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Sample records for activation system s9

  1. Effect of repeated ether anesthesias on the mono-oxygenase system of rat liver S-9 fraction.

    PubMed

    Paolini, M; Bauer, C; Corsi, C; Tonelli, F; Hrelia, P; Bronzetti, G; Forti, G C

    1984-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ether anesthesia in rats, before i.p. injections to induce the mono-oxygenase enzyme system, on biochemical properties of liver S9 fractions. Aminopyrine N-demethylase and rho-nitroanisole O-demethylase activity levels, their stability, and lipid peroxidation were determined in S9 fractions after etherization (about 1 min in ether vapor chamber daily for 3 consecutive days, before i.p. injections of Na-phenobarbital and beta-naphthoflavone) and compared with controls receiving the same injections without etherization. The activities were slightly (but not significatively) enhanced after this treatment, but stability was markedly and significatively greater after 1 h of incubation in the conditions of the liver microsomal assay (+ 14.8% and + 74.7%, respectively); lipid peroxidation was strongly and significatively depressed (-76.0%). Etherization sufficient to kill the animals on the 4th day resulted in equally active but less stable S9 fraction enzymes. Dimethylnitrosamine (as a standard premutagen) was assayed with the D7 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using S9 fractions obtained from both anesthetized and nonanesthetized rats. According to biochemical data, results obtained with S9 from partially anesthetized rats were comparable with the conventional ones (S9 from nonanesthetized rats). On the contrary, the use of more prolonged ether anesthesia, including one on the day the animals are killed, gives S9 fraction significantly less effective. We conclude that if brief etherizations are used, for i.p. injections only, the S9 fractions obtained are entirely satisfactory and the procedures involved in production are simplified; the additional animal treatment (etherization) must be specified.

  2. An evaluation of a genotoxicity assay with liver s9 for activation and luminescent bacteria for detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B. Thomas

    1992-01-01

    A new short-term in vitro genotoxicity assay with marine bioluminescent bacteria was evaluated for sensitivity and cost. Known under the trade name of Mutatox™, this assay is a simple and rapid screening tool that detects DNA-damaging substances (genotoxins) by measuring light output from an isolated dark mutant strain of the luminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum. A positive response indicates the ability of the test chemical to restore the luminescent state in the dark mutant strain; the degree of light increase indicates the relative genotoxicity of the sample. In this study, the Mutatox assay with rat hepatic fractions (S9) as an exogenous metabolic activation system detected genotoxic activity with known progenotoxins: 2-acetamidofluorene, aflatoxin B1, 2-aminoanthracene, 2-aminofluorene, 2-aminonaphthalene, benzo[a]pyrene, 3-methyl-cholanthrene, and pyrene. Each chemical clearly demonstrated a dose response between 5.0 and 0.6 μg per tube. Known nongenotoxic controls carbofuran, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, malathion, simazine, and permethrin showed no genotoxic responses. The optimum assay conditions were determined to be rat S9 concentration of 0.4 mg/ml, preincubation at 37°C for 30 min, and 18 h incubation at 23°C. Genotoxicity data were obtained in <24 h. The Mutatox assay compared favorably in sensitivity with the Ames test; it was easier and more rapid to perform and, as a result, cost less. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value suggested that the Mutatox assay could be a valuable screening tool to monitor complex environmental samples for genotoxins.

  3. Comparison of S9 mix and hepatocytes as external metabolizing systems in mammalian cell cultures: cytogenetic effects of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene and aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Madle, E.; Tiedemann, G.; Madle, S.; Oett, A.; Kaufmann, G.

    1986-01-01

    Two external metabolizing systems, S9 mix from Aroclor-induced rat livers and freshly isolated hepatocytes, were used for activation in cultures of human lymphocytes and V79 cells. 7, 12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were employed as indirectly acting reference mutagens. Mutagenic effects were measured by induction of sister chromatid exchange (SCE). With DMBA, SCE-inducing effects were found to be quite similar after activation by S9 mix and activation by hepatocytes. In contrast with AFB1, S9 activation led to a stronger SCE induction than hepatocyte activation in both target cells. The induction of chromosomal aberrations by AFB1 after activation by the two metabolizing systems was also analyzed in V79 cells. This experiment again revealed that AFB1 was more efficiently activated by S9 mix than by hepatocytes. The experiments have shown that the suitability of hepatocytes as an activation system is not restricted to microbial or eukaryotic point mutation assays, but that hepatocyte metabolism can also be successfully included in cytogenetic tests with short- and long-term cultures of mammalian target cells.

  4. Comparison and in vivo relevance of two different in vitro head space metabolic systems: liver S9 and liver slices.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, B; Løkken, T; Zahlsen, K; Nilsen, O G

    1997-07-01

    In vitro systems of high biological organization, e.g. containing intact hepatocytes, have been considered as more reliable for metabolic studies and in vivo predictions of toxicokinetics than subcellular systems. For this reason, the kinetics and metabolism of low-molecular-weight volatile chemicals, i.e. head space elimination of substrate and formation of metabolites, were compared in liver S9 and in liver slices. Two substrates, toluene and n-hexane, were used as they represent differences in metabolic pathways and physical-chemical properties. The two systems responded similarly to diethyldithiocarbamate inhibition and acetone inhibition/induction of cytochrome P-450 mediated metabolism. In contrast to liver S9, liver slices did not respond adequately to phenobarbital induction raising the question of substrate availability for P-450 enzymes in liver slices. Liver slices appeared to be superior to liver S9 when specific metabolic pathways involving phase II enzymes were investigated. However, liver S9 seemed to be at least as good as liver slices for estimation of total metabolic rate constants (Km, Vmax) as a basis for in vivo predictions. As the head space liver S9 system is faster and easier to operate than liver slices, it is a promising screening tool for the metabolism of volatile compounds and metabolic interactions.

  5. Game Playing with a Bite! An Evaluative Simulation. Instructional Activities Series IA/S-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert G.

    This activity is one of a series of 17 teacher-developed instructional activities for geography at the secondary-grade level described in SO 009 140. This activity employs a simulation approach to investigate factors influencing industrial locations. Students design proposals intended to attract specific industries to specific cities. The flow…

  6. Optimization of a UDP-glucuronosyltransferase assay for trout liver S9 fractions: Activity enhancement by alamethicin, a pore-forming peptide

    EPA Science Inventory

    An existing assay for hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity was optimized for use with trout liver S9 fractions. Individual experiments were conducted to determine the time dependence of UGT activity as well as optimal levels of S9 protein, uridine 5’-diphosph...

  7. Effect of dietary casein levels on activation of promutagens in the spiral Salmonella mutagenicity assay. II. Studies with induced rat liver S9.

    PubMed

    Woodall, G M; Dauterman, W C; DeMarini, D M

    1996-06-10

    In the previous study (Mutation Res., this issue), we showed that increased levels of dietary casein as the sole protein source for male F344 rats decreased the ability of the uninduced liver S9s to activate 2-aminoanthracene (2AN) to a mutagen in strain TA98 using the spiral Salmonella mutagenicity assay. No effects of dietary casein levels were noted for the ability of uninduced liver S9s to activate the promutagens aflatoxin B1 (AFB) and benzo[a]pyrene (BAP). In the present study, we have extended this study to include liver S9s induced with either Aroclor 1254, phenobarbital or 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC). S9s were derived from individual male F344 rats fed for 6 weeks on semisynthetic diets containing 8%, 12% or 22% methionine-supplemented casein as the sole source of protein (diets were made isocaloric by adjusting the corn starch content). Rats were housed in large, raised-bed cages by groups of three/diet/inducing agent. S9 activation mixtures were prepared at 5 mg of S9 protein/ml of S9 mix. Slopes from the linear portions of the mutagenicity dose-response curves were analyzed by ANOVA comparisons. Assays used to elucidate the phase I activities of microsomal preparations were cytochrome P-450 content, cytochrome-c reductase activity, flavin-containing monooxygenase activity, 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD) activity, N-demethylation of benzphetamine, and para-nitrophenol O-deethylation. Phase II activities were assayed by estimating glutathione (GSH) content and measuring the metabolism of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) by glutathione S-transferase in cytosolic preparations. None of the phase I or phase II endpoints were significantly affected by dietary casein levels. In general, increasing levels of dietary casein resulted in increased body and liver wet weight and amount of S9 protein. Aroclor-induced S9s from rats fed the 22% or 12% casein diet were most effective at activating AFB, depending on the lot of Aroclor used for induction; these

  8. Induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutations by rat-liver homogenate (S9)-activated promutagens in human embryonic skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, D J; Okinaka, R T; Strniste, G F; Barnhart, B J

    1982-03-01

    Most normal human fibroblasts grown in culture do not metabolize promutagens/procarcinogens. Thus screening assays employing normal human fibroblasts have only been successful for direct-acting chemical mutagens and various radiations. In this report we describe a mutation assay (HGPRT locus) employing a normal human embryonic skin fibroblast and a rat-liver homogenate (S9) mixture. 3 model promutagens, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) have been utilized in these studies. In addition to discussing conditions for optimizing the response of this assay, our results indicate that at constant amount of S9 protein concentration, there exists a linear correlation between mutagenicity and dose. At 50% survival, the mutant frequencies induced by B[a]P and 3MC (5 micrograms/ml) are 60 and 30 times the background mutant frequency, respectively. Similarly, at 50% survival, DMN (5 mg/ml) induced 6-TGr mutant frequencies are 25-fold over the background frequency. The increase in cytotoxicity resulting from exposure of cells to these 'activated' chemicals is also a linear dose response. At high S9 concentrations a deactivation or detoxification phenomenon occurs. However, the mutagenic efficiency of S9-activated chemicals when plotted as the number of induced mutations versus log survival is unaffected by the deactivating capacity of S9 proteins. This study demonstrates a quantitative mutation assay using an early passage human culture with an exogenous rat-liver microsomal preparation providing activating enzymes.

  9. Comparison of rat liver S-9 activity induced with aroclor-1254 and phenobarbital/{beta}-naphthoflavone in microbial and CHO/HGPRT mutation assays

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Pant, K.

    1995-11-01

    There is an intense interest in alternatives to Aroclor-1254 (PCB) for induction of S-9. Manufacturers no longer produce PCB, and are selling PCB, in stock, with a 30% increase in price. One substitute, a combination of phenobarbital (PB) and {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}-NF), has been suggested to be a suitable replacement for PCB. In order to compare the activity of PB/{beta}-NF-induced S-9 with PCB-induced S-9, the two kinds of S-9 were prepared and tested in both Microbial and CHO/HGPRT Mutation Assays. One group of CD rats was treated with PB at 75 mg/kg by I.P. injection for 4 consecutive days and a single dose of {beta}-NF at 80 mg/kg 2 days prior to sacrifice. A second group of CD rats was treated with a single dose of Aroclor-1254 at 500 mg/kg on Day 1 by I.P. injection. All animals were sacrificed on Day 5. A Plate Incorporation Mutation Assay was performed with five Salmonella typhimurium tester strains and one Escherichia coli tester strain. A single dose of 2-Amino-anthracene (2-AA) at 1.25 {mu}g/plate for the five Salmonella typhimurium tester strains and 10 {mu}g/plate for the WP2uvrA tester stain was used as a positive control. DMSO at 0.1 mL/plate was used as a solvent control. In the CHO/HGPRT Gene Mutation Assay, 7, 12-Dimethylbenz ({alpha})anthra-cene (DMBA) was used at 5.0 {mu}g/mL as a positive control. Acetone at 10 {mu}L/mL was used as a solvent control. The results from the Microbial Assay showed that the increase in mean reversion frequency of 2-AA over that of the corresponding solvent control with the PB/{beta}-NF-induced S-9 was greater than the increase from the PCB-induced S-9 for all of the six tester strains. In the CHO/HGPRT Mutation Assay, the results showed that DMBA gave a similar positive response for both the PCB- and PB/{beta}-NF-induced S-9s. The data obtained from these comparative studies supports the suggestion of the authors listed above that PB/{beta}-NF is a suitable substitute for PCB for induction of S-9.

  10. Investigations on the mutagenicity of primary and secondary alpha-acetoxynitrosamines with Salmonella typhimurium: activation and deactivation of structurally related compounds by S-9.

    PubMed

    Pool, B L; Wiessler, M

    1981-01-01

    alpha-Acetoxynitrosamines may serve as model compounds to study mechanisms of action of N-nitrosamines. They are readily cleaved through hydrolysis, or by esterases, to yield the same ultimate, reactive species presumably also arising after metabolic activation of N-nitrosamines, Structure-activity investigations on alpha-acetoxynitrosamines promise to aid in elucidating mechanisms involved during the activation of N-nitrosamines. A series of alpha-acetoxyalkynitrosamines was therefore tested for mutagenicity with Salmonella typhimurium TA 1535. The compounds were readily cleaved, by hydrolysis, to mutagenic intermediates. When comparing compounds according to their proposed alkylating properties, unstable secondary alpha-acetates were considerably more mutagenic than the corresponding relatively stable primary alpha-acetates. Addition of S-9 mix caused both activation as well as deactivation in an unexpected structure-related pattern. This was so because an exactly opposite influence of S-9 components on the mutagenicity was observed for each pair of primary and secondary compounds containing the same alkylating spices. Furthermore, pairs of compounds with both methylating and ethylating properties were differently influenced by S-9 addition than those with propylating or butylating effects. This clearly demonstrates how different chemical properties of intermediate forms may strongly influence the biological activity of otherwise quite similar compounds.

  11. In Vitro Transformation of Chlorinated Parabens by the Liver S9 Fraction: Kinetics, Metabolite Identification, and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist Activity.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Masanori; Wada, Takeshi; Nagashima, Satoshi; Makino, Masakazu; Yasukawa, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the kinetics of in vitro transformation of a dichlorinated propyl paraben (2-propyl 3,5-dichloro-4-hydroxybenzoate; Cl2PP) by the rat liver S9 fraction and assessed the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist activity of the metabolite products identified in HPLC and GC/MS analysis and by metabolite syntheses. The results indicated that the chlorination of Cl2PP reduced its degradation rate by approximately 40-fold. Two hydroxylated metabolite products showed AhR agonist activity of up to 39% of that of the parent Cl2PP when assessed in a yeast (YCM3) reporter gene assay. The determination of the metabolic properties of paraben bioaccumulation presented here provides further information on the value of risk assessments of chlorinated parabens as a means to ensure human health and environmental safety.

  12. Comparison of metabolism-mediated effects of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in a HepG2/C3A cell-S9 co-incubation system and quantification of their glutathione conjugates.

    PubMed

    Tamta, Hemlata; Pawar, Rahul S; Wamer, Wayne G; Grundel, Erich; Krynitsky, Alexander J; Rader, Jeanne I

    2012-10-01

    1. Toxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) largely depends on their metabolic activation by hepatic enzymes, including cytochrome P450s, to become chemically reactive pyrrolic derivatives. These then spontaneously release the esterifying acids to generate carbonium ions that form covalent adducts with cellular nucleophiles to exhibit toxicity. 2. In our investigation, metabolism-mediated toxicity of monocrotaline, retrorsine, lycopsamine, echimidine (retronecine-type PAs), heliotrine (a heliotridine-type PA) and senkirkine (an otonecine-type PA) was studied using an in vitro co-incubation assay. 3. Human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2/C3A) cells were incubated with PAs in the presence and absence of rat liver S9 fraction and the toxicity was assessed as lowered mitochondrial activity. 4. Bioactivation potential was measured by incubating PAs with rat liver S9 fraction, NADPH and GSH in a cell free system. Pyrrolic metabolites generated were entrapped as glutathione conjugates (7-GSH-DHP and 7,9-di-GSHDHP) which were quantified using LC-MS-MS analysis. 5. Our results indicated that PAs were metabolized by rat liver S9 fraction into reactive pyrrolic derivatives which were toxic to HepG2/C3A cells. This approach can be used to determine and compare bioactivation potential and metabolism-mediated toxicity of various PAs.

  13. A New Nitrogenase Mechanism Using a CFe8S9 Model: Does H2 Elimination Activate the Complex to N2 Addition to the Central Carbon Atom?

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael L

    2016-02-11

    A truncated model of the FeMo cofactor is used to explore a new mechanism for the conversion of N2 to NH3 by the nitrogenase enzyme. After four initial protonation/reduction steps, the H4CFe8S9 cluster has two hydrogen atoms attached to sulfur, one hydrogen bridging two iron centers and one hydrogen bonded to carbon. The loss of the CH and FeHFe hydrogens as molecular hydrogen activates the cluster to addition of N2 to the carbon center. This unique step takes place at a nearly planar four-coordinate carbon center and leads to an intermediate with a significantly weakened N-N bond. A hydrogen attached to a sulfur atom is then transferred to the distal nitrogen atom. Additional prontonation/reduction steps are modeled by adding a hydrogen atom to sulfur and locating the transition states for transfer to nitrogen. The first NH3 is lost in a thermal neutral step, while the second step is endothermic. The loss of H2 activates the complex by reducing the barrier for N2 addition by 3.5 kcal/mol. Since this is the most difficult step in the mechanism, reducing the barrier for this step justifies the "extra expense" of H2 production.

  14. Use of human liver S9 in the Ames test: assay of three procarcinogens using human S9 derived from multiple donors.

    PubMed

    Hakura, Atsushi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sawada, Shigeki; Sugihara, Tadakazu; Hori, Yuji; Uchida, Kanako; Kerns, William D; Sagami, Fumio; Motooka, Satoru; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the inter-individual variation in the mutagenicity of chemicals using a variety of human S9 fractions. For this purpose, three procarcinogens, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), benzo[a]pyrene (BP), and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), were selected for the Ames test and their mutagenicity was examined using human liver S9 fractions prepared from 18 different donors and one pooled liver S9 fraction prepared from 15 different donors. In addition, rat S9 fraction prepared from male rats pretreated with phenobarbital and 5,6-benzoflavone (PB/BF) was used as reference in order to examine the mutagenic differences between human and rat (PB/BF) S9 fractions. The data demonstrate a large inter-individual diversity in the mutagenic response to procarcinogens. The mutagenicity of IQ and BP in the presence of a human liver S9 fraction (lot HLS-014) was equal to that observed in the presence of rat (PB/BF) S9 fraction. The mutagenicity of IQ and BP in the presence of a pooled human liver S9 fraction was lower (90 and 95%, respectively) than that observed in the presence of rat (PB/BF) S9. On the contrary, the mutagenicity of DMN in the presence of either a selected human liver S9 fraction (lot HLS-014) or pooled fraction was 8-fold higher than that found in the presence of rat (PB/BF) S9 fraction. Human liver S9 fraction (lot HLS-014) had one of the highest cytochrome P450 enzyme activities among the 18 different donors and higher than the pooled human liver S9 fraction. These results suggest that the use of both selected human liver S9 fractions with high metabolic activity (e.g., lot HLS-014 as used in this study) and a pooled S9 fraction with moderate metabolic activity could be used as a means to evaluate the inter-individual variability in mutagenic response to chemicals and to confirm positive responses from studies completed with rodent S9.

  15. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  16. Active optical zoom system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Shen, Chuan; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Chun-Mei

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we propose an active optical zoom system. The zoom module of the system is formed by a liquid lens and a spatial light modulator (SLM). By controlling the focal lengths of the liquid lens and the encoded digital lens on the SLM panel, we can change the magnification of an image without mechanical moving parts and keep the output plane stationary. The magnification can change from 1/3 to 3/2 as the focal length of the encoded lens on the SLM changes from infinity to 24 cm. The proposed active zoom system is simple and flexible, and has widespread application in optical communications, imaging systems, and displays.

  17. Comparison of trout hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions as in vitro models for predicting hepatic clearance in fish.

    PubMed

    Fay, Kellie A; Fitzsimmons, Patrick N; Hoffman, Alex D; Nichols, John W

    2017-02-01

    Isolated hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions have been used to collect in vitro biotransformation data for fish as a means of improving modeled estimates of chemical bioaccumulation. To date, however, there have been few direct comparisons of these 2 methods. In the present study, cryopreserved trout hepatocytes were used to measure in vitro intrinsic clearance rates for 6 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These rates were extrapolated to estimates of in vivo intrinsic clearance and used as inputs to a well stirred liver model to predict hepatic clearance. Predicted rates of hepatic clearance were then evaluated by comparison with measured rates determined previously using isolated perfused livers. Hepatic clearance rates predicted using hepatocytes were in good agreement with measured values (<2.1-fold difference for 5 of 6 compounds) under 2 competing binding assumptions. These findings, which may be attributed in part to high rates of PAH metabolism, are similar to those obtained previously using data from liver S9 fractions. For 1 compound (benzo[a]pyrene), the in vivo intrinsic clearance rate calculated using S9 data was 10-fold higher than that determined using hepatocytes, possibly due to a diffusion limitation on cellular uptake. Generally, however, there was good agreement between calculated in vivo intrinsic clearance rates obtained using either in vitro test system. These results suggest that both systems can be used to improve bioaccumulation assessments for fish, particularly when vitro rates of activity are relatively high, although additional work is needed to determine if the chemical domain of applicability for each system differs. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:463-471. Published 2016 SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  18. Imaging nervous system activity.

    PubMed

    Fields, Douglas R; Shneider, Neil; Mentis, George Z; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    This unit describes methods for loading ion- and voltage-sensitive dyes into neurons, with a particular focus on the spinal cord as a model system. In addition, we describe the use of these dyes to visualize neural activity. Although the protocols described here concern spinal networks in culture or an intact in vitro preparation, they can be, and have been, widely used in other parts of the nervous system.

  19. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  20. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  1. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  2. Metabolite generation via microbial biotransformations with Actinomycetes: rapid screening for active strains and biosynthesis of important human metabolites of two development-stage compounds, 5-[(5S,9R)-9-(4-cyanophenyl)-3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-1-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,3,7-triazaspiro[4.4]non7-yl-methyl]-3-thiophenecarboxylic acid (BMS-587101) and dasatinib.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenying; Josephs, Jonathan L; Skiles, Gary L; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2008-04-01

    The enzymes present in many microbial strains are capable of carrying out a variety of biotransformations when presented with drug-like molecules. Although the enzymes responsible for the biotransformations are not well characterized, microbial strains can often be found that produce metabolites identical to those found in mammalian systems. However, traditional screening for microbial strains that produce metabolites of interest is done with many labor intensive steps that include multiple shake flasks and many manual manipulations, which hinder the application of these techniques in drug metabolite preparation. A 24-well microtiter plate screening system was developed for rapid screening of actinomycetes strains for their ability to selectively produce metabolites of interest. The utility of this system was first demonstrated with the well characterized cytochrome P450 substrate diclofenac. Subsequently, the use of this system allowed the rapid identification of several actinomycetes strains that were capable of converting two drug candidates under development, 5-[(5S,9R)-9-(4-cyanophenyl)-3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-1-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,3,7-triazaspiro[4.4]non7-yl-methyl]-3-thiophenecarboxylic acid and N-(2-chloro-6-methylphenyl)-2-[[6-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl)]-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl]amino)]-1,3-thiazole-5-carboxamide (dasatinib, Sprycel, BMS-345825), to mammalian metabolites of interest. Milligram quantities of the metabolites were then prepared by scaling-up the microbial biotransformation reactions. These quantities were sufficient for initial characterization, such as testing for pharmacological activity and use as analytical standards, prior to the availability of authentic chemically synthesized compounds.

