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Sample records for activation syndrome mas

  1. MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION SYNDROME AND CYTOKINE DIRECTED THERAPIES

    PubMed Central

    Grom, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is an episode of overwhelming inflammation that occurs most commonly in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is characterized by expansion and activation of T lymphocytes and hemophagocytic macrophages, and bears great similarity to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). This disorder has substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is frequently a delay in recognition and initiation of treatment. Here, we will review what is known about the pathogenesis of MAS and in particular its similarities to HLH. The development of MAS is characterized by a cytokine storm, with the elaboration of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. We will examine the evidence for various cytokines in the initiation and pathogenesis of MAS, and discuss how new biologic therapies may alter the risk of MAS. Finally we will review current treatment options for MAS, and examine how cytokine-directed therapy could serve as novel treatment modalities. PMID:24974063

  2. Successful therapy of macrophage activation syndrome with dexamethasone palmitate.

    PubMed

    Nakagishi, Yasuo; Shimizu, Masaki; Kasai, Kazuko; Miyoshi, Mari; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potential life-threatening complication of childhood systemic inflammatory disorders. Corticosteroids are commonly used as the first-line therapy for MAS. We report four patients with MAS who were successfully treated with dexamethasone palmitate (DexP), a liposome-incorporated dexamethasone, much more efficient than free corticosteroids. DexP effectively inhibited inflammation in MAS patients in whom the response to pulse methylprednisolone was not sufficient to manage their diseases. DexP was also effective as the first-line therapy for MAS. Based on these findings, DexP is an effective therapy in treating MAS patients. PMID:24754272

  3. [Effect of Astragali Radix in improving early renal damage in metabolic syndrome rats through ACE2/Mas pathway].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong-ying; Liang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Ning-yin; Xu, Han; Yang, Mi-na; Lin, Xin; Yu, Heng; Chang, Peng; Yu, Jing

    2015-11-01

    To study the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin (Ang) 1-7 specific receptor Mas protain in renal blood vessels of metabolic syndrome ( MS) rats and its anti-oxidative effect. A total of 80 male SD rats were divided into four groups: the normal control group (NC, the same volume of normal saline), the MS group (high fat diet), the MS + Astragali Radix group (MS + HQ, 6 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage) and the MS + Valsartan group (MS + XST, 30 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage). After four weeks of intervention, their general indexes, biochemical indexes and blood pressure were measured; plasma and renal tissue Ang II, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide demutase (SOD) levels were measured with radioimmunoassay. The protein expressions of Mas receptor, AT1R, ACE and ACE2 were detected by western blot analysis. According to the result, compared with the NC group, the MS group and the MS + HQ group showed significant increases in systolic and diastolic pressures, body weight, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, free fatty acid and Ang II level of MS rats (P < 0.05). The MS + XST group showed notable decreases in systolic and diastolic pressures than that of the MS group. The MS group showed significant increases in the SOD activity and NO level and decrease in the MDA level after being intervened with Astragali Radix. ACE and AT1R protein expressions in renal tissues of the MS group were higher than that in the NC group, but with lower ACE2 and -Mas receptor expressions (all P < 0.05). Compared with the MS group, the MS + HQ group showed significant increase in Mas receptor expression in renal tissues, whereas the MS + XST group showed notable decrease in AT1R (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, Astragali Radix can increase the Mas receptor expressions in renal tissues, decrease ACE expression and change local Ang II, MDA, NO and SOD in kidneys, so as to protect early damages in renal tissues. PMID:27071265

  4. [Macrophage activation syndrome associated with adult-onset Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2007-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially lethal disease, resulting from uncontrolled activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and macrophages. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease. AOSD resemble reactive MAS in its symptoms and laboratory data. Moreover, AOSD per se induces MAS. It is, therefore, quite difficult to differentiate these syndrome and disease. The immunodeficiency state induced by treatment in AOSD could reactivate latent viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus, which could potentially lead to MAS. The therapeutic agents for AOSD, such as sulfasalazine, also could provoke reactive MAS. Because multiple factors are involved in inducing MAS to a different degree, the main cause should be searched for and targeted for the therapy. PMID:18174671

  5. Macrophage activation syndrome in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a phenomenon characterized by cytopenia, organ dysfunction, and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophages. Current diagnostic criteria are imprecise, but the syndrome is now recognized as a form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is characteristically associated with autoimmune diatheses. The diagnosis of incipient MAS in patients with autoimmune disease requires a high index of suspicion, as several characteristics of the disorder may be present in the underlying condition or infectious complications associated with the treatment thereof. Proposed treatment regimens include aggressive approaches that require validation in future controlled studies. This review discusses the major aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of MAS with a focus on the association with autoimmune disease. PMID:20407267

  6. Role of meconium in the reaction of airways smooth musculature in the newborn with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS).

    PubMed

    Islami, Hilmi; Bexheti, Sadi; Shabani, Ragip; Nuraj, Bajram; Zeqiri, Fehmi; Sukalo, Aziz; Kurtishi, Ilir; Kutllovci, Skender; Qorraj, Hasime; Disha, Mentor

    2009-11-01

    The role of meconium in the respiratory system was studied in newborns, who died from various causes (250 up to 3000 g of weight). We monitored tracheal rings response to dopamine, serotonin and ethanol in different concentrations (dopamine: 0,05 mg/ml, 0,5 mg/ml, 5 mg/ml; serotonin (5-HT): 10-4, 10-3, 10-2, 10-1 mol/dm3; ethanol: 0,02 ml, 0,5 ml, 1,0 ml; 96%). Tracheal smooth musculature tonus (TSM) was examined in 48 tracheal preparations taken after the newborn exitus due to different reasons. Based on functional researche of isolated preparations of tracheas, it may be concluded that: aspiration of meconium has not changed the response of TSM to dopamine, serotonin and ethanol (p>0,1) in comparison with the control group, which have died due to different lung inflammatory processes (e.g. pneumonia, bronchopneumonia, atelectasis, cerebral hemorrhage). The results suggest that meconium does not potentiate the constricting action of dopamine, serotonin and ethanol in tracheobronchial system. Meconium causes mild relaxation of the TSM through a mechanism that is not intermediated by the products of cyclooxygenases (prostaglandins, prostacyclins) from the tracheal epithelium or proteins. Also, as it seems, the direct activity of many tested acids in the smooth musculature has no significant impact on increase of the airways tonus in MAS syndrome. PMID:20002002

  7. Increasing brain angiotensin converting enzyme 2 activity decreases anxiety-like behavior in male mice by activating central Mas receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; de Kloet, Annette D; Pati, Dipanwita; Hiller, Helmut; Smith, Justin A; Pioquinto, David J; Ludin, Jacob A; Oh, S Paul; Katovich, Michael J; Frazier, Charles J; Raizada, Mohan K; Krause, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    Over-activation of the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) inhibits RAS activity by converting angiotensin-II, the effector peptide of RAS, to angiotensin-(1-7), which activates the Mas receptor (MasR). Whether increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety by stimulating central MasR is unknown. To test the hypothesis that increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety-like behavior via central MasR stimulation, we generated male mice overexpressing ACE2 (ACE2 KI mice) and wild type littermate controls (WT). ACE2 KI mice explored the open arms of the elevated plus maze (EPM) significantly more than WT, suggesting increasing ACE2 activity is anxiolytic. Central delivery of diminazene aceturate, an ACE2 activator, to C57BL/6 mice also reduced anxiety-like behavior in the EPM, but centrally administering ACE2 KI mice A-779, a MasR antagonist, abolished their anxiolytic phenotype, suggesting that ACE2 reduces anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR. To identify the brain circuits mediating these effects, we measured Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, subsequent to EPM exposure and found that ACE2 KI mice had decreased Fos in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis but had increased Fos in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Within the BLA, we determined that ∼62% of GABAergic neurons contained MasR mRNA and expression of MasR mRNA was upregulated by ACE2 overexpression, suggesting that ACE2 may influence GABA neurotransmission within the BLA via MasR activation. Indeed, ACE2 overexpression was associated with increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (indicative of presynaptic release of GABA) onto BLA pyramidal neurons and central infusion of A-779 eliminated this effect. Collectively, these results suggest that ACE2 may reduce anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR that facilitate GABA release onto pyramidal neurons within the

  8. Decomposition of adsorbed VX on activated carbons studied by {sup 31}P MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Ishay Columbus; Daniel Waysbort; Liora Shmueli; Ido Nir; Doron Kaplan

    2006-06-15

    The fate of the persistent OP nerve agent O-ethyl S-(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl) methylphosphonothioate (VX) on granular activated carbons that are used for gas filtration was studied by means of 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Four types of activated carbon were used, including coal-based BPL. VX as vapor or liquid was adsorbed on carbon granules, and MAS NMR spectra were recorded periodically. The results show that at least 90% of the adsorbed VX decomposes within 20 days or less to the nontoxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and bis(S-2-diisopropylaminoethane) ((DES){sub 2}). Decomposition occurred irrespective of the phase from which VX was loaded, the presence of metal impregnation on the carbon surface, and the water content of the carbon. Theoretical and practical aspects of the degradation are discussed. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Macrophage activation syndrome in the era of biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grom, Alexei A; Horne, AnnaCarin; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) refers to acute overwhelming inflammation caused by a 'cytokine storm'. Although increasingly recognized as a life-threatening complication of various rheumatic diseases, clinically, MAS is strikingly similar to primary and secondary forms of haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Not surprisingly, many rheumatologists prefer the term secondary HLH rather than MAS to describe this condition, and efforts to change the nomenclature are in progress. The pathophysiology of MAS remains elusive, but observations in animal models, as well as data on the effects of new anticytokine therapies on rates and clinical presentations of MAS in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), provide clues to the understanding of this perplexing clinical phenomenon. In this Review, we explore the latest available evidence and discuss potential diagnostic challenges in the era of increasing use of biologic therapies. PMID:27009539

  10. Decomposition of adsorbed VX on activated carbons studied by 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Ishay; Waysbort, Daniel; Shmueli, Liora; Nir, Ido; Kaplan, Doron

    2006-06-15

    The fate of the persistent OP nerve agent O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) on granular activated carbons that are used for gas filtration was studied by means of 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. VX as vapor or liquid was adsorbed on carbon granules, and MAS NMR spectra were recorded periodically. The results show that at least 90% of the adsorbed VX decomposes within 20 days or less to the nontoxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and bis(S-2-diisopropylaminoethane) {(DES)2}. Decomposition occurred irrespective of the phase from which VX was loaded, the presence of metal impregnation on the carbon surface, and the water content of the carbon. Theoretical and practical aspects of the degradation are discussed. PMID:16830567

  11. Macrophage activation syndrome in the course of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Emmi, Giacomo; Fastiggi, Michele; Silvestri, Elena; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-08-01

    An overwhelming activation of cytotoxic T cells and well-differentiated macrophages leading to systemic overload of inflammatory mediators characterizes the so-called macrophage activation syndrome (MAS); this potentially life-threatening clinical entity may derive from several genetic defects involved in granule-mediated cytotoxicity but has been largely observed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, many rheumatologic diseases, infections, and malignancies. The occurrence of MAS in the natural history or as the revealing clue of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders (AIDs), rare conditions caused by disrupted innate immunity pathways with overblown release of proinflammatory cytokines, has been only reported in few isolated patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, familial Mediterranean fever, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome since 2001. All these patients displayed various clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic features of MAS and have often required intensive care support. Only one patient has died due to MAS. Defective cytotoxic cell function was documented in a minority of patients. Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment, but anakinra was clinically effective in three refractory cases. Even if MAS and AIDs share multiple clinical features as well as heterogeneous pathogenetic scenes and a potential response to anti-interleukin-1 targeted therapies, MAS requires a prompt specific recognition in the course of AIDs due to its profound severity and high mortality rate. PMID:25846831

  12. Immobilized MAS1 lipase showed high esterification activity in the production of triacylglycerols with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiumei; Li, Daoming; Qu, Man; Durrani, Rabia; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-02-01

    Immobilization of lipase MAS1 from marine Streptomyces sp. strain W007 and its application in catalyzing esterification of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with glycerol were investigated. The resin XAD1180 was selected as a suitable support for the immobilization of lipase MAS1, and its absorption ability was 75mg/g (lipase/resin ratio) with initial buffer pH value of 8.0. The thermal stability of immobilized MAS1 was improved significantly compared with that of the free lipase. Immobilized MAS1 had no regiospecificity in the hydrolysis of triolein. The highest esterification degree (99.31%) and TAG content (92.26%) by immobilized MAS1-catalyzed esterification were achieved under the optimized conditions, which were significantly better than those (82.16% and 47.26%, respectively) by Novozym 435. More than 92% n-3 PUFA was incorporated into TAG that had similar fatty acids composition to the substrate (n-3 PUFA). The immobilized MAS1 exhibited 50% of its initial activity after being used for five cycles. PMID:27596418

  13. A case of macrophage activation syndrome developing in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease-associated colitis.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Kazuko; Kawai, Toshinao; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Yokoyama, Midori; Arai, Katsuhiro; Harayama, Shizuko; Oana, Shinji; Onodera, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    Although macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) develops in some patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), all of the reported cases have been associated with pathogenic microbial infections. We report a 2-year-old boy with CGD-associated colitis who suffered from MAS without any clinical signs of a microbial infection. He was treated with 1 course of methylprednisolone pulse therapy and the clinical symptoms improved; however, the colitis was difficult to control even with immunosuppressive drugs, and he eventually required hematopoietic stem cell transplantation 1 year after the onset of MAS. It is likely that MAS develops in patients with CGD colitis independent of microbial infections. PMID:23652865

  14. Shrimp Serine Proteinase Homologues PmMasSPH-1 and -2 Play a Role in the Activation of the Prophenoloxidase System

    PubMed Central

    Jearaphunt, Miti; Amparyup, Piti; Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2015-01-01

    Melanization mediated by the prophenoloxidase (proPO) activating system is a rapid immune response used by invertebrates against intruding pathogens. Several masquerade-like and serine proteinase homologues (SPHs) have been demonstrated to play an essential role in proPO activation in insects and crustaceans. In a previous study, we characterized the masquerade-like SPH, PmMasSPH1, in the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon as a multifunctional immune protein based on its recognition and antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio harveyi. In the present study, we identify a novel SPH, known as PmMasSPH2, composed of an N-terminal clip domain and a C-terminal SP-like domain that share high similarity to those of other insect and crustacean SPHs. We demonstrate that gene silencing of PmMasSPH1 and PmMasSPH2 significantly reduces PO activity, resulting in a high number of V. harveyi in the hemolymph. Interestingly, knockdown of PmMasSPH1 suppressed not only its gene transcript but also other immune-related genes in the proPO system (e.g., PmPPAE2) and antimicrobial peptides (e.g., PenmonPEN3, PenmonPEN5, crustinPm1 and Crus-likePm). The PmMasSPH1 and PmMasSPH2 also show binding activity to peptidoglycan (PGN) of Gram-positive bacteria. Using a yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that PmMasSPH1 specifically interacted with the final proteinase of the proPO cascade, PmPPAE2. Furthermore, the presence of both PmMasSPH1 and PmPPAE2 enhances PGN-induced PO activity in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest the importance of PmMasSPHs in the activation of the shrimp proPO system. PMID:25803442

  15. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    In this contribution the ability of 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T1(1H) and T1ρ(1H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in 19F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around 19F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded 19F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way 19F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1–7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2−/y) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2−/y mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1–7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what’s more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1–7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  17. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1-7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2(-/y) mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1-7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what's more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1-7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  18. The protective effect of the Cornus mas fruits (cornelian cherry) on hypertriglyceridemia and atherosclerosis through PPARα activation in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sozański, T; Kucharska, A Z; Szumny, A; Magdalan, J; Bielska, K; Merwid-Ląd, A; Woźniak, A; Dzimira, S; Piórecki, N; Trocha, M

    2014-11-15

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) fruits have been used in traditional cuisine and in folk medicine in various countries. This study was conducted to evaluate the constituents and impact of cornelian cherry (C. mas L.) fruits lyophilisate on lipid levels, PPARα protein expression, atheromatous changes in the aorta, oxido-redox state, and proinflammatory cytokines in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. The HPLC-MS method was used for determining active constituents in cornelian cherry. In a subsequent in vivo study the protective effect of the cornelian cherry on diet-induced hyperlipidemia was studied using a rabbit model fed 1% cholesterol. Cornelian cherry (100mg/kg b.w.) or simvastatin (5mg/kg b.w.) were administered orally for 60 days. Two iridoids - loganic acid and cornuside - and five anthocyanins were identified as the main constituents of the cornelian cherry. The administering of the cornelian cherry led to a 44% significant decrease in serum triglyceride levels, as well as prevented development of atheromatous changes in the thoracic aorta. Cornelian cherry significantly increased PPARα protein expression in the liver, indicating that its hypolipidemic effect may stem from enhanced fatty acid catabolism. Simvastatin treatment did not affect PPAR-α expression. Moreover, the cornelian cherry had a significant protective effect on diet-induced oxidative stress in the liver, as well as restored upregulated proinflammatory cytokines serum levels. In conclusion, we have shown loganic acid to be the main iridoid constituent in the European cultivar of the cornelian cherry, and proven that the cornelian cherry could have protective effects on diet-induced hypertriglicerydemia and atherosclerosis through enhanced PPARα protein expression and via regulating oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:25444446

  19. Possible macrophage activation syndrome following initiation of adalimumab in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Souabni, Leila; Dridi, Leila; Ben Abdelghani, Kawther; Kassab, Selma; Chekili, Selma; Laater, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) has been rarely reported in the course of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) and in the majority of cases, it was triggered by an infection. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first case of MAS occurring after adalimumab treatment initiation and not triggered by an infection. A 26-yearold woman with classical features of AOSD developed persistent fever, severe bicytopenia associated with extreme hyperferritinemia, hyponatremia and abnormal liver function tow months after the initiation of adalimumab treatment. The diagnosis of MAS was made without histological proof. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and her condition improved. During the disease course, extensive studies could not identify any viral infection or other known underlying etiology for the reactive MAS. The adalimumab was incriminated in this complication. Currently, the patient is in remission on tocilizumab and low-dose prednisolone. PMID:25018831

  20. Diminazene aceturate, an angiotensin-converting enzyme II activator, prevents gastric mucosal damage in mice: Role of the angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Luan Kelves M; Nicolau, Lucas A D; Sousa, Nayara A; Araújo, Thiago S L; Sousa, Francisca Beatriz M; Costa, Douglas S; Souza, Fabiana M; Pacífico, Dvison M; Martins, Conceição S; Silva, Renan O; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Cerqueira, Gilberto S; Medeiros, Jand Venes R

    2016-07-15

    The angiotensin (Ang) II converting enzyme (ACE II) pathway has recently been shown to be associated with several beneficial effects in various organisms, including gastroprotection. ACE II is responsible for converting Ang II into an active peptide, Ang-(1-7), which in turn binds the Mas receptor. Recent studies have shown that diminazene aceturate (Dize) a trypanocidal used in animals, activates ACE II. Thus, in this study, we aimed to evaluate the gastroprotective effects of Dize via the ACE II/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway against gastric lesions induced by ethanol and acetic acid in mice. The results showed that Dize could promote gastric protection via several mechanisms, including increased levels of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory factors (e.g., decreasing tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 expression and reducing myeloperoxidase activity), maturation of collagen fibers, and promotion of re-epithelialization and regeneration of gastric tissue in different injury models. Thus, Dize represents a novel potential gastroprotective agent. PMID:27241079

  1. Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis with macrophage activation syndrome and coronary artery dilatation misdiagnosed as Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Keskindemirci, Gonca; Aktay Ayaz, Nuray; Melikoğlu, Neslihan; Bornaun, Helen; Aydoğmuş, Çiğdem; Aldemir, Esin; Aydoğan, Gönül

    2015-01-01

    Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) is characterized by arthritis, fever and visceral organ involvement including hepatosplenomegaly, lympadenopathy and serositis. This is a case of SoJIA misdiagnosed as Kawasaki disease (KD) and developed machrophage activation syndrome (MAS) secondary to Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. It is presented to point out the conditions that may come along. First of all, SoJIA should be kept in mind while making the differential diagnosis of coronary arterial ectasias and dilatations usually seen in vasculitic diseases like KD. Second, as a very fatal complication MAS should always be considered while following a patient with the diagnosis of SoJIA. Infections like EBV may be the potential triggers for development of MAS especially in immunesupressed patients. PMID:27411422

  2. [Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Tavares, Anna Carolina Faria Moreira Gomes; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Guimarães, Luciano Junqueira; Guimarães, Raquel Rosa; Santos, Flávia Patrícia Sena Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Machrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially fatal disease, commonly associated with chronic rheumatic diseases, mainly juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is included in the group of secondary forms of haemophagocytic syndrome, and other causes are lymphoproliferative diseases and infections. Its most important clinical and laboratorial manifestations are non-remitting fever, splenomegaly, bleeding, impairment of liver function, cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypofibrinogenemia and hyperferritinemia. The treatment needs to be started quickly, and the majority of cases have a good response with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The Epstein-Barr virus is described as a possible trigger for many cases of MAS, especially in these patients in treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. In these refractory cases, etoposide (VP16) should be administered, associated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Our objective is to describe a rare case of MAS probably due to EBV infection in a subject with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which achieved complete remission of the disease after therapy guided by 2004-HLH protocol. PMID:25575650

  3. Angiotensin (1-7)/Mas receptor axis activation ameliorates the changes in fatty acid composition in diabetic rats with nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kulwinder; Singh, Tajinder; Sharma, PL

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is often associated with altered fatty acids composition. This study was designed to investigate the role of angiotensin (Ang) (1-7)/Mas receptor in improving fatty acids composition in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nephropathy (DN) in rats. Rats treated with STZ (50 mg/kg, i.p. once) developed DN after 8 weeks. Fatty acid composition was estimated in renal cortical tissue by gas chromatography. Treatment with Ang (1-7), A-779, and Ang (1-7) plus A-779 was given from week 4 to week 8. Diabetic rats exhibited a significant increase in levels of saturated fatty acids and a significant decrease in levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Treatment with Ang (1-7) significantly attenuated these diabetes-induced changes. In diabetic rats, prior administration of A-779 significantly attenuated the increase in PUFAs produced by Ang (1-7); however, for saturated fatty acids, A-779 significantly blocked the decrease in palmitic acid only. Our study, for the first time, documented that endogenous Ang (1-7) modulates fatty acid composition in rats. Further, treatment with Ang (1-7) significantly attenuated diabetes-induced changes in fatty acids composition. This may be an additional mechanism implying the renoprotective role of Ang (1-7) in diabetic rats.

  4. Mas-Related Gene (Mrg) C Activation Attenuates Bone Cancer Pain via Modulating Gi and NR2B

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui’e; Lei, Yishan; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study is to investigate the role of Mas-related gene (Mrg) C in the pathogenesis and treatment of bone cancer pain (BCP). Methods BCP mouse model was established by osteosarcoma cell inoculation. Pain-related behaviors were assessed with the spontaneous lifting behavior test and mechanical allodynia test. Expression levels of MrgC, Gi, and NR2B in the spinal cord were detected with Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Results Pain-related behavior tests showed significantly increased spontaneous flinches (NSF) and decreased paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) in mouse models of BCP. Western blot analysis showed that, compared with the control group and before modeling, all the expression levels of MrgC, Gi, and NR2B in the spinal cord of BCP mice were dramatically elevated, which were especially increased at day 7 after operation and thereafter, in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, the treatment of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 significantly up-regulated Gi and down-regulated NR2B expression levels, in the spinal cord of BCP mice, in a time-dependent manner. On the other hand, anti-MrgC significantly down-regulated Gi expression, while dramatically up-regulated NR2B expression, in the BCP mice. Similar results were obtained from the immunohistochemical detection. Importantly, BAM8-22 significantly attenuated the nociceptive behaviors in the BCP mice. Conclusion Our results indicated the MrgC-mediated Gi and NR2B expression alterations in the BCP mice, which might contribute to the pain hypersensitivity. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of BCP in clinic. PMID:27152740

  5. Risk of significant cytopenias after treatment with tocilizumab in systemic juvenile arthritis patients with a history of macrophage activation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is the first FDA- approved treatment for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). We report 3 cases of cytopenias in children with sJIA treated with TCZ. Two of the children who developed significant cytopenias shortly after initiation of TCZ had a history of macrophage activation syndrome. We raise the possibility that patients with a tendency towards MAS have an increased risk of developing cytopenias when treated with tocilizumab. PMID:22931129

  6. 2016 Classification Criteria for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Complicating Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Lisa; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-03-01

    To develop criteria for the classification of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of 28 experts was first asked to classify 428 patient profiles as having or not having MAS, based on clinical and laboratory features at the time of disease onset. The 428 profiles comprised 161 patients with systemic JIA-associated MAS and 267 patients with a condition that could potentially be confused with MAS (active systemic JIA without evidence of MAS, or systemic infection). Next, the ability of candidate criteria to classify individual patients as having MAS or not having MAS was assessed by evaluating the agreement between the classification yielded using the criteria and the consensus classification of the experts. The final criteria were selected in a consensus conference. Experts achieved consensus on the classification of 391 of the 428 patient profiles (91.4%). A total of 982 candidate criteria were tested statistically. The 37 best-performing criteria and 8 criteria obtained from the literature were evaluated at the consensus conference. During the conference, 82% consensus among experts was reached on the final MAS classification criteria. In validation analyses, these criteria had a sensitivity of 0.73 and a specificity of 0.99. Agreement between the classification (MAS or not MAS) obtained using the criteria and the original diagnosis made by the treating physician was high (κ=0.76). We have developed a set of classification criteria for MAS complicating systemic JIA and provided preliminary evidence of its validity. Use of these criteria will potentially improve understanding of MAS in systemic JIA and enhance efforts to discover effective therapies, by ensuring appropriate patient enrollment in studies. PMID:26865703

  7. Expert consensus on dynamics of laboratory tests for diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Alexandra; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify which laboratory tests that change over time are most valuable for the timely diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). Methods A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of experts was first asked to evaluate 115 profiles of patients with MAS, which included the values of laboratory tests at the pre-MAS visit and at MAS onset, and the change in values between the two time points. The experts were asked to choose the 5 laboratory tests in which change was most important for the diagnosis of MAS and to rank the 5 selected tests in order of importance. The relevance of change in laboratory parameters was further discussed and ranked by the same experts at a consensus conference. Results Platelet count was the most frequently selected test, followed by ferritin level, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), white cell count, neutrophil count, and fibrinogen and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Ferritin was most frequently assigned the highest score. At the end of the process, platelet count, ferritin level and AST were the laboratory tests in which the experts found change over time to be most important. Conclusions We identified the laboratory tests in which change over time is most valuable for the early diagnosis of MAS in sJIA. The dynamics of laboratory values during the course of MAS should be further scrutinised in a prospective study in order to establish the optimal cut-off values for their variation. PMID:26848401

  8. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue.

    PubMed

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  9. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  10. High Systemic Levels of the Cytokine-Inducing HMGB1 Isoform Secreted in Severe Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Palmblad, Karin; Schierbeck, Hanna; Sundberg, Erik; Horne, Anna-Carin; Harris, Helena Erlandsson; Henter, Jan-Inge; Antoine, Daniel J; Andersson, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of systemic inflammation. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein extensively leaked extracellularly during necrotic cell death or actively secreted by natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages and additional cells during infection or sterile injury. Extracellular HMGB1 orchestrates key events in inflammation as a prototypic alarmin. The redox states of its three cysteines render the molecule mutually exclusive functions: fully reduced “all-thiol HMGB1” exerts chemotactic activity; “disulfide HMGB1” has cytokine-inducing, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated effects—while terminally oxidized “sulfonyl HMGB1” lacks inflammatory activity. This study examines the kinetic pattern of systemic HMGB1 isoform expression during therapy in four children with severe MAS. Three of the four patients with underlying systemic rheumatic diseases were treated with biologics and two suffered from triggering herpes virus infections at the onset of MAS. All patients required intensive care unit therapy due to life-threatening illness. Tandem mass-spectrometric analysis revealed dramatically increased systemic levels of the cytokine-inducing HMGB1 isoform during early MAS. Disease control coincided with supplementary etoposide therapy initiated to boost apoptotic cell death, when systemic HMGB1 levels drastically declined and the molecule emerged mainly in its oxidized, noninflammatory isoform. Systemic interferon (IFN)-γ and ferritin peaked concomitantly with HMGB1, whereas interleukin (IL)-18 and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 levels developed differently. In conclusion, this work provides new insights in HMGB1 biology, suggesting that the molecule is not merely a biomarker of inflammation, but most likely also contributes to the pathogenesis of MAS. These observations encourage further studies of disulfide HMGB1 antagonists to improve outcome of MAS. PMID:25247290

  11. Genetics Home Reference: activated PI3K-delta syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions activated PI3K-delta syndrome activated PI3K-delta syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Activated PI3K-delta syndrome is a disorder that impairs the immune ...

  12. Investigation of the Structure and Active Sites of TiO2 Nanorod Supported VOx Catalysts by High-Field and Fast-Spinning 51V MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Xu, Suochang; Li, Weizhen; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Dixon, David A.; Vasiliu, Monica; Craciun, Raluca; Wang, Yong; Bao, Xinhe; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-07-02

    Supported VOx/TiO2-Rod catalysts were studied by 51V MAS NMR at high field using a sample spinning rate of 55 kHz. The superior spectral resolution allows for the observation of at least five vanadate species. The assignment of these vanadate species was carried out by quantum mechanical calculations of 51V NMR chemical shifts of model V-surface structures. Methanol oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) was used to establish the correlation between the reaction rate and the various surface V-sites. It is found that monomeric V-species dominated the catalyst at low vanadium loadings with two peaks observed at about -502 and -529 ppm. V-dimers with two bridged oxygen appeare at about -555 ppm. Vanadate dimers and polyvanadates connected by one bridged oxygen atom between two adjacent V atoms resonate at about -630 ppm. A positive correlation is found between the V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak and the ODH rate while a better correlation is obtained by including monomeric contributions. This result indicates that surface V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak are the major active sites for ODH reaction despite mono-V species are more catalytic active but their relative ratios are decreased dramatically at high V-loadings. Furthermore, a portion of the V-species is found invisible. In particular, the level of such invisibility increases with decreased level of V-loading, suggesting the existence of paramagnetic V-species at the surface.

  13. An atypical presentation of adult-onset Still’s disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension and macrophage activation syndrome treated with immunosuppression: a case-based review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Daniel K.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Haythe, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a known complication of rheumatologic diseases, but it is only rarely associated with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We describe the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented in a pulmonary hypertension crisis and was found to have underlying AOSD with PAH and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with a course complicated by macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). She dramatically improved with steroids, cyclosporine A, and anakinra, with total resolution of the MAS and significant improvement of her pulmonary arterial pressures. While there are only select case reports of AOSD associated with PAH, this is the first reported case of (1) AOSD complicated by both PAH and MAS and (2) AOSD complicated by biopsy-proven NSIP. Clinically, this case highlights the efficacy of immunosuppressive agents in the treatment of PAH and MAS from underlying AOSD and supports their use in this setting. PMID:27162622

  14. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Managing Activities and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Managing Activities and Exercise On this Page Avoiding Extremes Developing an Activity ... recent manageable level of activity. Strength and Conditioning Exercises Strength and conditioning exercises are an important component ...

  15. McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with questions about grants, contracts & research areas Training, Education & Career Development Support for Training at Universities & Other Institutions Extramural training, fellowships & career development opportunities Training at ...

  16. Mast cell activation syndrome masquerading as agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-01-01

    Acquired agranulocytosis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The few known causes/associations usually are readily identifiable (e.g., drug reaction, Felty syndrome, megaloblastosis, large granular lymphocytic leukemia, etc.). We report a novel association with mast cell disease. A 61-year-old morbidly obese man developed rheumatoid arthritis unresponsive to several medications. Agranulocytosis developed shortly after sulfasalazine was started but did not improve when the drug was soon stopped. Other symptoms across many systems developed including hives and presyncope. Marrow aspiration and biopsy showed only neutropenia. Serum tryptase was mildly elevated; urinary prostaglandin D2 was markedly elevated. Other causes were not found. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) was diagnosed. Oral antihistamines, montelukast, and cromolyn were unhelpful; aspirin was initially felt contraindicated. Imatinib immediately increased neutrophils from 0% to 25% but did not help symptoms; subsequent addition of aspirin increased neutrophils further and abated symptoms. Different presentations of different MCAS patients reflect elaboration of different mediators likely consequent to different Kit mutations. Mast cells (MCs) help regulate adipocytes, and adipocytes can inhibit granulopoiesis; thus, a Kit-mutated MC clone may have directly and/or indirectly driven agranulocytosis. MCAS should be considered in otherwise idiopathic agranulocytosis presenting with comorbidities best explained by MC mediator release. PMID:22338992

  17. Sensitivity of Neurospora crassa to a Marine-Derived Aspergillus tubingensis Anhydride Exhibiting Antifungal Activity That Is Mediated by the MAS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Liat; Lodin, Anat; Herold, Inbal; Ilan, Micha; Carmeli, Shmuel; Yarden, Oded

    2014-01-01

    The fungus Aspergillus tubingensis (strain OY907) was isolated from the Mediterranean marine sponge Ircinia variabilis. Extracellular extracts produced by this strain were found to inhibit the growth of several fungi. Among the secreted extract components, a novel anhydride metabolite, tubingenoic anhydride A (1) as well as the known 2-carboxymethyl-3-hexylmaleic acid anhydride, asperic acid, and campyrone A and C were purified and their structure elucidated. Compound 1 and 2-carboxymethyl-3-hexylmaleic acid anhydride inhibited Neurospora crassa growth (MIC = 330 and 207 μM, respectively) and affected hyphal morphology. We produced a N. crassa mutant exhibiting tolerance to 1 and found that a yet-uncharacterized gene, designated mas-1, whose product is a cytosolic protein, confers sensitivity to this compound. The ∆mas-1 strain showed increased tolerance to sublethal concentrations of the chitin synthase inhibitor polyoxin D, when compared to the wild type. In addition, the expression of chitin synthase genes was highly elevated in the ∆mas-1 strain, suggesting the gene product is involved in cell wall biosynthesis and the novel anhydride interferes with its function. PMID:25257783

  18. Physical Activity Patterns of Youth with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Phil E.; MacDonald, Megan; Hornyak, Joseph E.; Ulrich, Dale A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the physical activity patterns of children with Down syndrome. A cross-sectional approach and accelerometry were used to measure the time children with Down syndrome (N = 104) spent in sedentary, light, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Results indicated that adolescents from ages 14 to 15 years…

  19. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions. PMID:26714690

  20. An activating G{sub s}{alpha} mutation is present in fibrous dysplasia of bone in the McCune-Albright syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Shenker, A.; Weinstein, L.S.; Spiegel, A.M.; Sweet, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a sporadic disease characterized by polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, cafe-au-lait spots, and multiple endocrinopathies. The etiology of fibrous dysplasia is unknown. Activating mutations of codon 201 in the gene encoding the {alpha}-subunit of G{sub s}, the G-protein that stimulates adenylyl cyclase, have been found in all affected MAS tissues that have been studied. Initial attempts to amplify DNA from decalcified paraffin-embedded bone specimens from frozen surgical bone specimens from five MAS patients using polymerase chain reaction and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. Most of the cells in four specimens of dysplastic bone contained a heterozygous mutation encoding substitution of Arg{sup 201} of G{sub s}{alpha} with His, but the mutation was barely detectable in peripheral blood specimens from the patients. Only a small amount of mutant allele was detected in a specimen of normal cortical bone from the fifth patient, although this patients had a high proportion of mutation in other, affected tissues. The mosaic distribution of mutant alleles is consistent with an embryological somatic cell mutation of the G{sub s}{alpha} gene in MAS. The presence of an activating mutation of G{sub s}{alpha} in osteoblastic progenitor cells may cause them to exhibit increased proliferation and abnormal differentiation, thereby producing the lesions of fibrous dysplasia. 43 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic onset of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Hari K.; Rao, Avinash; Mittal, Anshul; Jain, Promil

    2016-01-01

    Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is defined as arthritis affecting one or more joint usually in the juvenile age group (< 16 years of age) with or preceded by fever of at least 2 weeks duration that is documented to be daily (“quotidian”) for at least 3 days which may be associated with evanescent (non-fixed) erythematous rash or generalized lymph node enlargement or hepatomegaly/splenomegaly/both or serositis. Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a life-threatening complication of sJIA marked by sudden onset of non-remitting high fever, profound depression in all three blood cell lines (i.e. leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia), hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and elevated serum liver enzyme levels. In children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the clinical picture may mimic sepsis or an exacerbation of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 16-year-old female patient presenting with high grade fever with joint pains and generalized weakness which proved to be systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis with macrophage activation syndrome after ruling out all other differential diagnoses and responded well to intravenous steroids. PMID:27407277

  2. Physical Activity and Walking Onset in Infants with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Meghann; Burghardt, Amy; Ulrich, Dale A.; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Infants with Down syndrome (DS) are described as being less active and they also experience significant delays in motor development. It is hypothesized that early infant physical activity may be influential for the acquisition of independent walking. Physical activity was monitored longitudinally in 30 infants with DS starting at an average age of…

  3. Physical Activity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Overweight in Rural Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Justin B.; Davis, Catherine L.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Lewis, Richard D.; Yin, Zenong

    2008-01-01

    Background: Research suggests significant health differences between rural dwelling youth and their urban counterparts with relation to cardiovascular risk factors. This study was conducted to (1) determine relationships between physical activity and markers of metabolic syndrome, and (2) to explore factors relating to physical activity in a…

  4. Reactive macrophage activation syndrome possibly triggered by canakinumab in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Banse, Christopher; Vittecoq, Olivier; Benhamou, Ygal; Gauthier-Prieur, Maud; Lequerré, Thierry; Lévesque, Hervé

    2013-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and serious complication of adult-onset Still's disease. We describe a case in a 49-year-old woman with Still's disease refractory to glucocorticoids, methotrexate, and infliximab. Anakinra provided satisfactory disease control for 1 year, after which escape phenomenon occurred. After four tocilizumab injections, cutaneous melanoma developed. The persistent systemic manifestations prompted treatment with two canakinumab injections. Ten days later, she had a spiking fever, dyspnea, low back pain, abdominal pain, odynophagia, and hepatomegaly. Laboratory tests showed liver cytolysis (180 IU/L; N: 10-35), acute renal failure (creatinine, 407 μmol/L; N:50-100), thrombocytopenia (60 G/L; N: 150-400), leukocytosis (12,200/mm(3); N: 4000-10,000), hypertriglyceridemia (5070 mmol/L; N: 0.4-1.6), lactate dehydrogenase elevation (4824 IU/L; N: 135-250), and hyperferritinemia (97 761 μg/L; N:15-150). Examination of a bone marrow biopsy showed phagocytosis. Tests were negative for viruses and other infectious agents. Glucocorticoid therapy (1.5 mg/Kg/d) and intravenous polyvalent immunoglobulins (0.5 g/Kg/d) were given. Her condition improved despite the many factors of adverse prognostic significance (thrombocytopenia, absence of lymphadenopathy, and glucocorticoid therapy at diagnosis). This is the first reported case of MAS after canakinumab therapy in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease. PMID:23751410

  5. MAS2-8 radar and digital control unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, J. M.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    The design of the MAS 2-8 (2 to 8 GHz microwave-active spectrometer), a ground-based sensor system, is presented. A major modification in 1974 to the MAS 2-8, that of a control subsystem to automate the data-taking operation, is the prime focus. The digital control unit automatically changes all system parameters except FM rate and records the return signal on paper tape. The overall system operation and a detailed discussion of the design and operation of the digital control unit are presented.

  6. Discovery of Novel Bmy1 Alleles Increasing β-Amylase Activity in Chinese Landraces and Tibetan Wild Barley for Improvement of Malting Quality via MAS

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xue; Westcott, Sharon; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Yan, Guijun; Lance, Reg; Zhang, Guoping; Sun, Dongfa; Li, Chengdao

    2013-01-01

    China has a large barley germplasm collection which has not been well characterized and is therefore underutilized. The Bmy1 locus encoding the β-amylase enzyme on chromosome 4H has been well characterized in the worldwide barley germplasm collections due to its importance in the malting and brewing industry. The Bmy1 locus was chosen as an indicator to understand genetic potential for improvement of malting quality in Chinese landraces and Tibetan wild barley. The genetic diversity of 91 barley accessions was assessed using allele specific Multiplex-ready molecular markers. Eight accessions were further sequenced, based on the Multiplex-ready marker diversity for Bmy1 in the germplasm. Six of the eight accessions clustered together in a unique group, and showed similarities to ‘Haruna Nijo’, wild barley accession PI296896 and ‘Ashqelon’. Sequence comparisons with the known Bmy1 alleles identified not only the existing 13 amino acid substitutions, but also a new substitution positioned at A387T from a Chinese landrace W127, which has the highest β-amylase activity. Two new alleles/haplotypes namely Bmy1-Sd1c and Bmy1-Sd5 were designated based on different amino acid combinations. We identified new amino acid combination of C115, D165, V233, S347 and V430 in the germplasm. The broad variation in both β-amylase activity and amino acid composition provides novel alleles for the improvement of malting quality for different brewing styles, which indicates the high potential value of the Chinese landraces and Tibetan wild barley. PMID:24019884

  7. Using Stable Isotopes to Assess Reduced Physical Activity of Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter S. W.; Joughlin, C.

    1993-01-01

    This study found that the physical activity levels of 10 children with Prader-Willi syndrome were significantly reduced in comparison to children without the syndrome. Increasing activity levels in children with Prader-Willi syndrome is suggested as a way to raise total energy expenditure and control weight gain. (Author/JDD)

  8. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3 mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67 kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3 mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7 mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  9. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor. PMID:26073599

  10. An update on renal involvement in hemophagocytic syndrome (macrophage activation syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Esmaili, Haydarali; Mostafidi, Elmira; Mehramuz, Bahareh; Ardalan, Mohammadreza; Mohajel-Shoja, Mohammadali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is mainly characterized by massive infiltration of bone marrow by activated macrophages and often presents with pancytopenia. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is also present with thrombocytopenia and renal involvement. Both conditions could coexist with each other and complicate the condition. Evidence Acquisition: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), EMBASE, Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science with keywords relevant to; Hemophagocytic syndrome, macrophage activation syndrome, interferon-gamma and thrombotic microangiopathy, have been searched. Results: Viral infection, rheumatologic disease and malignancies are the main underlying causes for secondary HPS. calcineurin inhibitors and viral infections are also the main underlying causes of TMA in transplant recipients. In this review, we discussed a 39-year-old male who presented with pancytopenia and renal allograft dysfunction. With the diagnosis of HPS induced TMA his renal condition and pancytopenia improved after receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasmapheresis therapy. Conclusions: HPS is an increasingly recognized disorder in the realm of different medical specialties. Renal involvement complicates the clinical picture of the disease, and this condition even is more complex in renal transplant recipients. We should consider the possibility of HPS in any renal transplant recipient with pancytopenia and allograft dysfunction. The combination of HPS with TMA future increases the complexity of the situation. PMID:27047804

  11. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  12. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Suiter, Christopher L; Quinn, Caitlin M; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates. PMID:25797001

  13. How Do Adults With Down Syndrome Perceive Physical Activity?

    PubMed

    Love, Adam; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis

    2016-07-01

    Adults with Down syndrome (DS) tend to have low physical activity levels, which may relate to how they perceive participation in physical activities. The current study entailed interviews with 30 adults with DS (age 18-71 yr, 18 women) to examine how they perceived physical activity, exercise, and sport. Through qualitative analysis informed by grounded theory, the investigators found that adults with DS have positive perceptions of physical activity that center on enjoyment. Three facets of enjoyment were identified: interaction, achievement, and process. Interaction reflected enjoyment of social contact with others including relatives, peers, caregivers, and animals. Achievement involved enjoyment of achieving particular ends including accomplishment of tasks, material rewards, formation of athletic identities, and improvement of health. Process represented enjoyment from performing a particular activity itself. This multifaceted enjoyment expressed by adults with DS may facilitate physical activity and should be considered when developing programs to improve their well-being. PMID:27623609

  14. Ganser-like Syndrome After Loss of Psychic Self-activation Syndrome: Psychogenic or Organic?

    PubMed Central

    Kaphan, Elsa; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Royère, Marie L.; Guedj, Eric; Pelletier, Jean; Ali Chérif, André

    2014-01-01

    Very few data are available on the long-term changes in the cognitive abilities of patients with loss of psychic self-activation syndrome (LPSAS). Here, we present a 25-year follow-up study on a case of LPSAS resulting from bilateral pallidal lesions caused by carbon monoxide intoxication. Typical signs of LPSAS were observed, showing no changes in severity, but Ganser syndrome (GS) gradually developed and worsened during the follow-up period. GS is generally assumed to be a psychogenic syndrome, but an organic etiology has been suspected by the authors of several case reports. Here, atypical features of GS plead against the independence of GS and LPSAS. DaTSCAN and brain 18FDG-PET were performed. Since left hippocampal hypometabolism has been previously described in patients with functional amnesia, it is possible that long periods of mental inactivity may have psychological consequences, but the atypical features of GS also suggest that an organic mechanism may be involved. PMID:25280796

  15. Atypical Signaling and Functional Desensitization Response of MAS Receptor to Peptide Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Desnoyer, Russell; Speth, Robert C.; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2014-01-01

    MAS is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) implicated in multiple physiological processes. Several physiological peptide ligands such as angiotensin-(1–7), angiotensin fragments and neuropeptide FF (NPFF) are reported to act on MAS. Studies of conventional G protein signaling and receptor desensitization upon stimulation of MAS with the peptide ligands are limited so far. Therefore, we systematically analyzed G protein signals activated by the peptide ligands. MAS-selective non-peptide ligands that were previously shown to activate G proteins were used as controls for comparison on a common cell based assay platform. Activation of MAS by the non-peptide agonist (1) increased intracellular calcium and D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate (IP1) levels which are indicative of the activation of classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathways, (2) decreased Gαi mediated cAMP levels and (3) stimulated Gα12-dependent expression of luciferase reporter. In all these assays, MAS exhibited strong constitutive activity that was inhibited by the non-peptide inverse agonist. Further, in the calcium response assay, MAS was resistant to stimulation by a second dose of the non-peptide agonist after the first activation has waned suggesting functional desensitization. In contrast, activation of MAS by the peptide ligand NPFF initiated a rapid rise in intracellular calcium with very weak IP1 accumulation which is unlike classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathway. NPFF only weakly stimulated MAS-mediated activation of Gα12 and Gαi signaling pathways. Furthermore, unlike non-peptide agonist-activated MAS, NPFF-activated MAS could be readily re-stimulated the second time by the agonists. Functional assays with key ligand binding MAS mutants suggest that NPFF and non-peptide ligands bind to overlapping regions. Angiotensin-(1–7) and other angiotensin fragments weakly potentiated an NPFF-like calcium response at non-physiological concentrations (≥100 µM). Overall, our data

  16. The Marfan Syndrome. Fact Sheet [and] Physical Education and Activity Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Marfan Foundation, Port Washington, NY.

    This document consists of two brochures, the first explaining the Marfan Syndrome and a second providing guidelines for physical education and activity for people who have this syndrome are provided. The brochure on factual information about Marfan syndrome outlines the associated medical problems involving the cardiovascular system, the skeleton,…

  17. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (also known as neuromyotonia, Isaacs-Mertens syndrome, continuous muscle fiber activity syndrome, and quantal squander syndrome) is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by hyperexcitability and continuous firing of ... which include progressive muscle stiffness, continuously contracting ...

  18. Therapeutic Potential of Interferon-γ and Its Antagonists in Autoinflammation: Lessons from Murine Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Avau, Anneleen; Matthys, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) affects immune responses in a complex fashion. Its immunostimulatory actions, such as macrophage activation and induction of T helper 1-type responsiveness, are widely acknowledged, however, as documented by a large body of literature, IFN-γ has also the potential to temper inflammatory processes via other pathways. In autoimmune and autoinflammatory disorders, IFN-γ can either play a disease-enforcing role or act as protective agent, depending on the nature of the disease. In animal models of any particular autoimmune disease, certain changes in the induction procedure can reverse the net outcome of introduction or ablation of IFN-γ. Here, we review the role of endogenous IFN-γ in inflammatory disorders and related murine models, with a focus on systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). In particular, we discuss our recent findings in a mouse model of sJIA, in which endogenous IFN-γ acts as a regulatory agent, and compare with results from mouse models of MAS. Also, we elaborate on the complexity in the activity of IFN-γ and the resulting difficulty of predicting its value or that of its antagonists as treatment option. PMID:26610523

  19. Mas-Mediated Antioxidant Effects Restore the Functionality of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2-Angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas Axis in Diabetic Rat Carotid

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Mayara Santos; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araujo

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of reactive oxygen species during type I-diabetes impairs carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality, which accounts for the impaired carotid flow in diabetic rats. We also hypothesized that angiotensin-(1–7) chronic treatment of diabetic rats restores carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality and carotid flow. Relaxant curves for angiotensin II or angiotensin-(1–7) were obtained in carotid from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Superoxide or hydrogen peroxide levels were measured by flow cytometry in carotid endothelial cells. Carotid flow was also determined. We found that endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in diabetic rat carotid impairs ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality, which reduces carotid flow. In this mechanism, hydrogen peroxide derived from superoxide dismutation inhibits ACE2 activity in generating angiotensin-(1–7) seemingly by activating ICl,SWELL, while superoxide inhibits the nitrergic Mas-mediated vasorelaxation evoked by angiotensin-(1–7). Angiotensin-(1–7) treatment of diabetic rats restored carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality by triggering a positive feedback played by endothelial Mas receptors, that blunts endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of reactive oxygen species. Mas-mediated antioxidant effects also restored diabetic rat carotid flow, pointing to the contribution of ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis in maintaining carotid flow. PMID:24877125

  20. Treatment benefits on metabolic syndrome with diet and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Dragusha, Gani; Elezi, Abdulla; Dragusha, Shpend; Gorani, Daut; Begolli, Luljeta

    2010-05-01

    The research has included 422 patients aged between 25 to 60, of whom 341 were men and 81 women. The purpose of research was to determine impact of diet and physical activity in the treatment of metabolic syndrome during the six month period. Processing of results through descriptive and discriminative analysis have indicated that 6 month treatment with diet and physical activity have had an impact in the: waistline decrease by 6.05 cm or 5.50% among males, and 4.92 cm or 5.10% among females; body mass index (BMI) decrease by 1.78 or 6.20% among males, and 2.3 or 8.16% among females; decrease of blood triglycerides levels by 0.35 mmol/L or 16.28% among males, and 0.27 mmol/L or 13.30% among females; increase of blood cholesterol HDL-C by 0.48 mmol/L or 34.78% among males, and 0.06 mmol/L or 4.28% among females; systolic arterial pressure decreased by 15 mmHg or 10.18%, and diastolic blood pressure by 8.74 mmHg or 9.47% among males, and systolic arterial pressure decreased by 7.39 mmHg or 5.17%, and diastolic blood pressure decreased by 5.18 mmHg or 5.75% among females; the level of blood glucose decreased by 0.45 mmol/L or 7.04% among males, and by 0.64 mmol/L or 9.92% decreased among females. The results show that physical exercise and diet are important factors in reducing the values symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In order to improve symptoms of metabolic syndrome, it is necessary to keep on with healthy diet and physical exercise that means the change of lifestyle. PMID:20507300

  1. EULAR Sjogren's syndrome disease activity index: development of a consensus systemic disease activity index for primary Sjogren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Raphaèle; Ravaud, Philippe; Bowman, Simon; Baron, Gabriel; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Theander, Elke; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Bootsma, Hendrika; Mariette, Xavier; Vitali, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop a disease activity index for patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SS): the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Sjögren’s Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI). Methods Thirty-nine SS experts participated in an international collaboration, promoted by EULAR, to develop the ESSDAI. Experts identified 12 organ-specific “domains” contributing to disease activity. For each domain, features of disease activity were classified in 3 or 4 levels according to their severity. Data abstracted from 96 patients with systemic complications of primary SS were used to generate 702 realistic vignettes for which all possible systemic complications were represented. Using the 0–10 physician global assessment (PhGA) scale, each expert scored the disease activity of 5 patient profiles and 20 realistic vignettes. Multiple regression modelling, with PhGA used as the dependent variable, was used to estimate the weight of each domain. Results All 12 domains were significantly associated with disease activity in the multivariate model, domain weights ranged from 1 to 6. The ESSDAI scores varied from 2 to 47 and were significantly correlated with PhGA for both real patient profiles and realistic vignettes (r=0.61 and r=0.58, respectively, p<0.0001). Compared to 57 (59.4%) of the real patient profiles, 468 (66.7%) of the realistic vignettes were considered likely or very likely to be true. Conclusion The ESSDAI is a clinical index designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. Once validated, such a standardized evaluation of primary SS should facilitate clinical research and should be helpful as an outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:19561361

  2. Utility of hydroxyurea in mast cell activation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is a relatively recently recognized cause of chronic multisystem polymorbidity of a generally inflammatory theme. Patients with MCAS often report migratory soft tissue and/or bone pain which frequently responds poorly to typical (narcotic and non-narcotic) analgesics as well as atypical analgesics such as antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Hydroxyurea (HU) is an oral ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor commonly used in the treatment of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms and sickle cell anemia. HU has been used to treat systemic mastocytosis, sometimes effecting improvement in MC activation symptoms but not tumor burden, suggesting potential utility of the drug in MCAS, too. Reported here are five cases of successful use of relatively low-dose HU in MCAS to reduce symptoms including previously refractory soft tissue and/or bone pain. HU may be useful in treating mediator symptoms in MCAS, but further study is needed to define optimal dosing strategies and patient subpopulations most likely to benefit. PMID:24192267

  3. Guillain-barré syndrome during active brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Aygul, Recep; Deniz, Orhan; Guzelcik, Metin; Kotan, Dilcan

    2010-12-01

    It has been reported that approximately two thirds of patients diagnosed with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) have had a prodromal illness within a four-week period preceding the onset of GBS. This prodromal illness is most commonly an upper respiratory tract illness or, secondly, gastroenteritis. However, specific infectious agents, such as mycoplasma, cytomegalovirus, Ebstein-Barr virus, vaccinia, variola, campylobacter, varicella-zoster, measles, mumps, hepatitis A and B viruses, rubella, influenza A and B viruses, coxackie and echoviruses, have also been reported to be certain or probable etiologic antecedent agents of GBS. In contrast, GBS during active brucellosis has rarely been reported. This article presents the case of a 28 year-old male patient with GBS during active brucellosis who responded fully to treatment directed to brucellosis. and it is stressed that brucellosis should be considered as a probable etiologic agent in patients with GBS who live in areas where brucellosis is endemic. PMID:25610149

  4. Activation of spinal MrgC-Gi-NR2B-nNOS signaling pathway by Mas oncogene-related gene C receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 attenuates bone cancer pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu’e; Zhang, Juan; Lei, Yishan; Lu, Cui’e; Hou, Bailing; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In the present study, we investigate the effects of Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) C receptors (MrgC) on the expression and activation of spinal Gi protein, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in mouse model of bone cancer pain. Methods: The number of spontaneous foot lift (NSF) and paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) were measured after inoculation of tumor cells and intrathecal injection of MrgC agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22) or MrgC antagonist anti-MrgC for 14 days after operation. Expression of spinal MrgC, Gi protein, NR2B and nNOS and their phosphorylated forms after inoculation was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Double labeling was used to identify the co-localization of NR2B or nNOS with MrgC in spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) neurons. The effects of intrathecal injection of BAM8-22 or anti-MrgC on nociceptive behaviors and the corresponding expression of spinal MrgC, Gi protein, NR2B and nNOS were also investigated. Results: The expression of spinal MrgC, Gi protein, NR2B, and nNOS was higher in tumor-bearing mice in comparison to sham mice or normal mice. Intrathecal injection of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 significantly alleviated bone cancer pain, up-regulated MrgC and Gi protein expression, and down-regulated the expression of spinal p-NR2B, t-nNOS and p-nNOS in SCDH on day 14 after operation, whereas administration of anti-MrgC produced the opposite effect. Meanwhile, MrgC-like immunoreactivity (IR) co-localizes with NR2B-IR or nNOS-IR in SCDH neurons. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that MrgC-activated spinal Gi-NR2B-nNOS signaling pathway plays important roles in the development of bone cancer pain. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:27158400

  5. Mas' Making and Pedagogy: Imagined Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournillier, Janice B.

    2009-01-01

    In this article I draw on an ethnographic case study that examined mas' makers' perceptions of the learning/teaching practices at work in the production of costumes for Trinidad and Tobago's annual Carnival celebrations. During the 2005 Carnival season I spent four months in the field, my country of birth, and collected data through participant…

  6. Object recognition in Williams syndrome: Uneven ventral stream activation

    PubMed Central

    O’Hearn, Kirsten; Roth, Jennifer K.; Courtney, Susan M.; Luna, Beatriz; Street, Whitney; Terwillinger, Robert; Landau, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder associated with severe visuospatial deficits, relatively strong language skills, heightened social interest, and increased attention to faces. On the basis of the visuospatial impairments, this disorder has been characterized primarily as a deficit of the dorsal stream, the occipitoparietal brain regions that subserve visuospatial processing. However, some evidence indicates that this disorder may also affect the development of the ventral stream, the occipitotemporal cortical regions that subserve face and object recognition. The present studies examined ventral stream function in WS, with the hypothesis that faces would produce a relatively more mature pattern of ventral occipitotemporal cortical activation, relative to other objects that are also represented across these visual areas. We compared functional magnetic resonance imaging activation patterns during viewing of human faces, cat faces, houses and shoes in individuals with WS (age 14–27), typically developing 6–9 year olds (matched approximately on mental age), and typically developing 14–26 year olds (matched on chronological age). Typically developing individuals exhibited changes in the pattern of activation over age, consistent with previous reports. The ventral stream topography of the WS individuals differed from both control groups, however, reflecting the same level of activation to face stimuli as chronological age matches, but less activation to house stimuli than either mental age or chronological age matches. We discuss the possible causes of this unusual topography and implications for understanding the behavioral profile of people with WS. PMID:21477194

  7. Return to activity following fasciotomy for chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Irion, Val; Magnussen, Robert A; Miller, Timothy L; Kaeding, Christopher C

    2014-10-01

    Diagnosis of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is relatively rare but has been well documented in athletes. There are, however, few reports regarding return to athletic activity after surgery among elite-level athletes. We hypothesized that a majority of elite-level athletes would successfully return to their previous level of competition following fasciotomy for CECS. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify elite-level athletes (collegiate or professional sport participation) who underwent fasciotomy for CECS over a 3-year period. Data collected included sport or activity, treatment and surgical details, time away from sport/activity after surgery, and ability to return to prior level of activity. Six males and seven females were included in the analysis. Patient age ranged from 17 to 24 years with a mean of 19.7 years. Six patients underwent unilateral lower extremity compartment release, and seven underwent bilateral lower extremity compartment release. The anterior and lateral compartments alone were released in 11 patients (84.6%). Two patients (15.4%) underwent four-compartment releases. Eleven patients (84.6%) were able to return to their previous elite level of sport participation at a mean of 10.6 weeks following surgical fasciotomy. Patients who had four-compartment release had a more than 3.5 week average longer return to full sporting activities (p = 0.011). Fasciotomy is effective in allowing elite athletes with CECS to return to sport. PMID:24664450

  8. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaolin; Li, Guangze; Chen, Shuzhen; Chen, Ji; Buck, Joshua; Zhu, Yulan; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Chen, Yanfang; Olson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD results from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of NADPH oxidases. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  9. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Li, G; Chen, S; Bihl, J; Buck, J; Zhu, Y; Xia, H; Lazartigues, E; Chen, Y; Olson, J E

    2014-07-25

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in the cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase (Nox) isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD result from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of Nox isoforms. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  10. Do Children with down Syndrome Perform Sufficient Physical Activity to Maintain Good Health? A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Nora; Dodd, Karen J.; Abblitt, Casey

    2009-01-01

    Our pilot study investigated if children with Down syndrome engaged in the recommended 60 min of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) every day. Twenty-three children with Down syndrome (7 girls, 16 boys; mean age 11.7 years, SD = 3.1) wore a triaxial accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to measure their activity levels. The average…

  11. Identifying the Barriers and Facilitators to Participation in Physical Activity for Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, M.; Shields, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many children with Down syndrome do not undertake the recommended amount of daily physical activity. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers and facilitators to physical activity for this group. Methods: Eighteen in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 parents (16 mothers, 4 fathers) of children with Down syndrome aged…

  12. Physical Activity and Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Chomistek, Andrea K.; Dimitrakoff, Jordan D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wu, Kana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a prevalent urologic disorder among men, but its etiology is still poorly understood. Our objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and incidence of CP/CPPS in a large cohort of male health professionals. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study among men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study followed from 1986 to 2008. The study population included 20,918 men who completed all CP/CPPS questions on the 2008 questionnaire. Leisure-time physical activity, including type and intensity of activity, was measured by questionnaire in 1986. A National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index pain score was calculated based on the responses on the 2008 questionnaire. Participants with pain scores ≥ 8 were considered CP/CPPS cases (n=689). Results Higher leisure-time physical activity was associated with lower risk of CP/CPPS. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) comparing >35.0 to ≤3.5 MET-h/wk of physical activity was 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56, 0.92, p for trend <0.001). Observed inverse associations between physical activity and CP/CPPS were similar for both moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities. Sedentary behavior, measured as time spent watching television, was not associated with risk of CP/CPPS (p for trend 0.64). Conclusions Findings from this study, the first large scale and most comprehensive study to date on this association, suggest that higher levels of leisure-time physical activity may lower risk of CP/CPPS in middle-aged and older men. PMID:25116086

  13. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization,more » a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.« less

  14. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization, a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.

