications in practical devices, such as fuel cells. Here, we show that the integration of an O2-sensitive hydrogenase into a specifically designed viologen-based redox polymer protects the enzyme from O2 damage and high-potential deactivation. Electron transfer between the polymer-bound viologen moieties controls the potential applied to the active site of the hydrogenase and thus insulates the enzyme from excessive oxidative stress. Under catalytic turnover, electrons provided from the hydrogen oxidation reaction induce viologen-catalysed O2 reduction at the polymer surface, thus providing self-activated protection from O2. The advantages of this tandem protection are demonstrated using a single-compartment biofuel cell based on an O2-sensitive hydrogenase and H2/O2 mixed feed under anode-limiting conditions.

  18. Gβ₂ mimics activation kinetic slowing of CaV2.2 channels by noradrenaline in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Castellanos, Juan M; Vivas, Oscar; Garduño, Julieta; De la Cruz, Lizbeth; Arenas, Isabel; Elías-Viñas, David; Mackie, Ken; García, David E

    2014-02-28

    Several neurotransmitters and hormones acting through G protein-coupled receptors elicit a voltage-dependent regulation of CaV2.2 channels, having profound effects on cell function and the organism. It has been hypothesized that protein-protein interactions define specificity in signal transduction. Yet it is unknown how the molecular interactions in an intracellular signaling cascade determine the specificity of the voltage-dependent regulation induced by a specific neurotransmitter. It has been suspected that specific effector regions on the Gβ subunits of the G proteins are responsible for voltage-dependent regulation. The present study examines whether a neurotransmitter's specificity can be revealed by simple ion-current kinetic analysis likely resulting from interactions between Gβ subunits and the channel-molecule. Noradrenaline is a neurotransmitter that induces voltage-dependent regulation. By using biochemical and patch-clamp methods in rat sympathetic neurons we examined calcium current modulation induced by each of the five Gβ subunits and found that Gβ2 mimics activation kinetic slowing of CaV2.2 channels by noradrenaline. Furthermore, overexpression of the Gβ2 isoform reproduces the effect of noradrenaline in the willing-reluctant model. These results advance our understanding on the mechanisms by which signals conveying from a variety of membrane receptors are able to display precise homeostatic responses. PMID:24513289

  19. Lifecycle baseline summary for ADS 6504IS isotopes facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The scope of this Activity Data Sheet (ADS) is to provide a detailed plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This project places the former isotopes production facilities in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S&M) until the facilities are included in the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program. The facilities included within this deactivation project are Buildings 3026-C, 3026-D, 3028, 3029, 3038-AHF, 3038-E, 3038-M, 3047, 3517, 7025, and the Center Circle Facilities (Buildings 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033-A, 3034, and 3118). The scope of deactivation identified in this Baseline Report include surveillance and maintenance activities for each facility, engineering, contamination control and structural stabilization of each facility, radioluminescent (RL) light removal in Building 3026, re-roofing Buildings 3030, 3118, and 3031, Hot Cells Cleanup in Buildings 3047 and 3517, Yttrium (Y) Cell and Barricades Cleanup in Building 3038, Glove Boxes & Hoods Removal in Buildings 3038 and 3047, and Inventory Transfer in Building 3517. For a detailed description of activities within this Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) element, see the Level 6 and Level 7 Element Definitions in Section 3.2 of this report.

  20. Osmotic Edema Rapidly Increases Neuronal Excitability Through Activation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Slow Inward Currents in Juvenile and Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lauderdale, Kelli; Murphy, Thomas; Tung, Tina; Davila, David; Binder, Devin K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular edema (cell swelling) is a principal component of numerous brain disorders including ischemia, cortical spreading depression, hyponatremia, and epilepsy. Cellular edema increases seizure-like activity in vitro and in vivo, largely through nonsynaptic mechanisms attributable to reduction of the extracellular space. However, the types of excitability changes occurring in individual neurons during the acute phase of cell volume increase remain unclear. Using whole-cell patch clamp techniques, we report that one of the first effects of osmotic edema on excitability of CA1 pyramidal cells is the generation of slow inward currents (SICs), which initiate after approximately 1 min. Frequency of SICs increased as osmolarity decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Imaging of real-time volume changes in astrocytes revealed that neuronal SICs occurred while astrocytes were still in the process of swelling. SICs evoked by cell swelling were mainly nonsynaptic in origin and NMDA receptor-dependent. To better understand the relationship between SICs and changes in neuronal excitability, recordings were performed in increasingly physiological conditions. In the absence of any added pharmacological reagents or imposed voltage clamp, osmotic edema induced excitatory postsynaptic potentials and burst firing over the same timecourse as SICs. Like SICs, action potentials were blocked by NMDAR antagonists. Effects were more pronounced in adult (8–20 weeks old) compared with juvenile (P15–P21) mice. Together, our results indicate that cell swelling triggered by reduced osmolarity rapidly increases neuronal excitability through activation of NMDA receptors. Our findings have important implications for understanding nonsynaptic mechanisms of epilepsy in relation to cell swelling and reduction of the extracellular space. PMID:26489684

  1. Kinetics studies of d-glucose hydrogenation over activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Muthanna J.

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic hydrogenation of d-glucose to produce d-sorbitol was studied in a three-phase laboratory scale reactor. The hydrogenation reactions were performed on activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst in the temperature range 25-65°C and in a constant pressure of 1 atm. The kinetic data were modeled by zero, first and second-order reaction equations. In the operating regimes studied, the results show that the hydrogenation reaction was of a first order with respect to d-glucose concentration. Also the activation energy of the reaction was determined, and found to be 12.33 kJ mole-1. A set of experiment was carried out to test the deactivation of the catalyst, and the results show that the deactivation is slow with the ability of using the catalyst for several times with a small decrease in product yield.

  2. Between-hand difference in ipsilateral deactivation is associated with hand lateralization: fMRI mapping of 284 volunteers balanced for handedness

    PubMed Central

    Tzourio-Mazoyer, N.; Petit, L.; Zago, L.; Crivello, F.; Vinuesa, N.; Joliot, M.; Jobard, G.; Mellet, E.; Mazoyer, B.

    2015-01-01

    In right-handers (RH), an increase in the pace of dominant hand movement results in increased ipsilateral deactivation of the primary motor cortex (M1). By contrast, an increase in non-dominant hand movement frequency is associated with reduced ipsilateral deactivation. This pattern suggests that inhibitory processes support right hand dominance in right-handers and raises the issues of whether this phenomenon also supports left hand preference in left-handers (LH), and/or whether it relates to asymmetry of manual ability in either group. Thanks to the BIL&GIN, a database dedicated to the investigation of hemispheric specialization (HS), we studied the variation in M1 activity during right and left finger tapping tasks (FTT) in a sample of 284 healthy participants balanced for handedness. An M1 fMRI localizer was defined for each participant as an 8 mm diameter sphere centered on the motor activation peak. RH exhibited significantly larger deactivation of the ipsilateral M1 when moving their dominant hand than their non-dominant hand. In contrast, LH exhibited comparable ipsilateral M1 deactivation during either hand movement, reflecting a bilateral cortical specialization. This pattern is likely related to left-handers’ good performances with their right hand and consequent lower asymmetry in manual ability compared with RH. Finally, inter-individual analyses over the whole sample demonstrated that the larger the difference in manual skill across hands, the larger the difference in ipsilateral deactivation. Overall, we propose that difference in ipsilateral deactivation is a marker of difference in manual ability asymmetry reflecting differences in the strength of transcallosal inhibition when a given hand is moving. PMID:25705184

  3. Uncovering the deactivation mechanism of Au catalyst with operando high spatial resolution IR and X-ray microspectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Elad

    2016-06-01

    Detecting the reaction mechanism of multistep catalytic transformations is essential for optimization of these complex processes. In this study, the mechanism of catalyst deactivation within a flow reactor was studied under reaction conditions. Spectral mapping of the catalyst and the organic phase along a flow reactor were performed with micrometer-sized synchrotron-based X-ray and IR beams, respectively, with a spatial resolution of 15 μm. Heterogeneous Au catalyst was packed in a flow reactor and activated toward the cascade reaction of pyran formation. X-ray absorption microspectroscopy measurements revealed that the highly oxidized Au(III), which is the catalytically active species, was continuously reduced along the flow reactor. IR microspectroscopy measurements detected a direct correlation between the reduction of the Au catalyst and deactivation of the catalytic process. It was observed that within 1.5 mm from the reactor's inlet all the catalytic reactivity was quenched. Microspectroscopy measurements determined that the reduction of Au(III) was induced by nucleophilic attack of butanol, which is one of the reactants in this reaction. Slower deactivation rates were measured once the reactants concentration was decreased by an order of magnitude. Under these conditions the reaction path within the flow reactor was increased from 1.5 to 6 mm. These results demonstrate the molecular level understanding of reaction mechanism which can be achieved by high spatial resolution microspectroscopy measurements.

  4. Ligand-specific Deactivation Time Course of GluN1/GluN2D NMDA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    K Vance; N Simorowski; S Traynelis; H Furukawa

    2011-12-31

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate a majority of excitatory synaptic transmission. One unique property of GluN1/GluN2D NMDA receptors is an unusually prolonged deactivation time course following the removal of L-glutamate. Here we show, using x-ray crystallography and electrophysiology, that the deactivation time course of GluN1/GluN2D receptors is influenced by the conformational variability of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as the structure of the activating ligand. L-glutamate and L-CCG-IV induce significantly slower deactivation time courses compared with other agonists. Crystal structures of the isolated GluN2D LBD in complex with various ligands reveal that the binding of L-glutamate induces a unique conformation at the backside of the ligand-binding site in proximity to the region at which the transmembrane domain would be located in the intact receptors. These data suggest that the activity of the GluN1/GluN2D NMDA receptor is controlled distinctively by the endogenous neurotransmitter L-glutamate.

  5. Slow Movements of Bio-Inspired Limbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babikian, Sarine; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Kanso, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Slow and accurate finger and limb movements are essential to daily activities, but the underlying mechanics is relatively unexplored. Here, we develop a mathematical framework to examine slow movements of tendon-driven limbs that are produced by modulating the tendons' stiffness parameters. Slow limb movements are driftless in the sense that movement stops when actuations stop. We demonstrate, in the context of a planar tendon-driven system representing a finger, that the control of stiffness suffices to produce stable and accurate limb postures and quasi-static (slow) transitions among them. We prove, however, that stable postures are achievable only when tendons are pretensioned, i.e., they cannot become slack. Our results further indicate that a non-smoothness in slow movements arises because the precision with which individual stiffnesses need to be altered changes substantially throughout the limb's motion.

  6. Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

  7. Default-Mode Function and Task-Induced Deactivation Have Overlapping Brain Substrates in Children

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Moriah E.; Chang, Catherine E.; Glover, Gary H.; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Greicius, Michael D.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    The regions that comprise the functionally connected resting-state default-mode network (DMN) in adults appear to be the same as those that are characterized by task-induced decreases in blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Independent component analysis can be used to produce a picture of the DMN as an individual rests quietly in the scanner. Contrasts across conditions in which cognitive load is parametrically modulated can delineate neural structures that have decreases in activation in response to high-demand task conditions. Examination of the degree to which these networks subsume dissociable brain substrates, and of the degree to which they overlap, provides insight concerning their purpose, function, and the nature of their associations. Few studies have examined the DMN in children, and none have tested whether the neural regions that comprise the DMN during a resting condition are the same regions that show reduced activity when children engage in cognitive tasks. In this paper we describe regions that show both task-related decreases and spontaneous intrinsic activity at rest in children, and we examine the co-localization of these networks. We describe ways in which the DMN in 7-12-year-old children is both similar to and different from the DMN in adults; moreover, we document that task-induced deactivations and default-mode resting-state activity in children share common neural substrates. It appears, therefore, that even before adolescence a core aspect of task-induced deactivation involves reallocating processing resources that are active at rest. We describe how future studies assessing the development of these systems would benefit from examining these constructs as part of one continuous system. PMID:18482851

  8. Slow Conduction in Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Melvyn; Kootsey, J. Mailen; Johnson, Edward A.; Sawanobori, Tohru

    1973-01-01

    Mechanisms of slow conduction in cardiac muscle are categorized and the most likely identified. Propagating action potentials were obtained experimentally from a synthetically grown strand of cardiac muscle (around 50 μm by 30 mm) and theoretically from a one-dimensional cable model that incorporated varying axial resistance and membrane properties along its length. Action potentials propagated at about 0.3 m/s, but in some synthetic strands there were regions (approximately 100 μm in length) where the velocity decreased to 0.002 m/s. The electrophysiological behavior associated with this slow conduction was similar to that associated with slow conduction in naturally occurring cardiac muscle (notches, Wenckebach phenomena, and block). Theoretically, reasonable changes in specific membrane capacitance, membrane activity, and various changes in geometry were insufficient to account for the observed slow conduction velocities. Conduction velocities as low as 0.009 m/s, however, could be obtained by increasing the resistance (ri) of connections between the cells in the cable; velocities as low as 0.0005 m/s could be obtained by a further increase in ri made possible by a reduction in membrane activity by one-fourth, which in itself decreased conduction velocity by only a factor of 1/1.4. As a result of these findings, several of the mechanisms that have been postulated, previously, are shown to be incapable of accounting for delays such as those which occur in the synthetic strand as well as in the atrioventricular (VA) node. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 2FIGURE 3FIGURE 4 PMID:4709519

  9. Slow light beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanhong; Klein, Mason; Hohensee, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Phillips, David F; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2008-07-25

    We demonstrate a slow light beam splitter using rapid coherence transport in a wall-coated atomic vapor cell. We show that particles undergoing random and undirected classical motion can mediate coherent interactions between two or more optical modes. Coherence, written into atoms via electromagnetically induced transparency using an input optical signal at one transverse position, spreads out via ballistic atomic motion, is preserved by an antirelaxation wall coating, and is then retrieved in outgoing slow light signals in both the input channel and a spatially-separated second channel. The splitting ratio between the two output channels can be tuned by adjusting the laser power. The slow light beam splitter may improve quantum repeater performance and be useful as an all-optical dynamically reconfigurable router.

  10. System and method of cylinder deactivation for optimal engine torque-speed map operation

    DOEpatents

    Sujan, Vivek A; Frazier, Timothy R; Follen, Kenneth; Moon, Suk-Min

    2014-11-11

    This disclosure provides a system and method for determining cylinder deactivation in a vehicle engine to optimize fuel consumption while providing the desired or demanded power. In one aspect, data indicative of terrain variation is utilized in determining a vehicle target operating state. An optimal active cylinder distribution and corresponding fueling is determined from a recommendation from a supervisory agent monitoring the operating state of the vehicle of a subset of the total number of cylinders, and a determination as to which number of cylinders provides the optimal fuel consumption. Once the optimal cylinder number is determined, a transmission gear shift recommendation is provided in view of the determined active cylinder distribution and target operating state.

  11. Slowing heterosexual HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Ronald, A R

    1995-06-01

    HIV-1 is spreading rapidly through heterosexual intercourse in many societies. Slowing the transmission of this virus is the most urgent global public health priority. Our understanding of the biologic differences between societies that account for most vacancies in heterosexual HIV transmission are now understood. Effective interventions to slow transmission must be designed, implemented, and evaluated. Human and fiscal resources must be provided through a shared global effort. The consequences of failing to do so will lead to a world catastrophe of unprecedented magnitude. PMID:7673667

  12. Helium Pot System for Maintaining Sample Temperature after Cryocooler Deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Haid, B J

    2005-01-26

    A system for maintaining a sample at a constant temperature below 10K after deactivating the cooling source is demonstrated. In this system, the cooling source is a GM cryocooler that is joined with the sample through an adaptor that consists of a helium pot and a resistive medium. Upon deactivating the cryocooler, the power applied to a heater located on the sample side of the resistive medium is decreased gradually to maintain an appropriate temperature rise across the resistive medium as the helium pot warms. The temperature is held constant in this manner without the use of solid or liquid cryogens and without mechanically disconnecting the sample from the cooler. Shutting off the cryocooler significantly reduces sample motion that results from vibration and expansion/contraction of the cold head housing. The reduction in motion permits certain processes that are very sensitive to sample position stability, but are not performed throughout the duration that the sample is at low-temperature. An apparatus was constructed to demonstrate this technique using a 4K GM cryocooler. Experimental and theoretical predictions indicate that when the helium pot is pressurized to the working pressure of the cryocooler's helium supply, a sample with continuous heat dissipation of several-hundred milliwatts can be maintained at 7K for several minutes when using an extension that increases the cold head length by less than 50%.