  3. ADASY (Active Daylighting System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Moliní, Daniel; González-Montes, Mario; Fernández-Balbuena, Antonio Á.; Bernabéu, Eusebio; García-Botella, Ángel; García-Rodríguez, Lucas; Pohl, Wilfried

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of ADASY (Active Daylighting System) work is to design a façade static daylighting system oriented to office applications, mainly. The goal of the project is to save energy by guiding daylight into a building for lighting purpose. With this approach we can reduce the electrical load for artificial lighting, completing it with sustainable energy. The collector of the system is integrated on a vertical façade and its distribution guide is always horizontal inside of the false ceiling. ADASY is designed with a specific patent pending caption system, a modular light-guide and light extractor luminaire system. Special care has been put on the final cost of the system and its building integration purpose. The current ADASY configuration is able to illuminate 40 m2 area with a 300lx-400lx level in the mid time work hours; furthermore it has a good enough spatial uniformity distribution and a controlled glare. The data presented in this study are the result of simulation models and have been confirmed by a physical scaled prototype. ADASY's main advantages over regular illumination systems are: -Low maintenance; it has not mobile pieces and therefore it lasts for a long time and require little attention once installed. - No energy consumption; solar light continue working even if there has been a power outage. - High quality of light: the colour rendering of light is very high - Psychological benefits: People working with daylight get less stress and more comfort, increasing productivity. - Health benefits

  4. Imaging nervous system activity.

    PubMed

    Fields, R D; O'Donovan, M J

    2001-05-01

    Optical imaging methods rely upon visualization of three types of signals: (1) intrinsic optical signals, including light scattering and reflectance, birefringence, and spectroscopic changes of intrinsic molecules, such as NADH or oxyhemoglobin; (2) changes in fluorescence or absorbance of voltage-sensitive membrane dyes; and (3) changes in fluorescence or absorbance of calcium-sensitive indicator dyes. Of these, the most widely used approach is fluorescent microscopy of calcium-sensitive dyes. This unit describes protocols for the use of calcium-sensitive dyes and voltage-dependent dyes for studies of neuronal activity in culture, tissue slices, and en-bloc preparations of the central nervous system.

  5. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  6. Comparison of trout hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions as in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Isolated hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions have been used to collect in vitro biotransformation data for fish as a means of improving modeled estimates of chemical bioaccumulation. To date, however, there have been few direct comparisons of these two methods. In the present study, cryopreserved trout hepatocytes were used to measure in vitro intrinsic clearance rates for 6 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These rates were extrapolated to estimates of in vivo intrinsic clearance and used as inputs to a well-stirred liver model to predict hepatic clearance. Predicted rates of hepatic clearance were then evaluated by comparison to measured rates determined previously using isolated perfused livers. Hepatic clearance rates predicted using hepatocytes were in good agreement with measured values (< 2.1 fold difference for 5 of 6 compounds) under two competing binding assumptions. These findings, which may be attributed in part to high rates of PAH metabolism, are similar to those obtained previously using data from liver S9 fractions. For one compound (benzo[a]pyrene), the in vivo intrinsic clearance rate calculated using S9 data was 10-fold higher than that determined using hepatocytes, possibly due to a diffusion limitation on cellular uptake. Generally, however, there was good agreement between calculated in vivo intrinsic clearance rates obtained using either in vitro test system. These results suggest that both systems can be used to improve

  7. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  8. Genome mining of lipolytic exoenzymes from Bacillus safensis S9 and Pseudomonas alcaliphila ED1 isolated from a dairy wastewater lagoon.

    PubMed

    Ficarra, Florencia A; Santecchia, Ignacio; Lagorio, Sebastián H; Alarcón, Sergio; Magni, Christian; Espariz, Martín

    2016-11-01

    Dairy production plants produce highly polluted wastewaters rich in organic molecules such as lactose, proteins and fats. Fats generally lead to low overall performance of the treatment system. In this study, a wastewater dairy lagoon was used as microbial source and different screening strategies were conducted to select 58 lipolytic microorganisms. Exoenzymes and RAPD analyses revealed genetic and phenotypic diversity among isolates. Bacillus safensis, Pseudomonas alcaliphila and the potential pathogens, B. cereus, Aeromonas and Acinetobacter were identified by 16S-rRNA, gyrA, oprI and/or oprL sequence analyses. Five out of 10 selected isolates produced lipolytic enzymes and grew in dairy wastewater. Based on these abilities and their safety, B. safensis S9 and P. alcaliphila ED1 were selected and their genome sequences determined. The genome of strain S9 and ED1 consisted of 3,794,315 and 5,239,535 bp and encoded for 3990 and 4844 genes, respectively. Putative extracellular enzymes with lipolytic (12 and 16), proteolytic (20) or hydrolytic (10 and 15) activity were identified for S9 and ED1 strains, respectively. These bacteria also encoded other technological relevant proteins such as amylases, proteases, glucanases, xylanases and pectate lyases.

  9. S33138 (N-[4-[2-[(3aS,9bR)-8-cyano-1,3a,4,9b-tetrahydro[1] benzopyrano[3,4-c]pyrrol-2(3H)-yl)-ethyl]phenyl-acetamide), a preferential dopamine D3 versus D2 receptor antagonist and potential antipsychotic agent: III. Actions in models of therapeutic activity and induction of side effects.

    PubMed

    Millan, Mark J; Loiseau, Florence; Dekeyne, Anne; Gobert, Alain; Flik, Gunnar; Cremers, Thomas I; Rivet, Jean-Michel; Sicard, Dorothée; Billiras, Rodolphe; Brocco, Mauricette

    2008-03-01

    In contrast to clinically available antipsychotics, the novel benzopyranopyrrolidine derivative, S33138 (N-[4-[2-[(3aS,9bR)-8-cyano-1,3a,4,9b-tetrahydro[1]benzopyrano[3,4-c]pyrrol-2(3H)-yl)-ethyl]phenyl-acetamide), behaves as a preferential antagonist of D(3) versus D(2) receptors and does not interact with histamine H(1) and muscarinic receptors. In contrast to haloperidol, clozapine, olanzapine, and risperidone, S33138 (0.16-2.5 mg/kg s.c.) did not disrupt performance in passive-avoidance and five-choice serial reaction time procedures. Furthermore, upon either systemic administration (0.04-2.5 mg/kg s.c.) or introduction into the frontal cortex (0.04-0.63 mug/side), S33138 potently attenuated the perturbation of social recognition by scopolamine or a prolonged intersession delay. Over a comparable and low-dose range, S33138 (0.04-0.63 mg/kg s.c.) elevated dialysis levels of acetylcholine in the frontal cortex of freely moving rats. At higher doses (2.5-10.0 mg/kg s.c.), S33138 also increased frontocortical levels of histamine, whereas monoamines, glutamate, glycine, and GABA were unaffected. By analogy to the other antipsychotics, S33138 (0.63-10.0 mg/kg s.c.) inhibited conditioned avoidance responses in rats, apomorphine-induced climbing in mice, and hyperlocomotion elicited by amphetamine, cocaine, dizocilpine, ketamine, and phencyclidine in rats. S33138 (0.16-2.5 mg/kg s.c.) also blocked the reduction of prepulse inhibition elicited by apomorphine. In comparison with the above actions, only "high" doses of S33138 (10.0-40.0 mg/kg s.c.) elicited catalepsy. To summarize, reflecting preferential blockade of D(3) versus D(2) receptors, S33138 preserves and/or enhances cognitive function, increases frontocortical cholinergic transmission, and is active in models of antipsychotic properties at doses well below those inducing catalepsy. In comparison with clinically available agents, S33138 displays, thus, a distinctive and promising profile of potential

  10. Portable active interrogation system.

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C. E.; Brener, M. W.; Hollas, C. L.; Myers, W. L.

    2004-01-01

    The system consists of a pulsed DT neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 7} n/s) and a portable but high intrinsic efficiency, custom-designed, polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}He neutron detector. A multichannel scaler card in a ruggedized laptop computer acquires the data. A user-friendly LabVIEW program analyzes and displays the data. The program displays a warning message when highly enriched uranium or any other fissionable materials is detected at a specified number of sigmas above background in the delayed region between pulses. This report describes the system and gives examples of the response of the system to highly enriched uranium and some other fissionable materials, at several distances and with various shielding materials.

  11. Active Shimmy Control System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    reviewed by thoe nformation Offite (01) end Is reslesuabe to the National Technical Wnrdstleftiv Oervico (WI2B). At N13..S it iuil be, avail-able th the...Figure 2, - are used only for the passive system. BH and BL are hydraulic (velocity squared) and linear shimmy damper constants, and KALP in the...NOTES KPH i.63E6 1.403E6 x KrI 11.20 5000 .. X &T, ~ ipl, , x KOC 77270 - X KALP 18000 -X IPH 69.7 83.9 X ITH .68 x "ITI, .03 - x ITII2 3.h9 - xIA .o

  12. Active Tensor Magnetic Gradiometer System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Modify Forward Computer Models .............................................................................................2 Modify TMGS Simulator...active magnetic gradient measurement system are based upon the existing tensor magnetic gradiometer system ( TMGS ) developed under project MM-1328...Magnetic Gradiometer System ( TMGS ) for UXO Detection, Imaging, and Discrimination.” The TMGS developed under MM-1328 was successfully tested at the

  13. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  14. In vitro Metabolism of Sodium 9-dehydro-17-hydro-andrographolide-19-yl Sulfate in Rat Liver S9 by Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry Method

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dongkun; Shao, Jun; Chen, Weikang; Luo, Yuehua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sodium 9-dehydro-17-hydro-andrographolide-19-yl sulfate (DHAS) is the active ingredient of Xiyanping injection, a traditional Chinese medicine in clinical use. However, there has been no report about the metabolic rate and metabolites of DHAS in vitro. Materials and Methods: In this article, DHAS was incubated with rat liver S9, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used for the metabolism study. The residual concentrations of substrate were determined by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry method for the metabolic rate study of DHAS in liver S9. Metabolites were identified by the (UPLC-TOF-MSE) Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry method. Results: The calibration curves of DHAS were linear over the concentration range from 0.75 μM to 75.22 μM with correlation coefficients >0.99. The lower limit of quantification was 0.150 μM for DHAS. The determination recoveries of DHAS were in the range of 84.9–90.6%. The t½ and CLint of DHAS in rat liver S9 were 98.6 ± 2.1 min and 3.5 ± 0.1 mL/min/g, respectively. Five metabolites were preliminarily identified based on the high resolution mass spectrum data in comparison with related references. These metabolites were mainly the products of dehydration and hydrogenation of DHAS. Conclusion: The present in vitro metabolic study of DHAS provided valuable information about the metabolic rate and potential metabolites of DHAS, which are important for future in vivo metabolism studies of DHAS and the discovery of more active andrographolide derivatives. SUMMARY In this paper, sodium 9-dehydro-17-hydro-andrographolide-19-yl sulfate (DHAS) metabolism in vitro has been investigated with rat liver S9 using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The result of quantitative analysis showed that DHAS had a long t1/2, which indicated its high metabolic stability. Five metabolites of DHAS

  15. Assessment of metabolic stability using the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols are given for assessing metabolic stability in rainbow trout using the liver S9 fraction. These protocols describe the isolation of S9 fractions from trout livers, evaluation of metabolic stability using a substrate depletion approach, and expression of the res...

  16. Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure, and optical property of the pentanary chalcohalide Ba3KSb4S9Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hua-Jun; Liu, Peng-Fei

    2015-12-01

    The pentanary chalcohalide Ba3KSb4S9Cl has been prepared from stoichiometric mixtures of KCl, Ba, Sb, and S in an evacuated silica tube, which is the first example of chalcohalides in the pentanary A/Ae/Sb/Q/X (A=alkali metal; Ae=alkaline-earth metal; Q=S, Se, Te; X=F, Cl, Br, I) system. This material crystallize in the Pnnm space group and its new structure type comprises one-dimensional (1D) [Sb3S7]5- chains running down the [001] direction separated by isolated dimeric Sb2S4 polyhedra, Ba2+, K+, and Cl-, respectively. The optical gap of 1.99 eV for Ba3KSb4S9Cl was deduced from the UV/vis reflectance spectroscopy and DFT study indicates a indirect band gap with an electronic transfer excitation of S 3p to Sb 5p orbital electrons.

  17. Solar active region display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M.; Raben, V.; Weyland, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System (SARDS) is a client-server application that automatically collects a wide range of solar data and displays it in a format easy for users to assimilate and interpret. Users can rapidly identify active regions of interest or concern from color-coded indicators that visually summarize each region's size, magnetic configuration, recent growth history, and recent flare and CME production. The active region information can be overlaid onto solar maps, multiple solar images, and solar difference images in orthographic, Mercator or cylindrical equidistant projections. Near real-time graphs display the GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, flare events, and daily F10.7 value as a function of time; color-coded indicators show current trends in soft x-ray flux, flare temperature, daily F10.7 flux, and x-ray flare occurrence. Through a separate window up to 4 real-time or static graphs can simultaneously display values of KP, AP, daily F10.7 flux, GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, GOES >10 and >100 MeV proton flux, and Thule neutron monitor count rate. Climatologic displays use color-valued cells to show F10.7 and AP values as a function of Carrington/Bartel's rotation sequences - this format allows users to detect recurrent patterns in solar and geomagnetic activity as well as variations in activity levels over multiple solar cycles. Users can customize many of the display and graph features; all displays can be printed or copied to the system's clipboard for "pasting" into other applications. The system obtains and stores space weather data and images from sources such as the NOAA Space Environment Center, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, the joint ESA/NASA SOHO spacecraft, and the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory, and can be extended to include other data series and image sources. Data and images retrieved from the system's database are converted to XML and transported from a central server using HTTP and SOAP protocols, allowing

  18. The Interaction Pattern between a Homology Model of 40S Ribosomal S9 Protein of Rhizoctonia solani and 1-Hydroxyphenaize by Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Dharni, Seema; Sanchita; Sharma, Ashok; Patra, Dharani Dhar

    2014-01-01

    1-Hydroxyphenazine (1-OH-PHZ), a natural product from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SD12, was earlier reported to have potent antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. In the present work, the antifungal activity of 1-OH-PHZ on 40S ribosomal S9 protein was validated by molecular docking approach. 1-OH-PHZ showed interaction with two polar contacts with residues, Arg69 and Phe19, which inhibits the synthesis of fungal protein. Our study reveals that 1-OH-PHZ can be a potent inhibitor of 40S ribosomal S9 protein of R. solani that may be a promising approach for the management of fungal diseases. PMID:24864254

  19. The interaction pattern between a homology model of 40S ribosomal S9 protein of Rhizoctonia solani and 1-hydroxyphenaize by docking study.

    PubMed

    Dharni, Seema; Sanchita; Samad, Abdul; Sharma, Ashok; Patra, Dharani Dhar

    2014-01-01

    1-Hydroxyphenazine (1-OH-PHZ), a natural product from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SD12, was earlier reported to have potent antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. In the present work, the antifungal activity of 1-OH-PHZ on 40S ribosomal S9 protein was validated by molecular docking approach. 1-OH-PHZ showed interaction with two polar contacts with residues, Arg69 and Phe19, which inhibits the synthesis of fungal protein. Our study reveals that 1-OH-PHZ can be a potent inhibitor of 40S ribosomal S9 protein of R. solani that may be a promising approach for the management of fungal diseases.

  20. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  1. Method optimization for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) liver S9 isolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols have been proposed to assess metabolic stability in rainbow trout liver S9 fractions. Using in vitro substrate depletion assays, in vitro intrinsic clearance rates can be calculated for a variety of study compounds. Existing protocols suggest potential adaptati...

  2. Impact analysis of ICH S9 on non-clinical development of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Bonelli, Milton; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Beken, Sonja

    2015-10-01

    Cancer presents a major healthcare challenge worldwide, with several millions new cases a year, and represents a therapeutic area with a high need for new drugs. To respond to this, the parties of the International Conference for Harmonization agreed in 2007 to develop a guideline on nonclinical requirements for oncology therapeutics' development (ICH S9), which came into effect in early 2010. This guideline includes recommendations to facilitate and accelerate the development and marketing of cancer therapeutic agents for serious and life threatening malignancies and aims to address this need through a refinement and a reduction in the use of experimental animals, following the 3Rs principles. To assess the impact of ICH S9 on drug development and reduction of animal use, we performed an analysis of Marketing Authorization Applications at the European Medicines Agency relevant to the period in which the development of the guideline was approaching the final steps and its early implementation period. From the analysis performed, a consistent trend towards a decrease in the average number of non-clinical studies performed (-40.7%) and number of animals used per development program (-58.1%) for new chemical entities has been detected, highlighting increasing compliance by companies to the recommendations of ICH S9.

  3. Content Analysis in Systems Engineering Acquisition Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    shape requirements definitions for system upgrade or modification contracts and new baseline contracts. Finally, content analysis training and skill...back to the system designers, this information can then be used to shape requirements definition for system upgrade or modification contracts and new...Activity System Requirements Definition Ensuring the system requirements adequately reflect the stakeholder requirements Negotiating modifications to

  4. Data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Data Management System-1100 is designed to operate in conjunction with the UNIVAC 1100 Series Operating System on any 1100 Series computer. DMS-1100 is divided into the following four major software components: (1) Data Definition Languages (DDL); (2) Data Management Routine (DMR); (3) Data Manipulation Languages (DML); and (4) Data Base Utilities (DBU). These software components are described in detail.

  5. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  6. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  7. A robust activity marking system for exploring active neuronal ensembles.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Cooper, Yonatan A; Baratta, Michael V; Weng, Feng-Ju; Zhang, Yuxiang; Ramamoorthi, Kartik; Fropf, Robin; LaVerriere, Emily; Xue, Jian; Young, Andrew; Schneider, Colleen; Gøtzsche, Casper René; Hemberg, Martin; Yin, Jerry Cp; Maier, Steven F; Lin, Yingxi

    2016-09-23

    Understanding how the brain captures transient experience and converts it into long lasting changes in neural circuits requires the identification and investigation of the specific ensembles of neurons that are responsible for the encoding of each experience. We have developed a Robust Activity Marking (RAM) system that allows for the identification and interrogation of ensembles of neurons. The RAM system provides unprecedented high sensitivity and selectivity through the use of an optimized synthetic activity-regulated promoter that is strongly induced by neuronal activity and a modified Tet-Off system that achieves improved temporal control. Due to its compact design, RAM can be packaged into a single adeno-associated virus (AAV), providing great versatility and ease of use, including application to mice, rats, flies, and potentially many other species. Cre-dependent RAM, CRAM, allows for the study of active ensembles of a specific cell type and anatomical connectivity, further expanding the RAM system's versatility.

  8. Differential expression of GSK3β and pS9GSK3β in normal human tissues: can pS9GSK3β be an epithelial marker?

    PubMed

    Lee, Hojung; Ro, Jae Y

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and phosphorylated GSK3β at Ser9 (pS9GSK3β) are crucial in cellular proliferation and metabolism. GSK3β and pS9GSK3β are deregulated in many diseases including tumors. Data on altered expression of GSK3β and pS9GSK3β are mainly limited to tumor tissues, thus the expression of GSK3β and pS9GSK3β in normal human tissue has been largely unknown. Thus, we examined the immunohistochemical localization of GSK3β and pS9GSK3β in human fetal and adult tissues, and also compared the expression pattern of GSK3β and pS9GSK3β with that of the CK7 and CK20. We found GSK3β expression in neurons of brain, myenteric plexus in gastrointestinal tract, squamous epithelium of skin, and mammary gland. The expression of pS9GSK3β was restricted to the epithelial cells of breast and pancreaticobiliary duct, distal nephron of kidney, gastrointestinal tract, fallopian tube, epididymis, secretory cell of prostatic gland, and umbrella cell of urinary tract. The staining pattern of pS9GSK3β and CK7 was overlapped in most organs except for gastrointestinal tract where CK7 was negative and CK20 was positive. Our results show that the expression of GSK3β may be associated with differentiation of ectodermal derived tissues and pS9GSK3β with that of epithelial cells of endodermal derived tissues in human. In addition, the expression of pS9GSK3β in the selective epithelial cells may indicate its association with secretory or barrier function of specific cells and may serve as another immunohistochemical marker for epithelial cells.

  9. An active tactile perception system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petriu, E.; Greenspan, M.; Gelinas, F.; McMath, W. S.; Yeung, S. K.

    System development and application aspects are described for an experimental robotic system for the tactile perception of the global geometric profile of object surfaces which are larger than the dimensions of the tactile sensor. Local cutaneous information provided by a tactile sensor is integrated with the kinesthetic position parameters of a robot arm, resulting in a 3D geometric model of the tactile sensor pose on the explored object surface. Currently available tactile sensors provide poor information on the geometric profile of 3D object surfaces. In order to maximize the information available for 3D analysis, an instrumented passive compliant wrist was used to attach a pressure measuring tactile probe to the robot arm carrier. Data was collected by a noncompliant planar sensing array in direct contact with an object surface. Information recorded includes the following: positional and orientation data on the robot arm manipulator, passive compliance kinesthetic data as measured by the kinematics of the wrist, and cutaneous tactile data represented by the binary image of the sensors pose on the object. The dimensions of the sensor array were found to be a critical factor in system performance. Use of a large array results in fewer touch poses being required to explore an object's surface, on the other hand a large planar array will touch fewer and higher peaks thus missing surface detail. To improve performance, there is a need to design tactile sensors specifically for geometric profile measuring.