  15. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Associated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome among People in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jing; Shen, Chong; Chu, Min J.; Gao, Yue X.; Xu, Guang F.; Huang, Jian P.; Xu, Qiong Q.; Cai, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is prevalent worldwide and its prevalence is related to physical activity, race, and lifestyle. Little data is available for people living in rural areas of China. In this study we examined associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with metabolic syndrome components among people in rural China. Methods The Nantong Metabolic Syndrome Study recruited 13,505 female and 6,997 male participants between 2007 and 2008. Data of socio-demographic characteristics and lifestyle were collected. The associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Results Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 21.6%. It was significantly lower in men than in women. Low risks of metabolic syndrome were observed in those who did less sitting and engaged in more vigorous physical activity. The highest tertile of vigorous physical activity was associated with 15–40% decreased odds of metabolic syndrome and all of its components, except for low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in men. Women with the highest tertile of moderate physical activity had 15–30% lower odds of central obesity, high glucose, and high triglycerides compared with those in the lowest tertile. Sitting time >42 hours per week had a 4%-12% attributable risk of metabolic syndrome, central obesity, and high triglycerides in both genders, and abnormal glucose and diastolic blood pressure in women. Sleeping for more than 8 hours per day was associated with risk of high serum glucose and lipids. Conclusions Our data suggested that physical activity has a preventive effect against metabolic syndrome and all its abnormal components, and that longer sitting time and sleep duration are associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome components, including central obesity and high triglycerides, glucose, and diastolic blood pressure. This study could provide information for future investigation into these associations. Also

  16. Cortical Activation During Levitation and Tentacular Movements of Corticobasal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Caulo, Massimo; Onofrj, Valeria; Thomas, Astrid; Tartaro, Armando; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2015-11-01

    Levitation and tentacular movements (LTM) are considered specific, yet rare (30%), features of Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS), and are erroneously classified as alien hand. Our study focuses on these typical involuntary movements and aims to highlight possible neural correlates.LTM were recognizable during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 4 of 19 CBS patients. FMRI activity was evaluated with an activation recognition program for movements, during LTM, consisting of levitaton and finger writhing, and compared with the absence of movement (rest) and voluntary movements (VM), similar to LTM, of affected and unaffected arm-hand. FMRI acquisition blocks were balanced in order to match LTM blocks with rest and VM conditions. In 1 of the 4 patients, fMRI was acquired only during LTM and with a different equipment.Despite variable intensity and range of involuntary movements, evidenced by videos, fMRI showed, during LTM, a significant (P<0.05-0.001) activation only of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1). Voluntary movements of the affected and unaffected arm elicited the known network including frontal, supplementary, sensory-motor cortex, and cerebellum. Willed movements of the LTM-affected arm induced higher and wider activation of contralateral M1 compared with the unaffected arm.The isolated activation of M1 suggests that LTM is a cortical disinhibition symptom, not involving a network. Higher activation of M1 during VM confirms that M1 excitability changes occur in CBS. Our study calls, finally, attention to the necessity to separate LTM from other alien hand phenomena. PMID:26559277

  17. Cortical Activation During Levitation and Tentacular Movements of Corticobasal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Pizzi, Stefano Delli; Caulo, Massimo; Onofrj, Valeria; Thomas, Astrid; Tartaro, Armando; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Levitation and tentacular movements (LTM) are considered specific, yet rare (30%), features of Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS), and are erroneously classified as alien hand. Our study focuses on these typical involuntary movements and aims to highlight possible neural correlates. LTM were recognizable during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 4 of 19 CBS patients. FMRI activity was evaluated with an activation recognition program for movements, during LTM, consisting of levitaton and finger writhing, and compared with the absence of movement (rest) and voluntary movements (VM), similar to LTM, of affected and unaffected arm-hand. FMRI acquisition blocks were balanced in order to match LTM blocks with rest and VM conditions. In 1 of the 4 patients, fMRI was acquired only during LTM and with a different equipment. Despite variable intensity and range of involuntary movements, evidenced by videos, fMRI showed, during LTM, a significant (P<0.05–0.001) activation only of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1). Voluntary movements of the affected and unaffected arm elicited the known network including frontal, supplementary, sensory-motor cortex, and cerebellum. Willed movements of the LTM-affected arm induced higher and wider activation of contralateral M1 compared with the unaffected arm. The isolated activation of M1 suggests that LTM is a cortical disinhibition symptom, not involving a network. Higher activation of M1 during VM confirms that M1 excitability changes occur in CBS. Our study calls, finally, attention to the necessity to separate LTM from other alien hand phenomena. PMID:26559277

  18. Ultra-low temperature MAS-DNP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Bouleau, Eric; Saint-Bonnet, Pierre; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2016-03-01

    Since the infancy of NMR spectroscopy, sensitivity and resolution have been the limiting factors of the technique. Regular essential developments on this front have led to the widely applicable, versatile, and powerful spectroscopy that we know today. However, the Holy Grail of ultimate sensitivity and resolution is not yet reached, and technical improvements are still ongoing. Hence, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) making use of high-frequency, high-power microwave irradiation of electron spins has become very promising in combination with magic angle sample spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments. This is because it leads to a transfer of the much larger polarization of these electron spins under suitable irradiation to surrounding nuclei, greatly increasing NMR sensitivity. Currently, this boom in MAS-DNP is mainly performed at minimum sample temperatures of about 100K, using cold nitrogen gas to pneumatically spin and cool the sample. This Perspective deals with the desire to improve further the sensitivity and resolution by providing "ultra"-low temperatures for MAS-DNP, using cryogenic helium gas. Different designs on how this technological challenge has been overcome are described. It is shown that stable and fast spinning can be attained for sample temperatures down to 30K using a large cryostat developed in our laboratory. Using this cryostat to cool a closed-loop of helium gas brings the additional advantage of sample spinning frequencies that can greatly surpass those achievable with nitrogen gas, due to the differing fluidic properties of these two gases. It is shown that using ultra-low temperatures for MAS-DNP results in substantial experimental sensitivity enhancements and according time-savings. Access to this temperature range is demonstrated to be both viable and highly pertinent. PMID:26920837

  19. Ultra-low temperature MAS-DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel; Bouleau, Eric; Saint-Bonnet, Pierre; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2016-03-01

    Since the infancy of NMR spectroscopy, sensitivity and resolution have been the limiting factors of the technique. Regular essential developments on this front have led to the widely applicable, versatile, and powerful spectroscopy that we know today. However, the Holy Grail of ultimate sensitivity and resolution is not yet reached, and technical improvements are still ongoing. Hence, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) making use of high-frequency, high-power microwave irradiation of electron spins has become very promising in combination with magic angle sample spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments. This is because it leads to a transfer of the much larger polarization of these electron spins under suitable irradiation to surrounding nuclei, greatly increasing NMR sensitivity. Currently, this boom in MAS-DNP is mainly performed at minimum sample temperatures of about 100 K, using cold nitrogen gas to pneumatically spin and cool the sample. This Perspective deals with the desire to improve further the sensitivity and resolution by providing "ultra"-low temperatures for MAS-DNP, using cryogenic helium gas. Different designs on how this technological challenge has been overcome are described. It is shown that stable and fast spinning can be attained for sample temperatures down to 30 K using a large cryostat developed in our laboratory. Using this cryostat to cool a closed-loop of helium gas brings the additional advantage of sample spinning frequencies that can greatly surpass those achievable with nitrogen gas, due to the differing fluidic properties of these two gases. It is shown that using ultra-low temperatures for MAS-DNP results in substantial experimental sensitivity enhancements and according time-savings. Access to this temperature range is demonstrated to be both viable and highly pertinent.

  20. Dental perspectives in fibrous dysplasia and McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Boyce, Alison M; Collins, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (FD), endocrine disorders, and café-au-lait skin pigmentation. Ninety percent of MAS patients have FD lesions in the craniofacial area, resulting in significant orofacial deformity, dental disorders, bone pain, and compromised oral health. Maxillomandibular FD is also associated with dental developmental disorders, malocclusion, and high caries index. There are limited data on the outcomes of dental treatments in maxillomandibular FD/MAS patients, because clinicians and researchers have limited access to patients, and there are concerns that dental surgery may activate quiescent jaw FD lesions to grow aggressively. This report highlights current perspectives on dental management issues associated with maxillomandibular FD within the context of MAS. PMID:23953425

  1. Dental Perspectives in Fibrous Dysplasia and McCune-Albright Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akintoye, Sunday O.; Boyce, Alison M.; Collins, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (PFD), endocrine disorders and café-au-lait skin pigmentation. Ninety percent of MAS patients have FD lesions in the craniofacial area, resulting in significant orofacial deformity, dental disorders, bone pain and compromised oral health. Maxillo-mandibular FD is also associated with dental developmental disorders, malocclusion, and high caries index. There is limited data on the outcomes of dental treatments in maxillo-mandibular FD/MAS patients, because clinicians and researchers have limited access to patients, and there are concerns that dental surgery may activate quiescent jaw FD lesions to grow aggressively. This report highlights current perspectives on dental management issues associated with maxillo-mandibular FD within the context of MAS. PMID:23953425

  2. Oocyte maturation. Basic and clinical aspects of in vitro maturation (IVM) with special emphasis of the role of FF-MAS.

    PubMed

    Grøndahl, Christian

    2008-02-01

    treatment of human infertility is being discussed, including both the safety and efficacy issues that need to be addressed. It is being reviewed how FF-MAS and related MAS analogues by our group and other scientific groups have been observed to mediate a dose-dependant response on both the nuclear maturation and especially the cytoplasmic maturation during oocyte maturation In Vitro thus giving rise to pre-embryos of higher developmental potential. Studies are reviewed regarding the family of meiosis activating sterols, its In Vivo regulation by gonadotropins (especially LH) and suggestions to the signaling pathways as the putative MAS receptor eliciting the important cytoplasmic maturation signaling cascade that involves mos/MAP kinase. The pharmacological effect of synthetic FF-MAS has been observed in various models and species, including murine, porcine and humane oocytes. Finally, the chromosome status of IVM human oocytes has been the focus of a large prospective clinical trial, documenting that FF-MAS acting on human oocytes during In Vitro maturation presents a safe procedure evaluated on numerical chromosome aberration rates in metaphase-II oocytes. In conclusion the In Vitro maturation of human oocytes is already now a valuable clinical treatment alternative for a subset of infertile patients, especially the Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) patients. IVM has the promise of being tomorrow's gold standard in treatment of human infertility if most of the important components of oocyte maturation are understood and can be adequately addressed In Vitro. Considering the present low frequency of successful fertilization and pre-implantation development following In Vitro maturation of human oocytes, the addition of FF-MAS or MAS analogues to the maturation medium to improve the cytoplasmic maturation and to yield higher quality pre-embryos may prove highly beneficial. PMID:18321442

  3. HEALTHY Intervention: Fitness, Physical Activity, and Metabolic Syndrome Results

    PubMed Central

    Jago, Russell; McMurray, Robert G.; Drews, Kimberly L.; Moe, Esther L.; Murray, Tinker; Pham, Trang H.; Venditti, Elizabeth M.; Volpe, Stella L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to assess the effect of the HEALTHY intervention on the metabolic syndrome (Met-S), fitness, and physical activity levels of US middle-school students. Methods Cluster randomized controlled trial conducted in 42 (21 intervention) US middle schools. Participants were recruited at the start of sixth grade (2006) when baseline assessments were made, with post-assessments made 2.5 yr later at the end of eighth grade (2009). The HEALTHY intervention had four components: 1) improved school food environment, 2) physical activity and eating educational sessions, 3) social marketing, and 4) revised physical education curriculum. Met-S risk factors, 20-m shuttle run (fitness), and self-reported moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were assessed at each time point. Ethnicity and gender were self-reported. Obesity status (normal weight, overweight, or obese) was also assessed. Results At baseline, 5% of the participants were classified with Met-S, with two-thirds of the males and one-third of the females recording below average baseline fitness levels. Control group participants reported 96 min of MVPA at baseline with 103 min reported by the intervention group. There were no statistically significant (P < 0.05) differences in Met-S, fitness, or MVPA levels at the end of the study after adjustment for baseline values and confounders. There were no differences in any ethnic, obesity, or ethnic × obesity subgroups for either gender. Conclusions The HEALTHY intervention had no effect on the Met-S, fitness, or physical activity levels. Approaches that focus on how to change physical activity, fitness, and Met-S using nonschool or perhaps in addition to school based components need to be developed. PMID:21233778

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension that markedly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes, PPARα, PPARδ/β and PPARγ are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors, which modulate the expression of an array of genes that play a central role in regulating glucose, lipid and cholesterol metabolism, where imbalance can lead to obesity, T2DM and CVD. They are also drug targets, and currently, PPARα (fibrates) and PPARγ (thiazolodinediones) agonists are in clinical use for treating dyslipidemia and T2DM, respectively. These metabolic characteristics of the PPARs, coupled with their involvement in metabolic diseases, mean extensive efforts are underway worldwide to develop new and efficacious PPAR-based therapies for the treatment of additional maladies associated with the MetS. This article presents an overview of the functional characteristics of three PPAR isotypes, discusses recent advances in our understanding of the diverse biological actions of PPARs, particularly in the vascular system, and summarizes the developmental status of new single, dual, pan (multiple) and partial PPAR agonists for the clinical management of key components of MetS, T2DM and CVD. It also summarizes the clinical outcomes from various clinical trials aimed at evaluating the atheroprotective actions of currently used fibrates and thiazolodinediones. PMID:20932114

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes Affecting Human Natural Killer Cell Cytolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyoungjun; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor-dependent fusion, promotes the release of the lytic granule contents into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process. PMID:24478771

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Salman

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension that markedly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes, PPARα, PPARδ/ß and PPARγ are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors, which modulate the expression of an array of genes that play a central role in regulating glucose, lipid and cholesterol metabolism, where imbalance can lead to obesity, T2DM and CVD. They are also drug targets, and currently, PPARα (fibrates) and PPARγ (thiazolodinediones) agonists are in clinical use for treating dyslipidemia and T2DM, respectively. These metabolic characteristics of the PPARs, coupled with their involvement in metabolic diseases, mean extensive efforts are underway worldwide to develop new and efficacious PPAR-based therapies for the treatment of additional maladies associated with the MetS. This article presents an overview of the functional characteristics of three PPAR isotypes, discusses recent advances in our understanding of the diverse biological actions of PPARs, particularly in the vascular system, and summarizes the developmental status of new single, dual, pan (multiple) and partial PPAR agonists for the clinical management of key components of MetS, T2DM and CVD. It also summarizes the clinical outcomes from various clinical trials aimed at evaluating the atheroprotective actions of currently used fibrates and thiazolodinediones. PMID:20932114

  7. Cassini's Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) Process: How to Successfully Command 200 Navigation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Genevie Velarde; Mohr, David; Kirby, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    To keep Cassini on its complex trajectory, more than 200 orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) have been planned from July 2004 to July 2010. With only a few days between many of these OTMs, the operations process of planning and executing the necessary commands had to be automated. The resulting Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) process minimizes the workforce required for, and maximizes the efficiency of, the maneuver design and uplink activities. The MAS process is a well-organized and logically constructed interface between Cassini's Navigation (NAV), Spacecraft Operations (SCO), and Ground Software teams. Upon delivery of an orbit determination (OD) from NAV, the MAS process can generate a maneuver design and all related uplink and verification products within 30 minutes. To date, all 112 OTMs executed by the Cassini spacecraft have been successful. MAS was even used to successfully design and execute a maneuver while the spacecraft was in safe mode.

  8. BOREAS Level-1B MAS Imagery At-sensor Radiance, Relative X and Y Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, Richard; Strub, Richard; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Ungar, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    For BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS), the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with the other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes detailed land cover and biophysical parameter maps such as fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (fPAR) and Leaf Area Index (LAI). Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-1b MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C-130 INS data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  9. Parents' Perceptions of Health and Physical Activity Needs of Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menear, Kristi Sayers

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome typically have low fitness levels and obesity despite data that indicate physiological gains from physical activity and exercise interventions. Low fitness levels and obesity in individuals with Down syndrome may be related to sedentary lifestyles, social and recreational opportunities, or low motivation to be…

  10. Abnormal fMRI Activation Pattern during Story Listening in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds Losin, Elizabeth A.; Rivera, Susan M.; O'Hare, Elizabeth D.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.; Pinter, Joseph D.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is characterized by disproportionately severe impairments of speech and language, yet little is known about the neural underpinnings of these deficits. We compared fMRI activation patterns during passive story listening in 9 young adults with Down syndrome and 9 approximately age-matched, typically developing controls. The typically…

  11. Activation of cutaneous immune responses in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Birklein, Frank; Drummond, Peter D.; Li, Wenwu; Schlereth, Tanja; Albrecht, Nahid; Finch, Philip M.; Dawson, Linda F.; Clark, J. David; Kingery, Wade S.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is unresolved, but TNF-α and IL-6 are elevated in experimental skin blister fluid from CRPS affected limbs, as is tryptase, a marker for mast cells. In the rat fracture model of CRPS exaggerated sensory and sympathetic neural signaling stimulate keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation, causing the local production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines leading to pain behavior. The current investigation used CRPS patient skin biopsies to determine whether keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation occur in CRPS skin and to identify the cellular source of the up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6, and tryptase observed in CRPS experimental skin blister fluid. Skin biopsies were collected from the affected skin and the contralateral mirror site in 55 CRPS patients and the biopsy sections were immunostained for keratinocyte, cell proliferation, mast cell markers, TNF-α, and IL-6. In early CRPS keratinocytes were activated in the affected skin, resulting in proliferation, epidermal thickening, and up-regulated TNF-α and IL-6 expression. In chronic CRPS there was reduced keratinocyte proliferation with epidermal thinning in the affected skin. Acute CRPS patients also had increased mast cell accumulation in the affected skin, but there was no increase in mast cell numbers in chronic CRPS. PMID:24462502

  12. Physical Activity, Body Composition and Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Salonen, Minna K.; Wasenius, Niko; Kajantie, Eero; Lano, Aulikki; Lahti, Jari; Heinonen, Kati; Räikkönen, Katri; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Low physical activity (PA) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in all age groups. We measured intensity and volume of PA and examined the associations between PA and the metabolic syndrome (MS), its components and body composition among young Finnish adults. Research Design and Methods The study comprises 991 men and women born 1985-86, who participated in a clinical study during the years 2009-11 which included assessments of metabolism, body composition and PA. Objectively measured (SenseWear Armband) five-day PA data was available from 737 participants and was expressed in metabolic equivalents of task (MET). Results The prevalence of MS ranged between 8-10%. Higher total mean volume (MET-hours) or intensity (MET) were negatively associated with the risk of MS and separate components of MS, while the time spent at sedentary level of PA was positively associated with MS. Conclusions MS was prevalent in approximately every tenth of the young adults at the age of 24 years. Higher total mean intensity and volume rates as well as longer duration spent at moderate and vigorous PA level had a beneficial impact on the risk of MS. Longer time spent at the sedentary level of PA increased the risk of MS. PMID:25992848

  13. Inhibition of Mas G-protein signaling improves coronary blood flow, reduces myocardial infarct size, and provides long-term cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Li, Zhuangjie; Dang, Huong; Chen, Ruoping; Liaw, Chen; Tran, Thuy-Anh; Boatman, P Douglas; Connolly, Daniel T; Adams, John W

    2012-01-01

    The Mas receptor is a class I G-protein-coupled receptor that is expressed in brain, testis, heart, and kidney. The intracellular signaling pathways activated downstream of Mas are still largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the expression pattern and signaling of Mas in the heart and assessed the participation of Mas in cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mas mRNA and protein were present in all chambers of human hearts, with cardiomyocytes and coronary arteries being sites of enriched expression. Expression of Mas in either HEK293 cells or cardiac myocytes resulted in constitutive coupling to the G(q) protein, which in turn activated phospholipase C and caused inositol phosphate accumulation. To generate chemical tools for use in probing the function of Mas, we performed a library screen and chemistry optimization program to identify potent and selective nonpeptide agonists and inverse agonists. Mas agonists activated G(q) signaling in a dose-dependent manner and reduced coronary blood flow in isolated mouse and rat hearts. Conversely, treatment of isolated rat hearts with Mas inverse agonists improved coronary flow, reduced arrhythmias, and provided cardioprotection from ischemia-reperfusion injury, an effect that was due, at least in part, to decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Participation of Mas in ischemia-reperfusion injury was confirmed in Mas knockout mice, which had reduced infarct size relative to mice with normal Mas expression. These results suggest that activation of Mas during myocardial infarction contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury and further suggest that inhibition of Mas-G(q) signaling may provide a new therapeutic strategy directed at cardioprotection. PMID:22003054

  14. A Novel α/β-Hydrolase Gene IbMas Enhances Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Sweetpotato

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuejin; He, Shaozhen; Liu, Qingchang

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the major environmental stresses in agriculture worldwide and affects crop productivity and quality. The development of crops with elevated levels of salt tolerance is therefore highly desirable. In the present study, a novel maspardin gene, named IbMas, was isolated from salt-tolerant sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) line ND98. IbMas contains maspardin domain and belongs to α/β-hydrolase superfamily. Expression of IbMas was up-regulated in sweetpotato under salt stress and ABA treatment. The IbMas-overexpressing sweetpotato (cv. Shangshu 19) plants exhibited significantly higher salt tolerance compared with the wild-type. Proline content was significantly increased, whereas malonaldehyde content was significantly decreased in the transgenic plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthesis were significantly enhanced in the transgenic plants. H2O2 was also found to be significantly less accumulated in the transgenic plants than in the wild-type. Overexpression of IbMas up-regulated the salt stress responsive genes, including pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase, pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase, SOD, psbA and phosphoribulokinase genes, under salt stress. These findings suggest that overexpression of IbMas enhances salt tolerance of the transgenic sweetpotato plants by regulating osmotic balance, protecting membrane integrity and photosynthesis and increasing reactive oxygen species scavenging capacity. PMID:25501819

  15. Adipocyte Mineralocorticoid Receptor Activation Leads to Metabolic Syndrome and Induction of Prostaglandin D2 Synthase.

    PubMed

    Urbanet, Riccardo; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Feraco, Alessandra; Venteclef, Nicolas; El Mogrhabi, Soumaya; Sierra-Ramos, Catalina; Alvarez de la Rosa, Diego; Adler, Gail K; Quilliot, Didier; Rossignol, Patrick; Fallo, Francesco; Touyz, Rhian M; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a major risk factor for the development of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. Pharmacological antagonism of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, limits metabolic syndrome in preclinical models, but mechanistic studies are lacking to delineate the role of MR activation in adipose tissue. In this study, we report that MR expression is increased in visceral adipose tissue in a preclinical mouse model of metabolic syndrome and in obese patients. In vivo conditional upregulation of MR in mouse adipocytes led to increased weight and fat mass, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome features without affecting blood pressure. We identified prostaglandin D2 synthase as a novel MR target gene in adipocytes and AT56, a specific inhibitor of prostaglandin D2 synthase enzymatic activity, blunted adipogenic aldosterone effects. Moreover, translational studies showed that expression of MR and prostaglandin D2 synthase is strongly correlated in adipose tissues from obese patients. PMID:25966493

  16. Allergic manifestations and cutaneous histamine responses in patients with McCune Albright syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background McCune Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare disorder characterized by precocious puberty, café-au-lait spots, and fibrous dysplasia. Its cause is an activating mutation in the GNAS gene, encoding a subunit of the stimulatory G protein, Gsalpha (Gsα). The action of any mediator that signals via Gsα and cyclic AMP can be up regulated in MAS. We had observed gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux, and anaphylaxis in McCune Albright patients. Objective As histamine is known to signal via histamine 1 (H1) and histamine 2 (H2) receptors, which couple with stimulatory G proteins, we attempted to mechanistically link histamine responsiveness to the activating GNAS mutation. We hypothesized that responsiveness to histamine skin testing would differ between MAS patients and healthy controls. Patients and methods After obtaining informed consent, we performed a systematic review of histamine responsiveness and allergic manifestations in 11 MAS patients and 11 sex-matched, Tanner-stage matched controls. We performed skin prick testing, quantifying the orthogonal diameters of wheals and erythema. We also quantitated G protein mRNA expression. Results The peak wheal and flare responses to histamine were significantly higher in MAS patients compared to controls. Conclusions This study suggests that MAS patients may be at risk for exaggerated histamine responsiveness compared to unaffected controls. PMID:23663565

  17. Heteromerization Between the Bradykinin B2 Receptor and the Angiotensin-(1-7) Mas Receptor: Functional Consequences.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Bruno D; Carretero, Oscar A; Janic, Brana; Grecco, Hernán E; Gironacci, Mariela M

    2016-10-01

    Bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) and angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor (MasR)-mediated effects are physiologically interconnected. The molecular basis for such cross talk is unknown. It is hypothesized that the cross talk occurs at the receptor level. We investigated B2R-MasR heteromerization and the functional consequences of such interaction. B2R fused to the cyan fluorescent protein and MasR fused to the yellow fluorescent protein were transiently coexpressed in human embryonic kidney293T cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis showed that B2R and MasR formed a constitutive heteromer, which was not modified by their agonists. B2R or MasR antagonists decreased fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency, suggesting that the antagonist promoted heteromer dissociation. B2R-MasR heteromerization induced an 8-fold increase in the MasR ligand-binding affinity. On agonist stimulation, the heteromer was internalized into early endosomes with a slower sequestration rate from the plasma membrane, compared with single receptors. B2R-MasR heteromerization induced a greater increase in arachidonic acid release and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation after angiotensin-(1-7) stimulation, and this effect was blocked by the B2R antagonist. Concerning serine/threonine kinase Akt activity, a significant bradykinin-promoted activation was detected in B2R-MasR but not in B2R-expressing cells. Angiotensin-(1-7) and bradykinin elicited antiproliferative effects only in cells expressing B2R-MasR heteromers, but not in cells expressing each receptor alone. Proximity ligation assay confirmed B2R-MasR interaction in human glomerular endothelial cells supporting the interaction between both receptors in vivo. Our findings provide an explanation for the cross talk between bradykinin B2R and angiotensin-(1-7) MasR-mediated effects. B2R-MasR heteromerization induces functional changes in the receptor that may lead to long-lasting protective properties. PMID

  18. Physical Fitness and Physical Activity in Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borremans, Erwin; Rintala, Pauli; McCubbin, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    While physical activity is beneficial for youth with developmental disabilities, little is known about those individuals' fitness profile and levels of activity. Therefore the purpose of this study was to investigate the physical fitness profile and physical activity level of 30 adolescents with and without Asperger syndrome (AS). Evaluations were…

  19. Object Recognition in Williams Syndrome: Uneven Ventral Stream Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hearn, Kirsten; Roth, Jennifer K.; Courtney, Susan M.; Luna, Beatriz; Street, Whitney; Terwillinger, Robert; Landau, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder associated with severe visuospatial deficits, relatively strong language skills, heightened social interest, and increased attention to faces. On the basis of the visuospatial deficits, this disorder has been characterized primarily as a deficit of the dorsal stream, the occipitoparietal brain regions…

  20. Active surveillance for congenital rubella syndrome in Yangon, Myanmar.

    PubMed Central

    Thant, Kyaw-Zin; Oo, Win-Mar; Myint, Thein-Thein; Shwe, Than-Nu; Han, Aye-Maung; Aye, Khin-Mar; Aye, Kay-Thi; Moe, Kyaw; Thein, Soe; Robertson, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Rubella vaccine is not included in the immunization schedule in Myanmar. Although surveillance for outbreaks of measles and rubella is conducted nationwide, there is no routine surveillance for congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Therefore, we organized a study to assess the burden of CRS. METHODS: From 1 December 2000 to 31 December 2002 active surveillance for CRS was conducted among children aged 0-17 months at 13 hospitals and 2 private clinics in Yangon, the capital city. Children with suspected CRS had a standard examination and a blood sample was obtained. All serum samples were tested for rubella-specific IgM; selected samples were tested for rubella-specific IgG and for rubella RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). FINDINGS: A total of 81 children aged 0-17 months were suspected of having CRS. Of these, 18 children had laboratory-confirmed CRS (7 were IgM positive; 7 were RT-PCR positive; and 10 were IgG positive at > 6 months of age). One additional child who tested positive by RT-PCR and whose mother had had rubella during pregnancy but who had a normal clinical examination was classified as having congenital rubella infection. During 2001-02 no rubella outbreaks were detected in Yangon Division. In the 31 urban townships of Yangon Division, the annual incidence was 0.1 laboratory-confirmed cases of CRS per 1000 live births. CONCLUSION: This is the first population-based study of CRS incidence from a developing country during a rubella-endemic period; the incidence of CRS is similar to endemic rates found in industrialized countries during the pre-vaccine era. Rubella-specific IgG tests proved practical for diagnosing CRS in children aged > 6 months. This is one of the first studies to report on the use of rubella-specific RT-PCR directly on serum samples; further studies are warranted to confirm the utility of this method as an additional means of diagnosing CRS. PMID:16501710

  1. Arginase activity and nitric oxide levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Meral; Okur, Hacer Kuzu; Pelin, Zerrin; Öğünç, Ayliz Velioğlu; Öztürk, Levent

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is characterized by repetitive obstruction of the upper airways, and it is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. There have been several studies demonstrating low levels of nitric oxide in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome compared with healthy controls. In this study, we hypothesized that reduced nitric oxide levels would result in high arginase activity. Arginase reacts with L-arginine and produces urea and L-ornithine, whereas L-arginine is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase, which produces nitric oxide. METHODS: The study group consisted of 51 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients (M/F: 43/8; mean age 49±10 years of age) and 15 healthy control subjects (M/F: 13/3; mean age 46±14 years of age). Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients were divided into two subgroups based on the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide levels and arginase activity were measured via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of serum samples. RESULTS: Serum nitric oxide levels in the control subjects were higher than in the obstructive sleep apnea patients with and without cardiovascular diseases (p<0.05). Arginase activity was significantly higher (p<0.01) in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients without cardiovascular diseases compared with the control group. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients with cardiovascular diseases had higher arginase activity than the controls (p<0.001) and the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients without cardiovascular diseases (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Low nitric oxide levels are associated with high arginase activity. The mechanism of nitric oxide depletion in sleep apnea patients suggests that increased arginase activity might reduce the substrate availability of nitric oxide synthase and thus could reduce nitric oxide levels. PMID:24714832

  2. Identifying Facilitators and Barriers to Physical Activity for Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahy, J.; Shields, N.; Taylor, N. F.; Dodd, K. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adults with Down syndrome are typically sedentary, and many do not participate in the recommended levels of physical activity per week. The aim of this study was to identify the facilitators and barriers to physical activity for this group. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit the views of adults with Down…

  3. Investigation of domain size in polymer membranes using double quantum filtered spin diffusion MAS NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Alam, Todd Michael; Cherry, Brian Ray; Cornelius, Christopher James

    2005-02-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate sulfonated Diels-Alder poly(phenlylene) polymer membranes. Under high spinning speed {sup 1}H MAS conditions, the proton environments of the sulfonic acid and phenylene polymer backbone are resolved. A double-quantum (DQ) filter using the rotor-synchronized back-to-back (BABA) NMR multiple-pulse sequence allowed the selective suppression of the sulfonic proton environment in the {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra. This DQ filter in conjunction with a spin diffusion NMR experiment was then used to measure the domain size of the sulfonic acid component within the membrane. In addition, the temperature dependence of the sulfonic acid spin-spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was determined, providing an estimate of the activation energy for the proton dynamics of the dehydrated membrane.

  4. 48 CFR 538.272 - MAS price reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false MAS price reductions. 538... Schedules 538.272 MAS price reductions. (a) Section 552.238-75, Price Reductions, requires the contractor to maintain during the contract period the negotiated price/discount relationship (and/or term and...

  5. 48 CFR 538.272 - MAS price reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false MAS price reductions. 538... Schedules 538.272 MAS price reductions. (a) Section 552.238-75, Price Reductions, requires the contractor to maintain during the contract period the negotiated price/discount relationship (and/or term and...

  6. 48 CFR 538.272 - MAS price reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false MAS price reductions. 538... Schedules 538.272 MAS price reductions. (a) Section 552.238-75, Price Reductions, requires the contractor to maintain during the contract period the negotiated price/discount relationship (and/or term and...

  7. 48 CFR 538.272 - MAS price reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false MAS price reductions. 538... Schedules 538.272 MAS price reductions. (a) Section 552.238-75, Price Reductions, requires the contractor to maintain during the contract period the negotiated price/discount relationship (and/or term and...

  8. [Clinical relevance of antidepressant-induced activation syndrome: from a perspective of bipolar spectrum disorder].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Teruaki; Inoue, Takeshi; Suzuki, Katsuji; Kitaichi, Yuji; Masui, Takuya; Denda, Kenzo; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2007-01-01

    Recent concerns have been raised regarding whether antidepressants, especially selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) might increase suicidal tendencies and intense debate-rages over the pros and cons of their use. Although systematic reviews and population-based studies have been conducted, a consensus on this association remains to be established. Subsequently, the concept of so-called 'activation syndrome' associated with antidepressants has been accepted without its adequate verification. In the present report, we present our experience of seven cases considered of having 'activation syndrome' brought on by antidepressants, and examine its clinical relevance to bipolar spectrum disorder (Ghaemi, et al., 2001) both symptomatologically and diagnostically. Five patients, diagnosed as having major depressive disorder according to the diagnostic manual (DSM-IV), met the criteria of bipolar spectrum disorder and suffered from activation syndrome following the administration of SSRIs, mainly paroxetine. Similarly, hypomania developed in all five cases with depression; the diagnostic criteria of a hypomanic episode were not met. In the remaining two patients, who were both diagnosed with bipolar disorder, one showed irritability and insomnia through imipramine use, and the another developed a hypomanic and/or a mixed state after the co-administration of fluvoxamine and trazodone. From the results of our examination, 'bipolarity', which is the pivotal factor of bipolar spectrum, might exist behind the phenomenon recognized as activation syndrome, and be revealed by antidepressant treatment, just like manic switching. Moreover, the various problems encountered in the current practice of treating mood disorders, including unipolar-bipolar dichotomy, manic switching by antidepressants, and narrow criteria for a mixed episode, were pointed out a new through this concept of activation syndrome. Actually, the understanding of activation syndrome clinically leads to

  9. The roles of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity and its association with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, collectively known as the metabolic syndrome or syndrome X, is one of the most challenging health problems facing industrialized countries. The nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs alpha (α), beta (β) also known as delta (δ), and gamma (γ)), have well-documented roles in lipid and glucose metabolism. Pharmacologically, PPARα is activated by fibrate hypolipidemic drugs, whereas PPARγ is activated by insulin sensitizers thiazolidinediones (TZDs). No marketed drug is yet available for PPARβ(δ). The identification of fibrates and TZDs as respective ligands for PPARα and PPARγ was a groundbreaking finding that sparked notable pharmaceutical interest in PPARs as potential drug targets for treatment of the metabolic syndrome. Limiting side effects associated with clinical use of TZDs have emerged in recent years. New and novel PPAR drugs with broad safety margins and therapeutic potentials for the metabolic syndrome are in development. These include partial, dual, or pan PPAR agonists; PPAR antagonists; and selective PPAR modulators. The objective of this chapter is to highlight the therapeutic benefits of targeting more than one PPAR subtype in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome. The pros and cons observed during clinical use of TZDs and the strategies and progress made in the production of new generations of safe and effective PPAR ligands are discussed. PMID:24373239

  10. Mutations in activation-induced cytidine deaminase in patients with hyper IgM syndrome.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Y; Lavoie, A; Cunningham-Rundles, C; Bédard, P M; Hébert, J; Côté, L; Dan, K; Sedlak, D; Buckley, R H; Fischer, A; Durandy, A; Conley, M E

    2000-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that mutations in a newly described RNA editing enzyme, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), can cause an autosomal recessive form of hyper IgM syndrome. To determine the relative frequency of mutations in AID, we evaluated a group of 27 patients with hyper IgM syndrome who did not have defects in CD40 ligand and 23 patients with common variable immunodeficiency. Three different mutations in AID were identified in 18 patients with hyper IgM syndrome, including 14 French Canadians, 2 Lumbee Indians, and a brother and sister from Okinawa. No mutations were found in the remaining 32 patients. In the group of patients with hyper IgM syndrome, the patients with mutations in AID were older at the age of diagnosis, were more likely to have positive isohemagglutinins, and were less likely to have anemia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia. Lymphoid hyperplasia was seen in patients with hyper IgM syndrome and normal AID as well as the patients with hyper IgM syndrome and defects in AID. PMID:11112359

  11. A Drosophila model of GSS syndrome suggests defects in active zones are responsible for pathogenesis of GSS syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Kyu; Jeon, Yong-Chul; Lee, Dae-Weon; Oh, Jae-Min; Lee, Hyun-Pil; Jeong, Byung-Hoon; Carp, Richard I.; Koh, Young Ho; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    We have established a Drosophila model of Gerstmann–Sträussler–Scheinker (GSS) syndrome by expressing mouse prion protein (PrP) having leucine substitution at residue 101 (MoPrPP101L). Flies expressing MoPrPP101L, but not wild-type MoPrP (MoPrP3F4), showed severe defects in climbing ability and early death. Expressed MoPrPP101L in Drosophila was differentially glycosylated, localized at the synaptic terminals and mainly present as deposits in adult brains. We found that behavioral defects and early death of MoPrPP101L flies were not due to Caspase 3-dependent programmed cell death signaling. In addition, we found that Type 1 glutamatergic synaptic boutons in larval neuromuscular junctions of MoPrPP101L flies showed significantly increased numbers of satellite synaptic boutons. Furthermore, the amount of Bruchpilot and Discs large in MoPrPP101L flies was significantly reduced. Brains from scrapie-infected mice showed significantly decreased ELKS, an active zone matrix marker compared with those of age-matched control mice. Thus, altered active zone structures at the molecular level may be involved in the pathogenesis of GSS syndrome in Drosophila and scrapie-infected mice. PMID:20829230

  12. Fine Motor Activities Program to Promote Fine Motor Skills in a Case Study of Down's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lersilp, Suchitporn; Putthinoi, Supawadee; Panyo, Kewalin

    2016-01-01

    Children with Down's syndrome have developmental delays, particularly regarding cognitive and motor development. Fine motor skill problems are related to motor development. They have impact on occupational performances in school-age children with Down's syndrome because they relate to participation in school activities, such as grasping, writing, and carrying out self-care duties. This study aimed to develop a fine motor activities program and to examine the efficiency of the program that promoted fine motor skills in a case study of Down's syndrome. The case study subject was an 8 -year-old male called Kai, who had Down's syndrome. He was a first grader in a regular school that provided classrooms for students with special needs. This study used the fine motor activities program with assessment tools, which included 3 subtests of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, second edition (BOT-2) that applied to Upper-limb coordination, Fine motor precision and Manual dexterity; as well as the In-hand Manipulation Checklist, and Jamar Hand Dynamometer Grip Test. The fine motor activities program was implemented separately and consisted of 3 sessions of 45 activities per week for 5 weeks, with each session taking 45 minutes. The results showed obvious improvement of fine motor skills, including bilateral hand coordination, hand prehension, manual dexterity, in-hand manipulation, and hand muscle strength. This positive result was an example of a fine motor intervention program designed and developed for therapists and related service providers in choosing activities that enhance fine motor skills in children with Down's syndrome. PMID:27357876

  13. The Marfan Syndrome: Physical Activity Guidelines for Physical Educators, Coaches and Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeo, Thomas J.

    Intended for physical educators, this manual provides guidelines for providing safe and effective physical activity programs for children with Marfan syndrome, a congenital condition involving the connective tissues and the probable cause of sudden death by heart failure of some young competitive athletes in recent cases. The manual includes…

  14. Magnetoencephalographic Analysis of Cortical Activity in Adults with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virji-Babul, N.; Cheung, T.; Weeks, D.; Herdman, A. T.; Cheyne, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: This preliminary study served as a pilot for an ongoing analysis of spectral power in adults with Down syndrome (DS) using a 151 channel whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG). The present study is the first step for examining and comparing cortical responses during spontaneous and task related activity in DS. Method: Cortical…

  15. Correlation between Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Anthropometrical Parameters in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, F. J.; Rosety-Rodriguez, M.

    2007-01-01

    Since we have recently found that regular exercise increased erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in adolescents with Down syndrome, these programs may be recommended. This study was designed to assess the role of anthropometrical parameters as easy, economic and non-invasive biomarkers of GPX. Thirty-one…

  16. Matriptase initiates epidermal prokallikrein activation and disease onset in a mouse model of Netherton syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Masedunskas, Andrius; Bey, Alexandra L.; Rasmussen, Amber; Weigert, Roberto; List, Karin; Szabo, Roman; Overbeek, Paul A.; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI is the etiological origin of Netherton syndrome. The principal morbidities of the disease are stratum corneum detachment and chronic inflammation. We show that the membrane protease, matriptase, initiates Netherton syndrome in a LEKTI-deficient mouse model by premature activation of a pro-kallikrein-related cascade. Auto-activation of pro-inflammatory and stratum corneum detachment-associated pro-kallikrein-related peptidases was either low or undetectable, but they were efficiently activated by matriptase. Ablation of matriptase from LEKTI-deficient mice dampened inflammation, eliminated aberrant protease activity, prevented stratum corneum detachment, and improved epidermal barrier function. The study uncovers a pathogenic matriptase-pro-kallikrein pathway that could be operative in several human skin and inflammatory diseases. PMID:20657595

  17. Automatic detection of tic activity in the Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernabei, Michel; Andreoni, Giuseppe; Mendez Garcia, Martin O; Piccini, Luca; Aletti, Federico; Sassi, Marco; Servello, Domenico; Porta, Mauro; Preatoni, Ezio

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a simple decision-support system for the detection of tic events during the Tourette Syndrome (TS). The system is based on a triaxial accelerometer placed on the patient's trunk. TS is a neurological disorder that emerges during childhood and that is characterized by a large spectrum of involuntary/compulsive movements and sounds. 12 subjects with chronic TS participated in the study and the tic events were both measured by the proposed device and visually classified through video recording. 3D-acceleration timeseries were combined through a module operator and their noise was eliminated by a median filter. Signal to noise ratio was improved by a nonlinear energy operator. Finally, a time-variant threshold was used to detect tic events. The automatic tic recognition showed a performance around 80 % in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. In conclusion, this simple, automatic and unobtrusive method offers an alternative approach to quantitatively assess the tic events in clinical and non clinical environments. This overcomes the limitations of the current motor tic evaluation which is done by clinical observation and/or video-inspection in specialized neurological centres. PMID:21096762

  18. Rho-Associated Kinase Activity Is an Independent Predictor of Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kajikawa, Masato; Noma, Kensuke; Nakashima, Ayumu; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Aibara, Yoshiki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Sasaki, Shota; Kato, Masaya; Dote, Keigo; Goto, Chikara; Liao, James K.; Higashi, Yukihito

    2016-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases play an important role in a variety of cellular functions. Although Rho-associated kinase activity has been shown to be an independent predictor for future cardiovascular events in a general population, there is no information on Rho-associated kinase activity in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We evaluated leukocyte Rho-associated kinase activity by Western blot analysis in 73 patients with acute coronary syndrome and 73 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Rho-associated kinase activity within 2 hours of acute coronary syndrome onset was higher in patients with acute coronary syndrome than in the control subjects (0.95±0.55 versus 0.69±0.31; P<0.001). Rho-associated kinase activity promptly increased from 0.95±0.55 to 1.11±0.81 after 3 hours and reached a peak of 1.21±0.76 after 1 day (P=0.03 and P=0.03, respectively) and then gradually decreased to 0.83±0.52 after 7 days, 0.78±0.42 after 14 days, and 0.72±0.30 after 6 months (P=0.22, P=0.29, and P=0.12, respectively). During a median follow-up period of 50.8 months, 31 first major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and coronary revascularization) occurred. After adjustment for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and concomitant treatment with statins, increased Rho-associated kinase activity was associated with increasing risk of first major cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 4.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.98–11.34; P<0.001). These findings suggest that Rho-associated kinase activity is dramatically changed after acute coronary syndrome and that Rho-associated kinase activity could be a useful biomarker to predict cardiovascular events in Japanese patients with acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26283039

  19. Detecting consciousness in a total locked-in syndrome: an active event-related paradigm.

    PubMed

    Schnakers, Caroline; Perrin, Fabien; Schabus, Manuel; Hustinx, Roland; Majerus, Steve; Moonen, Gustave; Boly, Melanie; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Laureys, Steven

    2009-08-01

    Total locked-in syndrome is characterized by tetraplegia, anarthria and paralysis of eye motility. In this study, consciousness was detected in a 21-year-old woman who presented a total locked-in syndrome after a basilar artery thrombosis (49 days post-injury) using an active event-related paradigm. The patient was presented sequences of names containing the patient's own name and other names. The patient was instructed to count her own name or to count another target name. Similar to 4 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, the P3 response recorded for the voluntarily counted own name was larger than while passively listening. This P3 response was observed 14 days before the first behavioral signs of consciousness. This study shows that our active event-related paradigm allowed to identify voluntary brain activity in a patient who would behaviorally be diagnosed as comatose. PMID:19241281

  20. The syndrome of continuous muscle fibre activity following gold therapy.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Mamoli, B

    1984-01-01

    A 72-year-old man suffering from arthritis received a total dose of 500 mg sodium aurothiomalate during a period of 5 months. His clinical state then deteriorated and he had to be hospitalized. Upon admission he was bedridden, his level of consciousness was slightly impaired, he was confused and respiration was laboured. Continuous muscle activity was noted on all extremities and at first, erroneously, fasciculations were diagnosed. The EMG exhibited continuous muscle fibre activity consisting of duplets, triplets and multiplets. The discharges occurred in an irregular pattern; when various muscles were examined at the same time no synchronicity could be observed between muscle discharges. In the left m. deltoideus an increased percentage of polyphasic potentials was found, whereas mean duration of motor unit potentials was normal. Spontaneous activity remained unchanged during sleep and administration of intravenous diazepam or phenytoin. Blocking of ulnar nerve at either elbow or wrist level did not stop spontaneous activity in m. abductor digiti quinti. Ischaemia increased the amount of discharges after 7 min. Within 4 months after termination of gold therapy the patient's condition improved and he was discharged from hospital. Regular EMG follow-up after 8 months showed complete cessation of abnormal spontaneous activities. Nerve conduction velocities were normal except for markedly reduced compound action potential in peroneal nerves. Continuous muscle fibre activity as a side-effect of gold therapy is described. PMID:6440953

  1. The molecular basis of Rieger syndrome. Analysis of Pitx2 homeodomain protein activities.

    PubMed

    Amendt, B A; Sutherland, L B; Semina, E V; Russo, A F

    1998-08-01

    Rieger syndrome is an autosomal-dominant developmental disorder that includes glaucoma and mild craniofacial dysmorphism in humans. Mutations in the Pitx2 homeobox gene have been linked to Rieger syndrome. We have characterized wild type and mutant Pitx2 activities using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, protein binding, and transient transfection assays. Pitx2 preferentially binds the bicoid homeodomain binding site and transactivates reporter genes containing this site. The combination of Pitx2 and another homeodomain protein, Pit-1, yielded a synergistic 55-fold activation of the prolactin promoter in transfection assays. Addition of Pit-1 increased Pitx2 binding to the bicoid element in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we demonstrate specific binding of Pit-1 to Pitx2 in vitro. Thus, wild type Pitx2 DNA binding activity is modulated by protein-protein interactions. We next studied two Rieger mutants. A threonine to proline mutation (T68P) in the second helix of the homeodomain retained DNA binding activity with the same apparent KD and only about a 2-fold reduction in the Bmax. However, this mutant did not transactivate reporter genes containing the bicoid site. The mutant Pitx2 protein binds Pit-1, but there was no detectable synergism on the prolactin promoter. A second mutation (L54Q) in a highly conserved residue in helix 1 of the homeodomain yielded an unstable protein. Our results provide insights into the potential mechanisms underlying the developmental defects in Rieger syndrome. PMID:9685346

  2. Identifying risk factors of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in AIDS patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Zheng, Yuhuang; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Guoqiang; Chen, Xia; Mamadou, Diallo; He, Yan; Zhou, Huaying; Chen, Zi

    2013-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome typically occurs within days after patients undergo highly active anti-retroviral therapy and is a big hurdle for effective treatment of AIDS patients. In this study, we monitored immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in 238 AIDS patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among them, immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurred in 47 cases (19.7%). Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients had significantly higher rate of opportunistic infection (p<0.001) and persistently lower CD4(+) cell count (p<0.001) compared to the non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients. In contrast, no significant differences in HIV RNA loads were observed between the immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group and non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group. These data suggest that a history of opportunistic infection and CD4(+) cell counts at baseline may function as risk factors for immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in AIDS patients as well as potential prognostic markers. These findings will improve the management of AIDS with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23434049

  3. Oral Pigmentation in McCune-Albright Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, Dominique C.; Boyce, Alison M.; Collins, Michael T.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The differential diagnosis for oral lentigines includes several syndromes with important associated systemic findings. McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS), a mosaic condition associated with café au lait pigmentation, is not typically considered a mucosal lentiginosis syndrome. The clinical phenotype of MAS is variable because of mosaicism, but oral pigmentation developing in mid-childhood to early adulthood should be recognized as a clinical feature of MAS. OBSERVATIONS We present 4 patients with MAS who developed oral mucosal pigmentation during childhood or early adulthood. All patients had other characteristic findings of MAS including hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, and café au lait pigmentation. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Oral pigmentation is an underrecognized finding in MAS and presents later in development compared with the other mucosal lentiginosis syndromes. The diagnosis of MAS is most commonly a clinical diagnosis because mutational analysis is challenging in mosaic conditions. Expanding the cutaneous phenotype to include oral pigmentation further characterizes the clinical findings in this mosaic condition, broadens the differential diagnosis of syndromes with oral pigmentation, and in some cases may aid in earlier diagnosis of MAS. PMID:24671640

  4. UPLC-TOF-MS Characterization and Identification of Bioactive Iridoids in Cornus mas Fruit

    PubMed Central

    West, Brett J.; Jensen, C. Jarakae

    2013-01-01

    Cornus mas L. is indigenous to Europe and parts of Asia. Although Cornus is widely considered to be an iridoid rich genera, only two iridoids have been previously found in this plant. The lack of information on taxonomically and biologically active iridoids prompted us to develop and optimize an analytical method for characterization of additional phytochemicals in C. mas fruit. An ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with photodiode array spectrophotometry (PDA) and electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS) was employed and mass parameters were optimized. Identification was made by elucidating the mass spectral data and further confirmed by comparing retention times and UV spectra of target peaks with those of reference compounds. Primary DNA damage and antigenotoxicity tests in E. coli PQ37 were used to screen the iridoids for biological activity. As a result, ten phytochemicals were identified, including iridoids loganic acid, loganin, sweroside, and cornuside. Nine of these were reported for the first time from C. mas fruit. The iridoids did not induce SOS repair of DNA, indicating a lack of genotoxic activity in E. coli PQ37. However, loganin, sweroside, and cornuside did reduce the amount of DNA damage caused by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, suggesting potential antigenotoxic activity. PMID:24228188

  5. [Multiple autoimmune syndrome. Reynolds-syndrome (acral scleroderma, primary biliary cirrhosis, Sjögren syndrome) associated with the lupus erythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Müller, F B; Groth, W; Mahrle, G

    2004-05-01

    A female patient presented with acral scleroderma, Sjögren syndrome, antibodies specific for primary biliary cirrhosis and clinical as well as histological features of lichen planus and subacute lupus erythematosus. In addition an euthyroid Hashimoto thyroiditis was found. Her findings correspond to type II of the multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and can be described as an association of Reynolds syndrome and the lupus erythematosus/lichen planus-overlap syndrome. PMID:15138654

  6. Systemic blood coagulation activation in acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Undas, Anetta; Szułdrzyński, Konstanty; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Tracz, Wiesława; Zmudka, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated systemic alterations to the blood coagulation system that occur during a coronary thrombotic event. Peripheral blood coagulation in patients with acute coronary thrombosis was compared with that in people with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Blood coagulation and platelet activation at the microvascular injury site were assessed using immunochemistry in 28 non-anticoagulated patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus 28 stable CAD patients matched for age, sex, risk factors, and medications. AMI was associated with increased maximum rates of thrombin-antithrombin complex generation (by 93.8%; P < .001), thrombin B-chain formation (by 57.1%; P < .001), prothrombin consumption (by 27.9%; P = .012), fibrinogen consumption (by 27.0%; P = .02), factor (f) Va light chain generation (by 44.2%; P = .003), and accelerated fVa inactivation (by 76.1%; P < .001), and with enhanced release of platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand (by 44.4%; P < .001). FVa heavy chain availability was similar in both groups because of enhanced formation and activated protein C (APC)–mediated destruction. The velocity of coagulant reactions in AMI patients showed positive correlations with interleukin-6. Heparin treatment led to dampening of coagulant reactions with profiles similar to those for stable CAD. AMI-induced systemic activation of blood coagulation markedly modifies the pattern of coagulant reactions at the site of injury in peripheral vessels compared with that in stable CAD patients. PMID:18931343

  7. Speech-activated Myoclonus Mimicking Stuttering in a Patient with Myoclonus–Dystonia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, David A.; Hedera, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Acquired neurogenic stuttering has been considered a fairly uncommon clinical occurrence; speech-activated myoclonus is a rare entity that can mimic stuttering and is caused by a wide array of etiologies. Case Report Here we report a patient with myoclonus–dystonia syndrome (MDS), due to an identified disease-causing mutation, who displayed speech-activated myoclonus mimicking stuttering. Discussion In MDS, myoclonus has only infrequently been reported to affect speech. This case further expands the spectrum of conditions causing the rare clinical phenomenon of speech-activated myoclonus. PMID:27441098

  8. [Conception for permanent activation of nuclear factor kbeta as molecular basis for metabolic syndrom pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kaidashev, I P

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of new data concerning the development of pathology due to the community of evolutionary new pathological factors was done. Author provides the comparison of well-known and new definition for "metabolic syndrome" and diagnostic criteria of this pathology. The conception for permanent activation of nuclear factor kbeta as possible typic pathological process was discussed. Suppose that NF-kbeta is the possible key molecule in the initiation and formation of "vicious circle"--insulinresistance--inflammation--atherosclerosis. PMID:24340624

  9. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas

    PubMed Central

    Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Acuña, María José; Santos, Robson A.; Bader, Michael; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Olguin, Hugo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7) in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7) and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophy in vivo using unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT) and Mas-knockout (Mas KO) mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7) immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7) prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7) increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:26851244

  10. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Acuña, María José; Santos, Robson A; Bader, Michael; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Olguin, Hugo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7) in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7) and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophyin vivousing unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT) and Mas-knockout (Mas KO) mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7) immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7) prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7) increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:26851244

  11. Triple trouble--macrophage activation syndrome in a case of severe leptospirosis and scrub typhus co-infection.

    PubMed

    Diwan, A G; Shewale, Rahul; Iyer, Shivakumar; Nisal, Amit; Agrawa, Prakhar

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a potentially life threatening phenomenon characterised by aggressive proliferation of macrophages and T lymphocytes leading to haemophagocytosis of other blood cells and multi organ failure. Here we present a very unusual combination of leptospirosis and scrub typhus infection leading to macrophage activation syndrome. Scrub typhus associated with macrophage activation syndrome has rarely been reported in India. A 40 year old female presented with high grade fever, seizures, bodyache, arthralgia and severe breathlessness. Investigations revealed persistent thrombocytopenia, impaired liver function tests, renal dysfunction, leptospiral IgM ELISA positive and a positive Weil Felix test. There was evidence of haemophagocytosis in bone marrow. Macrophage activation syndrome if left untreated has been associated with rapidly fatal outcome and early treatment can help us save that one precious thing..called life..! PMID:25327097

  12. Atypical Functional Brain Activation During a Multiple Object Tracking Task in Girls With Turner Syndrome: Neurocorrelates of Reduced Spatiotemporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, Elliott A.; Stoddard, Joel; Lai, Song; Lackey, John; Shi, Jianrong; Ross, Judith L.; Simon, Tony J.

    2010-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with spatial and numerical cognitive impairments. We hypothesized that these nonverbal cognitive impairments result from limits in spatial and temporal processing, particularly as it affects attention. To examine spatiotemporal attention in girls with Turner syndrome versus typically developing controls, we used a multiple object tracking task during functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging. Participants actively tracked a target among six distracters or passively viewed the animations. Neural activation in girls with Turner syndrome during object tracking overlapped with but was dissimilar to the canonical frontoparietal network evident in typically developing controls and included greater limbic activity. Task performance and atypical functional activation indicate anomalous development of cortical and subcortical temporal and spatial processing circuits in girls with Turner syndrome. PMID:20441384

  13. Activated STING in a Vascular and Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D.; Ramsey, S.E.; Sanchez, G.A. Montealegre; Tenbrock, K.; Wittkowski, H.; Jones, O.Y.; Kuehn, H.S.; Lee, C.-C.R.; DiMattia, M.A.; Cowen, E.W.; Gonzalez, B.; Palmer, I.; DiGiovanna, J.J.; Biancotto, A.; Kim, H.; Tsai, W.L.; Trier, A.M.; Huang, Y.; Stone, D.L.; Hill, S.; Kim, H.J.; Hilaire, C. St.; Gurprasad, S.; Plass, N.; Chapelle, D.; Horkayne-Szakaly, I.; Foell, D.; Barysenka, A.; Candotti, F.; Holland, S.M.; Hughes, J.D.; Mehmet, H.; Issekutz, A.C.; Raffeld, M.; McElwee, J.; Fontana, J.R.; Minniti, C.P.; Moir, S.; Kastner, D.L.; Gadina, M.; Steven, A.C.; Wingfield, P.T.; Brooks, S.R.; Rosenzweig, S.D.; Fleisher, T.A.; Goldbach-Mansky, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The study of autoinflammatory diseases has uncovered mechanisms underlying cytokine dysregulation and inflammation. METHODS We analyzed the DNA of an index patient with early-onset systemic inflammation, cutaneous vasculopathy, and pulmonary inflammation. We sequenced a candidate gene, TMEM173, encoding the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), in this patient and in five unrelated children with similar clinical phenotypes. Four children were evaluated clinically and immunologically. With the STING ligand cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP), we stimulated peripheral-blood mononuclear cells and fibroblasts from patients and controls, as well as commercially obtained endothelial cells, and then assayed transcription of IFNB1, the gene encoding interferon-β, in the stimulated cells. We analyzed IFNB1 reporter levels in HEK293T cells cotransfected with mutant or nonmutant STING constructs. Mutant STING leads to increased phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), so we tested the effect of Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors on STAT1 phosphorylation in lymphocytes from the affected children and controls. RESULTS We identified three mutations in exon 5 of TMEM173 in the six patients. Elevated transcription of IFNB1 and other gene targets of STING in peripheral-blood mono-nuclear cells from the patients indicated constitutive activation of the pathway that cannot be further up-regulated with stimulation. On stimulation with cGAMP, fibro-blasts from the patients showed increased transcription of IFNB1 but not of the genes encoding interleukin-1 (IL1), interleukin-6 (IL6), or tumor necrosis factor (TNF). HEK293T cells transfected with mutant constructs show elevated IFNB1 reporter levels. STING is expressed in endothelial cells, and exposure of these cells to cGAMP resulted in endothelial activation and apoptosis. Constitutive up-regulation of phosphorylated STAT1 in patients’ lymphocytes was

  14. Activity-Dependent Changes in MAPK Activation in the Angelman Syndrome Mouse Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filonova, Irina; Trotter, Justin H.; Banko, Jessica L.; Weeber, Edwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by disruption of the maternal "UBE3A" gene. Ube3a protein is identified as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows neuron-specific imprinting. Despite extensive research evaluating the localization and basal expression profiles of Ube3a in mouse models, the molecular…

  15. Impact of structural differences in carcinopreventive agents indole-3-carbinol and 3,3'-diindolylmethane on biological activity. An X-ray, ¹H-¹⁴N NQDR, ¹³C CP/MAS NMR, and periodic hybrid DFT study.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Szafrański, Marek; Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Burchardt, Dorota V

    2015-09-18

    Three experimental techniques (1)H-(14)N NQDR, (13)C CP/MAS NMR and X-ray and Density Functional Theory (GGA/BLYP with PBC) and Hirshfeld surfaces were applied for the structure-activity oriented studies of two phyto-antioxidants and anticarcinogens: indole-3-carbinol, I3C, and 3,3'-diindolylmethane, DIM, (its bioactive metabolite). One set of (14)N NQR frequencies for DIM (2.310, 2.200 and 0.110 MHz at 295K) and I3C (2.315, 1.985 and 0.330 MHz at 160K) was recorded. The multiplicity of NQR lines recorded at RT revealed high symmetry (chemical and physical equivalence) of both methyl indazole rings of DIM. Carbonyl (13)C CSA tensor components were calculated from the (13)C CP/MAS solid state NMR spectrum of I3C recorded under fast and slow spinning. At room temperature the crystal structure of I3C is orthorhombic: space group Pca21, Z=4, a=5.78922(16), b=15.6434(7) and c=8.4405(2)Å. The I3C molecules are aggregated into ribbons stacked along [001]. The oxygen atomsare disorderedbetween the two sites of different occupancy factors. It implies that the crystal is built of about 70% trans and 30% gauche conformers, and apart from the weak OH⋯O hydrogen bonds (O⋯O=3.106Å) the formation of alternative O'H⋯O bonds (O'⋯O=2.785Å) is possible within the 1D ribbons. The adjacent ribbons are further stabilised by O'H⋯O bonds (O'⋯O=2.951Å). The analysis of spectra and intermolecular interactions pattern by experimental techniques was supported by solid (periodic) DFT calculations. The knowledge of the topology and competition of the interactions in crystalline state shed some light on the preferred conformations of CH2OH in I3C and steric hindrance of methyl indole rings in DIM. A comparison of the local environment in gas phase and solid permitted drawing some conclusions on the nature of the interactions required for effective processes of recognition and binding of a given anticarcinogen to the protein or nucleic acid. PMID:26066413

  16. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance. PMID:27095695

  17. MAS PFG NMR Studies of Mixtures in Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, Marcel; Hertel, Stefan; Wehring, Markus; Schlayer, Stefan; Stallmach, Frank; Galvosas, Petrik

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques have been successfully combined for the study of mixture diffusion in porous materials. Using a modular setup of commercially available components, gradient pulses of up to ±2.6 T/m can be applied coinciding with fast sample rotation at the magic angle. Methods for the proper alignment of all components are presented along with protocols for MAS PFG NMR experiments. Finally, first diffusion measurements of n-hexane and benzene being adsorbed together in the metal-organic framework MOF-5 are presented.