  13. Indices of electromyographic activity and the "slow" component of oxygen uptake kinetics during high-intensity knee-extension exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Garland, Stephen W; Wang, Wen; Ward, Susan A

    2006-07-01

    The control of pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics above the lactate threshold (LT) is complex and controversial. Above LT, VO2 for square-wave exercise is greater than predicted from the sub-LT VO2-WR relationship, reflecting the contribution of an additional "slow" component (VO2(sc)). Investigators have argued for a contribution to this slow component from the recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibres, which are less aerobically efficient than slow-twitch fibres. Six healthy subjects performed a rapid-incremental bilateral knee-extension exercise test to the limit of tolerance for the estimation of VO2(peak), ventilatory threshold (VT), and the difference between VO2(peak) and VO2 at VT (Delta). Subjects then completed three repetitions of square-wave exercise at 30% of VT for 10 min (moderate intensity), and at VT + 25%Delta (heavy intensity) for 20 min. Pulmonary gas exchange was measured breath-by-breath. Surface EMG was recorded from m. rectus femoris; integrated EMG (IEMG) and mean power frequency (MPF) were derived for successive contractions. In comparison to moderate-intensity exercise, the phase 2 VO2 kinetics in heavy exercise were marginally slower than for moderate-intensity exercise (time constant (+/- SD) 25 +/- 9 and 22 +/- 10 s, respectively; NS), with a discernible VO2(sc) (VO2 difference between minutes 6 and 3 of exercise: 74 +/- 21 and 0 +/- 20 ml min(-1), respectively). However, there was no significant change in IEMG or MPF, either in the moderate domain or in the heavy domain over the period when the slow component was manifest. These observations argue against an appreciable preferential recruitment of fast-twitch units with high force-generating characteristics and fast sarcolemmal conduction velocities in concert with the development of the VO2 slow component during heavy-intensity knee-extensor exercise. The underlying mechanism(s) remains to be resolved.

  14. Deactivation and regeneration of ZSM-5 zeolite in catalytic pyrolysis of plastic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Pyrolysis transforms plastic wastes in valuable liquids and gases useful as fuels or source of chemicals. > The use of ZSM-5 zeolite in pyrolysis favours the production of gases and of lighter and more aromatic liquids. > ZSM-5 zeolite is almost completely deactivated after one plastics pyrolysis experiment. > ZSM-5 zeolite used in plastic wastes pyrolysis can be regenerated by burning the deposited coke in an air stream. > Regenerated ZSM-5 recovers its activity and produces liquids and gases equivalent to those obtained with fresh catalyst. - Abstract: In this work, a study of the regeneration and reuse of ZSM-5 zeolite in the pyrolysis of a plastic mixture has been carried out in a semi-batch reactor at 440 deg. C. The results have been compared with those obtained with fresh-catalyst and in non-catalytic experiments with the same conditions. The use of fresh catalyst produces a significant change in both the pyrolysis yields and the properties of the liquids and gases obtained. Gases more rich in C3-C4 and H{sub 2} are produced, as well as lower quantities of aromatic liquids if compared with those obtained in thermal decomposition. The authors have proved that after one pyrolysis experiment the zeolite loses quite a lot of its activity, which is reflected in both the yields and the products quality; however, this deactivation was found to be reversible since after regeneration heating at 550 deg. C in oxygen atmosphere, this catalyst recovered its initial activity, generating similar products and in equivalent proportions as those obtained with fresh catalyst.

  15. Förster resonance energy transfer structural kinetic studies of cardiac thin filament deactivation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Jayasundar, Jayant J; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2009-06-12

    Cardiac thin filament deactivation is initiated by Ca2+ dissociation from troponin C (cTnC), followed by multiple structural changes of thin filament proteins. These structural transitions are the molecular basis underlying the thin filament regulation of cardiac relaxation, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. In this study Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to investigate the dynamics and kinetics of the Ca2+-induced conformational changes of the cardiac thin filaments, specifically the closing of the cTnC N-domain, the cTnC-cTnI (troponin I) interaction, and the cTnI-actin interaction. The cTnC N-domain conformational change was examined by monitoring FRET between a donor (AEDANS) attached to one cysteine residue and an acceptor (DDPM) attached the other cysteine of the mutant cTnC(L13C/N51C). The cTnC-cTnI interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residue 89 of cTnC to residues 151 and 167 of cTnI, respectively. The cTnI-actin interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residues 151 and 167 of cTnI to residue 374 of actin. FRET Ca2+ titrations and stopped-flow kinetic measurements show that different thin filament structural transitions have different Ca2+ sensitivities and Ca2+ dissociation-induced kinetics. The observed structural transitions involving the regulatory region and the mobile domain of cTnI occurred at fast kinetic rates, whereas the kinetics of the structural transitions involving the cTnI inhibitory region was slow. Our results suggest that the thin filament deactivation upon Ca2+ dissociation is a two-step process. One step involves rapid binding of the mobile domain of cTnI to actin, which is kinetically coupled with the conformational change of the N-domain of cTnC and the dissociation of the regulatory region of cTnI from cTnC. The other step involves switching the inhibitory region of cTnI from interacting with cTnC to interacting with actin. The latter processes

  16. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Structural Kinetic Studies of Cardiac Thin Filament Deactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jun; Jayasundar, Jayant J.; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac thin filament deactivation is initiated by Ca2+ dissociation from troponin C (cTnC), followed by multiple structural changes of thin filament proteins. These structural transitions are the molecular basis underlying the thin filament regulation of cardiac relaxation, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. In this study Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to investigate the dynamics and kinetics of the Ca2+-induced conformational changes of the cardiac thin filaments, specifically the closing of the cTnC N-domain, the cTnC-cTnI (troponin I) interaction, and the cTnI-actin interaction. The cTnC N-domain conformational change was examined by monitoring FRET between a donor (AEDANS) attached to one cysteine residue and an acceptor (DDPM) attached the other cysteine of the mutant cTnC(L13C/N51C). The cTnC-cTnI interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residue 89 of cTnC to residues 151 and 167 of cTnI, respectively. The cTnI-actin interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residues 151 and 167 of cTnI to residue 374 of actin. FRET Ca2+ titrations and stopped-flow kinetic measurements show that different thin filament structural transitions have different Ca2+ sensitivities and Ca2+ dissociation-induced kinetics. The observed structural transitions involving the regulatory region and the mobile domain of cTnI occurred at fast kinetic rates, whereas the kinetics of the structural transitions involving the cTnI inhibitory region was slow. Our results suggest that the thin filament deactivation upon Ca2+ dissociation is a two-step process. One step involves rapid binding of the mobile domain of cTnI to actin, which is kinetically coupled with the conformational change of the N-domain of cTnC and the dissociation of the regulatory region of cTnI from cTnC. The other step involves switching the inhibitory region of cTnI from interacting with cTnC to interacting with actin. The latter processes

  17. Deactivation of excitatory neurons in the prelimbic cortex via Cdk5 promotes pain sensation and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Qiang; Cen, Cheng; Li, Chong; Cao, Shuai; Wang, Ning; Zhou, Zheng; Liu, Xue-Mei; Xu, Yu; Tian, Na-Xi; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Wang, Li-Ping; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is implicated in processing sensory-discriminative and affective pain. Nonetheless, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate a role for excitatory neurons in the prelimbic cortex (PL), a sub-region of mPFC, in the regulation of pain sensation and anxiety-like behaviours. Using a chronic inflammatory pain model, we show that lesion of the PL contralateral but not ipsilateral to the inflamed paw attenuates hyperalgesia and anxiety-like behaviours in rats. Optogenetic activation of contralateral PL excitatory neurons exerts analgesic and anxiolytic effects in mice subjected to chronic pain, whereas inhibition is anxiogenic in naive mice. The intrinsic excitability of contralateral PL excitatory neurons is decreased in chronic pain rats; knocking down cyclin-dependent kinase 5 reverses this deactivation and alleviates behavioural impairments. Together, our findings provide novel insights into the role of PL excitatory neurons in the regulation of sensory and affective pain. PMID:26179626

  18. Deactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors by hyperoxia decreases blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Sinski, Maciej; Lewandowski, Jacek; Przybylski, Jacek; Zalewski, Paweł; Symonides, Bartosz; Abramczyk, Piotr; Gaciong, Zbigniew

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that hyperoxia-induced deactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors reduces sympathetic activity in hypertensive patients but it does not affect blood pressure. The maintenance of blood pressure can be explained by the direct, vasoconstrictive effect of hyperoxia, which offsets diminished sympathetic activity. This study compares the effect of acute hyperoxia on hemodynamic parameters between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Twelve males with hypertension (age 39.4±2.4 years; body mass index 27.4±1.1 kg m(-2)) and 11 normotensive males (age 39.9±2.7 years; body mass index 25.4±0.7 kg m(-2)) received, via non-rebreathing mask ventilation, ambient air, followed by 100% oxygen for 20 min. The stroke volume, heart rate, cardiac output, blood pressure, total peripheral resistance, respiratory rate, baroreceptor control of heart rate and oxygen saturation were recorded continuously. Several 30 s periods were analyzed before, during and after inducing hyperoxia. At baseline, the hypertensive subject's blood pressure was higher and their baroreflex control of heart rate was lower when compared with the normotensive control group. After the first 30 s of hyperoxia, systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures, as well as the total peripheral resistance, decreased significantly in hypertensives but not in normotensives. After 20 min of 100% oxygen ventilation, systolic and mean blood pressures and total peripheral resistance was increased in hypertensive patients, and the cardiac output and stroke volume had decreased in both groups. The results of this study confirm that deactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors can acutely decrease blood pressure in humans.

  19. Cognitive impairment in pain through amygdala-driven prefrontal cortical deactivation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guangchen; Sun, Hao; Fu, Yu; Li, Zhen; Pais-Vieira, Miguel; Galhardo, Vasco; Neugebauer, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive deficits such as impaired decision-making can be a consequence of persistent pain. Normal functions of the intact amygdala and prefrontal cortex are required for emotion-based decision-making that relies on the ability to assess risk, attribute value and identify advantageous strategies. We tested the hypothesis that pain-related cognitive deficits result from amygdala-driven impairment of medial prefrontal cortical (mPFC) function. To do this, we used electrophysiological single-unit recordings in vivo, patch-clamp in brain slices, and various behavioral assays to show that increased neuronal activity in the amygdala in an animal model of arthritis pain was accompanied by decreased mPFC activation and impaired decision-making. Further, pharmacologic inhibition (with a CRF1 receptor antagonist) of pain-related hyperactivity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), but not central amygdala (CeA), reversed deactivation of mPFC pyramidal cells and improved decision-making deficits. Pain-related cortical deactivation resulted from a shift of balance between inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission. Direct excitatory transmission to mPFC pyramidal cells did not change in the pain model whereas polysynaptic inhibitory transmission increased. GABAergic transmission was reduced by non-NMDA receptor antagonists, suggesting synaptic inhibition was glutamate-driven. The results are consistent with a model of BLA-driven feed-forward inhibition of mPFC neurons. In contrast to the differential effects of BLA versus CeA hyperactivity on cortical-cognitive functions, both amygdala nuclei modulate emotional-affective pain behavior. Thus this study shows that the amygdala contributes not only to emotional-affective but also cognitive effects of pain. The novel amygdalo-cortical pain mechanism has important implications for our understanding of amygdala functions and amygdalo-cortical interactions. PMID:20392966

  20. Slow slip and the transition from fast to slow fronts in the rupture of frictional interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Scheibert, Julien; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Amundsen, David Skålid; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-06-17

    The failure of the population of microjunctions forming the frictional interface between two solids is central to fields ranging from biomechanics to seismology. This failure is mediated by the propagation along the interface of various types of rupture fronts, covering a wide range of velocities. Among them are the so-called slow fronts, which are recently discovered fronts much slower than the materials' sound speeds. Despite intense modeling activity, the mechanisms underlying slow fronts remain elusive. Here, we introduce a multiscale model capable of reproducing both the transition from fast to slow fronts in a single rupture event and the short-time slip dynamics observed in recent experiments. We identify slow slip immediately following the arrest of a fast front as a phenomenon sufficient for the front to propagate further at a much slower pace. Whether slow fronts are actually observed is controlled both by the interfacial stresses and by the width of the local distribution of forces among microjunctions. Our results show that slow fronts are qualitatively different from faster fronts. Because the transition from fast to slow fronts is potentially as generic as slow slip, we anticipate that it might occur in the wide range of systems in which slow slip has been reported, including seismic faults. PMID:24889640

  1. Deactivation of lipopolysaccharide by Ar and H2 inductively coupled low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartis, E. A. J.; Barrett, C.; Chung, T.-Y.; Ning, N.; Chu, J.-W.; Graves, D. B.; Seog, J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Using an inductively coupled plasma system, we study the effects of direct plasma, plasma-generated high-energy photons in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV), and radical treatments on lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is a biomolecule found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and a potent stimulator of the immune system composed of polysaccharide and lipid A, which contains six aliphatic chains. LPS film thickness spun on silicon was monitored by ellipsometry while the surface chemistry was characterized before and after treatments by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, biological activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay under (a) a sensitive regime (sub-µM concentrations of LPS) and (b) a bulk regime (above µM concentrations of LPS) after plasma treatments. Direct plasma treatment causes rapid etching and deactivation of LPS in both Ar and H2 feed gases. To examine the effect of UV/VUV photons, a long-pass filter with a cut-off wavelength of 112 nm was placed over the sample. H2 UV/VUV treatment causes material removal and deactivation due to atomic and molecular UV/VUV emission while Ar UV/VUV treatment shows minimal effects as Ar plasma does not emit UV/VUV photons in the transmitted wavelength range explored. Interestingly, radical treatments remove negligible material but cause deactivation. Based on the amphiphilic structure of LPS, we expect a lipid A rich surface layer to form at the air-water interface during sample preparation with polysaccharide layers underneath. XPS shows that H2 plasma treatment under direct and UV/VUV conditions causes oxygen depletion through removal of C-O and O-C = O bonds in the films, which does not occur in Ar treatments. Damage to these groups can remove aliphatic chains that contribute to the pyrogenicity of LPS. Radical treatments from both Ar and H2 plasmas remove aliphatic carbon from the near-surface, demonstrating the important role of neutral species.

  2. Revealing Deactivation Pathways Hidden in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is commonly employed with the intention to monitor electronic excited-state dynamics occurring in a neutral molecule. With the help of theory, we show that when excited-state processes occur on similar time scales the different relaxation pathways are completely obscured in the total photoionization signal recorded in the experiment. Using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and Dyson norms, we calculate the photoionization signal of cytosine and disentangle the transient contributions originating from the different deactivation pathways of its tautomers. In the simulations, the total signal from the relevant keto and enol tautomers can be decomposed into contributions either from the neutral electronic state populations or from the distinct mechanistic pathways across the multiple potential surfaces. The lifetimes corresponding to these contributions cannot be extracted from the experiment, thereby illustrating that new experimental setups are necessary to unravel the intricate non-adiabatic pathways occurring in polyatomic molecules after irradiation by light. PMID:27762396

  3. Ultrafast electronic deactivation dynamics of the rare natural nucleobase hypoxanthine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röttger, Katharina; Siewertsen, Ron; Temps, Friedrich

    2012-05-01

    The electronic deactivation of the 6-oxopurine derivative hypoxanthine, its nucleoside inosine and the nucleotide inosine monophosphate have been studied by femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy after ππ∗ photoexcitation at λ = 260 nm. The development of a highly sensitive parallel broadband (near-UV/VIS) and single-color (deep-UV) transient absorption setup enabled us to monitor the excited-state decay and the ground-state recovery dynamics in one and the same experiment. The measurements revealed similar relaxation behavior, with time constants of τ1 ≲ 0.1 ps, τ2 ≈ 0.21 ± 0.08 ps and τ3 ≈ 1.8 ± 0.4 ps, for all three investigated molecules. The observed dynamics are assumed to take place through a conical intersection involving an out-of-plane puckering mode of the six-membered ring similar to guanine.

  4. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sype, T.T.; Fischer, S.R.; Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

  5. Reducing the deactivation of Ni-metal during the catalytic partial oxidation of a surrogate diesel fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Daniel J.; Campos, Andrew; Smith, Mark W.; Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Spivey, James J.