  10. Isolation and characterization of multiple F-box genes linked to the S9- and S10-RNase in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazuma; Moriya, Shigeki; Haji, Takashi; Abe, Kazuyuki

    2013-06-01

    Using 11 consensus primer pairs designed from S-linked F-box genes of apple and Japanese pear, 10 new F-box genes (MdFBX21 to 30) were isolated from the apple cultivar 'Spartan' (S(9)S(10)). MdFBX21 to 23 and MdFBX24 to 30 were completely linked to the S(9) -RNase and S(10-)RNase, respectively, and showed pollen-specific expression and S-haplotype-specific polymorphisms. Therefore, these 10 F-box genes are good candidates for the pollen determinant of self-incompatibility in apple. Phylogenetic analysis and comparison of deduced amino acid sequences of MdFBX21 to 30 with those of 25 S-linked F-box genes previously isolated from apple showed that a deduced amino acid identity of greater than 88.0 % can be used as the tentative criterion to classify F-box genes into one type. Using this criterion, 31 of 35 F-box genes of apple were classified into 11 types (SFBB1-11). All types included F-box genes derived from S(3-) and S(9-)haplotypes, and seven types included F-box genes derived from S(3-), S(9-), and S(10-)haplotypes. Moreover, comparison of nucleotide sequences of S-RNases and multiple F-box genes among S(3-), S(9-), and S(10-)haplotypes suggested that F-box genes within each type showed high nucleotide identity regardless of the identity of the S-RNase. The large number of F-box genes as candidates for the pollen determinant and the high degree of conservation within each type are consistent with the collaborative non-self-recognition model reported for Petunia. These findings support that the collaborative non-self-recognition system also exists in apple.

  11. Atomic and electronic structure of Mo6S9-xIx nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meden, A.; Kodre, A.; Padeznik Gomilsek, J.; Arcon, I.; Vilfan, I.; Vrbanic, D.; Mrzel, A.; Mihailovic, D.

    2005-09-01

    Moybdenum-based subnanometre diameter nanowires are easy to synthesize and disperse, and they exhibit a variety of functional properties in which they are superior to other one-dimensional materials. However, further progress in the understanding of physical properties and the development of new and specific applications have so far been impeded by the fact that their structure was not accurately known. Here we report on a combination of systematic x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure experiments, and first-principles theoretical structure calculations, which are used to determine the atomic skeletal structure of individual Mo6S9-xIx (MoSIx) nanowires, their packing arrangement within bundles and their electronic band structure. From this work we conclude that the variations in functional properties appear to arise from different stoichiometry, not skeletal structure. A supplementary data file is available from http://stacks.iop.org/0957-4484/16/1578

  12. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C; Reichhardt, C J Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the mobility and velocity fluctuations of a driven particle moving through an active matter bath of self-mobile disks for varied density or area coverage and varied activity. We show that the driven particle mobility can exhibit nonmonotonic behavior that is correlated with distinct changes in the spatiotemporal structures that arise in the active media. We demonstrate that the probe particle velocity distributions exhibit specific features in the different dynamic regimes and identify an activity-induced uniform crystallization that occurs for moderate activity levels and is distinct from the previously observed higher activity cluster phase. The velocity distribution in the cluster phase has telegraph noise characteristics produced when the probe particle moves alternately through high-mobility areas that are in the gas state and low-mobility areas that are in the dense phase. For higher densities and large activities, the system enters what we characterize as an active jamming regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches that have power-law-distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for nonactive disk systems near the jamming transition.

  13. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  14. PASS: Creating Physically Active School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciotto, Carol M.; Fede, Marybeth H.

    2014-01-01

    PASS, a Physically Active School System, is a program by which school districts and schools utilize opportunities for school-based physical activity that enhance overall fitness and cognition, which can be broken down into four integral parts consisting of connecting, communicating, collaborating, and cooperating. There needs to be an…

  15. Metals distributions in activated sludge systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.W.; Kodukula, P.S.

    1984-05-01

    Despite extensive laboratory and field studies over the past 25 years, little advance has been made in prediction of metals distribution and removal in activated sludge treatment systems. This paper reports the results of carefully controlled pilot studies, from which empirical metals distribution models were developed. The models accurately predict the distribution of process stream metals at each point in the activated sludge process between the soluble and solids phases. The distribution models together with data on primary and secondary clarifier suspended solids removal efficiencies, are easily applied to predict the removals of influent metals in activated sludge systems. 36 references, 2 figures.

  16. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  17. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  18. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  19. [Cloning and expression of S9-1 gene of rice black-streaked dwarf virus in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Li, Chunbo; Zhong, Yongwang; Zhang, Xudong; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2003-06-01

    The cDNA of RBSDV S9 was amplified by RT-PCR using the total RNA of infected maize leaves as the template, and then the PCR product was cloned into pBluescriptII SK. After the DNA sequence was determined, the S9-1 gene was subcloned into E. coli expression vector pET-21d. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that a 40 kD protein was highly expressed. N-terminal sequence analysis confirmed the 40 kD protein was S9-1 protein. Antiserum was prepared using the purified protein. Western blotting indicated that S9-1 protein could be detected in the infected maize leaves.

  20. The plasminogen activator system: biology and regulation.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, J P; Muñoz-Cánoves, P; Montero, L; Koziczak, M; Nagamine, Y

    1999-10-01

    The regulation of plasminogen activation involves genes for two plasminogen activators (tissue type and urokinase type), two specific inhibitors (type 1 and type 2), and a membrane-anchored urokinase-type plasminogen-activator-specific receptor. This system plays an important role in various biological processes involving extracellular proteolysis. Recent studies have revealed that the system, through interplay with integrins and the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin, is also involved in the regulation of cell migration and proliferation in a manner independent of proteolytic activity. The genes are expressed in many different cell types and their expression is under the control of diverse extracellular signals. Gene expression reflects the levels of the corresponding mRNA, which should be the net result of synthesis and degradation. Thus, modulation of mRNA stability is an important factor in overall regulation. This review summarizes current understanding of the biology and regulation of genes involved in plasminogen activation at different levels.

  1. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  2. A robust activity marking system for exploring active neuronal ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Cooper, Yonatan A; Baratta, Michael V; Weng, Feng-Ju; Zhang, Yuxiang; Ramamoorthi, Kartik; Fropf, Robin; LaVerriere, Emily; Xue, Jian; Young, Andrew; Schneider, Colleen; Gøtzsche, Casper René; Hemberg, Martin; Yin, Jerry CP; Maier, Steven F; Lin, Yingxi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the brain captures transient experience and converts it into long lasting changes in neural circuits requires the identification and investigation of the specific ensembles of neurons that are responsible for the encoding of each experience. We have developed a Robust Activity Marking (RAM) system that allows for the identification and interrogation of ensembles of neurons. The RAM system provides unprecedented high sensitivity and selectivity through the use of an optimized synthetic activity-regulated promoter that is strongly induced by neuronal activity and a modified Tet-Off system that achieves improved temporal control. Due to its compact design, RAM can be packaged into a single adeno-associated virus (AAV), providing great versatility and ease of use, including application to mice, rats, flies, and potentially many other species. Cre-dependent RAM, CRAM, allows for the study of active ensembles of a specific cell type and anatomical connectivity, further expanding the RAM system’s versatility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13918.001 PMID:27661450

  3. Aging assessment for active fire protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.B.; Nowlen, S.P.; Tanaka, T.

    1995-06-01

    This study assessed the impact of aging on the performance and reliability of active fire protection systems including both fixed fire suppression and fixed fire detection systems. The experience base shows that most nuclear power plants have an aggressive maintenance and testing program and are finding degraded fire protection system components before a failure occurs. Also, from the data reviewed it is clear that the risk impact of fire protection system aging is low. However, it is assumed that a more aggressive maintenance and testing program involving preventive diagnostics may reduce the risk impact even further.

  4. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  5. Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    market . Overall Program Summary The overall objective of the Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS) program was to develop and demonstrate...mode fiber, with alignment tolerances of several microns functions well for data communications , single mode fiber is required for several significant...in the laser/optics community . Boeing and MCNC have signed a memorandum of agreement for commercialization and are actively seeking partners for

  6. Application of the TGx‐28.65 transcriptomic biomarker to classify genotoxic and non‐genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells in the presence of rat liver S9

    PubMed Central

    Buick, Julie K.; Williams, Andrew; Swartz, Carol D.; Recio, Leslie; Li, Heng‐Hong; Fornace, Albert J.; Thomson, Errol M.; Aubrecht, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    In vitro transcriptional signatures that predict toxicities can facilitate chemical screening. We previously developed a transcriptomic biomarker (known as TGx‐28.65) for classifying agents as genotoxic (DNA damaging) and non‐genotoxic in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Because TK6 cells do not express cytochrome P450s, we confirmed accurate classification by the biomarker in cells co‐exposed to 1% 5,6 benzoflavone/phenobarbital‐induced rat liver S9 for metabolic activation. However, chemicals may require different types of S9 for activation. Here we investigated the response of TK6 cells to higher percentages of Aroclor‐, benzoflavone/phenobarbital‐, or ethanol‐induced rat liver S9 to expand TGx‐28.65 biomarker applicability. Transcriptional profiles were derived 3 to 4 hr following a 4 hr co‐exposure of TK6 cells to test chemicals and S9. Preliminary studies established that 10% Aroclor‐ and 5% ethanol‐induced S9 alone did not induce the TGx‐28.65 biomarker genes. Seven genotoxic and two non‐genotoxic chemicals (and concurrent solvent and positive controls) were then tested with one of the S9s (selected based on cell survival and micronucleus induction). Relative survival and micronucleus frequency was assessed by flow cytometry in cells 20 hr post‐exposure. Genotoxic/non‐genotoxic chemicals were accurately classified using the different S9s. One technical replicate of cells co‐treated with dexamethasone and 10% Aroclor‐induced S9 was falsely classified as genotoxic, suggesting caution in using high S9 concentrations. Even low concentrations of genotoxic chemicals (those not causing cytotoxicity) were correctly classified, demonstrating that TGx‐28.65 is a sensitive biomarker of genotoxicity. A meta‐analysis of datasets from 13 chemicals supports that different S9s can be used in TK6 cells, without impairing classification using the TGx‐28.65 biomarker. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:243–260, 2016. © 2016 Her Majesty the

  7. Traveling and Resting Crystals in Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-02-01

    A microscopic field theory for crystallization in active systems is proposed which unifies the phase-field-crystal model of freezing with the Toner—Tu theory for self-propelled particles. A wealth of different active crystalline states are predicted and characterized. In particular, for increasing strength of self-propulsion, a transition from a resting crystal to a traveling crystalline state is found where the particles migrate collectively while keeping their crystalline order. Our predictions, which are verifiable in experiments and in particle-resolved computer simulations, provide a starting point for the design of new active materials.

  8. Gamma Band Activity in the Reticular Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep–wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep–wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem–thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep–wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of

  9. Gamma band activity in the reticular activating system.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francisco J; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep-wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem-thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep-wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of pre

  10. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an active imaging system which has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and a receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination wile eliminating solar background.

  11. Transport in active systems crowded by obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2017-02-01

    The reactive and diffusive dynamics of a single chemically powered Janus motor in a crowded medium of moving but passive obstacles is investigated using molecular simulation. It is found that the reaction rate of the catalytic motor reaction decreases in a crowded medium as the volume fraction of obstacles increases as a result of a reduction in the Smoluchowski diffusion-controlled reaction rate coefficient that contributes to the overall reaction rate. A continuum model is constructed and analyzed to interpret the dependence of the steady-state reaction rate observed in simulations on the volume fraction of obstacles in the system. The steady-state concentration fields of reactant and product are shown to be sensitive to the local structure of obstacles around the Janus motor. It is demonstrated that the active motor exhibits enhanced diffusive motion at long times with a diffusion constant that decreases as the volume fraction of crowding species increases. In addition, the dynamical properties of a passive tracer particle in a system containing many active Janus motors is studied to investigate how an active environment influences the transport of non-active species. The diffusivity of a passive tracer particle in an active medium is found to be enhanced in systems with forward-moving Janus motors due to the cooperative dynamics of these motors.

  12. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  13. Closed-loop active optical system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    A control system, based on a real-time lateral shear interferometer has been developed for use in control during thermal tests and static error compensation experiments. The minicomputer which controls the interferometer and provides its service functions also controls the active system, thereby giving flexibility to the algorithm. The minicomputer system contains 288 K bytes of memory and 15 M bytes of disk storage. The interferometer system employed is composed of the measuring head and its support electronics, a video display on which wavefront contour maps are generated, and a DECwriter operator console. The versatility provided by the use of a general purpose interferometer system allows for interactive control of the closed-loop process. Various arithmetic capabilities such as the addition of wavefronts, division by a constant, and fitting of wavefront data with Zernike polynomials, allow for measurements to be averaged and for removal of alignment errors before correction is performed.

  14. Active gated imaging in driver assistance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we shall present the active gated imaging system (AGIS) in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast-gated camera and pulsed illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest. A dedicated gated CMOS imager sensor and near infra-red (NIR) pulsed laser illuminator, is presented in this paper to provide active gated technology. In recent years, we have developed these key components and learned the system parameters, which are most beneficial to nighttime (in all weather conditions) driving in terms of field of view, illumination profile, resolution, and processing power. We shall present our approach of a camera-based advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) named BrightEye™, which makes use of the AGIS technology in the automotive field.

  15. Features of laser-induced luminescence and photoconductivity of layered Cu3In5S9 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, A. G.; Kyazym-zade, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M.; Mamedov, R. M.; Salmanova, A. A.; Gasanova, L. G.; Mahammadov, A. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Luminescence and photoconductivity of layered Cu3In5S9 crystals at high levels of optical excitation are studied experimentally. A pulsed nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with built-in second and third harmonic generators to generate 1064-, 532-, and 355-nm radiation is used as a light source. It is found that the photoluminescence spectra exhibit two emission bands due to zone-acceptor level and impurity donor-impurity acceptor transitions. It is shown that the photoconductivity in Cu3In5S9 is monopolar. The waveform of the photoconductivity consists of fast and slow components associated with two channels of recombination.

  16. Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A study to define the requirements for advanced extravehicular activities (AEVA) was conducted. The purpose of the study was to develop an understanding of the EVA technology requirements and to map a pathway from existing or developing technologies to an AEVA system capable of supporting long-duration missions on the lunar surface. The parameters of an AEVA system which must sustain the crewmembers and permit productive work for long periods in the lunar environment were examined. A design reference mission (DRM) was formulated and used as a tool to develop and analyze the EVA systems technology aspects. Many operational and infrastructure design issues which have a significant influence on the EVA system are identified.

  17. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  18. Active State Model for Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; Chien, Steve; Zak, Michail; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Fisher, Forest

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the active state model (ASM) is an architecture for the development of advanced integrated fault-detection-and-isolation (FDI) systems for robotic land vehicles, pilotless aircraft, exploratory spacecraft, or other complex engineering systems that will be capable of autonomous operation. An FDI system based on the ASM concept would not only provide traditional diagnostic capabilities, but also integrate the FDI system under a unified framework and provide mechanism for sharing of information between FDI subsystems to fully assess the overall health of the system. The ASM concept begins with definitions borrowed from psychology, wherein a system is regarded as active when it possesses self-image, self-awareness, and an ability to make decisions itself, such that it is able to perform purposeful motions and other transitions with some degree of autonomy from the environment. For an engineering system, self-image would manifest itself as the ability to determine nominal values of sensor data by use of a mathematical model of itself, and selfawareness would manifest itself as the ability to relate sensor data to their nominal values. The ASM for such a system may start with the closed-loop control dynamics that describe the evolution of state variables. As soon as this model was supplemented with nominal values of sensor data, it would possess self-image. The ability to process the current sensor data and compare them with the nominal values would represent self-awareness. On the basis of self-image and self-awareness, the ASM provides the capability for self-identification, detection of abnormalities, and self-diagnosis.

  19. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  20. Research on an Active Seat Belt System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Takeshi

    In a car crash, permanent injury can be avoided if deformation of an occupant's rib cage is maintained within the allowable value. In order to realize this condition, the occupant's seat belt tension must be instantaneously adjusted by a feedback control system. In this study, a seat belt tension control system based on the active shock control system is proposed. The semi-active control law used is derived from the sliding mode control method. One advantage of this proposed system is that it does not require a large power actuator because the seat belt tension is controlled by a brake mechanism. The effectiveness is confirmed by numerical simulation using general parameters of a human thorax and a passenger car in a collision scenario with a wall at a velocity of 100 km/h. The feasibility is then confirmed with a control experiment using a scale model of about 1/10 scale. The relative displacement of the thorax model approaches the allowable value smoothly along the control reference and settles near this value. Thus, the proposed seat belt tension control system design is established.

  1. Active magnetic bearings give systems a lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Leo

    1992-07-01

    While the active magnetic bearings currently being used in such specialized applications as centrifugal compressors for natural gas pumps are more expensive than conventional bearings, they furnish improved machine service life, controlled damping of high-speed rotors to eliminate critical-speed vibrations, and the obviation of lubrication systems. Attention is presently given to magnetic bearings used by the electric power industry, homopolar magnetic radial and thrust bearings, weapon-system and gas turbine engine applications of magnetic bearings, and the benefits of magnetic bearings for energy-storage flywheels.

  2. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  3. Bacteriophage: A Model System for Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANO, CARL S.; YOUNG, MATTHEW W.; PATTERSON, ROBIN R.

    2002-01-01

    Although bacteriophage provided a useful model system for the development of molecular biology, its simplicity, accessibility, and familiarity have not been fully exploited in the classroom. We describe a student-centered laboratory course in which student teams selected phage from sewage samples and characterized the phage in a semester-long project that modeled real-life scientific research. The course used an instructional approach that included active learning, collaboration, and learning by inquiry. Cooperative student teams had primary responsibility for organizing the content of the course, writing to learn using a journal article format, involving the entire group in shared laboratory responsibilities, and applying knowledge to the choice of new experiments. The results of student evaluations indicated a high level of satisfaction with the course. Our positive experience with this course suggests that phage provides an attractive model system for an active-learning classroom. PMID:23653543

  4. A Photoacoustic Study of Chemically Active Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    unless so designated by other documentation IS. KEY WORDS (Continue w reverse aide If neceeairy wd Identify by block nmber) Photoacoustic, Spectroscopy ...CwcAhnm i, pwo If w M Idntitty by block nin1b9) -,xThe method of gas-microphone photoacoustic spectroscopy and the related photothermal deflection... spectroscopy have been developed for application to chemically active systems. Fourier Transform Infrared Photoacoustic Spectros- copy has been used to study

  5. Spontaneous activity in the developing auditory system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity is a common feature of sensory systems during early development. This sensory-independent neuronal activity has been implicated in promoting their survival and maturation, as well as growth and refinement of their projections to yield circuits that can rapidly extract information about the external world. Periodic bursts of action potentials occur in auditory neurons of mammals before hearing onset. This activity is induced by inner hair cells (IHCs) within the developing cochlea, which establish functional connections with spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) several weeks before they are capable of detecting external sounds. During this pre-hearing period, IHCs fire periodic bursts of Ca(2+) action potentials that excite SGNs, triggering brief but intense periods of activity that pass through auditory centers of the brain. Although spontaneous activity requires input from IHCs, there is ongoing debate about whether IHCs are intrinsically active and their firing periodically interrupted by external inhibitory input (IHC-inhibition model), or are intrinsically silent and their firing periodically promoted by an external excitatory stimulus (IHC-excitation model). There is accumulating evidence that inner supporting cells in Kölliker's organ spontaneously release ATP during this time, which can induce bursts of Ca(2+) spikes in IHCs that recapitulate many features of auditory neuron activity observed in vivo. Nevertheless, the role of supporting cells in this process remains to be established in vivo. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for generating IHC activity in the developing cochlea will help reveal how these events contribute to the maturation of nascent auditory circuits.

  6. Light and immune systems: activation of immunological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Light has been used to treat diseases for hundreds of years. Convenient and powerful light sources such as lasers make photomedicine a major branch in diseases treatment and detection. Originally, light was often used for local treatment, using photomechanical, photochemical, photothermal reactions and photomodulation as the major mechanisms. More and more investigators have become interested in the systemic effects of light, particularly in its effects on immune systems. Much work has been done to activate and/or enhance the host immune system to combat cancer, either using light as a direct tool or as an adjuvant method. Light has long been used for assisting disease detection and diagnosis. Advances in light technology have made photo-diagnostics ever more precise spatially and temporally. Many techniques facilitate observation of bio-molecule interactions and other biological processes at the cellular level, hence providing opportunities to detect and monitor immune activities. This manuscript will review recent photo-immunological research in treatment of cancer. The recent development of combination therapies involving lasers will be presented. Specifically, the results of cancer treatment using laser photothermal interaction, either with or without additional immunological stimulation will be discussed. The immunological effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), and of its combination with immunotherapy in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Much interest has been recently concentrated in the immunological responses after laser treatment. Such responses at cellular and molecular levels will be discussed. The effect of these treatment modalities on the distant metastases also showed promise of light induced antitumor immunity. The combination therapy and induced immunological responses appear to be the key for long-term control of tumors.

  7. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  8. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  9. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  10. Processing abstract language modulates motor system activity.

    PubMed

    Glenberg, Arthur M; Sato, Marc; Cattaneo, Luigi; Riggio, Lucia; Palumbo, Daniele; Buccino, Giovanni

    2008-06-01

    Embodiment theory proposes that neural systems for perception and action are also engaged during language comprehension. Previous neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have only been able to demonstrate modulation of action systems during comprehension of concrete language. We provide neurophysiological evidence for modulation of motor system activity during the comprehension of both concrete and abstract language. In Experiment 1, when the described direction of object transfer or information transfer (e.g., away from the reader to another) matched the literal direction of a hand movement used to make a response, speed of responding was faster than when the two directions mismatched (an action-sentence compatibility effect). In Experiment 2, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to study changes in the corticospinal motor pathways to hand muscles while reading the same sentences. Relative to sentences that do not describe transfer, there is greater modulation of activity in the hand muscles when reading sentences describing transfer of both concrete objects and abstract information. These findings are discussed in relation to the human mirror neuron system.

  11. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 101: Constellation EVA Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Nicole C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Why do we need space suits? 2) Protection From the Environment; 3) Primary Life Support System (PLSS); 4) Thermal Control; 5) Communications; 6) Helmet and Extravehicular Visor Assy; 7) Hard Upper Torso (HUT) and Arm Assy; 8) Display and Controls Module (DCM); 9) Gloves; 10) Lower Torso Assembly (LTA); 11) What Size Do You Need?; 12) Boot and Sizing Insert; 13) Boot Heel Clip and Foot Restraint; 14) Advanced and Crew Escape Suit; 15) Nominal & Off-Nominal Landing; 16) Gemini Program (mid-1960s); 17) Apollo EVA on Service Module; 18) A Bold Vision for Space Exploration, Authorized by Congress; 19) EVA System Missions; 20) Configurations; 21) Reduced Gravity Program; and 22) Other Opportunities.