  18. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  19. Improving Physical Activity and Metabolic Syndrome Indicators in Women: A Transtheoretical Model-Based Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Ghofranipour, Fazllolah; Feizi, Awat; Pirzadeh, Asiyeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed at investigating the impact of an educational intervention based on transtheoretical model to increase physical activity and improve metabolic syndrome indicators in women. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 142 women with metabolic syndrome were randomly assigned to the case and control group (each group 71 participants). SECQ (Marcus), processes of change (Marcus), decisional balance (Bandura) and self-efficacy (Nigg) questionnaires and International Physical Activities Standard Questionnaire in preintervention, 3 and 6 months after intervention were completed. Furthermore, abdominal obesity, triglycerides (TG), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) were measured. Physical activity intervention based on transtheoretical model (TTM) was performed in the case group. Finally, data were analyzed by SPSS (16) (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) and repeated measure ANOVA, independent t-test and Freidman was used. A two-tailed P value, lower than 0.05, was considered to be statistically significant. Results: After the intervention, physical activity level increased in the intervention group, and they also progressed in stages of change, but the people in the control group had regressed. All changes in TTM constructs were significant in the intervention group during the time and differences in pros and cons were not significant in the control group. Abdominal obesity and TG has significantly reduced, and HDL has increased in the intervention group. In the control group, there was a significant increase in TGs and a decrease in HDL. Conclusions: Physical activity training based on TTM can improve physical activity and metabolic syndrome indicators in women. PMID:25949778

  20. Activity of daily living for Morquio A syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Eriko; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Mackenzie, William G.; Theroux, Mary C.; Pizarro, Christian; Xie, Li; Miller, Freeman; Rahman, Tariq; Kecskemethy, Heidi H.; Nagao, Kyoko; Morlet, Thierry; Shaffer, Thomas H.; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Akemi; Shintaku, Haruo; Orii, Kenji E.; Orii, Koji O.; Mason, Robert W.; Montaño, Adriana M.; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of daily living (ADL) and surgical interventions in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA). The factor(s) that affect ADL are age, clinical phenotypes, surgical interventions, therapeutic effect, and body mass index. The ADL questionnaire comprises three domains: “Movement,” “Movement with cognition,” and “Cognition.” Each domain has four subcategories rated on a 5-point scale based on the level of assistance. The questionnaire was collected from 145 healthy controls and 82 patients with MPS IVA. The patient cohort consisted of 63 severe and 17 attenuated phenotypes (2 were undefined); 4 patients treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), 33 patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for more than a year, and 45 untreated patients. MPS IVA patients show a decline in ADL scores after 10 years of age. Patients with a severe phenotype have a lower ADL score than healthy control subjects, and lower scores than patients with an attenuated phenotype in domains of “Movement” and “Movement with cognition.” Patients, who underwent HSCT and were followed up for over 10 years, had higher ADL scores and fewer surgical interventions than untreated patients. ADL scores for ERT patients (2.5 years follow-up on average) were similar with the-age-matched controls below 10 years of age, but declined in older patients. Surgical frequency was higher for severe phenotypic patients than attenuated ones. Surgical frequency for patients treated with ERT was not decreased compared to untreated patients. In conclusion, we have shown the utility of the proposed ADL questionnaire and frequency of surgical interventions in patients with MPS IVA to evaluate the clinical severity and therapeutic efficacy compared with age-matched controls. PMID:27161890

  1. Activity of daily living for Morquio A syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Eriko; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Mackenzie, William G; Theroux, Mary C; Pizarro, Christian; Xie, Li; Miller, Freeman; Rahman, Tariq; Kecskemethy, Heidi H; Nagao, Kyoko; Morlet, Thierry; Shaffer, Thomas H; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Akemi; Shintaku, Haruo; Orii, Kenji E; Orii, Koji O; Mason, Robert W; Montaño, Adriana M; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of daily living (ADL) and surgical interventions in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA). The factor(s) that affect ADL are age, clinical phenotypes, surgical interventions, therapeutic effect, and body mass index. The ADL questionnaire comprises three domains: "Movement," "Movement with cognition," and "Cognition." Each domain has four subcategories rated on a 5-point scale based on the level of assistance. The questionnaire was collected from 145 healthy controls and 82 patients with MPS IVA. The patient cohort consisted of 63 severe and 17 attenuated phenotypes (2 were undefined); 4 patients treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), 33 patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for more than a year, and 45 untreated patients. MPS IVA patients show a decline in ADL scores after 10years of age. Patients with a severe phenotype have a lower ADL score than healthy control subjects, and lower scores than patients with an attenuated phenotype in domains of "Movement" and "Movement with cognition." Patients, who underwent HSCT and were followed up for over 10years, had higher ADL scores and fewer surgical interventions than untreated patients. ADL scores for ERT patients (2.5years follow-up on average) were similar with the-age-matched controls below 10years of age, but declined in older patients. Surgical frequency was higher for severe phenotypic patients than attenuated ones. Surgical frequency for patients treated with ERT was not decreased compared to untreated patients. In conclusion, we have shown the utility of the proposed ADL questionnaire and frequency of surgical interventions in patients with MPS IVA to evaluate the clinical severity and therapeutic efficacy compared with age-matched controls. PMID:27161890

  2. Irregular 24-hour Activity Rhythms and the Metabolic Syndrome in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Shahmir; Yu, Lei; Bennett, David A.; Buchman, Aron S.; Lim, Andrew S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms – near 24-hour intrinsic biological rhythms – modulate many aspects of human physiology and hence disruption of circadian rhythms may have an important impact on human health. Experimental work supports a potential link between irregular circadian rhythms and several key risk factors for cardiovascular disease including hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, collectively termed the metabolic syndrome. While several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between shift-work and the components of the metabolic syndrome in working-age adults, there is a relative paucity of data concerning the impact of non-occupational circadian irregularity in older women and men. To address this question, we studied 7 days of actigraphic data from 1137 older woman and men participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a community-based cohort study of the chronic conditions of aging. The regularity of activity rhythms was quantified using the nonparametric interdaily stability metric, and was related to the metabolic syndrome and its components obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. More regular activity rhythms were associated with a lower odds of having the metabolic syndrome (OR=0.69, 95%CI=0.60–0.80, p=5.8×10−7), being obese (OR=0.73, 95%CI=0.63–0.85, p=2.5×10−5), diabetic (OR=0.76, 95%CI=0.65–0.90, p=9.3×10−4), hypertensive (OR=0.78, 95%CI=0.66–0.91, p=2.0×10−3), or dyslipidemic (OR=0.82, 95%CI=0.72–0.92, p=1.2×10−3). These associations were independent of differences in objectively measured total daily physical activity or rest, and were not accounted for by prevalent coronary artery disease, stroke, or peripheral artery disease. Moreover, more regular activity rhythms were associated with lower odds of having cardiovascular disease (OR=0.83; 95%CI=0.73–0.95, p=5.7×10−3), an effect that was statistically mediated by the metabolic syndrome. We conclude that irregular activity

  3. Thoracic outlet syndrome of pectoralis minor etiology mimicking cardiac symptoms on activity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is the result of compression or irritation of neurovascular bundles as they pass from the lower cervical spine into the arm, via the axilla. If the pectoralis minor muscle is involved the patient may present with chest pain, along with pain and paraesthesia into the arm. These symptoms are also commonly seen in patients with chest pain of a cardiac origin. In this case, a patient presents with a history of left sided chest pain with pain and paraesthesia into the left upper limb, which only occurs whilst running. The symptoms were reproduced on both digital pressure over the pectoralis minor muscle and on provocative testing for thoracic outlet syndrome. The patient’s treatment therefore focused on the pectoralis minor muscle, with a complete resolution of symptoms. This illustrates that not all cases of chest pain with associated arm symptoms that occur on physical activity are of cardiac origin. PMID:23204575

  4. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Tissue-specific activation of cortisol in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stuart A; Hassan-Smith, Zaki K; Lavery, Gareth G

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely prescribed for their anti-inflammatory properties, but have 'Cushingoid' side effects including visceral obesity, muscle myopathy, hypertension, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, and hepatic steatosis. These features are replicated in patients with much rarer endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) excess (Cushing's syndrome), which has devastating consequences if left untreated. Current medical therapeutic options that reverse the tissue-specific consequences of hypercortisolism are limited. In this article, we review the current evidence that local GC metabolism via the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) plays a central role in mediating the adverse metabolic complications associated with circulatory GC excess - challenging our current view that simple delivery of active GCs from the circulation represents the most important mode of GC action. Furthermore, we explore the potential for targeting this enzyme as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of both endogenous and exogenous Cushing's syndrome. PMID:26957494

  5. [Losartan for the correction of thrombocyte activity in patients suffering from arterial hypertension with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; medvedev, i N; Kumova, T A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate therapeutic effects of losartan on intravascular thrombocyte activity (ITA) in patients suffering from arterial hypertension with metabolic syndrome (MS). The subjects of the study were 35 patients administered losartan 50 mg a day for 4 months. The dynamics of the following parameters were evaluated: anthropometric parameters, blood lipids, lipid peroxidation in blood plasma and thrombocytes, the anti-oxidative protection of the liquid part of blood and platelets, and ITA. Student criterion was used for statistical analysis. In patients with AH and MS losartan had a positive effect on peroxidation syndrome and optimized ITA. To maintain the positive effects, prolonged administration of losartan is needed. In order to lower body mass in AH patients with MS losartan should be used in combination with non-drug means. PMID:18326282

  6. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  7. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Ion Channel Activity Promotes Virus Fitness and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M.; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  8. Aberrant glomerular filtration of urokinase-type plasminogen activator in nephrotic syndrome leads to amiloride-sensitive plasminogen activation in urine.

    PubMed

    Stæhr, Mette; Buhl, Kristian B; Andersen, René F; Svenningsen, Per; Nielsen, Flemming; Hinrichs, Gitte Rye; Bistrup, Claus; Jensen, Boye L

    2015-08-01

    In nephrotic syndrome, aberrant glomerular filtration of plasminogen and conversion to active plasmin in preurine are thought to activate proteolytically epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and contribute to sodium retention and edema. The ENaC blocker amiloride is an off-target inhibitor of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in vitro. It was hypothesized that uPA is abnormally filtered to preurine and is inhibited in urine by amiloride in nephrotic syndrome. This was tested by determination of Na(+) balance, uPA protein and activity, and amiloride concentration in urine from rats with puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced nephrotic syndrome. Urine samples from 6 adult and 18 pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome were analyzed for uPA activity and protein. PAN treatment induced significant proteinuria in rats which coincided with increased urine uPA protein and activity, increased urine protease activity, and total plasminogen/plasmin concentration and Na(+) retention. Amiloride (2 mg·kg(-1)·24 h(-1)) concentration in urine was in the range 10-20 μmol/l and reduced significantly urine uPA activity, plasminogen activation, protease activity, and sodium retention in PAN rats, while proteinuria was not altered. In paired urine samples, uPA protein was significantly elevated in urine from children with active nephrotic syndrome compared with remission phase. In six adult nephrotic patients, urine uPA protein and activity correlated positively with 24 h urine protein excretion. In conclusion, nephrotic syndrome is associated with aberrant filtration of uPA across the injured glomerular barrier. Amiloride inhibits urine uPA activity which attenuates plasminogen activation and urine protease activity in vivo. Urine uPA is a relevant target for amiloride in vivo. PMID:25972510

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus thermopakistaniensis Strain MAS1

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Naeem; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj

    2014-01-01

    Geobacillus thermopakistaniensis strain MAS1 was isolated from a hot spring located in the Northern Areas of Pakistan. The draft genome sequence was 3.5 Mb and identified a number of genes of potential industrial importance, including genes encoding glycoside hydrolases, pullulanase, amylopullulanase, glycosidase, and alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:24903880

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus thermopakistaniensis Strain MAS1.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Masood Ahmed; Rashid, Naeem; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; Whitman, William B

    2014-01-01

    Geobacillus thermopakistaniensis strain MAS1 was isolated from a hot spring located in the Northern Areas of Pakistan. The draft genome sequence was 3.5 Mb and identified a number of genes of potential industrial importance, including genes encoding glycoside hydrolases, pullulanase, amylopullulanase, glycosidase, and alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:24903880

  11. Resolution and polarization distribution in cryogenic DNP/MAS experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Corzilius, Björn; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Andreas, Loren B.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Matsuki, Yoh; Belenky, Marina L.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    This contribution addresses four potential misconceptions associated with high-resolution dynamic nuclear polarization/magic angle spinning (DNP/MAS) experiments. First, spectral resolution is not generally compromised at the cryogenic temperatures at which DNP experiments are performed. As we demonstrate at a modest field of 9 T (380 MHz 1H), 1 ppm linewidths are observed in DNP/MAS spectra of a membrane protein in its native lipid bilayer, and <0.4 ppm linewidths are reported in a crystalline peptide at 85 K. Second, we address the concerns about paramagnetic broadening in DNP/MAS spectra of proteins by demonstrating that the exogenous radical polarizing agents utilized for DNP are distributed in the sample in such a manner as to avoid paramagnetic broadening and thus maintain full spectral resolution. Third, the enhanced polarization is not localized around the polarizing agent, but rather is effectively and uniformly dispersed throughout the sample, even in the case of membrane proteins. Fourth, the distribution of polarization from the electron spins mediated via spin diffusion between 1H–1H strongly dipolar coupled spins is so rapid that shorter magnetization recovery periods between signal averaging transients can be utilized in DNP/MAS experiments than in typical experiments performed at ambient temperature. PMID:20454732

  12. Recommended Levels of Physical Activity Are Associated with Reduced Risk of the Metabolic Syndrome in Mexican-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shenghui; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; Reininger, Belinda; McCormick, Joseph B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To measure the association between physical activity and the metabolic syndrome risk in Mexican-Americans. Methods Participants were drawn from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (n = 3,414), a randomly selected Mexican-American cohort in Texas on the US-Mexico border. Moderate and vigorous physical activity was assessed using reliable and validated instruments. The metabolic syndrome was defined as having 3 or more metabolic abnormalities. Results One thousand five hundred and twenty-four participants of the cohort (45.02%) were found to have the metabolic syndrome. Compared to participants who did not meet US physical activity guidelines, participants who met physical activity guidelines of 150 moderate and vigorous minutes per week (≥ 600 MET adjusted minutes) had 36% lower risk for the metabolic syndrome (OR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.42–0.98), and participants with total minutes per week of moderate and vigorous/strenuous activity greater than 743 MET adjusted minutes had 37% lower risk for the metabolic syndrome (OR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.42–0.94) compared with their counterparts, after adjusting for age, gender, annual household income, body mass index, smoking and alcohol drinking status, total portions of fruit and vegetable intake, census tracts and blocks, and survey version for physical activity. Conclusions Meeting or exceeding physical activity guidelines significantly was inversely associated with the risk for the metabolic syndrome in Mexican-Americans. Improving levels of physical activity appears to be an effective target for the metabolic syndrome prevention and control among Mexican-Americans independent of other factors. PMID:27054324

  13. De novo RRAGC mutation activates mTORC1 signaling in syndromic fetal dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Long, Pamela A; Zimmermann, Michael T; Kim, Maengjo; Evans, Jared M; Xu, Xiaolei; Olson, Timothy M

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a heritable, genetically heterogeneous disorder with variable age-dependent penetrance. We sought to identify the genetic underpinnings of syndromic, sporadic DCM in a newborn female diagnosed in utero. Postnatal evaluation revealed ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction, bilateral cataracts, and mild facial dysmorphisms. Comprehensive metabolic and genetic testing, including chromosomal microarray, mitochondrial DNA and targeted RASopathy gene sequencing, and clinical whole exome sequencing for known cardiomyopathy genes was non-diagnostic. Following exclusion of asymptomatic DCM in the parents, trio-based whole exome sequencing was carried out on a research basis, filtering for rare, predicted deleterious de novo and recessive variants. An unreported de novo S75Y mutation was discovered in RRAGC, encoding Ras-related GTP binding C, an essential GTPase in nutrient-activated mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. In silico protein modeling and molecular dynamics simulation predicted the mutation to disrupt ligand interactions and increase the GDP-bound state. Overexpression of RagC(S75Y) rendered AD293 cells partially insensitive to amino acid deprivation, resulting in increased mTORC1 signaling compared to wild-type RagC. These findings implicate mTORC1 dysregulation through a gain-of-function mutation in RagC as a novel molecular basis for syndromic forms of pediatric heart failure, and expand genotype-phenotype correlation in RASopathy-related syndromes. PMID:27234373

  14. Hypertension in an Animal Model of HELLP Syndrome is Associated With Activation of Endothelin 1.

    PubMed

    Morris, Rachael; Spencer, Shauna-Kay; Kyle, Patrick B; Williams, Jan Michael; Harris, Al'shondra; Owens, Michelle Y; Wallace, Kedra

    2016-01-01

    Women with hypertensive forms of pregnancy such as hemolysis-elevated liver enzymes-low platelet syndrome have increased circulating endothelin 1; however, the relationship between hypertension and endothelin 1 has not been studied. Using an animal model, we sought to determine whether there was an increased activation/dysfunction of endothelin 1, the effect of endothelin 1 receptor-A blockade on hypertension and other manifestations of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome. On gestational day 12, timed-pregnant rats were infused with soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin (sEndoglin; 4.7 and 7 µg/kg) via mini-osmotic pumps for 8 days. A subset of rats were treated with receptor-A antagonist (ABT-627, 5mg/kg) for 8 days. Rats with hemolysis-elevated liver enzymes-low platelet syndrome had significantly increased hypertension (P = .0001), circulating endothelin 1 (P = .03), and a significant 3.3- and 7.2-fold increase in preproendothelin messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the placenta and liver (P = .01 and .04). Urinary protein:creatinine ratio was significantly increased in these animals (P = .0007), and circulating factors from these rats stimulated a significant increase in endothelial cell secretion of endothelin 1 (P = .001) in an in vitro assay. Blockade of the endothelin 1 receptor A significantly decreased hypertension (P = .001), circulating endothelin 1, and interleukin 17 (P = .004 and .003), placental preproendothelin mRNA expression (P = .016), and urinary protein:creatinine ratio (P = .007) in rats with hemolysis-elevated liver enzymes-low platelet syndrome. Blockade of the endothelin 1 receptor A significantly decreased hemolysis (P = .009), liver enzymes (P = .011), and significantly increased platelet levels (P = .03) and decreased circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes (P = .0004 and .0001) in rats infused with sFlt-1 and sEndoglin. These data support the hypothesis that endothelin 1 activation

  15. ACE2, angiotensin-(1-7) and Mas receptor axis in inflammation and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, AC; Silveira, KD; Ferreira, AJ; Teixeira, MM

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have improved our understanding of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). These have included the recognition that angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) is a biologically active product of the RAS cascade. The identification of the ACE homologue ACE2, which forms Ang-(1-7) from Ang II, and the GPCR Mas as an Ang-(1-7) receptor have provided the necessary biochemical and molecular background and tools to study the biological significance of Ang-(1-7). Most available evidence supports a counter-regulatory role for Ang-(1-7) by opposing many actions of Ang II on AT1 receptors, especially vasoconstriction and proliferation. Many studies have now shown that Ang-(1-7) by acting via Mas receptor exerts inhibitory effects on inflammation and on vascular and cellular growth mechanisms. Ang-(1-7) has also been shown to reduce key signalling pathways and molecules thought to be relevant for fibrogenesis. Here, we review recent findings related to the function of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis and focus on the role of this axis in modifying processes associated with acute and chronic inflammation, including leukocyte influx, fibrogenesis and proliferation of certain cell types. More attention will be given to the involvement of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the context of renal disease because of the known relevance of the RAS for the function of this organ and for the regulation of kidney inflammation and fibrosis. Taken together, this knowledge may help in paving the way for the development of novel treatments for chronic inflammatory and renal diseases. PMID:23488800

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Behavioral, Activity, Ferritin, and Clinical Indicators of Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kathy C.; Bost, James E.; Rogers, Valerie E.; Hutchison, Lisa C.; Beck, Cornelia K.; Bliwise, Donald L.; Kovach, Christine R.; Cuellar, Norma; Allen, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Lack of a valid diagnostic measure of restless legs syndrome (RLS) for persons with dementia, who do not have the cognitive ability to report complex symptoms, impedes RLS treatment and research in this population. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of a combination of indicators for identifying RLS that could eventually be used to diagnose RLS in persons with dementia. Design: 3-day, prospective instrument validation. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Cognitively intact, 107 with RLS, 105 without RLS. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Serial 20-min observations with a new measure, the Behavioral Indicators Test–Restless Legs (BIT-RL); leg movements with 3 nights of the Periodic Activity Monitor–Restless Legs (PAM-RL); ferritin; sleep history; clinical data; polysomnography; Hopkins Telephone Diagnostic Interview of RLS Symptoms. Results: The best-fitting diagnostic model for identifying RLS included previous history of iron deficiency (odds ratio [OR] 7.30), leg discomfort (OR 6.47), daytime fatigue (OR 6.15), difficulty falling asleep (OR 3.25), RLS family history (OR 2.60), BIT-RL (OR 1.49), and absence of diabetes (OR 0.27), with sensitivity 78%, specificity 79%, and 77% correctly classified. This model retained its predictive accuracy even with co-morbid sleep apnea. Conclusions: When compared to those without restless legs syndrome (RLS), persons with RLS have observable behaviors, such as rubbing the legs, that differentiate them, but the behaviors have no circadian and activity-related variability. The final model of clinical and sleep historical data and observation for RLS behaviors using the Behavioral Indicators Test–Restless Legs had good diagnostic accuracy. Citation: Richards KC, Bost JE, Rogers VE, Hutchison LC, Beck CK, Bliwise DL, Kovach CR, Cuellar N, Allen RP. Diagnostic accuracy of behavioral, activity, ferritin, and clinical indicators of restless legs syndrome. SLEEP 2015

  17. Paraoxonase Activity and Lipid Profile in Paediatric Nephrotic Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anuradha B.; Patil, Vidya S.; Ingleshwar, Deepti G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dyslipidaemia of Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) is known to be linked to oxidative reactions and atherosclerosis. Paraoxonase (PON1) has been implicated in the prevention of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) lipid peroxidation and also degrades biologically active oxidised lipids in lipoprotein. Aim The present study was taken up to assess PON1 levels in paediatric nephrotic syndrome and also to see if any correlation exists between lipid parameters and PON1. Materials and Methods This study consists of Group 1 with 40 cases of NS in the age group of 2-14 years and Group 2 with 40 age and sex matched healthy controls. Lipid profile and paraoxonase activity was measured in serum samples of both the groups. Results Statistical analysis by student’s t-test showed that the mean levels of Total Cholesterol, Trigylycerides, LDL, and VLDL were significantly increased in Group 1 when compared to Group 2 (p <0.001). The mean levels of HDL were similar in both groups. The levels of PON1 were significantly lowered in Group 1 when compared to Group 2. Correlation studies showed no significant correlation between lipid profile and PON1. Conclusion Cases have atherosclerotic dyslipidaemia and significantly decreased PON1 activity. Decreased PON1 may lead to increased oxidation of LDL accelerating the process of atherosclerosis. PMID:27134858

  18. Type IX Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Menkes syndrome: the decrease in lysyl oxidase activity is associated with a corresponding deficiency in the enzyme protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, H; Peltonen, L; Kivirikko, K I

    1985-01-01

    Type IX of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (E-D IX) and the Menkes syndrome are X-linked recessively inherited disorders characterized by abnormalities in copper metabolism. These abnormalities are associated with a severe reduction in the activity of lysyl oxidase, the extracellular copper enzyme that initiates crosslinking of collagens and elastin. No increase in this deficient enzyme activity was obtained when culture media from fibroblasts of patients with E-D IX or the Menkes syndrome were incubated with copper under various conditions in vitro. A distinct, although small, increase in lysyl oxidase activity was obtained, however, when copper-supplemented media were used during culturing of the fibroblasts, although even under these conditions, the enzyme activity in the media from the affected cells remained markedly below that of the controls. Immunoprecipitation, dot-blotting, and immunoperoxidase staining experiments with antisera to human lysyl oxidase indicated that fibroblasts from patients with E-D IX or the Menkes syndrome do not secrete into their medium, or contain inside the cell, any significant amounts of a copper-deficient, catalytically inactive lysyl oxidase protein. These findings appear to be consistent with the hypothesis that synthesis of the lysyl oxidase protein itself is impaired. The possibility is not excluded, however, that a copper-deficient enzyme protein may be synthesized in normal amounts but become degraded very rapidly inside the cell. The failure to obtain any large increase in the deficient lysyl oxidase activity upon various forms of copper administration suggests that it may not be possible to obtain any significant improvement in the connective tissue manifestations of these disorders by copper therapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:9556668

  19. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by repetitive activities, such as running. The pressure in a compartment only increases during that activity. Compartment syndrome is most common in the lower leg and forearm. It can also occur in the hand, foot, thigh, and upper arm.

  20. Macrophage activation syndrome as the initial manifestation of severe juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus. Favorable response to cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Torres Jiménez, Alfonso; Solís Vallejo, Eunice; Zeferino Cruz, Maritza; Céspedes Cruz, Adriana; Sánchez Jara, Berenice

    2014-01-01

    The macrophage activation syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal complication of patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. This is a clinicopathological entity characterized by activation of histiocytes with prominent hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow and other reticuloendothelial systems. In patients with lupus it may mimic an exacerbation of the disease or infection. We report the case of a 7-year-old girl in whom the diagnosis of lupus erythematosus and macrophage activation syndrome was simultaneously made with response to the use of cyclophosphamide. PMID:24035795

  1. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in epilepsy (small) and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS). In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g., syncope), or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of epileptic seizures is largely overlooked. Emotional stimuli such as anxiety and stress are potent causes of seizures and tic activity in epilepsy and TS, respectively. This manuscript will describe a possible neural mechanism by which afferent autonomic projections linked to cognition and behavior influence central thalamo-cortical regulation, which appears to be an important means for controlling both seizure and tic activity. It also summarizes the link between the integrity of the default mode network and autonomic regulation in patients with epilepsy as well as the link between impaired motor control and autonomic regulation in patients with TS. Two neurological conditions; epilepsy and TS were chosen, as seizures and tics represent parameters that can be easily measured to investigate influences of autonomic functions. The EDA biofeedback approach is anticipated to gain a strong position within the next generation of treatment for epilepsy, as a non-invasive technique with minimal side effects. This approach also takes advantage of the current practical opportunity to utilize growing digital health technology. PMID:26441491

  2. Bilirubin, platelet activation and heart disease: a missing link to cardiovascular protection in Gilbert's syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kundur, Avinash R; Singh, Indu; Bulmer, Andrew C

    2015-03-01

    Gilbert's syndrome (GS) is a relatively common condition, inducing a benign, non-hemolytic, unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Gilbert's Syndrome is associated with mutation in the Uridine Glucuronosyl Transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene promoter, reducing UGT1A1 activity, which normally conjugates bilirubin allowing its elimination from the blood. Individuals with GS demonstrate mildly elevated plasma antioxidant capacity caused by elevated levels of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), reduced thiols and glutathione. Interestingly, the development of, and risk of mortality from, cardiovascular disease is remarkably reduced in GS individuals. An explanation for this protection may be explained by bilirubin's ability to inhibit multiple processes that induce platelet hyper-reactivity and thrombosis, thus far under-appreciated in the literature. Reactive oxygen species are produced continuously via metabolic processes and have the potential to oxidatively modify proteins and lipids within cell membranes, which may encourage the development of thrombosis and CVDs. Oxidative stress induced platelet hyper-reactivity significantly increases the risk of thrombosis, which can potentially lead to tissue infarction. Here, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which increased antioxidant status might influence platelet function and link this to cardiovascular protection in GS. In summary, this is the first article to discuss the possible role of bilirubin as an anti-thrombotic agent, which inhibits platelet activation and potentially, organ infarction, which could contribute to the reduced mortality rate in mildly hyperbilirbinemic individuals. PMID:25576848

  3. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus NS4b Protein Inhibits Host RNase L Activation

    PubMed Central

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Jha, Babal K.; Yount, Boyd; Goldstein, Stephen A.; Li, Yize; Elliott, Ruth; Sims, Amy C.; Baric, Ralph S.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is the first highly pathogenic human coronavirus to emerge since severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2002. Like many coronaviruses, MERS-CoV carries genes that encode multiple accessory proteins that are not required for replication of the genome but are likely involved in pathogenesis. Evasion of host innate immunity through interferon (IFN) antagonism is a critical component of viral pathogenesis. The IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)-RNase L pathway activates upon sensing of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Activated RNase L cleaves viral and host single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), which leads to translational arrest and subsequent cell death, preventing viral replication and spread. Here we report that MERS-CoV, a lineage C Betacoronavirus, and related bat CoV NS4b accessory proteins have phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and antagonize OAS-RNase L by enzymatically degrading 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A), activators of RNase L. This is a novel function for NS4b, which has previously been reported to antagonize IFN signaling. NS4b proteins are distinct from lineage A Betacoronavirus PDEs and rotavirus gene-encoded PDEs, in having an amino-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) and are localized mostly to the nucleus. However, the expression level of cytoplasmic MERS-CoV NS4b protein is sufficient to prevent activation of RNase L. Finally, this is the first report of an RNase L antagonist expressed by a human or bat coronavirus and provides a specific mechanism by which this occurs. Our findings provide a potential mechanism for evasion of innate immunity by MERS-CoV while also identifying a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27025250

  4. Coherence selection in double CP MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jen-Hsien; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tzou, Der-Lii M.

    2008-11-01

    Applications of double cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, via 1H/ 15N and then 15N/ 13C coherence transfers, for 13C coherence selection are demonstrated on a 15N/ 13C-labeled N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) compound. The 15N/ 13C coherence transfer is very sensitive to the settings of the experimental parameters. To resolve explicitly these parameter dependences, we have systematically monitored the 13C{ 15N/ 1H} signal as a function of the rf field strength and the MAS frequency. The data reveal that the zero-quantum coherence transfer, with which the 13C effective rf field is larger than that of the 15N by the spinning frequency, would give better signal sensitivity. We demonstrate in one- and two-dimensional double CP experiments that spectral editing can be achieved by tailoring the experimental parameters, such as the rf field strengths and/or the MAS frequency.

  5. Commercial facility site selection simulating based on MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yi; Li, Qingquan; Zheng, Guizhou

    2008-10-01

    The location of commercial facility decides the benefit of the operator to a large degree. Existing location methods can express the static relationships between site selection result and location factors, but there still are some limites when express the dynamic and uncertain relationship between them. Hence, a dynamic, stochastic and forecastable location model should be built which can introduce the customer's behavior into the model and combine the macro pattern and micro spatial interaction. So the authors proposes Geosim-LM based on MAS. Geosim-LM has 3 kinds of agents, CustAgent, SiteAgent and GovAgent. They represent the customers, commercial fercilities and government. The land type, land price and traffic are the model environment. Then Geosim-LM is applied in the bank branches site evaluation and selection in Liwan district, Guangzhou. In existing bank branches site evaluation, there are 70% consistent in score grade between result of Geosim-LM after 200 round runing and actual rebust location. It proves the model is reliable and feasible. The conclusions can be get from the paper. MAS have advantages in location choice than existed methods. The result of Geosim-LM running can powerfully proves that building location model based on MAS is feasible.

  6. Circulating oxidized low-density lipoproteins and arterial elasticity: comparison between men with metabolic syndrome and physically active counterparts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoproteins in the intimae of arteries and endothelial dysfunction are key events in the development of atherosclerosis. Patients with metabolic syndrome are at high risk for cardiovascular diseases but the linkage between metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis is incompletely understood. We studied whether the levels of oxidized LDL and arterial elasticity differ between metabolic syndrome patients and physically active controls. Methods 40 men with metabolic syndrome and 40 physically active controls participated in this cross-sectional study. None of the study subjects had been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease. Levels of oxidized LDL were assessed by a two-site ELISA immunoassay. Arterial elasticity was assessed non-invasively by the HDI/PulseWave™ CR-2000 arterial tonometer. Results Levels of oxidized LDL were 89.6 ± 33.1 U/L for metabolic syndrome subjects and 68.5 ± 23.6 U/L for controls (p = 0.007). The difference remained significant after adjustment for LDL cholesterol. Large artery elasticity index (C1) was 16.2 ± 4.1 mL/mmHgx10 for metabolic syndrome subjects and 19.4 ± 3.7 mL/mmHgx10 for controls (p = 0.001), small artery indices (C2) were 7.0 ± 3.2 mL/mmHgx100 and 6.5 ± 2.9 mL/mmHgx100 (NS), respectively. Conclusions Subjects with metabolic syndrome had elevated levels of oxidized LDL and reduced large arterial elasticity compared to controls. This finding may partly explain the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases among metabolic syndrome patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01114763 PMID:20727144

  7. Auditory Attraction: Activation of visual cortex by music and sound in Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Cannistraci, Chris J.; Anderson, Adam; Kim, Chai-Youn; Eapen, Mariam; Gore, John C.; Blake, Randolph; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with a distinctive phenotype including cognitive-linguistic features, non-social anxiety, and a strong attraction to music. We performed functional MRI studies examining brain responses to musical and other types of auditory stimuli in young adults with WS and typically-developing controls. In Study 1, the WS group exhibited unforeseen activations of the visual cortex to musical stimuli, and it was this novel finding that became the focus of two subsequent studies. Using retinotopy, color localizers and additional sound conditions, we identified specific visual areas in WS subjects that were activated by both musical and non-musical auditory stimuli. The results, similar to synesthetic-like experiences, have implications for cross-modal sensory processing in typical and atypical neurodevelopment. PMID:20440382

  8. A girl with increased writing and painting activities associated with Turner's syndrome and autistic spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Ahouee, Shohreh Mohseni; Shooshtari, Mitra Hakim; Bidaki, Reza

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the findings on the evaluation of a 9-year-old girl with disabling and pronounced increased writing and painting activities associated with Turner's syndrome and autistic spectrum disorder. She spent most of the time doing these activities which affected not only her academic performance, but also social relationships. A comprehensive treatment plan consists of both biological and psychological aspects, is the main point of this case. Low dose of risperidone (0.5 mg/day) was started to decrease the patient's stereotypic behaviors. Sertraline (12.5 mg/day) was prescribed for her phobia. She was also referred to an occupational therapist in order to improve her social skills. PMID:26015917

  9. Physical activity disparities by socioeconomic status among metabolic syndrome patients: The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Physical activity plays an important role in preventing further progression of metabolic syndrome conditions to cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes. This study investigated physical activity disparities by socioeconomic status among metabolic syndrome patients. The fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012) data were analyzed (n=19,831). A revised definition of the US National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III was used for screening metabolic syndrome patients. Using International Physical Activity Questionnaire, physical activity adherence was defined as participating in 150+ minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity, 75+ minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity per week. Socioeconomic status was measured by level of education and house-hold income. Among metabolic syndrome patients, physical activity adherence rate of first (lowest), second, third, and fourth quartile house-hold income group were 28.31% (95% confidence interval [CI], 26.14-30.28%), 34.68% (95% CI, 32.71-36.70), 37.44% (95% CI, 35.66-39.25), and 43.79% (95% CI, 41.85-45.75). Physical activity adherence rate of groups with elementary or lower, middle-school, high-school, and college or higher education degree were 25.17% (95% CI, 22.95-27.54), 38.2% (95% CI, 35.13-41.00), 39.60% (95% CI, 38.24-41.77), and 36.89% (95% CI, 35.77-38.03), respectively. This study found that physical activity adherence rate was lower in socioeconomically disadvantaged metabolic syndrome patients, which may aggravate health inequity status of Korean society. PMID:26933654

  10. Crosstalk between circulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, adipokines and metabolic syndrome in obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) has direct and indirect function in adipokines production process. We aimed to assess the possible influence of circulating PPARγ on relative risk of metabolic syndrome and also examine the association between circulating PPARγ and adipokines levels among obese subjects. Methods A total of 96 obese subjects (body mass index (BMI) ≥30) were included in the current cross-sectional study. We assessed the body composition with the use of Body Composition Analyzer BC-418MA - Tanita. The MetS (metabolic syndrome) was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. All baseline blood samples were obtained following an overnight fasting. Serum concentrations of adipokines including Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), omentin-1, vaspin, progranulin, nesfatin-1 and circulating PPARγ was measured with the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Statistical analyses were performed using software package used for statistical analysis (SPSS). Results We found main association between circulating PPARγ and body composition in obese population. The risk of metabolic syndrome in subjects with higher concentration of PPARγ was 1.9 fold in compared with lower concentration of PPARγ after adjustment for age, sex and BMI. There was significant association between PPARγ and adipokines, specially nesfatin-1 and progranulin. Defined adipokines pattern among participants demonstrated the markedly higher concentration of vaspin, RBP4 and nesfatin-1 in participants with MetS compared to non-MetS subjects. Conclusions It appears all of studied adipokines might have association with PPARγ level and might simultaneously be involve in some common pathway to make susceptible obese subjects for MetS. PMID:24330836

  11. Prevalence and Impact of Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Zhuo, Hanjing; Benowitz, Neal L.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Liu, Kathleen D.; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cigarette smoke exposure has recently been found to be associated with increased susceptibility to trauma- and transfusion-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to determine 1) the prevalence of cigarette smoke exposure in a diverse multi-center sample of ARDS patients, and 2) whether cigarette smoke exposure is associated with severity of lung injury and mortality in ARDS. Design Analysis of the Albuterol for the Treatment of ALI (ALTA) and Omega ARDS Network studies. Setting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network hospitals. Patients Three hundred eighty one patients with ARDS. Interventions None. Measurements NNAL (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol), a validated tobacco-specific marker, was measured in urine samples from subjects enrolled in two NHLBI ARDS Network randomized controlled trials. Main Results Urine NNAL levels were consistent with active smoking in 36% of ARDS patients and with passive smoking in 41% of nonsmokers (vs 20% and 40% in general population, respectively). Patients with NNAL levels in the active smoking range were younger and had a higher prevalence of alcohol misuse, fewer comorbidities, lower severity of illness, and less septic shock at enrollment compared to patients with undetectable NNAL levels. Despite this lower severity of illness, the severity of lung injury did not significantly differ based on biomarker-determined smoking status. Cigarette smoke exposure was not significantly associated with death after adjusting for differences in age, alcohol use, comorbidities, and severity of illness. Conclusions In this first multicenter study of biomarker-determined cigarette smoke exposure in ARDS patients, we found that active cigarette smoke exposure was significantly more prevalent among ARDS patients compared to population averages. Despite their younger age, better overall health, and lower severity of illness, smokers by NNAL had similar severity of lung injury as patients with

  12. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  13. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  14. Hyperphosphorylation of RyRs Underlies Triggered Activity in Transgenic Rabbit Model of LQT2 Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Rees, Colin M.; Li, Weiyan; Cooper, Leroy L.; Jindal, Hitesh K.; Peng, Xuwen; Lu, Yichun; Terentyeva, Radmila; Odening, Katja E.; Daley, Jean; Bist, Kamana; Choi, Bum-Rak; Karma, Alain; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Loss-of function mutations in HERG potassium channels underlie long QT syndrome (LQTS) type 2 (LQT2), and are associated with fatal ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Previously, most studies focused on plasmamembrane-related pathways involved in arrhythmogenesis in LQTS, while pro-arrhythmic changes in intracellular Ca2+ handling remained unexplored. Objective We investigated the remodeling of Ca2+ homeostasis in ventricular cardiomyocytes derived from transgenic rabbit model of LQT2 in order to determine whether these changes contribute to triggered activity in the form of early afterdepolarizations (EADs). Methods and Results Confocal Ca2+ imaging revealed decrease in amplitude of Ca2+ transients and SR Ca2+ content in LQT2 myocytes. Experiments using SR-entrapped Ca2+ indicator demonstrated enhanced RyR-mediated SR Ca2+ leak in LQT2 cells. Western blot analyses showed increased phosphorylation of RyR in LQT2 myocytes vs. controls. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated loss of protein phosphatases type 1 and type 2 from the RyR complex. Stimulation of LQT2 cells with β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol resulted in prolongation of the plateau of action potentials accompanied by aberrant Ca2+ releases and EADs, which were abolished by inhibition of CaMKII. Computer simulations showed that late aberrant Ca2+ releases caused by RyR hyperactivity promote EADs and underlie the enhanced triggered activity through increased forward mode of NCX1. Conclusions Hyperactive, hyperphosphorylated RyRs due to reduced local phosphatase activity enhance triggered activity in LQT2 syndrome. EADs are promoted by aberrant RyR-mediated Ca2+ releases that are present despite a reduction of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) content. Those releases increase forward mode NCX1, thereby slowing repolarization and enabling L-type Ca2+ current reactivation. PMID:25249569

  15. The MicroMAS CubeSat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, K.; Blackwell, W. J.; Allen, G.; Bury, M.; Efromson, R.; Galbraith, C.; Hancock, T.; Leslie, V.; Osaretin, I.; Retherford, L.; Scarito, M.; Shields, M.; Toher, D.; Wight, K.; Miller, D.; Marinan, A.; Paek, S.; Peters, E.; Schmidt, F. H.; Alvisio, B.; Wise, E.; Masterson, R.; Franzim Miranda, D.; Crail, C.; Kingsbury, R.; Souffrant, A.; Orrego, L.; Eslinger, G.; Nicholas, A.; Pong, C.

    2012-12-01

    The recently published Midterm Assessment of NASA's Implementation of the Decadal Survey finds that, "The nation's Earth observing system is beginning a rapid decline in capability as long-running missions end and key new missions are delayed, lost, or canceled. The projected loss of observing capability could have significant adverse consequences for science and society." In this presentation, we explore low-cost, mission-flexible, and rapidly deployable spaceborne sensors that can meet stringent performance requirements pervading the NASA Earth Science measurement programs, including especially the recommended NRC Decadal Survey missions. New technologies have enabled a novel approach toward this science observational goal, and in this paper we describe recent technology develop efforts to address the challenges above through the use of CubeSat radiometers. The Micro-sized Microwave Atmospheric Satellite (MicroMAS) is a 3U cubesat (30x10x10 cm, ~4kg) hosting a passive microwave spectrometer operating near the 118.75-GHz oxygen absorption line. The focus of the first MicroMAS mission (hereafter, MicroMAS-1) is to observe convective thunderstorms, tropical cyclones, and hurricanes from a near-equatorial orbit at approximately 500-km altitude. A MicroMAS flight unit is currently being developed in anticipation of a 2014 launch to be provided by NASA. A parabolic reflector is mechanically rotated as the spacecraft orbits the earth, thus directing a cross-track scanned beam with FWHM beamwidth of 2.4-degrees, yielding an approximately 25-km diameter footprint from a nominal altitude of 500 km. Radiometric calibration is carried out using observations of cold space, the earth's limb, and an internal noise diode that is weakly coupled through the RF front-end electronics. A key technology feature is the development of an ultra-compact intermediate frequency processor module for channelization, detection, and A-to-D conversion. The antenna system and RF front

  16. Heart Activity and Autistic Behavior in Infants and Toddlers with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jane E.; Tonnsen, Bridgette; Robinson, Ashley; Shinkareva, Svetlana V.

    2012-01-01

    The present study contrasted physiological arousal in infants and toddlers with fragile X syndrome to typically developing control participants and examined physiological predictors early in development to autism severity later in development in fragile X syndrome. Thirty-one males with fragile X syndrome (ages 8-40 months) and 25 age-matched…

  17. Obesity, Food Selectivity, and Physical Activity in Individuals with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.; Bishop, Ellen; Holiday, David; Olmsted, Murrey

    2010-01-01

    National survey data from 884 families were used to examine the overall health of children and adults with fragile X syndrome. Results indicate the rate of obesity in adults with fragile X syndrome is similar to the general population (30%). Male children with fragile X syndrome, however, had higher rates of obesity (31%) when compared with…

  18. Cardiac vagal activation by adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment in infants with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Ayako; Hayano, Junichiro; Fujimoto, Shinji; Ando, Naoki; Mizuno, Kumiko; Kamei, Michi; Kobayashi, Satoru; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Togari, Hajime

    2007-02-01

    West syndrome (WS) is a generalized epileptic syndrome of infancy and early childhood with various etiologies, and consists of a triad of infantile spasm, arrest or regress of psychomotor development and specific electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern of hypsarrhythmia. WS had been believed to be refractory, but recent evidence supports effectiveness of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) treatment. The ACTH treatment, however, has a problem that it is often accompanied by adverse autonomic symptoms. We therefore examined heart rate variability (HRV) for assessing cardiac autonomic functions in WS and prospectively observed the changes during ACTH treatment. We studied 15 patients with WS and 9 age-matched controls during sleep (EEG stage 2). Compared with controls, the patients with WS were greater in the low-frequency component (LF) of HRV, an index reflecting sympatho-vagal interaction (p = 0.02), but were comparable for high-frequency component (HF) and LF-to-HF ratio (LF/HF), indices reflecting cardiac vagal activity and sympathetic predominance, respectively. During ACTH treatment, heart rate decreased (p < 0.01), LF and HF increased (p < 0.01), and LF/HF did not differ significantly. These results indicate that WS might be accompanied by autonomic changes and that ACTH treatment enhances parasympathetic function and causes bradycardia. PMID:17287597

  19. EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI): a user guide

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bowman, Simon J; Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Theander, Elke; Bootsma, Hendrika; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Ramos-Casals, Manel; Dörner, Thomas; Ravaud, Philippe; Vitali, Claudio; Mariette, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The EULAR Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity index (ESSDAI) is a systemic disease activity index that was designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. With the growing use of the ESSDAI, some domains appear to be more challenging to rate than others. The ESSDAI is now in use as a gold standard to measure disease activity in clinical studies, and as an outcome measure, even a primary outcome measure, in current randomised clinical trials. Therefore, ensuring an accurate and reproducible rating of each domain, by providing a more detailed definition of each domain, has emerged as an urgent need. The purpose of the present article is to provide a user guide for the ESSDAI. This guide provides definitions and precisions on the rating of each domain. It also includes some minor improvement of the score to integrate advance in knowledge of disease manifestations. This user guide may help clinicians to use the ESSDAI, and increase the reliability of rating and consequently of the ability to detect true changes over time. This better appraisal of ESSDAI items, along with the recent definition of disease activity levels and minimal clinically important change, will improve the assessment of patients with primary SS and facilitate the demonstration of effectiveness of treatment for patients with primary SS. PMID:26509054

  20. Markers of endothelial cell activation and injury in childhood haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nevard, C H; Blann, A D; Jurd, K M; Haycock, G B; Hunt, B J

    1999-08-01

    Diarrhoea-associated haemolytic uraemic syndrome (D+ HUS) is usually caused by verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli. Histology shows endothelial swelling with localised thrombus. Activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis also occurs. These facts, combined with the knowledge that recovery usually follows within weeks, led us to hypothesise that verotoxin causes localised endothelial cell activation but not injury. Markers of endothelial cell activation and injury were measured serially in 30 children with acute D+ HUS, healthy children, and children receiving chronic dialysis. Interpretation of markers was complicated by the renal dysfunction characteristic of D+ HUS. Nevertheless there was no evidence for endothelial cell injury, as soluble tissue factor levels were not increased and soluble thrombomodulin levels were lower than dialysed controls (P<0.001). In the acute phase, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule levels were raised above normal (P<0.001), but were lower than dialysed controls (P<0.001), and soluble E-selectin levels were not significantly increased compared with normal controls (P=0.2). Hence, there was no evidence for endothelial cell damage or endothelial cell activation by the time children reached hospital; but this study did not exclude the possibility that endothelial cell activation occurred prior to hospital admission. PMID:10452276

  1. Menstrual cycle phase does not affect sympathetic neural activity in women with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stickford, Abigail SL; VanGundy, Tiffany B; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) are primarily premenopausal women, which may be attributed to female sex hormones. We tested the hypothesis that hormonal fluctuations of the menstrual cycle alter sympathetic neural activity and orthostatic tolerance in POTS women. Ten POTS women were studied during the early follicular (EF) and mid-luteal (ML) phases of the menstrual cycle. Haemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were measured when supine, during 60 deg upright tilt for 45 min or until presyncope, and during the cold pressor test (CPT) and Valsalva manoeuvres. Blood pressure and total peripheral resistance were higher during rest and tilting in the ML than EF phase; however, heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output were similar between phases. There were no mean ± SD differences in MSNA burst frequency (8 ± 8 EF phase vs. 10 ± 10 bursts min–1 ML phase at rest; 34 ± 15 EF phase vs. 36 ± 16 bursts min–1 ML phase at 5 min tilt), burst incidence or total activity, nor any differences in the cardiovagal and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivities between phases under any condition. The incidence of presyncope was also the same between phases. There were no differences in haemodynamic or sympathetic responses to CPT or Valsalva. These results suggest that the menstrual cycle does not affect sympathetic neural activity but modulates blood pressure and vasoconstriction in POTS women during tilting. Thus, factors other than sympathetic neural activity are probably responsible for the symptoms of orthostatic intolerance across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS. Key points Women with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) report fluctuations in orthostatic tolerance throughout the menstrual cycle. The mechanism(s) underlying blood pressure control across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS are unknown. The findings of the present study indicate that the menstrual

  2. MSI2 is required for maintaining activated myelodysplastic syndrome stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, James; Ho, Tzu-Chieh; Amin, Elianna; Xu, Haiming; Barlowe, Trevor S.; Perez, Alexendar R.; Durham, Benjamin H.; Tivnan, Patrick; Okabe, Rachel; Chow, Arthur; Vu, Ly; Park, Sun Mi; Prieto, Camila; Famulare, Christopher; Patel, Minal; Lengner, Christopher J.; Verma, Amit; Roboz, Gail; Guzman, Monica; Klimek, Virginia M.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Leslie, Christina; Nimer, Stephen D.; Kharas, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are driven by complex genetic and epigenetic alterations. The MSI2 RNA-binding protein has been demonstrated to have a role in acute myeloid leukaemia and stem cell function, but its role in MDS is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that elevated MSI2 expression correlates with poor survival in MDS. Conditional deletion of Msi2 in a mouse model of MDS results in a rapid loss of MDS haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and reverses the clinical features of MDS. Inversely, inducible overexpression of MSI2 drives myeloid disease progression. The MDS HSPCs remain dependent on MSI2 expression after disease initiation. Furthermore, MSI2 expression expands and maintains a more activated (G1) MDS HSPC. Gene expression profiling of HSPCs from the MSI2 MDS mice identifies a signature that correlates with poor survival in MDS patients. Overall, we identify a role for MSI2 in MDS representing a therapeutic target in this disease. PMID:26898884

  3. White-Nose Syndrome: Human Activity in the Emergence of an Extirpating Mycosis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Hannah T; Barton, Hazel A

    2013-12-01

    In winter 2006, the bat population in Howe Cave, in central New York State, USA, contained a number of bats displaying an unusual white substance on their muzzles. The following year, numerous bats in four surrounding caves displayed unusual winter hibernation behavior, including day flying and entrance roosting. A number of bats were found dead and dying, and all demonstrated a white, powdery substance on their muzzles, ears, and wing membranes, which was later identified as the conidia of a previously undescribed fungal pathogen, Geomyces destructans. The growth of the conidia gave infected bats the appearance of having dunked their faces into powdered sugar. The disease was named white-nose syndrome and represents an emerging zoonotic mycosis, likely introduced through human activities, which has led to a precipitous decline in North American bat species. PMID:26184962

  4. Active Control of Repetitive Structural Transitions between Replication Forks and Holliday Junctions by Werner Syndrome Helicase.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soochul; Lee, Jinwoo; Yoo, Sangwoon; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Ahn, Byungchan; Hohng, Sungchul

    2016-08-01

    The reactivation of stalled DNA replication via fork regression invokes Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and the recovery of the replication fork after DNA repair or error-free DNA synthesis. The coordination mechanism for these DNA structural transitions by molecular motors, however, remains unclear. Here we perform single-molecule fluorescence experiments with Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and model replication forks. The Holliday junction is readily formed once the lagging arm is unwound, and migrated unidirectionally with 3.2 ± 0.03 bases/s velocity. The recovery of the replication fork was controlled by branch migration reversal of WRN, resulting in repetitive fork regression. The Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and migration direction reversal are all ATP dependent, revealing that WRN uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to actively coordinate the structural transitions of DNA. PMID:27427477

  5. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    PubMed

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general. PMID:26415918

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Alter Sympathetic Activity During Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Josiane C.; Flôr, Atalia F. L.; França-Silva, Maria S.; Balarini, Camille M.; Braga, Valdir A.

    2015-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II), which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs), mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO). Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS): dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin, and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS. PMID:26779026

  7. Abnormal neuronal activity in Tourette syndrome and its modulation using deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Israelashvili, Michal; Loewenstern, Yocheved

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a common childhood-onset disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics that are typically accompanied by a multitude of comorbid symptoms. Pharmacological treatment options are limited, which has led to the exploration of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a possible treatment for severe cases. Multiple lines of evidence have linked TS with abnormalities in the motor and limbic cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) pathways. Neurophysiological data have only recently started to slowly accumulate from multiple sources: noninvasive imaging and electrophysiological techniques, invasive electrophysiological recordings in TS patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery, and animal models of the disorder. These converging sources point to system-level physiological changes throughout the CBG pathway, including both general altered baseline neuronal activity patterns and specific tic-related activity. DBS has been applied to different regions along the motor and limbic pathways, primarily to the globus pallidus internus, thalamic nuclei, and nucleus accumbens. In line with the findings that also draw on the more abundant application of DBS to Parkinson's disease, this stimulation is assumed to result in changes in the neuronal firing patterns and the passage of information through the stimulated nuclei. We present an overview of recent experimental findings on abnormal neuronal activity associated with TS and the changes in this activity following DBS. These findings are then discussed in the context of current models of CBG function in the normal state, during TS, and finally in the wider context of DBS in CBG-related disorders. PMID:25925326

  8. Linkage of regulators of TGF-β activity in the fetal ovary to polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hatzirodos, Nicholas; Bayne, Rosemary A.; Irving-Rodgers, Helen F.; Hummitzsch, Katja; Sabatier, Laetitia; Lee, Sam; Bonner, Wendy; Gibson, Mark A.; Rainey, William E.; Carr, Bruce R.; Mason, Helen D.; Reinhardt, Dieter P.; Anderson, Richard A.; Rodgers, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Although not often discussed, the ovaries of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) show all the hallmarks of increased TGF-β activity, with increased amounts of fibrous tissue and collagen in the ovarian capsule or tunica albuginea and ovarian stroma. Recent studies suggest that PCOS could have fetal origins. Genetic studies of PCOS have also found linkage with a microsatellite located in intron 55 of the extracellular matrix protein fibrillin 3. Fibrillins regulate TGF-β bioactivity in tissues by binding latent TGF-β binding proteins. We therefore examined expression of fibrillins 1–3, latent TGF-β binding proteins 1–4, and TGF-β 1–3 in bovine and human fetal ovaries at different stages of gestation and in adult ovaries. We also immunolocalized fibrillins 1 and 3. The results indicate that TGF-β pathways operate during ovarian fetal development, but most important, we show fibrillin 3 is present in the stromal compartments of fetal ovaries and is highly expressed at a critical stage early in developing human and bovine fetal ovaries when stroma is expanding and follicles are forming. These changes in expression of fibrillin 3 in the fetal ovary could lead to a predisposition to develop PCOS in later life.—Hatzirodos, N., Bayne, R. A., Irving-Rodgers, H. F., Hummitzsch, K., Sabatier, L., Lee, S., Bonner, W., Gibson, M. A., Rainey, W. E., Carr, B. R., Mason, H. D., Reinhardt, D. P., Anderson, R. A., Rodgers, R. J. Linkage of regulators of TGF-β activity in the fetal ovary to polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:21411746

  9. The immune pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuhuang; Zhou, Huaying; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo; He, Mei

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the immunological pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A total of 238 patients with AIDS who received initial HAART were included in this prospective cohort study. Blood samples were collected immediately, at baseline, at week 12, and at week 24 after initial HAART and at the onset of IRIS. Lymphocyte subsets, Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and interleukin (IL)-7 levels were measured by flow cytometry or ELISA. Among the 238 patients with AIDS who received HAART, 47 patients developed IRIS. The percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naive, memory, and activated cells exhibited no significant differences between AIDS patients with and without IRIS 24 weeks after initial HAART. The percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was lower in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients before HAART, 12 weeks after HAART, 24 weeks after HAART, and at the onset of IRIS. IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly higher at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were significantly lower at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. Plasma IL-7 decreased gradually with the progression of HAART. The level of IL-7 was higher in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients at all follow-up time points. An imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines, a consistently low CD(+)CD25(+)Fox3(+) percentage, and a high IL-7 level may be crucial in the pathogenesis of IRIS in AIDS patients who had received HAART. PMID:25131160

  10. Acute Effects of a Therapeutic Mobility Device on Physical Activity and Heart Rate in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Janet L.; Ulrich, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this feasibility study was to provide an opportunity to increase physical activity (PA) and heart rate (HR) for children with Down syndrome (DS) during unstructured group exercise utilizing a riding device called the Power Pumper®. Method: Twenty-four children aged 5 to 7 years old participated in this case-control study,…

  11. Selected Laws, Rules and State-Level Activities in Wisconsin Related to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Information Memorandum 87-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Richard

    This information memorandum describes the selected laws, rules, and state-level activities in Wisconsin related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tests for antibodies to the virus (HIV) that causes AIDS. A section on current state laws on AIDS and HIV antibody testing describes laws related to informed consent for testing,…

  12. Impaired Homocysteine Transmethylation and Protein-Methyltransferase Activity Reduce Expression of Selenoprotein P: Implications for Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity causes Metabolic Syndrome and Type-II Diabetes, disrupting hepatic function, methionine (Met)/homocysteine (Hcy) transmethylation and methyltransferase (PRMT) activities. Selenoprotein P (SEPP1), exported from the liver, is the predominate form of plasma selenium (Se) and the physiological S...

  13. Aberrant Inflammasome Activation Characterizes Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hong Yien; Yong, Yean Kong; Shankar, Esaki M; Paukovics, Geza; Ellegård, Rada; Larsson, Marie; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; French, Martyn A; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-05-15

    Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) complicates combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in up to 25% of patients with HIV/TB coinfection. Monocytes and IL-18, a signature cytokine of inflammasome activation, are implicated in TB-IRIS pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated inflammasome activation both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients. HIV/TB patients exhibited higher proportions of monocytes expressing activated caspase-1 (casp1) pre-cART, compared with HIV patients without TB, and patients who developed TB-IRIS exhibited the greatest increase in casp1 expression. CD64(+) monocytes were a marker of increased casp1 expression. Furthermore, IL-1β, another marker of inflammasome activation, was also elevated during TB-IRIS. TB-IRIS patients also exhibited greater upregulation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome mRNA, compared with controls. Analysis of plasma mitochondrial DNA levels showed that TB-IRIS patients experienced greater cell death, especially pre-cART. Plasma NO levels were lower both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence of inadequate inflammasome regulation. Plasma IL-18 levels pre-cART correlated inversely with NO levels but positively with monocyte casp1 expression and mitochondrial DNA levels, and expression of IL-18Rα on CD4(+) T cells and NK cells was higher in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence that IL-18 is a marker of inflammasome activation. We propose that inflammasome activation in monocytes/macrophages of HIV/TB patients increases with ineffective T cell-dependent activation of monocytes/macrophages, priming them for an excessive inflammatory response after cART is commenced, which is greatest in patients with TB-IRIS. PMID:27076678

  14. Down syndrome critical region 2 protein inhibits the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {beta} in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hae Jin; Park, Joongkyu; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Jongsun; Paik, Seung R.; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2008-11-21

    Down syndrome is mainly caused by a trisomy of chromosome 21. The Down syndrome critical region 2 (DSCR2) gene is located within a part of chromosome 21, the Down syndrome critical region (DSCR). To investigate the function of DSCR2, we sought to identify DSCR2-interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid assays. A human fetal brain cDNA library was screened, and DSCR2 was found to interact with a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {beta}, (PPAR{beta}). A co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that DSCR2 physically interacts with PPAR{beta} in mammalian HEK293 cells. DSCR2 also inhibited the ligand-induced transcriptional activity of PPAR{beta}. Furthermore, PPAR{beta} also decreased the solubility of DSCR2, which increased levels of insoluble DSCR2.

  15. Milli-Arcsecond (MAS) Imaging of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Oktem, Figen S.; Kamalabadi, Farzad; O'Neill, John; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Daw, Adrian N.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2016-05-01

    Dissipation in the solar corona is believed to occur in extremely thin current sheets of order 1-100 km. Emission from these hot but thin current sheets should be visible in coronal EUV emission lines. However, this spatial scale is far below the resolution of existing imaging instruments, so these dissipation sites have never been observed individually. Conventional optics cannot be manufactured with sufficient surface figure accuracy to obtain the required spatial resolution in the extreme-ultraviolet where these hot plasmas radiate. A photon sieve, a diffractive imaging element similar to a Fresnel zone plate, can be manufactured to provide a few milli-arcsec (MAS) resolution, with much more readily achievable tolerances than with conventional imaging technology. Prototype photon sieve elements have been fabricated and tested in the laboratory. A full-scale ultra-high resolution instrument will require formation flying and computational image deconvolution. Significant progress has been made in overcoming these challenges, and some recent results in these areas are discussed. A simple design for a sounding rocket concept demonstration payload is presented that obtains 80 MAS (0.080 arcsec) imaging with a 100 mm diameter photon sieve to image Fe XIV 334 and Fe XVI 335. These images will show the structure of the corona at a resolution never before obtained, and they will also allow a study of the temperature structure in the dissipation region.