    2010-09-01

    Ni catalysts are active and selective for the conversion of hydrocarbon into synthesis gas. However, conventional supported Ni catalysts rapidly deactivate at the high temperatures required for partial oxidation of diesel fuel by sintering and metal vaporization, as well as by carbon deposition and sulfur poisoning. Thus, to reduce deactivation Ni (3 wt%) was substituted into the structures of Ba-hexaaluminate (BNHA) and La–Sr–Zr pyrochlore (LSZN), and their activity was compared to a supported Ni/Al2O3 for the catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of a surrogate diesel fuel. Characterization by XRD showed a single phase β-alumina for the hexaaluminate, while LSZN had a pyrochlore structure with a defect SrZrO3 perovskite phase. Temperature programmed reduction experiments confirmed Ni was reducible in all catalysts. XANES results confirmed that Ni atoms were substituted into the hexaaluminate and pyrochlore structures, as spectra for each catalyst showed different coordination environments for Ni compared to a NiO standard. During CPOX activity tests (T = 900 °C and WHSV = 50,000 scc/gcat/h), the LSZN pyrochlore produced stable H2 and CO yields in the presence of 5 wt% 1-methylnaphthalene and 50 ppmw dibenzothiophene/n-tetradecane for 2 h, while both Ni/Al2O3 and BNHA catalysts were irreversibly deactivated by this mixture over the same time. Finally, activity loss was strongly linked to carbon formation.

  6. Slow wave sleep in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Ramón, Fidel; Hernández-Falcón, Jesús; Nguyen, Bao; Bullock, Theodore H

    2004-08-10

    Clear evidence of sleep in invertebrates is still meager. Defined as a distinct state of reduced activity, arousability, attention, and initiative, it is well established in mammals, birds, reptiles, and teleosts. It is commonly defined by additional electroencephalographic criteria that are only well established in mammals and to some extent in birds. Sleep states similar to those in mammals, except for electrical criteria, seem to occur in some invertebrates, based on behavior and some physiological observations. Currently the most compelling evidence for sleep in invertebrates (evidence that meets most standard criteria for sleep) has been obtained in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, in mammals, sleep is also characterized by a brain state different from that at rest but awake. The electrophysiological slow wave criterion for this state is not seen in Drosophila or in honey bees. Here, we show that, in crayfish, a behavioral state with elevated threshold for vibratory stimulation is accompanied by a distinctive form of slow wave electrical activity of the brain, quite different from that during waking rest. Therefore, crayfish can attain a sleep state comparable to that of mammals. PMID:15286285

  7. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY FOR THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT COMPLEX, HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.M.; Heineman, R.; Norton, S.; Miller, M.; Oates, L.

    2003-02-27

    Maintaining compliance with environmental regulatory requirements is a significant priority in successful completion of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nuclear Material Stabilization (NMS) Project. To ensure regulatory compliance throughout the deactivation and decommissioning of the PFP complex, an environmental regulatory strategy was developed. The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during PFP stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement. Significant environmental drivers for the PFP Nuclear Material Stabilization Project include the Tri-Party Agreement; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA); the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA); the Clean Air Act (CAA), and the Clean Water Act (CWA). Recent TPA negotiation s with Ecology and EPA have resulted in milestones that support the use of CERCLA as the primary statutory framework for decommissioning PFP. Milestones have been negotiated to support the preparation of Engineering Evaluations/Cost Analyses for decommissioning major PFP buildings. Specifically, CERCLA EE/CA(s) are anticipated for the following scopes of work: Settling Tank 241-Z-361, the 232-Z Incinerator, , the process facilities (eg, 234-5Z, 242, 236) and the process facility support buildings. These CERCLA EE/CA(s) are for the purpose of analyzing the appropriateness of the slab-on-grade endpoint Additionally, agreement was reached on performing an evaluation of actions necessary to address below-grade structures or other structures remaining after completion of the decommissioning of PFP. Remaining CERCLA actions will be integrated with other Central Plateau activities at the Hanford site.

  8. Slow recovery of excitability and the Wenckebach phenomenon in the single guinea pig ventricular myocyte.

    PubMed

    Delmar, M; Michaels, D C; Jalife, J

    1989-09-01

    The cellular mechanisms of Wenckebach periodicity were investigated in single, enzymatically dissociated guinea pig ventricular myocytes, as well as in computer reconstructions of transmembrane potential of the ventricular cell. When depolarizing current pulses of the appropriate magnitude were delivered repetitively to a well-polarized myocyte, rate-dependent activation failure was observed. Such behavior accurately mimicked the Wenckebach phenomenon in cardiac activation and was the consequence of variations in cell excitability during the diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle. The recovery of cell excitability during diastole was studied through the application of single test pulses of fixed amplitude and duration at variable delays with respect to a basic train of normal action potentials. The results show that recovery of excitability is a slow process that can greatly outlast action potential duration (i.e., postrepolarization refractoriness). Two distinct types of subthreshold responses were recorded when activation failure occurred: one was tetrodotoxin- and cobalt-insensitive (type 1) and the other was sensitive to sodium-channel blockade (type 2). Type 1 responses, which were commonly associated with the typical structure of the Wenckebach phenomenon (Mobitz type 1 block), were found to be the result of the nonlinear conductance properties of the inward rectifier current, IK1. Type 2 sodium-channel-mediated responses were associated with the so-called "millisecond Wenckebach." These responses may be implicated in the mechanism of Mobitz type 2 rate-dependent block. Single-cell voltage-clamp experiments suggest that variations in excitability during diastole are a consequence of the slow deactivation kinetics of the delayed rectifier, IK. Computer simulations of the ventricular cell response to depolarizing current pulses reproduced very closely all the response patterns obtained in the experimental preparation. It is concluded that postrepolarization

  9. Quantum gravity slows inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsamis, N.C. |; Woodard, R.P.

    1996-02-01

    We consider the quantum gravitational back-reaction on an initially inflating, homogeneous and isotropic universe whose topology is T{sup 3} {times} {Re}. Although there is no secular effect at one loop, an explicit calculation shows that two-loop processes act to slow the rate of expansion by an amount which becomes non-pertubatively large at late times. By exploiting Feynman`s tree theorem we show that all higher loops act in the same sense. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Go, Slow, and Whoa Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... quick tips for seasonal health, safety and fun Go, Slow, and Whoa Foods Past Issues / Summer 2007 ... of California and Flaghouse, Inc. 2002 Food Group GO Almost anytime foods SLOW Sometimes foods WHOA Once ...

  11. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of slow transit functional constipation is based upon diagnostic testing of patients with idiopathic constipation who responded poorly to conservative measures such as fiber supplements, fluids, and stimulant laxatives. These tests include barium enema or colonoscopy, colonic transit of radio-opaque markers, anorectal manometry, and expulsion of a water-filled balloon. Plain abdominal films can identify megacolon, which can be further characterized by barium or gastrografin studies. Colonic transit of radio-opaque markers identifies patients with slow transit with stasis of markers in the proximal colon. However, anorectal function should be characterized to exclude outlet dysfunction, which may coexist with colonic inertia. Because slow colonic transit is defined by studies during which patients consume a high-fiber diet, fiber supplements are generally not effective, nor are osmotic laxatives that consist of unabsorbed sugars. Stimulant laxatives are considered first-line therapy, although studies often show a diminished colonic motor response to such agents. There is no evidence to suggest that chronic use of such laxatives is harmful if they are used two to three times per week. Polyethylene glycol with or without electrolytes may be useful in a minority of patients, often combined with misoprostol. I prefer to start with misoprostol 200 mg every other morning and increase to tolerance or efficacy. I see no advantage in prescribing misoprostol on a TID or QID basis or even daily because it increases cramping unnecessarily. This drug is not acceptable in young women who wish to become pregnant. An alternative may be colchicine, which is reported to be effective when given as 0.6 mg TID. Long-term efficacy has not been studied. Finally, biofeedback is a risk-free approach that has been reported as effective in approximately 60% of patients with slow transit constipation in the absence of outlet dysfunction. Although difficult to understand

  12. [Lipoamide dehydrogenase, citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase in skeletal muscle. IX. The influence of the rate of thawing on activity and subcellular distribution in fast and slow frozen bovine muscle].

    PubMed

    Gottesmann, P; Hamm, R

    1985-10-01

    Samples of bovine muscle (post rigor) were frozen at -30 degrees C at two different rates (1.27 min/degrees C and 13.10 min/degrees C) and thawed at different rates between 1.6 (22 degrees C) and 430 min/degrees C (0 degrees C). The activities of the mitochondrial enzymes lipoamide dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase were determined in the supernatant of the tissue homogenate in phosphate buffer (total activity) and in the press juice of the intact tissue (activity in the sarcoplasma). The rate of thawing did not show a significant influence on total enzyme activities. In most cases, however, slow thawing caused a greater release of the enzymes from the mitochondria into the sarcoplasmic fluid than fast thawing, this effect being apparently independent of the rate of freezing. The greater damage to mitochondrial membranes upon slow thawing cannot be due to a longer exposure of the muscle cell to increased ionic strength in the non-freezable part of the cell water at the "critical" temperature around -3 degrees C because freezing of muscle samples at -3 degrees C and incubating them at -3 degrees C for five days resulted neither in changes of the total enzyme activities nor in a release of the three mitochondrial enzymes. From these results it is concluded that the influence of thawing rate on the damage to muscle mitochondria is probably not due to ionic effects or to recrystallization phenomena in the ice phase.

  13. Effect of Au nano-particle aggregation on the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst for acetylene hydrochlorination

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bin; Wang, Qinqin; Yu, Feng; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study of the valence state and distribution of the AuCl3/AC catalyst during the acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation process is described and discussed. Temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis indicate that the active Au3+ reduction to metallic Au0 is one reason for the deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy characterization demonstrated that the particle size of Au nano-particles increases with increasing reaction time. The results indicated that metallic Au0 exhibits considerable catalytic activity and that Au nano-particle aggregation may be another reason for the AuCl3/AC catalytic activity in acetylene hydrochlorination. PMID:25994222

  14. On the problem of deactivation of land areas contaminated with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Blagoev, V.V.; Galkin, A.P.; Galkina, L.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a complex of technologies for land deactivation in areas of nuclear accidents, short-term chemical fixation of such dusting areas as well as long-term combined chemical and biological fixation. Short-term fixation is based on application of chemical compositions containing side-products of hydrolysis of cellulose and calcium chloride. Long-term fixation is achieved by application of some plants that are able to intensive growth. These combined covers prevent an expansion of radionuclides into environment. Methods of deactivation include removal of surface layer of soil with following displacement or burial. Effective deactivation is provided by available technics and cheep chemicals.

  15. Importance of integrin LFA-1 deactivation for the generation of immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Semmrich, Monika; Smith, Andrew; Feterowski, Carolin; Beer, Sandra; Engelhardt, Britta; Busch, Dirk H.; Bartsch, Bernadett; Laschinger, Melanie; Hogg, Nancy; Pfeffer, Klaus; Holzmann, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic regulation of ligand binding is considered crucial for integrin function. However, the importance of activity regulation for integrin function in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we have applied gene targeting to delete the GFFKR sequence of the lymphocyte function-associated antigen–1 (LFA-1) αL subunit cytoplasmic domain in mouse germline. Lymphocytes from Lfa-1d/d mutant mice showed constitutive activation of LFA-1–mediated cell adhesion and impaired de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule-1 that resulted in defective cell migration. In contrast, signaling through LFA-1 was not affected in Lfa-1d/d cells. T cell activation by superantigen-loaded and allogeneic APCs, cytotoxic T cell activity, T-dependent humoral immune responses, and neutrophil recruitment during aseptic peritonitis were impaired in Lfa-1d/d mice. Thus, deactivation of LFA-1 and disassembly of LFA-1–mediated cell contacts seem to be vital for the generation of normal immune responses. PMID:15955836

  16. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  17. Slow change deafness.

    PubMed

    Neuhoff, John G; Wayand, Joseph; Ndiaye, Mamoudou C; Berkow, Ann B; Bertacchi, Breanna R; Benton, Catherine A

    2015-05-01

    In four experiments, we demonstrated a new phenomenon called "slow-change deafness." In Experiment 1 we presented listeners with continuous speech that changed three semitones in pitch over time, and we found that nearly 50 % failed to notice the change. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated the finding, demonstrated that the changes in the stimuli were well above threshold, and showed that when listeners were alerted to the possibility of a change, detection rates improved dramatically. Experiment 4 showed that increasing the magnitude of the change that occurred in the stimulus decreased the rate of change deafness. Our results are consistent with previous work that had shown that cueing listeners to potential auditory changes can significantly reduce change deafness. These findings support an account of change deafness that is dependent on both the magnitude of a stimulus change and listener expectations.

  18. Implementation of a Peltier-based cooling device for localized deep cortical deactivation during in vivo object recognition testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Kyle; Graham, Brett; Carouso, Samantha; Cox, David

    2012-02-01

    While the application of local cortical cooling has recently become a focus of neurological research, extended localized deactivation deep within brain structures is still unexplored. Using a wirelessly controlled thermoelectric (Peltier) device and water-based heat sink, we have achieved inactivating temperatures (<20 C) at greater depths (>8 mm) than previously reported. After implanting the device into Long Evans rats' basolateral amygdala (BLA), an inhibitory brain center that controls anxiety and fear, we ran an open field test during which anxiety-driven behavioral tendencies were observed to decrease during cooling, thus confirming the device's effect on behavior. Our device will next be implanted in the rats' temporal association cortex (TeA) and recordings from our signal-tracing multichannel microelectrodes will measure and compare activated and deactivated neuronal activity so as to isolate and study the TeA signals responsible for object recognition. Having already achieved a top performing computational face-recognition system, the lab will utilize this TeA activity data to generalize its computational efforts of face recognition to achieve general object recognition.

  19. Excited-State Deactivation of Branched Phthalocyanine Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huaning; Li, Yang; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Meng; Niu, Yingli; Zhang, Xinxing; Guo, Qianjin; Wang, Shuangqing; Yang, Guoqiang; Xia, Andong

    2015-12-21

    The excited-state relaxation dynamics and chromophore interactions in two phthalocyanine compounds (bis- and trisphthalocyanines) are studied by using steady-state and femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements, where the excited-state energy-transfer mechanism is explored. By exciting phthalocyanine compounds to their second electronically excited states and probing the subsequent relaxation dynamics, a multitude of deactivation pathways are identified. The transient absorption spectra show the relaxation pathway from the exciton state to excimer state and then back to the ground state in bisphthalocyanine (bis-Pc). In trisphthalocyanine (tris-Pc), the monomeric and dimeric subunits are excited and the excitation energy transfers from the monomeric vibrationally hot S1 state to the exciton state of a pre-associated dimer, with subsequent relaxation to the ground state through the excimer state. The theoretical calculations and steady-state spectra also show a face-to-face conformation in bis-Pc, whereas in tris-Pc, two of the three phthalocyanine branches form a pre-associated face-to-face dimeric conformation with the third one acting as a monomeric unit; this is consistent with the results of the transient absorption experiments from the perspective of molecular structure. The detailed structure-property relationships in phthalocyanine compounds is useful for exploring the function of molecular aggregates in energy migration of natural photosynthesis systems.

  20. Helium POT System for Maintaining Sample Temperature after Cryocooler Deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haid, B. J.

    2006-04-01

    A system for maintaining a sample at a constant temperature below 10 K after deactivating the cooling source is demonstrated. In this system, the cooling source is a 4 K GM cryocooler that is joined with the sample through an extension that consists of a helium pot and a thermal resistance. Upon stopping the cryocooler, the power applied to a heater located on the sample side of the thermal resistance is decreased gradually to maintain an appropriate temperature rise across the thermal resistance as the helium pot warms. The sample temperature is held constant in this manner without the use of solid or liquid cryogens and without mechanically disconnecting the sample from the cooler. Shutting off the cryocooler significantly reduces sample motion that results from vibration and expansion/contraction of the cold-head housing. The reduction in motion permits certain procedures that are very sensitive to sample position stability, but are performed with limited duration. A proof-of-concept system was built and operated with the helium pot pressurized to the cryocooler's charge pressure. A sample with 200 mW of continuous heat dissipation was maintained at 7 K while the cryocooler operated intermittently with a duty cycle of 9.5 minutes off and 20 minutes on.

  1. Charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon capacitors in the presence of hydrogen deactivated dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Witczak, Steven C.; Winokur, Peter S.; Lacoe, Ronald C.; Mayer, Donald C.