  12. Comparison of trout hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions as in vitro models for predicting hepatic clearance in fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions have been used to collect in vitro biotransformation data for fish as a means of improving modeled estimates of chemical bioaccumulation. To date, however, there have been few direct comparisons of these two methods. In the present st...

  13. Comparison of trout hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions as in vitro models for predicting hepatic clearance in fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions have been used to collect in vitro biotransformation data for fish as a means of improving modeled estimates of chemical bioaccumulation. To date, however, there have been few direct comparisons of these two methods. In the present stud...

  14. Cardiac autonomic nervous system activity in obesity.

    PubMed

    Liatis, Stavros; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Katsilambros, Nikolaos

    2004-08-01

    The development of obesity is caused by a disturbance of energy balance, with energy intake exceeding energy expenditure. As the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has a role in the regulation of both these variables, it has become a major focus of investigation in the fields of obesity pathogenesis. The enhanced cardiac sympathetic drive shown in most of the studies in obese persons might be due to an increase in their levels of circulating insulin. The role of leptin needs further investigation with studies in humans. There is a blunted response of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in obese subjects after consumption of a carbohydrate-rich meal as well as after insulin administration. This might be due to insulin resistance. It is speculated that increased SNS activity in obesity may contribute to the development of hypertension in genetically susceptible individuals. It is also speculated that the increase in cardiac SNS activity under fasting conditions in obesity may be associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  15. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  16. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  17. LSST active optics system software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Lotz, Paul; Xin, Bo; Claver, Charles; Angeli, George; Sebag, Jacques; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory P.

    2016-08-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an 8-meter class wide-field telescope now under construction on Cerro Pachon, near La Serena, Chile. This ground-based telescope is designed to conduct a decade-long time domain survey of the optical sky. In order to achieve the LSST scientific goals, the telescope requires delivering seeing limited image quality over the 3.5 degree field-of-view. Like many telescopes, LSST will use an Active Optics System (AOS) to correct in near real-time the system aberrations primarily introduced by gravity and temperature gradients. The LSST AOS uses a combination of 4 curvature wavefront sensors (CWS) located on the outside of the LSST field-of-view. The information coming from the 4 CWS is combined to calculate the appropriate corrections to be sent to the 3 different mirrors composing LSST. The AOS software incorporates a wavefront sensor estimation pipeline (WEP) and an active optics control system (AOCS). The WEP estimates the wavefront residual error from the CWS images. The AOCS determines the correction to be sent to the different degrees of freedom every 30 seconds. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of the AOS. More particularly, we will focus on the software architecture as well as the AOS interactions with the various subsystems within LSST.

  18. Scuba diving activates vascular antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Sureda, A; Batle, J M; Ferrer, M D; Mestre-Alfaro, A; Tur, J A; Pons, A

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to study the effects of scuba diving immersion on plasma antioxidant defenses, nitric oxide production, endothelin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. 9 male divers performed an immersion at 50 m depth for a total time of 35 min. Blood samples were obtained before diving at rest, immediately after diving, and 3 h after the diving session. Leukocyte counts, plasma 8oxoHG, malondialdehyde and nitrite levels significantly increased after recovery. Activities of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, catalase and superoxide significantly increased immediately after diving and these activities remained high after recovery. Plasma myeloperoxidase activity and protein levels and extracellular superoxide dismutase protein levels increased after 3 h. Endothelin-1 concentration significantly decreased after diving and after recovery. Vascular endothelial growth factor concentration significantly increased after diving when compared to pre-diving values, returning to initial values after recovery. Scuba diving at great depth activated the plasma antioxidant system against the oxidative stress induced by elevated pO₂ oxygen associated with hyperbaria. The decrease in endothelin-1 levels and the increase in nitric oxide synthesis could be factors that contribute to post-diving vasodilation. Diving increases vascular endothelial growth factor plasma levels which can contribute to the stimulation of tissue resistance to diving-derived oxidative damage.

  19. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles. PMID:27001289

  20. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  1. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  2. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  3. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  4. Electromechanical Modelling of an Active Isolation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn , AL 36849, U.S.A. Active Control of Automobile Two-Stage Suspension System-Half Car Model...element model ..... one d.imensnional modelo -ilo0- S-120 1 L 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5 Frequency(f/fO) 6(b) Sensor Voltage S20 10 16

  5. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  6. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  7. Active alignment/contact verification system

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A system involving an active (i.e. electrical) technique for the verification of: 1) close tolerance mechanical alignment between two component, and 2) electrical contact between mating through an elastomeric interface. For example, the two components may be an alumina carrier and a printed circuit board, two mating parts that are extremely small, high density parts and require alignment within a fraction of a mil, as well as a specified interface point of engagement between the parts. The system comprises pairs of conductive structures defined in the surfaces layers of the alumina carrier and the printed circuit board, for example. The first pair of conductive structures relate to item (1) above and permit alignment verification between mating parts. The second pair of conductive structures relate to item (2) above and permit verification of electrical contact between mating parts.

  8. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  9. Active pulse synchronization for OPCPA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueffing, Moritz; Metzger, Thomas; Deng, Yunpei; Schwarz, Alexander; Krausz, Ferenc; Kienberger, Reinhard

    2011-05-01

    The parametric amplification in nonlinear crystals requires both spacial and temporal stability of pump and seed pulses to attain stability of the amplified pulse. Especially the development of thin disk pump sources with pulse lengths down to 2 ps requires a temporal stability well beyond 100 fs . To reduce the timing shifts between pump and seed pulses in OPCPA systems we introduce a novel, active pulse synchronization system combining a high precision translation stage and a piezo-electric driven mirror. The timing jitter reduction of OPCPAs with kHz repetition rate demands a fast detection system allowing nearly shot to shot correction. Therefore the spectrum of a cross-correlation between the 1030 nm , 1 nm bandwidth pump and a broad bandwidth Ti:Sa seed pulse stretched to 10 ps in a BBO crystal is directly and in real time measured using a position sensitive detector. This method can easily be adopted to other OPA/OPCPA systems giving the chance to correct not only for slow drifts but also for fluctuations up to 300 Hz .

  10. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  11. An Automatic Tremor Activity Monitoring System (TAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, H.; Thompson, P. J.; Rogers, G.; Dragert, H.; Spence, G.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed an algorithm that quantitatively characterizes the level of seismic tremors from recorded seismic waveforms. For each hour of waveform at a given station, the process begins with the calculation of scintillation index and moving average with various time lengths. The scintillation index (essentially the `normalized variance of intensity of the signal') is adapted from the studies of pulses in radio waves and is an efficient tool to identify the energy bursts of tremor signals. Both scintillation index and moving average values are fed into a series of logic gates to determine if tremor activity exists. This algorithm is implemented in the Tremor Activity Monitoring System (TAMS) to provide automatic early alerts for episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events in the northern Cascadia margin. Currently, TAMS retrieves the digital waveforms recorded during the previous day from the Canadian National Seismographic Network (CNSN) archive server at 1 AM every morning. The detecting process is repeated for all stations and hours to determine the level of tremor activity of the previous day. If a sufficient number of stations within a radius of 100 km are determined to have tremor patterns and coherent tremor arrivals can be found at more than 3 stations, TAMS automatically sends out alert emails to a list of subscribers with a figure summarizing the hours and locations of coherent tremors. TAMS outputs are very consistent with the work done by visual inspection, especially for major ETS events. It is straightforward to configure TAMS into a near-real-time system that can send out hourly (or shorter) reports if necessary.

  12. 49 CFR 234.225 - Activation of warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Activation of warning system. 234.225 Section 234....225 Activation of warning system. A highway-rail grade crossing warning system shall be maintained to activate in accordance with the design of the warning system, but in no event shall it provide less than...

  13. 49 CFR 234.225 - Activation of warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Activation of warning system. 234.225 Section 234....225 Activation of warning system. A highway-rail grade crossing warning system shall be maintained to activate in accordance with the design of the warning system, but in no event shall it provide less than...

  14. 49 CFR 234.225 - Activation of warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Activation of warning system. 234.225 Section 234....225 Activation of warning system. A highway-rail grade crossing warning system shall be maintained to activate in accordance with the design of the warning system, but in no event shall it provide less than...

  15. Quaternary non-centrosymmetric sulfide Y4GaSbS9: Syntheses, structures, optical properties and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Zou, Xiaochuan; Feng, Xia; Shi, Yongfang; Wu, Liming

    2017-01-01

    A new rare-earth metal gallium thioantimonate, Y4GaSbS9, has been synthesized successfully via high-temperature solid-state method. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed it adopted a known RE4GaSbS9-structure type in the orthorhombic space group Aba2 (no.41) with a=13.480(4) Å, b=13.790(4) Å, c=13.990(4) Å, V=2600.6(2) Å3 and Z=8. The structure is composed of bimetallic polar (Sb2S5) units and dimeric (GaS4)2 tetrahedra that share vertexes to form a 1D infinite chains 2 ∞ 1Ga 10-, inside which the isolated Y3+ cations and S2- anions. Polycrystalline Y4GaSbS9 shows the weak powder second harmonic generation (SHG) responses of this family, which is about 7.5 times that of the benchmark α-SiO2 in the particle size of 74-106 μm at the laser radiation wavelength of 2050 nm with a non-phase-matchable behavior. In addition, the synthesis, structural characterization, and optical properties as well as theoretical studies are also discussed.

  16. Space Station Active Thermal Control System modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, Abdul; Lin, Chin H.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Station Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) has been modeled using modified SINDA/SINFLO programs to solve two-phase Thermo-fluid problems. The modifications include changes in several subroutines to incorporate implicit solution which allows larger time step as compared to that for explicit solutions. Larger time step saves computer time but involves larger computational error. Several runs were made using various time steps for the ATCS model. It has been found that for a reasonable approach, three times larger time step as compared to that used in explicit method is a good value which will reduce the computer time by approximately 50 percent and still maintain the accuracy of the output data to within 90 percent of the explicit values.

  17. New resorbable polymeric systems with antithrombogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, G; Gallardo, A; San Román, J; Rebuelta, M; Bermejo, P; Buján, J; Bellón, J M; Honduvilla, N G; Escudero, C

    1999-12-01

    The synthesis and application as resorbable coatings of vascular grafts of a new polyacrylic derivative of Triflusal (2-acetyloxy-4-trifluoromethyl)benzoic acid, a commercial drug with antithrombogenic properties, are described. The high-molecular-weight polyacrylic system is rather stable in physiological conditions and provides a chemical support for the slow release of the pharmacologically active compound, Triflusal, or its main metabolite (2-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl)benzoic acid (HTB). Experiments of deposition and retention of platelets in static basal conditions using plasma-rich medium from blood of sheep, seem to indicate that the polymeric coating of the polyacrylic derivative of Triflusal improves the antiaggregating character for platelets of the surface of small-diameter vascular grafts without the application of other antithrombogenic drugs.

  18. Ground-based observations of Phoebe (S9) and its rotational dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshkina, Ekaterina Yu.; Devyatkin, Alexandr V.; Gorshanov, Denis L.

    Analysis of CCD observations of Phoebe, the 9th satellite of Saturn (visual magnitude of about 16.5), with a mirror astrograph ZA-320M at Pulkovo Observatory in Saint-Petersburg are presented. Photometric observations are performed both in the integral band of the telescope and in bands BVR of the Johnson system. Reference catalogues USNO-A2.0 (for R - filter and integral observations) and Ticho-2 (for V and B - filters) were used. Rotational light-curve data for Phoebe taken over a short time span (2 - 8 hours) for several nights are presented. Numerical investigation of the evolution of Phoebe's rotational dynamics is carried out. The probability of Phoebe's capture in resonant states that are distinct from 1:1 is estimated.

  19. 49 CFR 234.225 - Activation of warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Activation of warning system. 234.225 Section 234... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.225 Activation of warning system. A highway-rail grade crossing warning system shall be maintained to activate in accordance with the design of...

  20. 49 CFR 234.225 - Activation of warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Activation of warning system. 234.225 Section 234... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.225 Activation of warning system. A highway-rail grade crossing warning system shall be maintained to activate in accordance with the design of...

  1. Can in vitro metabolism-dependent covalent binding data distinguish hepatotoxic from nonhepatotoxic drugs? An analysis using human hepatocytes and liver S-9 fraction.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Jonathon N; Kelly, Joan M; Tripathy, Sakambari; Zhao, Sabrina X; Lam, Wing W; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Obach, R Scott

    2009-02-01

    In vitro covalent binding studies in which xenobiotics are shown to undergo metabolism-dependent covalent binding to macromolecules have been commonly used to shed light on the biochemical mechanisms of xenobiotic-induced toxicity. In this paper, 18 drugs (nine hepatotoxins and nine nonhepatotoxins) were tested for their proclivity to demonstrate metabolism-dependent covalent binding to macromolecules in human liver S-9 fraction (9000 g supernatant) or human hepatocytes, as an extension to previous work that used human liver microsomes published in this journal [ Obach et al. ( 2008 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 21 , 1814 -1822 ]. In the S-9 fraction, seven out of the nine drugs in each category demonstrated some level of metabolism-dependent covalent binding. Inclusion of reduced glutathione, cofactors needed by conjugating enzymes, and other parameters (total daily dose and fraction of total intrinsic clearance comprised by covalent binding) improved the ability of the system to separate hepatotoxins from nonhepatotoxins to a limited extent. Covalent binding in human hepatocytes showed that six out of the nine hepatotoxins and four out of eight nonhepatotoxins demonstrated covalent binding. Taking into account estimates of total daily body burden of covalent binding from the hepatocyte data showed an improvement over other in vitro systems for distinguishing hepatotoxins from nonhepatotoxins; however, this metabolism system still displayed some false positives. Combined with the previous study using liver microsomes, these findings identify the limitations of in vitro covalent binding data for prospective prediction of hepatotoxicity for new drug candidates and highlight the need for a better understanding of the link between drug bioactivation, covalent adduct formation, and toxicity outcomes. Directly relating covalent binding to hepatotoxicity is likely an oversimplification of the process whereby adduct formation ultimately leads to toxicity. Understanding underlying

  2. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  3. Vehicle Systems Engineering and Integration Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-31

    procedural and subjective (see Program Managers Guide: A Modular Open Systems Approach to Acquisition Version 2, Open Systems Joint Task Force, http...a sensor pod for the Man- Transportable Robotic System (MTRS) PoR. The acquisition agent for the MTRS PoR is the Robotic System Joint Program...subjective (see Program Managers Guide: A Modular Open Systems Approach to Acquisition Version 2, Open Systems Joint Task Force, http://www.acq.osd.mil

  4. Activity Systems and Moral Reasoning: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardi, Eva; Helkama, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Seventeen social educator students were taught to analyze their work activity by means of a Vygotsky-inspired method, drawing on Engeström's notion of an activity system. The method aimed at increasing the consciousness of the students of the structure of work activity system. The participants wrote two accounts of their field-work practice…

  5. Active dc filter for HVDC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. ); Asplund, G.

    1994-01-01

    This article is a case history of the installation of active dc filters for high-performance, low-cost harmonics filtering at the Lindome converter station in the Konti-Skan 2 HVDC transmission link between Denmark and Sweden. The topics of the article include harmonics, interference, and filters, Lindome active dc filter, active dc filter design, digital signal processor, control scheme, protection and fault monitoring, and future applications.

  6. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  7. Limited Investigation of Active Feel Control Stick System (Active Stick)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    at VCORNER .............. 15 Figure 12: Pitch Rate Response to 1.5 g Commanded Force PTI at VHI ......................... 16 Figure 13: Pitch Angle...Response to 1.5 g Commanded Force PTI at VHI ...................... 17 Figure 14: Flight Control System Stick Attributes at VLO...23 Figure 19: Cooper-Harper Ratings for Head Down Display Task ( VHI ) ......................... 24 Figure 20: Fine

  8. Tools for active control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.; Newsom, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Efficient control law analysis and design tools which properly account for the interaction of flexible structures, unsteady aerodynamics and active controls are developed. Development, application, validation and documentation of efficient multidisciplinary computer programs for analysis and design of active control laws are also discussed.

  9. A Hybrid Activity System as Educational Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamazumi, Katsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    This article analyzes a hybrid after-school learning activity for children called "New School" (NS). NS is an inter-institutional, collaborative project based on a partnership between a university and local elementary schools that also involves other social actors and institutions. Using a framework of third generation activity theory, the article…

  10. Expression and characterization of glycogen synthase kinase-3 mutants and their effect on glycogen synthase activity in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, H; Argast, G M; Foord, O; Fischer, E H; Krebs, E G

    1996-01-01

    In these studies we expressed and characterized wild-type (WT) GSK-3 (glycogen synthase kinase-3) and its mutants, and examined their physiological effect on glycogen synthase activity. The GSK-3 mutants included mutation at serine-9 either to alanine (S9A) or glutamic acid (S9E) and an inactive mutant, K85,86MA. Expression of WT and the various mutants in a cell-free system indicated that S9A and S9E exhibit increased kinase activity as compared with WT. Subsequently, 293 cells were transiently transfected with WT GSK-3 and mutants. Cells expressing the S9A mutant exhibited higher kinase activity (2.6-fold of control cells) as compared with cells expressing WT and S9E (1.8- and 2.0-fold, respectively, of control cells). Combined, these results suggest serine-9 as a key regulatory site of GSK-3 inactivation, and indicate that glutamic acid cannot mimic the function of the phosphorylated residue. The GSK-3-expressing cell system enabled us to examine whether GSK-3 can induce changes in the endogenous glycogen synthase activity. A decrease in glycogen synthase activity (50%) was observed in cells expressing the S9A mutant. Similarly, glycogen synthase activity was suppressed in cells expressing WT and the S9E mutant (20-30%, respectively). These studies indicate that activation of GSK-3 is sufficient to inhibit glycogen synthase in intact cells, and provide evidence supporting a physiological role for GSK-3 in regulating glycogen synthase and glycogen metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8816781

  11. Active Control of Complex Physical Systems: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    release; distribution is unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maxtmum 200 words) Active control of complex systems imposes unique requirements for physical models and...months after the meeting, SPrinte In USA. Acceslon For NTIS CRA&W DTIC TAB Unlannounced ] Active Control of Complex Physical Systems Justificatton An...control strategies. Physical models This work on the active control of which are adequate to predict the influence of specific physical systems has been

  12. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells.

  13. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    What is Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM)? The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) is an expandable habitat technology demonstration on ISS; increase human-rated inflatable structure Technology Readiness Level (TRL) to level 9. NASA managed ISS payload project in partnership with Bigelow Aerospace. Launched to ISS on Space X 8 (April 8th, 2016). Fully expanded on May 28th, 2016. Jeff Williams/Exp. 48 Commander first entered BEAM on June 5th, 2016.

  14. Description of data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    One of the major responsibilities of the JPL Computing and Information Services Office is to develop and maintain a JPL plan for providing computing services to the JPL management and administrative community that will lead to improved productivity. The CISO plan to accomplish this objective has been titled 'Management and Administrative Support Systems' (MASS). The MASS plan is based on the continued use of JPL's IBM 3032 Computer system for administrative computing and for the MASS functions. The current candidate administrative Data Base Management Systems required to support the MASS include ADABASE, Cullinane IDMS and TOTAL. Previous uses of administrative Data Base Systems have been applied to specific local functions rather than in a centralized manner with elements common to the many user groups. Limited capacity data base systems have been installed in microprocessor based office automation systems in a few Project and Management Offices using Ashton-Tate dBASE II. These experiences plus some other localized in house DBMS uses have provided an excellent background for developing user and system requirements for a single DBMS to support the MASS program.

  15. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  16. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dimethylnitrosamine in mammalian cells (CHO/HGPRT system): enhancement by calcium phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Machanoff, R.; Sebastian, J.R.S.; Hsie, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) was determined in the CHO/HGPRT system. Metabolic activation of the promutagen was achieved by use of a liver homogenate supernatant (S9) prepared from Aroclor 1254-induced Sprague-Dawley rats. The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of DMN were enhanced by the inclusion of calcium chloride in the incubation mix, and this enhancement was dependent on the presence of sodium phosphate. Under conditions that yielded maximal activity (10 mM calcium chloride, 10 mM magnesium chloride, 50 mM sodium phosphate), an apparent calcium phosphate precipitate was observed. DMN activity increased with increasing amounts of S9 protein over the range 0.3-3.0 mg/ml in the S9 mix and appeared to plateau at higher concentrations. The mutagencity of DMN can be described as 110 mutants/10/sup 6/ cells per mM DMN per mg/ml S9 protein per hour.

  17. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dimethylnitrosamine in mammalian cells (CHO/HGPRT system): enhancement by calcium phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Machanoff, R.; San Sebastian, J.R.; Hsie, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) was determined in the CHO/HGPRT system. Metabolic activation of the promutagen was achieved by use of a liver homogenate supernatant (S9) prepared from Aroclor 1254-induced Sprague-Dawley rats. The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of DMN were enhanced by the inclusion of calcium chloride in the incubation mix, and this enhancement was dependent on the presence of sodium phosphate. Under conditions that yielded maximal activity (10 mM calcium chloride, 10 mM magnesium chloride, 50 mM sodium phosphate), an apparent calcium phospate precipitate was observed. DMN activity increased with increasing amounts of S9 protein over the range 0.3-3.0 mg/ml in the S9 mix and appeared to plateau at higher concentrations. The mutagenicity of DMN can be described as 110 mutants/10/sup 6/ cells per mM DMN per mg/ml S9 protein per hour.

  18. A summary of systems definition project activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. J.; Biringer, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    Design information and subsystem requirement definition to the overall program is presented. Application analysis and conceptual design for the wide variety of systems, system tradeoff studies and engineering design for the more promising application types, and the identification of the technology status and requirements for major subsystems and components are described. The residential design and analysis contracts, hybrid photovoltaic/solar thermal electric conversion contract, and development of prototype combined photovoltaic/thermal flat-plate collectors were studied.

  19. Sympathoadrenal system and activation of glycogenolysis during muscular activity.

    PubMed

    Cartier, L J; Gollnick, P D

    1985-04-01

    Comparisons were made of the appearance of phosphorylase (PHOS) a and lactate (LA) during electrical stimulation of the gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus (SM) muscles of normal and sympathectomized (SYMPX) rats. Ten-second stimulation at 3 Hz increased PHOS a approximately fourfold in the GM of normal rats, whereafter it declined during stimulation until at 60 s it was similar to rest. The increase in PHOS a of GM from SYMPX rats after 10 s of stimulation was approximately 50% that of normal rats. Stimulation of the SM produced smaller and slower increases in PHOS a with the peak occurring after 60 s, which remained constant to 90 s. SYMPX did not alter this effect in the SM. LA production and creatine phosphate depletion in the GM were continuous throughout stimulation and uninfluenced by SYMPX. This was true for the SM with the exception of LA production being greater after SYMPX. [ATP] was unchanged by electrical stimulation. The rate and magnitude of the PHOS a appearance was a function of stimulation frequency. Reversion of PHOS to the b form after stimulation was rapid, with approximately 50% of the peak value being attained in 2.5 s, and at 5 s the values were those of rest. These data demonstrate that an intact sympathoadrenal system is not obligatory for the initiation of glycogenolysis in skeletal muscle.