  16. Physical activity and risk of Metabolic Syndrome in an urban Mexican cohort

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Hernández, Pablo; Flores, Yvonne; Siani, Carole; Lamure, Michel; Dosamantes-Carrasco, L Darina; Halley-Castillo, Elizabeth; Huitrón, Gerardo; Talavera, Juan O; Gallegos-Carrillo, Katia; Salmerón, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Background In the Mexican population metabolic syndrome (MS) is highly prevalent. It is well documented that regular physical activity (PA) prevents coronary diseases, type 2 diabetes and MS. Most studies of PA have focused on moderate-vigorous leisure-time activity, because it involves higher energy expenditures, increase physical fitness, and decrease the risk of MS. However, for most people it is difficult to get a significant amount of PA from only moderately-vigorous leisure activity, so workplace activity may be an option for working populations, because, although may not be as vigorous in terms of cardio-respiratory efforts, it comprises a considerable proportion of the total daily activity with important energy expenditure. Since studies have also documented that different types and intensity of daily PA, including low-intensity, seem to confer important health benefits such as prevent MS, we sought to assess the impact of different amounts of leisure-time and workplace activities, including low-intensity level on MS prevention, in a sample of urban Mexican adults. Methods The study population consisted of 5118 employees and their relatives, aged 20 to 70 years, who were enrolled in the baseline evaluation of a cohort study. MS was assessed according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program, ATP III and physical activity with a validated self-administered questionnaire. Associations between physical activity and MS risk were assessed with multivariate logistic regression models. Results The prevalence of the components of MS in the study population were: high glucose levels 14.2%, high triglycerides 40.9%, high blood pressure 20.4%, greater than healthful waist circumference 43.2% and low-high density lipoprotein 76.9%. The prevalence of MS was 24.4%; 25.3% in men and 21.8% in women. MS risk was reduced among men (OR 0.72; 95%CI 0.57–0.95) and women (OR 0.78; 95%CI 0.64–0.94) who reported an amount of ≥30 minutes/day of leisure

  17. Chromosome aberration and environmental physical activity: Down syndrome and solar and cosmic ray activity, Israel, 1990-2000.

    PubMed

    Stoupel, Eliahu G; Frimer, Helena; Appelman, Zvi; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Dar, Hanna; Fejgin, Moshe D; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Manor, Esther; Barkai, Gad; Shalev, Stavit; Gelman-Kohan, Zully; Reish, Orit; Lev, Dorit; Davidov, Bella; Goldman, Boleslaw; Shohat, Mordechai

    2005-09-01

    The possibility that environmental effects are associated with chromosome aberrations and various congenital pathologies has been discussed previously. Recent advances in the collection and computerization of data make studying these potential associations more feasible. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible link between the number of Down syndrome (DS) cases detected prenatally or at birth yearly in Israel over a 10-year period compared with the levels of solar and cosmic ray activity 1 year before the detection or birth of each affected child. Information about 1,108,449 births was collected for the years 1990-2000, excluding 1991, when data were unavailable. A total of 1,310 cases of DS were detected prenatally or at birth--138 in the non-Jewish community and 1,172 in the Jewish population. Solar activity indices--sunspot number and solar radio flux 2,800 MHz at 10.7 cm wavelength for 1989-1999--were compared with the number of DS cases detected. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and their probabilities (P) were established for the percentage of DS cases in the whole population. There was a significant inverse correlation between the indices of solar activity and the number of cases of DS detected--r=-0.78, P=0.008 for sunspot number and r=-0.76, P=0.01 for solar flux. The possibility that cosmophysical factors inversely related to solar activity play a role in the pathogenesis of chromosome aberrations should be considered. We have confirmed a strong trend towards an association between the cosmic ray activity level and the incidence of DS. PMID:15988607

  18. Chromosome aberration and environmental physical activity: Down syndrome and solar and cosmic ray activity, Israel, 1990-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoupel, Eliahu G.; Frimer, Helena; Appelman, Zvi; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Dar, Hanna; Fejgin, Moshe D.; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Manor, Esther; Barkai, Gad; Shalev, Stavit; Gelman-Kohan, Zully; Reish, Orit; Lev, Dorit; Davidov, Bella; Goldman, Boleslaw; Shohat, Mordechai

    2005-09-01

    The possibility that environmental effects are associated with chromosome aberrations and various congenital pathologies has been discussed previously. Recent advances in the collection and computerization of data make studying these potential associations more feasible. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible link between the number of Down syndrome (DS) cases detected prenatally or at birth yearly in Israel over a 10-year period compared with the levels of solar and cosmic ray activity 1 year before the detection or birth of each affected child. Information about 1,108,449 births was collected for the years 1990-2000, excluding 1991, when data were unavailable. A total of 1,310 cases of DS were detected prenatally or at birth—138 in the non-Jewish community and 1,172 in the Jewish population. Solar activity indices—sunspot number and solar radio flux 2,800 MHz at 10.7 cm wavelength for 1989-1999—were compared with the number of DS cases detected. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and their probabilities (P) were established for the percentage of DS cases in the whole population. There was a significant inverse correlation between the indices of solar activity and the number of cases of DS detected—r=-0.78, P=0.008 for sunspot number and r=-0.76, P=0.01 for solar flux. The possibility that cosmophysical factors inversely related to solar activity play a role in the pathogenesis of chromosome aberrations should be considered. We have confirmed a strong trend towards an association between the cosmic ray activity level and the incidence of DS.

  19. Level of Physical Activity and In-Hospital Course of Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Juliana de Goes; Santos, Marcos Antonio Almeida; Barreto Filho, José Augusto Soares; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes; de Melo, Enaldo Vieira; de Oliveira, Norma Alves; Faro, Gustavo Baptista de Almeida; Sousa, Antônio Carlos Sobral

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. A sedentary lifestyle, present in 85% of the Brazilian population, is considered a risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease. However, the correlation of a sedentary lifestyle with cardiovascular events (CVE) during hospitalization for ACS is not well established. Objective To evaluate the association between physical activity level, assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), with in-hospital prognosis in patients with ACS. Methods Observational, cross-sectional, and analytical study with 215 subjects with a diagnosis of ACS consecutively admitted to a referral hospital for cardiac patients between July 2009 and February 2011. All volunteers answered the short version of the IPAQ and were observed for the occurrence of CVE during hospitalization with a standardized assessment conducted by the researcher and corroborated by data from medical records. Results The patients were admitted with diagnoses of unstable angina (34.4%), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without ST elevation (41.4%), and AMI with ST elevation (24.2%). According to the level of physical activity, the patients were classified as non-active (56.3%) and active (43.7%). A CVE occurred in 35.3% of the cohort. The occurrence of in-hospital complications was associated with the length of hospital stay (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15) and physical inactivity (OR = 2.54), and was independent of age, systolic blood pressure, and prior congestive heart failure. Conclusion A physically active lifestyle reduces the risk of CVE during hospitalization in patients with ACS. PMID:26690692

  20. Cellular Immune Activation in Cerebrospinal Fluid From Ugandans With Cryptococcal Meningitis and Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meya, David B.; Okurut, Samuel; Zziwa, Godfrey; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Kelsey, Melander; Cose, Steve; Joloba, Moses; Naluyima, Prossy; Palmer, Brent E.; Kambugu, Andrew; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Eller, Michael A.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Boulware, David R.; Manabe, Yuka C.; Janoff, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is characterized by high fungal burden and limited leukocyte trafficking to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The immunopathogenesis of CM immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of antiretroviral therapy at the site of infection is poorly understood. Methods. We characterized the lineage and activation status of mononuclear cells in blood and CSF of HIV-infected patients with noncryptococcal meningitis (NCM) (n = 10), those with CM at day 0 (n = 40) or day 14 (n = 21) of antifungal therapy, and those with CM-IRIS (n = 10). Results. At diagnosis, highly activated CD8+ T cells predominated in CSF in both CM and NCM. CM-IRIS was associated with an increasing frequency of CSF CD4+ T cells (increased from 2.2% to 23%; P = .06), a shift in monocyte phenotype from classic to an intermediate/proinflammatory, and increased programmed death ligand 1 expression on natural killer cells (increased from 11.9% to 61.6%, P = .03). CSF cellular responses were distinct from responses in peripheral blood. Conclusions. After CM, T cells in CSF tend to evolve with the development of IRIS, with increasing proportions of activated CD4+ T cells, migration of intermediate monocytes to the CSF, and declining fungal burden. These changes provide insight into IRIS pathogenesis and could be exploited to more effectively treat CM and prevent CM-IRIS. PMID:25492918

  1. Serine protease activity and residual LEKTI expression determine phenotype in Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Wagberg, Fredrik; Schmuth, Matthias; Crumrine, Debra; Lissens, Willy; Jayakumar, Arumugam; Houben, Evi; Mauro, Theodora M; Leonardsson, Göran; Brattsand, Maria; Egelrud, Torbjorn; Roseeuw, Diane; Clayman, Gary L; Feingold, Kenneth R; Williams, Mary L; Elias, Peter M

    2006-07-01

    Mutations in the SPINK5 gene encoding the serine protease (SP) inhibitor, lymphoepithelial-Kazal-type 5 inhibitor (LEKTI), cause Netherton syndrome (NS), a life-threatening disease, owing to proteolysis of the stratum corneum (SC). We assessed here the basis for phenotypic variations in nine patients with "mild", "moderate", and "severe" NS. The magnitude of SP activation correlated with both the barrier defect and clinical severity, and inversely with residual LEKTI expression. LEKTI co-localizes within the SC with kallikreins 5 and 7 and inhibits both SP. The permeability barrier abnormality in NS was further linked to SC thinning and proteolysis of two lipid hydrolases (beta-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase), with resultant disorganization of extracellular lamellar membranes. SC attenuation correlated with phenotype-dependent, SP activation, and loss of corneodesmosomes, owing to desmoglein (DSG)1 and desmocollin (DSC)1 degradation. Although excess SP activity extended into the nucleated layers in NS, degrading desmosomal mid-line structures with loss of DSG1/DSC1, the integrity of the nucleated epidermis appears to be maintained by compensatory upregulation of DSG3/DSC3. Maintenance of sufficient permeability barrier function for survival correlated with a compensatory acceleration of lamellar body secretion, providing a partial permeability barrier in NS. These studies provide a mechanistic basis for phenotypic variations in NS, and describe compensatory mechanisms that permit survival of NS patients in the face of unrelenting SP attack. PMID:16601670

  2. Reduced cholesterol levels impair Smoothened activation in Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blassberg, Robert; Macrae, James I.; Briscoe, James; Jacob, John

    2016-01-01

    Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a common autosomal-recessive disorder that results from mutations in the gene encoding the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7). Impaired DHCR7 function is associated with a spectrum of congenital malformations, intellectual impairment, epileptiform activity and autism spectrum disorder. Biochemically, there is a deficit in cholesterol and an accumulation of its metabolic precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) in developing tissues. Morphological abnormalities in SLOS resemble those seen in congenital Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-deficient conditions, leading to the proposal that the pathogenesis of SLOS is mediated by aberrant SHH signalling. SHH signalling is transduced through the transmembrane protein Smoothened (SMO), which localizes to the primary cilium of a cell on activation and is both positively and negatively regulated by sterol molecules derived from cholesterol biosynthesis. One proposed mechanism of SLOS involves SMO dysregulation by altered sterol levels, but the salient sterol species has not been identified. Here, we clarify the relationship between disrupted cholesterol metabolism and reduced SHH signalling in SLOS by modelling the disorder in vitro. Our results indicate that a deficit in cholesterol, as opposed to an accumulation of 7DHC, impairs SMO activation and its localization to the primary cilium. PMID:26685159

  3. Immune activation in irritable bowel syndrome: can neuroimmune interactions explain symptoms?

    PubMed

    Hughes, Patrick A; Zola, Heddy; Penttila, Irmeli A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Andrews, Jane M; Krumbiegel, Doreen

    2013-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract characterized by pain or discomfort from the lower abdominal region, which is associated with altered bowel habit. Despite its prevalence, there is currently a lack of effective treatment options for patients. IBS has long been considered as a neurological condition resulting from alterations in the brain gut axis, but immunological alterations are increasingly reported in IBS patients, consistent with the hypothesis that there is a chronic, but low-grade, immune activation. Mediators released by immune cells act to either dampen or amplify the activity of GI nerves. Release of a number of these mediators correlates with symptoms of IBS, highlighting the importance of interactions between the immune and the nervous systems. Investigation of the role of microbiota in these interactions is in its early stages, but may provide many answers regarding the mechanisms underlying activation of the immune system in IBS. Identifying what the key changes in the GI immune system are in IBS and how these changes modulate viscerosensory nervous function is essential for the development of novel therapies for the underlying disorder. PMID:23649183

  4. Association between cognitive performance, physical fitness, and physical activity level in women with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ickmans, Kelly; Clarys, Peter; Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; Aerenhouts, Dirk; Zinzen, Evert; Aelbrecht, Senne; Meersdom, Geert; Lambrecht, Luc; Pattyn, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Limited scientific evidence suggests that physical activity is directly related to cognitive performance in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). To date, no other study has examined the direct relationship between cognitive performance and physical fitness in these patients. This study examined whether cognitive performance and physical fitness are associated in female patients with CFS and investigated the association between cognitive performance and physical activity level (PAL) in the same study sample. We hypothesized that patients who performed better on cognitive tasks would show increased PALs and better performance on physical tests. The study included 31 women with CFS and 13 healthy inactive women. Participants first completed three cognitive tests. Afterward, they undertook a test to determine their maximal handgrip strength, performed a bicycle ergometer test, and were provided with an activity monitor. In patients with CFS, lower peak oxygen uptake and peak heart rate were associated with slower psychomotor speed (p < 0.05). Maximal handgrip strength was correlated with working memory performance (p < 0.05). Both choice and simple reaction time were lower in patients with CFS relative to healthy controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). In conclusion, physical fitness, but not PAL, is associated with cognitive performance in female patients with CFS. PMID:24203542

  5. Activity Pacing Self-Management in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Eupen, Inge; Meirte, Jill; Van Cauwenbergh, Deborah; Moorkens, Greta; Meeus, Mira; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an activity pacing self-management (APSM) intervention in improving performance of daily life activities in women with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). METHOD. A total of 33 women with CFS (age 41.1 ± 11.2 yr) were randomly allocated to APSM (experimental group; n = 16) or relaxation (control group; n = 17). Main outcome measures included the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM; primary) and Checklist Individual Strength (CIS). RESULTS. COPM scores changed significantly over time in both groups (p = .03). The change in Satisfaction scores showed a significant difference in favor only of APSM (effect size = 0.74 [0.11, 1.4]). CIS scores decreased significantly in the experimental group only (p < .01). CONCLUSION. APSM was found to be feasible and effective in optimizing participation in desired daily life activities in women with CFS. Replication in a larger sample with long-term follow-up is required. PMID:26356665

  6. How do people with chronically painful joint hypermobility syndrome make decisions about activity?

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anne; Corcoran, Kelley; Grahame, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Background: The model of activity avoidance prompted by fear of increased pain and/or harm dominates understanding and research into activity limitation in chronic pain. Yet, the accounts of people with chronic pain on decisions about activity limitation are rarely heard beyond the confines of fear and avoidance questionnaires. Methods: We used semi-structured interviews to explore the decisions of 11 women attending a pain management clinic with chronically painful Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS). Results: Six themes emerged from Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis: the overall aim of keeping pain to a manageable level, considering whether the planned activity was worth it and, running through all judgements, the influence of pain intensity. The decision was tipped towards avoidance by unpredictability of pain and by high emotional cost and towards going ahead with the activity by the wish to exert control and by low emotional cost. Many accounts described a specifiable cost–benefit analysis of individual decisions, weighing the importance of each activity against its potential aversive consequences, which only in a minority of cases was dominated by fear of pain or injury. Conclusion: Assumptions of fear as the basis of activity avoidance should not be used uncritically in clinical settings. Decisions about activity should explore beyond pain expectancy, incorporating goals, values, and decision processes. Summary points The model of fear of pain or re/injury and associated avoidance, an important insight that has generated effective therapeutic interventions, risks being over-applied and assumed rather than demonstrated. Patients’ own accounts, using qualitative analysis of interview in 11 women with long term chronic pain associated with joint hypermobility, give a more nuanced description of complex decision-making around activity. While a few activities were unquestionably avoided because of such fears, others were undertaken when benefits

  7. Matriptase initiates activation of epidermal pro-kallikrein and disease onset in a mouse model of Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Masedunskas, Andrius; Bey, Alexandra L; Rasmussen, Amber L; Weigert, Roberto; List, Karin; Szabo, Roman; Overbeek, Paul A; Bugge, Thomas H

    2010-08-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI is the etiological origin of Netherton syndrome, which causes detachment of the stratum corneum and chronic inflammation. Here we show that the membrane protease matriptase initiates Netherton syndrome in a LEKTI-deficient mouse model by premature activation of a pro-kallikrein cascade. Auto-activation of pro-inflammatory pro-kallikrein-related peptidases that are associated with stratum corneum detachment was either low or undetectable, but they were efficiently activated by matriptase. Ablation of matriptase from LEKTI-deficient mice dampened inflammation, eliminated aberrant protease activity, prevented detachment of the stratum corneum, and improved the barrier function of the epidermis. These results uncover a pathogenic matriptase-pro-kallikrein pathway that could operate in several human skin and inflammatory diseases. PMID:20657595

  8. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  9. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  10. Cardiorenal syndrome and vitamin D receptor activation in chronic kidney disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Darabian, Sirous; Rattanasompattikul, Manoch; Hatamizadeh, Parta; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Budoff, Matthew J.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2012-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) refers to a constellation of conditions whereby heart and kidney diseases are pathophysiologically connected. For clinical purposes, it would be more appropriate to emphasize the pathophysiological pathways to classify CRS into: (1) hemodynamic, (2) atherosclerotic, (3) uremic, (4) neurohumoral, (5) anemic–hematologic, (6) inflammatory–oxidative, (7) vitamin D receptor (VDR) and/or FGF23-, and (8) multifactorial CRS. In recent years, there have been a preponderance data indicating that vitamin D and VDR play an important role in the combination of renal and cardiac diseases. This review focuses on some important findings about VDR activation and its role in CRS, which exists frequently in chronic kidney disease patients and is a main cause of morbidity and mortality. Pathophysiological pathways related to suboptimal or defective VDR activation may play a role in causing or aggravating CRS. VDR activation using newer agents including vitamin D mimetics (such as paricalcitol and maxacalcitol) are promising agents, which may be related to their selectivity in activating VDR by means of attracting different post-D-complex cofactors. Some, but not all, studies have confirmed the survival advantages of D-mimetics as compared to non-selective VDR activators. Higher doses of D-mimetic per unit of parathyroid hormone (paricalcitol to parathyroid hormone ratio) is associated with greater survival, and the survival advantages of African American dialysis patients could be explained by higher doses of paricalcitol (>10 μg/week). More studies are needed to verify these data and to explore additional avenues for CRS management via modulating VDR pathway. PMID:26889405

  11. Is Xanthine oxidase activity in polycystic ovary syndrome associated with inflammatory and cardiovascular risk factors?

    PubMed

    Isık, Hatice; Aynıoglu, Oner; Tımur, Hakan; Sahbaz, Ahmet; Harma, Muge; Can, Murat; Guven, Berrak; Alptekin, Husnu; Kokturk, Furuzan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) to determine the relationship between xanthine oxidase (XO) and oxidative stress, inflammatory status, and various clinical and biochemical parameters. In this cross-sectional study a total of 83 women including 45 PCOS patients and 38 healthy women were enrolled. We collected blood samples for XO and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, hormone levels, cholesterol values, and inflammatory markers. Body mass index (BMI) , waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and blood pressure were assessed. Blood samples were taken for hormonal levels, cholesterol levels, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell and neutrophil counts, XO and SOD activities. The basal hormone levels, triglyceride (TG) levels, TG/HDL-C (high density lipoprotein-cholesterol) ratios FPG, FPI and HOMA-IR levels were higher in PCOS patients compared to controls (p<0.05). Platelet and plateletcrit (PCT) values, CRP, and XO activity were significantly increased, however SOD activity was decreased in PCOS patients (p<0.001). XO activity was positively correlated with LH/FSH and TG/HDL ratios, CRP, PCT, FPG, FPI, and HOMA-IR, and negatively correlated with QUICKI levels. In conclusion, XO is a useful marker to assess oxidative stress in PCOS patients. Positive correlations between XO and inflammatory markers and cardiovascular disease risk factors suggest that XO plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PCOS and its metabolic complications. PMID:27295433

  12. Intervention to increase physical activity in irritable bowel syndrome shows long-term positive effects

    PubMed Central

    Johannesson, Elisabet; Ringström, Gisela; Abrahamsson, Hasse; Sadik, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the long-term effects of physical activity on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and on quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. METHODS: Seventy-six patients from a previous randomized controlled interventional study on increased physical activity in IBS were asked to participate in this long-term follow-up study. The included patients attended one visit in which they filled out questionnaires and they underwent a submaximal cycle ergometer test. The primary end point was the change in the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) at baseline, i.e., before the intervention and at follow-up. The secondary endpoints were changes in quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. RESULTS: A total of 39 [32 women, median age 45 (28-61) years] patients were included in this follow-up. Median follow-up time was 5.2 (range: 3.8-6.2) years. The IBS symptoms were improved compared with baseline [IBS-SSS: 276 (169-360) vs 218 (82-328), P = 0.001]. This was also true for the majority of the dimensions of psychological symptoms such as disease specific quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. The reported time of physical activity during the week before the visit had increased from 3.2 (0.0-10.0) h at baseline to 5.2 (0.0-15.0) h at follow-up, P = 0.019. The most common activities reported were walking, aerobics and cycling. There was no significant difference in the oxygen uptake 31.8 (19.7-45.8) mL per min per kg at baseline vs 34.6 (19.0-54.6) mL/min per kg at follow-up. CONCLUSION: An intervention to increase physical activity has positive long-term effects on IBS symptoms and psychological symptoms. PMID:25593485

  13. Protective effects of Cornus mas fruit extract on carbon tetrachloride induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Es.Haghi, M.; Dehghan, G.; Banihabib, N.; Zare, S.; Mikaili, P.; Panahi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of kidney injury. Cornus mas is used for in renal aliments traditionally in Iran. The present study was aimed to investigate the antioxidant activity of C. mas fruit extract (CMFE) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treated oxidative stress in Wistar albino rats. Forty two male albino rats were divided into seven groups. Group I served as a sham; Group II served as a normal control; Group III served as a toxic control, with CCl4 (1 ml/kg body weight; 80% in olive oil); Groups IV and V received CMFE at doses of 300 and 700 mg/kg before CCl4 injection; Groups VI and VII received extract at same doses orally at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after CCl4 intoxication. CCl4 injection produced a significant rise in serum markers of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde along with the reduction of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismuta, catalase and glutathion peroxidase. Serum creatinine, urea and uric acid concentrations were increased whereas level of protein and albumin were reduced. Treatment of rats with different doses of fruit extract (300 and 700 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) ameliorated the alterations induced with CCl4 in lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defenses, biochemical and renal lesions. Based on these results, we conclude that CMFE protects kidney from oxidative stress induced by CCl4. PMID:25249718

  14. Molecular orientational dynamics in C70S48: Investigation by 13C MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grell, A.-S.; Talyzin, A.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F.

    2001-11-01

    At room temperature the MAS 13C NMR spectrum of C70S48 is identical to that of pure C70 above 323 K, except that the 13C line is shifted by 1.7 ppm compared to that of pure C70. From these results, we deduce that our system is mainly of the van der Waals type. A simulation of the low speed MAS spectrum shows that C70 molecules in C70S48 undergo a uniaxial rotation as in pure C70. This new result contradicts what had been previously published. The chemical shift of the 13C line does not vary with temperature, however the rotation of C70 slows down as the temperature is decreased and stops at ca. 150 K. Moreover the 13C spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, can be described by a single correlation time that follows an Arrhenius law with a 900 K activation energy. By NMR no phase transition is observed at 245 K contrary to dielectric relaxation measurements.

  15. Relevance of Sympathetic Nervous System Activation in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thorp, Alicia A.; Schlaich, Markus P.

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic tone is well recognised as being implicit in cardiovascular control. It is less readily acknowledged that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is integral in energy homeostasis and can exert profound metabolic effects. Accumulating data from animal and human studies suggest that central sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in the aetiology and complications of several metabolic conditions that can cluster to form the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Given the known augmented risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality associated with the MetS understanding the complex pathways underlying the metabolic derangements involved has become a priority. Many factors have been proposed to contribute to increased sympathetic nerve activity in metabolic abnormalities including obesity, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, hyperinsulinemia, and elevated adipokine levels. Furthermore there is mounting evidence to suggest that chronic sympathetic overactivity can potentiate two of the key metabolic alterations of the MetS, central obesity and insulin resistance. This review will discuss the regulatory role of the sympathetic nervous system in metabolic control and the proposed pathophysiology linking sympathetic overactivity to metabolic abnormalities. Pharmacological and device-based approaches that target central sympathetic drive will also be discussed as possible therapeutic options to improve metabolic control in at-risk patient cohorts. PMID:26064978

  16. Chronic ethanol consumption inhibits glucokinase transcriptional activity by Atf3 and triggers metabolic syndrome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Dae Yeon; Song, Eun Hyun; Park, Keon Jae; Kim, Gyu Hee; Jeong, Eun Ae; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Go, Min Jin; Kim, Dae Jin; Lee, Seong Su; Kim, Bong-Jo; Song, Jihyun; Roh, Gu Seob; Gao, Bin; Kim, Won-Ho

    2014-09-26

    Chronic ethanol consumption induces pancreatic β-cell dysfunction through glucokinase (Gck) nitration and down-regulation, leading to impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance, but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Gck gene expression and promoter activity in pancreatic β-cells were suppressed by chronic ethanol exposure in vivo and in vitro, whereas expression of activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) and its binding to the putative Atf/Creb site (from -287 to -158 bp) on the Gck promoter were up-regulated. Furthermore, in vitro ethanol-induced Atf3 inhibited the positive effect of Pdx-1 on Gck transcriptional regulation, enhanced recruitment of Hdac1/2 and histone H3 deacetylation, and subsequently augmented the interaction of Hdac1/Pdx-1 on the Gck promoter, which were diminished by Atf3 siRNA. In vivo Atf3-silencing reversed ethanol-mediated Gck down-regulation and β-cell dysfunction, followed by the amelioration of impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Together, we identified that ethanol-induced Atf3 fosters β-cell dysfunction via Gck down-regulation and that its loss ameliorates metabolic syndrome and could be a potential therapeutic target in treating type 2 diabetes. The Atf3 gene is associated with the induction of type 2 diabetes and alcohol consumption-induced metabolic impairment and thus may be the major negative regulator for glucose homeostasis. PMID:25074928

  17. Reduced synaptic activity in neuronal networks derived from embryonic stem cells of murine Rett syndrome model

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Lydia; Sütterlin, Rosmarie; Nenniger, Markus; Vogt, Kaspar E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental diseases such as the Rett syndrome (RTT) have received renewed attention, since the mechanisms involved may underlie a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In vertebrates early stages in the functional development of neurons and neuronal networks are difficult to study. Embryonic stem cell-derived neurons provide an easily accessible tool to investigate neuronal differentiation and early network formation. We used in vitro cultures of neurons derived from murine embryonic stem cells missing the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene (MeCP2-/y) and from wild type cells of the corresponding background. Cultures were assessed using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and immunofluorescence. We studied the functional maturation of developing neurons and the activity of the synaptic connections they formed. Neurons exhibited minor differences in the developmental patterns for their intrinsic parameters, such as resting membrane potential and excitability; with the MeCP2-/y cells showing a slightly accelerated development, with shorter action potential half-widths at early stages. There was no difference in the early phase of synapse development, but as the cultures matured, significant deficits became apparent, particularly for inhibitory synaptic activity. MeCP2-/y embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cultures show clear developmental deficits that match phenotypes observed in slice preparations and thus provide a compelling tool to further investigate the mechanisms behind RTT pathophysiology. PMID:24723848

  18. Mechanical and metabolic reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system in younger adults with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline; Morgan, Barbara; Schrage, William

    2014-01-01

    Aim Based on reports of exaggerated blood pressure responses to whole-body exercise in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), we tested the hypothesis that MetSyn adults would exhibit augmented sympathetic and pressor responses to mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation when compared with healthy, age-matched control subjects. Methods We studied 12 adults with MetSyn (34±3 years) and 12 healthy control subjects (34±3 years). Heart rate (HR; ECG), blood pressure (BP; finger photoplethysmography), and MSNA (microneurography of the peroneal nerve) were measured during: (1) Static handgrip exercise at 15% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and (2) Static handgrip exercise at 30% MVC to fatigue, followed by post-exercise ischemia (PEI). Increases in MSNA, HR, and BP were assessed. Results During static exercise at both 15 and 30% MVC, increases in MSNA, HR, and BP were not different between groups. MSNA remained significantly elevated from baseline during PEI and responses were not different between groups. Conclusion Sympathetic and pressor responses to mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation are not augmented in younger adults with MetSyn. PMID:24680829

  19. Segmental basal cell naevus syndrome caused by an activating mutation in smoothened.

    PubMed

    Khamaysi, Z; Bochner, R; Indelman, M; Magal, L; Avitan-Hersh, E; Sarig, O; Sprecher, E; Bergman, R

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant sonic hedgehog signalling, mostly due to PTCH1 mutations, has been shown to play a central role in the pathogenesis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), as well as in basal cell naevus syndrome (BCNS). Mutations in smoothened (SMO) encoding a receptor for sonic hedgehog have been reported in sporadic BCCs but not in BCNS. We report a case with multiple BCCs, pits and comedones in a segmental distribution over the upper part of the body, along with other findings compatible with BCNS. Histopathologically, there were different types of BCC. A heterozygous mutation (c.1234C>T, p.L412F) in SMO was detected in three BCCs but not in peripheral blood lymphocytes or the uninvolved skin. These were compatible with the type 1 mosaic form of BCNS. The p.L412F mutation was found experimentally to result in increased SMO transactivating activity, and the patient responded to vismodegib therapy. Activating mutations in SMO may cause BCNS. The identification of a gain-of-function mutation in SMO causing a type 1 mosaic form of BCNS further expands our understanding of the pathogenesis of BCC, with implications for the treatment of these tumours, whether sporadic or inherited. PMID:26822128

  20. Reduced synaptic activity in neuronal networks derived from embryonic stem cells of murine Rett syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Barth, Lydia; Sütterlin, Rosmarie; Nenniger, Markus; Vogt, Kaspar E

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental diseases such as the Rett syndrome (RTT) have received renewed attention, since the mechanisms involved may underlie a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In vertebrates early stages in the functional development of neurons and neuronal networks are difficult to study. Embryonic stem cell-derived neurons provide an easily accessible tool to investigate neuronal differentiation and early network formation. We used in vitro cultures of neurons derived from murine embryonic stem cells missing the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene (MeCP2-/y) and from wild type cells of the corresponding background. Cultures were assessed using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and immunofluorescence. We studied the functional maturation of developing neurons and the activity of the synaptic connections they formed. Neurons exhibited minor differences in the developmental patterns for their intrinsic parameters, such as resting membrane potential and excitability; with the MeCP2-/y cells showing a slightly accelerated development, with shorter action potential half-widths at early stages. There was no difference in the early phase of synapse development, but as the cultures matured, significant deficits became apparent, particularly for inhibitory synaptic activity. MeCP2-/y embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cultures show clear developmental deficits that match phenotypes observed in slice preparations and thus provide a compelling tool to further investigate the mechanisms behind RTT pathophysiology. PMID:24723848

  1. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis modulates fear memory and extinction in mice.

    PubMed

    Lazaroni, Thiago Luiz do Nascimento; Bastos, Cristiane Perácio; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Santos, Robson Souza; Pereira, Grace Schenatto

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate defense-alerting reaction to fear is a common feature of neuropsychiatric diseases. Therefore, impairments in brain circuits, as well as in molecular pathways underlying the neurovegetative adjustments to fear may play an essential role on developing neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we tested the hypothesis that interfering with angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor axis homeostasis, which appears to be essential to arterial pressure control, would affect fear memory and extinction. Mas knockout (MasKO) mice, in FVB/N background, showed normal cued fear memory and extinction, but increased freezing in response to context. Next, as FVB/N has poor performance in contextual fear memory, we tested MasKO in mixed 129xC57BL/6 background. MasKO mice behaved similarly to wild-type (WT), but memory extinction was slower in contextual fear conditioning to a weak protocol (1CS/US). In addition, delayed extinction in MasKO mice was even more pronounced after a stronger protocol (3CS/US). We showed previously that Angiotensin II receptor AT1 antagonist, losantan, rescued object recognition memory deficit in MasKO mice. Here, losartan was also effective. Memory extinction was accelerated in MasKO mice after treatment with losartan. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis may modulate fear memory extinction. Furthermore, we suggest MasKO mice as an animal model to study post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PMID:26642920

  2. PROKR2 missense mutations associated with Kallmann syndrome impair receptor signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Fabre, Ludovic; Teixeira, Luis; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) combines hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency, and anosmia or hyposmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis. In a large series of KS patients, ten different missense mutations (p.R85C, p.R85H, p.R164Q, p.L173R, p.W178S, p.Q210R, p.R268C, p.P290S, p.M323I, p.V331M) have been identified in the gene encoding the G protein-coupled receptor prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2), most often in the heterozygous state. Many of these mutations were, however, also found in clinically unaffected individuals, thus raising the question of their actual implication in the KS phenotype. We reproduced each of the ten mutations in a recombinant murine Prokr2, and tested their effects on the signalling activity in transfected HEK-293 cells, by measuring intracellular calcium release upon ligand-activation of the receptor. We found that all mutated receptors except one (M323I) had decreased signalling activities. These could be explained by different defective mechanisms. Three mutations (L173R, W178S, P290S) impaired cell surface-targeting of the receptor. One mutation (Q210R) abolished ligand-binding. Finally, five mutations (R85C, R85H, R164Q, R268C, V331M) presumably impaired G protein-coupling of the receptor. In addition, when wild-type and mutant receptors were coexpressed in HEK-293 cells, none of the mutant receptors that were retained within the cells did affect cell surface-targeting of the wild-type receptor, and none of the mutant receptors properly addressed at the plasma membrane did affect wild-type receptor signalling activity. This argues against a dominant negative effect of the mutations in vivo. PMID:18826963

  3. PROKR2 missense mutations associated with Kallmann syndrome impair receptor signalling activity

    PubMed Central

    Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Fabre, Ludovic; Teixeira, Luis; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) combines hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency, and anosmia or hyposmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis. In a large series of KS patients, ten different missense mutations (p.R85C, p.R85H, p.R164Q, p.L173R, p.W178S, p.Q210R, p.R268C, p.P290S, p.M323I, p.V331M) have been identified in the gene encoding the G protein-coupled receptor prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2), most often in the heterozygous state. Many of these mutations were, however, also found in clinically unaffected individuals, thus raising the question of their actual implication in the KS phenotype. We reproduced each of the ten mutations in a recombinant murine Prokr2, and tested their effects on the signalling activity in transfected HEK-293 cells, by measuring intracellular calcium release upon ligand-activation of the receptor. We found that all mutated receptors except one (M323I) had decreased signalling activities. These could be explained by different defective mechanisms. Three mutations (L173R, W178S, P290S) impaired cell surface-targeting of the receptor. One mutation (Q210R) abolished ligand-binding. Finally, five mutations (R85C, R85H, R164Q, R268C, V331M) presumably impaired G protein-coupling of the receptor. In addition, when wild-type and mutant receptors were coexpressed in HEK-293 cells, none of the mutant receptors that were retained within the cells did affect cell surface-targeting of the wild-type receptor, and none of the mutant receptors properly addressed at the plasma membrane did affect wild-type receptor signalling activity. This argues against a dominant negative effect of the mutations in vivo. PMID:18826963

  4. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  5. Effects of a recreational physical activity summer camp on body composition, metabolic syndrome and physical fitness in obese children.

    PubMed

    Roriz DE Oliveira, Mafalda S; Teixeira Seabra, André F; Ribeiro Maia, José A

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to examine the effects of a recreational physical activity summer camp on body composition, metabolic syndrome, and physical fitness in obese children. Forty-eight children (8-10 years; Body Mass Index ≥85th percentile) completed 4-weeks of a structured recreational physical activity program summer camp (5 hours/day, 5 days/week). Over the 4-weeks, significant reductions (P<0.05) in weight, waist circumference, Body Mass Index, percentage of body fat, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed. Additionally, a significant increase was observed in HDL-cholesterol, handgrip, trunk lift, and shuttle run (P<0.05). These findings suggest that a 4-week recreational physical activity summer camp yields several body-composition, metabolic-syndrome, and physical fitness benefits in obese children and should represent an effective support for their health development. PMID:26398201

  6. Anode consumption on a subsea X-mas tree

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    Anode consumption and coating breakdown on a X-mas tree installed at the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea was investigated after 5 years. A comparison with a spare tree and one tree being exposed for only 3--4 months was done. The epoxy coating has several blisters, in particular on stainless steel surfaces. Water inside the blisters has a pH of 13-14 indicating that the cathodic reaction occurs inside them. The anode dimensions indicate an overall anode consumption of approximately 20%, while the design allows 27% after 5 years. This indicates that the original design is quite conservative. If the design had been done according to present day design rules, the conservatism would be reduced; an overall anode consumption of 23% is then likely (still less than allowed 27%).

  7. MODIS Airborne simulator (MAS) Final Report for CLASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Arnold; Steven Platnick

    2010-11-24

    The MAS was flown aboard the NASA ER-2 for the CLASIC field experiment, and for all data collected, provided calibrated and geolocated (Level-1B) radiance data for it’s 50 spectral bands (ranging in wavelength for 0.47 to 14.3 µm). From the Level-1B data, as directed in the Statement of Work, higher order (Level-2) data products were derived. The Level-2 products include: a) cloud optical thickness, b) cloud effective radius, c) cloud top height (temperature), d) cloud fraction, e) cloud phase products. Preliminary Level-1B and Level-2 products were provided during the field experiment (typically within one or two days of data collection). Final version data products were made available in December 2008 following considerable calibration analysis. Data collection, data processing (to Level-2), and discussion of the calibration work are summarized below.

  8. Auditory Attraction: Activation of Visual Cortex by Music and Sound in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Kim, Chai-Youn; Eapen, Mariam; Gore, John C.; Blake, Randolph; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with a distinctive phenotype, including cognitive-linguistic features, nonsocial anxiety, and a strong attraction to music. We performed functional MRI studies examining brain responses to musical and other types of auditory stimuli in young adults with Williams syndrome and typically…

  9. Strategies to Increase the Physical Activity Participation of Young Adults with Asperger Syndrome in Community Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Jessica; Driver, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Currently one in 50 American school-age children is diagnosed with Autism. Although Asperger Syndrome is no longer acknowledged as a separate diagnosis, this article refers to high-functioning individuals with Autism as having Asperger Syndrome, since it is a culturally relevant term. One of the most challenging times for individuals with Asperger…

  10. Food Waste Composting Study from Makanan Ringan Mas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, A. A.; Ismail, S. N. M.; Jamaludin, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    The poor management of municipal solid waste in Malaysia has worsened over the years especially on food waste. Food waste represents almost 60% of the total municipal solid waste disposed in the landfill. Composting is one of low cost alternative method to dispose the food waste. This study is conducted to compost the food waste generation in Makanan Ringan Mas, which is a medium scale industry in Parit Kuari Darat due to the lack knowledge and exposure of food waste recycling practice. The aim of this study is to identify the physical and chemical parameters of composting food waste from Makanan Ringan Mas. The physical parameters were tested for temperature and pH value and the chemical parameter are Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium. In this study, backyard composting was conducted with 6 reactors. Tapioca peel was used as fermentation liquid and soil and coconut grated were used as the fermentation bed. Backyard composting was conducted with six reactors. The overall results from the study showed that the temperature of the reactors were within the range which are from 30° to 50°C. The result of this study revealed that all the reactors which contain processed food waste tend to produce pH value within the range of 5 to 6 which can be categorized as slightly acidic. Meanwhile, the reactors which contained raw food waste tend to produce pH value within the range of 7 to 8 which can be categorized as neutral. The highest NPK obtained is from Reactor B that process only raw food waste. The average value of Nitrogen is 48540 mg/L, Phosphorus is 410 mg/L and Potassium is 1550 mg/L. From the comparison with common chemical fertilizer, it shows that NPK value from the composting are much lower than NPK of the common chemical fertilizer. However, comparison with NPK of organic fertilizer shown only slightly difference value in NPK.

  11. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcombe, Corey R.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than ±0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported.

  12. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Morcombe, Corey R; Zilm, Kurt W

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than +/-0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported. PMID:12810033

  13. Metabolic syndrome and its relationship with the achievement of minimal disease activity state in psoriatic arthritis patients: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luisa; Caso, Francesco; Ramonda, Roberta; Del Puente, Antonio; Cantarini, Luca; Darda, Md Abud; Caso, Paolo; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Fiocco, Ugo; Punzi, Leonardo; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on achieving minimal disease activity (MDA) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α with a follow-up period of 24 months. A cohort of PsA patients was assessed at the University Federico II of Naples and at University of Padova. For the aim of the present study, patients' data were collected at baseline (T0), at 12 months (T1) and at 24 months (T2). Assessment of metabolic and disease activity parameters was performed at each visit. The NCEP-ACT III criteria were used to identify subjects with MetS and the MDA criteria to evaluate the disease activity. On the basis of the exclusion and inclusion criteria, 330 subjects were included in the study; 134 patients (40.7%) were classified as not having MetS and 196 (59.3%) as having MetS. An inverse association was found between presence of metabolic syndrome and the probability of achieving MDA. Univariate analysis indicated that patients with metabolic syndrome were less likely to achieve MDA than patients without metabolic syndrome (OR 0.45, p < 0.001). This inverse association remained statistically significant in the multivariate regression model (OR 0.56, p < 0.001). Metabolic syndrome is associated with a lower probability of achieving MDA in PsA patients in therapy with anti-TNF-α. PMID:25395342

  14. Patterns of acoustical activity of bats prior to and following White-nose Syndrome occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ford, W. Mark; Britzke, Eric R.; Dobony, Christopher A.; Rodrigue, Jane L.; Johnson, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose Syndrome (WNS), a wildlife health concern that has decimated cave-hibernating bat populations in eastern North America since 2006, began affecting source-caves for summer bat populations at Fort Drum, a U.S. Army installation in New York in the winter of 2007–2008. As regional die-offs of bats became evident, and Fort Drum's known populations began showing declines, we examined whether WNS-induced change in abundance patterns and seasonal timing of bat activity could be quantified using acoustical surveys, 2003–2010, at structurally uncluttered riparian–water habitats (i.e., streams, ponds, and wet meadows). As predicted, we observed significant declines in overall summer activity between pre-WNS and post-WNS years for little brown bats Myotis lucifugus, northern bats M. septentrionalis, and Indiana bats M. sodalis. We did not observe any significant change in activity patterns between pre-WNS and post-WNS years for big brown bats Eptesicus fuscus, eastern red bats Lasiurus borealis, or the small number of tri-colored bats Perimyotis subflavus. Activity of silver-haired bats Lasionycteris noctivagans increased from pre-WNS to post-WNS years. Activity levels of hoary bats Lasiurus cinereus significantly declined between pre- and post-WNS years. As a nonhibernating, migratory species, hoary bat declines might be correlated with wind-energy development impacts occurring in the same time frame rather than WNS. Intraseason activity patterns also were affected by WNS, though the results were highly variable among species. Little brown bats showed an overall increase in activity from early to late summer pre-WNS, presumably due to detections of newly volant young added to the local population. However, the opposite occurred post-WNS, indicating that reproduction among surviving little brown bats may be declining. Our data suggest that acoustical monitoring during the summer season can provide insights into species' relative abundance on the

  15. Reduced cerebral blood flow with orthostasis precedes hypocapnic hyperpnea, sympathetic activation, and postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Del Pozzi, Andrew T; Schwartz, Christopher E; Tewari, Deepali; Medow, Marvin S; Stewart, Julian M

    2014-06-01

    Hyperventilation and reduced cerebral blood flow velocity can occur in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). We studied orthostatically intolerant patients, with suspected POTS, with a chief complaint of upright dyspnea. On the basis of our observations of an immediate reduction of cerebral blood flow velocity with orthostasis, we hypothesize that the resulting ischemic hypoxia of the carotid body causes chemoreflex activation, hypocapnic hyperpnea, sympathetic activation, and increased heart rate and blood pressure in this subset of POTS. We compared 11 dyspneic POTS subjects with 10 healthy controls during a 70° head-up tilt. In POTS subjects during initial orthostasis before blood pressure recovery; central blood volume and mean arterial pressure were reduced (P<0.025), resulting in a significant (P<0.001) decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity, which temporally preceded (17±6 s; P<0.025) a progressive increase in minute ventilation and decrease in end tidal CO2 (P<0.05) when compared with controls. Sympathoexcitation, measured by muscle sympathetic nerve activity, was increased in POTS (P<0.01) and inversely proportional to end tidal CO2 and resulted in an increase in heart rate (P<0.001), total peripheral resistance (P<0.025), and a decrease in cardiac output (P<0.025). The decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity and mean arterial pressure during initial orthostasis was greater (P<0.025) in POTS. Our data suggest that exaggerated initial central hypovolemia during initial orthostatic hypotension in POTS results in reduced cerebral blood flow velocity and postural hypocapnic hyperpnea that perpetuates cerebral ischemia. We hypothesize that sustained hypocapnia and cerebral ischemia produce sympathoexcitation, tachycardia, and a statistically significant increase in blood pressure. PMID:24711524

  16. Promoter-dependent activity on androgen receptor N-terminal domain mutations in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Davies, John; Mongan, Nigel P; Bunch, Trevor; Brown, Rosalind S; Audi, Laura; Watt, Kate; McEwan, Iain J; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations are associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Missense mutations identified in the AR-N-terminal domain (AR-NTD) are rare, and clinical phenotypes are typically mild. We investigated 7 missense mutations and 2 insertion/deletions located in the AR-NTD. This study aimed to elucidate the pathogenic role of AR-NTD mutants in AIS and to use this knowledge to further define AR-NTD function. AR-NTD mutations (Q120E, A159T, G216R, N235K, G248V, L272F, and P380R) were introduced into AR-expression plasmids. Stably expressing cell lines were established for del57L and ins58L. Transactivation was measured using luciferase reporter constructs under the control of GRE and Pem promoters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and partial proteolysis studies were performed for mutations which showed reduced activities by using a purified AR-AF1 protein. Pem-luciferase reporter activation was reduced for A159T, N235K, and G248V but not the GRE-luciferase reporter. Protein structure analysis detected no significant change in the AR-AF1 region for these mutations. Reduced cellular expression and transactivation activity were observed for ins58L. The mutations Q120E, G216R, L272F, P380R, and del57L showed small or no detectable changes in function. Thus, clinical and experimental analyses have identified novel AR-signalling defects associated with mutations in the structurally disordered AR-NTD domain in patients with AIS. PMID:25500996

  17. RAI1 Transcription Factor Activity Is Impaired in Mutants Associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Canales, Cesar P.; Cao, Lei; Perez, Irene C.; Srivastava, Anand K.; Young, Juan I.; Walz, Katherina

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) is a complex genomic disorder mostly caused by the haploinsufficiency of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1), located in the chromosomal region 17p11.2. In a subset of SMS patients, heterozygous mutations in RAI1 are found. Here we investigate the molecular properties of these mutated forms and their relationship with the resulting phenotype. We compared the clinical phenotype of SMS patients carrying a mutation in RAI1 coding region either in the N-terminal or the C-terminal half of the protein and no significant differences were found. In order to study the molecular mechanism related to these two groups of RAI1 mutations first we analyzed those mutations that result in the truncated protein corresponding to the N-terminal half of RAI1 finding that they have cytoplasmic localization (in contrast to full length RAI1) and no ability to activate the transcription through an endogenous target: the BDNF enhancer. Similar results were found in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a SMS patient carrying RAI1 c.3103insC, where both mutant and wild type products of RAI1 were detected. The wild type form of RAI1 was found in the chromatin bound and nuclear matrix subcellular fractions while the mutant product was mainly cytoplasmic. In addition, missense mutations at the C-terminal half of RAI1 presented a correct nuclear localization but no activation of the endogenous target. Our results showed for the first time a correlation between RAI1 mutations and abnormal protein function plus they suggest that a reduction of total RAI1 transcription factor activity is at the heart of the SMS clinical presentation. PMID:23028815

  18. Inflammation Activation Contributes to Adipokine Imbalance in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shui-ping; Huang, Xian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation can be activated as a defensive response by the attack of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for ischemic tissue injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of ACS-activated inflammation on adipokine imbalance and the effects of statins on the crosstalk between inflammation and adipokine imbalance during ACS. In this study, 586 subjects were categorized into: (1) control group; (2) SA (stable angina) group; and (3) ACS group. Circulating levels of hs-CRP, adiponectin and resistin were measured by ELISA. Furthermore, forty C57BL/6 mice were randomized into: sham, AMI, low-statin (atorvastatin, 2 mg/kg/day) and high-statin (atorvastatin, 20 mg/kg/day) group. After 3 weeks, AMI models were established by surgical coronary artery ligation. Circulating levels and adipose expressions of adiponectin and resistin were assessed in animals. Besides, we investigate the effects of atorvastatin on ox-LDL-induced adipokine imbalance in vitro. As a result, we found that ACS patients had higher hs-CRP and resistin levels and lower adiponectin levels. Our correlation analysis demonstrated hs-CRP concentrations were positively correlated with resistin but negatively with adiponectin levels in humans. Our animal findings indicated higher circulating hs-CRP and resistin levels and lower adiponectin levels in AMI mice. Atorvastatin pre-treatment dose-dependently decreased hs-CRP and resistin levels but increased adiponectin levels in mice. The consistent findings were observed about the adipose expressions of resistin and adiponectin in mice. In study in vitro, ox-LDL increased cellular resistin expressions and otherwise for adiponectin expressions, which dose-dependently reversed by the addition of atorvastatin. Therefore, our study indicates that the ACS attack activates inflammation leading to adipokine imbalance that can be ameliorated by anti-inflammation of atorvastatin. PMID:26986475

  19. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its relationship with leisure time physical activity among Peruvian adults

    PubMed Central

    Gelaye, Bizu; Tafur, Luis Revilla; Lopez, Tania; Sanchez, Sixto; Williams, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Previous studies have suggested an inverse relationship between physical activity and MetS. However, these findings were inconsistent; and few investigators have examined these associations among South Americans. We estimated the prevalence of MetS and its association with leisure time physical activity (LTPA) among Peruvian adults. Materials and methods This cross-sectional study of 1,675 individuals (619 men and 1056 women) was conducted among residents in Lima and Callao, Peru. Information about LTPA, socio-demographic, and other lifestyle characteristics were collected by interview. The presence of MetS was defined using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. Results Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.9% and was more common among women (29.9%) than men (21.6%). Habitual participation in LTPA was associated with a 23% reduced risk of MetS (OR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.60–1.03). There was an inverse trend of MetS risk with amount of LTPA (p=0.016). Compared with non-exercisers, those who exercised < 150 minutes/week had a 21% reduced risk of MetS (AOR= 0.79; 95% CI 0.60–1.04). Individuals who exercised ≥ 150 minutes/week, compared with non-exercisers, had a 42% reduced risk of MetS (AOR=0.58; 95% CI: 0.36–0.93). Associations of similar magnitudes were observed when men and women were studied separately. Conclusion These data document a high prevalence of MetS and suggest an association with LTPA among urban dwelling Peruvians. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these observations and to examine interventions that may promote increased physical activity in this population. PMID:19563445

  20. Mas5, a homologue of bacterial DnaJ, is indispensable for the host infection and environmental adaptation of a filamentous fungal insect pathogen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Hu, Yue; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Mas5, a yeast heat shock protein classified to the Hsp40 group, is homologous to bacterial archetype DnaJ but functionally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we identify a Mas5 homologue (46.86 kDa) in Beauveria bassiana and show its indispensability for host infection and environmental adaptation of the fungal insect pathogen. The deletion of mas5 caused severe defects in aerial conidiation, conidial germination and submerged blastospore production (mimic to host haemocoel). The deletion mutant lost 100% virulence to Galleria mellonella larvae through normal cuticular penetration (topical inoculation) and 50% through cuticle-bypassing infection (intrahaemocoel injection). It formed no blastospore in vivo after inoculation or only a very few after injection. Its extracellular (cuticle degrading) enzymes and virulence-relating Pr1 proteases were 62% and 32% less active respectively. It became more sensitive to high osmolarity, oxidation, cell-wall perturbation, heat shock and UV-B irradiation. These concurred with reduced contents of intracellular mannitol and trehalose, decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes, impaired cell walls and suppressed transcripts of stress-responsive and virulence-relating genes. All the changes were restored by targeted mas5 complementation. All together, Mas5 is indispensable for the in vitro and in vivo life cycle of B. bassiana by targeting many sets of enzymes/proteins at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:26714790

  1. Characterization and Functions of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 in Obesity, Diabetes, and Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; McGuire, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a cell surface receptor activated by serine proteinases or specific synthetic compounds. Interest in PAR2 as a pharmaceutical target for various diseases is increasing. Here we asked two questions relevant to endothelial dysfunction and diabetes: How is PAR2 function affected in blood vessels? What role does PAR2 have in promoting obesity, diabetes, and/or metabolic syndrome, specifically via the endothelium and adipose tissues? We conducted a systematic review of the published literature in PubMed and Scopus (July 2015; search terms: par2, par-2, f2lr1, adipose, obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome). Seven studies focused on PAR2 and vascular function. The obesity, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome animal models differed amongst studies, but each reported that PAR2-mediated vasodilator actions were preserved in the face of endothelial dysfunction. The remaining studies focused on nonvascular functions and provided evidence supporting the concept that PAR2 activation promoted obesity. Key studies showed that PAR2 activation regulated cellular metabolism, and PAR2 antagonists inhibited adipose gain and metabolic dysfunction in rats. We conclude that PAR2 antagonists for treatment of obesity indeed show early promise as a therapeutic strategy; however, endothelial-specific PAR2 functions, which may offset mechanisms that produce vascular dysfunction in diabetes, warrant additional study. PMID:27006943

  2. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  3. Linkage of regulators of TGF-β activity in the fetal ovary to polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hatzirodos, Nicholas; Bayne, Rosemary A; Irving-Rodgers, Helen F; Hummitzsch, Katja; Sabatier, Laetitia; Lee, Sam; Bonner, Wendy; Gibson, Mark A; Rainey, William E; Carr, Bruce R; Mason, Helen D; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Anderson, Richard A; Rodgers, Raymond J

    2011-07-01

    Although not often discussed, the ovaries of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) show all the hallmarks of increased TGF-β activity, with increased amounts of fibrous tissue and collagen in the ovarian capsule or tunica albuginea and ovarian stroma. Recent studies suggest that PCOS could have fetal origins. Genetic studies of PCOS have also found linkage with a microsatellite located in intron 55 of the extracellular matrix protein fibrillin 3. Fibrillins regulate TGF-β bioactivity in tissues by binding latent TGF-β binding proteins. We therefore examined expression of fibrillins 1-3, latent TGF-β binding proteins 1-4, and TGF-β 1-3 in bovine and human fetal ovaries at different stages of gestation and in adult ovaries. We also immunolocalized fibrillins 1 and 3. The results indicate that TGF-β pathways operate during ovarian fetal development, but most important, we show fibrillin 3 is present in the stromal compartments of fetal ovaries and is highly expressed at a critical stage early in developing human and bovine fetal ovaries when stroma is expanding and follicles are forming. These changes in expression of fibrillin 3 in the fetal ovary could lead to a predisposition to develop PCOS in later life. PMID:21411746

  4. Imaging Evidence for Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome after Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS), a rare complication after cerebral revascularization, is a well-described phenomenon after carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting. However, the imaging evidence of CHS after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (iv tPA) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has not been reported. Case Report. Four patients were determined to have manifestations of CHS with clinical deterioration after treatment with iv tPA, including one patient who developed seizure, one patient who had a deviation of the eyes toward lesion with worsened mental status, and two patients who developed worsened hemiparesis. In all four patients, postthrombolysis head CT examinations were negative for hemorrhage; CT angiogram showed patent cervical and intracranial arterial vasculature; CT perfusion imaging revealed hyperperfusion with increased relative cerebral blood flow and relative cerebral blood volume and decreased mean transit time along with decreased time to peak in the clinically related artery territory. Vascular dilation was also noted in three of these four cases. Conclusions. CHS should be considered in patients with clinical deterioration after iv tPA and imaging negative for hemorrhage. Cerebral angiogram and perfusion studies can be useful in diagnosing CHS thereby helping with further management. PMID:27242938

  5. A novel human autoimmune syndrome caused by combined hypomorphic and activating mutations in ZAP-70.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alice Y; Punwani, Divya; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Cowan, Morton J; Olson, Jean L; Mathes, Erin F; Sunderam, Uma; Fu, Shu Man; Srinivasan, Rajgopal; Kuriyan, John; Brenner, Steven E; Weiss, Arthur; Puck, Jennifer M

    2016-02-01

    A brother and sister developed a previously undescribed constellation of autoimmune manifestations within their first year of life, with uncontrollable bullous pemphigoid, colitis, and proteinuria. The boy had hemophilia due to a factor VIII autoantibody and nephrotic syndrome. Both children required allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), which resolved their autoimmunity. The early onset, severity, and distinctive findings suggested a single gene disorder underlying the phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing performed on five family members revealed the affected siblings to be compound heterozygous for two unique missense mutations in the 70-kD T cell receptor ζ-chain associated protein (ZAP-70). Healthy relatives were heterozygous mutation carriers. Although pre-HCT patient T cells were not available, mutation effects were determined using transfected cell lines and peripheral blood from carriers and controls. Mutation R192W in the C-SH2 domain exhibited reduced binding to phosphorylated ζ-chain, whereas mutation R360P in the N lobe of the catalytic domain disrupted an autoinhibitory mechanism, producing a weakly hyperactive ZAP-70 protein. Although human ZAP-70 deficiency can have dysregulated T cells, and autoreactive mouse thymocytes with weak Zap-70 signaling can escape tolerance, our patients' combination of hypomorphic and activating mutations suggested a new disease mechanism and produced previously undescribed human ZAP-70-associated autoimmune disease. PMID:26783323

  6. Effect of the lipoprotein lipase activator NO-1886 on adriamycin-induced nephrotic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Hara, T; Kusunoki, M; Tsutsumi, K; Minami, A; Okada, K; Sakamoto, S; Ohnaka, M; Miyata, T; Nakamura, T; Aoki, T; Fukatsu, A; Nakaya, Y; Kakumu, S

    2000-05-01

    Hyperlipidemia associated with nephrotic syndrome may play a role in the deterioration of renal function. Tsutsumi et al have previously reported that the novel compound NO-1886 increases lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, resulting in a reduction of plasma triglycerides and an elevation of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in normal rats. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether NO-1886 suppresses the renal injury by treatment of the hyperlipidemia in an Adriamycin (Kyowa Hakko Kogyo, Tokyo, Japan) induced nephrosis rat model fed a high-protein diet that induced renal dysfunction and tubulointerstitial injury. Administration of Adriamycin caused hyperlipidemia, proteinuria, and edema with ascites in rats in 4 weeks. Furthermore, a combination of Adriamycin and a high-protein diet increased plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and decreased plasma albumin. Histologically, in Adriamycin-treated rats, marked interstitial cellular infiltration, tubular lumen dilation, and tubular cast formation in the kidney were observed. NO-1886 decreased plasma triglyceride and increased HDL cholesterol in Adriamycin-induced nephrotic rats. NO-1886 treatment reduced plasma creatinine and BUN levels and increased plasma albumin in Adriamycin-treated rats; it also ameliorated the ascites and proteinuria. Histologically, NO-1886-treated rats showed a quantitatively significant preservation of tubulointerstitial lesions. These data suggest that NO-1886 may have a protective effect against Adriamycin-induced nephrosis with tubulointerstitial nephritis in rats by a modification of the plasma lipid disorder. PMID:10831167

  7. [A case of active infective endocarditis in the remission phase of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Arioka, I; Maeta, H; Takazawa, A; Ukawa, T; Mizoguchi, K

    1998-06-01

    We successfully treated a case of active infective endocarditis in the remission phase of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS). A 21-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for fever, arthralgia, and general fatigue. His blood cultures revealed staphylococcus epidermidis. He underwent urgent aortic valve replacement and closure of the abscess cavity because of an ineffective antibiotic therapy and a progressive left heart failure. Operative findings showed about 100 ml bloody pericardial effusion, fresh vegetation on the aortic left coronary and non-coronary leaflets, and aortic root abscess just below the left coronary ostium. The aortic root abscess extended to the left ventricular wall between the base of left atrial appendage and the base of main pulmonary artery and was in the state of impending rupture. The left main coronary artery was fully exposed after debridement in the abscess cavity. It was thought that left atrial appendage as a pedicle was useful for filling up the abscess cavity to protect infection. PMID:9720381

  8. A novel human autoimmune syndrome caused by combined hypomorphic and activating mutations in ZAP-70

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Alice Y.; Punwani, Divya; Kadlecek, Theresa A.; Cowan, Morton J.; Olson, Jean L.; Mathes, Erin F.; Sunderam, Uma; Man Fu, Shu; Srinivasan, Rajgopal; Kuriyan, John; Brenner, Steven E.; Weiss, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    A brother and sister developed a previously undescribed constellation of autoimmune manifestations within their first year of life, with uncontrollable bullous pemphigoid, colitis, and proteinuria. The boy had hemophilia due to a factor VIII autoantibody and nephrotic syndrome. Both children required allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), which resolved their autoimmunity. The early onset, severity, and distinctive findings suggested a single gene disorder underlying the phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing performed on five family members revealed the affected siblings to be compound heterozygous for two unique missense mutations in the 70-kD T cell receptor ζ-chain associated protein (ZAP-70). Healthy relatives were heterozygous mutation carriers. Although pre-HCT patient T cells were not available, mutation effects were determined using transfected cell lines and peripheral blood from carriers and controls. Mutation R192W in the C-SH2 domain exhibited reduced binding to phosphorylated ζ-chain, whereas mutation R360P in the N lobe of the catalytic domain disrupted an autoinhibitory mechanism, producing a weakly hyperactive ZAP-70 protein. Although human ZAP-70 deficiency can have dysregulated T cells, and autoreactive mouse thymocytes with weak Zap-70 signaling can escape tolerance, our patients’ combination of hypomorphic and activating mutations suggested a new disease mechanism and produced previously undescribed human ZAP-70–associated autoimmune disease. PMID:26783323