    2000-06-01

    An improved charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors is presented which accounts for the deactivation of substrate dopants by hydrogen at elevated irradiation temperatures or small irradiation biases. Using high-frequency capacitance-voltage measurements, radiation-induced inversion voltage shifts are separated into components due to oxide trapped charge, interface traps, and deactivated dopants, where the latter is computed from a reduction in Si capacitance. In the limit of no radiation-induced dopant deactivation, this approach reduces to the standard midgap charge separation technique used widely for the analysis of room-temperature irradiations. The technique is demonstrated on a p-type MOS capacitor irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays at 100 degree sign C and zero bias, where the dopant deactivation is significant.(c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Patient perceptions of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    MacIver, Jane; Tibbles, Alana; Billia, Filio; Ross, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a class I recommendation for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions to occur between physicians and heart failure patients. Few studies have reported the patient’s perspective on the timing of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions. Aim: To determine patient awareness, preferences and timing of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions. Design: Grounded theory was used to collect and analyze interview data from 25 heart failure patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Setting and participants: Patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, from the Heart Function Clinic at University Health Network (Toronto, Canada). Results: The sample (n = 25) was predominately male (76%) with an average age of 62 years. Patients identified three stages where they felt implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation should be discussed: (1) prior to implantation, (2) with any significant deterioration but while they were of sound mind to engage in and communicate their preferences and (3) at end of life, where patients wished further review of their previously established preferences and decisions about implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation. Most patients (n = 17, 68%) said they would consider deactivation, six (24%) were undecided and two (8%) were adamant they would never turn it off. Conclusion: The patient preferences identified in this study support the need to include information on implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation at implant, with change in clinical status and within broader discussions about end-of-life treatment preferences. Using this process to help patients determine and communicate their implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation preferences may reduce the number of patients experiencing distressing implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks at end of life. PMID:27110361

  3. Microwave-driven enzyme deactivation using imidazolium salt-presenting silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuo; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2014-10-01

    Thermal enzyme deactivation by the imidazolium-presenting silica nanoparticles with the microwave irradiation is presented in this manuscript. The modified nanoparticles were synthesized, and it was observed that the modified nanoparticles can be a heat source in the buffer under the weak-power microwave irradiation. Finally, based on the heat-generating ability of these nanoparticles, deactivation of glutathione reductase and alkaline phosphatase with the modified nanoparticles were demonstrated. PMID:25223957

  4. On the nature of the deactivation of supported palladium nanoparticle catalysts in the decarboxylation of fatty acids.

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, E. W.; Pierson, J.; Wallace, R.; Miller, J. T.; Fuller, T. F.; Jones, C. W.

    2011-04-15

    Supported palladium catalysts are effective catalysts for the hydrogen-free decarboxylation of fatty acids. However, the catalysts deactivate severely after one use. Here, the recyclability of a well-defined, mesoporous silica-supported palladium nanoparticle catalyst is evaluated in the batch decarboxylation of stearic acid at 300 C under inert atmosphere, producing n-heptadecane. The nature of the catalyst deactivation is examined in detail via an array of characterization techniques. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrates that little palladium surface oxidation occurs over the course of the reaction, and a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suggests negligible particle sintering or agglomeration. Physisorption and chemisorption measurements demonstrate substantial loss in total surface area and porosity as well as accessible palladium surface area with these losses attributed to significant organic deposition on the catalyst, as verified via thermogravimetric analysis. High temperature calcination is applied to combust and remove these residues, but resultant nanoparticle agglomeration is significant. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and solid dissolution followed by organic extraction methodologies demonstrate that the carbonaceous deposits are not coke but rather strongly adsorbed reactants and products. Detrimental coke formation, as suggested by prior literature, is verified to be absent, as extraction of the surface-deposited organic species yields nearly complete recovery of the total surface area, pore volume, and active palladium surface area. Furthermore, the regenerated catalyst exhibits a corresponding significant recovery of decarboxylation activity.

  5. Ultrafast Faraday Rotation of Slow Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musorin, A. I.; Sharipova, M. I.; Dolgova, T. V.; Inoue, M.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The active control of optical signals in the time domain is what science and technology demand in fast all-optical information processing. Nanostructured materials can modify the group velocity and slow the light down, as the artificial light dispersion emerges. We observe the ultrafast temporal behavior of the Faraday rotation within a single femtosecond laser pulse under conditions of slow light in a one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystal. The Faraday effect changes by 20% over the time of 150 fs. This might be applicable to the fast control of light in high-capacity photonic devices.

  6. Small molecule PZL318: forming fluorescent nanoparticles capable of tracing their interactions with cancer cells and activated platelets, slowing tumor growth and inhibiting thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Wang, Yuji; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yaonan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Ming; Feng, Qiqi; Wu, Jianhui; Zhao, Shurui; Wu, Wei; Peng, Shiqi

    2015-01-01

    Low selectivity of chemotherapy correlates with poor outcomes of cancer patients. To improve this issue, a novel agent, N-(1-[3-methoxycarbonyl-4-hydroxyphenyl]-β-carboline-3-carbonyl)-Trp-Lys-OBzl (PZL318), was reported here. The transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy images demonstrated that PZL318 can form nanoparticles. Fluorescent and confocal images visualized that PZL318 formed fluorescent nanoparticles capable of targeting cancer cells and tracing their interactions with cancer cells. In vitro, 40 μM of PZL318 inhibited the proliferation of tumorigenic cells, but not nontumorigenic cells. In vivo, 10 nmol/kg of PZL318 slowed the tumor growth of S180 mice and alleviated the thrombosis of ferric chloride-treated ICR mice, while 100 μmol/kg of PZL318 did not injure healthy mice and they exhibited no liver toxicity. By analyzing Fourier transform–mass spectrometry and rotating-frame Overhauser spectroscopy (ROESY) two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, the chemical mechanism of PZL318-forming trimers and nanoparticles was explored. By using mesoscale simulation, a nanoparticle of 3.01 nm in diameter was predicted containing 13 trimers. Scavenging free radicals, downregulating sP-selectin expression and intercalating toward DNA were correlated with the antitumor mechanism of PZL318. PMID:26345234

  7. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  8. Slow launch for HGH.

    PubMed

    Gilden, D

    1995-05-01

    The human growth hormone (HGH) expanded access program for people with AIDS wasting syndrome is now in its fourth month. Enrollment has been slow, largely due to cost. Since HGH falls under the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Treatment Investigational New Drug (TIND) regulations, patients are required to pay for the drug--at a cost of about $150 per day, or more than $1,000 per week. Few insurance companies will compensate for the cost of HGH, and no state Medicaid or AIDS Drug Assistance Programs have agreed to cover the compound. Serono Laboratories, the manufacturer, is operating an indigent program that provides free or discount HGH for individuals who cannot purchase the drug any other way. There are only 25 slots available in this program. Lack of available data on how and when to use the drug creates obstacles for physicians. Most of the public data available comes from a single, twelve-week, placebo-controlled study involving 178 participants. However, there are alternative treatments for wasting syndrome. A regimen of testosterone and synthetic anabolic steroids, given to men, has provided positive results on an anecdotal basis. Wasting syndrome comes from a metabolic change which occurs with chronic HIV infection. Rather than first using stores of fat, the body breaks down protein to meet its energy requirements.

  9. Can ageing be slowed?

    PubMed Central

    Gaman, L; Stoian, I; Atanasiu, V

    2011-01-01

    Redox metabolism has long been considered to play important roles in aging and the development of age-related diseases. Both dietary and pharmacological manipulations of redox metabolism have been associated with the extension of lifespan. Increasing new evidence s also suggests that the process of aging may derive from imperfect clearance of oxidatively damaged material. The accumulation of this molecular “garbage”, relatively indigestible, further hinders cellular functions, induces progressive failure of maintenance and repair and increases the probability of death. One important trend in anti–aging strategy is, therefore, to prevent or even revert the accumulation of these oxidatively altered molecules by stimulating the maintenance and repair systems through hormesis. A promising approach for slowing down ageing and achieving a healthy senescence is represented by repeated exposure to various mild stresses (caloric restriction, moderate exercise, nutritional or pharmacological hormetins). This article reviews the potential therapeutic tools available to date for increasing longevity and obtaining and successful ageing from the redox and hormetic perspective. PMID:22514565

  10. Possibilities for recycling cellulases after use in cotton processing: part I: Effects of end-product inhibition, thermal and mechanical deactivation, and cellulase depletion by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Helena; Bishop, David; Cavaco-Paul, Artur

    2002-04-01

    Preliminary recycling experiments with cellulase enzymes after cotton treatments at 50 degrees C showed that activity remaining in the treatment liquors was reduced by about 80% after five recycling steps. The potential problems of end-product inhibition, thermal and mechanical deactivation, and the loss of some components of the cellulase complex by preferential and or irreversible adsorption to cotton substrates were studied. End-product inhibition studies showed that the build-up of cellobiose and glucose would be expected to cause no more than 40% activity loss after five textile treatment cycles. Thermal and mechanical treatments of cellulases suggested that the enzymes start to be deactivated at 60 degrees C and agitation levels similar to those used in textile processing did not cause significant enzyme deactivation. Analysis of cellulase solutions, by fast protein liquid chromatography, before and after adsorption on cotton fabrics, suggested that the cellobiohydrolase II (Cel6A) content of the cellulase complex was reduced, relative to the other components, by preferential adsorption. This would lead to a marked reduction in activity after several treatment cycles and top-up with pure cellobiohydrolase II would be necessary unless this component is easily recoverable from the treated fabric.

  11. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been expanded by FIU

  12. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-Chen; Liu, Han-Qiu; Hua, Xu-Yun; Shen, Yun-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is difficult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function. PMID:27212933

  13. Decontamination and deactivation of the power burst facility at the Idaho National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Greene, Christy Jo

    2007-05-01

    Successful decontamination and deactivation of the Power Burst Facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory was accomplished through the use of extensive planning, job sequencing, engineering controls, continuous radiological support, and the use of a dedicated group of experienced workers. Activities included the removal and disposal of irradiated fuel, miscellaneous reactor components and debris stored in the canal, removal and disposition of a 15.6 curie Pu:Be start-up source, removal of an irradiated in-pile tube, and the removal of approximately 220,000 pounds of lead that was used as shielding primarily in Cubicle 13. The canal and reactor vessel were drained and water was transferred to an evaporation tank adjacent to the facility. The canal was decontaminated using underwater divers, and epoxy was affixed to the interior surfaces of the canal to contain loose contamination. The support structures and concrete or steel frame walls that form the confinement were left in place. The reactor core was left in place and a carbon steel shielding plate was placed over the reactor core to reduce radiation levels. All low-level waste and mixed low level waste generated as a result of the work activities was characterized and disposed.

  14. Deactivation of the P, C, and R Reactor Disassembly Basins at the SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, J.B.

    2000-12-06

    The Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) at the Savannah River Site is engaged in planning the deactivation/closure of three of the site's five reactor disassembly basins. Activities are currently underway at 105-R Disassembly Basin and will continue with the 105-P and 105-C disassembly basins. The basins still contain the cooling and shielding water that was present when operations ceased. Low concentrations of radionuclides are present, with tritium, Cs-137, and Sr-90 being the major contributors. Although there is no evidence that any of the basins have leaked, the 50-year-old facilities will eventually contaminate the surrounding groundwaters. The FDD is pursuing a pro-active solution to close the basins in-place and prevent a release to the groundwater. In-situ ion-exchange is currently underway at the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin to reduce the Cs and Sr concentrations to levels that would allow release of the treated water to previously used on-site cooling ponds. A NEPA Environmental Assessment (EA) is being prepared to propose the preferred closure alternative for each of the three basins. The EA will be the primary mechanism to inform the public and gain stakeholder and regulatory approval.

  15. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for deactivation of the PUREX storage tunnel number 2

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    1999-10-11

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Storage Tunnel Number 2 (hereafter referred to as the PUREX Tunnel) was built in 1964. Since that time, the PUREX Tunnel has been used for storage of radioactive and mixed waste. In 1991, the PUREX Plant ceased operations and was transitioned to deactivation. The PUREX Tunnel continued to receive PUREX Plant waste material for storage during transition activities. Before 1995, a decision was made to store radioactive and mixed waste in the PUREX Tunnel generated from other onsite sources, on a case-by-case basis. This notice of construction (NOC) describes the activities associated with the reactivation of the PUREX Tunnel ventilation system and the transfer of up to 3.5 million curies (MCi) of radioactive waste to the PUREX Tunnel from any location on the Hanford Site. The unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimated for the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) is 5.6 E-2 millirem (mrem). The abated TEDE conservatively is estimated to account for 1.9 E-5 mrem to the MEI. The following text provides information requirements of Appendix A of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 (requirements 1 through 18).

  16. Vibrational mode deactivation rates for gaseous discharge-excited nitrogen(2) on selected surfaces measured with coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, John Walter, Jr.

    2000-09-01

    thus carried out by fitting a well tempered Master Equation Model (MEM) to the data. An examination of witness surfaces with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that N atoms had bonded at a slow rate. These adatoms eventually impacted the deactivation rates to a measurable extent. This chemical reaction saturates within 20 to 30 hours, depending on the surface composition. Gold did not show any chemical changes although there were small surface topographic changes. These included roughening that would accrue with time that apparently did not contribute to changes in the observed rates. Stainless steel showed the largest deactivation rates of all the selected materials. Titanium and Teflon provided the least deactivation. Together, these suggest that there are numerous small yet effective influences on vibrational energy disposal process at the surface.

  17. Adsorption and Deactivation Characteristics of Cu/ZnO-Based Catalysts for Methanol Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Howard, Bret H; Lekse, Jonathan W; Baltrus, John P; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-07-09

    The adsorption and deactivation characteristics of coprecipitated Cu/ZnO-based catalysts were examined and correlated to their performance in methanol synthesis from CO₂ hydrogenation. The addition of Ga₂O₃ and Y₂O₃ promoters is shown to increase the Cu surface area and CO₂/H₂ adsorption capacities of the catalysts and enhance methanol synthesis activity. Infrared studies showed that CO₂ adsorbs spontaneously on these catalysts at room temperature as both monoand bi-dentate carbonate species. These weakly bound species desorb completely from the catalyst surface by 200 °C while other carbonate species persist up to 500 °C. Characterization using N₂O decomposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis clearly indicated that Cu sintering is the main cause of catalyst deactivation. Ga and Y promotion improves the catalyst stability by suppressing the agglomeration of Cu and ZnO particles under pretreatment and reaction conditions.

  18. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  19. Self-condensation of cyclohexanone catalyzed by Amberlyst-15 -- Study of diffusional resistances and deactivation of the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, J.M.; Vegas, J.M.R.; Jodra, L.G. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The deactivation of a macroporous sulfonic resin in a condensation process with production of water is due to three simultaneous causes: inhibition by water, fouling/poisoning, and hydrolysis of sulfonic groups. The reaction was performed in a batch reactor. The diffusional resistances were negligible for stirrer speed > 100 rpm, and particle size < 0.09 mm. The inhibition by water was minimum with water concentration, C[sub w], in the range of 0.1-0.2 mol/l. For a greater C[sub w], the inhibition is expressed by the pseudoactivity a[sub w][equivalent to] k[sub 1]/k(1 + k[sub 2]C[sub w][sup 2]). The deactivation by fouling/poisoning follows third-order kinetics with respect to both the activity, a, and the concentration of byproducts, Cp, -da/dt=k[sub d]C[sub P][sup 3]a[sup 3]. The hydrolysis of sulfonic groups, measured by the loss of fractional acid capacity, y[sub n], follows second-order kinetics, -dy[sub n]/dt =k[sub H]y[sub n][sup 2].