  20. Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical…

  1. [Increased fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by activated protein C system].

    PubMed

    Gando, S; Tedo, I; Masio, H; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H

    1994-06-01

    To examine the hypothesis that activated protein C system during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery may increase fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass, protein C activity, protein C antigen and thrombomodulin of sixteen patients undergoing elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery were investigated after induction of anesthesia, before and after cardiopulmonary bypass, and at the end of operation. Protein C activity decreased and thrombomodulin increased significantly after the cardiopulmonary bypass. There were no significant correlations of thrombomodulin with protein C activity and protein C antigen. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that protein C system is activated and circulating thrombomodulin appears in the systemic circulation during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery and this enhanced activation of protein C system is possibly related to the reported increase of fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  2. Methodology for the systems engineering process. Volume 1: System functional activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Systems engineering is examined in terms of functional activities that are performed in the conduct of a system definition/design, and system development is described in a parametric analysis that combines functions, performance, and design variables. Emphasis is placed on identification of activities performed by design organizations, design specialty groups, as well as a central systems engineering organizational element. Identification of specific roles and responsibilities for doing functions, and monitoring and controlling activities within the system development operation are also emphasized.

  3. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  4. PEGASUS: Designing a System for Supporting Group Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyprianidou, Maria; Demetriadis, Stavros; Pombortsis, Andreas; Karatasios, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web-based system person-centred group-activity support system (PEGASUS) in university instruction, as a means for advancing person-centred learning by supporting group activity. The PEGASUS is expected to help students and teachers in two distinct…

  5. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  6. Entry-Level Activities in System Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylander, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    System-level consultation or organizational development in schools is an area in great need of theoretical models and definitions. The three articles in this special issue provide a unique learning opportunity not only for consultation across borders but also for consultation within the same nation. In my commentary, I limit my remarks to a few…

  7. Fused-Ring Oxazolopyrrolopyridopyrimidine Systems with Gram-Negative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiyuan; Moloney, Jonathan G.; Christensen, Kirsten E.; Moloney, Mark G.

    2017-01-01

    Fused polyheterocyclic derivatives are available by annulation of a tetramate scaffold, and been shown to have antibacterial activity against a Gram-negative, but not a Gram-positive, bacterial strain. While the activity is not potent, these systems are structurally novel showing, in particular, a high level of polarity, and offer potential for the optimization of antibacterial activity. PMID:28098784

  8. A System for Monitoring Posture and Physical Activity Using Accelerometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- Accelerometers can be used to monitor physical activity in the home over prolonged periods. We describe a novel system for...processing schema in which these parameters are extracted is described. Keywords - physical activity , accelerometers, congestive heart failure, chronic...When monitoring the condition of patients with neurodegenerative or chronic diseases, a knowledge of their body movement and physical activity

  9. Activities for endoscopy information systems standardization in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Hideto; Fujino, Masayuki A

    2006-01-01

    There are two activities for Japanese endoscopy information system. One is for a standard terminology (Minimal Standard Terminology: MST) for endoscopy reporting. Other is Integrating Healthcare Enterprise Japan (IHE-J) for an integration of hospital information system. In IHE-J activity, the members revealed specificities of an endoscopy workflow by making a comparison with a radiology workflow. The authors will propose a scheme for systematic standardization based on our experiences in the standardization activities.

  10. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Preston T.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  11. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineer Jerry Gutierrez in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  12. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers Lorraine Garcia (foreground) and Linda Robeck in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  13. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). In the background is the Pathfinder cruise stage, which the lander will be mated to once its functional tests are complete. The lander will remain attached to this stage during its six-to-seven-month journey to Mars. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  14. Collaborative Point Paper on Active Protection Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    construction, the silicone immediately becomes soft and flexible again; fabric uses spacer yarns to create 3D structure designed for optimal...absorption of impacting force; fabric’s surface coating and spacer yarns in immediate impact area instantly become rigid and transmit energy to adjacent... spacer yarns , thus absorbing and distributing energy away from impact site; micro- engineering provides maximum protection & leaves system lightweight

  15. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  16. Activation of the methylreductase system from Methanobacterium bryantii by corrins.

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, W B; Wolfe, R S

    1985-01-01

    Corrins activated the methylreductase system from Methanobacterium bryantii three- to fivefold in extracts resolved from low-molecular-weight factors. Corrins did not substitute for ATP and component B, which were also required for maximal activity. The concentration of diaquacobinamides required for one-half maximal activity was 1 microM. The concentrations of cyanocobalamin, methylcobalamin, Co alpha-(5-hydroxybenzimidazoyl)-Co beta-cyanocobamide, and 5'-deoxyadenosylcobinamide required for one-half maximal activity were between 4 and 7 microM. Deoxyadenosylcobalamin was nearly inactive. Activation was independent of thiols, coenzyme M, and ATP. Activation was also observed after partial purification of the methylreductase system by agarose column chromatography. Corrins were required in catalytic concentrations, methylcobalamin was not required, and methanogenesis was enzymatic. Corrin activation of the methylreductase is a novel effect on methanogenesis. However, the physiological significance of the corrin activation is uncertain. PMID:3930464

  17. Final report on EURAMET.QM-S9/1212: Supplementary comparison of analytical capabilities for synthetic natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valková, M.; Mirt, M.; Beranek, J.; Bárta, M.; Žamberova, I.; van der Veen, A. M. H.; Ziel, P. R.; Augusto, C. R.; Ribeiro, C. C.; Teixeira, D. C. G. S.; Oudwater, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The EURAMET supplementary comparison EURAMET.QM-S9 involves standard gas mixtures of synthetic natural gas. It is similar to key comparison CCQM-K16 (2001-2002). Analysed were gas mixtures of synthetic natural gas containing nitrogen, carbon dioxide and the alkanes up to hexane with a total of 10 components. Four laboratories (CMI, Czech Republic; INMETRO, Brazil; SMU, Slovakia; and VSL, The Netherlands) participated in this supplementary comparison. All of the participants, except CMI, have established facilities for natural gas analysis, and have existing claims for their Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) for natural gas mixtures. The agreement of the results in this supplementary comparison is very good. All the results with their reported uncertainties are in agreement with the reference values for all the participants. SMU and VSL participated in the key comparison CCQM-K16. VSL obtained very good results in both the supplementary comparison and the CCQM-K16 comparison. SMU obtained better results in the supplementary comparison than in CCQM-K16. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM.

  18. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  19. Synchronization of two different systems by using generalized active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ming-Chung; Hung, Yao-Chen

    2002-09-01

    We have already generalized the techniques from active control theory, and applied them to synchronize two different systems. In this Letter, we demonstrate these techniques by period-system, Lorenz and Rossler systems. Moreover, the effect of external noise is also included in our discussion.

  20. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    SciTech Connect

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  1. NASA's UAS [Unmanned Aircraft Systems] Related Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    NASA continues to operate all sizes of UAS in all classes of airspace both domestically and internationally. Missions range from highly complex operations in coordination with piloted aircraft, ground, and space systems in support of science objectives to single aircraft operations in support of aeronautics research. One such example is a scaled commercial transport aircraft being used to study recovery techniques due to large upsets. NASA's efforts to support routine UAS operations continued on several fronts last year. At the national level in the United States (U.S.), NASA continued its support of the UAS Executive Committee (ExCom) comprised of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and NASA. The committee was formed in recognition of the need of UAS operated by these agencies to access to the National Airspace System (NAS) to support operational, training, development and research requirements. Recommendations were received on how to operate both manned and unmanned aircraft in class D airspace and plans are being developed to validate and implement those recommendations. In addition the UAS ExCom has begun developing recommendations for how to achieve routine operations in remote areas as well as for small UAS operations in class G airspace. As well as supporting the UAS ExCom, NASA is a participant in the recently formed Aviation Rule Making Committee for UAS. This committee, established by the FAA, is intended to propose regulatory guidance which would enable routine civil UAS operations. As that effort matures NASA stands ready to supply the necessary technical expertise to help that committee achieve its objectives. By supporting both the UAS ExCom and UAS ARC, NASA is positioned to provide its technical expertise across the full spectrum of UAS airspace access related topic areas. The UAS NAS Access Project got underway this past year under the leadership of NASA s Aeronautics

  2. Retinal waves coordinate patterned activity throughout the developing visual system

    PubMed Central

    Ackman, James B.; Burbridge, Timothy J.; Crair, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The morphologic and functional development of the vertebrate nervous system is initially governed by genetic factors and subsequently refined by neuronal activity. However, fundamental features of the nervous system emerge before sensory experience is possible. Thus, activity-dependent development occurring before the onset of experience must be driven by spontaneous activity, but the origin and nature of activity in vivo remains largely untested. Here we use optical methods to demonstrate in live neonatal mice that waves of spontaneous retinal activity are present and propagate throughout the entire visual system before eye opening. This patterned activity encompassed the visual field, relied on cholinergic neurotransmission, preferentially initiated in the binocular retina, and exhibited spatiotemporal correlations between the two hemispheres. Retinal waves were the primary source of activity in the midbrain and primary visual cortex, but only modulated ongoing activity in secondary visual areas. Thus, spontaneous retinal activity is transmitted through the entire visual system and carries patterned information capable of guiding the activity-dependent development of complex intra- and inter- hemispheric circuits before the onset of vision. PMID:23060192

  3. Retinal waves coordinate patterned activity throughout the developing visual system.

    PubMed

    Ackman, James B; Burbridge, Timothy J; Crair, Michael C

    2012-10-11

    The morphological and functional development of the vertebrate nervous system is initially governed by genetic factors and subsequently refined by neuronal activity. However, fundamental features of the nervous system emerge before sensory experience is possible. Thus, activity-dependent development occurring before the onset of experience must be driven by spontaneous activity, but the origin and nature of activity in vivo remains largely untested. Here we use optical methods to show in live neonatal mice that waves of spontaneous retinal activity are present and propagate throughout the entire visual system before eye opening. This patterned activity encompassed the visual field, relied on cholinergic neurotransmission, preferentially initiated in the binocular retina and exhibited spatiotemporal correlations between the two hemispheres. Retinal waves were the primary source of activity in the midbrain and primary visual cortex, but only modulated ongoing activity in secondary visual areas. Thus, spontaneous retinal activity is transmitted through the entire visual system and carries patterned information capable of guiding the activity-dependent development of complex intra- and inter-hemispheric circuits before the onset of vision.

  4. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  5. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  6. Global positioning system: a new opportunity in physical activity measurement.

    PubMed

    Maddison, Ralph; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2009-11-04

    Accurate measurement of physical activity is a pre-requisite to monitor population physical activity levels and design effective interventions. Global Positioning System (GPS) technology offers potential to improve the measurement of physical activity. This paper 1) reviews the extant literature on the application of GPS to monitor human movement, with a particular emphasis on free-living physical activity, 2) discusses issues associated with GPS use, and 3) provides recommendations for future research. Overall findings show that GPS is a useful tool to augment our understanding of physical activity by providing the context (location) of the activity and used together with Geographical Information Systems can provide some insight into how people interact with the environment. However, no studies have shown that GPS alone is a reliable and valid measure of physical activity.

  7. Global positioning system: a new opportunity in physical activity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Maddison, Ralph; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2009-01-01

    Accurate measurement of physical activity is a pre-requisite to monitor population physical activity levels and design effective interventions. Global Positioning System (GPS) technology offers potential to improve the measurement of physical activity. This paper 1) reviews the extant literature on the application of GPS to monitor human movement, with a particular emphasis on free-living physical activity, 2) discusses issues associated with GPS use, and 3) provides recommendations for future research. Overall findings show that GPS is a useful tool to augment our understanding of physical activity by providing the context (location) of the activity and used together with Geographical Information Systems can provide some insight into how people interact with the environment. However, no studies have shown that GPS alone is a reliable and valid measure of physical activity. PMID:19887012

  8. An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Alan M; Hanson, Gregory R; Sexton, Angela Kay; Jones Jr, J P; Freer, Eva B; Sjoreen, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

  9. Comparative study between two different active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    An activated leading-edge (LE)-tailing-edge (TE) control system is applied to a drone aircraft with the objective of enabling the drone to fly subsonically at dynamic pressures which are 44% above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The control synthesis approach is based on the aerodynamic energy concept and it incorporates recent developments in this area. A comparison is made between the performance of the activated LE-TE control system and the performance of a TE control system, analyzed in a previous work. The results obtained indicate that although all the control systems achieve the flutter suppression objectives, the TE control system appears to be somewhat superior to the LE-TE control system, in this specific application. This superiority is manifested through reduced values of control surface activity over a wide range of flight conditions.

  10. [Activities of System Studies and Simulation, Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Launch Vehicle Interface Work Performed: a. S3 provided to KSC the new launch inclination targets needed for the April '04 launch date. 2. Prelaunch operations work performed: a. S3 updated the staffing plan for MSFC on-console personnel\\during the Final Countdown prior to launch. 3. Software Assessment Work Performed: a. S3 evaluated and recommended approval for Program Control Board (PCB) proposed change 649 for ground software changes, as well as change 650 and 650A for Stored Program Commands. 4. Education and Public Outreach Work Performed: a. S3 continues to coordinate the effort for the design and fabrication of scale models of the GP-3 for use at the launch site, education forums, and management/technical briefings. S3 also prepared a Change Request for additional funds needed for fabrication of additional scale models. S3 drafted the planned uses of these models, including the possibility of participation in the Boston, MA showings of the traveling Einstein Exhibit. 5. Program Management Support Work Performed: a. S3 prepared the input for and closed three MSFC Centerwide Action Item Tracking Systems (CAITS) actions during this period.

  11. International Collaboration Activities on Engineered Barrier Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2016-08-31

    The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program has been engaging in international collaborations between repository R&D programs for high-level waste (HLW) disposal to leverage on gathered knowledge and laboratory/field data of near- and far-field processes from experiments at underground research laboratories (URL). Heater test experiments at URLs provide a unique opportunity to mimetically study the thermal effects of heat-generating nuclear waste in subsurface repository environments. Various configurations of these experiments have been carried out at various URLs according to the disposal design concepts of the hosting country repository program. The FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier Experiment in Crystalline Host Rock) project is a large-scale heater test experiment originated by the Spanish radioactive waste management agency (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S.A. – ENRESA) at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) URL in Switzerland. The project was subsequently managed by CIEMAT. FEBEX-DP is a concerted effort of various international partners working on the evaluation of sensor data and characterization of samples obtained during the course of this field test and subsequent dismantling. The main purpose of these field-scale experiments is to evaluate feasibility for creation of an engineered barrier system (EBS) with a horizontal configuration according to the Spanish concept of deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock. Another key aspect of this project is to improve the knowledge of coupled processes such as thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) and thermal-hydro-chemical (THC) operating in the near-field environment. The focus of these is on model development and validation of predictions through model implementation in computational tools to simulate coupled THM and THC processes.

  12. Space Activism as an Epiphanic Belief System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    Years of interaction with young people in the space industry and in space activists groups led to my observation that many such individuals can cite a quite specific life event that triggered a life-long interest in or commitment to creating a space future. I am particularly intrigued by parallels between such experiences and the phenomenon of epiphanic experiences among committed Christians. I see analogies between the puzzlement among space activists and among Christian groups as to the reasons for so many people being "unbelievers." At a small international meeting on lunar exploration in 2003, I heard two separate lunch speakers cite such personal experiences. At the beginning of a break in that meeting, I grabbed the microphone from the chairman and asked each person to write down on a pad by his chair whether or not he (or she) had experienced a specific event that led to their involvement in space. If the answer was positive, I asked for a brief narrative, for their age at the time, and for their current age. I received 53 submissions, 20% of which simply stated that their involvement in space exploration was happenstance. (Apollo astronaut John Young was among these.) The other 80% of the submissions had specific stories. The ages at the time of the epiphany ranged from 4 to 47; and their current ages ranged from 22 to 78. I will present a high-level characterization of these inputs. Interest in space exploration as a form of belief system is consistent with choosing NASA goals for the purpose of inspiration and with phenomena such as the "Overview Effect". More research might explore what form the transcendent experience takes and whether it might be associated with feelings of universal connection such as the noosphere or "The Force". From a pragmatic point of view, outreach strategies for exploration should focus on giving individuals access to personal, potentially transformational experiences as opposed to astronaut talks at civic clubs.

  13. The function of the earth observing system - Data information system Distributed Active Archive Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The functionality of the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) which are significant elements of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is discussed. Each DAAC encompasses the information management system, the data archival and distribution system, and the product generation system. The EOSDIS DAACs are expected to improve the access to earth science data set needed for global change research.

  14. A hybrid electromagnetic shock absorber for active vehicle suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Bolandhemmat, Hamidreza; Behrad Khamesee, Mir; Golnaraghi, Farid

    2011-02-01

    The use of electromagnetic dampers (ED) in vehicle active suspension systems has drawn considerable attention in the past few years, attributed to the fact that active suspension systems have shown superior performance in improving ride comfort and road handling of terrain vehicles, compared with their passive and semi-active counterparts. Although demonstrating superb performance, active suspensions still have some shortcomings that must be overcome. They have high energy consumption, weight, and cost and are not fail-safe in case of a power breakdown. The novel hybrid ED, which is proposed in this paper, is a potential solution to the above-mentioned drawbacks of conventional active suspension systems. The proposed hybrid ED is designed to inherit the high-performance characteristics of an active ED with the reliability of a passive damper in a single package. The eddy current damping effect is utilised as a source of the passive damping. First, a prototype ED is designed and fabricated. The prototype ED is then utilised to experimentally establish the design requirements for a real-size active ED. This is accomplished by comparing its vibration isolation performance in a 1-DOF quarter-car test rig with that of a same-class semi-active damper. Then, after a real-size active ED is designed, the concept of hybrid damper is introduced to the damper design to address the drawbacks of the active ED. Finally, the finite-element method is used to accurately model and analyse the designed hybrid damper. It is demonstrated that by introducing the eddy current damping effect to the active part, a passive damping of approximately 1570 Ns/m is achieved. This amount of passive damping guarantees that the damper is fail-safe and reduces the power consumption more than 70%, compared with an active ED in an automotive active suspension system.

  15. A Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. This paper provides a tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements as well as a comparison of the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation. This paper also surveys the flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: Suppression of Transient Accelerations By Levitation (STABLE); the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM); and the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS).

  16. Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration-sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. A tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem, including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements, as well as a comparison or the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation is provided. The flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: suppression of transient accelerations by levitation, the microgravity vibration isolation mount, and the active rack isolation system are surveyed.

  17. Activity-Based Costing Systems for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Dennis H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines traditional costing models utilized in higher education and pinpoints shortcomings related to proper identification of costs. Describes activity-based costing systems as a superior alternative for cost identification, measurement, and allocation. (MLF)

  18. Disorder-mediated crowd control in an active matter system

    PubMed Central

    Pinçe, Erçağ; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Living active matter systems such as bacterial colonies, schools of fish and human crowds, display a wealth of emerging collective and dynamic behaviours as a result of far-from-equilibrium interactions. The dynamics of these systems are better understood and controlled considering their interaction with the environment, which for realistic systems is often highly heterogeneous and disordered. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of spatial disorder can alter the long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system, making it switch between gathering and dispersal of individuals. At equilibrium, colloidal particles always gather at the bottom of any attractive potential; however, under non-equilibrium driving forces in a bacterial bath, the colloids disperse if disorder is added to the potential. The depth of the local roughness in the environment regulates the transition between gathering and dispersal of individuals in the active matter system, thus inspiring novel routes for controlling emerging behaviours far from equilibrium. PMID:26956085

  19. Disorder-mediated crowd control in an active matter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinçe, Erçağ; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Living active matter systems such as bacterial colonies, schools of fish and human crowds, display a wealth of emerging collective and dynamic behaviours as a result of far-from-equilibrium interactions. The dynamics of these systems are better understood and controlled considering their interaction with the environment, which for realistic systems is often highly heterogeneous and disordered. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of spatial disorder can alter the long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system, making it switch between gathering and dispersal of individuals. At equilibrium, colloidal particles always gather at the bottom of any attractive potential; however, under non-equilibrium driving forces in a bacterial bath, the colloids disperse if disorder is added to the potential. The depth of the local roughness in the environment regulates the transition between gathering and dispersal of individuals in the active matter system, thus inspiring novel routes for controlling emerging behaviours far from equilibrium.

  20. Global vision systems regulatory and standard setting activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiana, Carlo; Münsterer, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    A number of committees globally, and the Regulatory Agencies they support, are active delivering and updating performance standards for vision system: Enhanced, Synthetic and Combined, as they apply to both Fixed Wing and, more recently, Rotorcraft operations in low visibility. We provide an overview of each committee's present and past work, as well as an update of recent activities and future goals.

  1. Understanding Tensions: Activity Systems Analysis of Cross-Continental Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, LanHui Zhang; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Using the lens of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory, activity theory, and Engeström's activity systems analysis, this qualitative study explores students' experiences in the context of a sixteen-week transpacific collaboration between seven students at Northern Illinois University (NIU) and seven students from Shandong Normal University (SDNU),…

  2. Chemoenzymatic asymmetric total syntheses of antitumor agents (3R,9R,10R)- and (3S,9R,10R)-Panaxytriol and (R)- and (S)-Falcarinol from Panax ginseng using an enantioconvergent enzyme-triggered cascade reaction.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sandra F; Steinreiber, Andreas; Orru, Romano V A; Faber, Kurt

    2002-12-27

    Total asymmetric synthesis of two components of Panax ginseng showing antitumor activity, i.e., (3R,9R,10R)- and (3S,9R,10R)-Panaxytriol and of both enantiomers of Falcarinol was accomplished. Due to the fact that the synthetic strategy was based on enantioconvergent biotransformations, the occurrence of any undesired stereoisomer was entirely avoided. The absolute configuration of naturally occurring Panaxytriol was confirmed to be (3R,9R,10R) on the basis of optical rotation values. It was shown that enzyme-triggered cascade reactions represent a valuable tool for the synthesis of natural products.