  9. Polycystic ovary syndrome: Implications of measurement of plasma aldosterone, renin activity and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Bordin, Luciana; Donà, Gabriella; Sabbadin, Chiara; Bakdounes, Leila; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Giorgino, Francesco L; Fiore, Cristina

    2012-05-01

    A positive correlation between aldosterone, inflammatory parameters, blood pressure and metabolic abnormalities in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has been reported in the early estrogenic phase. The aim of the study was to measure plasma aldosterone, plasma renin activity (PRA) and progesterone on the 21st day of the cycle, in women with PCOS and to consider the interrelationships between these hormones. Sixty-six consecutive normal BMI women with PCOS (median age 24 years, range 21-28 years) and 53 age- and body mass index-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Aldosterone, aldosterone/PRA ratio (ARR) and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index were significantly higher (p<0.0001) in PCOS women than controls. Positive correlations were found in PCOS but not in controls between (i) progesterone and aldosterone, (ii) aldosterone and PRA, (iii) PRA and progesterone. Mean blood pressures were within the normal range but significantly higher in PCOS than controls. The increase of plasma aldosterone, ARR and blood pressure in PCOS compared with controls is consistent with an increased mineralocorticoid effector mechanism in PCOS; prolonged therapy with spironolactone could counteract both the hyperandrogenism and reduce future cardiovascular risk. PMID:22387621

  10. Increased concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and fibrinogen in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Iván G; Gutiérrez, César L; Alarcón, Marcelo L; Jaramillo, Julio C; Segovia, Fabián M; Leiva, Elba M; Mujica, Verónica E; Icaza, Gloria N; Díaz, Nora S; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is closely linked to a generalized metabolic disorder referred to as insulin resistance. Disturbances in the hemostasis and fibrinolytic systems are a feature of MS. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration levels of fibrinogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a group of patients with MS with respect to a non-MS group, and to evaluate their possible relation with other risk factors in MS. The study was carried out in a total of 186 male and female non-smoking individuals aged 45-64 years, 93 with MS (ATP III criteria) and 93 without MS. Plasmatic levels of PAI-1 were measured by ELISA, and those of fibrinogen by the Claus method. The plasmatic levels of PAI-1 (men 49.2±19.8 vs. 35.0±12.2 ng/ml and women 42.0±19.7 vs. 31.6±14.6 ng/ml; p=0.0026) and fibrinogen (274.0±82.1 vs. 232.7±66.6 ng/ml; p=0.0002) were significantly higher in the MS group than in the non-MS group. PAI-1 was significantly associated with diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides and waist circumference. Fibrinogen was negatively associated with HDL-c. High plasmatic levels of PAI-1 and fibrinogen contribute to the cardiovascular risk that characterizes individuals with MS. PMID:21475821

  11. Diet and physical activity in relation to metabolic syndrome among urban Indian men and women.

    PubMed

    Miglani, Neetu; Bains, Kiran; Singh, Pritpal

    2015-01-01

    The relationship of diet and physical activity with metabolic syndrome (MS) was studied among 60 male and female (40-60 y) urban Indian MS patients. Intake of green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, fruits and milk were significantly (p ≤ .01) associated with reduced fat mass and waist circumference and increased lean body mass. Energy, carbohydrates, and fat intakes were significantly (p ≤ .01) correlated with increased body fat and waist circumference and reduced lean body mass. Energy, total and saturated fat intake were positively and significantly (p ≤ .05; .01) correlated with total cholesterol. Total fat was also significantly (p ≤ .05; .01) correlated with increased systolic blood pressure (r = 0.33), serum triglycerides (r = 0.33), LDL-C (r = 0.29) and VLDL-C (r = 0.28). Increased TDEE was significantly (p ≤ .01) associated with decreased body fat and waist circumference (r = 0.53 and 0.60) and increased lean body mass (r = 0.68). PMID:25402814

  12. Thalamocortical network activity enables chronic tic detection in humans with Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shute, Jonathan B; Okun, Michael S; Opri, Enrico; Molina, Rene; Rossi, P Justin; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Foote, Kelly D; Gunduz, Aysegul

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging therapy for severe cases of TS. We studied two patients with TS implanted with bilateral Medtronic Activa PC + S DBS devices, capable of chronic recordings, with depth leads in the thalamic centromedian-parafascicular complex (CM-PF) and subdural strips over the precentral gyrus. Low-frequency (1-10 Hz) CM-PF activity was observed during tics, as well as modulations in beta rhythms over the motor cortex. Tics were divided into three categories: long complex, complex, and simple. Long complex tics, tics involving multiple body regions and lasting longer than 5 s, were concurrent with a highly detectable thalamocortical signature (average recall [sensitivity] 88.6%, average precision 96.3%). Complex tics were detected with an average recall of 63.9% and precision of 36.6% and simple tics an average recall of 39.3% and precision of 37.9%. The detections were determined using data from both patients. PMID:27419067

  13. Angelman syndrome-associated ubiquitin ligase UBE3A/E6AP mutants interfere with the proteolytic activity of the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tomaić, V; Banks, L

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome, a severe neurodevelopmental disease, occurs primarily due to genetic defects, which cause lack of expression or mutations in the wild-type E6AP/UBE3A protein. A proportion of the Angelman syndrome patients bear UBE3A point mutations, which do not interfere with the expression of the full-length protein, however, these individuals still develop physiological conditions of the disease. Interestingly, most of these mutations are catalytically defective, thereby indicating the importance of UBE3A enzymatic activity role in the Angelman syndrome pathology. In this study, we show that Angelman syndrome-associated mutants interact strongly with the proteasome via the S5a proteasomal subunit, resulting in an overall inhibitory effect on the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Our results suggest that mutated catalytically inactive forms of UBE3A may cause defects in overall proteasome function, which could have an important role in the Angelman syndrome pathology. PMID:25633294

  14. Regulation of alveolar epithelial cell survival by the ACE-2/angiotensin 1-7/Mas axis.

    PubMed

    Uhal, Bruce D; Li, Xiaopeng; Xue, Anita; Gao, Xu; Abdul-Hafez, Amal

    2011-09-01

    Earlier work from this laboratory demonstrated that apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) requires autocrine generation of angiotensin (ANG) II. More recent studies showed that angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), which degrades ANGII to form ANG1-7, is protective but severely downregulated in human and experimental lung fibrosis. Here it was theorized that ACE-2 and its product ANG1-7 might therefore regulate AEC apoptosis. To evaluate this hypothesis, the AEC cell line MLE-12 and primary cultures of rat AECs were exposed to the profibrotic apoptosis inducers ANGII or bleomycin (Bleo). Markers of apoptosis (caspase-9 or -3 activation and nuclear fragmentation), steady-state ANGII and ANG1-7, and JNK phosphorylation were measured thereafter. In the absence of Bleo, inhibition of ACE-2 by small interfering RNA or by a competitive inhibitor (DX600 peptide) caused a reciprocal increase in autocrine ANGII and corresponding decrease in ANG1-7 in cell culture media (both P < 0.05) and, moreover, induced AEC apoptosis. At baseline (without inhibitor), ANG1-7 in culture media was 10-fold higher than ANGII (P < 0.01). Addition of purified ANGII or bleomycin-induced caspase activation, nuclear fragmentation, and JNK phosphorylation in cultured AECs. However, preincubation with ANG1-7 (0.1 μM) prevented JNK phosphorylation and apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment with A779, a specific blocker of the ANG1-7 receptor mas, prevented ANG1-7 blockade of JNK phosphorylation, caspase activation, and nuclear fragmentation. These data demonstrate that ACE-2 regulates AEC survival by balancing the proapoptotic ANGII and its antiapoptotic degradation product ANG1-7. They also suggest that ANG1-7 inhibits AEC apoptosis through the ANG1-7 receptor mas. PMID:21665960

  15. QuBiLs-MAS method in early drug discovery and rational drug identification of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Medina Marrero, R; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Barigye, S J; Echeverría Díaz, Y; Acevedo-Barrios, R; Casañola-Martín, G M; García Bernal, M; Torrens, F; Pérez-Giménez, F

    2015-01-01

    The QuBiLs-MAS approach is used for the in silico modelling of the antifungal activity of organic molecules. To this effect, non-stochastic (NS) and simple-stochastic (SS) atom-based quadratic indices are used to codify chemical information for a comprehensive dataset of 2478 compounds having a great structural variability, with 1087 of them being antifungal agents, covering the broadest antifungal mechanisms of action known so far. The NS and SS index-based antifungal activity classification models obtained using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) yield correct classification percentages of 90.73% and 92.47%, respectively, for the training set. Additionally, these models are able to correctly classify 92.16% and 87.56% of 706 compounds in an external test set. A comparison of the statistical parameters of the QuBiLs-MAS LDA-based models with those for models reported in the literature reveals comparable to superior performance, although the latter were built over much smaller and less diverse datasets, representing fewer mechanisms of action. It may therefore be inferred that the QuBiLs-MAS method constitutes a valuable tool useful in the design and/or selection of new and broad spectrum agents against life-threatening fungal infections. PMID:26567876

  16. Advances in the Management of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Swarnam, Kamala; Soraisham, Amuchou S.; Sivanandan, Sindhu

    2012-01-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a common cause of severe respiratory distress in term infants, with an associated highly variable morbidity and mortality. MAS results from aspiration of meconium during intrauterine gasping or during the first few breaths. The pathophysiology of MAS is multifactorial and includes acute airway obstruction, surfactant dysfunction or inactivation, chemical pneumonitis with release of vasoconstrictive and inflammatory mediators, and persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn (PPHN). This disorder can be life threatening, often complicated by respiratory failure, pulmonary air leaks, and PPHN. Approaches to the prevention of MAS have changed over time with collaboration between obstetricians and pediatricians forming the foundations for care. The use of surfactant and inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has led to the decreased mortality and the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) use. In this paper, we review the current understanding of the pathophysiology and management of MAS. PMID:22164183

  17. A novel technique based on a PNA hybridization probe and FRET principle for quantification of mutant genotype in fibrous dysplasia/McCune–Albright syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karadag, Abdullah; Riminucci, Mara; Bianco, Paolo; Cherman, Natasha; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Nguyen, Nga; Collins, Michael T.; Robey, Pamela G.; Fisher, Larry W.

    2004-01-01

    Somatic mutations are present in various proportions in numerous developmental pathologies. Somatic activating missense mutations of the GNAS gene encoding the Gsα protein have previously been shown to be the cause of fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD)/McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). Because in MAS patients, tissues as diverse as melanocytes, gonads and bone are affected, it is generally accepted that the GNAS mutation in this disease must have occurred early in development. Interestingly, it has been shown that the development of an active FD lesion may require both normal and mutant cells. Studies of the somatic mosaic states of FD/MAS and many other somatic diseases need an accurate method to determine the ratio of mutant to normal cells in a given tissue. A new method for quantification of the mutant:normal ratio of cells using a PNA hybridization probe-based FRET technique was developed. This novel technique, with a linear sensitivity of 2.5% mutant alleles, was used to detect the percentage mutant cells in a number of tissue and cell culture samples derived from FD/MAS lesions and could easily be adapted for the quantification of mutations in a large spectrum of diseases including cancer. PMID:15096559

  18. Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  19. Association of physical activity with risk of metabolic syndrome: findings from a cross-sectional study conducted in rural area, Nantong, China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Wu, Chuanli; Xu, Guangfei; Huang, Jianping; Gao, Yuexia; Lu, Qingyun; Hua, Tianqi; Cai, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases rapidly worldwide, and its association with physical activity (PA) varies with race and lifestyles. Little is known about the association in rural China. The Nantong Metabolic Syndrome Study recruited 13,505 female and 6997 male participants in 2007 and 2008. Socio-demographic characteristics, and physiological and behavioural data were collected. Logistic regression model was applied to estimate associations of metabolic syndrome and its components with different PAs. The overall metabolic syndrome prevalence was 21.6% in current study. Increasing total PA or moderate-to-vigorous-intensity occupational PA was associated with decreasing 5%-60% risk of having metabolic syndrome and abnormal metabolic syndrome components in both genders. An association between leisure-time PA and blood pressure was found in men, but no associations between leisure-time PA and metabolic syndrome components were found in women. Commuting PA, such as walking and taking bus, by bicycle and walking only, was associated with decrease of 20%-45% risk of several abnormal metabolic syndrome components in women. This study provides information for future investigation into the nature of these associations so that recommendations can be developed to reduce the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among rural population in China. PMID:26853182

  20. Neither classical nor alternative macrophage activation is required for Pneumocystis clearance during immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-Qian; Wang, Jing; Hoy, Zachary; Keegan, Achsah; Bhagwat, Samir; Gigliotti, Francis; Wright, Terry W

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocystis is a respiratory fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia [PcP]) in immunocompromised patients. Alveolar macrophages are critical effectors for CD4(+) T cell-dependent clearance of Pneumocystis, and previous studies found that alternative macrophage activation accelerates fungal clearance during PcP-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, the requirement for either classically or alternatively activated macrophages for Pneumocystis clearance has not been determined. Therefore, RAG2(-/-) mice lacking either the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptor (IFN-γR) or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) were infected with Pneumocystis. These mice were then immune reconstituted with wild-type lymphocytes to preserve the normal T helper response while preventing downstream effects of Th1 or Th2 effector cytokines on macrophage polarization. As expected, RAG2(-/-) mice developed severe disease but effectively cleared Pneumocystis and resolved IRIS. Neither RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) nor RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice displayed impaired Pneumocystis clearance. However, RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice developed a dysregulated immune response, with exacerbated IRIS and greater pulmonary function deficits than those in RAG2 and RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice. RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice had elevated numbers of lung CD4(+) T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and NK cells but severely depressed numbers of lung CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Impaired lung CD8(+) T cell responses in RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice were associated with elevated lung IFN-γ levels, and neutralization of IFN-γ restored the CD8 response. These data demonstrate that restricting the ability of macrophages to polarize in response to Th1 or Th2 cytokines does not impair Pneumocystis clearance. However, a cell type-specific IFN-γ/IFN-γR-dependent mechanism regulates CD8(+) T suppressor cell recruitment, limits immunopathogenesis, preserves lung function, and enhances the resolution of PcP-related IRIS

  1. Thyroid Hormone Levels and TSH Activity in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bielicki, P; Przybyłowski, T; Kumor, M; Barnaś, M; Wiercioch, M; Chazan, R

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by complete cessation of inspiratory flow (apnea) or upper airway airflow limitation (hypopnea) with increased respiratory muscle activity, which is repeatedly observed during sleep. Hypothyroidism has been described as a rare cause of OSAS, but it is considered to be the main cause of breathing disorders during sleep in patients in whom an improvement of OSAS is observed after thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Nevertheless, euthyreosis due to thyroxine replacement in patients with OSAS often does not improve the breathing disorder and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure is usually applied. The aim of this study was to assess thyroid function in patients with OSAS. We studied 813 patients in whom severe OSAS was diagnosed; the mean apnea-hypopnea index was 44.0. Most of the patients were obese (mean BMI 33.1 ± 6.6 kg/m2) and had excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS 12.8 ± 6.6). With the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration as the major criterion, hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 38 (4.7%) and hyperthyroidism was diagnosed in 31 (3.8%) patients. Analysis of basic anthropometric data, selected polysomnography results, and TSH, fT3, and fT4 values did not reveal any significant correlations. In conclusion, the incidence of thyroid function disorders seems to be no different in OSAS than that in the general population. We did not find correlations between TSH activity and the severity of breathing disorders during sleep. PMID:26542600

  2. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E; Lapin, Morten; Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S S; Bang, Jeanne Mari V; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Carey, John C; Yu, Ping; Vaughn, Cecily; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A; Andresen, Brage S

    2016-05-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping. PMID:27195699

  3. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S. S.; Bang, Jeanne Mari V.; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Carey, John C.; Yu, Ping; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R.; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A.; Andresen, Brage S.

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3’ splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping. PMID:27195699

  4. Comparative analysis of signature genes in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells, e.g. monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these cell...

  5. Not all M&As are alike--and that matters.

    PubMed

    Bower, J L

    2001-03-01

    Despite all that's been written about mergers and acquisitions, even the experts know surprisingly little about them. The author recently headed up a year-long study sponsored by Harvard Business School on the subject of M&A activity. In-depth findings will emerge over the next few years, but the research has already revealed some interesting results. Most intriguing is the notion that, although academics, consultants, and businesspeople lump M&As together, they represent very different strategic activities. Acquisitions occur for the following reasons: to deal with overcapacity through consolidation in mature industries; to roll up competitors in geographically fragmented industries; to extend into new products and markets; as a substitute for R&D; and to exploit eroding industry boundaries by inventing an industry. The different strategic intents present distinct integration challenges. For instance, if you acquire a company because your industry has excess capacity, you have to determine which plants to shut down and which people to let go. If, on the other hand, you buy a company because it has developed an important technology, your challenge is to keep the acquisition's best engineers from jumping ship. These scenarios require the acquiring company to engage in nearly opposite managerial behaviors. The author explores each type of M&A--its strategic intent and the integration challenges created by that intent. He underscores the importance of the acquiring company's assessment of the acquired group's culture. Depending on the type of M&A, approaches to the culture in place must vary, as will the level to which culture interferes with integration. He draws from the experiences of such companies as Cisco, Viacom, and BancOne to exemplify the different kinds of M&As. PMID:11246927

  6. Decentralized method for complex task allocation in massive MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahmi, Zaki; Gammoudi, M. M.

    2008-06-01

    Task allocation is still a fundamental problem in Multi-Agents System (MAS). It allows the formation a coalition of agents to cooperate together in order to carry out a complex task. Generally, the process of task allocation requires calculating the value of all the possible allocations, then determining which optimal. In the context of Massive Multi-Agent Systems (MMAS), one agent generates all the possible coalitions and then calculates the value of each, is inefficient. Moreover, the traditional approaches based on the negotiation between agents, are impractical because of the complexity of communications between agents. In this paper we propose a decentralized method, based on grouping agents using the Formal Concepts Analysis (FCA) approach for the task allocation in MMAS. In our model, agents are fully cooperative and each task is composed of several subtasks. The proposed solution is based on two steps: i) computing groups of agents having similar characteristics in the objective to distribute the task allocation process among agents and minimize the communication between agents. ii) Finding the optimal allocation by sharing the task allocation process among groups of agents.

  7. Distributed Cooperation Solution Method of Complex System Based on MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijin, Jiang; Yuhui, Xu

    To adapt the model in reconfiguring fault diagnosing to dynamic environment and the needs of solving the tasks of complex system fully, the paper introduced multi-Agent and related technology to the complicated fault diagnosis, an integrated intelligent control system is studied in this paper. Based on the thought of the structure of diagnostic decision and hierarchy in modeling, based on multi-layer decomposition strategy of diagnosis task, a multi-agent synchronous diagnosis federation integrated different knowledge expression modes and inference mechanisms are presented, the functions of management agent, diagnosis agent and decision agent are analyzed, the organization and evolution of agents in the system are proposed, and the corresponding conflict resolution algorithm in given, Layered structure of abstract agent with public attributes is build. System architecture is realized based on MAS distributed layered blackboard. The real world application shows that the proposed control structure successfully solves the fault diagnose problem of the complex plant, and the special advantage in the distributed domain.

  8. Meconium aspiration syndrome and neonatal outcome in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Malik, A S; Hillman, D

    1994-01-01

    The outcome in 148 inborn meconium-stained neonates was studied prospectively over a 5-month period. Fifty-three infants (38.5%) developed meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). There was a significantly higher rate of MAS (p < 0.001), mechanical ventilation (p < 0.016) and hospital stay (p < 0.016) in neonates with meconium in the trachea than in neonates with no meconium in the oropharynx. The incidence of MAS was significantly higher and the duration of hospital stay longer in outborn than in inborn infants (p < 0.022). PMID:7516134

  9. Transgenic mice with increased Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase activity: animal model of dosage effects in Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, C.J.; Avraham, K.B.; Lovett, M.; Smith, S.; Elroy-Stein, O.; Rotman, G.; Bry, C.; Groner, Y.

    1987-11-01

    Down syndrome, the phenotypic expression of human trisomy 21, is presumed to result from a 1.5-fold increase in the expression of the genes on human chromosome 21. As an approach to the development of an animal model for Down syndrome, several strains of transgenic mice that carry the human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase gene have been prepared. The animals express the transgene in a manner similar to that of humans, with 0.9- and 0.7-kilobase transcripts in a 1:4 ratio, and synthesize the human enzyme in an active form capable of forming human-mouse enzyme heterodimers. Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase activity is increased from 1.6- to 6.0-fold in the brains of four transgenic strains and to an equal or lesser extent in several other tissues. These animals provide a unique system for studying the consequences of increased dosage of the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase gene in Down syndrome and the role of this enzyme in a variety of other pathological processes.

  10. Lymphocyte subpopulations and suppressor cell activity in acute polyradiculoneuritis (Guillain-Barré syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R A; Aslan, S; Gray, I A

    1983-01-01

    Ficoll-Triosil separated peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells were analysed by fluorescent microscopy with Ortho monoclonal antisera to T cells (OKT3+) helper cells (OKT4+) and suppressor cytotoxic cells (OKT8+) and with polyclonal antiserum to surface immunoglobulin. Twenty-five normal subjects, 16 patients with acute polyradiculoneuritis (Guillain-Barré syndrome, AP) and 10 patients with other neurological diseases were studied. The percentages of OKT3+, OKT4+ and immunoglobulin bearing cells were similar in the three patient groups but the percentage of OKT8+ cells was reduced to 13.5 +/- 4.1 (mean +/- s.d.) compared with 19.4 +/- 4.9 in the normal subjects and 18.5 +/- 3.1 in the patients with other neurological diseases. The ratio of OKT4+/OKT8+ cells was correspondingly increased to 3.5 +/- 2.1 compared with 2.1 +/- 0.5 in the normal subjects and 2.1 +/- 0.4 in the patients with other neurological diseases. In one test of suppressor cell function Con A incubated mitomycin treated PBM cells were added to autologous PBM cells stimulated with Con A to compare the degree of suppression with that produced by control incubated mitomycin treated cells (Con A suppression test). In a second test of suppressor cell function short lived suppressor cell (SLS) activity was assayed by comparing PBM stimulation by Con A added at the start of culture with that produced by Con A added after 24 hr. Neither test revealed any significant differences between AP patients and control subjects. PMID:6221841

  11. Associations between physical activity and sedentary time on components of metabolic syndrome among adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Jaggers, Jason R; Prasad, Vivek K; Dudgeon, Wesley D; Blair, Steven N; Sui, Xuemei; Burgess, Stephanie; Hand, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Recent data show that people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are at a greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which could possibly be explained by an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) due to the known toxicities associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART). The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between physical activity (PA) and components of MetSyn in a sample of PLWHA taking ART. A total of 31 males and 32 females living with HIV and currently taking ART were enrolled in a home-based PA intervention aimed to reduce risk factors for CVD. Clinical assessments included measures of resting blood pressure (BP), waist circumference, height, weight, PA levels via accelerometer, and a fasted blood draw. Components of MetSyn were divided into three clusters (1 = 0-1; 2 = 2; 3 = 3 or more). A one-way analysis of variance was used to determine differences between clusters. Multiple linear regressions were used to identify significant associations between moderate intensity PA (MPA) and sedentary time among components of MetSyn. MPA was significantly lower across MetSyn clusters (p < 0.001), whereas sedentary time was significantly higher (p = 0.01). A multiple linear regression showed MPA to be a significant predictor of waist circumference after controlling for age, race, gender, and sedentary time. Routine PA can be beneficial in helping PLWHA reduce waist circumference ultimately leading to metabolic improvements. This in turn would help PLWHA self-manage known components of MetSyn, thus reducing their risk of CVD and mortality. PMID:24861098

  12. Prevention of immunotoxin-mediated vascular leak syndrome in rats with retention of antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Siegall, C B; Liggitt, D; Chace, D; Tepper, M A; Fell, H P

    1994-09-27

    Immunotoxins are hybrid molecules composed of a cell-surface binding domain and a protein toxin moiety that together target specific cell populations for elimination. These agents represent a promising approach for the treatment of many human diseases, most notably cancer. However, it has recently become clear that many immunotoxins when used in human clinical trials induce vascular leak syndrome (VLS), restricting the administration of doses necessary to achieve good therapeutic responses. The lack of an appropriate animal model has hindered efforts to understand and prevent immunotoxin-induced VLS. We have found that in rats, intravenous administration of the single-chain immunotoxin BR96 sFv-PE40 results in symptoms that closely resemble VLS seen in human immunotoxin trials. A large fluid accumulation in the thoracic cavity was observed, along with an increase in hematocrit and body weight and a decrease in serum albumin. The VLS was apparent within 24 hr after administration of immunotoxin and was seen in both immunocompetent and athymic rats. Similar symptoms were not found in mice even at lethal doses. Prophylactic administration of the corticosteroid dexamethasone resulted in prevention of VLS and survival of rats injected with what would otherwise be lethal doses of BR96 sFv-PE40. Prophylactic treatment with dexamethasone in rats xenografted with human tumors either did not inhibit or minimally inhibited the antitumor activity of BR96 sFv-PE40. The use of prophylactic corticosteroids should be considered for immunotoxin clinical trials, since it may improve therapeutic efficacy by decreasing the dose-limiting toxicity of VLS. PMID:7937798

  13. Acute Activation of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients Treated with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Warris, Lidewij T.; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Bierings, Marc B.; van den Bos, Cor; Zwaan, Christian M.; Sassen, Sebastiaan D. T.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Veening, Margreet A.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2016-01-01

    Although dexamethasone is highly effective in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can cause serious metabolic side effects. Because studies regarding the effects of dexamethasone are limited by their small scale, we prospectively studied the direct effects of treating pediatric ALL with dexamethasone administration with respect to activation of components of metabolic syndrome (MetS); in addition, we investigated whether these side effects were correlated with the level of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3–16 years of age) with ALL were studied during a 5-day dexamethasone course during the maintenance phase of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group ALL-10 and ALL-11 protocols. Fasting insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides levels were measured at baseline (before the start of dexamethasone; T1) and on the fifth day of treatment (T2). Dexamethasone trough levels were measured at T2. We found that dexamethasone treatment significantly increased the following fasting serum levels (P<0.05): HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. In addition, dexamethasone increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR>3.4) from 8% to 85% (P<0.01). Dexamethasone treatment also significantly increased the diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Lastly, dexamethasone trough levels (N = 24) were directly correlated with high glucose levels at T2, but not with other parameters. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment acutely induces three components of the MetS. Together with the weight gain typically associated with dexamethasone treatment, these factors may contribute to the higher prevalence of MetS and cardiovascular risk among survivors of childhood leukemia who received dexamethasone treatment. PMID:27362350

  14. Epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide (ENA-78), acute coronary syndrome prognosis, and modulatory effect of statins.

    PubMed

    Zineh, Issam; Beitelshees, Amber L; Welder, Gregory J; Hou, Wei; Chegini, Nasser; Wu, Jun; Cresci, Sharon; Province, Michael A; Spertus, John A

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial inflammation with chemokine involvement contributes to acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We tested the hypothesis that variation in the chemokine gene CXCL5, which encodes epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide (ENA-78), is associated with ACS prognosis. We also investigated whether statin use, a potent modulator of inflammation, modifies CXCL5's association with outcomes and characterized the in vitro effect of atorvastatin on endothelial ENA-78 production. Using a prospective cohort of ACS patients (n = 704) the association of the CXCL5 -156 G>C polymorphism (rs352046) with 3-year all-cause mortality was estimated with hazard ratios (HR). Models were stratified by genotype and race. To characterize the influence of statins on this association, a statin*genotype interaction was tested. To validate ENA-78 as a statin target in inflammation typical of ACS, endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with IL-1beta and atorvastatin with subsequent quantification of CXCL5 expression and ENA-78 protein concentrations. C/C genotype was associated with a 2.7-fold increase in 3-year all-cause mortality compared to G/G+G/C (95%CI 1.19-5.87; p = 0.017). Statins significantly reduced mortality in G/G individuals only (58% relative risk reduction; p = 0.0009). In HUVECs, atorvastatin dose-dependently decreased IL-1beta-stimulated ENA-78 concentrations (p<0.0001). Drug effects persisted over 48 hours (p<0.01). CXCL5 genotype is associated with outcomes after ACS with potential statin modification of this effect. Atorvastatin lowered endothelial ENA-78 production during inflammation typical of ACS. These findings implicate CXCL5/ENA-78 in ACS and the statin response. PMID:18769620

  15. Psychometric Comparison of the Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS) and the Questions about Behavioral Function (QABF)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, S.; Iacono, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS) and the Questions About Behavioral Function (QABF) are frequently used to assess the learned function of challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability (ID). The aim was to explore and compare the psychometric properties of the MAS and the QABF. Method: Seventy adults with ID and…

  16. Downregulation of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis promotes breast cancer metastasis by enhancing store-operated calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Tang, Wei; Wang, Yuhao; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Bin; Cai, Chunqing; Meng, Xiaojing; Zou, Fei

    2016-07-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important component of the tumor microenvironment and plays a key role in promoting cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, metabolism, migration and invasion. Meanwhile, the arm of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)2/angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas axis in connection with RAS is associated with anti-proliferative, vasodilatory and anti-metastatic properties. Previous studies have shown that Ang-(1-7) reduces the proliferation of orthotopic human breast tumor growth by inhibiting cancer-associated fibroblasts. However, the role of ACE/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the metastasis of breast cancer cells is still unknown. In the present study, we found that ACE2 protein level is negatively correlated with the metastatic ability of breast cancer cells and breast tumor grade. Upregulation of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis inhibits breast cancer cell migration and invasion in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistically, ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis activation inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and PAK1/NF-κB/Snail1 pathways, and induces E-cadherin expression. In summary, our results demonstrate that downregulation of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis stimulates breast cancer metastasis through the activation of SOCE and PAK1/NF-κB/Snail1 pathways. These results provide new mechanisms by which breast cancer develop metastasis and shed light on developing novel anti-metastasis therapeutics for metastatic breast cancer by modulating ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis. PMID:27063099

  17. A generic, computerized nuclear materials accountability system (NucMAS) and its layered products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jr, J M

    1989-01-01

    NucMAS provides a material balance area with a computerized data management system for nuclear materials accountability. NucMAS is a generic application. It handles the data management and reporting functions for different processing facilities by storing all process-specific information as data rather than procedure. A NucMAS application is configured for each facility it supports. NucMAS and its layered products are compatible with three types of data clients. Core NucMAS has a screen-oriented user interface to support the accountability clerk as a client. Accountability clerks enter data from operating logs and laboratory analyses one to three days after actual processing. Layered products support process operators and automated systems as near-real-time and real-time data clients. The core and layered products use a data-driven approach which results in software that is configurable and maintainable. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Du, Juan; Chen, Rongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS. Methods Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB) and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP). All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35–60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV) and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment. Results For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml) and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg), lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml) and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml) in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7) and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9) in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1). Conclusion Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury. PMID:26745868

  19. [Foetal therapy for Down syndrome: a pro-active ethical reflection].

    PubMed

    de Wert, G M W R; Dondorp, W J

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal screening for Down syndrome has to date focused on facilitating the informed choice to continue or not with a pregnancy. The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) for Down syndrome does potentially offer the option to apply foetal neurocognitive therapy for Down syndrome (FTDS). Current research in animal models looks promising and therefore a proactive ethical reflection in relation to clinical trials is urgently needed. This discussion includes an exploration of the ethical aspects of FTDS. There seem to be no convincing a priori objections on the basis of the social model of disability. Arguments in terms of (respect for) autonomy, wellbeing and justice seem to in principle support such therapy. Still, both the conditions for sound clinical trials and the implications of possible effective therapy for current prenatal screening need further scrutiny. PMID:27334087

  20. Syndromic features and mild cognitive impairment in mice with genetic reduction on p300 activity: Differential contribution of p300 and CBP to Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome etiology.

    PubMed

    Viosca, Jose; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Olivares, Roman; Eckner, Richard; Barco, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a complex autosomal-dominant disease characterized by mental and growth retardation and skeletal abnormalities. A majority of the individuals diagnosed with RSTS carry heterozygous mutation in the gene CREBBP, but a small percentage of cases are caused by mutations in EP300. To investigate the contribution of p300 to RSTS pathoetiology, we carried out a comprehensive and multidisciplinary characterization of p300(+/-) mice. These mice exhibited facial abnormalities and impaired growth, two traits associated to RSTS in humans. We also observed abnormal gait, reduced swimming speed, enhanced anxiety in the elevated plus maze, and mild cognitive impairment during the transfer task in the water maze. These analyses demonstrate that p300(+/-) mice exhibit phenotypes that are reminiscent of neurological traits observed in RSTS patients, but their comparison with previous studies on CBP deficient strains also indicates that, in agreement with the most recent findings in human patients, the activity of p300 in cognition is likely less relevant or more susceptible to compensation than the activity of CBP. PMID:19822209

  1. Leisure Activities in Prader-Wlli Syndrome: Implications for Health, Cognition and Adaptive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Although hyperphagia and compulsivity in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are well described, recreation and adaptive skills are relatively unexplored. Parents of 123 participants with PWS (4--48 years) completed measures of their child's adaptive, recreation, and problem behaviors. Offspring received cognitive testing. Watching TV was the most…

  2. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Relatively Active and for Passive Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazelmans, Ellen; Prins, Judith; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2006-01-01

    In chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), facilitating, initiating, and perpetuating factors are distinguished. Although somatic factors might have initiated symptoms in CFS, they do not explain the persistence of fatigue. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for CFS focuses on factors that perpetuate and prolong symptoms. Recently it has been shown that,…

  3. Impairment in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and the Geriatric Syndrome of Self-Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naik, Aanand D.; Burnett, Jason; Pickens-Pace, Sabrina; Dyer, Carmel B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to characterize self-neglect definitively as a geriatric syndrome by identifying an association with functional impairment. Design and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional home evaluation of 100 community-living older adults referred by Adult Protective Services for geriatric self-neglect and 100 matched adults from a…

  4. Activities for Babies and Toddlers with Down Syndrome: A Physiotherapy Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelso, Rose-Anne; Price, Sue

    Children with Down Syndrome have the potential for the development of a large range and variety of postures, balance reactions, movements, and skills. Sometimes this potential remains relatively untapped resulting in unusual, inefficient, or even detrimental patterns of movement. By handling and playing with the child, he or she becomes more aware…

  5. A study of the relationship between clinical phenotypes and plasma iduronate-2-sulfatase enzyme activities in Hunter syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ok Jeong; Kim, Su-Jin; Sohn, Young Bae; Park, Hyung-Doo; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Chi-Hwa; Ko, Ah-Ra; Yook, Yeon-Joo; Lee, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Won; Kim, Se-Hwa; Cho, Sung-Yoon; Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Han, Sun Ju

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) deficiency. MPS II causes a wide phenotypic spectrum of symptoms ranging from mild to severe. IDS activity, which is measured in leukocyte pellets or fibroblasts, was reported to be related to clinical phenotype by Sukegawa-Hayasaka et al. Measurement of residual plasma IDS activity using a fluorometric assay is simpler than conventional measurements using skin fibroblasts or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This is the first study to describe the relationship between plasma IDS activity and clinical phenotype of MPS II. Methods We hypothesized that residual plasma IDS activity is related to clinical phenotype. We classified 43 Hunter syndrome patients as having attenuated or severe disease types based on clinical characteristics, especially intellectual and cognitive status. There were 27 patients with the severe type and 16 with the attenuated type. Plasma IDS activity was measured by a fluorometric enzyme assay using 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-iduronate 2-sulphate. Results Plasma IDS activity in patients with the severe type was significantly lower than that in patients with the attenuated type (P=0.006). The optimal cut-off value of plasma IDS activity for distinguishing the severe type from the attenuated type was 0.63 nmol·4 hr-1·mL-1. This value had 88.2% sensitivity, 65.4% specificity, and an area under receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.768 (ROC curve analysis; P=0.003). Conclusion These results show that the mild phenotype may be related to residual lysosomal enzyme activity. PMID:22474463

  6. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Crowther, Mark; Branch, Ware; Khamashta, Munther A

    2010-10-30

    The antiphospholipid syndrome causes venous, arterial, and small-vessel thrombosis; pregnancy loss; and preterm delivery for patients with severe pre-eclampsia or placental insufficiency. Other clinical manifestations are cardiac valvular disease, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia, and cognitive impairment. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote activation of endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets; and overproduction of tissue factor and thromboxane A2. Complement activation might have a central pathogenetic role. Of the different antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant is the strongest predictor of features related to antiphospholipid syndrome. Therapy of thrombosis is based on long-term oral anticoagulation and patients with arterial events should be treated aggressively. Primary thromboprophylaxis is recommended in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and probably in purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome. Obstetric care is based on combined medical-obstetric high-risk management and treatment with aspirin and heparin. Hydroxychloroquine is a potential additional treatment for this syndrome. Possible future therapies for non-pregnant patients with antiphospholipid syndrome are statins, rituximab, and new anticoagulant drugs. PMID:20822807

  7. Relationship between the metabolic syndrome and physical activity energy expenditure: a MONET study.

    PubMed

    Karelis, Antony D; Lavoie, Marie-Eve; Messier, Virginie; Mignault, Diane; Garrel, Dominique; Prud'homme, Denis; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in overweight and obese sedentary postmenopausal women. The study population consisted of 137 overweight and obese sedentary postmenopausal women (age, 57.7 +/- 4.8 years; BMI, 32.4 +/- 4.6 kg.m(-2)). Subjects had the MetS if 3 out of the following 5 criteria were met: visceral fat > 130 cm2, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol < 1.29 mmol.L(-1), fasting triglycerides > or = 1.7 mmol.L(-1), blood pressure > or = 130/85 mmHg, and fasting glucose > or =5.6 mmol.L(-1). We measured (i) body composition (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); (ii) visceral fat (by computed tomography); (iii) insulin sensitivity (using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp); (iv) plasma lipids, fasting glucose, and insulin, as well as 2 h glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test; (v) resting blood pressure; (vi) peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak); (vii) PAEE (using doubly labeled water); and (viii) lower-body muscle strength (using weight-training equipment). Forty-two women (30.7%) had the MetS in our cohort. Individuals without the MetS had significantly higher levels of PAEE (962 +/- 296 vs. 837 +/- 271 kcal.d(-1); p < 0.05), VO2 peak (18.2 +/- 3.0 vs. 16.7 +/- 3.2 mL.min(-1).kg(-1); p < 0.05), and insulin sensitivity, as well as significantly lower levels of 2 h glucose and central lean body mass. No differences in total energy expenditure, resting metabolic rate, and muscle strength between groups were observed. Logistic regression analysis showed that 2 h glucose (odds ratio (OR): 1.50 (95% CI 1.17-1.92)), central lean body mass (OR: 1.17 (95% CI 1.05-1.31)), and PAEE (OR: 0.998 (95% CI 0.997-1.000)), but not VO2 peak and (or) muscle strength, were independent predictors of the MetS. Lower levels of PAEE and higher levels of 2 h glucose, as well as central lean body mass, are independent determinants of the MetS in

  8. MasABK Proteins Interact with Proteins of the Type IV Pilin System to Affect Social Motility of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Fremgen, Sarah; Williams, Amanda; Furusawa, Gou; Dziewanowska, Katarzyna; Settles, Matthew; Hartzell, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Gliding motility is critical for normal development of spore-filled fruiting bodies in the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Mutations in mgl block motility and development but one mgl allele can be suppressed by a mutation in masK, the last gene in an operon adjacent to the mgl operon. Deletion of the entire 5.5 kb masABK operon crippled gliding and fruiting body development and decreased sporulation. Expression of pilAGHI, which encodes type IV pili (TFP) components essential for social (S) gliding, several cryptic pil genes, and a LuxR family protein were reduced significantly in the Δmas mutant while expression of the myxalamide operon was increased significantly. Localization and two-hybrid analysis suggest that the three Mas proteins form a membrane complex. MasA-PhoA fusions confirmed that MasA is an integral cytoplasmic membrane protein with a ≈100 amino acid periplasmic domain. Results from yeast two-hybrid assays showed that MasA interacts with the lipoprotein MasB and MasK, a protein kinase and that MasB and MasK interact with one another. Additionally, yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed a physical interaction between two gene products of the mas operon, MasA and MasB, and PilA. Deletion of mas may be accompanied by compensatory mutations since complementation of the Δmas social gliding and developmental defects required addition of both pilA and masABK. PMID:23342171

  9. Chicken parvovirus and its associations with malabsorption syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finkler, F; Lima, D A; Cerva, C; Moraes, L B; Cibulski, S P; Teixeira, T F; Santos, H F; Almeida, L L; Roehe, P M; Franco, A C

    2016-08-01

    Malabsorption syndrome (MAS) is a multifactorial syndrome which is characterized by enteric disorders and reduced growth rates of broilers. Such condition is responsible for significant economic losses to the poultry industry. A possible association between chicken parvovirus (ChPV) infections and the occurrence of MAS has been proposed. However, such association has not to date been elucidated in view that ChPV has been detected in healthy as well as in MAS-affected chickens. This study aimed to detect and quantify ChPV loads in sera and tissues of MAS-affected, as well as in healthy broilers. Fifty nine, 39-day-old broilers (50 diseased, 9 healthy birds), obtained from the same flocks, were examined. The highest ChPV DNA loads were detected in MAS-affected broilers, particularly in fecal samples and intestinal tissues (~5500 genomic copies/300ng of total DNA). The average viral genome load in serum in MAS-affected birds was 1134copies/mL, whereas no viral DNA was found in sera and thymus tissues from healthy animals. These findings reveal that MAS-affected broilers consistently carry ChPV DNA is serum, whereas healthy animals do not. In addition, viral loads in tissues (bursa of Fabricius, spleen, intestine and liver) of MAS-affected birds were significantly higher in comparison to the same tissues from healthy broilers. Although preliminary, the results obtained here indicate an association between the detection of ChPV DNA in serum, in addition to high ChPV viral loads in tissues, and the occurrence of MAS in broilers. Further experiments should be performed to confirm such results. PMID:27473992

  10. Effect of supplement with lactic-acid producing bacteria on fatigue and physical activity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Åsa; Nord, Carl E; Evengård, Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    Disturbances in intestinal microbial ecology and in the immune system of the host have been implicated as a part of the pathogenesis in chronic fatigue syndrome. Probiotic lactic acid producing bacteria have been shown to prevent and alleviate gastrointestinal disturbances and to normalize the cytokine profile which might be of an advantage for patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFB 1748 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 on fatigue and physical activity in CFS patients. Fifteen patients fulfilling the criteria set by international researchers in the field at the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention in 1994 for chronic fatigue syndrome, were included in the study. The patients had high fatigue severity scores and high disability scores. During the first two weeks baseline observations without treatment were assessed, succeeded by four weeks of intake of a probiotic product and a four-week follow-up period. The fatigue, health and physical activity was assessed by the use of the Visual Analogue Scales and the SF-12 Health Survey. Faecal samples were collected and the normal microflora was analysed. Neurocognitive functions improved during the study period while there were no significant changes in fatigue and physical activity scores. No major changes occurred in the gastrointestinal microflora. At the end of the study 6 of 15 patients reported that they had improved according to the assessment described. The findings in this study that improvement of health is possible to achieve should encourage further studies with interventions with probiotics in patients with CFS. PMID:19171024

  11. Neural activity in relation to empirically derived personality syndromes in depression using a psychodynamic fMRI paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Taubner, Svenja; Wiswede, Daniel; Kessler, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The heterogeneity between patients with depression cannot be captured adequately with existing descriptive systems of diagnosis and neurobiological models of depression. Furthermore, considering the highly individual nature of depression, the application of general stimuli in past research efforts may not capture the essence of the disorder. This study aims to identify subtypes of depression by using empirically derived personality syndromes, and to explore neural correlates of the derived personality syndromes. Materials and Methods: In the present exploratory study, an individually tailored and psychodynamically based functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm using dysfunctional relationship patterns was presented to 20 chronically depressed patients. Results from the Shedler–Westen Assessment Procedure (SWAP-200) were analyzed by Q-factor analysis to identify clinically relevant subgroups of depression and related brain activation. Results: The principle component analysis of SWAP-200 items from all 20 patients lead to a two-factor solution: “Depressive Personality” and “Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality.” Both factors were used in a whole-brain correlational analysis but only the second factor yielded significant positive correlations in four regions: a large cluster in the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the left ventral striatum, a small cluster in the left temporal pole, and another small cluster in the right middle frontal gyrus. Discussion: The degree to which patients with depression score high on the factor “Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality” correlated with relatively higher activity in three key areas involved in emotion processing, evaluation of reward/punishment, negative cognitions, depressive pathology, and social knowledge (OFC, ventral striatum, temporal pole). Results may contribute to an alternative description of neural correlates of depression showing differential brain activation dependent

  12. GATA1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation of the γ-Secretase Activating Protein Increases Aβ Formation in Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jin; Wisniewski, Thomas; Praticò, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Because of an extra copy of the Aβ precursor protein gene on chromosome 21, Down syndrome (DS) individuals develop high levels of Aβ peptides and Alzheimer disease–like brain amyloidosis early in life. Here we show that the γ-secretase activating protein (GSAP), a key enzyme in amyloidogenesis, is increased in DS brains and specifically regulated at the transcriptional level by GATA1 transcription factor. The discovery of this novel pathway has translational implications for DS, because pharmacological inhibition of GSAP is an attractive and viable Aβ-lowering therapeutic strategy for this disorder. PMID:26448035

  13. Loss-of-Function FERMT1 Mutations in Kindler Syndrome Implicate a Role for Fermitin Family Homolog-1 in Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lai-Cheong, Joey E.; Parsons, Maddy; Tanaka, Akio; Ussar, Siegfried; South, Andrew P.; Gomathy, Sethuraman; Mee, John B.; Barbaroux, Jean-Baptiste; Techanukul, Tanasit; Almaani, Noor; Clements, Suzanne E.; Hart, Ian R.; McGrath, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Kindler syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skin atrophy and blistering. It results from loss-of-function mutations in the FERMT1 gene encoding the focal adhesion protein, fermitin family homolog-1. How and why deficiency of fermitin family homolog-1 results in skin atrophy and blistering are unclear. In this study, we investigated the epidermal basement membrane and keratinocyte biology abnormalities in Kindler syndrome. We identified altered distribution of several basement membrane proteins, including types IV, VII, and XVII collagens and laminin-332 in Kindler syndrome skin. In addition, reduced immunolabeling intensity of epidermal cell markers such as β1 and α6 integrins and cytokeratin 15 was noted. At the cellular level, there was loss of β4 integrin immunolocalization and random distribution of laminin-332 in Kindler syndrome keratinocytes. Of note, active β1 integrin was reduced but overexpression of fermitin family homolog-1 restored integrin activation and partially rescued the Kindler syndrome cellular phenotype. This study provides evidence that fermitin family homolog-1 is implicated in integrin activation and demonstrates that lack of this protein leads to pathological changes beyond focal adhesions, with disruption of several hemidesmosomal components and reduced expression of keratinocyte stem cell markers. These findings collectively provide novel data on the role of fermitin family homolog-1 in skin and further insight into the pathophysiology of Kindler syndrome. PMID:19762710

  14. The Neuroprotective Effect of Cornus mas on Brain Tissue of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Francik, Renata; Kryczyk, Jadwiga; Krośniak, Mirosław; Berköz, Mehmet; Sanocka, Ilona; Francik, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) is a valuable source of phenolic antioxidants. Flavonoid derivatives as nonenzymatic antioxidants are important in the pathophysiology of many diseases including neurological disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) or heart disease. In this study, we examined the effect of an addition of freeze-dried fruit of cornelian cherry on three types of diets: control diet, fructose diet, and diet enriched in fats (high-fat diet). This effect was studied by determining the following antioxidant parameters in both brain tissue and plasma in rats: catalase, ferric reducing ability of plasma, paraoxonase, protein carbonyl groups, and free thiol groups. Results indicate that both fructose diet and high-fat diet affect the antioxidant capacity of the organism. Furthermore, an addition of cornelian cherry resulted in increased activity of catalase in brain tissue, while in plasma it caused the opposite effect. In turn, with regard to paraoxonase activity in both brain tissue and plasma, it had a stimulating effect. Adding cornelian cherry to the tested diets increased the activity of PON in both tested tissues. Moreover, protective effect of fruits of this plant was observed in the process of oxidation of proteins by decreasing levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiol groups in brain tissue as well as in plasma. PMID:25401157

  15. In Silico Design for Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Agonist from Traditional Chinese Medicine for Treatment of Metabolic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a master mediator of metabolic homeostasis. It is considered as a significant millstone to treat metabolic syndromes including obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver. It can sense cellular energy or nutrient status by switching on the catabolic pathways. Investigation of AMPK has new findings recently. AMPK can inhibit cell growth by the way of autophagy. Thus AMPK has become a hot target for small molecular drug design of tumor inhibition. Activation of AMPK must undergo certain extent change of the structure. Through the methods of structure-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulation, we attempted to find out appropriate small compounds from the world's largest TCM Database@Taiwan that had the ability to activate the function of AMPK. Finally, we found that two TCM compounds, eugenyl_beta-D-glucopyranoside and 6-O-cinnamoyl-D-glucopyranose, had the qualification to be AMPK agonist. PMID:24899913

  16. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to ...

  17. Acquisition of an instrumental activity of daily living in patients with Korsakoff's syndrome: a comparison of trial and error and errorless learning.

    PubMed

    Oudman, Erik; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W; Kerklaan, Sandra; Lindsen, Karen; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Korsakoff's syndrome show devastating amnesia and executive deficits. Consequently, the ability to perform instrumental activities such as making coffee is frequently diminished. It is currently unknown whether patients with Korsakoff's syndrome are able to (re)learn instrumental activities. A good candidate for an effective teaching technique in Korsakoff's syndrome is errorless learning as it is based on intact implicit memory functioning. Therefore, the aim of the current study was two-fold: to investigate whether patients with Korsakoff's syndrome are able to (re)learn instrumental activities, and to compare the effectiveness of errorless learning with trial and error learning in the acquisition and maintenance of an instrumental activity, namely using a washing machine to do the laundry. Whereas initial learning performance in the errorless learning condition was superior, both intervention techniques resulted in similar improvement over eight learning sessions. Moreover, performance in a different spatial layout showed a comparable improvement. Notably, in follow-up sessions starting after four weeks without practice, performance was still elevated in the errorless learning condition, but not in the trial and error condition. The current study demonstrates that (re)learning and maintenance of an instrumental activity is possible in patients with Korsakoff's syndrome. PMID:24047431

  18. Induction of nitric oxide synthase activity by toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 in a macrophage-monocyte cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Zembowicz, A; Vane, J R

    1992-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is a Mr 22,000 protein produced by Staphylococcus aureus. It is thought to be the cause of toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the hypothesis that TSST-1 induces nitric oxide (NO) synthase and that the NO formed may be involved in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. We used the murine monocyte-macrophage cell line J744.2 that responds to TSST-1 and also expresses NO synthase activity upon immunological stimulation. J774.2 macrophages stimulated with TSST-1 (10-100 nM) generated nitrite, a breakdown product of NO, and induced concentration-dependent elevations of cGMP in the pig kidney epithelial cell line (LLC-PK1). This latter effect was due to the generation of L-arginine-derived NO for it was (i) abolished by oxyhemoglobin (10 microM), a scavenger of NO, or by methylene blue (10 microM), an inhibitor of NO-activated guanylate cyclase; (ii) potentiated by superoxide dismutase (100 units/ml), which prolongs the life of NO; (iii) inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (0.3 mM), an inhibitor of NO synthase; (iv) significantly decreased when L-arginine (0.4 mM) in the medium was replaced by D-arginine (0.4 mM). Moreover, TSST-1 (100 nM) enhanced the activity of cytosolic NO synthase in J774.2 cells. Hydrocortisone (1 microM) but not indomethacin (5 micrograms/ml) or salicylic acid (5 micrograms/ml) prevented the generation of NO2- and the increases in cGMP levels in LLC-PK1 cells induced by J774.2 cells stimulated with TSST-1. The effects of hydrocortisone were partially reversed by coincubation with RU 486 (1 microM), an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptors. Thus, TSST-1 and perhaps other exotoxins produced by Gram-positive bacteria induce NO synthase and the increased NO formation may contribute to toxic shock syndrome and possibly to changes in the immune responses that accompany infection. PMID:1372433

  19. Clinical activity and safety of the dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib for higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes following DNA methyltransferase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Lewis R; Greenberg, Peter; Raza, Azra; Olnes, Matthew J; Holland, James F; Reddy, Premkumar; Maniar, Manoj; Wilhelm, Francois

    2015-06-01

    Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na) is an inhibitor of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and polo-like kinase pathways that induces mitotic arrest and apoptosis in neoplastic cells, while sparing normal cells. Our purpose is to summarize the clinical activity and safety of intravenous (IV) rigosertib delivered by an external ambulatory infusion pump in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts-1, -2, or, -t myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) following prior treatment with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors. A total of 39 patients with MDS who fulfilled these criteria were enrolled in four phase 1-2 clinical trials of IV rigosertib. Thirty five (88%) had higher risk disease according to the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System. Median overall survival for this group of 39 patients was 35 weeks. Of 30 evaluable patients with follow-up bone marrow biopsies, 12 (40%) achieved complete (n = 5) or partial (n = 7) bone marrow blast responses. In addition, 15 patients achieved stabilization of bone marrow blasts. One patient with a complete bone marrow response also achieved a complete cytogenetic response. A second patient with stable bone marrow blasts achieved a partial cytogenetic response. Two of the responding patients and three patients with stable disease had hematological improvements. Rigosertib-induced bone marrow blast decreases and stability appeared to be predictive of prolonged survival. IV rigosertib had a favorable safety profile without significant myelosuppression. Most common drug-related toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, dysuria, and hematuria. In summary, IV rigosertib is well tolerated and has clinical activity in patients with higher risk MDS following DNMT inhibitor treatment. A multinational pivotal phase 3 randomized clinical trial of rigosertib versus best supportive care for patients with MDS with excess blasts following prior treatment with DNMT inhibitors (ONTIME: ON 01910.Na Trial In Myelodysplastic SyndromE) has recently

  20. Comparative randomised active drug controlled clinical trial of a herbal eye drop in computer vision syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Pranab Kr; Bairagi, Debasis; Roy, Sudipta; Majumder, Nilay Kr; Paul, Ratish Ch; Bagchi, Sunil Ch

    2005-07-01

    A comparative double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial of a herbal eye drop (itone) was conducted to find out its efficacy and safety in 120 patients with computer vision syndrome. Patients using computers for more than 3 hours continuously per day having symptoms of watering, redness, asthenia, irritation, foreign body sensation and signs of conjunctival hyperaemia, corneal filaments and mucus were studied. One hundred and twenty patients were randomly given either placebo, tears substitute (tears plus) or itone in identical vials with specific code number and were instructed to put one drop four times daily for 6 weeks. Subjective and objective assessments were done at bi-weekly intervals. In computer vision syndrome both subjective and objective improvements were noticed with itone drops. Itone drop was found significantly better than placebo (p<0.01) and almost identical results were observed with tears plus (difference was not statistically significant). Itone is considered to be a useful drug in computer vision syndrome. PMID:16366195

  1. Using Video Modeling, Prompting, and Behavior-Specific Praise to Increase Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity for Young Children with down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamo, Elyse K.; Wu, Jenny; Wolery, Mark; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Ledford, Jennifer R.; Barton, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome may be at increased risk of problems associated with inactivity. Early intervention to increase physical activity may lead to increased participation in typical activities and long-term increases in quality of life (e.g., decreased likelihood of obesity-related illness). A multi-component intervention, including video…

  2. Citron and lemon under the lens of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mucci, Adele; Parenti, Francesca; Righi, Valeria; Schenetti, Luisa

    2013-12-01

    High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) is an NMR technique that can be applied to semi-solid samples. Flavedo, albedo, pulp, seeds, and oil gland content of lemon and citron were studied through HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy, which was used directly on intact tissue specimens without any physicochemical manipulation. HR-MAS NMR proved to be a very suitable technique for detecting terpenes, sugars, organic acids, aminoacids and osmolites. It is valuable in observing changes in sugars, principal organic acids (mainly citric and malic) and ethanol contents of pulp specimens and this strongly point to its use to follow fruit ripening, or commercial assessment of fruit maturity. HR-MAS NMR was also used to derive the molar percentage of fatty acid components of lipids in seeds, which can change depending on the Citrus species and varieties. Finally, this technique was employed to elucidate the metabolic profile of mold flavedo. PMID:23871074

  3. BOREAS Level-2 MAS Surface Reflectance and Temperature Images in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Strub, Richard; Lobitz, Brad

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Aircraft Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed aircraft data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes biophysical parameter maps such as surface reflectance and temperature. Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-2 MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C130 navigation data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  4. Comparison of the White-Nose Syndrome Agent Pseudogymnoascus destructans to Cave-Dwelling Relatives Suggests Reduced Saprotrophic Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Hannah T.; Barton, Hazel A.

    2014-01-01

    White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is an emerging infectious mycosis that has impacted multiple species of North American bats since its initial discovery in 2006, yet the physiology of the causal agent, the psychrophilic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans ( = Geomyces destructans), is not well understood. We investigated the ability of P. destructans to secrete enzymes that could permit environmental growth or affect pathogenesis and compared enzyme activity across several Pseudogymnoascus species isolated from both hibernating bats and cave sediments. We found that P. destructans produced enzymes that could be beneficial in either a pathogenic or saprotrophic context, such as lipases, hemolysins, and urease, as well as chitinase and cellulases, which could aid in saprotrophic growth. The WNS pathogen showed significantly lower activity for urease and endoglucanase compared to con-generic species (Pseudogymnoascus), which may indicate a shift in selective pressure to the detriment of P. destructans’ saprotrophic ability. Based on the positive function of multiple saprotrophic enzymes, the causal agent of White-nose Syndrome shows potential for environmental growth on a variety of substrates found in caves, albeit at a reduced level compared to environmental strains. Our data suggest that if P. destructans emerged as an opportunistic infection from an environmental source, co-evolution with its host may have led to a reduced capacity for saprotrophic growth. PMID:24466096

  5. Comparison of the white-nose syndrome agent Pseudogymnoascus destructans to cave-dwelling relatives suggests reduced saprotrophic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Hannah T; Barton, Hazel A

    2014-01-01

    White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is an emerging infectious mycosis that has impacted multiple species of North American bats since its initial discovery in 2006, yet the physiology of the causal agent, the psychrophilic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans ( = Geomyces destructans), is not well understood. We investigated the ability of P. destructans to secrete enzymes that could permit environmental growth or affect pathogenesis and compared enzyme activity across several Pseudogymnoascus species isolated from both hibernating bats and cave sediments. We found that P. destructans produced enzymes that could be beneficial in either a pathogenic or saprotrophic context, such as lipases, hemolysins, and urease, as well as chitinase and cellulases, which could aid in saprotrophic growth. The WNS pathogen showed significantly lower activity for urease and endoglucanase compared to con-generic species (Pseudogymnoascus), which may indicate a shift in selective pressure to the detriment of P. destructans' saprotrophic ability. Based on the positive function of multiple saprotrophic enzymes, the causal agent of White-nose Syndrome shows potential for environmental growth on a variety of substrates found in caves, albeit at a reduced level compared to environmental strains. Our data suggest that if P. destructans emerged as an opportunistic infection from an environmental source, co-evolution with its host may have led to a reduced capacity for saprotrophic growth. PMID:24466096

  6. Antiretroviral activity of 5-azacytidine during treatment of a HTLV-1 positive myelodysplastic syndrome with autoimmune manifestations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are often accompanied by autoimmune phenomena. The underlying mechanisms for these associations remain uncertain, although T cell activation seems to be important. Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) has been detected in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, mostly in regions of the world which are endemic for the virus, and where association of HTLV-1 with rheumatological manifestation is not rare. We present here the case of a 58 year old man who presented with cytopenias, leukocytoclastic vasculitis of the skin and glomerulopathy, and was diagnosed as MDS (refractory anemia with excess blasts - RAEB 1). The patient also tested positive for HTLV-1 by PCR. After 8 monthly cycles of 5-azacytidine he achieved a complete hematologic remission. Following treatment, a second PCR for HTLV-1 was carried out and found to be negative. This is the first report in the literature of a HTLV-1-positive MDS with severe autoimmune manifestations, which was treated with the hypomethylating factor 5-azacitidine, achieving cytogenetic remission with concomitant resolution of the autoimmune manifestations, as well as HTLV-1-PCR negativity. HTLV-1-PCR negativity may be due to either immune mediated clearance of the virus, or a potential antiretroviral effect of 5-azacytidine. 5-azacytidine is known for its antiretroviral effects, although there is no proof of its activity against HTLV-1 infection in vivo. PMID:22214262

  7. Comparing the Effects of Lovastatin and Cornus Mas Fruit on Fibrinogen Level in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Sedigheh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Adelnia, Azadeh; Kazemi, Somayeh; Shamsi, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerosis, which is a result of gradual deposition of lipids in the lower part of blood vessel endothelium, is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. It has been proved that some inflammatory blood markers such as fibrinogen can predict the risk for cardiovascular disease conditions, not only in cardiovascular patients, but also in those who do not have any manifestations of the atherosclerotic development. In this study, the effect of cornus mas l. was evaluated on fibrinogen of hypercholesterolemic rabbits and it was also compared with lovastatin drug. METHODS In this study, 25 New Zealand adult male rabbits were randomly divided into five groups of five. They were treated for 60 days by 5 different diets, namely basic, high cholesterol, regular plus 1 g/kgBW cornus mas L. powder, high cholesterol plus 1 g/kgBW cornus mas L. powder, and high cholesterol plus 10 mg/kgBW lovastatin. At the beginning and at the end of this period, blood samples were collected from the rabbits and their serum fibrinogen levels were measured. RESULTS Cornus mas L. powder and lovastatin significantly decreased fibrinogen levels in comparison with high cholesterol group (P < 0.05). Furthermore cornus mas L. powder could reduce the fibrinogen level more than lovastatin (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION The results indicated that consumption of cornus mas L. might be beneficial in atherosclerotic patients due to its reducing effects on fibrinogen. PMID:22577405

  8. The Consistency of the Pandemic Simulations between the SEIR Model and the MAS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyosaka, Yuki; Hirose, Hideo

    There are two main methods for pandemic simulations: the SEIR model and the MAS model. The SEIR model can deal with simulations quickly for many homogeneous populations with simple ordinary differential equations; however, the model cannot accommodate many detailed conditions. The MAS model, the multi-agent simulation, can deal with detailed simulations under the many kinds of initial and boundary conditions with simple social network models. However, the computing cost will grow exponentially as the population size becomes larger. Thus, simulations in the large-scale model would hardly be realized unless supercomputers are available. By combining these two methods, we may perform the pandemic simulations in the large-scale model with lower costs. That is, the MAS model is used in the early stage of a pandemic simulation to determine the appropriate parameters to be used in the SEIR model. With these obtained parameters, the SEIR model may then be used. To investigate the validity of this combined method, we first compare the simulation results between the SEIR model and the MAS model. Simulation results of the MAS model and the SEIR model that uses the parameters obtained by the MAS model simulation are found to be close to each other.