  20. Human Gamma Oscillations during Slow Wave Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Valderrama, Mario; Crépon, Benoît; Botella-Soler, Vicente; Martinerie, Jacques; Hasboun, Dominique; Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Baulac, Michel; Adam, Claude; Navarro, Vincent; Le Van Quyen, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS). At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30–50 Hz) and high (60–120 Hz) frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves (“IN-phase” pattern), confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave (“ANTI-phase” pattern). This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks. PMID:22496749

  1. Murine startle mutant Nmf11 affects the structural stability of the glycine receptor and increases deactivation

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Megan E.; Caley, Alex; Gielen, Marc C.; Harvey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Hyperekplexia or startle disease is a serious neurological condition affecting newborn children and usually involves dysfunctional glycinergic neurotransmission.Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are major mediators of inhibition in the spinal cord and brainstem.A missense mutation, replacing asparagine (N) with lysine (K), at position 46 in the GlyR α1 subunit induced hyperekplexia following a reduction in the potency of the transmitter glycine; this resulted from a rapid deactivation of the agonist current at mutant GlyRs.These effects of N46K were rescued by mutating a juxtaposed residue, N61 on binding Loop D, suggesting these two asparagines may interact.Asparagine 46 is considered to be important for the structural stability of the subunit interface and glycine binding site, and its mutation represents a new mechanism by which GlyR dysfunction induces startle disease. Abstract Dysfunctional glycinergic inhibitory transmission underlies the debilitating neurological condition, hyperekplexia, which is characterised by exaggerated startle reflexes, muscle hypertonia and apnoea. Here we investigated the N46K missense mutation in the GlyR α1 subunit gene found in the ethylnitrosourea (ENU) murine mutant, Nmf11, which causes reduced body size, evoked tremor, seizures, muscle stiffness, and morbidity by postnatal day 21. Introducing the N46K mutation into recombinant GlyR α1 homomeric receptors, expressed in HEK cells, reduced the potencies of glycine, β‐alanine and taurine by 9‐, 6‐ and 3‐fold respectively, and that of the competitive antagonist strychnine by 15‐fold. Replacing N46 with hydrophobic, charged or polar residues revealed that the amide moiety of asparagine was crucial for GlyR activation. Co‐mutating N61, located on a neighbouring β loop to N46, rescued the wild‐type phenotype depending on the amino acid charge. Single‐channel recording identified that burst length for the N46K mutant was reduced and fast agonist application

  2. Another slow year

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This article is a review of the petroleum activity in the Middle East. The article is accompanied by a detailed color map showing the activity in the area. Highlights of the article include the fact that Saudi Arabia's drilling and development activity has sunk to its lowest level in many years. The article also points out that discoveries are increasing production in North and South Yemen as well as in Syria. The article also highlights the fact that Qatar is beginning work on its massive North gas field in the Gulf. Also attention is paid to the effects of the Iranian and Iraq war on each other's oil and gas activities. The article also mentions the drilling activity of Dubai and Oman.

  3. Neuronal activity of orexin and non-orexin waking-active neurons during wake-sleep states in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Lin, J-S; Sakai, K

    2008-05-15

    Using extracellular single unit recordings alone or in combination with neurobiotin juxtacellular labeling and orexin (hypocretin) immunohistochemistry in the mouse, we have recorded a total of 452 neurons in the orexin neuron field of the posterior hypothalamus. Of these, 76 exhibited tonic discharge highly specific to wakefulness, referred to as waking-active neurons. They showed differences from each other in terms of spike shape, activity profile, and response to an arousing sound stimulus and could be classified into three groups on the basis of spike shape as: 1) biphasic broad; 2) biphasic narrow; and 3) triphasic. Waking-active neurons characterized by biphasic broad spikes were orexin-immunopositive, whereas those characterized by either biphasic narrow or triphasic broad spikes were orexin-immunonegative. Unlike waking-specific histamine neurons, all orexin and non-orexin waking-active neurons exhibited slow (<10 Hz) tonic discharges during wakefulness and ceased firing shortly after the onset of electroencephalogram (EEG) synchronization (deactivation), the EEG sign of sleep (drowsy state). They remained virtually silent during slow-wave sleep, but displayed transient discharges during paradoxical (or rapid eye movement) sleep. During the transition from sleep to wakefulness, both orexin and triphasic non-orexin neurons fired in clusters prior to the onset of EEG activation, the EEG sign of wakefulness, and responded with a short latency to an arousing sound stimulus given during sleep. In contrast, the biphasic narrow non-orexin neurons fired in single spikes either prior to, or after, EEG activation during the same transition and responded to the stimulus with a longer latency. The activity of all waking-active neurons preceded the return of muscle tonus at the transition from paradoxical sleep to wakefulness. These data support the view that the activity of orexin and non-orexin waking-active neurons in the posterior hypothalamus plays an important

  4. Slow oscillations during sleep coordinate interregional communication in cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Cox, Roy; van Driel, Joram; de Boer, Marieke; Talamini, Lucia M

    2014-12-10

    Large-amplitude sleep slow oscillations group faster neuronal oscillations and are of functional relevance for memory performance. However, relatively little is known about the impact of slow oscillations on functionally coupled networks. Here, we provide a comprehensive view on how human slow oscillatory dynamics influence various measures of brain processing. We demonstrate that slow oscillations coordinate interregional cortical communication, as assessed by phase synchrony in the sleep spindle frequency range and cross-frequency coupling between spindle and beta activity. Furthermore, we show that the organizing role of slow oscillations is restricted to circumscribed topographical areas. These findings add importantly to our basic understanding of the orchestrating role of slow oscillations. In addition, they are of considerable relevance for accounts of sleep-dependent memory reprocessing and consolidation. PMID:25505340

  5. [Application of deactivating properties of some sorbents in aquaculture feed production].

    PubMed

    Vasukevich, T A; Nitievskaya, L S

    2014-01-01

    The possibility and effectiveness of application of selective sorbents for fish feed production in aquaculture in the area exposed to the radioactive pollution were studied. The investigations of the fish feed deactivating properties with additives of ferrocyn and potassium alginate, and magnesium on whitefish fry-fingerlings and yearlings were carried out. The study has shown that the ferrocyn performance is greater than 99% regardless of the fish age. 1% ferrocyn addition to feed allows increasing the acceptable concentration of feed compo- nents polluted by the above norm cesium radionuclide up to 20 times. The alginate additives in feed provide almost double decrease in the activity of fish tissues. The optimally effective alginate dose should exceed the calcium concentration in feed up to 4 times. It was found that utilization of the feedstock (fish meal, crops and legumes, oil meal and oil cake) polluted by radionuclides is possible in combined aquaculture feed pro- duction. The application of sorbents in feed will allow increasing the amount permissible for use of the feed components polluted above the norm; ensure the radiation safety of feed and, finally, the protection of aquatic biological resources from radioactive contamination. It is shown that the sorbent additive in feed is also jus- tified in case of fish farming in closed waters affected by radioactive pollution. Feeding by mixed fodder with the sorbent additives prevents fish from radionuclide intake from natural food sources.

  6. [Application of deactivating properties of some sorbents in aquaculture feed production].

    PubMed

    Vasukevich, T A; Nitievskaya, L S

    2014-01-01

    The possibility and effectiveness of application of selective sorbents for fish feed production in aquaculture in the area exposed to the radioactive pollution were studied. The investigations of the fish feed deactivating properties with additives of ferrocyn and potassium alginate, and magnesium on whitefish fry-fingerlings and yearlings were carried out. The study has shown that the ferrocyn performance is greater than 99% regardless of the fish age. 1% ferrocyn addition to feed allows increasing the acceptable concentration of feed compo- nents polluted by the above norm cesium radionuclide up to 20 times. The alginate additives in feed provide almost double decrease in the activity of fish tissues. The optimally effective alginate dose should exceed the calcium concentration in feed up to 4 times. It was found that utilization of the feedstock (fish meal, crops and legumes, oil meal and oil cake) polluted by radionuclides is possible in combined aquaculture feed pro- duction. The application of sorbents in feed will allow increasing the amount permissible for use of the feed components polluted above the norm; ensure the radiation safety of feed and, finally, the protection of aquatic biological resources from radioactive contamination. It is shown that the sorbent additive in feed is also jus- tified in case of fish farming in closed waters affected by radioactive pollution. Feeding by mixed fodder with the sorbent additives prevents fish from radionuclide intake from natural food sources. PMID:25980288

  7. Slow binding kinetics of secreted protein, acidic, rich in cysteine-VEGF interaction limit VEGF activation of VEGF receptor 2 and attenuate angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cydzik, Marzena; Abdul-Wahid, Aws; Park, Soyeon; Bourdeau, Annie; Bowden, Katherine; Prodeus, Aaron; Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J; Ringuette, Maurice J; Gariépy, Jean

    2015-08-01

    VEGF-A (VEGF) drives angiogenesis through activation of downstream effectors to promote endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Although VEGF binds both VEGF receptor 1 (R1) and receptor 2 (R2), its proangiogenic effects are attributed to R2. Secreted protein, acidic, rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular glycoprotein thought to inhibit angiogenesis by preventing VEGF from activating R1, but not R2. Because R2 rather than R1 mediates proangiogenic activities of VEGF, the role of human SPARC in angiogenesis was reevaluated. We confirm that association of SPARC with VEGF inhibits VEGF-induced HUVEC adherence, motility, and proliferation in vitro and blocks VEGF-induced blood vessel formation ex vivo. SPARC decreases VEGF-induced phosphorylation of R2 and downstream effectors ERK, Akt, and p38 MAPK as shown by Western blot and/or phosphoflow analysis. Surface plasmon resonance indicates that SPARC binds slowly to VEGF (0.865 ± 0.02 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) with a Kd of 150 nM, forming a stable complex that dissociates slowly (1.26 ± 0.003 × 10(-3) s(-1)). Only domain III of SPARC binds VEGF, exhibiting a 15-fold higher affinity than full-length SPARC. These findings support a model whereby SPARC regulates angiogenesis by sequestering VEGF, thus restricting the activation of R2 and the subsequent activation of downstream targets critical for endothelial cell functions.

  8. Viscous heating effect on deactivation of helminth eggs in ventilated improved pit sludge.

    PubMed

    Belcher, D; Foutch, G L; Smay, J; Archer, C; Buckley, C A

    2015-01-01

    Viscous heating by extrusion of faecal material obtained from ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrines can be used to deactivate soil-transmitted helminth (STH) eggs by increasing the temperature of faecal sludge uniformly. Viscous heating can deactivate STH eggs present in sludge to make the material safer to transport, dispose of, or use in agricultural applications or as an energy source. The mechanical energy required to generate the shear rate can originate from any source. No other heat source or additive is required. Here we determined a baseline for the deactivation of STH eggs using viscous heating. To characterize equipment performance, three parameters were investigated: (1) minimum temperature required for deactivation; (2) local maximum temperatures for various flow rates and moisture contents (MCs); and (3) thermal efficiency. Excess water is undesirable since low viscosities require extended residence time and increased energy input. The minimum temperature to achieve greater than 90% helminth egg deactivation is 70 °C. For the laboratory-scale equipment tested, the maximum allowable mass flow rate for VIP sludge with 77% MC was found to be 3.6 g/s.

  9. Reversible deactivation radical polymerization mediated by cobalt complexes: recent progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chi-How; Yang, Tsung-Yao; Zhao, Yaguang; Fu, Xuefeng

    2014-11-21

    Mediation of reversible deactivation radical polymerization (RDRP) by cobalt(II) complexes (CMRP) is the most highly developed subcategory of organometallic mediated RDRP (OMRP). Attention was paid to CMRP for its unusual high efficiency observed for the control of acrylate and vinyl acetate polymerization that produced homo- and block copolymers with narrow molecular weight distribution and a predictable molecular weight. The reactions of organic radicals with cobalt(II) metallo-radicals and organo-cobalt(III) complexes have a central role in the pathways that mediate this type of reversible deactivation radical polymerization. The reversible deactivation pathway dominates the polymerization when cobalt(II) complexes can reversibly deactivate the radicals to form organo-cobalt(III) complexes. Degenerative transfer becomes the major pathway when the cobalt(II) species fully convert to organo-cobalt(III) complexes and the radicals in solution rapidly exchange with radicals in organo-cobalt(III) complexes. This review describes the polymerization behavior and control mechanisms used by cobalt complexes in the mediation of reversible deactivation radical polymerization. The emerging developments for CMRP in the aqueous phase and with photo-initiation are also described, followed by the challenges and future applications of this method.

  10. How do persons with chronic low back pain speed up and slow down? Trunk-pelvis coordination and lumbar erector spinae activity during gait.

    PubMed

    Lamoth, Claudine J C; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Meijer, Onno G; Beek, Peter J

    2006-02-01

    In healthy walking, the timing between trunk and pelvic rotations, as well as erector spinae (ES) activity varies systematically with walking velocity, whereas a comparable velocity-dependent adaptation of trunk-pelvis coordination is often reduced or absent in persons with low back pain (LBP). Based on the hypothesis that trunk-pelvis coordination is linked to overall gait stability, persons with LBP can be expected to have difficulties in dealing with perturbations. We examined the ability of 12 persons with LBP and 12 controls to adapt trunk and pelvis rotations and ES activity to sudden changes in velocity. 3D angular movements of thoracic, lumbar, and pelvic segments and surface EMG were recorded during treadmill walking at six different velocities, which increased or decreased unexpectedly. Relative phases of segmental rotations were determined and (in-)variant properties of kinematics and ES activity were studied using principal component analysis. Compared to healthy controls, persons with LBP exhibited a reduced ability to adapt trunk-pelvis coordination and ES muscle activity to changes in velocity. Altered coordination and muscular control may reflect an attempt to stabilise the spine and prevent the occurrence of unexpected perturbations. The assessment of gait patterns in terms of coordination may help clinicians to quantify movement impairments and may suggest interventions aimed at facilitating the emergence of desired coordination patterns.

  11. Rural Growth Slows Down.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Mark; And Others

    1987-01-01

    After decade of growth, rural income, population, and overall economic activity have stalled and again lag behind urban trends. Causes include banking and transportation deregulation, international competition, agricultural finance problems. Only nonmetropolitan counties dependent on retirement, government, and trade show continuing income growth…

  12. Solvent effects on the ultrafast nonradiative deactivation mechanisms of thymine in aqueous solution: Excited-state QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Akira Arai, Gaku; Yamazaki, Shohei; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2013-12-07

    On-the-fly excited-state quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (QM/MM-MD) simulations of thymine in aqueous solution are performed to investigate the role of solvent water molecules on the nonradiative deactivation process. The complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) method is employed for a thymine molecule as the QM part in order to provide a reliable description of the excited-state potential energies. It is found that, in addition to the previously reported deactivation pathway involving the twisting of the C-C double bond in the pyrimidine ring, another efficient deactivation pathway leading to conical intersections that accompanies the out-of-plane displacement of the carbonyl group is observed in aqueous solution. Decay through this pathway is not observed in the gas phase simulations, and our analysis indicates that the hydrogen bonds with solvent water molecules play a key role in stabilizing the potential energies of thymine in this additional decay pathway.

  13. AGS slow extracted beam improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Marneris, I.; Danowski, G.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.

    1997-07-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is a strong focusing accelerator which is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to an equivalent proton energy of 29 GeV. Since the late 1960`s it has been serving high energy physics (HEP - proton beam) users of both slow and fast extracted beams. The AGS fixed target program presently uses primary proton and heavy ion beams (HIP) in slowly extracted fashion over spill lengths of 1.5 to 4.0 seconds. Extraction is accomplished by flattoping the main and extraction magnets and exciting a third integer resonance in the AGS. Over the long spill times, control of the subharmonic amplitude components up to a frequency of 1 kilohertz is very crucial. One of the most critical contributions to spill modulation is due to the AGS MMPS. An active filter was developed to reduce these frequencies and it`s operation is described in a previous paper. However there are still frequency components in the 60-720 Hz sub-harmonic ripple range, modulating the spill structure due to extraction power supplies and any remaining structures on the AGS MMPS. A recent scheme is being developed to use the existing tune-trim control horizontal quadrupole magnets and power supply to further reduce these troublesome noise sources. Feedback from an external beam sensor and overcoming the limitations of the quadrupole system by lead/lag compensation techniques will be described.

  14. Activation of D2 autoreceptors alters cocaine-induced locomotion and slows down local field oscillations in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Koulchitsky, Stanislav; Delairesse, Charlotte; Beeken, Thom; Monteforte, Alexandre; Dethier, Julie; Quertemont, Etienne; Findeisen, Rolf; Bullinger, Eric; Seutin, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Psychoactive substances affecting the dopaminergic system induce locomotor activation and, in high doses, stereotypies. Network mechanisms underlying the shift from an active goal-directed behavior to a "seemingly purposeless" stereotypic locomotion remain unclear. In the present study we sought to determine the relationships between the behavioral effects of dopaminergic drugs and their effects on local field potentials (LFPs), which were telemetrically recorded within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of freely moving rats. We used the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole in a low, autoreceptor-selective (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) and in a high (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) dose, and a moderate dose of cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). In the control group, power spectrum analysis revealed a prominent peak of LFP power in the theta frequency range during active exploration. Cocaine alone stimulated locomotion, but had no significant effect on the peak of the LFP power. In contrast, co-administration of low dose quinpirole with cocaine markedly altered the pattern of locomotion, from goal-directed exploratory behavior to recurrent motion resembling locomotor stereotypy. This behavioral effect was accompanied by a shift of the dominant theta power toward a significantly lower (by ∼15%) frequency. High dose quinpirole also provoked an increased locomotor activity with signs of behavioral stereotypies, and also induced a shift of the dominant oscillation frequency toward the lower range. These results demonstrate a correlation between the LFP oscillation frequency within the VTA and a qualitative aspect of locomotor behavior, perhaps due to a variable level of coherence of this region with its input or output areas.