  3. Bayesian Inference Networks and Spreading Activation in Hypertext Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savoy, Jacques

    1992-01-01

    Describes a method based on Bayesian networks for searching hypertext systems. Discussion covers the use of Bayesian networks for structuring index terms and representing user information needs; use of link semantics based on constrained spreading activation to find starting points for browsing; and evaluation of a prototype system. (64…

  4. Human activity recognition based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Jose Antonio; Angelov, Plamen; Ledezma, Agapito; Sanchis, Araceli

    2010-10-01

    Environments equipped with intelligent sensors can be of much help if they can recognize the actions or activities of their users. If this activity recognition is done automatically, it can be very useful for different tasks such as future action prediction, remote health monitoring, or interventions. Although there are several approaches for recognizing activities, most of them do not consider the changes in how a human performs a specific activity. We present an automated approach to recognize daily activities from the sensor readings of an intelligent home environment. However, as the way to perform an activity is usually not fixed but it changes and evolves, we propose an activity recognition method based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems.

  5. Involvement of the plasminogen activation system in cow endometritis.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, S; Taitzoglou, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Boscos, C M; Kaldrimidou, E; Saratsis, Ph

    2004-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the: (a) presence and activity of components of the "plasminogen activators/plasmin" system in dairy cows with or without endometritis; (b) variations in enzyme activity according to the degree of endometritis; and (c) associations between these enzymes and changes in endometrial histology after intrauterine antibiotic treatment. Endometrial biopsies were collected from anestrus (no palpable ovarian structures and milk progesterone <1 ng/ml) Holstein cows, 30-40 days postpartum. On the basis of a vaginoscopic examination, rectal palpation of the cervix and uterus, and endometrial histology, there were 92 cows with endometritis and 20 cows without endometritis. After biopsy collection, each cow was given an intrauterine infusion of 1.5x10(6) IU of procaine penicillin G. In cows with endometritis, genital tract examinations and biopsies were repeated 2 weeks later. Both plasminogen activators (PAs), tissue type (t-PA) and urokinase (u-PA), were immunologically identified in all uterine biopsies. Plasminogen activator activity (PAA) increased, whereas plasminogen activator inhibition (PAI) and plasmin inhibition (PI) decreased in proportion to the degree of inflammation. Two weeks after intrauterine treatment, PAA had decreased significantly in all cows that had reduced severity of endometrial inflammation and had increased significantly in all cows with increased severity of inflammation. The change in the degree of inflammation depended upon plasminogen activator activity; cows with higher PAA were more likely to improve. In conclusion, there was evidence for a role of the plasminogen activation proteolytic system in bovine endometritis.

  6. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active

  7. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    PubMed

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener.

  8. EURAMET.M.P-S9: comparison in the negative gauge pressure range -950 to 0 hPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxholm, S.; Otal, P.; AltintaS, A.; Bermanec, L. G.; Durgut, Y.; Hanrahan, R.; Kocas, I.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Pražák, D.; Sandu, I.; Åetina, J.; Spohr, I.; Steindl, D.; Tammik, K.; Testa, N.

    2016-01-01

    registered as EURAMET project no. 1170 and as a supplementary comparison EURAMET.M.P-S9 in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Low Energy Physical Activity Recognition System on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Luis Miguel Soria; Gonzalez-Abril, Luis; Ramirez, Juan Antonio Ortega; de la Concepcion, Miguel Angel Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    An innovative approach to physical activity recognition based on the use of discrete variables obtained from accelerometer sensors is presented. The system first performs a discretization process for each variable, which allows efficient recognition of activities performed by users using as little energy as possible. To this end, an innovative discretization and classification technique is presented based on the χ2 distribution. Furthermore, the entire recognition process is executed on the smartphone, which determines not only the activity performed, but also the frequency at which it is carried out. These techniques and the new classification system presented reduce energy consumption caused by the activity monitoring system. The energy saved increases smartphone usage time to more than 27 h without recharging while maintaining accuracy. PMID:25742171

  10. Simulation of P systems with active membranes on CUDA.

    PubMed

    Cecilia, José M; García, José M; Guerrero, Ginés D; Martínez-del-Amor, Miguel A; Pérez-Hurtado, Ignacio; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J

    2010-05-01

    P systems or Membrane Systems provide a high-level computational modelling framework that combines the structure and dynamic aspects of biological systems in a relevant and understandable way. They are inherently parallel and non-deterministic computing devices. In this article, we discuss the motivation, design principles and key of the implementation of a simulator for the class of recognizer P systems with active membranes running on a (GPU). We compare our parallel simulator for GPUs to the simulator developed for a single central processing unit (CPU), showing that GPUs are better suited than CPUs to simulate P systems due to their highly parallel nature.

  11. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  12. Emergent ultra-long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active-inactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua P.; Aragones, Juan L.; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser

    2016-04-01

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  13. JPL Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) for sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) was developed for sewage treatment and is being applied to a one-million gallon per day sewage treatment pilot plant in Orange County California. Activities reported include pyrolysis and activation of carbon-sewage sludge, and activated carbon treatment of sewage to meet ocean discharge standards. The ACTS Sewage treatment operations include carbon-sewage treatment, primary and secondary clarifiers, gravity (multi-media) filter, filter press dewatering, flash drying of carbon-sewage filter cake, and sludge pyrolysis and activation. Tests were conducted on a laboratory scale, 10,000 gallon per day demonstration plant and pilot test equipment. Preliminary economic studies are favorable to the ACTS process relative to activated sludge treatment for a 175,000,000 gallon per day sewage treatment plant.

  14. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Hendrik P N; Charbel Issa, Peter; Walier, Maja; Janzer, Stefanie; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Börncke, Florian; Fritsche, Lars G; Chong, Ngaihang V; Fimmers, Rolf; Wienker, Thomas; Holz, Frank G; Weber, Bernhard H F; Oppermann, Martin

    2008-07-02

    Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112) and controls (n = 67). Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH), factor B-C2 (BF-C2) and complement C3 (C3) genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001), were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  15. Control of active reflector system for radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guo-hua; Li, Guo-ping; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Zhen-chao

    2016-10-01

    According to the control requirements of the active reflector surface in the 110 m radio telescope at QiTai(QTT) Xinjiang, a new displacement actuator and a new displacement control system were designed and manufactured and then their characteristics were tested by a dual-frequency laser interferometer in the micro-displacement laboratory. The displacement actuator was designed by a scheme of high precision worm and roller screw structures, and the displacement control system was based on a ARM micro-processor. Finally, the S curve acceleration control methods were used to design the hardware platform and software algorithm for the active reflection surface of the control system. The test experiments were performed based on the laser metrology system on an active reflector close-loop antenna prototype for large radio telescope. Experimental results indicate that it achieves a 30 mm working stroke and 5 μm RMS motion resolution. The accuracy (standard deviation) is 3.67 mm, and the error between the determined and theoretical values is 0.04% when the rated load is 300 kg, the step is 2 mm and the stroke is 30mm. Furthermore, the active reflector integrated system was tested by the laser sensors with the accuracy of 0.25 μm RMS on 4-panel radio telescope prototype, the measurement results show that the integrated precision of the active reflector closed-loop control system is less than 5 μm RMS, and well satisfies the technical requirements of active reflector control system of the QTT radio telescope in 3 mm wavelength.

  16. Active Sensing System with In Situ Adjustable Sensor Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Nurzaman, Surya G.; Culha, Utku; Brodbeck, Luzius; Wang, Liyu; Iida, Fumiya

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread use of sensors in engineering systems like robots and automation systems, the common paradigm is to have fixed sensor morphology tailored to fulfill a specific application. On the other hand, robotic systems are expected to operate in ever more uncertain environments. In order to cope with the challenge, it is worthy of note that biological systems show the importance of suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability to handle different kinds of sensing tasks with particular requirements. Methodology This paper presents a robotics active sensing system which is able to adjust its sensor morphology in situ in order to sense different physical quantities with desirable sensing characteristics. The approach taken is to use thermoplastic adhesive material, i.e. Hot Melt Adhesive (HMA). It will be shown that the thermoplastic and thermoadhesive nature of HMA enables the system to repeatedly fabricate, attach and detach mechanical structures with a variety of shape and size to the robot end effector for sensing purposes. Via active sensing capability, the robotic system utilizes the structure to physically probe an unknown target object with suitable motion and transduce the arising physical stimuli into information usable by a camera as its only built-in sensor. Conclusions/Significance The efficacy of the proposed system is verified based on two results. Firstly, it is confirmed that suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability enables the system to sense different physical quantities, i.e. softness and temperature, with desirable sensing characteristics. Secondly, given tasks of discriminating two visually indistinguishable objects with respect to softness and temperature, it is confirmed that the proposed robotic system is able to autonomously accomplish them. The way the results motivate new research directions which focus on in situ adjustment of sensor morphology will also be discussed. PMID:24416094

  17. Gating and Conductance Properties of Bk Channels Are Modulated by the S9–S10 Tail Domain of the α Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Brenda L.; Magleby, Karl L.

    2001-01-01

    The COOH-terminal S9–S10 tail domain of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels is a major determinant of Ca2+ sensitivity (Schreiber, M., A. Wei, A. Yuan, J. Gaut, M. Saito, and L. Salkoff. 1999. Nat. Neurosci. 2:416–421). To investigate whether the tail domain also modulates Ca2+-independent properties of BK channels, we explored the functional differences between the BK channel mSlo1 and another member of the Slo family, mSlo3 (Schreiber, M., A. Yuan, and L. Salkoff. 1998. J. Biol. Chem. 273:3509–3516). Compared with mSlo1 channels, mSlo3 channels showed little Ca2+ sensitivity, and the mean open time, burst duration, gaps between bursts, and single-channel conductance of mSlo3 channels were only 32, 22, 41, and 37% of that for mSlo1 channels, respectively. To examine which channel properties arise from the tail domain, we coexpressed the core of mSlo1 with either the tail domain of mSlo1 or the tail domain of mSlo3 channels, and studied the single-channel currents. Replacing the mSlo1 tail with the mSlo3 tail resulted in the following: increased open probability in the absence of Ca2+; reduced the Ca2+ sensitivity greatly by allowing only partial activation by Ca2+ and by reducing the Hill coefficient for Ca2+ activation; decreased the voltage dependence ∼28%; decreased the mean open time two- to threefold; decreased the mean burst duration three- to ninefold; decreased the single-channel conductance ∼14%; decreased the Kd for block by TEAi ∼30%; did not change the minimal numbers of three to four open and five to seven closed states entered during gating; and did not change the major features of the dependency between adjacent interval durations. These observations support a modular construction of the BK channel in which the tail domain modulates the gating kinetics and conductance properties of the voltage-dependent core domain, in addition to determining most of the high affinity Ca2+ sensitivity. PMID:11723163

  18. Active disturbance rejection control for fractional-order system.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingda; Li, Donghai; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Chunzhe

    2013-05-01

    Fractional-order proportional-integral (PI) and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are the most commonly used controllers in fractional-order systems. However, this paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme for fractional-order system based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the fractional-order dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. External disturbance, sensor noise, and parameter disturbance are also estimated using extended state observer. The ADRC stability of rational-order model is analyzed. Simulation results on three typical fractional-order systems are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Lattime, Scott B.; Taylor, Shawn; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Oswald, Jay; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    Reducing blade tip clearances through active tip clearance control in the high pressure turbine can lead to significant reductions in emissions and specific fuel consumption as well as dramatic improvements in operating efficiency and increased service life. Current engines employ scheduled cooling of the outer case flanges to reduce high pressure turbine tip clearances during cruise conditions. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, reburst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). In an effort to improve upon current thermal methods, a first generation mechanically-actuated active clearance control (ACC) system has been designed and fabricated. The system utilizes independent actuators, a segmented shroud structure, and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. Ambient temperature performance tests of this first generation ACC system assessed individual seal component leakage rates and both static and dynamic overall system leakage rates. The ability of the nine electric stepper motors to control the position of the seal carriers in both open- and closed-loop control modes for single and multiple cycles was investigated. The ability of the system to follow simulated engine clearance transients in closed-loop mode showed the system was able to track clearances to within a tight tolerance ( 0.001 in. error).

  20. Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Lattime, Scott B.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Oswald, Jay; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    Reducing blade tip clearances through active tip clearance control in the high pressure turbine can lead to significant reductions in emissions and specific fuel consumption as well as dramatic improvements in operating efficiency and increased service life. Current engines employ scheduled cooling of the outer case flanges to reduce high pressure turbine tip clearances during cruise conditions. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, reburst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). In an effort to improve upon current thermal methods, a first generation mechanically-actuated active clearance control (ACC) system has been designed and fabricated. The system utilizes independent actuators, a segmented shroud structure, and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. Ambient temperature performance tests of this first generation ACC system assessed individual seal component leakage rates and both static and dynamic overall system leakage rates. The ability of the nine electric stepper motors to control the position of the seal carriers in both open- and closed-loop control modes for single and multiple cycles was investigated. The ability of the system to follow simulated engine clearance transients in closed-loop mode showed the system was able to track clearances to within a tight tolerance (0.001 in. error).

  1. A comparison of active adverse event surveillance systems worldwide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Lin; Moon, Jinhee; Segal, Jodi B

    2014-08-01

    Post-marketing drug surveillance for adverse drug events (ADEs) has typically relied on spontaneous reporting. Recently, regulatory agencies have turned their attention to more preemptive approaches that use existing data for surveillance. We conducted an environmental scan to identify active surveillance systems worldwide that use existing data for the detection of ADEs. We extracted data about the systems' structures, data, and functions. We synthesized the information across systems to identify common features of these systems. We identified nine active surveillance systems. Two systems are US based-the FDA Sentinel Initiative (including both the Mini-Sentinel Initiative and the Federal Partner Collaboration) and the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD); two are Canadian-the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies (CNODES) and the Vaccine and Immunization Surveillance in Ontario (VISION); and two are European-the Exploring and Understanding Adverse Drug Reactions by Integrative Mining of Clinical Records and Biomedical Knowledge (EU-ADR) Alliance and the Vaccine Adverse Event Surveillance and Communication (VAESCO). Additionally, there is the Asian Pharmacoepidemiology Network (AsPEN) and the Shanghai Drug Monitoring and Evaluative System (SDMES). We identified two systems in the UK-the Vigilance and Risk Management of Medicines (VRMM) Division and the Drug Safety Research Unit (DSRU), an independent academic unit. These surveillance systems mostly use administrative claims or electronic medical records; most conduct pharmacovigilance on behalf of a regulatory agency. Either a common data model or a centralized model is used to access existing data. The systems have been built using national data alone or via partnership with other countries. However, active surveillance systems using existing data remain rare. North America and Europe have the most population coverage; with Asian countries making good advances.

  2. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described, and the results for both linear and nonlinear performance analysis of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  3. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload-handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described and the results from both linear and nonlinear performance analyses of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  4. Identification of the major metabolite of 2,5-bis(5-hydroxymethyl-2-thienyl)furan (NSC 652287), an antitumor agent, in the S9 subcellular fraction of dog liver cells.

    PubMed

    Phillip, Lawrence R; Jorden, Jean L; Rivera, Maria I; Wolfe, Tracy L; Upadhyayb, Kaye; Stinson, Sherman F

    2002-02-05

    Alpha-Terthienyl (1) is a trithiophene found widely distributed in plants. Other naturally occurring trithiophenes are less widely distributed, but nonetheless exhibit potent antiviral and cytotoxic activities. A synthetic analog of 1, 2,5-bis(5-hydroxymethyl-2-thienyl)furan (2; NSC 652287) has recently been shown to possess exceptional activity and selectivity against several cell lines of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) anticancer drug screen. When incubated with the S9 subcellular fraction of dog liver cells, the concentration of 2 was observed to decline as a function of time, with a concomitant increase in a significant, time-dependent concentration of an unknown entity. The results of electron-ionization mass spectrometric analysis of the metabolite indicate an increase in 14 amu over that of 2, leading to suspicions that either an oxidation or a methylation had occurred. Results of differential derivatization and accurate mass analysis allow us to propose that metabolism of 2 involves the biotransformation of one of the two hydroxymethyl groups of 2 into a carboxylic acid functionality. This is further supported by separate experiments involving chemical oxidation and S9 incubation of 5-[5-[5-hydroxymethyl-2-thienyl]-2-furanyl]-2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde: comparing the mass spectra and gas chromatographic retention times of the resulting products to those of the identified metabolite of 2 show all to be the same.

  5. Physical activity benefits and risks on the gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donald

    2011-12-01

    This review evaluates the current understanding of the benefits and risks of physical activity and exercise on the gastrointestinal system. A significant portion of endurance athletes are affected by gastrointestinal symptoms, but most symptoms are transient and do not have long-term consequences. Conversely, physical activity may have a protective effect on the gastrointestinal system. There is convincing evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of colon cancer. The evidence is less convincing for gastric and pancreatic cancers, gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cholelithiasis, diverticular disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and constipation. Physical activity may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and inflammatory bowel disease, although this has not been proven unequivocally. This article provides a critical review of the evidence-based literature concerning exercise and physical activity effects on the gastrointestinal system and provides physicians with a better understanding of the evidence behind exercise prescriptions for patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Well-designed prospective randomized trials evaluating the risks and benefits of exercise and physical activity on gastrointestinal disorders are recommended for future research.

  6. Implementation study of wearable sensors for activity recognition systems

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemian, Mona

    2015-01-01

    This Letter investigates and reports on a number of activity recognition methods for a wearable sensor system. The authors apply three methods for data transmission, namely ‘stream-based’, ‘feature-based’ and ‘threshold-based’ scenarios to study the accuracy against energy efficiency of transmission and processing power that affects the mote's battery lifetime. They also report on the impact of variation of sampling frequency and data transmission rate on energy consumption of motes for each method. This study leads us to propose a cross-layer optimisation of an activity recognition system for provisioning acceptable levels of accuracy and energy efficiency. PMID:26609413

  7. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A method is developed that determines the placement of an active control surface for maximum effectiveness in suppressing flutter. No specific control law is required by this method which is based on the aerodynamic energy concept. It is argued that the spanwise placement of the active controls should coincide with the locations where maximum energy per unit span is fed into the system. The method enables one to determine the distribution, over the different surfaces of the aircraft, of the energy input into the system as a result of the unstable fluttering mode. The method is illustrated using three numerical examples.

  8. Actively controlled multiple-sensor system for feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Michael J.; Silberberg, Teresa M.

    1991-08-01

    Typical vision systems which attempt to extract features from a visual image of the world for the purposes of object recognition and navigation are limited by the use of a single sensor and no active sensor control capability. To overcome limitations and deficiencies of rigid single sensor systems, more and more researchers are investigating actively controlled, multisensor systems. To address these problems, we have developed a self-calibrating system which uses active multiple sensor control to extract features of moving objects. A key problem in such systems is registering the images, that is, finding correspondences between images from cameras of differing focal lengths, lens characteristics, and positions and orientations. The authors first propose a technique which uses correlation of edge magnitudes for continuously calibrating pan and tilt angles of several different cameras relative to a single camera with a wide angle field of view, which encompasses the views of every other sensor. A simulation of a world of planar surfaces, visual sensors, and a robot platform used to test active control for feature extraction is then described. Motion in the field of view of at least one sensor is used to center the moving object for several sensors, which then extract object features such as color, boundary, and velocity from the appropriate sensors. Results are presented from real cameras and from the simulated world.

  9. Benfotiamine upregulates antioxidative system in activated BV-2 microglia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Ivana; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation and resulting sustained neuroinflammatory reaction are generally associated with neurodegeneration. Activated microglia acquires proinflammatory cellular profile that generates oxidative burst. Their persistent activation exacerbates inflammation, which damages healthy neurons via cytotoxic mediators, such as superoxide radical anion and nitric oxide. In our recent study, we have shown that benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate) possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of benfotiamine on the pro-oxidative component of activity of LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells were investigated. The activation of microglia was accompanied by upregulation of intracellular antioxidative defense, which was further promoted in the presence of benfotiamine. Namely, activated microglia exposed to non-cytotoxic doses of benfotiamine showed increased levels and activities of hydrogen peroxide- and superoxide-removing enzymes—catalase and glutathione system, and superoxide dismutase. In addition, benfotiamine showed the capacity to directly scavenge superoxide radical anion. As a consequence, benfotiamine suppressed the activation of microglia and provoked a decrease in NO and ·O−2 production and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, benfotiamine might silence pro-oxidative activity of microglia to alleviate/prevent oxidative damage of neighboring CNS cells. PMID:26388737

  10. Mutagenic activation of aromatic amines by molluscs as a biomarker of marine pollution.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Méndez, F M; Rodríguez-Ariza, A; Usero-García, J; Pueyo, C; López-Barea, J

    1998-01-01

    Mutagenic activation of arylamines by mollusc S9 fractions was evaluated as a biomarker for marine pollution. Two bivalve species were used as bioindicators, the common mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the striped venus (Chameleo gallina). A strain of Salmonella typhimurium overproducing O-acetyltransferase was used as indicator of mutagenicity. Mussels from an area of the North Atlantic Spanish zone that was exposed to an accidental crude oil spill were compared to bivalves from a reference area. C. gallina samples were from low polluted and highly polluted areas of the South Atlantic Spanish littoral. The promutagen 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) was activated to mutagenic derivative(s) by S9 fractions from both C. gallina and M. edulis. Animals from contaminated sites showed higher arylamine activation capabilities than reference animals. This was further correlated with the mutagenic activities of corresponding cyclopentone-dichloromethane animal extracts. 2-AA activation by mollusc S9 was potentiated by alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), known to inhibit PAH-inducible CYP1A cytochromes from vertebrates, but inhibited by methimazole (MZ), a substrate of the flavin monooxygenase (FMO) system. 2-AA-activating enzymes were mainly cytosolic; this localization clearly suggests that such activity could be attributed to soluble enzymes, different from the CYP1A or FMO systems. In conclusion, mutagenic activation of arylamines by mollusc S9, using as indicator a strain of Salmonella typhimurium that overproduces O-acetyltransferase, could be a reliable biomarker for marine pollution.