  9. T cell activation and cytokine release in streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nadal, D; Lauener, R P; Braegger, C P; Kaufhold, A; Simma, B; Lütticken, R; Seger, R A

    1993-05-01

    A 5-year-old girl with streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome during varicella infection had high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 but no interleukin-1 or interleukin-2 in the serum. Intravenous administration of gamma-globulin coincided with clinical improvement and with reduction of the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6. The data suggest that streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins trigger synthesis of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 in vivo; intravenously administered gamma-globulin may down-regulate the cytokine response. PMID:8496751

  10. Downregulation of protein kinase PKR activation by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus at its early stage infection.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yueqiang; Ma, Zexu; Wang, Rong; Yang, Liping; Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The interferon-induced double-strand RNA activated protein kinase (PKR) plays an important role in antiviral response. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) on PKR activation. Here we report that PRRSV inhibited PKR activation during its early stage infection of primary pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). PRRSV infection led to lower level of phosphorylated PKR in comparison with mock-infected cells. The PKR inhibition was sustained until 10h post infection in the presence of polyI:C, a synthetic analog of double-stranded RNA activating PKR. PKR-mediated phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α was also lower in the PRRSV-infected PAMs during the early stage infection. Interestingly, inactivated PRRSV was capable to inhibit the PKR activation until 6h post infection. This suggests that structural components of PRRSV virions were responsible for the inhibition, although PRRSV replication was needed for longer inhibition. These results indicate that the downregulation of PKR activation during early infection stage should be essential for PRRSV to avoid the antiviral response to initiate replication. This finding contributes to our understanding on PRRSV interaction with host innate immune response and reveal a target for control of PRRSV infection. PMID:27066702

  11. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor overexpressed in granulosa cells from polycystic ovary syndrome ovaries is functionally active.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Gordon, Uma D; López Bernal, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with anovulatory infertility. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR), which is critical for ovulation, has been suggested to be expressed prematurely in the ovarian follicles of women with PCOS. This study aimed to analyse the expression and activity of LHCGR in ovarian granulosa cells from PCOS patients and the involvement of ARF6 small GTPase in LHCGR internalization. Granulosa cells (GC) isolated from follicular fluid collected during oocyte retrieval from normal women (n = 19) and women with PCOS (n = 17) were used to study differences in LHCGR protein expression and activity between normal and PCOS patients. LHCGR expression is up-regulated in GC from PCOS women. LHCGR in PCOS GC is functionally active, as shown by increased cAMP production upon human gonadotrophin (HCG)-stimulation. Moreover, ARF6 is highly expressed in GC from PCOS patients and HCG-stimulation increases the concentrations of active ARF6. The inhibition of ARF6 activation attenuates HCG-induced LHCGR internalization in both normal and PCOS GC, indicating that there are no alterations in LHCGR internalisation in GC from PCOS. In conclusion, the expression and activation of LHCGR and ARF6 are up-regulated in GC from PCOS women but the mechanism of agonist-induced LHCGR internalization is unaltered. PMID:27061682

  12. The Magellan Adaptive Secondary VisAO Camera: diffraction-limited broadband visible imaging and 20mas fiber array IFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopon, Derek; Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared; Gasho, Victor; Follette, Katherine

    2010-07-01

    The Magellan Adaptive Secondary AO system, scheduled for first light in the fall of 2011, will be able to simultaneously perform diffraction limited AO science in both the mid-IR, using the BLINC/MIRAC4 10μm camera, and in the visible using our novel VisAO camera. The VisAO camera will be able to operate as either an imager, using a CCD47 with 8.5 mas pixels, or as an IFS, using a custom fiber array at the focal plane with 20 mas elements in its highest resolution mode. In imaging mode, the VisAO camera will have a full suite of filters, coronagraphic focal plane occulting spots, and SDI prism/filters. The imaging mode should provide ~20% mean Strehl diffraction-limited images over the band 0.5-1.0 μm. In IFS mode, the VisAO instrument will provide R~1,800 spectra over the band 0.6-1.05 μm. Our unprecedented 20 mas spatially resolved visible spectra would be the highest spatial resolution achieved to date, either from the ground or in space. We also present lab results from our recently fabricated advanced triplet Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector (ADC) and the design of our novel wide-field acquisition and active optics lens. The advanced ADC is designed to perform 58% better than conventional doublet ADCs and is one of the enabling technologies that will allow us to achieve broadband (0.5-1.0μm) diffraction limited imaging and wavefront sensing in the visible.

  13. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  14. Activation of a cryptic splice site in the growth hormone receptor associated with growth hormone insensitivity syndrome in a genetic isolate of Laron Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavi, A.; Bartlett, R.; Brown, M.

    1994-09-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease found worldwide. Despite various ethnic differences, all patients with LS described display classic dysmorphic features and extreme short stature due to defects in the growth hormone receptor (GHR). The vast majority of these patients are sporadic occurrences resulting from consanguineous matings; however, an Ecuadorian genetic isolate of LS has been reported. Our investigations have identified a genetic isolate of LS of Anglo Saxon origin. Seven individuals, by all clinical and biochemical criteria, have LS. As a result of extensive review of family and medical histories we have constructed a pedigree tracing the lineage of our affected patients through the 17th century. No GHR gross deletions were detected using an exon-specific PCR assay developed in our laboratory. Previous molecular analyses have identified mutations in exons 2-7 in numerous patients with classical LS. Single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was performed on GHR exons 2-7, and a marked conformational shift was noted in exon 7. Cycle sequencing of exon 7 from three affected individuals, and from four first-degree relatives, revealed a C{r_arrow}T transition at position 766 of the cDNA, and a heterozygous C{r_arrow}T transition at the identical position in the obligate carriers studied. This mutation is predicted to activate a cryptic donor splice site 63 base pairs upstream from the 3{prime} end of exon 7, effectively truncating the GHR cDNA without changing the reading frame. The resultant GHR protein is shortened by a proposed 21 amino acids. The identification and conformation of this mutation not only identifies a novel mutation in the GHR, and the first to be described in LS patients of English descent, but also allows for comparisons between genotypes and phenotypes in an inbred population.

  15. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained. PMID:27017576

  16. Observations of radio-quiet quasars at 10-mas resolution by use of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal; Tagore, Amitpal S.; Roberts, Carl; Sluse, Dominique; Stacey, Hannah; Vives-Arias, Hector; Wucknitz, Olaf; Volino, Filomena

    2015-11-01

    We present Very Large Array detections of radio emission in 4 four-image gravitational lens systems with quasar sources: HS 0810+2554, RX J0911+0511, HE 0435-1223 and SDSS J0924+0219, and extended Multi-Element Remote Linked Interferometer (e-MERLIN) observations of two of the systems. The first three are detected at a high level of significance, and SDSS J0924+0219 is detected. HS 0810+2554 is resolved, allowing us for the first time to achieve 10-mas resolution of the source frame in the structure of a radio-quiet quasar. The others are unresolved or marginally resolved. All four objects are among the faintest radio sources yet detected, with intrinsic flux densities in the range 1-5 μJy; such radio objects, if unlensed, will only be observable routinely with the Square Kilometre Array. The observations of HS 0810+2554, which is also detected with e-MERLIN, strongly suggest the presence of a mini active galactic nucleus, with a radio core and milliarcsecond scale jet. The flux densities of the lensed images in all but HE 0435-1223 are consistent with smooth galaxy lens models without the requirement for smaller scale substructure in the model, although some interesting anomalies are seen between optical and radio flux densities. These are probably due to microlensing effects in the optical.

  17. Mutations in SRCAP, encoding SNF2-related CREBBP activator protein, cause Floating-Harbor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hood, Rebecca L; Lines, Matthew A; Nikkel, Sarah M; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Beaulieu, Chandree; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J M; Allanson, Judith; Kim, Chong Ae; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Moilanen, Jukka S; Lacombe, Didier; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Whiteford, Margo L; Quaio, Caio Robledo D C; Gomy, Israel; Bertola, Debora R; Albrecht, Beate; Platzer, Konrad; McGillivray, George; Zou, Ruobing; McLeod, D Ross; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Marcadier, Janet; Majewski, Jacek; Bulman, Dennis E; White, Susan M; Boycott, Kym M

    2012-02-10

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive-language deficits, and a distinctive facial appearance. Occurrence is generally sporadic, although parent-to-child transmission has been reported on occasion. Employing whole-exome sequencing, we identified heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP in five unrelated individuals with sporadic FHS. Sanger sequencing identified mutations in SRCAP in eight more affected persons. Mutations were de novo in all six instances in which parental DNA was available. SRCAP is an SNF2-related chromatin-remodeling factor that serves as a coactivator for CREB-binding protein (CREBBP, better known as CBP, the major cause of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome [RTS]). Five SRCAP mutations, two of which are recurrent, were identified; all are tightly clustered within a small (111 codon) region of the final exon. These mutations are predicted to abolish three C-terminal AT-hook DNA-binding motifs while leaving the CBP-binding and ATPase domains intact. Our findings show that SRCAP mutations are the major cause of FHS and offer an explanation for the clinical overlap between FHS and RTS. PMID:22265015

  18. Continuous muscle activity, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis: ionic or non ionic disorders?

    PubMed

    Serratrice, G; Serratrice, J

    2011-06-01

    The early pathophysiologic study showed increasing evidence that autoimmunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of neuromyotonia. Antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel were detected in the serum of patients who had peripheral nerves hyperexcitability and also Morvan's disease or limbic encephalitis. These discoveries offered new approaches to treatments. Recently, antibodies previously attributed to VGKC recognise 2 surface antigens LGI1 and CASPR2 into the VGKC complex. Finally, VGKC antibodies are directed to 2 proteins the first one is a key hippocampic protein containing pre and post synaptic proteins. The second one CASPR2 is an hippocampic and paranodal protein. There clinical significance is different: hyperexcitability, limbic encephalitis without thymoma for LGI1, hyperexcitability, Morvan limbic encephalitis and frequent thymoma for CASPR2. In conclusion, the term NMT--LE--VGKC should be changed to NMT--LE with LGII and CASPR2 antibodies and classified as auto immune synaptic disorders. Mutations in genes encoding both these proteins are found in hereditary epilepsy and other syndromes. Various potassium channelopathies are closely linked to Morvan's syndromes. A new classification of antibodies will be necessary. PMID:21842591

  19. [An autopsied case of chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection complicated in systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Jun; Koike, Ryuji; Sugihara, Takahiko; Hagiyama, Hiroyuki; Nishio, Junko; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Kubota, Tetsuo; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Ichiro; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki

    2002-12-01

    We have experienced a case of chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) complicated in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). A 35-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of fever and dyspnea on exertion. She was diagnosed as having SLE on the basis of arthritis, oropharyngeal ulcer, lymphopenia, and positive autoantibodies against DNA, RNP and SSA. The diagnosis of APS was also made because of positive anti-cardiolipin IgG antibodies and the existence of multiple pulmonary infarction with pulmonary hypertension. The administration of 30 mg/day of prednisolone and anti-coagulation significantly improved clinical symptoms. However, she was again admitted to the hospital four months later because of progressive liver damage and pancytopenia. Increment of prednisolone did not improve the clinical situation and she expired because of pulmonary hemorrhage. At autopsy, there were a significant increase of histiocytes with hemophagocytosis and a dense infiltration of atypical lymphocytes in the liver, spleen, lymph nodes and bone marrow. Infiltrated lymphocytes were positive for CD 3 and EBER 1 in immunohistochemical staining and EBVmRNA was detected by in situ hybridization. Final pathological diagnosis was CAEBV with hemophagocytic syndrome in association with lupus nephritis, pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary infarction. PMID:12599514

  20. McCune-Albright syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Claudia E; Collins, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is classically defined by the clinical triad of fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), café-au-lait skin spots, and precocious puberty (PP). It is a rare disease with estimated prevalence between 1/100,000 and 1/1,000,000. FD can involve a single or multiple skeletal sites and presents with a limp and/or pain, and, occasionally, a pathologic fracture. Scoliosis is common and may be progressive. In addition to PP (vaginal bleeding or spotting and development of breast tissue in girls, testicular and penile enlargement and precocious sexual behavior in boys), other hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies may be involved including hyperthyroidism, growth hormone excess, Cushing syndrome, and renal phosphate wasting. Café-au-lait spots usually appear in the neonatal period, but it is most often PP or FD that brings the child to medical attention. Renal involvement is seen in approximately 50% of the patients with MAS. The disease results from somatic mutations of the GNAS gene, specifically mutations in the cAMP regulating protein, Gs alpha. The extent of the disease is determined by the proliferation, migration and survival of the cell in which the mutation spontaneously occurs during embryonic development. Diagnosis of MAS is usually established on clinical grounds. Plain radiographs are often sufficient to make the diagnosis of FD and biopsy of FD lesions can confirm the diagnosis. The evaluation of patients with MAS should be guided by knowledge of the spectrum of tissues that may be involved, with specific testing for each. Genetic testing is possible, but is not routinely available. Genetic counseling, however, should be offered. Differential diagnoses include neurofibromatosis, osteofibrous dysplasia, non-ossifying fibromas, idiopathic central precocious puberty, and ovarian neoplasm. Treatment is dictated by the tissues affected, and the extent to which they are affected. Generally, some form of surgical intervention is recommended

  1. Specific alterations in complement protein activity of little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) hibernating in white-nose syndrome affected sites.

    PubMed

    Moore, Marianne S; Reichard, Jonathan D; Murtha, Timothy D; Zahedi, Bita; Fallier, Renee M; Kunz, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is the most devastating condition ever reported for hibernating bats, causing widespread mortality in the northeastern United States. The syndrome is characterized by cutaneous lesions caused by a recently identified psychrophilic and keratinophylic fungus (Geomyces destructans), depleted fat reserves, atypical behavior, and damage to wings; however, the proximate cause of mortality is still uncertain. To assess relative levels of immunocompetence in bats hibernating in WNS-affected sites compared with levels in unaffected bats, we describe blood plasma complement protein activity in hibernating little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) based on microbicidal competence assays using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Blood plasma from bats collected during mid-hibernation at WNS-affected sites had higher bactericidal ability against E. coli and S. aureus, but lower fungicidal ability against C. albicans when compared with blood plasma from bats collected at unaffected sites. Within affected sites during mid-hibernation, we observed no difference in microbicidal ability between bats displaying obvious fungal infections compared to those without. Bactericidal ability against E. coli decreased significantly as hibernation progressed in bats collected from an affected site. Bactericidal ability against E. coli and fungicidal ability against C. albicans were positively correlated with body mass index (BMI) during late hibernation. We also compared complement activity against the three microbes within individuals and found that the ability of blood plasma from hibernating M. lucifugus to lyse microbial cells differed as follows: E. coli>S. aureus>C. albicans. Overall, bats affected by WNS experience both relatively elevated and reduced innate immune responses depending on the microbe tested, although the cause of observed immunological changes remains unknown. Additionally, considerable trade-offs may exist between energy

  2. Targeting components of the stress system as potential therapies for the metabolic syndrome: the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Yumuk, Volkan D

    2006-11-01

    The three peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes PPAR-alpha, PPAR-gamma, and PPAR-delta are ligand-activated transcription factors of the nuclear receptor family. PPARs form obligate heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor, which bind to peroxisome-proliferator-response elements (PPREs). PPAR-alpha is expressed mainly in liver, brown fat, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle; PPAR-gamma in intestine and adipose tissue; PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma are both expressed in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, and foam cells; PPAR-delta in skeletal muscle, human embryonic kidney, intestine, heart, adipose tissue, developing brain, and keratinocytes. Intense interest in the development of drugs with new mechanisms of action for the metabolic syndrome has focused attention on nuclear receptors, such as PPARs that function as regulators of energy homeostasis. Agonists of PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma are currently used to treat diabetic dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. Dual PPAR-alpha/gamma agonists and PPAR-alpha/gamma/delta pan-agonists are under investigation for treatment of cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome. Selective PPAR modulators (SPPARMs) are PPAR ligands that possess desirable efficacy and improved tolerance. Efforts are being made to identify novel partial agonists or antagonists for PPAR-gamma in order to combine their antidiabetic and antiobesity effects. Glucocorticoids are major mediators of the stress response and could be the link between stress and PPAR activator signaling and thus may affect the downstream metabolic pathways involved in fuel homeostasis. PMID:17148746

  3. The effect of McConnell taping on vastus medialis and lateralis activity during squatting in adults with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Sung-Hyoun

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of McConnell taping to patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome on the change of the muscle activity of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis during squatting. The total numbers of participants are 16 patients with pain in their knee. There are three different experiments: no-taping, placebo taping, and McConnell taping. As a result, both the muscle activity of vastus medialis and muscle activity ratio of vastus medialis to vastus lateralis increased in placebo taping compared to no-taping, which wasn’t statistically significant. However, the muscle activity of vastus medialis and muscle activity ratio of vastus medialis to vastus lateralis increased in McConnell taping compared to no-taping, which was statistically significant. These results suggest that McConnell taping affects the activity of quadriceps by changing the position of the patella, and thus can effectively be applied in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:24278879

  4. Alteration of prolyl oligopeptidase and activated α-2-macroglobulin in multiple sclerosis subtypes and in the clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tenorio-Laranga, Jofre; Peltonen, Iida; Keskitalo, Salla; Duran-Torres, Gilberto; Natarajan, Renuka; Männistö, Pekka T; Nurmi, Antti; Vartiainen, Nina; Airas, Laura; Elovaara, Irina; García-Horsman, J Arturo

    2013-06-15

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP) has been considered as a drug target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In plasma, PREP has been found altered in several disorders of the central nervous system including multiple sclerosis (MS). Oxidative stress and the levels of an endogenous plasma PREP inhibitor have been proposed to decrease PREP activity in MS. In this work, we measured the circulating levels of PREP in patients suffering of relapsing remitting (RR), secondary progressive (SP), primary progressive (PP) MS, and in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). We found a significantly lower PREP activity in plasma of RRMS as well as in PPMS patients and a trend to reduced activity in subjects diagnosed with CIS, compared to controls. No signs of oxidative inactivation of PREP, and no correlation with the endogenous PREP inhibitor, identified as activated α-2-macroglobulin (α2M*), were observed in any of the patients studied. However, a significant decrease of α2M* was recorded in MS. In cell cultures, we found that PREP specifically stimulates immune active cells possibly by modifying the levels of fibrinogen β, thymosin β4, and collagen. Our results open new lines of research on the role of PREP and α2M* in MS, aiming to relate them to the diagnosis and prognosis of this devastating disease. PMID:23643808

  5. Various shrug exercises can change scapular kinematics and scapular rotator muscle activities in subjects with scapular downward rotation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Choi, Woo-Jeong; Jeong, Hyo-Jung; Yoon, Tae-Lim

    2016-02-01

    Scapular dyskinesis, characterized by scapular downward rotation syndrome (SDRS) affects scapula-humeral rhythm and results in shoulder dysfunction. Previous study has led to the recommendation of standard shrug exercise to contend with SDRS and strengthen the upper trapezius (UT) muscle. However, few researchers have examined which shrug exercise is most effective. The aim of this research was to compare scapular kinematic changes and scapular rotator muscles activity across three different shrug exercises in SDRS. The amounts of scapular downward rotation were measured by a caliper and the scapular upward rotation angle was measured using two digital inclinometers. Surface electromyography was used to measure EMG amplitude from the UT, lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and levator scapula (LS). Seventeen subjects with SDRS were recruited for this study. The subjects performed three shrug exercises with 30° shoulder abduction (preferred shrug, frontal shrug, and stabilization shrug). The stabilization shrug showed a significantly greater scapular upward rotation angle compared with the preferred shrug (P=0.004) and frontal shrug (P=0.006). The UT activity was significantly greater in the frontal shrug than in the preferred shrug (P=0.002). The UT/LS muscle activity ratio was also significantly greater in the frontal shrug than in the preferred shrug (P=0.004). The stabilization shrug should be preferred to enhance the upward rotation angle. In addition, the frontal shrug can be used as an effective method to increase UT activity and to decrease LS activity in SDRS. PMID:26625348

  6. A high-fat diet and NAD(+) activate Sirt1 to rescue premature aging in cockayne syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Mitchell, Sarah J; Fang, Evandro F; Iyama, Teruaki; Ward, Theresa; Wang, James; Dunn, Christopher A; Singh, Nagendra; Veith, Sebastian; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Mangerich, Aswin; Wilson, Mark A; Mattson, Mark P; Bergersen, Linda H; Cogger, Victoria C; Warren, Alessandra; Le Couteur, David G; Moaddel, Ruin; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; de Cabo, Rafael; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-11-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an accelerated aging disorder characterized by progressive neurodegeneration caused by mutations in genes encoding the DNA repair proteins CS group A or B (CSA or CSB). Since dietary interventions can alter neurodegenerative processes, Csb(m/m) mice were given a high-fat, caloric-restricted, or resveratrol-supplemented diet. High-fat feeding rescued the metabolic, transcriptomic, and behavioral phenotypes of Csb(m/m) mice. Furthermore, premature aging in CS mice, nematodes, and human cells results from aberrant PARP activation due to deficient DNA repair leading to decreased SIRT1 activity and mitochondrial dysfunction. Notably, β-hydroxybutyrate levels are increased by the high-fat diet, and β-hydroxybutyrate, PARP inhibition, or NAD(+) supplementation can activate SIRT1 and rescue CS-associated phenotypes. Mechanistically, CSB can displace activated PARP1 from damaged DNA to limit its activity. This study connects two emerging longevity metabolites, β-hydroxybutyrate and NAD(+), through the deacetylase SIRT1 and suggests possible interventions for CS. PMID:25440059

  7. Genetics Home Reference: cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome Enable ...

  8. Overexpressed Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (DSCAM) Deregulates P21-Activated Kinase (PAK) Activity in an In Vitro Neuronal Model of Down Syndrome: Consequences on Cell Process Formation and Extension.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Núñez, Ramón; Barraza, Natalia; Gonzalez-Jamett, Arlek; Cárdenas, Ana Maria; Barnier, Jean-Vianney; Caviedes, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    In humans, Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the presence of an extra copy of autosome 21. The most striking finding in DS patients is intellectual disability and the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neuropathology in adulthood. Gene overdose is most likely to underlie both developmental impairments, as well as altered neuronal function in DS. Lately, the disruption of cellular signaling and regulatory pathways has been implicated in DS pathophysiology, and many of such pathways may represent common targets for diverse DS-related genes, which could in turn represent attractive therapeutical targets. In this regard, one DS-related gene Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (DSCAM), has important functions in neuronal proliferation, maturation, and synaptogenesis. p21-associated kinases (PAKs) appear as a most interesting possibility for study, as DSCAM is known to regulate the PAKs pathway. Hence, in DS, overexpressed DSCAM could deregulate PAKs activity and affect signaling pathways that regulate synaptic plasticity such as dendritic spine dynamics and axon guidance and growth. In the present work, we used an immortalized cell line derived from the cerebral cortex of an animal model of DS such as the trisomy 16 (Ts16) fetal mouse (named CTb), and a similar cell line established from a normal littermate (named CNh), to study the effect of DSCAM in the PAKs pathway. The present study shows that DSCAM is overexpressed in CTb cells by approximately twofold, compared to CNh cells. Congruently, PAK1, as well as its downstream effectors LIMK and cofilin, stay phosphorylated for longer periods after DSCAM activation in the CTb cells, leading to an altered actin dynamics, expressed as an increased basal F/G ratio and reduced neurite growth, in the trisomic condition. The present work presents the correlation between DSCAM gene overexpression and a dysregulation of the PAK pathway, resulting in altered morphological parameters of neuronal plasticity in the trisomic cell

  9. A Single Amino Acid Deletion in the Matrix Protein of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Confers Resistance to a Polyclonal Swine Antibody with Broadly Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Luca N.; Monday, Nicholas; Calvert, Jay G.; Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of virus neutralization (VN) activity in 176 pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) identified one pig with broadly neutralizing activity. A Tyr-10 deletion in the matrix protein provided escape from broad neutralization without affecting homologous neutralizing activity. The role of the Tyr-10 deletion was confirmed through an infectious clone with a Tyr-10 deletion. The results demonstrate differences in the properties and specificities of VN responses elicited during PRRSV infection. PMID:25855739

  10. Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome Caused by Recreational Sports Activities and Muscle Anomaly in the Wrist

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Dueber, Christoph; Mueller, Lars-Peter; Degreif, Juergen

    1996-09-15

    A 34-year-old man with digital ischemia is reported. Angiography revealed thromboembolic occlusions of the proper digital arteries of the index, middle, and ring fingers and a tortuous ulnar artery in Guyon's canal. Though hypothenar hammer syndrome was suspected, there was no relevant occupational history. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated an anomalous muscular sling around the ulnar artery immediately adjacent to the hook of the hamate. The ulnar artery showed mural thrombi in its tortuous segment. These findings were confirmed during operative exploration. After thrombectomy and embolectomy the involved segment of the ulnar artery was replaced by an autologous vein graft. Postoperatively there was complete resolution of the symptoms. Only during convalescence did it become clear that the patient was a passionate golfer.

  11. In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Germacrone Against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiaping; Bai, Xiaolei; Cui, Tiantian; Zhou, Han; Chen, Yao; Xie, Jiexiong; Shi, Qingwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Guihong

    2016-09-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most serious diseases affecting the swine industry worldwide; however, there is no efficient control strategies against PRRSV at present. Therefore, development of new antiviral treatment strategies is urgently needed. As reported, germacrone can efficiently impair influenza virus replication. In this study, we exploited whether germacrone has the potential to inhibit PRRSV infection. Our results showed that the germacrone significantly inhibited replication of PRRSV in vitro and repressed the synthesis of viral RNA and protein. However, it did not block PRRSV binding and entry. Further studies confirmed that germacrone impaired PRRSV replication at an early stage, and inhibited infection of both classic and highly pathogenic type II PRRSV strains. Collectively, our findings imply that the germacrone has the potential to be used as an anti-PRRSV drug. PMID:27178541

  12. Complement-mediated neutrophil activation in sepsis- and trauma-related adult respiratory distress syndrome. Clarification with radioaerosol lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Complement-mediated neutrophil activation (CMNA) has been proposed as an important pathogenic mechanism causing acute microvascular lung injury in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). To clarify the relationship between CMNA and evolving lung injury, we studied 26 patients with multiple trauma and sepsis within 24 hours of risk establishment for ARDS. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was quantified as the clearance rate of a particulate radioaerosol. Seventeen patients (65%) had increased PACP (six developed ARDS) while nine (35%) had normal PACP (none developed ARDS; clearance rates of 3.4%/min and 1.5%/min, respectively). These patients, regardless of evidence of early lung injury, had elevated plasma C3adesArg levels and neutrophil chemotactic desensitization to C5a/C5adesArg. Plasma C3adesArg levels correlated weakly, but significantly, with PACP. Thus, CMNA may be a necessary, but not a sufficient, pathogenic mechanism in the evolution of ARDS.

  13. A neural-specific splicing event generates an active form of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Le Page, Yann; Demay, Florence; Salbert, Gilles

    2004-09-01

    Actin polymerization is required for cellular events such as podosome, lamellipode or filopode formation in migrating cells, and members of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family have essential roles in regulating actin dynamics at the cell leading edge. However, WASP proteins need first to be activated in order to be able to target actin polymerization. Here, we show the occurrence of a neural-specific splicing event, which is favoured by the nuclear orphan receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor I, and generates a truncated WASP protein deleted of exon 2-encoded amino acids. This deletion relocates the protein to the plasma membrane and induces the formation of actin-rich podosome-like structures that also contain paxillin and vinculin. Furthermore, expression of the truncated protein in PC12 cells, as well as in primary neurons, stimulates neuritogenesis. These data underscore the importance of the neural-specific splicing of WASP RNA during development. PMID:15332112

  14. A case report of suspected hepatopulmonary syndrome secondary to ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Yasuyuki; TORISU, Shidow; HAGIO, Mitsuyoshi; YAMAGUCHI, Ryoji; MIZUTANI, Shinya; NAGANOBU, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a respiratory complication of hepatic disease, that is well recognized in humans and defined by the presence of 1) liver disease, 2) hypoxemia and/or high alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaDO2) and 3) intrapulmonary vasodilatation. The present report describes a similar case of HPS in a dog. A six-month-old Papillon was diagnosed with ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis and showed progressive increases in AaDO2 over the course of the following six months. The presence of intrapulmonary vasodilatation was confirmed by agitated saline contrast transthoracic echocardiography. Also, the absence of congenital cardiac defect was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. From these results, we suspected that this dog had HPS. This is the first description of suspected canine HPS. PMID:26616155

  15. CBP histone acetyltransferase activity regulates embryonic neural differentiation in the normal and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Weaver, Ian C G; Gauthier-Fisher, Andrée; Wang, Haoran; He, Ling; Yeomans, John; Wondisford, Frederic; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D

    2010-01-19

    Increasing evidence indicates that epigenetic changes regulate cell genesis. Here, we ask about neural precursors, focusing on CREB binding protein (CBP), a histone acetyltransferase that, when haploinsufficient, causes Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS), a genetic disorder with cognitive dysfunction. We show that neonatal cbp(+/-) mice are behaviorally impaired, displaying perturbed vocalization behavior. cbp haploinsufficiency or genetic knockdown with siRNAs inhibited differentiation of embryonic cortical precursors into all three neural lineages, coincident with decreased CBP binding and histone acetylation at promoters of neuronal and glial genes. Inhibition of histone deacetylation rescued these deficits. Moreover, CBP phosphorylation by atypical protein kinase C zeta was necessary for histone acetylation at neural gene promoters and appropriate differentiation. These data support a model in which environmental cues regulate CBP activity and histone acetylation to control neural precursor competency to differentiate, and indicate that cbp haploinsufficiency disrupts this mechanism, thereby likely causing cognitive dysfunction in RTS. PMID:20152182

  16. Erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase activity: genetic analysis in nuclear families with one child affected by Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brahe, C; Serra, A; Morton, N E

    1985-06-01

    Erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was measured in 142 members of 32 nuclear families in which one child had Down syndrome (DS). The mean activity in subjects with trisomy 21 appears higher than in parents and sibs, though not significantly so. However, this fact does not seem to modify the properties expected for a trait genetically controlled in a diploid population. The commingling analysis of the COMT activity in the whole group, and in each subgroup of relatives, suggests a mixture of two or, more likely, three components, the latter being in agreement with a transmission model of genes without dominance. The most parsimonious hypothesis supported by the mixed model segregation analysis is that of an additive major locus (d = 0.5) with an estimated frequency of 0.40 +/- 0.03 for the COMTH gene, to which a small polygenic effect (H = 0.067) can be added. This hypothesis is supported further by the analysis of family resemblance, r = 0.45 +/- 0.12 being the maximum likelihood estimator of the intraclass correlation among sibs. The higher COMT activity in DS subjects may reflect a situation of general enzyme disorder only indirectly connected with trisomy of chromosome 21. PMID:3160238

  17. Activation of NF-κB by nucleocapsid protein of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Fang, Liurong; Jiang, Yunbo; Jin, Hui; Wang, Yanwei; Wang, Dang; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2011-02-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical transcription factor in innate and adaptive immune response as well as cell proliferation and survival. Previous studies have demonstrated that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection activated NF-κB pathways through IκB degradation in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. To evaluate the mechanisms behind this, we investigated the role of PRRSV structural proteins in the regulation of NF-κB. In this study, we screened the structural proteins of PRRSV by NF-κB DNA-binding assay and luciferase activity assay and demonstrated that PRRSV nucleocapsid (N) protein could activate NF-κB in MARC-145 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that the region between aa 30 and 73 of N protein was essential for its function in the activation of NF-κB. These results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular mechanism of PRRSV infection and inflammation response. PMID:21063763

  18. Cytokine release syndrome after blinatumomab treatment related to abnormal macrophage activation and ameliorated with cytokine-directed therapy.

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Rheingold, Susan R; Maude, Shannon L; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Barrett, David M; Seif, Alix E; Nichols, Kim E; Suppa, Erica K; Kalos, Michael; Berg, Robert A; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Aplenc, Richard; Gore, Lia; Grupp, Stephan A

    2013-06-27

    Blinatumomab is a CD19/CD3-bispecific T-cell receptor-engaging (BiTE) antibody with efficacy in refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Some patients treated with blinatumomab and other T cell-activating therapies develop cytokine release syndrome (CRS). We hypothesized that patients with more severe toxicity may experience abnormal macrophage activation triggered by the release of cytokines by T-cell receptor-activated cytotoxic T cells engaged by BiTE antibodies and leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We prospectively monitored a patient during blinatumomab treatment and observed that he developed HLH. He became ill 36 hours into the infusion with fever, respiratory failure, and circulatory collapse. He developed hyperferritinemia, cytopenias, hypofibrinogenemia, and a cytokine profile diagnostic for HLH. The HLH continued to progress after discontinuation of blinatumomab; however, he had rapid improvement after IL-6 receptor-directed therapy with tocilizumab. Patients treated with T cell-activating therapies, including blinatumomab, should be monitored for HLH, and cytokine-directed therapy may be considered in cases of life-threatening CRS. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00103285. PMID:23678006

  19. Comparison of dietary intake and physical activity between women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Annie W; Lujan, Marla E

    2014-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a prevalent endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age worldwide. In addition to deleterious effects on fertility imparted by PCOS, women with PCOS are at increased risk of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression, and certain cancers. Hormonal and metabolic aberrations in PCOS have the potential to influence dietary intake and physical activity levels. There are emerging global data that women with PCOS have different baseline dietary energy intakes compared with women without PCOS. These alterations in diet may exacerbate clinical symptoms and compound risk of chronic disease in patients. Few studies have compared baseline physical activity levels between women with and without PCOS. Although comparisons between studies are confounded by several factors, the data point to no differences in activity levels among PCOS and non-PCOS groups. This review provides an assessment of the current literature on baseline dietary intake and physical activity levels in women with PCOS. Future recommendations to strengthen research in this area are provided, given the implications to aid in the development of effective nutrition-focused interventions for PCOS. PMID:25469380

  20. Sanfilippo D syndrome: Estimation of N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase activity with a radiolabeled monosulfated disaccharide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, C.; Hopwood, J.J.

    1989-02-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase activity was assayed by incubation of the radiolabeled disaccharide O-(a-N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate)-(1----3)-L-(6-/sup 3/H)-idonic acid (GlcNAc6S-IdOA), with homogenates of leucocytes, cultured fibroblasts, and urine from normal individuals, patients affected with N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase-deficiency (Sanfilippo D syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis type IIID), and patients affected with other mucopolysaccharidoses and lysosomal storage disorders. The assay clearly distinguished affected homozygotes from their obligate heterozygotes and normal controls and other lysosomal storage disorders. Sulfatase activity in fibroblasts, leucocytes, and urine toward GlcNAc6S-IdOA exhibited a pH optimum at 4.2, 4.5, and 5.1, respectively. Sulfatase activity in fibroblasts had an apparent Km of 7.2 microM and was significantly inhibited by both sulfate and phosphate ions. The action of fibroblast or leucocyte N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase activity toward GlcNAc6S-IdOA is recommended for the routine enzymatic detection and classification of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIID patients.

  1. Are early onset aging conditions correlated to daily activity functions in youth and adults with Down syndrome?

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Chen, Wen-Xiu; Lin, Fu-Gong; Wu, Jia-Ling; Chu, Cordia

    2014-11-13

    This study aims to answer the research question of "Are early onset aging conditions correlated to daily activity functions in youth and adults with Down syndrome (DS)?" A cross-sectional survey was employed to recruit 216 individuals with DS over 15 years of age in the analyses. A structured questionnaire included demographic data, brief self-reported aging conditions, Dementia Screening Questionnaire for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (DSQIID) and activity of daily living (ADL) scales were completed by the primary caregivers who were well-suited for providing information on the functioning conditions of the DS individuals. Results showed that the most five frequent aging conditions (sometimes, usually and always) included frailty (20.2%), vision problem (15.8%), loss of language ability (15.3%), sleep problem (14.9%) and memory impairment (14.5%). Other onset aging conditions included more chronic diseases (13.9%), hearing loss (13%), chewing ability and tooth loss (12.5%), incontinence (11.1%), depressive syndrome (7.7%), falls and gait disorder (7.2%), loss of taste and smell (7.2%). The data also showed scores of DSQIID, onset aging conditions and ADL has significant relationships each other in Pearson's correlation tests. Finally, multiple linear regression analyses indicated onset aging conditions (β=-0.735, p<0.001) can significantly predicted the variation in ADL scores after adjusting other factors (R(2)=0.381). This study suggests that the authority should initiate early intervention programs aim to improve healthy aging and ADL functions for people with DS. PMID:25462513

  2. High-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization in MAS spectra of membrane and soluble proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Lansing, Jonathan C; Haddad, Kristin C; Bachovchin, William W; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G

    2003-11-12

    One of the principal promises of solid-state NMR (SSNMR) magic angle spinning (MAS) experiments has been the possibility of determining the structures of molecules in states that are not accessible via X-ray or solution NMR experiments-e.g., membrane or amyloid proteins. However, the low sensitivity of SSNMR often restricts structural studies to small-model compounds and precludes many higher-dimensional solid-state MAS experiments on such systems. To address the sensitivity problem, we have developed experiments that utilize dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance sensitivity. In this communication, we report the successful application of MAS DNP to samples of cryoprotected soluble and membrane proteins. In particular, we have observed DNP signal enhancements of up to 50 in 15N MAS spectra of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and alpha-lytic protease (alpha-LP). The spectra were recorded at approximately 90 K where MAS is experimentally straightforward, and the results suggest that the described protocol will be widely applicable. PMID:14599177

  3. The role of angiotensin-(1–7) receptor Mas in spermatogenesis in mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Marcelo C; Pinheiro, Sérgio V B; Ferreira, Anderson J; Santos, Robson A S; Bordoni, Leonardo S; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; França, Luiz R

    2009-01-01

    Evidence regarding the components of the renin–angiotensin (Ang) system suggests that this system plays an important role in male reproduction. However, there are few data available in the literature on the effects of Ang-(1–7) on the male reproductive system. The present study investigated the effects of the genetic deletion and chronic blockage of Ang-(1–7) receptor Mas on spermatogenesis and male fertility. The localization of Mas in mouse and rat testes was determined by binding assays and immunofluorescence, whereas the testis structure and spermatogenic process were morphologically and stereologically analysed by light microscopy. Ang-(1–7) binding and immunofluorescence revealed the presence of Mas in the testes of mice and rats. Although the total numbers of Sertoli and Leydig cells per testis and Leydig cell size were similar in both wild-type and Mas-deficient mice, Mas−/– animals exhibited a significant reduction in testis weight and a greater volume of apoptotic cells, giant cells and vacuoles in the seminiferous epithelium. In both mice and rats, an increased number of apoptotic cells were found during meiosis. Due to disturbed spermatogenesis, daily sperm production was markedly reduced in Mas−/– mice. Moreover, chronic infusion of A-779 [an Ang-(1–7) antagonist] in rats significantly increased the total number of apoptotic cells and primary spermatocytes in particular stages of spermatogenesis. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that Ang-(1–7) receptor Mas plays an important role in the regulation of spermatogenesis. PMID:19438767

  4. A software framework for analysing solid-state MAS NMR data.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Tim J; Fogh, Rasmus H; Boucher, Wayne; Higman, Victoria A; Eisenmenger, Frank; Bardiaux, Benjamin; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Laue, Ernest D

    2011-12-01

    Solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR of proteins has undergone many rapid methodological developments in recent years, enabling detailed studies of protein structure, function and dynamics. Software development, however, has not kept pace with these advances and data analysis is mostly performed using tools developed for solution NMR which do not directly address solid-state specific issues. Here we present additions to the CcpNmr Analysis software package which enable easier identification of spinning side bands, straightforward analysis of double quantum spectra, automatic consideration of non-uniform labelling schemes, as well as extension of other existing features to the needs of solid-state MAS data. To underpin this, we have updated and extended the CCPN data model and experiment descriptions to include transfer types and nomenclature appropriate for solid-state NMR experiments, as well as a set of experiment prototypes covering the experiments commonly employed by solid-sate MAS protein NMR spectroscopists. This work not only improves solid-state MAS NMR data analysis but provides a platform for anyone who uses the CCPN data model for programming, data transfer, or data archival involving solid-state MAS NMR data. PMID:21953355

  5. Recognition of Membrane Sterols by Polyene Antifungals Amphotericin B and Natamycin, A 13C MAS NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Filip; Griffin, David C.; Loraine, Jessica; Rittig, Michael; Delves-Broughton, Joss; Bonev, Boyan B.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular action of polyene macrolides with antifungal activity, amphotericin B and natamycin, involves recognition of sterols in membranes. Physicochemical and functional studies have contributed details to understanding the interactions between amphotericin B and ergosterol and, to a lesser extent, with cholesterol. Fewer molecular details are available on interactions between natamycin with sterols. We use solid state 13C MAS NMR to characterize the impact of amphotericin B and natamycin on mixed lipid membranes of DOPC/cholesterol or DOPC/ergosterol. In cholesterol-containing membranes, amphotericin B addition resulted in marked increase in both DOPC and cholesterol 13C MAS NMR linewidth, reflecting membrane insertion and cooperative perturbation of the bilayer. By contrast, natamycin affects little either DOPC or cholesterol linewidth but attenuates cholesterol resonance intensity preferentially for sterol core with lesser impact on the chain. Ergosterol resonances, attenuated by amphotericin B, reveal specific interactions in the sterol core and chain base. Natamycin addition selectively augmented ergosterol resonances from sterol core ring one and, at the same time, from the end of the chain. This puts forward an interaction model similar to the head-to-tail model for amphotericin B/ergosterol pairing but with docking on opposite sterol faces. Low toxicity of natamycin is attributed to selective, non-cooperative sterol engagement compared to cooperative membrane perturbation by amphotericin B. PMID:27379235

  6. Cloud and aerosol studies using combined CPL and MAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark A.; Rodier, Sharon; Hu, Yongxiang; McGill, Matthew J.; Holz, Robert E.

    2004-11-01

    Current uncertainties in the role of aerosols and clouds in the Earth's climate system limit our abilities to model the climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties of adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. The A-train satellites (Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat, PARASOL, and Aura) will provide an unprecedented opportunity to address these uncertainties. The various active and passive sensors of the A-train will use a variety of measurement techniques to provide comprehensive observations of the multi-dimensional properties of clouds and aerosols. However, to fully achieve the potential of this ensemble requires a robust data analysis framework to optimally and efficiently map these individual measurements into a comprehensive set of cloud and aerosol physical properties. In this work we introduce the Multi-Instrument Data Analysis and Synthesis (MIDAS) project, whose goal is to develop a suite of physically sound and computationally efficient algorithms that will combine active and passive remote sensing data in order to produce improved assessments of aerosol and cloud radiative and microphysical properties. These algorithms include (a) the development of an intelligent feature detection algorithm that combines inputs from both active and passive sensors, and (b) identifying recognizable multi-instrument signatures related to aerosol and cloud type derived from clusters of image pixels and the associated vertical profile information. Classification of these signatures will lead to the automated identification of aerosol and cloud types. Testing of these new algorithms is done using currently existing and readily available active and passive measurements from the Cloud Physics Lidar and the MODIS Airborne Simulator, which simulate, respectively, the CALIPSO and MODIS A-train instruments.

  7. Associations between Objectively Measured Physical Activity, Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Risk Factors for Metabolic Syndrome in 12- to 15-Year-Old Tianjin City Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Sijie; Wang, Jianxiong; Zhang, Yibing; Zhang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study aim was to explore associations between daily physical activity level, cardiorespiratory fitness and metabolic syndrome among Chinese children. Design: We conducted a school-based, cross-sectional study. Setting: Participants including 112 boys and 121 girls were recruited from three schools in the urban suburbs of Tianjin…

  8. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed. PMID:21462966

  9. Activation of the mTOR pathway by the amino acid (L)-leucine in the 5q- syndrome and other ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    Boultwood, Jacqueline; Yip, Bon Ham; Vuppusetty, Chaitanya; Pellagatti, Andrea; Wainscoat, James S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with the 5q- syndrome and Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) suffer from a severe macrocytic anemia. The 5q- syndrome and DBA are disorders of aberrant ribosome biogenesis (ribosomopathies) and haploinsufficiency of the ribosomal protein genes RPS14 and RPS19, respectively, underlies the anemia found in these disorders. Erythroblasts obtained from patients with the 5q- syndrome and DBA show impaired mRNA translation and this defect in translation may represent a potential therapeutic target in these ribosomopathies. There are some indications that the amino acid l-leucine, a translation enhancer, may have some efficacy in this group of disorders. Recent studies have shown that l-leucine treatment of zebrafish and murine models of the 5q- syndrome and DBA results in a marked improvement in the anemia. l-leucine treatment of RPS14-deficient and RPS19-deficient erythroblasts and erythroblasts from patients with the 5q- syndrome has been shown to result in an increase in cell proliferation, erythroid differentiation and mRNA translation in culture. l-leucine has been shown to improve hemoglobin levels and transfusion independence in a patient with DBA. l-leucine activates the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling pathway that controls cell growth and mRNA translation. There is evidence to suggest that the promotion of translation via the mTOR pathway by l-leucine is the mechanism that underlies the enhanced erythroid progenitor cell growth and differentiation observed in animal and cellular models of the 5q- syndrome and DBA treated with this amino acid. These data support the rationale for clinical trials of l-leucine as a therapeutic agent for the 5q- syndrome and DBA. PMID:23031788

  10. Line shapes in CP/MAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shigenobu; Hayamizu, Kikuko

    1993-02-01

    Cross polarization (CP) from 1H to quadrupolar nuclei with S = 3/2 has been carried out under magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions for powder samples of Na 2B 4O 7·10H 2O and H 3BO 3. The line shapes in the CP/MAS NMR spectra are different from those in the spectra measured with the single pulse sequence combined with 1H dipolar decoupling. Furthermore, the line shapes are found to be dependent on the measuring conditions such as the pulse amplitude for the quadrupolar nuclei. The spin-locking experiments demonstrate that line shapes in CP/MAS NMR spectra are largely dependent on the spin-locking efficiency.

  11. Technology Enhanced Learning for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Cerebral Paralysis: The MAS Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomo-Palacios, Ricardo; Paniagua-Martín, Fernando; García-Crespo, Ángel; Ruiz-Mezcua, Belén

    Education for students with disabilities now takes place in a wide range of settings, thus, including a wider range of assistive tools. As a result of this, one of the most interesting application domains of technology enhanced learning is related to the adoption of learning technologies and designs for people with disabilities. Following this unstoppable trend, this paper presents MAS, a software platform aimed to help people with severe intellectual disabilities and cerebral paralysis in their learning processes. MAS, as a technology enhanced learning platform, provides several tools that supports learning and monitoring for people with special needs, including adaptative games, data processing and monitoring tools. Installed in a special needs education institution in Madrid, Spain, MAS provides special educators with a tool that improved students education processes.

  12. Effects of white spot syndrome virus infection on immuno-enzyme activities and ultrastructure in gills of Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Li; Zuo, Di; Wang, Lan-Mei; Sun, Ting; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Yun-Long

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we explored the pathogenic mechanism of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, by investigating activities of enzymes related to innate immune function during infection. After 6-12 h of exposure to WSSV, the activities of four enzymes, phenoloxidase (PO), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lysozyme (LSZ), increased in the gills of C. quadricarinatus but then sharply decreased during longer infection times. Except for PO, the activities of other enzymes in the WSSV-infected crayfish (Group II) were significantly lower than those of the controls at 72 h post-exposure (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the enzyme activities in the group treated with polysaccharides before challenge with WSSV (Group III) were higher than those in Group II. This phenomenon demonstrated that the polysaccharides could improve the immuno-enzyme activities and enhance the organism's antiviral defenses. Morphological examination by transmission electron microscopy revealed abundant WSSV particles and significant damage in the gills of infected crayfish. WSSV infection caused parts of the gill epithelium and microvilli to be reduced in number and size or damaged; meanwhile, the mitochondria morphology changed, with parts of the cristae diminished leaving large vacuoles. Moreover, electron dense deposits appeared and heterochromatinized nuclei could be seen in blood cells with ruptured nuclear membranes and outflow of nucleoplasm. The findings of this study furthers our understanding of the biochemical alterations induced by viral infections, including changes in the antioxidant status, oxidative stress and lysozyme activity, which could help to advance strategies for control of WSSV in crayfish. PMID:22281607

  13. Lower Pre-Treatment T Cell Activation in Early- and Late-Onset Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goovaerts, Odin; Jennes, Wim; Massinga-Loembé, Marguerite; Ondoa, Pascale; Ceulemans, Ann; Vereecken, Chris; Worodria, William; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Colebunders, Robert; Kestens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) is an inflammatory complication in HIV-TB co-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). The role of disturbed T cell reconstitution in TB-IRIS is not well understood. We investigated T cell activation and maturation profiles in patients who developed TB-IRIS at different intervals during ART. Methods Twenty-two HIV-TB patients who developed early-onset TB-IRIS and 10 who developed late-onset TB-IRIS were matched for age, sex and CD4 count to equal numbers of HIV-TB patients who did not develop TB-IRIS. Flow cytometry analysis was performed on fresh blood, drawn before and after ART initiation and during TB-IRIS events. T cell activation and maturation was measured on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells using CD45RO, CD38, HLA-DR, CCR7 and CD27 antibodies. Results CD8+ T cell activation before ART was decreased in both early-onset (77% vs. 82%, p = 0.014) and late-onset (71% vs. 83%, p = 0.012) TB-IRIS patients compared to non-IRIS controls. After ART initiation, the observed differences in T cell activation disappeared. During late-onset, but not early-onset TB-IRIS, we observed a skewing from memory to terminal effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations (p≤0.028). Conclusion Our data provide evidence of reduced CD8+ T cell activation before ART as a common predisposing factor of early- and late-onset TB-IRIS. The occurrence of TB-IRIS itself was not marked by an over-activated CD8+ T cell compartment. Late- but not early-onset TB-IRIS was characterized by a more terminally differentiated T cell phenotype. PMID:26208109

  14. Deletion of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marisa A P; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K S; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Worth, Austen J; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P A; Snapper, Scott B; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C I; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O; Forsell, Mattias N E; Thrasher, Adrian J; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8(+) T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8(+) T cells at the expense of CD4(+) T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells. PMID:27425374

  15. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder. PMID:25848016

  16. Differential regulation of proinflammatory mediators following LPS- and ATP-induced activation of monocytes from patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Anush; Petrek, Martin; Navratilova, Zdenka; Blbulyan, Armen; Boyajyan, Anna; Manukyan, Gayane

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in association with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Growing evidence supports the involvement of monocytes in APS pathogenesis. Inflammatory activation of monocytes promotes thrombus formation and other APS complications. However, mechanisms underlying their activation are poorly investigated. We aimed to determine transcriptional activity of monocytes after exposing them to low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPS + adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using comparative qRT-PCR. The results showed that LPS significantly increased transcriptional levels of TLR2, IL-23, CCL2, CXCL10, IL-1β, and IL-6 in APS cells, while, in cells from healthy donors, LPS resulted in IL-6 and STAT3 elevated mRNAs. Double stimulation of the cells resulted in decreased mRNA levels of NLRP3 in monocytes isolated from healthy donors and CCL2, IL-1β in APS cells. By contrast, TLR2 mRNAs were elevated in both investigated groups after culture of the cells with LPS + ATP. Thus, the findings indicate increased sensitivity of APS cells to LPS that may contribute to thrombus formation and enhance development or progression of autoimmune processes. Low concentrations of ATP diminish LPS-induced inflammatory state of APS monocytes which might be a potential mechanism which regulates inflammatory state of the cells. PMID:25785264

  17. Deletion of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K. S.; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Worth, Austen J.; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P. A.; Snapper, Scott B.; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C. I.; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O.; Forsell, Mattias N. E.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8+ T cells at the expense of CD4+ T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells. PMID:27425374

  18. The role of opioid antagonist efficacy and constitutive opioid receptor activity in the opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Navani, Dipesh M; Sirohi, Sunil; Madia, Priyanka A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2011-10-01

    On the basis of efficacy, opioid antagonists are classified as inverse opioid agonists (e.g. naltrexone) or neutral opioid antagonists (e.g. 6β-naltrexol). This study examined the interaction between naltrexone and 6β-naltrexol in the precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome in morphine dependent mice. Furthermore, the possible contribution of constitutive opioid receptor activity to precipitated withdrawal was evaluated using increasing levels of morphine dependence. In the first experiment, low doses of 6β-naltrexol antagonized naltrexone precipitated withdrawal while high doses acted additively. All doses of naltrexone increased 6β-naltrexol's potency to precipitate withdrawal. The next experiment examined changes in antagonist potency to precipitate withdrawal with increasing morphine dependence. Mice were exposed to morphine for 1-6 days and then withdrawal was precipitated. Naltrexone was more potent than 6β-naltrexol at all the time points. The ED(50) of both drugs decreased at the same rate suggesting that increased dependence produced no change in constitutive opioid receptor activity. Taken together these results indicate that the functional efficacy of 6β-naltrexol is dose-dependent and that constitutive opioid receptor activity did not change as opioid dependence increased from 1 to 6 days. PMID:21736895

  19. Differential Regulation of Proinflammatory Mediators following LPS- and ATP-Induced Activation of Monocytes from Patients with Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Anush; Petrek, Martin; Navratilova, Zdenka; Blbulyan, Armen; Boyajyan, Anna; Manukyan, Gayane

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in association with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Growing evidence supports the involvement of monocytes in APS pathogenesis. Inflammatory activation of monocytes promotes thrombus formation and other APS complications. However, mechanisms underlying their activation are poorly investigated. We aimed to determine transcriptional activity of monocytes after exposing them to low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPS + adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using comparative qRT-PCR. The results showed that LPS significantly increased transcriptional levels of TLR2, IL-23, CCL2, CXCL10, IL-1β, and IL-6 in APS cells, while, in cells from healthy donors, LPS resulted in IL-6 and STAT3 elevated mRNAs. Double stimulation of the cells resulted in decreased mRNA levels of NLRP3 in monocytes isolated from healthy donors and CCL2, IL-1β in APS cells. By contrast, TLR2 mRNAs were elevated in both investigated groups after culture of the cells with LPS + ATP. Thus, the findings indicate increased sensitivity of APS cells to LPS that may contribute to thrombus formation and enhance development or progression of autoimmune processes. Low concentrations of ATP diminish LPS-induced inflammatory state of APS monocytes which might be a potential mechanism which regulates inflammatory state of the cells. PMID:25785264

  20. Neural Activation During Mental Rotation in Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: The Influence of Sex Hormones and Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    van Hemmen, Judy; Veltman, Dick J; Hoekzema, Elseline; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Dessens, Arianne B; Bakker, Julie

    2016-03-01

    Sex hormones, androgens in particular, are hypothesized to play a key role in the sexual differentiation of the human brain. However, possible direct effects of the sex chromosomes, that is, XX or XY, have not been well studied in humans. Individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), who have a 46,XY karyotype but a female phenotype due to a complete androgen resistance, enable us to study the separate effects of gonadal hormones versus sex chromosomes on neural sex differences. Therefore, in the present study, we compared 46,XY men (n = 30) and 46,XX women (n = 29) to 46,XY individuals with CAIS (n = 21) on a mental rotation task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Previously reported sex differences in neural activation during mental rotation were replicated in the control groups, with control men showing more activation in the inferior parietal lobe than control women. Individuals with CAIS showed a female-like neural activation pattern in the parietal lobe, indicating feminization of the brain in CAIS. Furthermore, this first neuroimaging study in individuals with CAIS provides evidence that sex differences in regional brain function during mental rotation are most likely not directly driven by genetic sex, but rather reflect gonadal hormone exposure. PMID:25452569

  1. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy. PMID:26971503

  2. EBV reactivation serological profile in primary Sjögren's syndrome: an underlying trigger of active articular involvement?

    PubMed

    Pasoto, Sandra Gofinet; Natalino, Renato Romera; Chakkour, Henrique Pires; Viana, Vilma Dos Santos Trindade; Bueno, Cleonice; Leon, Elaine Pires; Vendramini, Margarete Borges Gualhardo; Neto, Mauricio Levy; Bonfa, Eloisa

    2013-05-01

    Antibody to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early antigen diffuse (anti-EA-D) is associated with viral replication. However, their possible associations with clinical/therapeutic features in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) were not established. We evaluated 100 pSS patients (American-European Criteria) and 89 age/gender/ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Disease activity was measured by EULAR Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI). Antibodies to EBV (anti-VCA IgG/IgM, anti-EBNA-1 IgG, anti-EA-D IgG) were determined by ELISA. Patients and controls had comparable frequencies and mean levels of anti-VCA IgG (90 vs. 86.5 %, p = 0.501; 2.6 ± 1.1 vs. 2.5 ± 1.1 AU/mL, p = 0.737) and anti-EBNA-1 IgG (92 vs. 94.4 %, p = 0.576; 141.3 ± 69.8 vs. 135.6 ± 67.5 RU/mL, p = 0.464). Anti-VCA IgM was negative in all cases. Noteworthy, higher frequency and increased mean levels of anti-EA-D were observed in patients than controls (36 vs. 4.5 %, p < 0.0001; 38.6 ± 57.4 vs. 7.9 ± 26.3 RU/mL, p < 0.0001). Further analysis of patients with (n = 36) and without (n = 64) anti-EA-D revealed comparable age/gender/ethnicity (p ≥ 0.551), current prednisone dose (4.8 ± 6.9 vs. 5.1 ± 10.4 mg/day, p = 0.319), and current uses of prednisone (52.8 vs. 37.5 %, p = 0.148) and immunosuppressants (44.4 vs. 31.3 %, p = 0.201). ESSDAI values were comparable (p = 0.102), but joint activity was more frequent (25 vs. 9.4 %, p = 0.045) in anti-EA-D positive patients. Anti-EA-D antibodies were not associated with anti-Ro/SSA (p = 1.000), anti-La/SSB (p = 0.652), rheumatoid factor (p = 1.000), anti-α-fodrin (p = 0.390) or antiphospholipid antibodies (p = 0.573), not suggesting cross-reactivity. The higher anti-EA-D frequency associated with joint activity raises the possibility that a subclinical EBV reactivation may trigger or perpetuate the articular involvement in pSS. PMID:22955798

  3. Reduced thrombosis in Klkb1−/− mice is mediated by increased Mas receptor, prostacyclin, Sirt1, and KLF4 and decreased tissue factor

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, Evi X.; Fang, Chao; Merkulova, Alona; Alhalabi, Omar; Grobe, Nadja; Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanism for reduced thrombosis in prekallikrein null mice (Klkb1−/−) is unknown. Klkb1−/− mice have delayed carotid artery occlusion times on the rose bengal and ferric chloride thrombosis models. Klkb1−/− plasmas have long-activated partial thromboplastin times and defective contact activation–induced thrombin generation that partially corrects upon prolonged incubation. However, in contact activation–induced pulmonary thromboembolism by collagen/epinephrine or long-chain polyphosphate, Klkb1−/− mice, unlike F12−/− mice, do not have survival advantage. Klkb1−/− mice have reduced plasma BK levels and renal B2R mRNA. They also have increased expression of the renal receptor Mas and plasma prostacyclin. Increased prostacyclin is associated with elevated aortic vasculoprotective transcription factors Sirt1 and KLF4. Treatment of Klkb1−/− mice with the Mas antagonist A-779, COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide, or Sirt1 inhibitor splitomicin lowers plasma prostacyclin and normalizes arterial thrombosis times. Treatment of normal mice with the Mas agonist AVE0991 reduces thrombosis. Klkb1−/− mice have reduced aortic tissue factor (TF) mRNA, antigen, and activity. In sum, Klkb1−/− mice have a novel mechanism for thrombosis protection in addition to reduced contact activation. This pathway arises when bradykinin delivery to vasculature is compromised and mediated by increased receptor Mas, prostacyclin, Sirt1, and KLF4, leading to reduced vascular TF. PMID:25339356

  4. 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra of mullites from different kaolinites.