  15. Sodium ions, acting at high-affinity extracellular sites, inhibit sodium-ATPase activity of the sodium pump by slowing dephosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Beaugé, L A; Glynn, I M

    1979-01-01

    1. It is known that extracellular Na+ ions, in low concentrations, inhibit Na+-ATPase activity in resealed red cell ghosts and that this inhibition is reversed by high concentrations of extracellular Na+. We have attempted to elucidate these actions of extracellular Na+ by investigating the dependence on Na+ concentration of (a) ATP-ADP exchange and Na+-ATPase activity both in native and in N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-treated (Na+ + K+)-ATPase from pig kidney, and (b) the rate of hydrolysis of the phosphorylated kidney enzyme in the absence of K+ ions. 2. With the native enzyme, ATP-ADP exchange and Na+-ATPase activity showed similar responses to changes in Na+ concentration: a steep but S-shaped rise between 0 and 2.5 mM, a slight fall (exchange) or a plateau (ATPase) between 2.5 and 10 mM, and a roughly linear rise between 10 and 150 mM. With NEM-treated enzyme, the ATP-ADP exchange, which was greatly accelerated, showed no sign either of inhibition at intermediate Na+ concentrations or of the reversal of that inhibition at higher concentrations. The exchange rate increased with Na+ concentration in a smooth curve and was half-maximal at about 7 mM. 3. The effects, on ATP-ADP exchange, of changing the concentrations of ATP, ADP and Mg have also been investigated. With both native and NEM-treated enzyme, the interactions of ATP, ADP and Mg are complicated; they show that, for the reaction leading to ATP formation, either free ADP rather than MgADP is the substrate, or Mg2+ ions are inhibitory (or both). 4. Since NEM, in the conditions in which we have used it, is believed to act by inhibiting the conversion of an ADP-sensitive form of the phosphoenzyme (E1P) to an ADP-insensitive form (E2P), the absence of Na+ inhibition of ATP-ADP exchange in NEM-treated enzyme, together with the parallel effects of Na+ ions on the ATP-ADP exchange activity and on the Na+-ATPase activity of native enzyme, suggests that the inhibitory effect of external Na+ occurs after the conversion

  16. Deactivation mechanisms for Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} acetylene hydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.B.; Huggins, B.J.; Meyers, B.L.; Kaminsky, M.P.

    1994-12-31

    The selective hydrogenation of acetylenic impurities to ethylene is a crucial purification step in the production of olefins by steam cracking. This hydrogenation is done catalytically using a Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in a fixed bed reactor. The designed lifetime of the catalyst in a front end acetylene converter is about 4 years. Accelerated catalyst deactivation and thermal runaways caused by loss in catalyst selectivity are common problems which plague acetylene converters. Such problems result in unscheduled shutdowns and increased costs to replace deactivated catalyst. This presentation outlines several deactivation mechanisms of the catalyst and discusses how they affect catalyst lifetime and performance. Catalyst characterization using electron microscopy and CO chemisorption provides information on how poisons deteriorate the catalyst and Pd particle size changes produced by use and regeneration. Thermal gravimetric analysis was also used to determine the extent of coke burn-off using less severe regeneration procedures.

  17. Highly controlled nest homeostasis of honey bees helps deactivate phenolics in nectar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fanglin; He, Jianzhong; Fu, Wenjun

    2005-06-01

    Honey bees have a highly developed nest homeostasis, for example, maintaining low CO2 levels and stable nest temperatures at 35°C.We investigate the role of nest homeostasis in deactivating phenolic compounds present in the nectar of Aloe littoralis. We show that the phenolic content in nectar was reduced (from 0.65% to 0.49%) after nectar was incubated in a nest of Apis cerana, and that it was reduced still more (from 0.65% to 0.37%) if nectar was mixed with hypopharyngeal gland proteins (HGP) of worker bees before being placed inside a nest. HGP had little effect on samples outside a nest, indicating that nest conditions are necessary for HGP to deactivate phenolics in nectar. Consequently, the highly controlled nest homeostasis of honey bees facilitates direct deactivation of phenolics in nectar, and plays a role in the action of HGP as well.

  18. SLOW THROMBIN IS ZYMOGEN-LIKE

    PubMed Central

    Huntington, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Blood coagulation is the result of a cascade of zymogen activation events, however, its initiation is allosteric. Factor VIIa circulates in a zymogen-like state and is allosterically activated by binding to tissue factor. Thrombin, the final protease generated in the blood coagulation cascade, has also been shown to exist in a low activity state in the absence of cofactors, and the structural features of this ‘slow’ form has been studied for many years. In this manuscript I will review the general features that render zymogens inactive and how proteolytic cleavage results in activation, but I will also show how this distinction is blurred by zymogens that have activity (protease-like zymogens) and proteases with low activity (zymogen-like proteases). This will then be applied in the analysis of slow thrombin to reveal how allosteric activation of thrombin simply reflects the conversion from a zymogen-like enzyme to an active serine protease. PMID:19630791

  19. Unilateral deactivation of macaque dorsolateral prefrontal cortex induces biases in stimulus selection.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Kevin; Lomber, Stephen G; Everling, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Following unilateral brain injury, patients are often unable to detect a stimulus presented in the contralesional field when another is presented simultaneously ipsilesionally. This phenomenon has been referred to as extinction and has been conceptualized as a deficit in selective attention. Although most commonly observed following damage to posterior parietal areas, extinction has been observed following lesions of prefrontal cortex (PFC) in both humans and nonhuman primates. To date, most studies in nonhuman primates have examined lesions of multiple PFC subregions, including the frontal eye fields (FEF). Theoretical accounts of attentional disturbances from human patients, however, also implicate other PFC areas, including the middle frontal gyrus. Here, we investigated the effects of deactivating PFC areas anterior to the FEF on stimulus selection using a free-choice task. Macaque monkeys were presented with two peripheral stimuli appearing either simultaneously, or at varying stimulus onset asynchronies, and their performance was evaluated during unilateral cryogenic deactivation of part of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or the cortex lining the caudal principal sulcus, the likely homologue of the human middle frontal gyrus. A decreased proportion of saccades was made to stimuli presented in the hemifield contralateral to the deactivated PFC. We also observed increases in reaction times to contralateral stimuli and decreases for stimuli presented in the hemifield ipsilateral to the deactivated hemisphere. In both cases, these results were greatest when both PFC subregions were deactivated. These findings demonstrate that selection biases result from PFC deactivation and support a role of dorsolateral prefrontal subregions anterior to FEF in stimulus selection. PMID:26792881

  20. Cigarette smoke induces molecular responses in respiratory tissues of ApoE(-/-) mice that are progressively deactivated upon cessation.

    PubMed

    Boué, Stéphanie; De León, Héctor; Schlage, Walter K; Peck, Michael J; Weiler, Horst; Berges, An; Vuillaume, Grégory; Martin, Florian; Friedrichs, Baerbel; Lebrun, Stefan; Meurrens, Kris; Schracke, Nadine; Moehring, Michaela; Steffen, Yvonne; Schueller, Jutta; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is the primary etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a risk factor for both lung and cardiovascular (CV) diseases, which are rarely investigated concomitantly. Although smoking cessation shows clear CV risk benefit, lung-related disease risk remains higher in former smokers than in never smokers. We sought to determine the differential molecular responses of murine respiratory tissues to better understand the toxicity pathways involved in smoking-related disease risk and those related to the benefits of smoking cessation. ApoE(-/-) mice were exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke (CS) or a smoking cessation-mimicking protocol for up to 6 months and transcriptomics analysis of nasal epithelium and lung parenchyma performed. We supported our gene expression profiling approach with standard lung histopathology and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analysis. Many BALF analytes involved in functions ranging from inflammation to cell proliferation and tissue remodeling were found elevated in BALF. Gene expression levels of these molecules were also increased in lung tissue, suggesting that the inflammatory response was the result of local tissue activation and the contribution of recruited inflammatory cells. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of expression data from murine lungs and nasal epithelium showed distinct activation patterns of inflammation, complement, and xenobiotic metabolism pathways during CS exposure that were deactivated upon smoking cessation. Pathways involved in cell proliferation and tissue remodeling were activated by CS and progressively deactivated upon smoke exposure cessation. Differential CS-mediated responses of pulmonary and nasal tissues reflect common mechanisms but also the varying degrees of epithelial functional specialization and exposure along the respiratory tract. PMID:24096154

  1. Slow motion increases perceived intent.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eugene M; Burns, Zachary C; Converse, Benjamin A

    2016-08-16

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor's intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in "slow motion." Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception.

  2. Slow motion increases perceived intent

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Eugene M.; Burns, Zachary C.; Converse, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor’s intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in “slow motion.” Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  3. Slow motion increases perceived intent.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eugene M; Burns, Zachary C; Converse, Benjamin A

    2016-08-16

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor's intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in "slow motion." Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  4. Paleoseismic activity at the southern termination of Alhama de Murcia fault (Southeastern Betics, Spain): geomporphic and trenching evidence along a slow moving fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortuño, M. C.; Masana, E.; Buylaert, J. P.; Canora, C.; Cunha, P.; García-Meléndez, E.; Martínez-Díaz, J.; Murrey, A.; Sohbati, R.; Štěpančíková, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Alhama de Murcia fault (FAM) is part of the Eastern Betics Shear Zone (EBSZ), one of the most seismically active regions of the Iberian Peninsula. The fault, of NE-SW strike, is prominent along an almost 100 km trace and constitutes the geomorphologic southeastern boundary between a train of ranges situated in the NW block (Eg. Las Estancias and La Tercia ranges) and the Plioquaternary basins in the SE block (Eg. Huercal-Overa and Guadalentin-Segura basins). Its activity as a senestral strike-slip fault with local reverse component has been well documented in its central and north-eastern segments in previous works. In this study, we have focused on its south-western termination, that has a special interest for the risk assessment since no historical damaging earthquake has been associated to it. At this part, the FAM has generated a splay-like structure composed of three main branches referred as septentrional, medium and meridional tips. Owing to a more E-W orientation of this fault arrangement compared to the northernmost segment, the faults are expected to have a greater reverse component. This assumption is corroborated by the geomorphological and geological survey, which has shown that the area is compartmentalized in tectonic highs that result from the folding and faulting of Plioquaternary units. The paleosismological survey and OSL dating of sediments in 5 trenches along the medium and meridional fault branches have permitted to better understand the most recent tectonic activity of the area: Alluvial fans draining from Las Estancias range have been blocked, strongly folded and faulted repeatedly in a complex manner during the Middle-Late Pliestocene. The occurrence of, at least, two paleoearthquakes during the last 150 ka has been recognized in each of the trenches, and a third event, in one of them. The structures observed suggest that the strike-slip component decreases gradually towards the western end, while the vertical component increases. A ~ 0

  5. Deactivation of 6-Aminocoumarin Intramolecular Charge Transfer Excited State through Hydrogen Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Krystkowiak, Ewa; Dobek, Krzysztof; Maciejewski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of the spectral (absorption and emission) and photophysical study of 6-aminocoumarin (6AC) in various aprotic hydrogen-bond forming solvents. It was established that solvent polarity as well as hydrogen-bonding ability influence solute properties. The hydrogen-bonding interactions between S1-electronic excited solute and solvent molecules were found to facilitate the nonradiative deactivation processes. The energy-gap dependence on radiationless deactivation in aprotic solvents was found to be similar to that in protic solvents. PMID:25244014

  6. Beyond catalyst deactivation: cross-metathesis involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics

    PubMed Central

    Lafaye, Kevin; Bosset, Cyril; Nicolas, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Alkenes containing N-heteroaromatics are known to be poor partners in cross-metathesis reactions, probably due to catalyst deactivation caused by the presence of a nitrogen atom. However, some examples of ring-closing and cross-metathesis involving alkenes that incorporate N-heteroaromatics can be found in the literature. In addition, recent mechanistic studies have focused on the rationalization of nitrogen-induced catalysts deactivation. The purpose of this mini-review is to give a brief overview of successful metathesis reactions involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics in order to delineate some guidelines for the use of these challenging substrates in metathesis reactions. PMID:26664645

  7. Beyond catalyst deactivation: cross-metathesis involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics.

    PubMed

    Lafaye, Kevin; Bosset, Cyril; Nicolas, Lionel; Guérinot, Amandine; Cossy, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Alkenes containing N-heteroaromatics are known to be poor partners in cross-metathesis reactions, probably due to catalyst deactivation caused by the presence of a nitrogen atom. However, some examples of ring-closing and cross-metathesis involving alkenes that incorporate N-heteroaromatics can be found in the literature. In addition, recent mechanistic studies have focused on the rationalization of nitrogen-induced catalysts deactivation. The purpose of this mini-review is to give a brief overview of successful metathesis reactions involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics in order to delineate some guidelines for the use of these challenging substrates in metathesis reactions.

  8. Beyond catalyst deactivation: cross-metathesis involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics.

    PubMed

    Lafaye, Kevin; Bosset, Cyril; Nicolas, Lionel; Guérinot, Amandine; Cossy, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Alkenes containing N-heteroaromatics are known to be poor partners in cross-metathesis reactions, probably due to catalyst deactivation caused by the presence of a nitrogen atom. However, some examples of ring-closing and cross-metathesis involving alkenes that incorporate N-heteroaromatics can be found in the literature. In addition, recent mechanistic studies have focused on the rationalization of nitrogen-induced catalysts deactivation. The purpose of this mini-review is to give a brief overview of successful metathesis reactions involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics in order to delineate some guidelines for the use of these challenging substrates in metathesis reactions. PMID:26664645

  9. Stable transmission of slow highly charged ions through tapered glass capillary with active discharging method for sub-micron sized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kojima, Takao M.; Natsume, Yoshio; Kimura, Jun; Abe, Tomoko

    2016-09-01

    Stable transmission of a sub-μm-sized Ar8+ beam of 64-104-keV energy through glass tandem optics was achieved. The optics consisted of a 4-electrode tapered capillary and a sub-μm-sized tapered capillary tip, arranged in series. To actively discharge the capillary, and thus obtain stable transmission, an electrode was applied with a mechanical relay closing at a 0.01-0.1 Hz frequency. Transmitted beams were observed for tip outlets' diameters of 0.75 and 2.0 μm. When only a 4-electrode capillary was used, a beam density enhancement with a multiplicity of 14 times of the input beam density was achieved. A transmission efficiency up to 70% was observed with good reproducibility when the electrodes were biased with appropriate voltages.

  10. Methane reforming reaction with carbon dioxide over Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalyst. I. Deactivation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, V.C.H.; Swaan, H.M.; Microdatos, C.

    1996-06-01

    The deactivation of Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts under the conditions of carbon dioxide reforming of methane was studied as a function of different operating parameters. Several techniques have been used: temperature programmed hydrogenation, magnetic measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. It was shown that, whatever the pretreatment, nickel carbide constituted the active phase for this reaction, being established in the very initial period of operation. The reaction mixture was found to be able to reduce the nickel phase on stream. The two major aging factors, namely nickel sintering and carbon deposition, were shown to be strongly related to the pretreated conditions. A model is proposed to explain the influence of the analyzed operating parameters on the nature of the coke formation and on the changes in morphology of the nickel particles. Optimal operating conditions for the above catalyst for CO{sub 2} reforming are defined. 29 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Single-Molecule Nanocatalysis Shows In Situ Deactivation of Pt/C Electrocatalysts during the Hydrogen-Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Chen, Tao; Alia, Shaun; Pivovar, Bryan S; Xu, Weilin

    2016-02-24

    By coupling a Pt-catalyzed fluorogenic reaction with the Pt-electrocatalyzed hydrogen-oxidation reaction (HOR), we combine single-molecule fluorescence microscopy with traditional electrochemical methods to study the real-time deactivation kinetics of a Pt/C electrocatalyst at single-particle level during electrocatalytic hydrogen-oxidation reaction. The decay of the catalytic performance of Pt/C could be mainly attributed to the electrocatalysis-induced etching or dissolution of Pt nanoparticles. Spontaneous regeneration of activity and incubation period of the Pt electrocatalyst were also observed at single-particle level. All these new insights are practically useful for the understanding and rational design of highly efficient electrocatalysts for application in fuel cells. PMID:26821777

  12. Global intracellular slow-wave dynamics of the thalamocortical system.

    PubMed

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-06-25

    It is widely accepted that corticothalamic neurons recruit the thalamus in slow oscillation, but global slow-wave thalamocortical dynamics have never been experimentally shown. We analyzed intracellular activities of neurons either from different cortical areas or from a variety of specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei in relation to the phase of global EEG signal in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found that, on average, slow-wave active states started off within frontal cortical areas as well as higher-order and intralaminar thalamus (posterior and parafascicular nuclei) simultaneously. Then, the leading edge of active states propagated in the anteroposterior/lateral direction over the cortex at ∼40 mm/s. The latest structure we recorded within the slow-wave cycle was the anterior thalamus, which followed active states of the retrosplenial cortex. Active states from different cortical areas tended to terminate simultaneously. Sensory thalamic ventral posterior medial and lateral geniculate nuclei followed cortical active states with major inhibitory and weak tonic-like "modulator" EPSPs. In these nuclei, sharp-rising, large-amplitude EPSPs ("drivers") were not modulated by cortical slow waves, suggesting their origin in ascending pathways. The thalamic active states in other investigated nuclei were composed of depolarization: some revealing "driver"- and "modulator"-like EPSPs, others showing "modulator"-like EPSPs only. We conclude that sensory thalamic nuclei follow the propagating cortical waves, whereas neurons from higher-order thalamic nuclei display "hub dynamics" and thus may contribute to the generation of cortical slow waves.