  11. Active Control of Linear Periodic System with Two Unstable Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    tV;;;.~II.~9 - B ~ZV ~- p1 . ,,~ >. ~ ACTIVE CONTROL OF LINEAR PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS by Gregory E. Myers, B.S.E. 2nd Lt...PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University...December 1982 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited -ow PREFACE This thesis is a continuation of the work done by Yeakel in the control of

  12. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

  13. Low-dose effect of ethanol on locomotor activity induced by activation of the mesolimbic system.

    PubMed

    Milton, G V; Randall, P K; Erickson, C K

    1995-06-01

    Four experiments were designed to study the ability of 0.5 g/kg ethanol (EtOH) intraperitoneally to modify locomotor activity induced by drugs that interact with different sites in the mesolimbic system (MLS) of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Locomotor activity was measured in a doughnut-shaped circular arena after various treatments. EtOH alone did not alter locomotor activity in any of the experiments. Amphetamine (AMP, intraperitoneally or intraaccumbens) increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the presence of EtOH attenuated AMP-induced locomotor activity. Bilateral infusion of GABAA antagonist picrotoxin (PIC) into the ventral tegmental area also increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the presence of EtOH attenuated PIC-induced locomotor activity. On the other hand, the interaction between bilateral infusion of mu-receptor agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-NMe-Phe-Gly-ol (DAGO) and EtOH on locomotor activity is complex. The highest dose of DAGO that significantly increased locomotor activity was not affected by the presence of EtOH. But, with lower doses of DAGO that either had no effect or a small increase in locomotor activity, the combination of EtOH and DAGO increased and attenuated locomotor activity, respectively. Results from this study support our hypothesis that a low dose of EtOH that does not modify behavior can interact with neurotransmitter systems in the brain and modify drug-induced locomotor activity. Modification of this drug-induced locomotor activity by a low dose of EtOH is dependent on the rate of ongoing locomotor behavior induced by drug and the neurotransmitter substrate that the drug modified to induce locomotor behavior.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Specification for installation of the crew activity planning system coaxial cable communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. A.; Roman, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    The specification used to install a broadband coaxial cable communication system to support remote terminal operations on the Crew Activity Planning system at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center are reported. The system supports high speed communications between a Harris Slash 8 computer and one or more Sanders Graphic 7 displays.

  15. Automated Activation and Deactivation of a System Under Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The MPLM Automated Activation/Deactivation application (MPLM means Multi-Purpose Logistic Module) was created with a three-fold purpose in mind: 1. To reduce the possibility of human error in issuing commands to, or interpreting telemetry from, the MPLM power, computer, and environmental control systems; 2. To reduce the amount of test time required for the repetitive activation/deactivation processes; and 3. To reduce the number of on-console personnel required for activation/ deactivation. All of these have been demonstrated with the release of the software. While some degree of automated end-item commanding had previously been performed for space-station hardware in the test environment, none approached the functionality and flexibility of this application. For MPLM activation, it provides mouse-click selection of the hardware complement to be activated, activates the desired hardware and verifies proper feedbacks, and alerts the user when telemetry indicates an error condition or manual intervention is required. For MPLM deactivation, the product senses which end items are active and deactivates them in the proper sequence. For historical purposes, an on-line log is maintained of commands issued and telemetry points monitored. The benefits of the MPLM Automated Activation/ Deactivation application were demonstrated with its first use in December 2002, when it flawlessly performed MPLM activation in 8 minutes (versus as much as 2.4 hours for previous manual activations), and performed MPLM deactivation in 3 minutes (versus 66 minutes for previous manual deactivations). The number of test team members required has dropped from eight to four, and in actuality the software can be operated by a sole (knowledgeable) system engineer.

  16. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-05

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  17. The Solar System Ballet: A Kinesthetic Spatial Astronomy Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, Inge; Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.; Astronomy, Center; Education ResearchCAPER, Physics

    2011-05-01

    The Solar System Ballet was developed in order for students of all ages to learn about the planets, their motions, their distances, and their individual characteristics. To teach people about the structure of our Solar System can be revealing and rewarding, for students and teachers. Little ones (and some bigger ones, too) often cannot yet grasp theoretical and spatial ideas purely with their minds. Showing a video is better, but being able to learn with their bodies, essentially being what they learn about, will help them understand and remember difficult concepts much more easily. There are three segments to this activity, which can be done together or separately, depending on time limits and age of the students. Part one involves a short introductory discussion about what students know about the planets. Then students will act out the orbital motions of the planets (and also moons for the older ones) while holding a physical model. During the second phase we look at the structure of the Solar System as well as the relative distances of the planets from the Sun, first by sketching it on paper, then by recreating a scaled version in the class room. Again the students act out the parts of the Solar System bodies with their models. The third segment concentrates on recreating historical measurements of Earth-Moon-Sun system. The Solar System Ballet activity is suitable for grades K-12+ as well as general public informal learning activities.

  18. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0–60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  19. Activation of ion transport systems during cell volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eveloff, J.L.; Warnock, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    This review discusses the activation of transport pathways during volume regulation, including their characteristics, the possible biochemical pathways that may mediate the activation of transport pathways, and the relations between volume regulation and transepithelial transport in renal cells. Many cells regulate their volume when exposed to an anisotonic medium. The changes in cell volume are caused by activation of ion transport pathways, plus the accompanying osmotically driven water movement such that cell volume returns toward normal levels. The swelling of hypertonically shrunken cells is termed regulatory volume increase (RVI) and involves an influx of NaCl into the cell via either activation of Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl cotransport systems, or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The reshrinking of hypotonically swollen cells is termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and involves an efflux of KCl and water from the cell by activation of either separate K/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/ conductances, a K-Cl cotransport system, or parallel K/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The biochemical mechanisms involved in the activation of transport systems are largely unknown, however, the phosphoinositide pathway may be implicated in RVI; phorbol esters, cGMP, and Ca/sup 2 +/ affect the process of volume regulation. Renal tubular cells, as well as the blood cells that transverse the medulla, are subjected to increasing osmotic gradients from the corticomedullary junction to the papillary tip, as well as changing interstitial and tubule fluid osmolarity, depending on the diuretic state of the animal. Medullary cells from the loop of Henle and the papilla can volume regulate by activating Na-K-2Cl cotransport or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchange systems.

  20. Summary of NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle; Odonnell, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    A summary of NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program Activities is presented. The NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program represents a unified NASA wide effort with the overall objective of providing NASA with the policy and posture which will increase the safety, performance, and reliability of space power systems. The specific objectives of the program are to: enhance cell/battery safety and reliability; maintain current battery technology; increase fundamental understanding of primary and secondary cells; provide a means to bring forth advanced technology for flight use; assist flight programs in minimizing battery technology related flight risks; and ensure that safe, reliable batteries are available for NASA's future missions.

  1. Multi-carrier mobile TDMA system with active array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Ryutaro; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Hamamoto, Naokazu

    1990-01-01

    A multi-carrier time division multiple access (TDMA) is proposed for the future mobile satellite communications systems that include a multi-satellite system. This TDMA system employs the active array antenna in which the digital beam forming technique is adopted to control the antenna beam direction. The antenna beam forming is carried out at the base band frequency by using the digital signal processing technique. The time division duplex technique is applied for the TDM/TDMA burst format, in order not to overlap transmit and receive timing.

  2. Moodog: Tracking Student Activity in Online Course Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hangjin; Almeroth, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Many universities are currently using Course Management Systems (CMSes) to conduct online learning, for example, by distributing course materials or submitting homework assignments. However, most CMSes do not include comprehensive activity tracking and analysis capabilities. This paper describes a method to track students' online learning…

  3. 40 CFR 60.759 - Specifications for active collection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... = age of the solid waste in the ith section, years CNMOC = concentration of nonmethane organic compounds... Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 60.759 Specifications for active collection systems. (a) Each owner or... condensate management, accessibility, compatibility with filling operations, integration with closure end...

  4. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the…

  5. Electromechanical Simulation of Actively Controlled Rotordynamic Systems with Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Reng Rong; Palazzolo, A. B.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, G.

    1991-01-01

    Theories and tests for incorporating piezoelectric pushers as actuator devices for active vibration control are discussed. It started from a simple model with the assumption of ideal pusher characteristics and progressed to electromechanical models with nonideal pushers. Effects on system stability due to the nonideal characteristics of piezoelectric pushers and other elements in the control loop were investigated.

  6. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  7. Posttranslational regulatory system for nitrogenase activity in Azospirillum spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, H A; Hartmann, A; Lowery, R G; Fitzmaurice, W P; Roberts, G P; Burris, R H

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism for "NH4+ switch-off/on" of nitrogenase activity in Azospirillum brasilense and A. lipoferum was investigated. A correlation was established between the in vivo regulation of nitrogenase activity by NH4Cl or glutamine and the reversible covalent modification of dinitrogenase reductase. Dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) activity was detected in extracts of A. brasilense with NAD as the donor molecule. Dinitrogenase reductase-activating glycohydrolase (DRAG) activity was present in extracts of both A. brasilense and A. lipoferum. The DRAG activity in A. lipoferum was membrane associated, and it catalyzed the activation of inactive nitrogenase (by covalent modification of dinitrogenase reductase) from both A. lipoferum and Rhodospirillum rubrum. A region homologous to R. rubrum draT and draG was identified in the genomic DNA of A. brasilense as a 12-kilobase EcoRI fragment and in A. lipoferum as a 7-kilobase EcoRI fragment. It is concluded that a posttranslational regulatory system for nitrogenase activity is present in A. brasilense and A. lipoferum and that it operates via ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase as it does in R. rubrum. Images PMID:2504694

  8. Dynamic positioning system based on active disturbance rejection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhengling; Guo, Chen; Fan, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    A dynamically positioned vessel, by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the certifying class societies (DNV, ABS, LR, etc.), is defined as a vessel that maintains its position and heading (fixed location or pre-determined track) exclusively by means of active thrusters. The development of control technology promotes the upgrading of dynamic positioning (DP) systems. Today there are two different DP systems solutions available on the market: DP system based on PID regulator and that based on model-based control. Both systems have limited disturbance rejection capability due to their design principle. In this paper, a new DP system solution is proposed based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) technology. This technology is composed of Tracking-Differentiator (TD), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Nonlinear Feedback Combination. On one hand, both TD and ESO can act as filters and can be used in place of conventional filters; on the other hand, the total disturbance of the system can be estimated and compensated by ESO, which therefore enhances the system's disturbance rejection capability. This technology's advantages over other methods lie in two aspects: 1) This method itself can not only achieve control objectives but also filter noisy measurements without other specialized filters; 2) This method offers a new useful approach to suppress the ocean disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Quench Protection System based on Active Power Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, Nozomu

    In superconducting coils, local and excessive joule heating may give damage to the superconducting windings when a quench occurs and therefore it is essential that the quench is detected quickly and precisely so that the coils can be safely discharged. We have presented a quench protection system based on the active power method which detects a quench by measuring the instantaneous active power generated in a superconducting coil. The protection system based on this method is strong against the inductive voltage and noise which may cause insufficient quench recognition. However, the proposed system is useful for a single coil but it is vulnerable to the magnetically coupled multi-coil such as high field superconducting coils. Because the proposed system can not avoid insufficient quench recognition by the mutual inductive voltage from the other coils. This paper presents a method to improve the characteristics of the active power method by cancelling the mutual inductive voltage. The experimental results of the quench protection for small Bi2223 coils show that the proposed system is useful for the magnetically coupled coils.

  10. Timing of activity of two fault systems on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galluzzi, V.; Guzzetta, L.; Giacomini, L.; Ferranti, L.; Massironi, M.; Palumbo, P.

    2015-10-01

    Here we discuss about two fault systems found in the Victoria and Shakespeare quadrangles of Mercury. The two fault sets intersect each other and show probable evidence for two stages of deformation. The most prominent system is N-S oriented and encompasses several tens to hundreds of kilometers long and easily recognizable fault segments. The other system strikes NE- SW and encompasses mostly degraded and short fault segments. The structural framework of the studied area and the morphological appearance of the faults suggest that the second system is older than the first one. We intend to apply the buffered crater counting technique on both systems to make a quantitative study of their timing of activity that could confirm the already clear morphological evidence.

  11. Active terahertz wave imaging system for detecting hidden objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yuner; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz wave can penetrate the common dielectric materials such as clothing, cardboard boxes, plastics and so on. Besides, the low photon energy and non-ionizing characteristic of the terahertz wave are especially suitable for the safety inspection of the human body. Terahertz imaging technology has a tremendous potential in the field of security inspection such as stations, airports and other public places. Terahertz wave imaging systems are divided into two categories: active terahertz imaging systems and passive terahertz imaging systems. So far, most terahertz imaging systems work at point to point mechanical scan pattern with the method of passive imaging. The imaging results of passive imaging tend to have low contrast and the image is not clear enough. This paper designs and implements an active terahertz wave imaging system combining terahertz wave transmitting and receiving with a Cassegrain antenna. The terahertz wave at the frequency of 94GHz is created by impact ionization avalanche transit time (IMPATT) diode, focused on the feed element for Cassegrain antenna by high density polyethylene (HDPE) lens, and transmitted to the human body by Cassegrain antenna. The reflected terahertz wave goes the same way it was emitted back to the feed element for Cassegrain antenna, focused on the horn antenna of detector by another high density polyethylene lens. The scanning method is the use of two-dimensional planar mirror, one responsible for horizontal scanning, and another responsible for vertical scanning. Our system can achieve a clear human body image, has better sensitivity and resolution than passive imaging system, and costs much lower than other active imaging system in the meantime.

  12. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  14. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Mariarosaria; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2005-10-01

    Vascular system is constituted by a complex and articulate network, e.g. arteries, arterioles, venules and veins, that requires a high degree of coordination between different elemental cell types. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) constitute a recent described family of 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors that are activated by proteolysis. In recent years several evidence have been accumulated for an involvement of this receptor in the response to endothelial injury in vitro and in vivo experimental settings suggesting a role for PAR2 in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular system. This review will deal with the role of PAR2 receptor in the cardiovascular system analyzing both in vivo and in vitro published data. In particular this review will deal with the role of this receptor in vascular reactivity, ischemia/reperfusion injury, coronary atherosclerotic lesions and angiogenesis.

  15. Automated system for analyzing the activity of individual neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankman, Isaac N.; Johnson, Kenneth O.; Menkes, Alex M.; Diamond, Steve D.; Oshaughnessy, David M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a signal processing system that: (1) provides an efficient and reliable instrument for investigating the activity of neuronal assemblies in the brain; and (2) demonstrates the feasibility of generating the command signals of prostheses using the activity of relevant neurons in disabled subjects. The system operates online, in a fully automated manner and can recognize the transient waveforms of several neurons in extracellular neurophysiological recordings. Optimal algorithms for detection, classification, and resolution of overlapping waveforms are developed and evaluated. Full automation is made possible by an algorithm that can set appropriate decision thresholds and an algorithm that can generate templates on-line. The system is implemented with a fast IBM PC compatible processor board that allows on-line operation.

  16. Active stabilization to prevent surge in centrifugal compression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Greitzer, Edward M.; Simon, Jon S.; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the active stabilization of surge in a centrifugal engine. The aims of the research were to extend the operating range of a compressor as far as possible and to establish the theoretical framework for the active stabilization of surge from both an aerodynamic stability and a control theoretic perspective. In particular, much attention was paid to understanding the physical limitations of active stabilization and how they are influenced by control system design parameters. Previously developed linear models of actively stabilized compressors were extended to include such nonlinear phenomena as bounded actuation, bandwidth limits, and robustness criteria. This model was then used to systematically quantify the influence of sensor-actuator selection on system performance. Five different actuation schemes were considered along with four different sensors. Sensor-actuator choice was shown to have a profound effect on the performance of the stabilized compressor. The optimum choice was not unique, but rather shown to be a strong function of some of the non-dimensional parameters which characterize the compression system dynamics. Specifically, the utility of the concepts were shown to depend on the system compliance to inertia ratio ('B' parameter) and the local slope of the compressor speedline. In general, the most effective arrangements are ones in which the actuator is most closely coupled to the compressor, such as a close-coupled bleed valve inlet jet, rather than elsewhere in the flow train, such as a fuel flow modulator. The analytical model was used to explore the influence of control system bandwidth on control effectiveness. The relevant reference frequency was shown to be the compression system's Helmholtz frequency rather than the surge frequency. The analysis shows that control bandwidths of three to ten times the Helmholtz frequency are required for larger increases in the compressor flow range

  17. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    All flutter suppression systems require sensors to detect the movement of the lifting surface and to activate a control surface according to a synthesized control law. Most of the work performed to date relates to the development of control laws based on predetermined locations of sensors and control surfaces. These locations of sensors and control surfaces are determined either arbitrarily, or by means of a trial and error procedure. The aerodynamic energy concept indicates that the sensors should be located within the activated strip. Furthermore, the best chordwise location of a sensor activating a T.E. control surface is around the 65 percent chord location. The best chordwise location for a sensor activating a L.E. surface is shown to lie upstream of the wing (around 20 percent upstream of the leading edge), or alternatively, two sensors located along the same chord should be used.

  18. Identifying healthcare activities using a real-time location system.

    PubMed

    Cagle, Rick; Darling, Erika; Kim, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses human resource allocation in a Veterans Health Administration audiology clinic as a model for clinics facing similar challenges in maximizing quality, safety, and effectiveness of care. A framework is proposed combining automatic identification technology with simulation and visualization software, asserting a relationship between location of staff within the facility and clinical activity, focusing healthcare staff on high-value activities to deliver safe, quality care. This enables "what-if" analyses of potential resource allocation scenarios, correlating location information from radiofrequency identification tags worn by clinicians and technicians in the clinic as part of a real-time location system, then inferring probable activity from the data. Once the baseline "as-is" can be established, the model will be refined to supply predictive analyses of resource allocation and management. Simulations of activities in specialized spaces saves time managing resources, which means more time can be spent on patient safety and increased satisfaction.

  19. Toxin activity assays, devices, methods and systems therefor

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory Jon

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, system and method for conducting toxin activity assay using sedimentation. The toxin activity assay may include generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample. The complexes may include a target toxin and a labeling agent, or may be generated due to presence of active target toxin and/or labeling agent designed to be incorporated into complexes responsive to the presence of target active toxin. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a lower density than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transporting occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.

  20. Smart interactive electronic system for monitoring the electromagnetic activities of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Sorin G.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2001-08-01

    A novel electronic device capable of sensing and monitoring the myoelectric, polarization wave and electromagnetic activities of the biological systems and in particular the human body is presented. It is known that all the physical and chemical processes within biological systems are associated with polarization, depolarization waves from the brain, neural signals and myoelectric processes that manifest themselves in ionic and dipole motion. The technology developed in our laboratory is based on certain charge motion sensitive electronics. The electronic system developed is capable of sensing the electromagnetic activities of biological systems. The information obtained is then processed by specialized software in order to interpret it from physical and chemical point of view.

  1. Research progress in some traditional and non-traditional medicinal species in the USDA, ARS, PGRCU (S9) germplasm collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoids and anthocyanins have shown anti-cancer activities in humans. Therefore, fruit and leaves from several accessions of Abutilon theophrasti Medik., and seeds from Desmodium discolor Vogel, D. incanum (G. Mey) D.C., D. intortum (Mill.) Urb., D. sandwicense E. Mey., D. tortuosum (Sw.) D.C., H...

  2. Complement activation by antibodies to Sm in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, U K; Fong, S; Hoch, S; Cook, R D; Vaughan, J H; Curd, J G

    1983-02-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantitate antibodies to Sm (anti-Sm) and to measure complement activation by anti-Sm in vitro. Anti-Sm in plasma of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were bound to purified Sm bound to polyvinyl chloride microtitre plates and assayed for bound IgG or IgM using enzyme linked anti-gamma or anti-mu. The activation of C4 by anti-Sm was measured by adding diluted normal human serum (complement) to the wells and quantitating the amount of C4 bound to the well surface using (Fab')2 goat anti-C4 followed by enzyme linked rabbit anti-goat IgG. The plasmas of 12 of 36 patients with SLE contained anti-Sm and all 12 activated complement (complement activating anti-Sm). Twenty-eight plasmas containing anti-Sm from 12 patients with SLE were studied. Ten of the 12 patients had anti-Sm of the IgG class whereas two had anti-Sm of both IgG and IgM classes. The amount of C4 activating anti-Sm correlated significantly with the in vivo activation of C4 measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis for C4d and C4, suggesting that complement activation by anti-Sm is important in vivo.

  3. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  4. Active system area networks for data intensive computations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-04-01

    The goal of the Active System Area Networks (ASAN) project is to develop hardware and software technologies for the implementation of active system area networks (ASANs). The use of the term ''active'' refers to the ability of the network interfaces to perform application-specific as well as system level computations in addition to their traditional role of data transfer. This project adopts the view that the network infrastructure should be an active computational entity capable of supporting certain classes of computations that would otherwise be performed on the host CPUs. The result is a unique network-wide programming model where computations are dynamically placed within the host CPUs or the NIs depending upon the quality of service demands and network/CPU resource availability. The projects seeks to demonstrate that such an approach is a better match for data intensive network-based applications and that the advent of low-cost powerful embedded processors and configurable hardware makes such an approach economically viable and desirable.

  5. Extracellular enzyme activity in a willow sewage treatment system.

    PubMed

    Brzezinska, Maria Swiontek; Lalke-Porczyk, Elżbieta; Kalwasińska, Agnieszka

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on the activity of extra-cellular enzymes in soil-willow vegetation filter soil which is used in the post-treatment of household sewage in an onsite wastewater treatment system located in central Poland. Wastewater is discharged from the detached house by gravity into the onsite wastewater treatment system. It flows through a connecting pipe into a single-chamber septic tank and is directed by the connecting pipe to a control well to be further channelled in the soil-willow filter by means of a subsurface leaching system. Soil samples for the studies were collected from two depths of 5 cm and 1 m from three plots: close to the wastewater inflow, at mid-length of the plot and close to its terminal part. Soil samples were collected from May to October 2009. The activity of the extra-cellular enzymes was assayed by the fluorometric method using 4-methylumbelliferyl and 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin substrate. The ranking of potential activity of the assayed enzymes was the same at 5 cm and 1 m soil depths, i.e. esterase > phosphmomoesterase > leucine-aminopeptidase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase. The highest values of enzymatic activity were recorded in the surface layer of the soil at the wastewater inflow and decreased with increasing distance from that point.

  6. Does cold activate the Drosophila melanogaster immune system?

    PubMed

    Salehipour-Shirazi, Golnaz; Ferguson, Laura V; Sinclair, Brent J

    2017-01-01

    Cold exposure appears to activate aspects of the insect immune system; however, the functional significance of the relationship between cold and immunity is unclear. Insect success at low temperatures is shaped in part by interactions with biotic stressors, such as pathogens, thus it is important to understand how and why immunity might be activated by cold. Here we explore which components of the immune system are activated, and whether those components differ among different kinds of cold exposure. We exposed Drosophila melanogaster to both acute (2h, -2°C) and sustained (10h, -0.5°C) cold, and measured potential (antimicrobial peptide expression, phenoloxidase activity, haemocyte counts) and realised (survival of fungal infection, wound-induced melanisation, bacterial clearance) immunity following recovery. Acute cold increased circulating haemocyte concentration and the expression of Turandot-A and diptericin, but elicited a short-term decrease in the clearance of gram-positive bacteria. Sustained cold increased the expression of Turandot-A, with no effect on other measures of potential or realised immunity. We show that measures of potential immunity were up-regulated by cold, whereas realised immunity was either unaffected or down-regulated. Thus, we hypothesize that cold-activation of potential immunity in Drosophila may be a compensatory mechanism to maintain stable immune function during or after low temperature exposure.