    PubMed

    He, Hongping; Guo, Jiugao; Zhu, Jianxi; Yuan, Peng; Hu, Cheng

    2004-04-01

    Mullites synthesized from four kaolinites with different random defect densities have been studied by 27Al and 29Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). All these mullites show the same XRD pattern. However, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra reveal that the mullites derived from kaolinites with high defect densities, have a sillimanite-type Al/Si ordering scheme and are low in silica, whereas those mullites derived from kaolinites with low defect densities, consist of both sillimanite- and mullite-type Al/Si ordering schemes and are rich in silica. PMID:15084323

  5. Activating Mutations Affecting the Dbl Homology Domain of SOS2 Cause Noonan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cordeddu, Viviana; Yin, Jiani C; Gunnarsson, Cecilia; Virtanen, Carl; Drunat, Séverine; Lepri, Francesca; De Luca, Alessandro; Rossi, Cesare; Ciolfi, Andrea; Pugh, Trevor J; Bruselles, Alessandro; Priest, James R; Pennacchio, Len A; Lu, Zhibin; Danesh, Arnavaz; Quevedo, Rene; Hamid, Alaa; Martinelli, Simone; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Gnazzo, Maria; Daniele, Paola; Lissewski, Christina; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Odent, Sylvie; Philip, Nicole; Faivre, Laurence; Vlckova, Marketa; Seemanova, Eva; Digilio, Cristina; Zenker, Martin; Zampino, Giuseppe; Verloes, Alain; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Roberts, Amy E; Cavé, Hélène; Gelb, Bruce D; Neel, Benjamin G; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The RASopathies constitute a family of autosomal-dominant disorders whose major features include facial dysmorphism, cardiac defects, reduced postnatal growth, variable cognitive deficits, ectodermal and skeletal anomalies, and susceptibility to certain malignancies. Noonan syndrome (NS), the commonest RASopathy, is genetically heterogeneous and caused by functional dysregulation of signal transducers and regulatory proteins with roles in the RAS/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction pathway. Mutations in known disease genes account for approximately 80% of affected individuals. Here, we report that missense mutations altering Son of Sevenless, Drosophila, homolog 2 (SOS2), which encodes a RAS guanine nucleotide exchange factor, occur in a small percentage of subjects with NS. Four missense mutations were identified in five unrelated sporadic cases and families transmitting NS. Disease-causing mutations affected three conserved residues located in the Dbl homology (DH) domain, of which two are directly involved in the intramolecular binding network maintaining SOS2 in its autoinhibited conformation. All mutations were found to promote enhanced signaling from RAS to ERK. Similar to NS-causing SOS1 mutations, the phenotype associated with SOS2 defects is characterized by normal development and growth, as well as marked ectodermal involvement. Unlike SOS1 mutations, however, those in SOS2 are restricted to the DH domain. PMID:26173643

  6. Recombinase Activating Gene 1 Deficiencies Without Omenn Syndrome May Also Present With Eosinophilia and Bone Marrow Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ulusoy, Ezgi; Karaca, Neslihan Edeer; Azarsiz, Elif; Berdeli, Afig; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndromes are a heterogenous group of diseases characterized by impairment in both cellular and humoral immunity with a range of genetic disorders. Complete recombinase activating gene (RAG) deficiency is associated with classical T-B-NK+ SCID which is the most common phenotype of Turkish SCID patients. There is a broad spectrum of hypomorfic RAG mutations including Omenn syndrome, leaky or atypical SCID with expansion of γδ T cells, autoimmunity and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections. Methods Twenty-one (44%) patients had RAG1 deficiency of all 44 SCID patients followed up by pediatric immunology department. A retrospective analysis was conducted on the medical records of all SCID patients with RAG1 deficiency. Results Eight patients were classified as T-B-NK+ SCID, five patients as T+B-NK+ SCID (three of these were Omenn phenotype), and eight patients as T+B+NK+ SCID phenotype. Mean age of the whole study group, mean age at onset of symptoms and mean age at diagnosis were 87.7 ± 73.8 (12 - 256), 4.4 ± 8.2 (1 - 36) and 29.1 ± 56.8 (1 - 244) months, respectively. Consanguinity was present in 11 (52%) of 21 patients. Autoimmunity was found in six patients (28%). Ten patients (47%) had CMV infection, four (19%) had Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections and three (14%) had Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) infections. Seven patients who had refractory cytopenia (two pancytopenia and five bicytopenia) underwent bone marrow biopsy, three of whom had bone marrow fibrosis. Future evaluations must be considered about bone marrow fibrosis in RAG1 deficiency patients. Eosinophilia was observed in 10 patients, seven of whom did not have Omenn phenotype. Conclusion Non-Omenn phenotype RAG1 deficiencies can also present with eosinophilia. This report is presented to emphasize that RAG1 mutations may lead to diverse clinical phenotypes. PMID:27081423

  7. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  8. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is a rare condition caused by missing a copy of several genes. Parents may not have ... history of the condition. However, a person with Williams syndrome has a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  9. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  10. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Familial Idiopathic Basal Ganglia ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fahr's Syndrome? Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, ...

  11. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing disease Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor Diabetes Ectopic Cushing syndrome Exogenous Cushing syndrome Kidney stones Pituitary tumor Rheumatoid arthritis Tumor Update Date 10/28/2015 Updated by: ...

  12. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  13. A specific phospholipase C activity regulates phosphatidylinositol levels in lung surfactant of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spyridakis, Spyros; Leondaritis, George; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2010-03-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a lipid-rich material lining the inside of the lungs. It reduces surface tension at the liquid/air interface and thus, it confers protection of the alveoli from collapsing. The surface-active component of LS is dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, while anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and primarily phosphatidylglycerol are involved in the stabilization of the LS monolayer. The exact role of PtdIns in this system is not well-understood; however, PtdIns levels change dramatically during the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution. In this report we present evidence of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, which may regulate PtdIns levels. Characterization of this extracellular activity showed specificity for PtdIns and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, sharing the typical substrate concentration-, pH-, and calcium-dependencies with mammalian PI-PLCs. Fractionation of BAL fluid showed that PI-PLC did not co-fractionate with large surfactant aggregates, but it was found mainly in the soluble fraction. Importantly, analysis of BAL samples from control subjects and from patients with ARDS showed that the PI-PLC specific activity was decreased by 4-fold in ARDS samples concurrently with the increase in BAL PtdIns levels. Thus, we have identified for the first time an extracellular PI-PLC enzyme activity that may be acutely involved in the regulation of PtdIns levels in LS. PMID:19491339

  14. Evidence for Increased 5α-Reductase Activity During Early Childhood in Daughters of Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torchen, Laura C.; Idkowiak, Jan; Fogel, Naomi R.; O'Neil, Donna M.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Arlt, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heritable, complex genetic disease. Animal models suggest that androgen exposure at critical developmental stages contributes to disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation resulting in increased androgen production produces the phenotypic features of PCOS by programming during critical developmental periods. Although we have not found evidence for increased in utero androgen levels in cord blood in the daughters of women with PCOS (PCOS-d), target tissue androgen production may be amplified by increased 5α-reductase activity analogous to findings in adult affected women. It is possible to noninvasively test this hypothesis by examining urinary steroid metabolites. Objective: We performed this study to investigate whether PCOS-d have altered androgen metabolism during early childhood. Design, Setting, and Participants: Twenty-one PCOS-d, 1–3 years old, and 36 control girls of comparable age were studied at an academic medical center. Main Outcome Measures: Urinary steroid metabolites were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-four hour steroid excretion rates and precursor to product ratios suggestive of 5α-reductase and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were calculated. Results: Age did not differ but weight for length Z-scores were higher in PCOS-d compared to control girls (P = .02). PCOS-d had increased 5α-tetrahydrocortisol:tetrahydrocortisol ratios (P = .04), suggesting increased global 5α-reductase activity. There was no evidence for differences in 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity. Steroid metabolite excretion was not correlated with weight. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that differences in androgen metabolism are present in early childhood in PCOS-d. Increased 5α-reductase activity could contribute to the development of PCOS by amplifying target tissue androgen action. PMID:26990942

  15. The effect of solar-geomagnetic activity during and after admission on survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Milvidaite, Irena; Kubilius, Raimondas; Stasionyte, Jolanta

    2014-08-01

    A number of studies have established the effects of solar-geomagnetic activity on the human cardio-vascular system. It is plausible that the heliophysical conditions existing during and after hospital admission may affect survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We analyzed data from 1,413 ACS patients who were admitted to the Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine, Lithuania, and who survived for more than 4 days. We evaluated the associations between active-stormy geomagnetic activity (GMA), solar proton events (SPE), and solar flares (SF) that occurred 0-3 days before and after admission, and 2-year survival, based on Cox's proportional-hazards model, controlling for clinical data. After adjustment for clinical variables, active-stormy GMA on the 2nd day after admission was associated with an increased (by 1.58 times) hazard ratio (HR) of cardiovascular death (HR = 1.58, 95 % CI 1.07-2.32). For women, geomagnetic storm (GS) 2 days after SPE occurred 1 day after admission increased the HR by 3.91 times (HR = 3.91, 95 % CI 1.31-11.7); active-stormy GMA during the 2nd-3rd day after admission increased the HR by over 2.5 times (HR = 2.66, 95 % CI 1.40-5.03). In patients aged over 70 years, GS occurring 1 day before or 2 days after admission, increased the HR by 2.5 times, compared to quiet days; GS in conjunction with SF on the previous day, nearly tripled the HR (HR = 3.08, 95 % CI 1.32-7.20). These findings suggest that the heliophysical conditions before or after the admission affect the hazard ratio of lethal outcome; adjusting for clinical variables, these effects were stronger for women and older patients.

  16. The effect of solar-geomagnetic activity during and after admission on survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Milvidaite, Irena; Kubilius, Raimondas; Stasionyte, Jolanta

    2014-08-01

    A number of studies have established the effects of solar-geomagnetic activity on the human cardio-vascular system. It is plausible that the heliophysical conditions existing during and after hospital admission may affect survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We analyzed data from 1,413 ACS patients who were admitted to the Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine, Lithuania, and who survived for more than 4 days. We evaluated the associations between active-stormy geomagnetic activity (GMA), solar proton events (SPE), and solar flares (SF) that occurred 0-3 days before and after admission, and 2-year survival, based on Cox's proportional-hazards model, controlling for clinical data. After adjustment for clinical variables, active-stormy GMA on the 2nd day after admission was associated with an increased (by 1.58 times) hazard ratio (HR) of cardiovascular death (HR=1.58, 95 % CI 1.07-2.32). For women, geomagnetic storm (GS) 2 days after SPE occurred 1 day after admission increased the HR by 3.91 times (HR=3.91, 95 % CI 1.31-11.7); active-stormy GMA during the 2nd-3rd day after admission increased the HR by over 2.5 times (HR=2.66, 95 % CI 1.40-5.03). In patients aged over 70 years, GS occurring 1 day before or 2 days after admission, increased the HR by 2.5 times, compared to quiet days; GS in conjunction with SF on the previous day, nearly tripled the HR (HR=3.08, 95 % CI 1.32-7.20). These findings suggest that the heliophysical conditions before or after the admission affect the hazard ratio of lethal outcome; adjusting for clinical variables, these effects were stronger for women and older patients. PMID:24018849

  17. Unmasking Diogenes Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Kashinath; Gopinath, Hima; Kini, Hema; Kumar, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Diogenes syndrome is characterized by extreme self-neglect, social withdrawal, and poor personal and domestic hygiene. We report a case of Diogenes syndrome presenting with dermatitis passivata. An unusual "mask" of dirt resembling a carapace, onset of neglect after awareness of a breast lump and resumption of personal grooming and social activities after removal of the lump and counseling were seen. PMID:26120158

  18. Activation of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Decreases On-site Mortality in Crush Syndrome through Insulin Signaling-Na/K-ATPase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bo-Shi; Zhang, En-Hui; Wu, Miao; Guo, Jin-Min; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia; Yu, Jian-Guang

    2016-01-01

    On-site mortality in crush syndrome remains high due to lack of effective drugs based on definite diagnosis. Anisodamine (Ani) is widely used in China for treatment of shock, and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) mediates such antishock effect. The present work was designed to test whether activation of α7nAChR with Ani decreased mortality in crush syndrome shortly after decompression. Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice with crush syndrome were injected with Ani (20 mg/kg and 28 mg/kg respectively, i.p.) 30 min before decompression. Survival time, serum potassium, insulin, and glucose levels were observed shortly after decompression. Involvement of α7nAChR was verified with methyllycaconitine (selective α7nAChR antagonist) and PNU282987 (selective α7nAChR agonist), or in α7nAChR knockout mice. Effect of Ani was also appraised in C2C12 myotubes. Ani reduced mortality and serum potassium and enhanced insulin sensitivity shortly after decompression in animals with crush syndrome, and PNU282987 exerted similar effects. Such effects were counteracted by methyllycaconitine or in α7nAChR knockout mice. Mortality and serum potassium in rats with hyperkalemia were also reduced by Ani. Phosphorylation of Na/K-ATPase was enhanced by Ani in C2C12 myotubes. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase on insulin receptor, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and Na/K-ATPase counteracted the effect of Ani on extracellular potassium. These findings demonstrated that activation of α7nAChR could decrease on-site mortality in crush syndrome, at least in part based on the decline of serum potassium through insulin signaling-Na/K-ATPase pathway. PMID:27065867

  19. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets. PMID:25702767

  20. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome as a Reason for Active Management of Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiang; Wei, Yong-Xiang; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) constitutes an independent factor for high warfarin dose for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the 6-month anticoagulation treatment by warfarin is enough for patients with PE complicated by OSAHS. Methods: We investigated 97 PE patients, 32 of them had OSAHS and 65 non-OSAHS. Warfarin was administered for 6-month if no abnormal circumstances occurred. All patients were followed up for 18 months. Adverse events (AE) included death, major bleeding, hospitalization due to heart failure or pulmonary hypertension, and recurrence or aggravation of PE (including deep vein thrombosis). Recurrence rate of PE after warfarin cessation was compared between the two groups. Results: OSAHS patients required a significantly higher dose of warfarin than their non-OSAHS counterparts (4.73 mg vs. 3.61 mg, P < 0.001). During warfarin treatment, no major bleeding and aggravation of PE occurred among OSAHS patients, and the rates of various AE were not significantly different between the OSAHS and non-OSAHS groups. PE recurrence was higher in OSAHS than non-OSAHS groups after withdrawal of warfarin (21.43% vs. 6.78%, P = 0.047). Compared with non-OSAHS patients, OSAHS group had lower international normalized ratio (INR) value but higher plasminogen on baseline and INR resumed to a relatively low level after warfarin discontinuation. Conclusions: OSAHS patients may present with hypercoagulation and relatively high-risk of recurrence of PE after cessation of 6-month warfarin treatment. PMID:26265606

  1. Heterozygous Mutations in MAP3K7, Encoding TGF-β-Activated Kinase 1, Cause Cardiospondylocarpofacial Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Carine; Rogers, Curtis; Le Goff, Wilfried; Pinto, Graziella; Bonnet, Damien; Chrabieh, Maya; Alibeu, Olivier; Nistchke, Patrick; Munnich, Arnold; Picard, Capucine; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2016-08-01

    Cardiospondylocarpofacial (CSCF) syndrome is characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, brachydactyly with carpal-tarsal fusion and extensive posterior cervical vertebral synostosis, cardiac septal defects with valve dysplasia, and deafness with inner ear malformations. Whole-exome sequencing identified heterozygous MAP3K7 mutations in six distinct CSCF-affected individuals from four families and ranging in age from 5 to 37 years. MAP3K7 encodes transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which is involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 signaling pathway. MAPK-p38 signaling was markedly altered when expression of non-canonical TGF-β-driven target genes was impaired. These findings support the loss of transcriptional control of the TGF-β-MAPK-p38 pathway in fibroblasts obtained from affected individuals. Surprisingly, although TAK1 is located at the crossroad of inflammation, immunity, and cancer, this study reports MAP3K7 mutations in a developmental disorder affecting mainly cartilage, bone, and heart. PMID:27426734

  2. Shiga Toxin Promotes Podocyte Injury in Experimental Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome via Activation of the Alternative Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Monica; Buelli, Simona; Pezzotta, Anna; Corna, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Conti, Debora; Thurman, Joshua M.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)–producing Escherichia coli is the offending agent of postdiarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disorder of glomerular ischemic damage and widespread microvascular thrombosis. We previously documented that Stx induces glomerular complement activation, generating C3a responsible for microvascular thrombosis in experimental HUS. Here, we show that the presence of C3 deposits on podocytes is associated with podocyte damage and loss in HUS mice generated by the coinjection of Stx2 and LPS. Because podocyte adhesion to the glomerular basement membrane is mediated by integrins, the relevance of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signals in podocyte dysfunction was evaluated. Podocyte expression of ILK increased after the injection of Stx2/LPS and preceded the upregulation of Snail and downregulation of nephrin and α-actinin-4. Factor B deficiency or pretreatment with an inhibitory antibody to factor B protected mice against Stx2/LPS-induced podocyte dysregulation. Similarly, pretreatment with a C3a receptor antagonist limited podocyte loss and changes in ILK, Snail, and α-actinin-4 expression. In cultured podocytes, treatment with C3a reduced α-actinin-4 expression and promoted ILK-dependent nuclear expression of Snail and cell motility. These results suggest that Stx-induced activation of the alternative pathway of complement and generation of C3a promotes ILK signaling, leading to podocyte dysfunction and loss in Stx-HUS. PMID:24578132

  3. Proteolytic activation cascade of the Netherton syndrome-defective protein, LEKTI, in the epidermis: implications for skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fortugno, Paola; Bresciani, Alberto; Paolini, Chantal; Pazzagli, Chiara; El Hachem, May; D'Alessio, Marina; Zambruno, Giovanna

    2011-11-01

    Lympho-epithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI) is the defective protein of the ichthyosiform condition Netherton syndrome (NS). Strongly expressed in the most differentiated epidermal layers, LEKTI is a serine protease inhibitor synthesized as three different high-molecular-weight precursors, which are rapidly processed into shorter fragments and secreted extracellularly. LEKTI polypeptides interact with several proteases to regulate skin barrier homeostasis as well as inflammatory and/or immunoallergic responses. Here, by combining antibody mapping, N-terminal sequencing, and site-specific mutagenesis, we defined the amino-acid sequence of most of the LEKTI polypeptides physiologically generated in human epidermis. We also identified three processing intermediates not described so far. Hence, a proteolytic cascade model for LEKTI activation is proposed. We then pinpointed the most effective fragments against the desquamation-related kallikreins (KLKs) and we proved that LEKTI is involved in stratum corneum shedding as some of its polypeptides inhibit the KLK-mediated proteolysis of desmoglein-1. Finally, we quantified the individual LEKTI fragments in the uppermost epidermis, showing that the ratios between LEKTI polypeptides and active KLK5 are compatible with a fine-tuned inhibition. These findings are relevant both to the understanding of skin homeostasis regulation and to the design of novel therapeutic strategies for NS. PMID:21697885

  4. Increased Cortical Synaptic Activation of TrkB and Downstream Signaling Markers in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nosheny, RL; Belichenko, PV; Busse, BL; Weissmiller, AM; Dang, V; Das, D; Fahimi, A; Salehi, A; Smith, SJ; Mobley, WC

    2015-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS), trisomy 21, is characterized by synaptic abnormalities and cognitive deficits throughout the lifespan and with development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology and progressive cognitive decline in adults. Synaptic abnormalities are also present in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, but which synapses are affected and the mechanisms underlying synaptic dysfunction are unknown. Here we show marked increases in the levels and activation status of TrkB and associated signaling proteins in cortical synapses in Ts65Dn mice. Proteomic analysis at the single synapse level of resolution using array tomography (AT) uncovered increased colocalization of activated TrkB with signaling endosome related proteins, and demonstrated increased TrkB signaling. The extent of increases in TrkB signaling differed in each of the cortical layers examined and with respect to the type of synapse, with the most marked increases seen in inhibitory synapses. These findings are evidence of markedly abnormal TrkB-mediated signaling in synapses. They raise the possibility that dysregulated TrkB signaling contributes to synaptic dysfunction and cognitive deficits in DS. PMID:25753471

  5. ADIPOCYTES FROM WOMEN WITH POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME DEMONSTRATE ALTERED PHOSPHORYLATION AND ACTIVITY OF GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE KINASE 3

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wendy; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Williams, Heith; Magoffin, Denis A.; Pall, Marita; Azziz, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that an abnormality in glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a pathogenic factor in PCOS. Design Prospective experimental study (adipocytes). Setting Tertiary care academic medical center and teaching hospital Patients Patients with PCOS and healthy controls. Interventions Blood sampling, physical exam, biopsy of subcutaneous lower abdominal fat. Main Outcome Measure(s) Glucose transport and protein levels and phosphorylation state of GSK3α and GSK3β in adipocytes, assessment of GSK3β activity. Results Basal protein levels of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3α and GSK3β) did not differ between controls and women with PCOS, nor did basal or insulin-stimulated levels of serine phosphorylated GSK3α. However, in adipocytes of PCOS women insulin stimulation was not associated with increased serine phosphorylation of GSK3β, in contrast to controls. Tyrosine phosphorylation of GSK3β was also higher in PCOS compared to controls. Consistent with the phosphorylation data, GSK3β activity was elevated in PCOS adipocytes. Conclusions These data suggest GSK3β is hyperactivated and resistant to downregulation by insulin in PCOS. Using physiologic approaches, we demonstrated that abnormal GSK3β regulation is a potential mechanism for the insulin resistance seen in some women with PCOS, which may contribute to their development of the syndrome. PMID:18178198

  6. Antiviral activity of recombinant porcine surfactant protein A against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Zheng, Qisheng; Zhang, Yuanpeng; Li, Pengcheng; Fu, Yanfeng; Hou, Jibo; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has caused significant economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. However, there is not an ideal vaccine to provide complete protection against PRRSV. Thus, the need for new antiviral strategies to control PRRSV still remains. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) belongs to the family of C-type lectins, which can exert antiviral activities. In this present study, we assessed the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine SP-A (RpSP-A) on PRRSV infection in Marc 145 cells and revealed its antiviral mechanism using a plaque assay, real-time qPCR, western blotting analysis and an attachment and penetration assay. Our results showed that RpSP-A could inhibit the infectivity of PRRSV in Marc 145 cells and could reduce the total RNA and protein level. The attachment assay indicated that RpSP-A in the presence of Ca(2+) could largely inhibit Marc 145 cell attachment; however, in the penetration assay, it was relatively inactive. Furthermore, our study suggested that virus progeny released from infected Marc145 cells were blocked by RpSP-A from infecting other cells. We conclude that RpSP-A has antiviral activity against PRRSV, most probably by blocking viral attachment and the cell-to-cell transmission pathway, and therefore, RpSP-A holds promise as a novel antiviral agent against PRRSV. PMID:27101074

  7. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nonstructural protein 1beta modulates host innate immune response by antagonizing IRF3 activation.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Kwon, Byungjoon; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Jones, Clinton; Pattnaik, Asit K; Osorio, Fernando A

    2010-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection of swine leads to a serious disease characterized by a delayed and defective adaptive immune response. It is hypothesized that a suboptimal innate immune response is responsible for the disease pathogenesis. In the study presented here we tested this hypothesis and identified several nonstructural proteins (NSPs) with innate immune evasion properties encoded by the PRRS viral genome. Four of the total ten PRRSV NSPs tested were found to have strong to moderate inhibitory effects on beta interferon (IFN-beta) promoter activation. The strongest inhibitory effect was exhibited by NSP1 followed by, NSP2, NSP11, and NSP4. We focused on NSP1alpha and NSP1beta (self-cleavage products of NSP1 during virus infection) and NSP11, three NSPs with strong inhibitory activity. All of three proteins, when expressed stably in cell lines, strongly inhibited double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) signaling pathways. NSP1beta was found to inhibit both IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)- and NF-kappaB-dependent gene induction by dsRNA and Sendai virus. Mechanistically, the dsRNA-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 were strongly inhibited by NSP1beta. Moreover, when tested in a porcine myelomonocytic cell line, NSP1beta inhibited Sendai virus-mediated activation of porcine IFN-beta promoter activity. We propose that this NSP1beta-mediated subversion of the host innate immune response plays an important role in PRRSV pathogenesis. PMID:19923190

  8. The biochemistry of fatty liver and kidney syndrome. Biotin-mediated restoration of hepatic gluconeogenesis in vitro and its relationship to pyruvate carboxylase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, D W

    1976-01-01

    Liver slices from chicks affected by the fatty liver and kidney syndrome display an extremely low extent of hepatic gluconeogenesis which is associated with decreased activities of certain rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzymes. Pyruvate carboxylase activity is particularly severely affected, being less than 4% of control values. Incubation of affected slices in a biotin-containing nutrient medium restores both gluconeogenesis and pyruvate carboxylase actiivity (the latter to approx. 35% of the control valve). Activities of the other enzymes studied were not greatly affected by this treatment. Restoration of gluconeogenesis did not occur if biotin was excluded from the nutrient medium, nor was it prevented by protein-synthesis inhibitors. It is concluded that the syndrome involves the lack of available biotin in the liver rather than suppression of apocarboxylase synthesis. PMID:182141

  9. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sarraf, Mohammad; Schrier, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed. PMID:21423563

  10. Moderate MAS enhances local 1H spin exchange and spin diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Matthias; Micke, Peter; Saalwächter, Kay; Hempel, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-diffusion experiments are often combined with magic-angle spinning (MAS) to achieve higher spectral resolution of solid samples. Here we show that local proton spin diffusion can indeed become faster at low (<10 kHz) spinning rates as compared to static conditions. Spin diffusion under static conditions can thus be slower than the often referred value of 0.8 nm2/ms, which was determined using slow MAS (Clauss et al., 1993). The enhancement of spin diffusion by slow MAS relies on the modulation of the orientation-dependent dipolar couplings during sample rotation and goes along with transient level crossings in combination with dipolar truncation. The experimental finding and its explanation is supported by density matrix simulations, and also emphasizes the sensitivity of spin diffusion to the local coupling topology. The amplification of spin diffusion by slow MAS cannot be explained by any model based on independent spin pairs; at least three spins have to be considered.

  11. Understanding the symmetric line shape in the 17O MAS spectra for hexagonal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Oki, Shinobu; Deguchi, Kenzo; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state 17O Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 17O-enriched hexagonal ice, [17O]-Ih, between 173 and 253 K were presented. Marked changes in the line shape were clearly observed, indicating water molecular reorientation in the crystal structure. At 173 K, molecular motions were considered to be frozen and analysis of the 1D MAS spectrum yielded the following parameters: quadrupole coupling constant (CQ) = 6.6 ± 0.2 MHz and asymmetry parameter (ηQ) = 0.95 ± 0.05. At 232 K and above, contrary to the conventional explanation, pseudo-symmetric line shapes appeared in the 17O MAS NMR spectra arising from the contribution of second-order quadrupole interactions. As a chemical exchange model to describe these isotropic 17O MAS NMR spectra, a modified Ratcliffe model, which consider the effects of proton disorder, was proposed, and the resulting theoretical spectra could well reproduce the experimental spectra.

  12. Project MAS, 1982-1983. O.E.E. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villegas, Ana; Villegas, Jose

    This multi-site instructional program, in its first year of a three-year funding cycle, provided instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL) and native language arts, as well as bilingual instruction in various content areas, to 400 Spanish speaking students of limited English proficiency in grades 3-8. The functional goal of Project MAS,…

  13. The Multidimensional Attitudes Scale toward Persons with Disabilities (MAS): Construction and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findler, Liora; Vilchinsky, Noa; Werner, Shirli

    2007-01-01

    This study presents the development of a new instrument, the "Multidimensional Attitudes Scale Toward Persons With Disabilities" (MAS). Based on the multidimensional approach, it posits that attitudes are composed of three dimensions: affect, cognition, and behavior. The scale was distributed to a sample of 132 people along with a self-esteem…

  14. Considerations for Consortia as States Transition Away from AA-MAS. NCEO Brief. Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Outcomes, 2014

    2014-01-01

    States with an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) that received a flexibility waiver from some of the requirements of No Child Left Behind are required to phase out their use of this assessment. And, on August 23, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education published a proposed rollback of regulation that allowed the…

  15. An Analysis of the Rise and Fall of the AA-MAS Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Ysseldyke, James E.; Edwards, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, to address concerns about students who might fall in the "gap" between the regular assessment and the alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS), the U.S. Department of Education announced that states could develop alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). This article…

  16. Successfully Transitioning from the AA-MAS to the General Assessment. NCEO Policy Directions. Number 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl; Thurlow, Martha; Christensen, Laurene; Shyyan, Vitaliy

    2014-01-01

    Federal policy initiatives such as the flexibility waivers for accountability are requiring that states transition away from the use of an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). It is expected that those students who had participated in that assessment will instead participate in the state's general assessment…

  17. Advanced instrumentation for DNP-enhanced MAS NMR for higher magnetic fields and lower temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Yoh; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fukazawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-03-01

    Sensitivity enhancement of MAS NMR using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is gaining importance at moderate fields (B0 < 9 T) and temperatures (T > 90 K) with potential applications in chemistry and material sciences. However, considering the ever-increasing size and complexity of the systems to be studied, it is crucial to establish DNP under higher field conditions, where the spectral resolution and the basic NMR sensitivity tend to improve. In this perspective, we overview our recent efforts on hardware developments, specifically targeted on improving DNP MAS NMR at high fields. It includes the development of gyrotrons that enable continuous frequency tuning and rapid frequency modulation for our 395 GHz-600 MHz and 460 GHz-700 MHz DNP NMR spectrometers. The latter 700 MHz system involves two gyrotrons and a quasi-optical transmission system that combines two independent sub-millimeter waves into a single dichromic wave. We also describe two cryogenic MAS NMR probe systems operating, respectively, at T ∼100 K and ∼30 K. The latter system utilizes a novel closed-loop helium recirculation mechanism, achieving cryogenic MAS without consuming any cryogen. These instruments altogether should promote high-field DNP toward more efficient, reliable and affordable technology. Some experimental DNP results obtained with these instruments are presented.

  18. Advanced instrumentation for DNP-enhanced MAS NMR for higher magnetic fields and lower temperatures.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fukazawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-03-01

    Sensitivity enhancement of MAS NMR using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is gaining importance at moderate fields (B0<9T) and temperatures (T>90K) with potential applications in chemistry and material sciences. However, considering the ever-increasing size and complexity of the systems to be studied, it is crucial to establish DNP under higher field conditions, where the spectral resolution and the basic NMR sensitivity tend to improve. In this perspective, we overview our recent efforts on hardware developments, specifically targeted on improving DNP MAS NMR at high fields. It includes the development of gyrotrons that enable continuous frequency tuning and rapid frequency modulation for our 395 GHz-600 MHz and 460 GHz-700 MHz DNP NMR spectrometers. The latter 700 MHz system involves two gyrotrons and a quasi-optical transmission system that combines two independent sub-millimeter waves into a single dichromic wave. We also describe two cryogenic MAS NMR probe systems operating, respectively, at T ∼ 100K and ∼ 30K. The latter system utilizes a novel closed-loop helium recirculation mechanism, achieving cryogenic MAS without consuming any cryogen. These instruments altogether should promote high-field DNP toward more efficient, reliable and affordable technology. Some experimental DNP results obtained with these instruments are presented. PMID:26920836

  19. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Suochang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M; Peden, Charles H F; Lercher, Johannes A

    2015-09-11

    Here we present the design of reusable and perfectly sealed all-zirconia MAS rotors. The rotors are used to study AlPO4-5 molecular sieve crystallization under hydrothermal conditions, high temperature high pressure cyclohexanol dehydration reaction, and low temperature metabolomics of intact biological tissue. PMID:26171928

  20. Sealed Rotors for In Situ High Temperature High Pressure MAS NMR†

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Suochang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are used to study AlPO4-5 molecular sieve crystallization under hydrothermal conditions, high temperature high pressure cyclohexanol dehydration reaction, and low temperature metabolomics of intact biological tissue. PMID:26171928

  1. Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae Strain 09mas018883, Isolated from a Swedish Cow.

    PubMed

    Zubair, S; de Villiers, E P; Fuxelius, H H; Andersson, G; Johansson, K-E; Bishop, R P; Bongcam-Rudloff, E

    2013-01-01

    We announce the complete genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae strain 09mas018883, isolated from the milk of a cow with clinical mastitis. The availability of this genome may allow identification of candidate genes, leading to discovery of antigens that might form the basis for development of a vaccine as an alternative means of mastitis control. PMID:23846269

  2. 47 CFR 101.1317 - Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications. 101.1317 Section 101.1317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems...

  3. Atypical Functional Brain Activation during a Multiple Object Tracking Task in Girls with Turner Syndrome: Neurocorrelates of Reduced Spatiotemporal Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Elliott A.; Stoddard, Joel; Lai, Song; Lackey, John; Shi, Jianrong; Ross, Judith L.; Simon, Tony J.

    2010-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with spatial and numerical cognitive impairments. We hypothesized that these nonverbal cognitive impairments result from limits in spatial and temporal processing, particularly as it affects attention. To examine spatiotemporal attention in girls with Turner syndrome versus typically developing controls, we used a…

  4. An FTIR Calibration for Structural Hydrogen in Feldspars Using 1H MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. A.; Rossman, G. R.

    2002-05-01

    It is important to know how to determine the speciation and concentration of H in feldspars because this information could be used to determine primary magmatic water activity or to estimate the degree of hydrothermal alteration in igneous rocks. FTIR spectroscopy is sensitive to changes in speciation of hydrogen, and can be calibrated for quantitative determination of H concentration using 1H MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy. Three pegmatitic albites, one metamorphic albite, three volcanic plagioclases (albite, andesine, and anorthite) and one pegmatite oligoclase were used in this study to provide a range of plagioclase compositions. Two pegmatitic microclines and one sanidine were also studied. Polarized infrared spectra were obtained in the three principal optical directions for each specimen. Samples were prepared for 1H MAS NMR experiments at 12 kHz spinning speed in a dry box, without the use of a liquid grinding aid. A spectrum from anhydrous synthetic corundum was used as a baseline for feldspar NMR spectra. The pegmatitic and metamorphic albites are transparent, but contain submicroscopic fluid inclusions as evidenced by a broad band at 3400 cm-1 and an asymmetric band at 5200 cm-1 in the IR spectra that shift to bands characteristic of ice upon cooling to 77 K. These albites have a very sharp band at 4.7 ppm (relative to TMS) in their NMR spectra consistent with fluid inclusion water. In addition to the broad fluid inclusion band, the pegmatitic albites have sharp bands in the mid-IR similar the OH bands found in quartz. All other plagioclases have broad, anisotropic bands around 3200 cm-1 in the mid-IR and MOH combination stretch-bend bands near 4500 cm-1 in the near-IR, indicative of structural OH. The NMR spectra of these plagioclases have a broad band at 4.7 to 4.9 ppm TMS. The OH vector in plagioclases is preferentially aligned parallel to the a crystallographic axis. The concentration of structural OH in the plagioclases ranges from 50

  5. New Cirrus Retrieval Algorithms and Results from eMAS during SEAC4RS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, R.; Platnick, S. E.; Meyer, K.; Wang, C.; Wind, G.; Arnold, T.; King, M. D.; Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS) scanning imager was flown on the ER-2 during the SEAC4RS field campaign. The imager provides measurements in 38 spectral channels from the visible into the 13μm CO2 absorption bands at approximately 25 m nadir spatial resolution at cirrus altitudes, and with a swath width of about 18 km, provided substantial context and synergy for other ER-2 cirrus observations. The eMAS is an update to the original MAS scanner, having new midwave and IR spectrometers coupled with the previous VNIR/SWIR spectrometers. In addition to the standard MODIS-like cloud retrieval algorithm (MOD06/MYD06 for MODIS Terra/Aqua, respectively) that provides cirrus optical thickness (COT) and effective particle radius (CER) from several channel combinations, three new algorithms were developed to take advantage of unique aspects of eMAS and/or other ER-2 observations. The first uses a combination of two solar reflectance channels within the 1.88 μm water vapor absorption band, each with significantly different single scattering albedo, allowing for simultaneous COT and CER retrievals. The advantage of this algorithm is that the strong water vapor absorption can significantly reduce the sensitivity to lower level clouds and ocean/land surface properties thus better isolating cirrus properties. A second algorithm uses a suite of infrared channels in an optimal estimation algorithm to simultaneously retrieve COT, CER, and cloud-top pressure/temperature. Finally, a window IR algorithm is used to retrieve COT in synergy with the ER-2 Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) cloud top/base boundary measurements. Using a variety of quantifiable error sources, uncertainties for all eMAS retrievals will be shown along with comparisons with CPL COT retrievals.

  6. Colchicine therapy in acute coronary syndrome patients acts on caspase-1 to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome monocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Stacy; Martínez, Gonzalo J; Payet, Cloe A; Barraclough, Jennifer Y; Celermajer, David S; Bursill, Christina; Patel, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    Inflammasome activation, with subsequent release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18, has recently been implicated in atherosclerosis-associated inflammation. This study aims to assess in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients (1) inflammasome activation in circulating monocytes and (2) whether short-term oral colchicine, a recognized anti-inflammatory agent that has been shown to be cardio-protective in clinical studies, might acutely suppress inflammasome-dependent inflammation. ACS patients (n=21) were randomized to oral colchicine (1 mg followed by 0.5 mg 1 h later) or no treatment, and compared with untreated healthy controls (n=9). Peripheral venous blood was sampled pre- (day 1) and 24 h post- (day 2) treatment. Monocytes were cultured and stimulated with ATP. Analysis of key inflammasome markers was performed by ELISA. IL-1β secretion increased by 580.4% (P<0.01) in ACS patients compared with controls but only with ATP stimulation. Untreated ACS patients secreted significantly higher levels of IL-18 compared with healthy controls independent of ATP stimulation (P<0.05). Colchicine treatment in ACS patients markedly reduced intracellular and secreted levels of IL-1β compared with pre-treatment levels (P<0.05 for both), as well as significantly reducing pro-caspase-1 mRNA levels by 57.7% and secreted caspase-1 protein levels by 30.2% compared with untreated patients (P<0.05 for both). Monocytes from ACS patients are 'primed' to secrete inflammasome-related cytokines and short-term colchicine acutely and markedly suppresses monocyte caspase-1 activity, thereby reducing monocyte secretion of IL-1β. PMID:27129183

  7. The role of stretch-activated ion channels in acute respiratory distress syndrome: finally a new target?

    PubMed

    Schwingshackl, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) and oxygen therapy (hyperoxia; HO) comprise the cornerstones of life-saving interventions for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Unfortunately, the side effects of MV and HO include exacerbation of lung injury by barotrauma, volutrauma, and propagation of lung inflammation. Despite significant improvements in ventilator technologies and a heightened awareness of oxygen toxicity, besides low tidal volume ventilation few if any medical interventions have improved ARDS outcomes over the past two decades. We are lacking a comprehensive understanding of mechanotransduction processes in the healthy lung and know little about the interactions between simultaneously activated stretch-, HO-, and cytokine-induced signaling cascades in ARDS. Nevertheless, as we are unraveling these mechanisms we are gathering increasing evidence for the importance of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) in the activation of lung-resident and inflammatory cells. In addition to the discovery of new SAC families in the lung, e.g., two-pore domain potassium channels, we are increasingly assigning mechanosensing properties to already known Na(+), Ca(2+), K(+), and Cl(-) channels. Better insights into the mechanotransduction mechanisms of SACs will improve our understanding of the pathways leading to ventilator-induced lung injury and lead to much needed novel therapeutic approaches against ARDS by specifically targeting SACs. This review 1) summarizes the reasons why the time has come to seriously consider SACs as new therapeutic targets against ARDS, 2) critically analyzes the physiological and experimental factors that currently limit our knowledge about SACs, and 3) outlines the most important questions future research studies need to address. PMID:27521425

  8. Physical Activity, Dietary Intake, and the Insulin Resistance Syndrome in Nondiabetic Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draheim, Christopher C.; Williams, Daniel P.; McCubbin, Jeffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    A study identified 145 adults with mild mental retardation and hyperinsulinemia, borderline high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, and abdominal obesity. Those who participated in more frequent bouts of physical activity or who consumed lower dietary fat intakes were one-third as likely to have hyperinsulinemia…

  9. Olmesartan Inhibits Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice Overexpressing Renin Independently of Blood Pressure: Its Beneficial Effects on ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas Axis and NADPH Oxidase Expression.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Tomohiro; Tomita, Hirofumi; Narita, Ikuyo; Kinjo, Takahiko; Nishizaki, Kimitaka; Ichikawa, Hiroaki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Osanai, Tomohiro; Okumura, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced renin-angiotensin activity causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. The angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis pathway functions against Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling. We investigated whether olmesartan (Olm), an AT1R blocker, inhibits cardiac hypertrophy independently of blood pressure, and evaluated the potential mechanisms. The 3- to 4-month-old male mice overexpressing renin in the liver (Ren-Tg) were given Olm (5 mg/kg/d) and hydralazine (Hyd) (3.5 mg/kg/d) orally for 2 months. Systolic blood pressure was higher in the Ren-Tg mice than in wild-type littermates. Olm and Hyd treatments lowered systolic blood pressure to the same degree. However, cardiac hypertrophy, evaluated by echocardiography, heart weight, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes, and gene expression, was inhibited by only Olm treatment, but not by Hyd. Olm treatment reversed decreased gene expressions of ACE2 and Mas receptor of Ren-Tg mice and inhibited enhanced NADPH oxidase (Nox)4 expression and reactive oxygen species, whereas Hyd treatment had no influence on them. These findings indicate that Olm treatment inhibits cardiac hypertrophy independently of blood pressure, not only through its original AT1R blockade but partly through enhancement of ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis and suppression of Nox4 expression. PMID:26886190

  10. New Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Therapeutic Strategies Based on the Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/Angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas Receptor Axis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Anderson J.; Murça, Tatiane M.; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A.; Castro, Carlos Henrique; Raizada, Mohan K.; Santos, Robson A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1–7) is now recognized as a biologically active component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The discovery of the angiotensin-converting enzyme homologue ACE2 revealed important metabolic pathways involved in the Ang-(1–7) synthesis. This enzyme can form Ang-(1–7) from Ang II or less efficiently through hydrolysis of Ang I to Ang-(1–9) with subsequent Ang-(1–7) formation. Additionally, it is well established that the G protein-coupled receptor Mas is a functional ligand site for Ang-(1–7). The axis formed by ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas represents an endogenous counter regulatory pathway within the RAS whose actions are opposite to the vasoconstrictor/proliferative arm of the RAS constituted by ACE/Ang II/AT1 receptor. In this review we will discuss recent findings concerning the biological role of the ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas arm in the cardiovascular and pulmonary system. Also, we will highlight the initiatives to develop potential therapeutic strategies based on this axis. PMID:22319643

  11. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... also need to make changes in your work duties or home and sports activities. Some of the ... Call for an appointment with your provider if: You have symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome Your symptoms ...

  13. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a deep intronic pseudoexon-activating mutation in the androgen receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Tommiska, Johanna; Saarinen, Lilli; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frilander, Mikko J; Palvimo, Jorma J; Toppari, Jorma; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene underlie complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), the most common cause of 46,XY sex reversal. Molecular genetic diagnosis of CAIS, however, remains uncertain in patients who show normal coding region of AR. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of AR disruption leading to CAIS in two 46,XY sisters. We analyzed whole-genome sequencing data of the patients for pathogenic variants outside the AR coding region. Patient fibroblasts from the genital area were used for AR cDNA analysis and protein quantification. Analysis of the cDNA revealed aberrant splicing of the mRNA caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.2450-118A>G) in the intron 6 of AR. The mutation creates a de novo 5' splice site and a putative exonic splicing enhancer motif, which leads to the preferential formation of two aberrantly spliced mRNAs (predicted to include a premature stop codon). Patient fibroblasts contained no detectable AR protein. Our results show that patients with CAIS and normal AR coding region need to be examined for deep intronic mutations that can lead to pseudoexon activation. PMID:27609317

  14. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a deep intronic pseudoexon-activating mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Tommiska, Johanna; Saarinen, Lilli; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frilander, Mikko J.; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Toppari, Jorma; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene underlie complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), the most common cause of 46,XY sex reversal. Molecular genetic diagnosis of CAIS, however, remains uncertain in patients who show normal coding region of AR. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of AR disruption leading to CAIS in two 46,XY sisters. We analyzed whole-genome sequencing data of the patients for pathogenic variants outside the AR coding region. Patient fibroblasts from the genital area were used for AR cDNA analysis and protein quantification. Analysis of the cDNA revealed aberrant splicing of the mRNA caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.2450-118A>G) in the intron 6 of AR. The mutation creates a de novo 5′ splice site and a putative exonic splicing enhancer motif, which leads to the preferential formation of two aberrantly spliced mRNAs (predicted to include a premature stop codon). Patient fibroblasts contained no detectable AR protein. Our results show that patients with CAIS and normal AR coding region need to be examined for deep intronic mutations that can lead to pseudoexon activation. PMID:27609317

  15. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) Architecture and Design Accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, Lawrence; Racette, Paul; Blackwell, William; Galbraith, Christopher; Thompson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term "hyperspectral microwave" is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth s atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4-9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the scan head computer

  16. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) architecture and design accommodations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Thompson, E.

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term “ hyperspectral microwave” is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth's atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4 - 9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the s- an head

  17. States' Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) in 2009. Synthesis Report 75

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Hodgson, Jennifer; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    All students, including students with disabilities, must be included in state accountability systems as required by law. In April 2007, federal regulations provided states the flexibility to offer another assessment option--an Alternate Assessment based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) for some students with disabilities. The AA-MAS is…

  18. Participation and Performance Reporting for the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS). Technical Report 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Deb; Thurlow, Martha L.; Lazarus, Sheryl S.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines publicly reported participation and performance data for the alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). The authors' analysis of these data included all states publicly reporting AA-MAS data, regardless of whether they had received approval to use the results for Title I accountability calculations.…

  19. Comparison of the 1H NMR analysis of solids by the CRAMPS and MAS-only techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dec, Steven F.; Bronnimann, Charles E.; Wind, Robert A.; Maciel, Gary E.

    1H NMR spectra are reported on eight representative solid samples, including pure powdered crystalline samples, synthetic organic polymers, a silica gel, HY zeolite, and a lignite. Spectra were obtained by the following three approaches: (1) single pulse on a static sample, (2) CRAMPS, and (3) single pulse with magic-angle spinning (MAS-only). The MAS-only results were obtained as a function of MAS speed. Although the MAS-only technique is capable of achieving a significant degree of line narrowing, even with modest MAS speeds, MAS-only spectra of the general quality of the apparently undistorted high-resolution 1H spectra obtained by the CRAMPS technique are not obtained at the highest MAS speeds examined (21 kHz for a polymethylmethacrylate sample), unless the 1H- 1H dipolar interactions in the sample are rather weak, as with silica gel or a zeolite. Thus, caution should be exercised in interpreting 1H MAS-only spectra, especially if CRAMPS results are not available as a calibration.

  20. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Targets Down Syndrome Candidate Region 1 (DSCR1/RCAN1) to control Neuronal Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Seul; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Seo, Su Ryeon

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a neurotrophic peptide involved in a wide range of nervous functions, including development, differentiation, and survival, and various aspects of learning and memory. Here we report that PACAP induces the expression of regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1), which is abnormally expressed in the brains of Down syndrome patients. Increased RCAN1 expression is accompanied by activation of the PKA-cAMP response element-binding protein pathways. EMSA and ChIP analyses demonstrate the presence of a functional cAMP response element in the RCAN1 promoter. Moreover, we show that PACAP-dependent neuronal differentiation is significantly disturbed by improper RCAN1 expression. Our data provide the first evidence of RCAN1, a Down syndrome-related gene, as a novel target for control of the neurotrophic function of PACAP. PMID:26157140

  1. [Hemodynamic correlation between the reaction of circulatory system on physical activity and exogenic adrenaline in liquidators of Chernobyl accident with neurocirculatory dystonia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, A N; Vereskun, S B

    2007-01-01

    The article presents a correlation analysis between hemodynamic changes occurred after performing submaximum physical activity using bicycle ergometer (physical stress) and intravenous injection of adrenalin (pharmacological stress) in 30 liquidators of Chernobyl accident and who have a neurocirculatory dystonia syndrome. It enables to establish interrelations for a number of maximal values of parameters of hemodynamics which is determined by the same shifts in circulatory system with sympathoadrenal direction during these two kinds of stress influence. PMID:18416159

  2. Semi-parametric time-domain quantification of HR-MAS data from prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ratiney, Helene; Albers, Mark J.; Rabeson, Herald; Kurhanewicz, John

    2011-01-01

    High Resolution – Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) spectroscopy provides rich biochemical profiles that require accurate quantification to permit biomarker identification and to understand the underlying pathological mechanisms. Meanwhile, quantification of HR-MAS data from prostate tissue samples is challenging due to significant overlap between the resonant peaks, the presence of short T2∗ metabolites such as citrate or polyamines (T2 from 25 to 100 msec) and macromolecules, and variations in chemical shifts and T2∗s within a metabolite’s spin systems. Since existing methods do not address these challenges completely, a new quantification method was developed and optimized for HR-MAS data acquired with an ultra short TE and over 30,000 data points. The proposed method, named HR-QUEST (High Resolution – QUEST), iteratively employs the QUEST time-domain semi-parametric strategy with a new model function that incorporates prior knowledge from whole and subdivided metabolite signals. With these features, HR-QUEST is able to independently fit the chemical shifts and T2∗s of a metabolite’s spin systems, a necessity for HR-MAS data. By using the iterative fitting approach, it is able to account for significant contributions from macromolecules and to handle shorter T2 metabolites, such as citrate and polyamines. After subdividing the necessary metabolite basis signals, the root mean square (RMS) of the residual was reduced by 52% for measured HR-MAS data from prostate tissue. Monte Carlo studies on simulated spectra with varied macromolecular contributions showed that the iterative fitting approach (6 iterations) coupled with inclusion of long T2 macromolecule components in the basis set improve the quality of the fit, as assessed by the reduction of the RMS of the residual and of the RMS error of the metabolite signal estimate, by 27% and 71% respectively. With this optimized configuration, HR-QUEST was applied to measured HR-MAS prostate data and reliably

  3. Activation of the IL-2 Receptor in Podocytes: A Potential Mechanism for Podocyte Injury in Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Zea, Arnold H.; Stewart, Tyrus; Ascani, Jeannine; Tate, David J.; Finkel-Jimenez, Beatriz; Wilk, Anna; Reiss, Krzysztof; Smoyer, William E.; Aviles, Diego H.

    2016-01-01

    The renal podocyte plays an important role in maintaining the structural integrity of the glomerular basement membrane. We have previously reported that patients with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) have increased IL-2 production. We hypothesized that podocytes express an IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) and signaling through this receptor can result in podocyte injury. To confirm the presence of the IL-2R, we tested a conditionally immortalized murine podocyte cell line by flow cytometry, qPCR, and Western blot. To test for the presence of the IL-2R in vivo, immunohistochemical staining was performed on human renal biopsies in children with FSGS and control. Podocytes were stimulated with IL-2 in vitro, to study signaling events via the JAK/STAT pathway. The results showed that stimulation with IL-2 resulted in increased mRNA and protein expression of STAT 5a, phosphorylated STAT 5, JAK 3, and phosphorylated JAK 3. We then investigated for signs of cellular injury and the data showed that pro-apoptotic markers Bax and cFLIP were significantly increased following IL-2 exposure, whereas LC3 II was decreased. Furthermore, mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis were both significantly increased following activation of the IL-2R. We used a paracellular permeability assay to monitor the structural integrity of a podocyte monolayer following IL-2 exposure. The results showed that podocytes exposed to IL-2 have increased albumin leakage across the monolayer. We conclude that murine podocytes express the IL-2R, and that activation through the IL-2R results in podocyte injury. PMID:27389192

  4. Recessive Inactivating Mutations in TBCK, Encoding a Rab GTPase-Activating Protein, Cause Severe Infantile Syndromic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; Caputo, Viviana; Phelps, Ian G; Stella, Lorenzo; Worgan, Lisa; Dempsey, Jennifer C; Nguyen, Alina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Webster, Richard; Pizzuti, Antonio; Marvin, Colby T; Ishak, Gisele E; Ardern-Holmes, Simone; Richmond, Zara; Bamshad, Michael J; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R; Tartaglia, Marco; Chopra, Maya; Doherty, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Infantile encephalopathies are a group of clinically and biologically heterogeneous disorders for which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a syndromic neonatal encephalopathy characterized by profound developmental disability, severe hypotonia, seizures, diminished respiratory drive requiring mechanical ventilation, brain atrophy, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphism. Biallelic inactivating mutations in TBCK (TBC1-domain-containing kinase) were independently identified by whole-exome sequencing as the cause of this condition in four unrelated families. Matching these families was facilitated by the sharing of phenotypic profiles and WES data in a recently released web-based tool (Geno2MP) that links phenotypic information to rare variants in families with Mendelian traits. TBCK is a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for small GTPases of the Rab family and has been shown to control cell growth and proliferation, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics, and mTOR signaling. Two of the three mutations (c.376C>T [p.Arg126(∗)] and c.1363A>T [p.Lys455(∗)]) are predicted to truncate the protein, and loss of the major TBCK isoform was confirmed in primary fibroblasts from one affected individual. The third mutation, c.1532G>A (p.Arg511His), alters a conserved residue within the TBC1 domain. Structural analysis implicated Arg511 as a required residue for Rab-GAP function, and in silico homology modeling predicted impaired GAP function in the corresponding mutant. These results suggest that loss of Rab-GAP activity is the underlying mechanism of disease. In contrast to other disorders caused by dysregulated mTOR signaling associated with focal or global brain overgrowth, impaired TBCK function results in progressive loss of brain volume. PMID:27040692

  5. Hypodense eosinophils and interleukin 5 activity in the blood of patients with the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, W F; Petersen, J; Sheff, D M; Folkerth, R D; Anderson, R J; Corson, J M; Sheffer, A L; Austen, K F

    1990-01-01

    The recent recognition of the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome (EMS) associated with the ingestion of L-tryptophan prompted an analysis of the peripheral blood eosinophil phenotypes and of the serum eosinophil hematopoietins in this disorder. Five patients with an illness characterized by the abrupt onset of aching skeletal muscles, edema, thickening and induration of the skin, and marked blood eosinophilia associated with L-tryptophan ingestion provided eosinophils, serum, or both, for evaluation. Gradient sedimentation density analysis of the peripheral blood eosinophils from four of these patients revealed that 43 +/- 13% (mean +/- SEM) of the cells had converted to the abnormal (hypodense) sedimenting phenotype. When normodense eosinophils from the reference donors were cultured for 3 days in medium supplemented with increasing concentrations of serum from the patients with EMS, their viability increased in a dose-dependent manner to 45%, which was significantly augmented over the effect of normal serum. This eosinophil viability-sustaining activity was inhibited by 76 +/- 7% (mean +/- SEM; n = 3) by the addition of anti-interleukin 5 (IL-5) but not by neutralizing antibodies monospecific for either granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or IL-3. IL-5, an eosinophilopoietic factor, converts normodense peripheral blood eosinophils in vitro to a hypodense sedimenting form with extended viability and augmented biologic responses to activating stimuli. Thus, the presence of IL-5 in the sera of patients with EMS may contribute to the development and maintenance of the eosinophilia and may regulate the conversion of the peripheral blood eosinophils to the hypodense phenotype with augmented pathobiologic potential. Images PMID:2236076

  6. Abnormalities of AMPK Activation and Glucose Uptake in Cultured Skeletal Muscle Cells from Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Audrey E.; Jones, David E.; Walker, Mark; Newton, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Post exertional muscle fatigue is a key feature in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Abnormalities of skeletal muscle function have been identified in some but not all patients with CFS. To try to limit potential confounders that might contribute to this clinical heterogeneity, we developed a novel in vitro system that allows comparison of AMP kinase (AMPK) activation and metabolic responses to exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells from CFS patients and control subjects. Methods Skeletal muscle cell cultures were established from 10 subjects with CFS and 7 age-matched controls, subjected to electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) for up to 24h and examined for changes associated with exercise. Results In the basal state, CFS cultures showed increased myogenin expression but decreased IL6 secretion during differentiation compared with control cultures. Control cultures subjected to 16h EPS showed a significant increase in both AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake compared with unstimulated cells. In contrast, CFS cultures showed no increase in AMPK phosphorylation or glucose uptake after 16h EPS. However, glucose uptake remained responsive to insulin in the CFS cells pointing to an exercise-related defect. IL6 secretion in response to EPS was significantly reduced in CFS compared with control cultures at all time points measured. Conclusion EPS is an effective model for eliciting muscle contraction and the metabolic changes associated with exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells. We found four main differences in cultured skeletal muscle cells from subjects with CFS; increased myogenin expression in the basal state, impaired activation of AMPK, impaired stimulation of glucose uptake and diminished release of IL6. The retention of these differences in cultured muscle cells from CFS subjects points to a genetic/epigenetic mechanism, and provides a system to identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25836975

  7. The angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin (1-7)/Mas axis protects the function of pancreatic β cells by improving the function of islet microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Li; Wang, Ying; Yuan, Li; Li, Yang; Li, Xiao-Ya

    2014-11-01

    In the diabetic state, the local rennin-angiotensin system (RAS) is activated in the pancreas, and is strongly associated with islet dysfunction. The angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin (1-7) [Ang(1-7)]/Mas axis is a protective, negative regulator of the classical renin-angiotensin system. In this study, we assessed the role of the ACE2/Ang(1‑7)/Mas axis in pancreatic β cell survival and function. ACE2 knockout and wild-type mice were fed a high-fat diet for 16 weeks. We then performed terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assays, and determined the expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the pancreatic islets. The effects of Ang(1-7) or Mas receptor silencing on endothelial function were assessed in MS-1 cells. MIN6 cells were then co-cultured with the MS-1 cells to evaluate the effects of ACE2 on insulin secretion. The ACE2 knockout mice were more susceptible than the wild-type mice to high-fat diet-induced β cell dysfunction. The TUNEL-positive area of the pancreatic islets and the expression levels of IL-1β and iNOS were markedly increased in the ACE2 knockout mice compared with their wild-type littermates. The Mas-silenced MS-1 cells were more sensitive to palmitate-induced dysfunction and apoptosis in vitro. Ang(1-7) increased the activity of the Akt/endothelial NOS/nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the MS-1 cells, protected MIN6 cells against palmitate-induced apoptosis, and improved MIN6 insulin secretory function in the co-culture system. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis is a potential target for protecting the funcion of β cells by improving the function of islet microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:25175177

  8. [Chronic exertional compartment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rom, Eyal; Tenenbaum, Shay; Chechick, Ofir; Burstein, Gideon; Amit, Yehuda; Thein, Ran

    2013-10-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is an uncommon phenomenon first reported in the mid 50's. This condition is characterized by sharp pain during physical activity, causing reduction in activity frequency or intensity and even abstention. This syndrome is caused by elevation of the intra-compartmental pressure which leads to decreased tissue perfusion, thus ischemic damage to the tissue ensues. Chronic exertional syndrome is usually related to repetitive physical activity, usually in young people and athletes. The physical activity performed by the patient causes a rise in intra-compartmental pressure and thereby causes pain. The patient discontinues the activity and the pain subsides within minutes of rest. Chronic exertional syndrome is reported to occur in the thigh, shoulder, arm, hand, foot and gluteal region, but most commonly in the leg, especially the anterior compartment. The diagnosis of chronic exertional syndrome is primarily based on patients' medical history, supported by intramuscular pressure measurement of the specific compartment involved. Treatment of chronic exertional syndrome, especially the anterior and lateral compartment of the leg is mainly by surgery i.e. fasciotomy. If the patient is reluctant to undergo a surgical procedure, the conservative treatment is based on abstention from the offending activity, changing footwear or using arch support. However, the conservative approach is not as successful as surgical treatment. PMID:24450036

  9. Constitutive JAK3 activation induces lymphoproliferative syndromes in murine bone marrow transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Melanie G.; Kharas, Michael G.; Werneck, Miriam B.; Bras, Séverine Le; Moore, Sandra A.; Ball, Brian; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Rodig, Scott J.; Aster, Jon C.; Lee, Benjamin H.; Cantor, Harvey; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase JAK3 plays a well-established role during normal lymphocyte development and is constitutively phosphorylated in several lymphoid malignancies. However, its contribution to lymphomagenesis remains elusive. In this study, we used the newly identified activating JAK3A572V mutation to elucidate the effect of constitutive JAK3 signaling on murine lymphopoiesis. In a bone marrow transplantation model, JAK3A572V induces an aggressive, fatal, and transplantable lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by the expansion of CD8+TCRαβ+CD44+CD122+Ly-6C+ T cellsthat closely resemble an effector/memory T-cell subtype. Compared with wild-type counterparts, these cells show increased proliferative capacities in response to polyclonal stimulation, enhanced survival rates with elevated expression of Bcl-2, and increased production of interferon-γ (IFNγ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), correlating with enhanced cytotoxic abilities against allogeneic target cells. Of interest, the JAK3A572V disease is epidermotropic and produces intraepidermal microabscesses. Taken together, these clinical features are reminiscent of those observed in an uncommon but aggressive subset of CD8+ human cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). However, we also observed a CD4+ CTCL-like phenotype when cells are transplanted in an MHC-I–deficient background. These data demonstrate that constitutive JAK3 activation disrupts T-cell homeostasis and induces lymphoproliferative diseases in mice. PMID:19139084

  10. Anhedonia in the psychosis risk syndrome: associations with social impairment and basal orbitofrontal cortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Cressman, Victoria L; Schobel, Scott A; Steinfeld, Sara; Ben-David, Shelly; Thompson, Judy L; Small, Scott A; Moore, Holly; Corcoran, Cheryl M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Anhedonia is associated with poor social function in schizophrenia. Here, we examined this association in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, taking into account social anxiety. We then explored correlations between anhedonia and basal metabolic activity in selected forebrain regions implicated in reward processing. Methods: In 62 CHR individuals and 37 healthy controls, we measured social adjustment (Social Adjustment Self-Report Scale), social and physical anhedonia (Chapman Revised Anhedonia Scales), and social anxiety (Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents) in cross-section. In a subgroup of 25 CHR individuals for whom high-spatial-resolution basal-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were available, we also assessed correlations of these socio-affective constructs with basal cerebral blood volume in orbitofrontal cortex and related regions involved in reward processing. Results: Relative to controls, CHR individuals reported social impairment, greater social and physical anhedonia, and more social anxiety, exhibiting impairments comparable to schizophrenia. Regression analyses showed that anhedonia predicted social impairment and correlated negatively with basal cerebral blood volume within the orbitofrontal cortex (all P’s<0.05). Conclusions: Anhedonia and social anxiety are prominent in CHR individuals. Trait-like anhedonia may be a core phenotype related to orbitofrontal cortical function that, independent of symptoms, predicts social impairment. These data provide a rationale for interventions that target anhedonia and related activity in orbitofrontal cortical circuits in CHR individuals. PMID:27336033

  11. [Familial spastic paraplegia with syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity (Isaacs)].