  13. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences

    PubMed Central

    Bellesi, Michele; Riedner, Brady A.; Garcia-Molina, Gary N.; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity (SWA), is invariably associated with slower electroencephalogram (EEG) activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals or lightening of sleep could have significant practical implications. Here we first review the evidence that it is possible to enhance sleep slow waves in humans using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Since these methods are currently impractical and their safety is questionable, especially for chronic long-term exposure, we then discuss novel data suggesting that it is possible to enhance slow waves using sensory stimuli. We consider the physiology of the K-complex (KC), a peripheral evoked slow wave, and show that, among different sensory modalities, acoustic stimulation is the most effective in increasing the magnitude of slow waves, likely through the activation of non-lemniscal ascending pathways to the thalamo-cortical system. In addition, we discuss how intensity and frequency of the acoustic stimuli, as well as exact timing and pattern of stimulation, affect sleep enhancement. Finally, we discuss automated algorithms that read the EEG and, in real-time, adjust the stimulation parameters in a closed-loop manner to obtain an increase in sleep slow waves and avoid undesirable arousals. In conclusion, while discussing the mechanisms that underlie the generation of sleep slow waves, we review the converging evidence showing that acoustic stimulation is safe and represents an ideal tool for slow wave sleep (SWS) enhancement. PMID:25389394

  14. Slow earthquakes, preseismic velocity changes, and the origin of slow frictional stick-slip.

    PubMed

    Kaproth, Bryan M; Marone, C

    2013-09-13

    Earthquakes normally occur as frictional stick-slip instabilities, resulting in catastrophic failure and seismic rupture. Tectonic faults also fail in slow earthquakes with rupture durations of months or more, yet their origin is poorly understood. Here, we present laboratory observations of repetitive, slow stick-slip in serpentinite fault zones and mechanical evidence for their origin. We document a transition from unstable to stable frictional behavior with increasing slip velocity, providing a mechanism to limit the speed of slow earthquakes. We also document reduction of P-wave speed within the active shear zone before stick-slip events. If similar mechanisms operate in nature, our results suggest that higher-resolution studies of elastic properties in tectonic fault zones may aid in the search for reliable earthquake precursors.

  15. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-02-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not completely understood. We show that slow rupture is an intrinsic and robust property of simple non-monotonic rate-and-state friction laws. It is associated with a new velocity scale cmin, determined by the friction law, below which steady state rupture cannot propagate. We further show that rupture can occur in a continuum of states, spanning a wide range of velocities from cmin to elastic wave-speeds, and predict different properties for slow rupture and ordinary fast rupture. Our results are qualitatively consistent with recent high-resolution laboratory experiments and may provide a theoretical framework for understanding slow rupture phenomena along frictional interfaces.

  16. Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E.

    2008-01-15

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design

  17. A One Year Study of Mode Deactivation Therapy: Adolescent Residential Patients with Conduct and Personality Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Christopher J.; Siv, Alexander M.

    2007-01-01

    This case study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) implementation in a child and adolescent residential treatment unit and provide preliminary effectiveness data on MDT versus treatment as usual (TAU). This case study compared the efficacy of two treatment methodologies for adolescent males in residential treatment…

  18. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy as a Manualized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Houston, Marsha-Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Family Therapy (MDT) in an outpatient setting as compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU). MDT is an evidence-based psychotherapy and has been shown to be effective treating adolescents with a variety of problems involving emotional disorder, physical and sexual aggression, as well as…

  19. A One Year Study of Mode Deactivation Therapy: Adolescent Residential Patients with Conduct and Personality Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Christopher J.; Siv, Alexander M.

    2011-01-01

    This case study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) implementation in a child and adolescent residential treatment unit and provide preliminary effectiveness data on MDT versus treatment as usual (TAU). This case study compared the efficacy of two treatment methodologies for adolescent males in residential treatment…

  20. CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: CATALYST DEACTIVATION. (R826694C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deactivation of 0.5 wt.% Pt/small gamma, Greek-Al2O3 catalysts during trichloroethylene (TCE)–steam reforming was studied with experiments at 700°C, H

  1. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  2. Understanding the mechanism of DNA deactivation in ion therapy of cancer cells: hydrogen peroxide action*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatnytskyi, Dmytro V.; Zdorevskyi, Oleksiy O.; Perepelytsya, Sergiy M.; Volkov, Sergey N.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the medium of biological cells under ion beam irradiation has been considered as a possible cause of cell function disruption in the living body. The interaction of hydrogen peroxide, a long-lived molecular product of water radiolysis, with active sites of DNA macromolecule was studied, and the formation of stable DNA-peroxide complexes was considered. The phosphate groups of the macromolecule backbone were picked out among the atomic groups of DNA double helix as a probable target for interaction with hydrogen peroxide molecules. Complexes consisting of combinations including: the DNA phosphate group, H2O2 and H2O molecules, and Na+ counterion, were considered. The counterions have been taken into consideration insofar as under the natural conditions they neutralise DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. The energy of the complexes have been determined by considering the electrostatic and the Van der Waals interactions within the framework of atom-atom potential functions. As a result, the stability of various configurations of molecular complexes was estimated. It was shown that DNA phosphate groups and counterions can form stable complexes with hydrogen peroxide molecules, which are as stable as the complexes with water molecules. It has been demonstrated that the formation of stable complexes of H2O2-Na+-PO4- may be detected experimentally by observing specific vibrations in the low-frequency Raman spectra. The interaction of H2O2 molecule with phosphate group of the double helix backbone can disrupt DNA biological function and induce the deactivation of the cell genetic apparatus. Thus, the production of hydrogen peroxide molecules in the nucleus of living cells can be considered as an additional mechanism by which high-energy ion beams destroy tumour cells during ion beam therapy. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene

  3. Excel Automatic Locking Scaffold. Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area. OST Reference #2320

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. To this end, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE’s Office of Science and Technology sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE’s projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased cost of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) LSDDP generated a list of need statements defining specific needs or problems where improved technologies could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. Although not addressed explicitly, the use of scaffolds is needed in several of the listed needs, including characterization, demolition, and asbestos abatement. In these areas, scaffold towers are used to access areas that are not accessible using mechanical methods such as manlifts or mechanical platforms. In addition, the work requires more mobility than what can be achieved using ladders. Because of the wide use of scaffold on D&D projects, a need exists for a safer to use, faster to set up, and overall cheaper scaffold system. This demonstration investigated the feasibility of using the Excel Automatic Locking Scaffold (innovative technology) to access areas where tube and clamp scaffold (baseline) is currently being used on D&D activities. Benefits expected from using the innovative technology include: Decreased exposure to radiation, chemical, and/or physical hazards during scaffold erection and dismantlement; Increased safety; Easier use; Shorten D&D Schedule; Reduced cost of operation; Excel Scaffold is compatible with tube and clamp scaffold. This report

  4. Uniform silicon slow light waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.

    2011-01-01

    An uniform silicon waveguide is proposed featuring ultralow-dispersion slow light. The core of the waveguide consists of one silicon trip and two pairs of air/silicon strip and the cladding is composed of several alternative silicon and air strips, which form a transverse band gap to confine propagating light in the core. The waveguide has several nearly linear photonic bands in a large frequency range, which can support broadband slow modes with a group velocity of 0.03-0.08 c and tolerable group velocity dispersion.

  5. Slow Images and Entangled Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Swordy, Simon

    2007-06-20

    I will discuss some recent experiments using slow light and entangled photons. We recently showed that it was possible to map a two dimensional image onto very low light level signals, slow them down in a hot atomic vapor while preserving the amplitude and phase of the images. If time remains, I will discuss some of our recent work with time-energy entangled photons for quantum cryptography. We were able to show that we could have a measurable state space of over 1000 states for a single pair of entangled photons in fiber.

  6. Slow Crack Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A=1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu, as evidence by consistent fracture toughness on the 100, 110, and 111 planes. Germanium does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n=100). Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.7 MPam and a Weibull modulus of m=6+/-2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, fracture strength should be greater than 30 MPa.

  7. Slow beams of massive molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deachapunya, S.; Fagan, P. J.; Major, A. G.; Reiger, E.; Ritsch, H.; Stefanov, A.; Ulbricht, H.; Arndt, M.

    2008-02-01

    Slow beams of neutral molecules are of great interest for a wide range of applications, from cold chemistry through precision measurements to tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics. We report on the quantitative observation of thermal beams of perfluorinated macromolecules with masses up to 6000 amu, reaching velocities down to 11 m/s. Such slow, heavy and neutral molecular beams are of importance for a new class of experiments in matter-wave interferometry and we also discuss the requirements for further manipulation and cooling schemes with molecules in this unprecedented mass range.

  8. Slow shocks around the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1982-01-01

    It is inferred from this study that magnetohydrodynamic slow shocks can exist in the vicinity of the sun. The study uses a two-hole corona model, the sub-Alfvenic streams originating from the edge of the polar open-field regions are forced to turn towards equator in coronal space following the curved boundary of the closed field region. When the streamlines from the opposite poles merge at a neutral point, their directions become parallel to the neutral sheet. An oblique slow shock can develop near or at the neutral point, the shock extends polewards to form a surface of discontinuity around the sun.

  9. Stochastic dynamics on slow manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, George W. A.; McKane, Alan J.; Rogers, Tim

    2013-07-01

    The theory of slow manifolds is an important tool in the study of deterministic dynamical systems, giving a practical method by which to reduce the number of relevant degrees of freedom in a model, thereby often resulting in a considerable simplification. In this paper we demonstrate how the same basic methodology may also be applied to stochastic dynamical systems, by examining the behaviour of trajectories conditioned on the event that they do not depart the slow manifold. We apply the method to two models: one from ecology and one from epidemiology, achieving a reduction in model dimension and illustrating the high quality of the analytical approximations.

  10. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-15

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The

  11. Failure of hippocampal deactivation during loss events in treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Blair A; Tolomeo, Serenella; Gradin, Victoria; Christmas, David; Matthews, Keith; Steele, J Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Major depressive disorder is characterized by anhedonia, cognitive biases, ruminations, hopelessness and increased anxiety. Blunted responses to rewards have been reported in a number of recent neuroimaging and behavioural studies of major depressive disorder. In contrast, neural responses to aversive events remain an under-studied area. While selective serotonergic reuptake inhibitors are often effective in treating major depressive disorder, their mechanism of action remains unclear. Following a series of animal model investigations of depressive illness and serotonergic function, Deakin and Graeff predicted that brain activity in patients with major depressive disorder is associated with an overactive dorsal raphe nucleus with overactive projections to the amygdala, periaqueductal grey and striatum, and an underactive median raphe nucleus with underactive projections to the hippocampus. Here we describe an instrumental loss-avoidance and win-gain reinforcement learning functional magnetic resonance imaging study with 40 patients with highly treatment-resistant major depressive disorder and never-depressed controls. The dorsal raphe nucleus/ periaqueductal grey region of the midbrain and hippocampus were found to be overactive in major depressive disorder during unsuccessful loss-avoidance although the median raphe nucleus was not found to be underactive. Hippocampal overactivity was due to a failure to deactivate during loss events in comparison to controls, and hippocampal over-activity correlated with depression severity, self-report 'hopelessness' and anxiety. Deakin and Graeff argued that the median raphe nucleus normally acts to inhibit consolidation of aversive memories via the hippocampus and this system is underactive in major depressive disorder, facilitating the development of ruminations, while the dorsal raphe nucleus system is engaged by distal cues predictive of threats and is overactive in major depressive disorder. During win events the striatum

  12. Down but not out in posterior cingulate cortex: Deactivation yet functional coupling with prefrontal cortex during demanding semantic cognition.

    PubMed

    Krieger-Redwood, Katya; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Karapanagiotidis, Theodoros; Seymour, Robert; Nunes, Adonany; Ang, Jit Wei Aaron; Majernikova, Vierra; Mollo, Giovanna; Smallwood, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    The posterior cingulate cortex (pCC) often deactivates during complex tasks, and at rest is often only weakly correlated with regions that play a general role in the control of cognition. These observations led to the hypothesis that pCC contributes to automatic aspects of memory retrieval and cognition. Recent work, however, has suggested that the pCC may support both automatic and controlled forms of memory processing and may do so by changing its communication with regions that are important in the control of cognition across multiple domains. The current study examined these alternative views by characterising the functional coupling of the pCC in easy semantic decisions (based on strong global associations) and in harder semantic tasks (matching words on the basis of specific non-dominant features). Increasingly difficult semantic decisions led to the expected pattern of deactivation in the pCC; however, psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed that, under these conditions, the pCC exhibited greater connectivity with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), relative to both easier semantic decisions and to a period of rest. In a second experiment using different participants, we found that functional coupling at rest between the pCC and the same region of dorsolateral PFC was stronger for participants who were more efficient at semantic tasks when assessed in a subsequent laboratory session. Thus, although overall levels of activity in the pCC are reduced during external tasks, this region may show greater coupling with executive control regions when information is retrieved from memory in a goal-directed manner. PMID:27485753

  13. Critical Curriculum Theory and Slow Ecopedagogical Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Enacting a critical environmental education curriculum theory with 8- to 9-year-old children in 1978 is now "restoried" in a "history of the present/future" like "case study" for prosecuting five interrelated problems confronting progress in environmental education and its research. They are: the intense heat of the…

  14. Reading and the Slow Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Advocates of high standards and expectations usually believe that gaps in reading achievement can be eliminated with good teaching, but slow readers need a specially designed reading curriculum. The teacher first needs to use an informal reading inventory to determine the student's reading level. Functioning generally on a higher level than…

  15. Fast wandering of slow birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, John

    2011-12-01

    I study a single slow bird moving with a flock of birds of a different and faster (or slower) species. I find that every species of flocker has a characteristic speed γ≠v0, where v0 is the mean speed of the flock such that if the speed vs of the slow bird equals γ, it will randomly wander transverse to the mean direction of flock motion far faster than the other birds will: Its mean-squared transverse displacement will grow in d=2 with time t like t5/3, in contrast to t4/3 for the other birds. In d=3, the slow bird's mean-squared transverse displacement grows like t5/4, in contrast to t for the other birds. If vs≠γ, the mean-squared displacement of the slow bird crosses over from t5/3 to t4/3 scaling in d=2 and from t5/4 to t scaling in d=3 at a time tc that scales according to tc∝|vs-γ|-2.

  16. IN SITU Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fossil Energy Research

    2008-03-31

    SCR catalyst management has become an important operations and maintenance activity for coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. To facilitate this activity, a method to determine Catalyst Activity in situ is being developed. This report describes the methodology and presents the results of a two ozone season demonstration conducted at Alabama Power Company's Gorgas Unit 10 during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons. The results showed that the in situ measurements are in good agreement with the laboratory measurements and the technique has some advantages over the traditional laboratory method of determining Catalyst Activity and Reactor Potential. SCR Performance is determined by the overall Reactor Potential (the product of the Catalyst Activity and the available surface area per unit of flue gas). The in situ approach provides a direct measurement of Reactor Potential under actual operating conditions, whereas laboratory measurements of Catalyst Activity need to be coupled with estimates of catalyst pluggage and flue gas flowrate in order to assess Reactor Potential. The project also showed that the in situ activity results can easily be integrated into catalyst management software to aid in making informed catalyst decisions.