    PubMed

    Yokota, T; Matsunaga, T; Furukawa, T; Tsukagoshi, H

    1989-06-01

    A woman aged fifty-three developed paraparesis at the age of 4, which progressed slowly and required crutches by the age of 30. At the age of 51, muscle stiffness involved bilateral hands and arms gradually. At the age of 53, she suffered from painful spasms in right deltoid muscle. Her two brothers had spastic paraplegia without other neurological deficits. Her paternal grandfather and maternal grandmother were cousins. Slight dementia was noted (WAIS: IQ, 79). Her posture was stiff and muscles of upper limbs were in a persistent contraction; Subcutaneous tissue was thin, and muscles were well-defined and firm. There was moderate muscle weakness of legs and hands. Continuous fasciculations and myokymias were recognized in muscles of the arms and the limb girdles. Muscle tone was considerably increased especially in the bilateral arms. The deep tendon reflexes were exaggerated with extensor plantar responses. Profuse sweating affected palms, soles and backs. No sensory disturbance was appreciated. There was no myotonic responses to percussion of muscles. Following laboratory data were normal; thyroid functions, CSF studies, anti HTLV-I antibody and long chain fatty acid in red blood cells, myelography and brain CT except for increased basal metabolic rate (53%). Electromyographic study in the arms and hands revealed spontaneous motor unit activities including doublets at rest and increased proportion of polyphasic potentials and high amplitude potentials in voluntary contraction. Biopsy of right quadriceps femoris muscle showed hypertrophy of type I fibers and angulated atrophy of type II fibers. Continuous muscle activities in upper limbs did not change at sleep or with intravenous administration of 7 mg diazepam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2803825

  12. Technology Development for a Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Thompson, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term hyperspectral microwave is used to indicate an all-weather sounding instrument that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earths atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions.

  13. El Proyecto Sismico "LARSE" - Trabajando Hacia un Futuro con Mas Seguridad para Los Angeles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henyey, Thomas L.; Fuis, Gary S.; Benthien, Mark L.; Burdette, Thomas R.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Clayton, Robert W.; Criley, Edward E.; Davis, Paul M.; Hendley, James W., II; Kohler, Monica D.; Lutter, William J.; McRaney, John K.; Murphy, Janice M.; Okaya, David A.; Ryberg, Trond; Simila, Gerald W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    La region de Los Angeles contiene una red de fallas activas, incluyendo muchas fallas por empuje que son profundas y no rompen la superficie de la tierra. Estas fallas ocultas incluyen la falla anteriormente desconocida que fue responsable por la devastacion que ocurrio durante el terremoto de Northridge en enero de 1994, el terremoto mas costoso en la historia de los Estados Unidos. El Experimento Sismico en la Region de Los Angeles (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, LARSE), esta localizando los peligros ocultos de los terremotos debajo de la region de Los Angeles para mejorar la construccion de las estructuras que pueden apoyar terremotos que son inevitables en el futuro, y que ayudaran a los cientificos determinar donde occurira el sacudimento mas fuerte y poderoso.

  14. Purification and characterization of an extracellular laccase from the anthracene-degrading fungus Fusarium solani MAS2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Rui; Luo, Zhu-Hua; Kwok-Kei Chow, R; Vrijmoed, L L P

    2010-12-01

    An extracellular laccase was purified from the culture medium of the non-white rot, anthracene-degrading fungal strain Fusarium solani MAS2. Both native PAGE and SDS-PAGE revealed one single band corresponding to a molecular weight of about 72 kDa. Treatment with endoglycosidase H reduced the molecular weight by 12%. The purified laccase maintained stable at pH 3-11 and up to 50 degrees C. The highest activity was detected at pH 3.0 and at 70 degrees C. The enzyme retained 46.2-97.2% of it activity in the presence of 20mM Pb(2+), Ni(2+), Cr(3+), and its activity was enhanced in the presence of 20mM Hg(2+). The laccase retained more than 50% of its activity in the presence of 5% acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), ethanol and methanol. The kinetic constants (K(m) and k(cat)) showed that 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMOP) and 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) were the more effective substrates rather than catechol and guaiacol. The novel properties of this laccase suggest its potential for biotechnological and environmental applications. PMID:20716485

  15. Investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics by 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, J H; Hoatson, G L; Vold, R L

    1998-11-01

    The technique of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy is presented for the investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics. To evaluate the effects of discrete random reorientation a Lie algebraic formalism based on the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is developed. The solution to the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is obtained both in the presence and absence of rf irradiation. This allows effects of molecular dynamics to be evaluated during rf pulses and extends the applicability of the formalism to arbitrary multiple pulse experiments. Theoretical methods are presented for the description of multiaxial dynamics with particular emphasis on the application of vector parameters to represent molecular rotations. Numerical time and powder integration algorithms are presented that are both efficient and easy to implement computationally. The applicability of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy for investigating molecular dynamics is evaluated from theoretical spectra. To demonstrate the potential of the technique the dynamics of thiourea-2H4 is investigated experimentally. From a series of variable temperature MAS and quadrupole echo spectra it has been found that the dynamics can be described by composite rotation about the CS and CN bonds. Both experiments are sensitive to the fast CS rotation which is shown to be described by the Arrhenius parameters E(CS) = 46.4 +/- 2.3 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CS))= 32.6 +/- 0.9. The MAS experiment represents a significant improvement by simultaneously allowing the dynamics of the slow CN rotation to be fully characterized in terms of E(CN) = 56.3 +/- 3.4 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CN)) = 25.3 +/- 1.1. PMID:9875600

  16. Tetrahedral site ordering in synthetic gallium albite: A 29Si MAS NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff, Barbara L.; Fleet, Michael E.; Burns, Peter C.

    1991-09-01

    The ordering of Si in the tetrahedral sites of gallium albite (NaGaSi 3O 8) has been studied by MAS NMR and Rietveld structure refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data. Low structural state (ordered) material was annealed at about 800°C under a load pressure of 1 kbar, and by Rietveld refinement has tetrahedral-site occupancies for Si of T1O = 0.24(3), T1m = 0.89(2), T2O = 0.98(2), and T2m = 0.89(2), respectively. Corresponding Si occupancies for high structural state (disordered) material are 0.71(2), 0.78(1), 0.76(2), and 0.74(2), respectively. The 29Si MAS NMR spectra of low gallium albite is equivalent to the three-peak spectrum of natural (Amelia) albite, with resonances at -89.6, -96.4, and -104.2 ppm but with relative peak areas of 0.79:1.0:0.77. The tetrahedral-site occupancies derived from the MAS NMR spectrum are in good agreement with those obtained by Rietveld refinement and, in particular, indicate that the -96.4 ppm peak must correspond to Si in T2O. This is the first independent assignment of the 29Si peak at -96 ppm in the spectrum of ordered albite to the T2O site. A peak at -96 ppm is also resolved in the spectrum of high gallium albite. The systematic differences in peak position between the 29Si MAS NMR spectra of low gallium albite and those of Amelia albite cannot be explained simply by the direct replacement of Al by Ga, without a change in angle at the bridging oxygen atoms.

  17. Application of solids MAS nuclear magnetic resonance to study of diagenetic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, S.E.; Woessner, D.E.

    1984-04-01

    Magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS-NMR) provides the opportunity to probe composition of and ordering in minerals involved in the formation and alteration of sediments. MAS-NMR has the capability to detect a large number of elements, including aluminum, silicon, boron, oxygen, and magnesium. The chemical state, structural location, and with cross polarization, hydration character and surface proximity can also be determined using this method. Although MAS-NMR is relatively new and quantitative methodology is still being developed, a variety of geologic processes have been clarified through its application. Use of /sup 27/Al NMR allows detailed determination of the smectite-illite transformation by monitoring the movements of aluminum into tetrahedral positions and resultant cation ordering. Because /sup 27/Al is detectable to low ppm levels, clay mineral components can be determined well below XRD detection levels. The /sup 29/Si and /sup 27/Al MAS-NMR have sufficient resolution to discriminate between minerals in a natural assemblage but not with the resolution of XRD. Quadrupolar nuclei such as /sup 27/Al have relatively poor spectral resolution as compared to nonquadrupolar nuclei such as /sup 29/Si. However, modern high field instrumentation can discriminate between most aluminum-containing minerals including aluminum oxides, hydroxides, oxyhydroxides, clays, and feldspars, as well as trace aluminum levels in quartz, cristobalite, and tridymite. The combination of /sup 27/Al and /sup 29/Si NMR (and availability of other nuclei) provide a powerful aid to the resolution of exploration and production problems including determination of minor to trace amorphous components, hydration state of elements in cherts and clays, and formation damage.

  18. Analysis of electron donors in photosystems in oxygenic photosynthesis by photo-CIDNP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Najdanova, M; Janssen, G J; de Groot, H J M; Matysik, J; Alia, A

    2015-11-01

    Both photosystem I and photosystem II are considerably similar in molecular architecture but they operate at very different electrochemical potentials. The origin of the different redox properties of these RCs is not yet clear. In recent years, insight was gained into the electronic structure of photosynthetic cofactors through the application of photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) with magic-angle spinning NMR (MAS NMR). Non-Boltzmann populated nuclear spin states of the radical pair lead to strongly enhanced signal intensities that allow one to observe the solid-state photo-CIDNP effect from both photosystem I and II from isolated reaction center of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and duckweed (Spirodela oligorrhiza) and from the intact cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis by (13)C and (15)N MAS NMR. This review provides an overview on the photo-CIDNP MAS NMR studies performed on PSI and PSII that provide important ingredients toward reconstruction of the electronic structures of the donors in PSI and PSII. PMID:26282679

  19. Activation of the Contact System at the Surface of Fusobacterium necrophorum Represents a Possible Virulence Mechanism in Lemièrre's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Karin; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum causes Lemièrre's syndrome, a serious disease with septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, pulmonary involvement, and systemic inflammation. The contact system is a link between inflammation and coagulation, and contact activation by the bacteria could therefore contribute to the abnormal coagulation and inflammation seen in patients with Lemièrre's syndrome. In this study, F. necrophorum was found to bind radiolabeled high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK), a central component of the contact system. Binding was inhibited by the addition of unlabeled HK and domain D5 of HK but not other components of the contact system, indicating a specific interaction mediated through the D5 region. Binding of HK was significantly reduced after pretreatment of the bacteria with trypsin, suggesting that surface proteins are involved in HK binding. Incubation of the bacteria with human plasma resulted in an HK breakdown pattern suggestive of bradykinin release, and bradykinin was also detected in the supernatant. In addition, we show that factor XI (FXI), another component of the contact system, binds to F. necrophorum and that the bound FXI reconstitutes the activated partial thromboplastin time of FXI-deficient plasma. Thrombin activity was detected at the surface of the bacteria following incubation with plasma, indicating that the intrinsic pathway of coagulation is activated at the surface. This activity was completely blocked by inhibitors of the contact system. The combined results show that the contact system is activated at the surface of F. necrophorum, suggesting a pathogenic role for this system in Lemièrre's syndrome. PMID:21646449

  20. Evaluation of Potential Protective Factors Against Metabolic Syndrome in Bottlenose Dolphins: Feeding and Activity Patterns of Dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Randall S.; McHugh, Katherine A.; Douglas, David C.; Shippee, Steve; McCabe, Elizabeth Berens; Barros, Nélio B.; Phillips, Goldie T.

    2013-01-01

    Free-ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) living in Sarasota Bay, Florida appear to have a lower risk of developing insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome compared to a group of dolphins managed under human care. Similar to humans, differences in diet and activity cycles between these groups may explain why Sarasota dolphins have lower insulin, glucose, and lipids. To identify potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome, existing and new data were incorporated to describe feeding and activity patterns of the Sarasota Bay wild dolphin community. Sarasota dolphins eat a wide variety of live fish and spend 10–20% of daylight hours foraging and feeding. Feeding occurs throughout the day, with the dolphins eating small proportions of their total daily intake in brief bouts. The natural pattern of wild dolphins is to feed as necessary and possible at any time of the day or night. Wild dolphins rarely eat dead fish or consume large amounts of prey in concentrated time periods. Wild dolphins are active throughout the day and night; they may engage in bouts of each key activity category at any time during daytime. Dive patterns of radio-tagged dolphins varied only slightly with time of day. Travel rates may be slightly lower at night, suggesting a diurnal rhythm, albeit not one involving complete, extended rest. In comparison, the managed dolphins are older; often fed a smaller variety of frozen-thawed fish types; fed fish species not in their natural diet; feedings and engaged activities are often during the day; and they are fed larger but fewer meals. In summary, potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome in dolphins may include young age, activity, and small meals fed throughout the day and night, and specific fish nutrients. These protective factors against insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are similar to those reported in humans. Further studies may benefit humans and dolphins. PMID:24133483

  1. Evaluation of potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome in bottlenose dolphins:feeding and activity patterns of dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Randall S.; McHugh, Katherine A.; Douglas, David C.; Shippee, Steve; McCabe, Elizabeth Berens; Barros, Nélio B.; Phillips, Goldie T.

    2014-01-01

    Free-ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) living in Sarasota Bay, Florida appear to have a lower risk of developing insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome compared to a group of dolphins managed under human care. Similar to humans, differences in diet and activity cycles between these groups may explain why Sarasota dolphins have lower insulin, glucose, and lipids. To identify potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome, existing and new data were incorporated to describe feeding and activity patterns of the Sarasota Bay wild dolphin community. Sarasota dolphins eat a wide variety of live fish and spend 10–20% of daylight hours foraging and feeding. Feeding occurs throughout the day, with the dolphins eating small proportions of their total daily intake in brief bouts. The natural pattern of wild dolphins is to feed as necessary and possible at any time of the day or night. Wild dolphins rarely eat dead fish or consume large amounts of prey in concentrated time periods. Wild dolphins are active throughout the day and night; they may engage in bouts of each key activity category at any time during daytime. Dive patterns of radio-tagged dolphins varied only slightly with time of day. Travel rates may be slightly lower at night, suggesting a diurnal rhythm, albeit not one involving complete, extended rest. In comparison, the managed dolphins are older; often fed a smaller variety of frozen-thawed fish types; fed fish species not in their natural diet; feedings and engaged activities are often during the day; and they are fed larger but fewer meals. In summary, potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome in dolphins may include young age, activity, and small meals fed throughout the day and night, and specific fish nutrients. These protective factors against insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are similar to those reported in humans. Further studies may benefit humans and dolphins.

  2. The renin-angiotensin system: a target of and contributor to dyslipidemias, altered glucose homeostasis, and hypertension of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Kelly; Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Cassis, Lisa A

    2012-03-15

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important therapeutic target in the treatment of hypertension. Obesity has emerged as a primary contributor to essential hypertension in the United States and clusters with other metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, hypertension, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol) defined within the metabolic syndrome. In addition to hypertension, RAS blockade may also serve as an effective treatment strategy to control impaired glucose and insulin tolerance and dyslipidemias in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or specific cholesterol metabolites have been demonstrated to activate components required for the synthesis [angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)], degradation (ACE2), or responsiveness (angiotensin II type 1 receptors, Mas receptors) to angiotensin peptides in cell types (e.g., pancreatic islet cells, adipocytes, macrophages) that mediate specific disorders of the metabolic syndrome. An activated local RAS in these cell types may contribute to dysregulated function by promoting oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. This review will discuss data demonstrating the regulation of components of the RAS by cholesterol and its metabolites, glucose, and/or insulin in cell types implicated in disorders of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, we discuss data supporting a role for an activated local RAS in dyslipidemias and glucose intolerance/insulin resistance and the development of hypertension in the metabolic syndrome. Identification of an activated RAS as a common thread contributing to several disorders of the metabolic syndrome makes the use of angiotensin receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors an intriguing and novel option for multisymptom treatment. PMID:22227126

  3. Xanthine Oxidase Activity Is Associated with Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Inflammatory and Oxidative Status Markers in Metabolic Syndrome: Effects of a Single Exercise Session

    PubMed Central

    Feoli, Ana Maria Pandolfo; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Piovesan, Carla Haas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in metabolic syndrome in subjects submitted to a single exercise session. We also investigated parameters of oxidative and inflammatory status. Materials/Methods. A case-control study (9 healthy and 8 MS volunteers) was performed to measure XO, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase activities, lipid peroxidation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) content, glucose levels, and lipid profile. Body mass indices, abdominal circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and TG levels were also determined. The exercise session consisted of 3 minutes of stretching, 3 minutes of warm-up, 30 minutes at a constant dynamic workload at a moderate intensity, and 3 minutes at a low speed. The blood samples were collected before and 15 minutes after the exercise session. Results. Serum XO activity was higher in MS group compared to control group. SOD activity was lower in MS subjects. XO activity was correlated with SOD, abdominal circumference, body mass indices, and hsCRP. The single exercise session reduced the SOD activity in the control group. Conclusions. Our data support the association between oxidative stress and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and suggest XO is present in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24967004

  4. Determination of the catalytic activity of LEOPARD syndrome-associated SHP2 mutants toward parafibromin, a bona fide SHP2 substrate involved in Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Noda, Saori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takeru; Tanuma, Sei-ichi; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-22

    SHP2, encoded by the PTPN11 gene, is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that plays a key role in the proliferation of cells via RAS-ERK activation. SHP2 also promotes Wnt signaling by dephosphorylating parafibromin. Germline missense mutations of PTPN11 are found in more than half of patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) and LEOPARD syndrome (LS), both of which are congenital developmental disorders with multiple common symptoms. However, whereas NS-associated PTPN11 mutations give rise to gain-of-function SHP2 mutants, LS-associated SHP2 mutants are reportedly loss-of-function mutants. To determine the phosphatase activity of LS-associated SHP2 more appropriately, we performed an in vitro phosphatase assay using tyrosine-phosphorylated parafibromin, a biologically relevant substrate of SHP2 and the positive regulator of Wnt signaling that is activated through SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation. We found that LS-associated SHP2 mutants (Y279C, T468M, Q506P, and Q510E) exhibited a substantially reduced phosphatase activity toward parafibromin when compared with wild-type SHP2. Furthermore, each of the LS-associated mutants displayed a differential degree of decrease in phosphatase activity. Deviation of the SHP2 catalytic activity from a certain range, either too strong or too weak, may therefore lead to similar clinical outcomes in NS and LS, possibly through an imbalanced Wnt signal caused by inadequate dephosphorylation of parafibromin. PMID:26742426

  5. Inhibition of helicase activity by a small molecule impairs Werner syndrome helicase (WRN) function in the cellular response to DNA damage or replication stress.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Monika; Sommers, Joshua A; Shoemaker, Robert H; Brosh, Robert M

    2011-01-25

    Modulation of DNA repair proteins by small molecules has attracted great interest. An in vitro helicase activity screen was used to identify molecules that modulate DNA unwinding by Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), mutated in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome. A small molecule from the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set designated NSC 19630 [1-(propoxymethyl)-maleimide] was identified that inhibited WRN helicase activity but did not affect other DNA helicases [Bloom syndrome (BLM), Fanconi anemia group J (FANCJ), RECQ1, RecQ, UvrD, or DnaB). Exposure of human cells to NSC 19630 dramatically impaired growth and proliferation, induced apoptosis in a WRN-dependent manner, and resulted in elevated γ-H2AX and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) foci. NSC 19630 exposure led to delayed S-phase progression, consistent with the accumulation of stalled replication forks, and to DNA damage in a WRN-dependent manner. Exposure to NSC 19630 sensitized cancer cells to the G-quadruplex-binding compound telomestatin or a poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. Sublethal dosage of NSC 19630 and the chemotherapy drug topotecan acted synergistically to inhibit cell proliferation and induce DNA damage. The use of this WRN helicase inhibitor molecule may provide insight into the importance of WRN-mediated pathway(s) important for DNA repair and the replicational stress response. PMID:21220316

  6. METABOLIC SYNDROME IN RELATION TO CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS, ACTIVE AND SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR IN HIV+ HISPANICS WITH AND WITHOUT LIPODYSTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Marrero, Farah A.; Santana-Bagur, Jorge L.; Joyner, Michael J.; Rodríguez-Zayas, Jorge; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics in Puerto Rico (PR) have a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome (met-syn), partially explained by low physical activity (PA) and possibly low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak). Met-syn is also associated with lipodystrophy in HIV infected (HIV+) adults taking antiretroviral therapies. However, associations between met-syn, VO2peak, PA, sedentary behavior and lipodystrophy among HIV+ Hispanics have not been adequately reported. Objective We tested the following hypotheses: 1) HIV+ Hispanics with lipodystrophy (HIV-Lipo) would have a higher prevalence of met-syn, lower VO2peak and PA, and higher sedentary behavior compared with those without lipodystrophy (HIV-no-Lipo) and without HIV infection (Non-HIV); and 2) met-syn would be inversely associated with VO2peak and PA, and directly associated with sedentary behavior. METHODS Ninety Hispanic adults (32 HIV-Lipo, 28 HIV-no-Lipo, 30 Non-HIV) completed measurements of VO2peak, anthropometry, PA and sedentary behavior with accelerometry, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, and lipids. ANOVA and chi-square tests were used to detect differences between groups, and regression analyses to test associations between variables. RESULTS More HIV-Lipo (69%) had met-syn compared with HIV-no-Lipo (39%) and Non-HIV (37%) (P=0.002). Sedentary behavior and PA were not different, but VO2peak differed between all groups: lowest in HIV-Lipo and highest in non-HIV. PA and sedentary behavior were not associated with met-syn, but PA was directly associated with VO peak (R2=0.26, p<0.01). Also, a lower odds ratio for met-syn was observed with higher VO2peak (0.87; 95% CI: 0.83-0.95). CONCLUSION Met-syn is related to lipodystrophy in HIV+ Hispanics in PR, and high VO2peak may protect against met-syn in this population. PMID:25563033

  7. Strategies for Surveillance of Pediatric Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), 2000–2007

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Kanyin L.; Apostal, Mirasol; Comstock, Nicole; Hurd, Sharon; Webb, Tameka Hayes; Mickelson, Stephanie; Scheftel, Joni; Smith, Glenda; Shiferaw, Beletshachew; Boothe, Effie

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the most common cause of acute kidney failure among US children. The Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) conducts population-based surveillance of pediatric HUS to measure the incidence of disease and to validate surveillance trends in associated Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 infection. Methods. We report the incidence of pediatric HUS, which is defined as HUS in children <18 years. We compare the results from provider-based surveillance and hospital discharge data review and examine the impact of different case definitions on the findings of the surveillance system. Results. During 2000–2007, 627 pediatric HUS cases were reported. Fifty-two percent of cases were classified as confirmed (diarrhea, anemia, microangiopathic changes, low platelet count, and acute renal impairment). The average annual crude incidence rate for all reported cases of pediatric HUS was 0.78 per 100 000 children <18 years. Regardless of the case definition used, the year-to-year pattern of incidence appeared similar. More cases were captured by provider-based surveillance (76%) than by hospital discharge data review (68%); only 49% were identified by both methods. Conclusions. The overall incidence of pediatric HUS was affected by key characteristics of the surveillance system, including the method of ascertainment and the case definitions. However, year-to-year patterns were similar for all methods examined, suggesting that several approaches to HUS surveillance can be used to track trends. PMID:22572665

  8. Alterations in Membrane Caveolae and BKCa Channel Activity in Skin Fibroblasts in Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Gongyi; Jacob, Robert F.; Kaulin, Yuri; DiMuzio, Paul; Xie, Yi; Mason, R. Preston; Tint, G. Stephen; Steiner, Robert D.; Roulett, Jean-Baptiste; Merkens, Louise; Whitaker-Mendez, Diana; Frank, Phillipe G.; Lisanti, Michael; Cox, Robert H.; Tulenko, Thomas N.

    2011-01-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an inherited disorder of cholesterol synthesis caused by mutations in DHCR7 which encodes the final enzyme in the cholesterol synthesis pathway. The immediate precursor to cholesterol synthesis, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) accumulates in the plasma and cells of SLOS patients which has led to the idea that the accumulation of abnormal sterols and/or reduction in cholesterol underlies the phenotypic abnormalities of SLOS. We tested the hypothesis that 7-DHC accumulates in membrane caveolae where it disturbs caveolar bilayer structure-function. Membrane caveolae from skin fibroblasts obtained from SLOS patients were isolated and found to accumulate 7-DHC. In caveolar-like model membranes containing 7-DHC, subtle, but complex alterations in intermolecular packing, lipid order and membrane width were observed. In addition, the BKCa K+ channel, which co-migrates with caveolin-1 in a membrane fraction enriched with cholesterol, was impaired in SLOS cells as reflected by reduced single channel conductance and a 50 mV rightward shift in the channel activation voltage. In addition, a marked decrease in BKCa protein but not mRNA expression levels were seen suggesting post-translational alterations. Accompanying these changes was a reduction in caveolin-1 protein and mRNA levels, but membrane caveolar structure was not altered. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that 7-DHC accumulation in the caveolar membrane results in defective caveolar signaling. However, additional cellular alterations beyond mere changes associated with abnormal sterols in the membrane likely contribute to the pathogenesis of SLOS. PMID:21724437

  9. Affective dysfunction in a mouse model of Rett syndrome: Therapeutic effects of environmental stimulation and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Mari A; Gray, Laura J; Pelka, Gregory J; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Christodoulou, John; Tam, Patrick P L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and consequent dysregulation of brain maturation. Patients suffer from a range of debilitating physical symptoms, however, behavioral and emotional symptoms also severely affect their quality of life. Here, we present previously unreported and clinically relevant affective dysfunction in the female heterozygous Mecp2(tm1Tam) mouse model of RTT (129sv and C57BL6 mixed background). The affective dysfunction and aberrant anxiety-related behavior of the Mecp2(+/-) mice were found to be reversible with environmental enrichment (EE) from 4 weeks of age. The effect of exercise alone (via wheel running) was also explored, providing the first evidence that increased voluntary physical activity in an animal model of RTT is beneficial for some phenotypes. Mecp2(+/-) mutants displayed elevated corticosterone despite decreased Crh expression, demonstrating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. EE of Mecp2(+/-) mice normalized basal serum corticosterone and hippocampal BDNF protein levels. The enrichment-induced rescue appears independent of the transcriptional regulation of the MeCP2 targets Bdnf exon 4 and Crh. These findings provide new insight into the neurodevelopmental role of MeCP2 and pathogenesis of RTT, in particular the affective dysfunction. The positive outcomes of environmental stimulation and physical exercise have implications for the development of therapies targeting the affective symptoms, as well as behavioral and cognitive dimensions, of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26019053

  10. Conformation analysis and molecular mobility of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene copolymer using solid-state 19F MAS and 1H --> 19F CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aimi, Keitaro; Ando, Shinji

    2004-07-01

    The changes in the conformation and molecular mobility accompanied by a phase transition in the crystalline domain were analyzed for ethylene (E) and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) copolymer, ETFE, using variable-temperature (VT) solid-state 19F magic angle spinning (MAS) and 1H --> 19F cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The shifts of the signals for fluorines in TFE units to higher frequency and the continuing decrease and increase in the T1rho(F) values suggest that conformational exchange motions exist in the crystalline domain between 42 and 145 degrees C. Quantum chemical calculations of magnetic shielding constants showed that the high-frequency shift of TFE units should be induced by trans to gauche conformational changes at the CH2-CF2 linkage in the E-TFE unit. Although the 19F signals of the crystalline domain are substantially overlapped with those of the amorphous domain at ambient probe temperature (68 degrees C), they were successfully distinguished by using the dipolar filter and spin-lock pulse sequences at 145 degrees C. The dipolar coupling constants for the crystalline domain, which can be estimated by fitting the dipolar oscillation behaviors in the 1H --> 19F CP curve, showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature from 42 to 145 degrees C. This is due to the averaging of 1H-19F dipolar interactions originating from the molecular motion in the crystalline domain. The increase in molecular mobility in the crystalline domain was clearly shown by VT T1rho(F) and 1H --> 19F CP measurements in the phase transition temperature range. PMID:15181627

  11. Protective Effect of Cornus mas Fruits Extract on Serum Biomarkers in CCl4-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Banihabib, Nafiseh; Es. Haghi, Masoud; Panahi, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nowadays attention to use herbs such as cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) is increasing, which contains high levels of antioxidants and anthocyanins. Cornus mas fruits have been used for gastrointestinal and excretory disorders for many years in traditional medicine, also may improve liver and kidney functions, and have protective effects such as anti-allergic, antidiabetic, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antihistamine and antimalarial properties. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate protective effects of Cornus mas fruits extract on serum biomarkers in CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in male rats. Materials and Methods: Hepatotoxicity was induced by administration of carbon tetrachloride (1 mL/kg i.p.) in 1:1 dilution with olive oil. To evaluate the effect of Cornus mas fruits extract on disease progression, serum marker enzymes, serum total protein and albumin and liver lipid peroxidation were determined in CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. Results: Oral administration of Cornus mas fruits extract to rats for 14 days provided a significant (P < 0.05) hepatoprotection by decreasing elevated serum level of enzymes, total serum protein, albumin and liver lipid peroxidation content. Conclusions: Cornus mas fruit extract effect may be due to including some antioxidant components, which caused membrane stabilizing and normalization of fluctuated biochemical profiles induced by CCl4 exposure. Our results validated the traditional use of Cornus mas in the treatment of liver disorders. PMID:24829584

  12. Phase Cycling Schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS Solid State NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY414, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D 1H/1H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY412, XY413, XY414, and XY814 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T10T2,±2, T1,±1T2,±1, etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field in homogeneity effects revealed that XY414 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp-RFDR are also analyzed

  13. Global Fold of Human Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptor Probed by Solid-State 13C-, 15N-MAS NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Vukoti, Krishna; Lynch, Diane L.; Hurst, Dow P.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The global fold of human cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor in the agonist-bound active state in lipid bilayers was investigated by solid-state 13C- and 15N magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, in combination with chemical-shift prediction from a structural model of the receptor obtained by microsecond-long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Uniformly 13C-, and 15N-labeled CB2 receptor was expressed in milligram quantities by bacterial fermentation, purified, and functionally reconstituted into liposomes. 13C MAS NMR spectra were recorded without sensitivity enhancement for direct comparison of Cα, Cβ, and C=O bands of superimposed resonances with predictions from protein structures generated by MD. The experimental NMR spectra matched the calculated spectra reasonably well indicating agreement of the global fold of the protein between experiment and simulations. In particular, the 13C chemical shift distribution of Cα resonances was shown to be very sensitive to both the primary amino acid sequence and the secondary structure of CB2. Thus the shape of the Cα band can be used as an indicator of CB2 global fold. The prediction from MD simulations indicated that upon receptor activation a rather limited number of amino acid residues, mainly located in the extracellular loop 2 and the second half of intracellular loop 3, change their chemical shifts significantly (≥1.5 ppm for carbons and ≥5.0 ppm for nitrogens). Simulated two-dimensional 13Cα(i)-13C=O(i) and 13C=O(i)-15NH(i+1) dipolar-interaction correlation spectra provide guidance for selective amino-acid labeling and signal assignment schemes to study the molecular mechanism of activation of CB2 by solid-state MAS NMR. PMID:23999926

  14. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  15. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  16. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have children and who have a family history of Morquio syndrome. Counseling is also recommended for families who have a child with Morquio syndrome to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available.

  17. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001549.htm Asperger syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form ...

  18. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis References Joseph RL, Alleva JT, Hudgins TH. Piriformis syndrome. In: Frontera: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  19. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid gland. Pendred syndrome also can affect the vestibular system, which controls balance. Some people with Pendred syndrome will show vestibular weakness when their balance is tested. However, the ...

  20. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  1. Premenstrual syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;2:CD001396. Lentz GM. Primary and secondary dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: etiology, diagnosis, management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  2. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing syndrome is called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone are examples of this type of ... Blood cortisol levels Blood sugar Saliva cortisol levels Dexamethasone suppression test 24-hour urine for cortisol and ...

  3. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  4. Hurler syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hurler syndrome is a rare disease of metabolism in which a person cannot break down long chains of sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (formerly called mucopolysaccharides). Hurler syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidosis, ...

  5. Bloom's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ...

  6. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes developmental delay and neurological problems. The physician Harry Angelman first delineated the syndrome in 1965, when ... 202-534-3731 Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 8588 Potter Park Drive Suite 500 Sarasota, FL 34238 national@ ...

  7. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  8. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  9. Acromegaly and McCune-Albright Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salenave, Sylvie; Boyce, Alison M.; Collins, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) includes the triad of poly/monostotic fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait spots, and hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies. Acromegaly affects around 20% of MAS patients. Aims: The objective was to review all reported cases of acromegaly associated with MAS. Methods: All studies and case reports of acromegaly in patients with MAS were systematically sought in the world literature up to January 2013. We also included new data (from three unreported cases) and updated data on 23 previously reported patients from our two centers. Results: We reviewed the cases of 112 patients (65 males). Mean age at diagnosis of acromegaly was 24.4 years (range, 3–64). Among the 40 pediatric patients, 23 (57%) had precocious puberty. GH/IGF-1 excess was suggested by accelerated growth in 85% of pediatric cases. Acromegaly was almost always associated with skull base fibrous dysplasia. Modern imaging techniques (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) revealed an adenoma in 54% of the patients (macroadenoma in more than two-thirds). Median GH levels and mean IGF-1 SD score at diagnosis were 57 μg/L (2.8 to 291 μg/L) and 8 (2.3 to 24), respectively. Hyperprolactinemia was present in 81% (mean, 149 μg/L; range, 21–600). Pituitary surgery, performed in 25 cases, very rarely cured the GH/IGF-1 excess. Somatostatin analogs improved GH/IGF-1 levels in most patients but achieved control of acromegaly in only 17 (30%) of 56 patients. Pegvisomant achieved normal IGF-1 levels in 10 of 13 cases. Conclusion: Acromegaly, which is present in 20–30% of patients with MAS, raises particular diagnostic and therapeutic issues. PMID:24517150

  10. Dumping Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  11. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  12. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. ... In most cases, Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. This form of Down syndrome is called trisomy 21. ...

  13. Unmasking Diogenes Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Kashinath; Gopinath, Hima; Kini, Hema; Kumar, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Diogenes syndrome is characterized by extreme self-neglect, social withdrawal, and poor personal and domestic hygiene. We report a case of Diogenes syndrome presenting with dermatitis passivata. An unusual “mask” of dirt resembling a carapace, onset of neglect after awareness of a breast lump and resumption of personal grooming and social activities after removal of the lump and counseling were seen. PMID:26120158

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Cantú syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Cantú syndrome Cantú syndrome Enable ...

  15. Carney Complex and McCune Albright Syndrome: An overview of clinical manifestations and human molecular genetics

    PubMed Central

    Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine neoplasia syndromes feature a wide spectrum of benign and malignant tumors of endocrine and non-endocrine organs associated with other clinical manifestations. This study outlines the main clinical features, genetic basis, and molecular mechanisms behind two multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes that share quite a bit of similarities, but one can be inherited whereas the other is always sporadic, Carney complex (CNC) and McCune-Albright (MAS), respectively. Spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac and other myxomas, and different types of endocrine tumors and other characterize Carney complex, which is caused largely by inactivating Protein Kinase A, Regulatory subunit, type I, Alpha (PRKAR1A) gene mutations. The main features of McCune-Albright are fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), café-au-lait macules and precocious puberty; the disease is caused by activating mutations in the Guanine Nucleotide-binding protein, Alpha-stimulating activity polypeptide (GNAS) gene which are always somatic. We review the clinical manifestations of the two syndromes and provide an update on their molecular genetics PMID:24012779

  16. Carney complex and McCune Albright syndrome: an overview of clinical manifestations and human molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2014-04-01

    Endocrine neoplasia syndromes feature a wide spectrum of benign and malignant tumors of endocrine and non-endocrine organs associated with other clinical manifestations. This study outlines the main clinical features, genetic basis, and molecular mechanisms behind two multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes that share quite a bit of similarities, but one can be inherited whereas the other is always sporadic, Carney complex (CNC) and McCune-Albright (MAS), respectively. Spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac and other myxomas, and different types of endocrine tumors and other characterize Carney complex, which is caused largely by inactivating Protein kinase A, regulatory subunit, type I, Alpha (PRKAR1A) gene mutations. The main features of McCune-Albright are fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), café-au-lait macules and precocious puberty; the disease is caused by activating mutations in the Guanine Nucleotide-binding protein, Alpha-stimulating activity polypeptide (GNAS) gene which are always somatic. We review the clinical manifestations of the two syndromes and provide an update on their molecular genetics. PMID:24012779

  17. Iliopsoas Syndrome in Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Catherine; Swanson, David; Garofolo, Garret; Rose, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coxa saltans refers to a constellation of diagnoses that cause snapping of the hip and is a major cause of anterior hip pain in dancers. When the internal type is accompanied by weakness or pain, it is referred to as iliopsoas syndrome. Iliopsoas syndrome is the result of repetitive active hip flexion in abduction and can be confused with other hip pathology, most commonly of labral etiology. Purpose: To report the incidence, clinical findings, treatment protocol, and results of treatment for iliopsoas syndrome in a population of dancers. Study Design: Retrospective case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A retrospective database review of 653 consecutive patients evaluated for musculoskeletal complaints over a 3-year period was completed. The diagnosis of iliopsoas syndrome was made based on anterior hip or groin pain, weakness with resisted hip flexion in abduction, or symptomatic clicking or snapping with a positive iliopsoas test. Patients identified with iliopsoas syndrome were further stratified according to age at time of onset, insidious versus acute onset, duration of symptoms, side of injury, presence of rest pain, pain with activities of daily living, and associated lower back pain. All patients diagnosed with iliopsoas syndrome underwent physical therapy, including hip flexor stretching and strengthening, pelvic mobilization, and modification of dance technique or exposure as required. Results: A total of 49 dancers were diagnosed and treated for iliopsoas syndrome. Within this injured population of 653 patients, the incidence in female dancers was 9.2%, significantly higher than that in male dancers (3.2%). The mean age at the time of injury was 24.6 years. The incidence of iliopsoas syndrome in dancers younger than 18 years was 12.8%, compared with 7% in dancers older than 18 years. Student dancers had the highest incidence (14%), followed by amateur dancers (7.5%), while professional dancers had the lowest incidence (4.6%). All

  18. Oculocerebral hypopigmentation syndrome (Cross syndrome).

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Unsal, E; Köse, G

    1991-01-01

    A typical case of Cross syndrome with hypopigmentation, mental and psychomotor retardation, spasticity, bilateral optic atrophy and dental defects in a three-year-old boy is presented. The clinical features of this rare syndrome are discussed. PMID:1814043

  19. Relation of Patients Living Without a Partner or Spouse to Being Physical Active after Acute Coronary Syndromes (From the PULSE Accelerometry Substudy)

    PubMed Central

    Green, Philip; Newman, Jonathan D.; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Davidson, Karina W.; Maurer, Mathew S.; Schwartz, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Living alone is associated with adverse outcomes after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). One potential mediator of the relationship between partner status and outcomes after an ACS is physical activity. To evaluate the association of partner status with physical activity after an ACS we analyzed data from 107 participants enrolled in the Prescription Use, Lifestyle, and Stress Evaluation Study, a prospective observational study of post-ACS patients. Accelerometers were employed to measure physical activity following hospital discharge. The primary outcome measure was maximum 10 hours of daytime activity one month after discharge. One month after discharge from an ACS hospitalization, participants without a partner or spouse exhibited 24.4% lower daytime activity than those with a partner or spouse (p=0.003). After controlling for age, gender, body mass index, Charlson comorbidity index, and traditional psychosocial and clinical cardiovascular correlates of post-ACS physical activity, partner status remained an independent predictor of post-ACS physical activity (20.5% lower daytime activity among those without partner or spouse, p=0.008). In conclusion, in this study of accelerometer-measured physical activity after an ACS hospitalization, those without a partner or spouse exhibit significantly less physical activity than those with a partner or spouse one month after discharge from the hospital. Low physical activity may be an important mediator of the prognosis associated with partner status after an ACS. PMID:23411104

  20. Griscelli syndrome: characterization of a new mutation and rescue of T-cytotoxic activity by retroviral transfer of RAB27A gene.

    PubMed

    Bizario, João C S; Feldmann, Jérôme; Castro, Fabíola A; Ménasché, Gaël; Jacob, Cristina M A; Cristofani, L; Casella, Erasmo B; Voltarelli, Júlio C; de Saint-Basile, Geneviève; Espreafico, Enilza M

    2004-07-01

    Griscelli syndrome (GS) is caused by mutations in the MYO5A (GS1), RAB27A (GS2), or MLPH (GS3) genes, all of which lead to a similar pigmentary dilution. In addition, GS1 patients show primary neurological impairment, whereas GS2 patients present immunodeficiency and periods of lymphocyte proliferation and activation, leading to their infiltration in many organs, such as the nervous system, causing secondary neurological damage. We report the diagnosis of GS2 in a 4-year-old child with haemophagocytic syndrome, immunodeficiency, and secondary neurological disorders. Typical melanosome accumulation was found in skin melanocytes and pigment clumps were observed in hair shafts. Two heterozygous mutant alleles of the RAB27A gene were found, a C-T transition (C352T) that leads to Q118stop and a G-C transversion on the exon 5 splicing donor site (G467+1C). Functional assays showed increased cellular activation and decreased cytotoxic activity of NK and CD8+ T cells, associated with defective lytic granules release. Myosin-Va expression and localization in the patient lymphocytes were also analyzed. Most importantly, we show that cytotoxic activity of the patient's CD8+ T lymphocytes can be rescued in vitro by RAB27A gene transfer mediated by a recombinant retroviral vector, a first step towards a potential treatment of the acute phase of GS2 by RAB27A transduced lymphocytes. PMID:15163896

  1. Going, going, gone: the impact of white-nose syndrome on the summer activity of the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus)

    PubMed Central

    Dzal, Yvonne; McGuire, Liam P.; Veselka, Nina; Fenton, M. Brock

    2011-01-01

    Since its discovery in the winter of 2005–2006, white-nose syndrome (WNS) has killed over one million little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) in the American northeast. Although many studies have reported die-offs of bats at winter hibernacula, it is important to understand how bat mortality linked to WNS at winter hibernacula affects bat activity levels in their summer ranges. In the summer (May–August) of 2007, 2008 and 2009, we recorded echolocation calls to determine bat activity at sites along the Hudson River, NY (within approx. 100 km of where WNS was first reported). We documented a 78 per cent decline in the summer activity of M. lucifugus, coinciding with the arrival and spread of WNS. We suggest that mortality of M. lucifugus in winter hibernacula is reflected by reduced levels of activity in the summer and that WNS affects the entire bat population of an area, and not only individual hibernacula. PMID:21106570

  2. Going, going, gone: the impact of white-nose syndrome on the summer activity of the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus).

    PubMed

    Dzal, Yvonne; McGuire, Liam P; Veselka, Nina; Fenton, M Brock

    2011-06-23

    Since its discovery in the winter of 2005-2006, white-nose syndrome (WNS) has killed over one million little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) in the American northeast. Although many studies have reported die-offs of bats at winter hibernacula, it is important to understand how bat mortality linked to WNS at winter hibernacula affects bat activity levels in their summer ranges. In the summer (May-August) of 2007, 2008 and 2009, we recorded echolocation calls to determine bat activity at sites along the Hudson River, NY (within approx. 100 km of where WNS was first reported). We documented a 78 per cent decline in the summer activity of M. lucifugus, coinciding with the arrival and spread of WNS. We suggest that mortality of M. lucifugus in winter hibernacula is reflected by reduced levels of activity in the summer and that WNS affects the entire bat population of an area, and not only individual hibernacula. PMID:21106570

  3. The effects of a community-based nutrition and physical activity intervention on Metabolic Syndrome in rural Mississippians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) was employed to address obesity, which is a risk factor for chronic diseases such as hypertension, heart disease, and Metabolic Syndrome (MS), in Mississippi Delta residents where incidence of these diseases is higher than national averages. University p...

  4. Using a Team Approach to Address Bullying of Students with Asperger's Syndrome in Activity-Based Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia; Simpson, Cynthia; Gaus, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of bullying among individuals with disabilities is alarming. Because of the social and motor deficiencies that individuals with Asperger's syndrome (AS) often display, they are frequently targets of bullying. The physical education setting often consists of a larger number of students than the typical academic instructional setting. This…

  5. Mothers and Fathers at Play with Their Children with Down Syndrome: Influence on Child Exploratory and Symbolic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Falco, Simona; Esposito, Gianluca; Venuti, Paola; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Through play children exercise their emerging mental abilities, and for their part, when in collaborative play, caregivers often adjust their behaviours to assist their children's progress. In this study, we focused on comparisons between play of Down Syndrome (DS) children with their two parents as well as on comparisons between the…

  6. Ligninolytic Activity of Fusarium virguliforme (SYN. F. solani f. sp. glycines), the Causal Agent of Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium virguliforme (syn. F. solani f. sp. glycines), a soil-borne fungus, is the causal agent of soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS), one of the most important diseases of soybean. Lignin degradation is not common in most soilborne fungi which are considered to be cellulose degraders only. In thi...

  7. SLOW-MAS NMR METHODS TO STUDY METABOLIC PROCESSES IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Bertram, Hanne Christine; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-09-25

    In vitro and in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy is widely used to measure metabolic profiles in cells, tissues, animals, and humans and to use them, e.g., for diagnosis and therapy response evaluations. However, the spectra often suffer from poor resolution due to variations in the isotropic bulk magnetic susceptibility present in biological objects, resulting in a broadening of the NMR lines. In principle this broadening can be averaged to zero by the technique of magic angle spinning (MAS), where the sample is rotated about an axis making an angle of 54o44’ relative to the external magnetic field. However, a problem is that in a standard MAS experiment spinning speeds of a kHz or more are required in order to avoid the occurrence of spinning sidebands (SSBs) in the spectra, which renders analysis of the spectra difficult again. At these spinning speeds the large centrifugal forces cause severe structural damage in larger biological objects, so that this method cannot be used to study metabolic processes in intact samples. In solid state NMR several methods have been developed where slow MAS is combined with special radio frequency pulse sequences to eliminate spinning side bands or separate them from the isotropic spectrum so that a SSB-free high-resolution isotropic spectrum is obtained. It has been shown recently that two methods, phase-adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) and phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT), can successfully be modified for applications in biological materials (1, 2). With PASS MAS speeds as low as 40 Hz can be employed, allowing non or minimally invasive in vitro studies of excised tissues and organs. This method was used, amongst other things, to study post mortem changes in the proton metabolite spectra in excised rabbit muscle tissue (3). With PHORMAT the NMR sensitivity is reduced and longer measuring times are required, but with this methodology the MAS speed can be reduced to ~1 Hz. This makes PHORMAT amenable for in vivo

  8. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome: the influence of modern diagnostic criteria on epidemiology and on Internet search activity by the public.

    PubMed

    Davis, Niall F; Gnanappiragasam, Sanjith; Thornhill, John A

    2015-10-01

    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is a chronic debilitating condition that is characterised by suprapubic pain and urinary symptoms such as urgency, nocturia and urinary frequency. The prevalence of the condition is increasing due to more inclusive diagnostic criteria. Herein, we review the evolving epidemiology of IC/PBS and investigate health seeking behaviour for the condition through Internet search activity. Study selection was performed in accordance with PRISMA. In addition, global search trends for the terms 'Interstitial Cystitis' and 'Painful Bladder Syndrome' from 2005 to 2015 were also evaluated using the 'Google Trends' search application. The mean search activity per month was recorded and mean activity at annual intervals calculated. Regional search activity by country and city was also measured. Prevalence rates for IC/PBS vary according to diagnostic criteria and range from 2% to 17.3% among the general population. Increased prevalence is associated with female gender and females with one first-degree relative affected. There has been an increase in global mean search activity for IC/PBS on an annual basis since 2005. The greatest increase in search activity was in USA, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, Ireland and India respectively. The top five cities for search activity for IC/PBS were in the USA. As diagnostic criteria for IC/PBS continues to become more inclusive it is likely that the prevalence will continue to increase. This is particularly true for the USA and Canada as these regions have demonstrated the greatest increase in Internet search activity for IC/ PBS. PMID:26816850

  9. 1H, 13C MAS NMR and GIAO-CPHF calculations of chloramphenicol, thiamphenicol and their pyrrole analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żołek, Teresa; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Krajewska, Dorota; Różański, Andrzej; Wawer, Iwona

    2003-02-01

    The 13C CP MAS and 1H MAS NMR and ab initio (GIAO-CPHF) calculations were used to obtain structural information on two known antibiotics: chloramphenicol, and thiamphenicol, and two new analogues: DL- threo-1-(1-methyl-4-nitro-pyrrole-2-yl)-2-dichloroacetamidopropane-1,3-diol and DL- threo-1-(1-methylsulfonylpyrrole-3-yl)-2-dichloroacetamidopropane-1,3-diol.

  10. Role of Mas receptor antagonist (A779) in renal hemodynamics in condition of blocked angiotensin II receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, A; Oryan, S; Nematbakhsh, M

    2016-03-01

    The vasodilatory effect of angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) is exerted in the vascular bed via Mas receptor (MasR) gender dependently. However, the crosstalk between MasR and angiotensin II (Ang II) types 1 and 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) may change some actions of Ang 1-7 in renal circulation. In this study by blocking AT1R and AT2R, the role of MasR in kidney hemodynamics was described. In anaesthetized male and female Wistar rats, the effects of saline as vehicle and MasR blockade (A779) were tested on mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal perfusion pressure (RPP), renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance (RVR) when both AT1R and AT2R were blocked by losartan and PD123319, respectively. In male rats, when AT1R and AT2R were blocked, there was a tendency for the increase in RBF/wet kidney tissue weight (RBF/KW) to be elevated by A779 as compared with the vehicle (P=0.08), and this was not the case in female rats. The impact of MasR on renal hemodynamics appears not to be sexual dimorphism either when Ang II receptors were blocked. It seems that co-blockade of all AT1R, AT2R, and MasR may alter RBF/ KW in male more than in female rats. These findings support a crosstalk between MasR and Ang II receptors in renal circulation. PMID:27030624

  11. Identification of Metastasis-Associated Metabolic Profiles of Tumors by (1)H-HR-MAS-MRS.

    PubMed

    Gorad, Saurabh S; Ellingsen, Christine; Bathen, Tone F; Mathiesen, Berit S; Moestue, Siver A; Rofstad, Einar K

    2015-10-01

    Tumors develop an abnormal microenvironment during growth, and similar to the metastatic phenotype, the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells is tightly linked to characteristics of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, we explored relationships between metabolic profile, metastatic propensity, and hypoxia in experimental tumors in an attempt to identify metastasis-associated metabolic profiles. Two human melanoma xenograft lines (A-07, R-18) showing different TMEs were used as cancer models. Metabolic profile was assessed by proton high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-HR-MAS-MRS). Tumor hypoxia was detected in immunostained histological preparations by using pimonidazole as a hypoxia marker. Twenty-four samples from 10 A-07 tumors and 28 samples from 10 R-18 tumors were analyzed. Metastasis was associated with hypoxia in both A-07 and R-18 tumors, and (1)H-HR-MAS-MRS discriminated between tissue samples with and tissue samples without hypoxic regions in both models, primarily because hypoxia was associated with high lactate resonance peaks in A-07 tumors and with low lactate resonance peaks in R-18 tumors. Similarly, metastatic and non-metastatic R-18 tumors showed significantly different metabolic profiles, but not metastatic and non-metastatic A-07 tumors, probably because some samples from the metastatic A-07 tumors were derived from tumor regions without hypoxic tissue. This study suggests that (1)H-HR-MAS-MRS may be a valuable tool for evaluating the role of hypoxia and lactate in tumor metastasis as well as for identification of metastasis-associated metabolic profiles. PMID:26585232

  12. (11)B MAS NMR and First-Principles Study of the [OBO3] Pyramids in Borates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Biao-Chun; Mi, Jin-Xiao; Laskowski, Robert; Terskikh, Victor; Zhang, Xi; Yang, Lingyun; Botis, Sanda M; Sherriff, Barbara L; Pan, Yuanming

    2016-03-01

    Borates are built from the [Bϕ3] planar triangles and the [Bϕ4] tetrahedral groups, where ϕ denotes O or OH. However, the [Bϕ4] groups in some borates are highly distorted to include three normal B-O bonds and one anomalously long B-O bond and, therefore, are best described as the [OBO3] pyramids. Four synthetic borates of the boracite-type structures (Mg3B7O13Br, Cu3B7O13Br, Zn3B7O13Cl, and Mg3B7O13Cl) containing a range of [OBO3] pyramids were investigated by multifield (7.05, 14.1, and 21.1 T) (11)B magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR), triple quantum (3Q) MAS NMR experiments, as well as density functional theory calculations. The high-resolution (11)B MAS NMR spectra supported by theoretical predictions show that the [OBO3] pyramids are characterized by isotropic chemical shifts δiso((11)B) from 1.4(1) to 4.9(1) ppm and nuclear quadrupole parameters CQ((11)B) up to 1.3(1) MHz, both significantly different from those of the [BO4] and [BO3] groups in borates. These δiso((11)B) and CQ((11)B) values indicate that the [OBO3] pyramids represent an intermediate state between the [BO4] tetrahedra and [BO3] triangles and demonstrate that the (11)B NMR parameters of four-coordinate boron oxyanions are sensitive to local structural environments. The orientation of the calculated unique electronic field gradient tensor element Vzz of the [OBO3] pyramids is aligned approximately along the direction of the anomalously long B-O bond, corresponding to B-2pz with the lowest electron density. PMID:26914372

  13. Deuterium and lithium-6 MAS NMR studies of manganese oxide electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Younkee

    Electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) is used world wide as the cathode materials in both lithium and alkaline primary (non-rechargeable) batteries. We have developed deuterium and lithium MAS NMR techniques to study EMD and related manganese oxides and hydroxides, where diffraction techniques are of limited value due to a highly defective nature of the structures. Deuterons in EMD, manganite, groutite, and deuterium-intercalated pyrolusite and ramsdellite were detected by NMR, for the first time, and their locations and motions in the structures were analyzed by applying variable temperature NMR techniques. Discharge mechanisms of EMD in alkaline (aqueous) electrolytes were studied, in conjunction with step potential electrochemical spectroscopic (SPECS) method, and five distinctive discharge processes were proposed. EMD is usually heat-treated at about 300--400°C to remove water to be used in lithium batteries. Details of the effects of heat-treatment, such as structural and compositional changes as a function of heat-treatment temperature, were studied by a combination of MAS NMR, XRD, and thermogravimetric analysis. Lithium local environments in heat-treated EMD (HEMD) that were discharged in lithium cells, were described in terms of related environments found in model compounds pyrolusite and ramsdellite where specific Li + sites were detected by MAS NMR and the hyperfine shift scale method of Grey et al. Acid-leaching of Li2MnO3 represents an approach for synthesizing new or modified manganese oxide electrode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries. Progressive removal of lithium from specific crystallographic sites, followed by a gradual change of the crystal structure, was monitored by a combination of NMR and XRD techniques.

  14. The Novel 10-Item Asthma Prediction Tool: External Validation in the German MAS Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Grabenhenrich, Linus B.; Reich, Andreas; Fischer, Felix; Zepp, Fred; Forster, Johannes; Schuster, Antje; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Bergmann, Renate L.; Bergmann, Karl E.; Wahn, Ulrich; Keil, Thomas; Lau, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background A novel non-invasive asthma prediction tool from the Leicester Cohort, UK, forecasts asthma at age 8 years based on 10 predictors assessed in early childhood, including current respiratory symptoms, eczema, and parental history of asthma. Objective We aimed to externally validate the proposed asthma prediction method in a German birth cohort. Methods The MAS-90 study (Multicentre Allergy Study) recorded details on allergic diseases prospectively in about yearly follow-up assessments up to age 20 years in a cohort of 1,314 children born 1990. We replicated the scoring method from the Leicester cohort and assessed prediction, performance and discrimination. The primary outcome was defined as the combination of parent-reported wheeze and asthma drugs (both in last 12 months) at age 8. Sensitivity analyses assessed model performance for outcomes related to asthma up to age 20 years. Results For 140 children parents reported current wheeze or cough at age 3 years. Score distribution and frequencies of later asthma resembled the Leicester cohort: 9% vs. 16% (MAS-90 vs. Leicester) of children at low risk at 3 years had asthma at 8 years, at medium risk 45% vs. 48%. Performance of the asthma prediction tool in the MAS-90 cohort was similar (Brier score 0.22 vs. 0.23) and discrimination slightly better than in the original cohort (area under the curve, AUC 0.83 vs. 0.78). Prediction and discrimination were robust against changes of inclusion criteria, scoring and outcome definitions. The secondary outcome ‘physicians’ diagnosed asthma at 20 years' showed the highest discrimination (AUC 0.89). Conclusion The novel asthma prediction tool from the Leicester cohort, UK, performed well in another population, a German birth cohort, supporting its use and further development as a simple aid to predict asthma risk in clinical settings. PMID:25536057

  15. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khamashta, M; Taraborelli, M; Sciascia, S; Tincani, A

    2016-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune condition characterized by the occurrence of thrombosis (arterial and/or venous), often multiple, and/or pregnancy morbidity. Thrombosis is one of the major disease mechanisms, mainly caused by activating endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets. At present, the management of APS patients with a history of thrombosis is based on long-term antithrombotic therapy, due to the high rate of recurrent thrombosis (29% per year without treatment). Obstetrical APS includes heterogeneous pregnancy complications whose pathogenesis has been increasingly elucidated in the past years. This is due to the current management and treatment, as 80% of APS patients achieve a live birth. The standard approach of APS is not supported by extensive evidence and the best options for refractory and incomplete cases need to be clarified. New and promising molecules are under investigation. PMID:27421221

  16. Cation disorder determined by MAS {sup 27}Al NMR in high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.A.; Sickafus, K.E.; Hughes, C.D.; Earl, W.L.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Garner, F.A.; Bradt, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) single crystals which had been neutron irradiated to high doses (53-250 dpa) were examined using {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The sensitivity of this procedure to a specific cation (Al) residing in different crystallographic environments allowed one to determine the distribution of the Al between the two cation sites in the spinel structure. The samples were irradiated at two different temperatures (400 and 750{degrees}C) and various doses. These results indicate that the Al was nearly fully disordered over the two lattice sites after irradiation.

  17. MAS Equipped with Ant Colony Applied into Dynamic Job Shop Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kai; Zhang, Ren Feng; Yang, Yan Qing

    This paper presents a methodology adopting the new structure of MAS(multi-agent system) equipped with ACO(ant colony optimization) algorithm for a better schedule in dynamic job shop. In consideration of the dynamic events in the job shop arriving indefinitely schedules are generated based on tasks with ant colony algorithm. Meanwhile, the global objective is taken into account for the best solution in the actual manufacturing environment. The methodology is tested on a simulated job shop to determine the impact with the new structure.

  18. MAS: Malware Analysis System Based on Hardware-Assisted Virtualization Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyoung; Kim, Inhyuk; Min, Changwoo; Eom, Young Ik

    There are many analysis techniques in order to analyze malicious codes. However, recently malicious codes often evade detection using stealthy obfuscation techniques, and attack computing systems. We propose an enhanced dynamic binary instrumentation using hardware-assisted virtualization technology. As a machine-level analyzer, our system can be isolated from almost the whole threats of malware, and provides single step analysis environment. Proposed system also supports rapid system call analysis environment. We implement our malware analysis system (referred as MAS) on the KVM hypervisor with Intel VT-x virtualization support. Our experiments with benchmarks show that the proposed system provides efficient analysis environment with low overhead.

  19. Recent Results from the MicroMAS Global Environmental MonitoringNanosatellite Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, W. J.; Cahoy, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Micro-sized Microwave Atmospheric Satellite (MicroMAS) is a dual-spinning 3U CubeSat equipped with apassive microwave radiometer that observes in nine channels near the 118.75-GHz oxygen absorption line.MicroMAS is designed to observe convective thunderstorms, tropical cyclones, and hurricanes from a midinclinationorbit. The MicroMAS flight unit was developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory and the MIT Space SystemsLaboratory and was launched to the International Space Station on July 13, 2014, and scheduled for an earlySeptember deployment for a ~90-day mission. The payload is housed in the "lower" 1U of the dual-spinning 3UCubeSat and mechanically rotated approximately once per second as the spacecraft orbits the Earth, resulting in across-track scanned beam with a full-width half-max (FWHM) beamwidth of 2.4 degrees and an approximately 17-km diameter footprint at nadir incidence from a nominal altitude of 400 km. The relatively low cost of MicroMASenables the deployment of a constellation of sensors, spaced equally around several orbit planes. A small fleet ofMicroMAS systems could yield high-resolution global temperature and water vapor profiles, as well as cloudmicrophysical and precipitation parameters.Significant advancements were made in the Assembly, Integration, and Test phase of the project developmentlifecycle. The flight software and communications architecture was refined and tested in relevant lab facilities. Thepower subsystem was modified to include additional required inhibits for the ISS launch. Hardware in the loop testsas well as simulations of the attitude determination and control system (ADCS) were performed to validate theunique dual-spinning, local vertical, local horizontal (LVLH) stabilized flight design. ADCS algorithms were testedon a 3-axis air bearing and custom rig inside a 3-axis programmable Helmholtz cage. Finally, the integratedspacecraft underwent a series of environmental tests in order to verify the results of thermal modeling

  20. Muscle attachment site (MAS) patterns for species determination in five species of Sarcophaga (Diptera: Sarcophagidae).

    PubMed

    Niederegger, Senta; Szpila, Krzysztof; Mall, Gita

    2016-01-01

    To further establish species determination using the muscle attachment site (MAS) pattern method, third instar larvae of five forensically important species of Sarcophaga Meigen were investigated: Sarcophaga argyrostoma (Robineau-Desvoidy), Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt, Sarcophaga melanura Meigen, Sarcophaga albiceps Meigen and Sarcophaga similis Meade. As in the previously investigated Calliphoridae, patterns were found to be species specific. The main feature of the Sarcophaga patterns is the divided central horizontal row of segment four. A genus pattern was established to be used as base for comparison in further species determination. PMID:26391172