  17. Magnesium oxide prepared via metal-chitosan complexation method: Application as catalyst for transesterification of soybean oil and catalyst deactivation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almerindo, Gizelle I.; Probst, Luiz F. D.; Campos, Carlos E. M.; de Almeida, Rusiene M.; Meneghetti, Simoni M. P.; Meneghetti, Mario R.; Clacens, Jean-Marc; Fajardo, Humberto V.

    2011-10-01

    A simple method to prepare magnesium oxide catalysts for biodiesel production by transesterification reaction of soybean oil with ethanol is proposed. The method was developed using a metal-chitosan complex. Compared to the commercial oxide, the proposed catalysts displayed higher surface area and basicity values, leading to higher yield in terms of fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel). The deactivation of the catalyst due to contact with CO2 and H2O present in the ambient air was verified. It was confirmed that the active catalytic site is a hydrogenocarbonate adsorption site.

  18. The Role of Phosphorus and Soot on the Deactivation of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Scott J; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G; Toops, Todd J

    2009-01-01

    The deactivation of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) by soot contamination and lube-oil derived phosphorus poisoning is investigated. Pt/CeO2/-Al2O3 DOCs aged using three different protocols developed by the authors and six high mileage field-returned DOCs of similar formulation are evaluated for THC and CO oxidation performance using a bench-flow reactor. Collectively, these catalysts exhibit a variety of phosphorus and soot morphologies contributing to performance deactivation. To isolate and examine the contribution of each deactivation mechanism, performance evaluations are carried out for each DOC ''as received'' and after removal of surface carbon in a high-temperature oxidizing environment. In such a manner the deactivation contribution of soot contamination is de-convoluted from that of phosphorus poisoning. It will be shown that this is accomplished while preserving phosphorus (and to a lesser degree sulfur, calcium and zinc) chemistries and concentrations within the washcoat. Washcoat contaminant information and materials changes are characterized using electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), BET surface area, oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, from which the relative severity of each mechanism can be quantified. Results show that soot contamination from diesel exhaust severely degrades THC and CO oxidation performance by acting as a catalyst surface diffusion barrier. This results in a considerable increase of light-off temperatures. In contrast, phosphorus poisoning, which is considered a significant deactivation mechanism in three-way catalysts, is shown to have minimal effect on DOC oxidation performance for the conditions studied here. Material changes include the formation of both Ce(III-IV) and aluminum phosphates which do not significantly hinder the THC and CO oxidation in lean

  19. Slow slip event at Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta; Wilson, J. David; Okubo, Paul G.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Segall, Paul; Brooks, Benjamin; Foster, James; Wolfe, Cecily; Syracuse, Ellen; Thurbe, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    Early in the morning of 1 February 2010 (UTC; early afternoon 31 January 2010 local time), continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) and tilt instruments detected a slow slip event (SSE) on the south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The SSE lasted at least 36 hours and resulted in a maximum of about 3 centimeters of seaward displacement. About 10 hours after the start of the slip, a flurry of small earthquakes began (Figure 1) in an area of the south flank recognized as having been seismically active during past SSEs [Wolfe et al., 2007], suggesting that the February earthquakes were triggered by stress associated with slip [Segall et al., 2006].

  20. Porphyrin Induced Laser Deactivation of Trypsinogen-Trypsin Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perido, Joanna; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by the inflammation of the pancreas, where the digestive enzyme trypsin is activated from the precursor enzyme trypsinogen while still in the pancreas. The presence of trypsin in the pancreas causes auto-activation of trypsinogen, resulting in greater inflammation and auto-digestion of the pancreas. In severe cases, this cascade effect can lead to organ failure, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer. Our hypothesis is that if trypsinogen is prevented from auto-activating into trypsin, then this cascade can be stopped. We propose to do this by inducing conformational changes in trypsinogen when bound to a photoactive porphyrin dye. Porphyrins are comprised of four linked heterocyclic groups forming a flat ring, and bind well with proteins such as trypsinogen. In this study we used spectroscopic techniques to probe the binding of meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatephenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) to trypsinogen in vitro, as a preliminary step to then prompt and characterize conformational changes of trypsinogen through irradiation. If conformational changes are detected the trypsinogen will be tested for trypsin inactivation. This investigation may provide promising initial results to the possible use of porphyrins as an inhibitor of the self-activation of trypsinogen into trypsin, and a potential inhibitor of pancreatitis. MARC*U-STAR.

  1. Slow-roll thawing quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi

    2009-04-15

    We derive slow-roll conditions for thawing quintessence. We solve the equation of motion of {phi} for a Taylor expanded potential (up to the quadratic order) in the limit where the equation of state w is close to -1 to derive the equation of state as a function of the scale factor. We find that the evolution of {phi} and hence w are described by only two parameters. The expression for w(a), which can be applied to general thawing models, coincides precisely with that derived recently by Dutta and Scherrer for hilltop quintessence. The consistency conditions of |w+1|<<1 are derived. The slow-roll conditions for freezing quintessence are also derived.

  2. Competing reaction processes on a lattice as a paradigm for catalyst deactivation.

    PubMed

    Abad, E; Kozak, J J

    2015-02-01

    We mobilize both a generating function approach and the theory of finite Markov processes to compute the probability of irreversible absorption of a randomly diffusing species on a lattice with competing reaction centers. We consider an N-site lattice populated by a single deep trap, and N-1 partially absorbing traps (absorption probability 0deactivation processes on planar surfaces and on catalyst pellets where only a single catalytic site remains fully active (deep trap), the other sites being only partially active as a result of surface poisoning. The central result of our study is that the predicted dependence of the reaction efficiency on system size N and on s is in qualitative accord with previously reported experimental results, notably catalysts exhibiting selective poisoning due to surface sites that have different affinities for chemisorption of the poisoning agent (e.g., acid zeolite catalysts). Deviations from the efficiency of a catalyst with identical sites are quantified, and we find that such deviations display a significant dependence on the topological details of the surface (for fixed values of N and s we find markedly different results for, say, a planar surface and for the polyhedral surface of a catalyst pellet). Our results highlight the importance of surface topology for the efficiency of catalytic conversion processes on inhomogeneous substrates, and in particular for those aimed at industrial applications. From our exact analysis we extract results for the two limiting cases s≈1

  3. Competing reaction processes on a lattice as a paradigm for catalyst deactivation.

    PubMed

    Abad, E; Kozak, J J

    2015-02-01

    We mobilize both a generating function approach and the theory of finite Markov processes to compute the probability of irreversible absorption of a randomly diffusing species on a lattice with competing reaction centers. We consider an N-site lattice populated by a single deep trap, and N-1 partially absorbing traps (absorption probability 0deactivation processes on planar surfaces and on catalyst pellets where only a single catalytic site remains fully active (deep trap), the other sites being only partially active as a result of surface poisoning. The central result of our study is that the predicted dependence of the reaction efficiency on system size N and on s is in qualitative accord with previously reported experimental results, notably catalysts exhibiting selective poisoning due to surface sites that have different affinities for chemisorption of the poisoning agent (e.g., acid zeolite catalysts). Deviations from the efficiency of a catalyst with identical sites are quantified, and we find that such deviations display a significant dependence on the topological details of the surface (for fixed values of N and s we find markedly different results for, say, a planar surface and for the polyhedral surface of a catalyst pellet). Our results highlight the importance of surface topology for the efficiency of catalytic conversion processes on inhomogeneous substrates, and in particular for those aimed at industrial applications. From our exact analysis we extract results for the two limiting cases s≈1

  4. Competing reaction processes on a lattice as a paradigm for catalyst deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, E.; Kozak, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    We mobilize both a generating function approach and the theory of finite Markov processes to compute the probability of irreversible absorption of a randomly diffusing species on a lattice with competing reaction centers. We consider an N-site lattice populated by a single deep trap, and N -1 partially absorbing traps (absorption probability 0 deactivation processes on planar surfaces and on catalyst pellets where only a single catalytic site remains fully active (deep trap), the other sites being only partially active as a result of surface poisoning. The central result of our study is that the predicted dependence of the reaction efficiency on system size N and on s is in qualitative accord with previously reported experimental results, notably catalysts exhibiting selective poisoning due to surface sites that have different affinities for chemisorption of the poisoning agent (e.g., acid zeolite catalysts). Deviations from the efficiency of a catalyst with identical sites are quantified, and we find that such deviations display a significant dependence on the topological details of the surface (for fixed values of N and s we find markedly different results for, say, a planar surface and for the polyhedral surface of a catalyst pellet). Our results highlight the importance of surface topology for the efficiency of catalytic conversion processes on inhomogeneous substrates, and in particular for those aimed at industrial applications. From our exact analysis we extract results for the two limiting cases

  5. Idaho Cleanup Project CPP-603A basin deactivation waste management 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Croson, D.V.; Davis, R.H.; Cooper, W.B.

    2007-07-01

    The CPP-603A basin facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL). CPP-603A operations are part of the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) that is managed by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI). Once the inventoried fuel was removed from the basins, they were no longer needed for fuel storage. However, they were still filled with water to provide shielding from high activity debris and contamination, and had to either be maintained so the basins did not present a threat to public or worker health and safety, or be isolated from the environment. The CPP-603A basins contained an estimated 50,000 kg (110,200 lbs) of sludge. The sludge was composed of desert sand, dust, precipitated corrosion products, and metal particles from past cutting operations. The sediment also contained hazardous constituents and radioactive contamination, including cadmium, lead, and U-235. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA), conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), evaluated the risks associated with deactivation of the basins and the alternatives for addressing those risks. The recommended action identified in the Action Memorandum was to perform interim stabilization of the basins. The sludge in the basins was removed and treated in accordance with the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) and disposed at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). A Non-Time Critical Removal Action (NTCRA) was conducted under CERCLA to reduce or eliminate other hazards associated with maintaining the facility. The CERCLA NTCRA included removing a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1); consolidating and mapping the location of debris objects containing Co-60; removing, treating, and disposing of the basin water; and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material (CLSM

  6. Imaging slow earthquakes in Cascadia using seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit

    Slow earthquakes have been observed in major plate boundaries worldwide, and accommodate a significant part of the plate motion through slow slip in the transition zone of the faults. They occur down-dip of the locked zone, where large damaging fast earthquakes nucleate. The physical processes that control slow quakes, however, remain enigmatic. To understand slow earthquakes, I study non-volcanic tremor, a form of seismic radiation associated with slow quakes. It is challenging to detect and locate tremor due to its lack of clear impulsive arrivals. I develop a new beam-backprojection technique to image slow earthquakes in high resolution by detecting and precisely locating tremor using small aperture seismic arrays. This technique can detect more duration of tremor, gives high resolution in tremor locations compared to a conventional envelope cross-correlation method, and also resolve tremor depth. I apply this technique in Cascadia, and show that the majority of tremor is occurring near the plate interface suggesting that they are possibly a result of shear slip on the subduction fault. Transition zone producing tremor appears to be fairly heterogeneous. Three patches down-dip of the transition zone produce majority of the tremor during small to moderate-sized tremor episodes. The patches repeat 10--15 times in 15 months. On the other hand, several up-dip patches are responsible for most of the tremor activity during large slow quakes. Moreover, I find that tremor behavior changes dramatically over different time scales. Over the time scale of several minutes, tremor propagates rapidly sub-parallel to the slip direction of the subduction zone at a velocity of ˜100 km/hr. This quasi-continuous streaking of tremor produces slip-parallel tremor bands over the time scale of several hours. Tremor bands migrate along-strike resulting in the slow rupture propagation at an average velocity of ˜8 km/day. Along-strike slow rupture propagation velocity during a large

  7. Slow extraction at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Resonant slow extraction at the SSC will permit fixed-target operation. Stochastic extraction appears to be a promising technique for achieving spill times of the order of 1000 s. However, systematic sextupole error fields in the SSC dipoles must be reduced a factor of twenty from the design values; otherwise the extraction process will be perturbed or suppressed. In addition, good regulation of the SSC power supplies is essential for smooth extraction over the spill period. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Slow-roll extended quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Siino, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-04-15

    We derive the slow-roll conditions for a nonminimally coupled scalar field (extended quintessence) during the radiation/matter dominated era extending our previous results for thawing quintessence. We find that the ratio {phi}e/3H{phi} becomes constant but negative, in sharp contrast to the ratio for the minimally coupled scalar field. We also find that the functional form of the equation of state of the scalar field asymptotically approaches that of the minimally coupled thawing quintessence.

  9. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  10. Photocatalytic acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation: scope, mechanism, and conquering deactivation with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Julis, Jennifer; Grabow, Kathleen; Hannebauer, Bernd; Bentrup, Ursula; Adam, Martin; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alkane dehydrogenation is of special interest for basic science but also offers interesting opportunities for industry. The existing dehydrogenation methodologies make use of heterogeneous catalysts, which suffer from harsh reaction conditions and a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous methodologies rely mostly on unsolicited waste generation from hydrogen acceptors. Conversely, acceptorless photochemical alkane dehydrogenation in the presence of trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl can be regarded as a more benign and atom efficient alternative. However, this methodology suffers from catalyst deactivation over time. Herein, we provide a detailed investigation of the trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl-photocatalyzed alkane dehydrogenation using spectroscopic and theoretical investigations. These studies inspired us to utilize CO2 to prevent catalyst deactivation, which leads eventually to improved catalyst turnover numbers in the dehydrogenation of alkanes that include liquid organic hydrogen carriers. PMID:25346450

  11. Pacemaker and defibrillator deactivation in competent hospice patients: an ethical consideration.

    PubMed

    Ballentine, Jennifer M

    2005-01-01

    The Denver Community Bioethics Committee (DCBC) is an independent, community-based group that undertakes ethics consultations for any individual or organization. Its members include adult protection professionals, physicians, elder-law attorneys, chaplains, nurses, social workers, and lay persons. In its 11-year history, the Committee has heard numerous cases concerning end-of-life care, futile treatment, and patients' rights. In 2003, a Colorado hospice provider asked the DCBC for assistance in developing a policy on deactivation of pacemakers and defibrillators in competent hospice patients. The hospice had encountered concerns from some physicians and cardiac care clinicians that deactivating such devices treads the fine line between legitimate withdrawal of burdensome treatment and assisted death. Although the specific deliberations of the DCBC are confidential, this article summarizes contributions from the committee's discussion, as well as independent research undertaken by the author.

  12. Fluorescence investigation of the chromatographic interactions of nitrogen heterocycles with deactivated silica

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, G.J.; Hurtubise, R.J.

    1988-10-15

    Solid-surface fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the chromatographic interactions of benzo(f)quinoline (B(f)Q) and benzo(h)quinoline (B(h)Q) with water-deactivated silica gel. The results indicated that some of the water was adsorbed on sites in silica that were incapable of proton donation to B(h)Q in the excited singlet state. It was also found that solute localization became more important on the water-deactivated silica. By combination of the luminescence data and the chromatographic data, the mass balance was calculated for three B(h)Q species responsible for the chromatographic bands. Spectral evidence was also obtained that supported a displacement-type of chromatographic mechanism for the systems investigated.

  13. Using liquid desiccant as a regenerable filter for capturing and deactivating contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Slayzak, Steven J.; Anderson, Ren S.; Judkoff, Ronald D.; Blake, Daniel M.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Ryan, Joseph P.

    2007-12-11

    A method, and systems for implementing such method, for purifying and conditioning air of weaponized contaminants. The method includes wetting a filter packing media with a salt-based liquid desiccant, such as water with a high concentration of lithium chloride. Air is passed through the wetted filter packing media and the contaminants in are captured with the liquid desiccant while the liquid desiccant dehumidifies the air. The captured contaminants are then deactivated in the liquid desiccant, which may include heating the liquid desiccant. The liquid desiccant is regenerated by applying heat to the liquid desiccant and then removing moisture. The method includes repeating the wetting with the regenerated liquid desiccant which provides a regenerable filtering process that captures and deactivates contaminants on an ongoing basis while also conditioning the air. The method may include filtration effectiveness enhancement by electrostatic or inertial means.

  14. Extending operating range of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine via cylinder deactivation

    DOEpatents

    Hergart, Carl-Anders; Hardy, William L.; Duffy, Kevin P.; Liechty, Michael P.

    2008-05-27

    An HCCI engine has the ability to operate over a large load range by utilizing a lower cetane distillate diesel fuel to increase ignition delay. This permits more stable operation at high loads by avoidance of premature combustion before top dead center. During low load conditions, a portion of the engines cylinders are deactivated so that the remaining cylinders can operate at a pseudo higher load while the overall engine exhibits behavior typical of a relatively low load.

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