  7. Biomining active cellulases from a mining bioremediation system.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Keith; Armstrong, Zachary; Song, Young C; Baldwin, Susan A; Withers, Stephen G; Hallam, Steven J

    2013-09-20

    Functional metagenomics has emerged as a powerful method for gene model validation and enzyme discovery from natural and human engineered ecosystems. Here we report development of a high-throughput functional metagenomic screen incorporating bioinformatic and biochemical analyses features. A fosmid library containing 6144 clones sourced from a mining bioremediation system was screened for cellulase activity using 2,4-dinitrophenyl β-cellobioside, a previously proven cellulose model substrate. Fifteen active clones were recovered and fully sequenced revealing 9 unique clones with the ability to hydrolyse 1,4-β-D-glucosidic linkages. Transposon mutagenesis identified genes belonging to glycoside hydrolase (GH) 1, 3, or 5 as necessary for mediating this activity. Reference trees for GH 1, 3, and 5 families were generated from sequences in the CAZy database for automated phylogenetic analysis of fosmid end and active clone sequences revealing known and novel cellulase encoding genes. Active cellulase genes recovered in functional screens were subcloned into inducible high copy plasmids, expressed and purified to determine enzymatic properties including thermostability, pH optima, and substrate specificity. The workflow described here provides a general paradigm for recovery and characterization of microbially derived genes and gene products based on genetic logic and contemporary screening technologies developed for model organismal systems.

  8. Effects of activation of endocannabinoid system on myocardial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Polak, Agnieszka; Harasim, Ewa; Chabowski, Adrian

    2016-05-21

    Endocannabinoids exert their effect on the regulation of energy homeostasis via activation of specific receptors. They control food intake, secretion of insulin, lipids and glucose metabolism, lipid storage. Long chain fatty acids are the main myocardial energy substrate. However, the heart exerts enormous metabolic flexibility emphasized by its ability to utilzation not only fatty acids, but also glucose, lactate and ketone bodies. Endocannabinoids can directly act on the cardiomyocytes through the CB1 and CB2 receptors present in cardiomyocytes. It appears that direct activation of CB1 receptors promotes increased lipogenesis, pericardial steatosis and bioelectrical dysfunction of the heart. In contrast, stimulation of CB2 receptors exhibits cardioprotective properties, helping to maintain appropriate amount of ATP in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the effects of endocannabinoids at both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, such as liver, pancreas, or adipose tissue, resulting indirectly in plasma availability of energy substrates and affects myocardial metabolism. To date, there is little evidence that describes effects of activation of the endocannabinoid system in the cardiovascular system under physiological conditions. In the present paper the impact of metabolic diseases, i. e. obesity and diabetes, as well as the cardiovascular diseases - hypertension, myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction on the deregulation of the endocannabinoid system and its effect on the metabolism are described.

  9. Measurement of active shoulder proprioception: dedicated system and device.

    PubMed

    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Wojtaszek, Marcin; Kaniewski, Ryszard; Stefaniak, Jakub; Dudziński, Witold; Romanowski, Leszek

    2013-02-01

    Proprioception is an essential part of shoulder stability and neuromuscular control. The purpose of the study was the development of a precise system of shoulder proprioception assessment in the active mode (Propriometr). For that purpose, devices such as the electronic goniometer and computer software had been designed. A pilot study was carried out on a control group of 27 healthy subjects, the average age being 23.8 (22-29) in order to test the system. The result of the assessment was the finding of the error of active reproduction of the joint position (EARJP). EARJP was assessed for flexion, abduction, external and internal rotation. For every motion, reference positions were used at three different angles. The results showed EARJP to range in 3-6.1°. The proprioception evaluation system (propriometr) allows a precise measurement of active joint position sense. The designed system can be used to assess proprioception in both shoulder injuries and treatment. In addition, all achieved results of normal shoulders may serve as reference to be compared with the results of forthcoming studies.

  10. Active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; Noethe, Lothar; Magrin, Demetrio; Kuijken, Konrad; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Capaccioli, Massimo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Farinato, Jacopo; Fierro, Davide; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Savarese, Salvatore; Rakich, Andrew; Umbriaco, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope, the 2.6-m survey telescope designed for visible wavelengths of the European Southern Observatory at Cerro Paranal, in the Atacama desert. The telescope is characterized by a wide field of view (1.42 deg diameter), leading to tighter active optics than in conventional telescopes, in particular for the alignment requirements. We discuss the effects of typical error sources on the image quality and present the specific solutions adopted for wavefront sensing and correction of the aberrations, which are based on the shaping of a monolithic primary mirror and the positioning of the secondary in five degrees of freedom.

  11. Active other worlds in the Solar System and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, François

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decades, space exploration has moved planetology from the field of astronomy to the disciplines of geosciences. A fleet of spacecrafts have discovered and study tens of worlds in our solar system and beyond. Everywhere, we have been surprised by the diversity and the vigour of the geophysical activity, from volcanic eruptions to plasma waves... Every scientists present at EGU could -and should- be interested in the extraterrestrial processes that are discovered and analyzed elsewhere. In our solar system, a variety of clouds and fluid dynamical phenomena can be studied in six terrestrial atmospheres and on four giant planets. Active glaciers are found on Mars and Pluto. Rivers and lakes have sculpted the surface of Titan and Mars. Sometime, we can even study geophysical activity with no equivalent on our planet: ice caps made of frozen atmosphere that erupt in geysers, hazes formed by organic polymers which can completely shroud a moon, etc. We study these active worlds because we are curious and wish to understand our universe and our origins. However, more than ever, two specific motivations drive solar system geosciences in 2016: Firstly, as we become more and more familiar with the other worlds around us, we can use them to better understand our own planet. Throughout the solar system, we can access to data that are simply not available on the Earth, or study active processes that are subtle on Earth but of greater importance elsewhere, so that we can better understand them. Many geophysical concepts and tools developed for the Earth can also be tested on other planets. For instance the numerical Climate Models used to assess Earth's future climate change are applied to other planets. Much is learned from such experiments. Secondly, the time has come to generalize the fundamental lessons that we have learned from the examples in the solar system (including the Earth) to address the countless scientific questions that are -and will be- raised by

  12. Assessing Preschool Children's Physical Activity: The Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children-Preschool Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William H.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; McIver, Kerry L.; Dowda, Marsha; Almeida, M. Joao C. A.; Pate, Russell R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present initial information concerning a new direct observation system--the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children-Preschool Version. The system will allow researchers to record young children's physical activity levels while also coding the topography of their physical activity, as well as detailed…

  13. Theory of activated transport in bilayer quantum Hall systems.

    PubMed

    Roostaei, B; Mullen, K J; Fertig, H A; Simon, S H

    2008-07-25

    We analyze the transport properties of bilayer quantum Hall systems at total filling factor nu=1 in drag geometries as a function of interlayer bias, in the limit where the disorder is sufficiently strong to unbind meron-antimeron pairs, the charged topological defects of the system. We compute the typical energy barrier for these objects to cross incompressible regions within the disordered system using a Hartree-Fock approach, and show how this leads to multiple activation energies when the system is biased. We then demonstrate using a bosonic Chern-Simons theory that in drag geometries current in a single layer directly leads to forces on only two of the four types of merons, inducing dissipation only in the drive layer. Dissipation in the drag layer results from interactions among the merons, resulting in very different temperature dependences for the drag and drive layers, in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  14. Active sample acquisition system for micro-penetrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhees, Chris; Potsaid, Benjamin

    1998-05-01

    This paper summarizes the design and development of a sub-surface sample acquisition system for use in micro-penetrators. The system was developed for flight use under NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 2 project. The system goal is to acquire approximately 100 mg of Martian sub-surface soil and return it to the inside of the micro-penetrator for analysis to determine the presence of water. Various passive and active sampling techniques that were tested during the development cycle are described. After significant testing, a side bore drill mechanism was chosen to be developed for use in the flight penetrators. The design, development, and testing of mechanism element are outlined, with particular emphasis placed on actuator development, drill stem design, impact testing, and mechanism testing in various soil types. The other system elements, a pyrotechnically actuated door mechanism to seal the sample and an impact restraint mechanism, are also described.

  15. Hypersonic Vehicle Propulsion System Control Model Development Roadmap and Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Le, Dzu K.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Hypersonic project is directed towards fundamental research for two classes of hypersonic vehicles: highly reliable reusable launch systems (HRRLS) and high-mass Mars entry systems (HMMES). The objective of the hypersonic guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) discipline team is to develop advanced guidance and control algorithms to enable efficient and effective operation of these challenging vehicles. The ongoing work at the NASA Glenn Research Center supports the hypersonic GN&C effort in developing tools to aid the design of advanced control algorithms that specifically address the propulsion system of the HRRLSclass vehicles. These tools are being developed in conjunction with complementary research and development activities in hypersonic propulsion at Glenn and elsewhere. This report is focused on obtaining control-relevant dynamic models of an HRRLS-type hypersonic vehicle propulsion system.

  16. Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study. Phase 2: Extravehicular activity at a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Valerie; Shields, Nicholas, Jr.; Carr, Gerald P.; Pogue, William; Schmitt, Harrison H.; Schulze, Arthur E.

    1988-01-01

    The focus is on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems requirements definition for an advanced space mission: remote-from-main base EVA on the Moon. The lunar environment, biomedical considerations, appropriate hardware design criteria, hardware and interface requirements, and key technical issues for advanced lunar EVA were examined. Six remote EVA scenarios (three nominal operations and three contingency situations) were developed in considerable detail.

  17. Exploring creative activity: a software environment for multimedia systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrett, Peter W.; Jardine, David A.

    1992-03-01

    This paper examines various issues related to the theory, design, and implementation of a system that supports creative activity for a multimedia environment. The system incorporates artificial intelligence notions to acquire concepts of the problem domain. This paper investigates this environment by considering a model that is a basis for a system, which supports a history of user interaction. A multimedia system that supports creative activity is problematic. It must function as a tool allowing users to experiment dynamically with their own creative reasoning process--a very nebulous task environment. It should also support the acquisition of domain knowledge so that empirical observation can be further evaluated. This paper aims to illustrate that via the reuse of domain-specific knowledge, closely related ideas can be quickly developed. This approach is useful in the following sense: Multimedia navigational systems hardcode referential links with respect to a web or network. Although users can access or control navigation in a nonlinear (static) manner, these referential links are 'frozen' and can not capture their creative actions, which are essential in tutoring or learning applications. This paper describes a multimedia assistant based on the notion of knowledge- links, which allows users to navigate through creative information in a nonlinear (dynamic) fashion. A selection of prototype code based on object-oriented techniques and logic programming partially demonstrates this.

  18. Coherence and frequency in the reticular activating system (RAS).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Urbano, Francisco J

    2013-06-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit (1) electrical coupling mainly in GABAergic cells, and (2) gamma band activity in virtually all of the cells. Specifically, cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) (1) show electrical coupling, and (2) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanism behind electrical coupling is important because the stimulant modafinil was shown to increase electrical coupling. We also provide recent findings demonstrating that all cells in the PPN and Pf have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential to gamma band activity. On the other hand, all SubCD, and some PPN, cells manifested sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. We speculate that continuous sensory input will modulate coupling and induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions.

  19. SCAR arrow-wing active flutter suppression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, C. K.; Visor, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    The potential performance and direct operating cost benefits of an active flutter suppression system (FSS) for the NASA arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration were determined. A FSS designed to increase the flutter speed of the baseline airplane 20 percent. A comparison was made of the performance and direct operating cost between the FSS equipped aircraft and a previously defined configuration with structural modifications to provide the same flutter speed. Control system synthesis and evaluation indicated that a FSS could provide the increase in flutter speed without degrading airplane reliability, safety, handling qualities, or ride quality, and without increasing repeated loads or hydraulic and electrical power capacity requirements.

  20. Ecophysiology of the Actinobacteria in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Seviour, Robert J; Kragelund, Caroline; Kong, Yunhong; Eales, Katherine; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Nielsen, Per H

    2008-06-01

    This review considers what is known about the Actinobacteria in activated sludge systems, their abundance and their functional roles there. Participation in processes leading to the microbiological removal of phosphate and in the operational problems of bulking and foaming are discussed in terms of their ecophysiological traits. We consider critically whether elucidation of their nutritional requirements and other physiological properties allow us to understand better what might affect their survival capabilities in these highly competitive systems. Furthermore, how this information might allow us to improve how these processes work is discussed.

  1. Behavioral activation system modulation on brain activation during appetitive and aversive stimulus processing

    PubMed Central

    Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sanjuán-Tomás, Ana; Belloch, Vicente; Parcet, Maria-Antònia; Ávila, César

    2010-01-01

    The reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposed the behavioral activation system (BAS) as a neurobehavioral system that is dependent on dopamine-irrigated structures and that mediates the individual differences in sensitivity and reactivity to appetitive stimuli associated with BAS-related personality traits. Theoretical developments propose that high BAS sensitivity is associated with both enhanced appetitive stimuli processing and the diminished processing of aversive stimuli. The objective of this study was to analyze how individual differences in BAS functioning were associated with brain activation during erotic and aversive picture processing while subjects were involved in a simple goal-directed task. Forty-five male participants took part in this study. The task activation results confirm the activation of the reward and punishment brain-related structures while viewing erotic and aversive pictures, respectively. The SR scores show a positive correlation with activation of the left lateral prefrontal cortex, the mesial prefrontal cortex and the right occipital cortex while viewing erotic pictures, and a negative correlation with the right lateral prefrontal cortex and the left occipital cortex while viewing aversive pictures. In summary, the SR scores modulate the activity of the cortical areas in the prefrontal and the occipital cortices that are proposed to modulate the BAS and the BIS-FFFS. PMID:20147458

  2. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  3. Energy monitoring system based on human activity in the workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Nur Hanim; Husain, Mohd Nor; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abdul; Othman, Mohd Azlishah; Malek, Fareq

    2015-05-01

    Human behaviors always related to day routine activities in a smart house directly give the significant factor to manage energy usage in human life. An Addition that, the factor will contribute to the best efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on the monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior at working place. Besides that, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy saving based on human behaviors. This scenario will help to see the human activity in the workplace in order to get the energy saving and support world green environment.

  4. Reliable and Affordable Control Systems Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Bob; Tomondi, Chris; McGinley, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Active, closed-loop control of combustor pattern factor is a cooperative effort between Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal) Engines and Systems and the NASA Glenn Research Center to reduce emissions and turbine-stator vane temperature variations, thereby enhancing engine performance and life, and reducing direct operating costs. Total fuel flow supplied to the engine is established by the speed/power control, but the distribution to individual atomizers will be controlled by the Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control (ACPFC). This system consist of three major components: multiple, thin-film sensors located on the turbine-stator vanes; fuel-flow modulators for individual atomizers; and control logic and algorithms within the electronic control.

  5. Contact system activation and high thrombin generation in hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Gu, Ja-Yoon; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Han, Se Eun; Kim, Young Il; Nam-Goong, Il Seong; Kim, Eun Sook; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2017-01-30

    Background Hyperthyroidism is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Since contact system activation through formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) has emerged as an important trigger of thrombosis, we hypothesized that the contact system is activated along with active NET formation in hyperthyroidism and that their markers correlate with disease severity. Materials and Methods In 61 patients with hyperthyroidism and 40 normal controls, the levels of coagulation factors (fibrinogen, and factor VII, VIII, IX, XI, and XII), D-dimer, thrombin generation assay (TGA) markers, NET formation markers (histone-DNA complex, double-stranded DNA, neutrophil elastase), and contact system markers (activated factor XII [XIIa], high-molecular-weight kininogen [HMWK], prekallikrein, and bradykinin) were measured. Results Patients with hyperthyroidism showed higher levels of fibrinogen [median (interquartile range), 315 (280-344) versus 262 (223-300), P=0.001], D-dimer [103.8 (64.8-151.5) versus 50.7 (37.4-76.0), P<0.001], peak thrombin [131.9 (102.2-159.4) versus 31.6 (14.8-83.7), P<0.001] and endogenous thrombin potential [649 (538-736) versus 367 (197-1147), P=0.021] in TGA with 1 pM tissue factor, neutrophil elastase [1.10 (0.39-2.18) versus 0.23 (0.20-0.35), P<0.001], factor XIIa [66.9 (52.8-87.0) versus 73.0 (57.1-86.6), P<0.001], HMWK [6.11 (4.95-7.98) versus 3.83 (2.60-5.68), P<0.001], prekallikrein [2.15 (1.00-6.36) versus 1.41 (0.63-2.22), P=0.026], and bradykinin [152.4 (137.6-180.4) versus 118.3 (97.1-137.9), P<0.001] than did normal controls. In age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression analysis, fibrinogen, factor VIII, IX, and XIIa, D-dimer, peak thrombin, neutrophil elastase, HMWK, and bradykinin showed significant odds ratios representing hyperthyroidism's contribution to coagulation and contact system activation. Free T4 was significantly correlated with factors VIII and IX, D-dimer, double-stranded DNA, and bradykinin. Conclusion This study

  6. Terrestrial Reference Systems and Frames. A review of current activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial Reference Systems (TRS) refer to an important domain of Geodesy, involving both theoretical and applied aspects, as well as deep connections with Astronomy, Earth Sciences and Geo-information. The concept of TRS implies several visions : - An astronomical vision, using TRS to study translational and rotational motion of the Earth in inertial space - An Earth Science vision, using TRS to build physical models of the Earth system, and its various components (solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, hydrosphere) - A metrological vision, using TRS together with suitable coordinate systems (geographical coordinates, map projections…) to define geographical position of objects in the Earth’s vicinity A survey of current activities in this area is presented, referring to works done by the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and more specifically its Commission 1, GGOS and IERS. A focus is done on concepts and terminology, as well as progresses to get a wide acceptance on the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) and its system of realizations through global, regional and national frames, as well as through specific systems such as satellite navigation systems.

  7. Outburst Activity of the Symbiotic System AG Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gális, R.; Hric, L.; Leedjärv, L.; Kundra, E.

    2015-07-01

    AG Dra is one of the best studied symbiotic systems. A period analysis of new and historical photometric data, as well as radial velocities, confirmed the presence of the two periods — about 550 days, caused by orbital motion, and around 350 days, related to pulsations of the cool component of AG Dra. In addition, the active stages change distinctively, but the outbursts recur with periods from 359 to 375 days.

  8. Experimental studies on semi active suspension systems with various dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. Anil; Bharath Raj, Ch; Rajendar, K.

    2015-12-01

    Some results of an experimental probe on semi Active suspension systems with various Dampers have been studied in the present paper. Dampers with different configurations were studied by using Magneto Rheological gel Damper. A comparison have been done for different configurations of Dampers viz.MR gel Damper with Magnetic field, MR gel Damper without magnetic field, Damper with conventional oil, Natural vibration without damper.

  9. Ionospheric effects in active retrodirective array and mitigating system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nandi, A. K.; Tomita, C. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of an active retrodirective array (ARA) in an ionospheric environment (that is either stationary or slowly-varying) was examined. The restrictions imposed on the pilot signal structure as a result of such operation were analyzed. A 3 tone pilot beam system was defined which first estimates the total electron content along paths of interest and then utilizes this information to aid the phase conjugator so that correct beam pointing can be achieved.

  10. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  11. Activity of respiratory system during laser irradiation of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, N. A.; Sergeyeva, L. I.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of one of the principal links of the respiratory system, the respiratory center, was studied as a function of the exposure of the medulla oblongata and the sensomotor zone of the cerebral hemisphere cortex to low level laser irradiation in the red wavelength of the spectrum. Experiments were done on white rats under barbital anesthesia. Under such conditions a substantial effect was observed on the activity of the respiratory center. Laser light may display activating or inhibitory influences, in some cases the bilateral symmetry of the activity of the respiratory center is affected indicating deep changes in the integrative mechanism of the functioning of the right and left sides of the hemispheres. The laser beam effect depends on many factors: specific light properties, duration of the exposure, repetition of exposures, initial functional state of the CNS, etc.

  12. Active damping performance of the KAGRA seismic attenuation system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yoshinori; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Aso, Yoichi; Barton, Mark; Erasmo Peña Arellano, Fabián; Shoda, Ayaka; Akutsu, Tomotada; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Hirata, Naoatsu; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Okutomi, Koki; Miyamoto, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Hideki; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (formerly LCGT now KAGRA) is presently under construction in Japan. This May we assembled a prototype of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) for the beam splitter and the signal recycling mirrors of KAGRA, which we call Type-B SAS, and evaluated its performance at NAOJ (Mitaka, Toyko). We investigated its frequency response, active damping performance, vibration isolation performance and long-term stability both in and out of vacuum. From the frequency response test and the active damping performance test, we confirmed that the SAS worked as we designed and that all mechanical resonances which could disturb lock acquisition and observation are damped within 1 minute, which is required for KAGRA, by the active controls.

  13. OCT detection of neural activity in American cockroach nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyńska, Iwona; Wyszkowska, Joanna; Bukowska, Danuta; Ruminski, Daniel; Karnowski, Karol; Stankiewicz, Maria; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2013-03-01

    We show results of a project which focuses on detection of activity in neural tissue with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) methods. Experiments were performed in neural cords dissected from the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana L.). Functional OCT imaging was performed with ultrahigh resolution spectral / Fourier domain OCT system (axial resolution 2.5 μm). Electrical stimulation (voltage pulses) was applied to the sensory cercal nerve of the neural cord. Optical detection of functional activation of the sample was performed in the connective between the terminal abdominal ganglion and the fifth abdominal ganglion. Functional OCT data were collected over time with the OCT beam illuminating selected single point in the connectives (i.e. OCT M-scans were acquired). Phase changes of the OCT signal were analyzed to visualize occurrence of activation in the neural cord. Electrophysiology recordings (microelectrode method) were also performed as a reference method to demonstrate electrical response of the sample to stimulation.

  14. Analyzing Age-Rotation-Activity Relationships in Wide Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton Clarke, Riley; Davenport, James R. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of flare activity among equal mass wide binary pairs using a combination of value-added data sets from the NASA Kepler mission. Wide binary twins form from the same molecular cloud and are therefore coeval, making them ideal benchmarks for stellar evolution and formation studies. This implies that their magnetic activity should decay at the same rate, causing a similar decrease in flare activity over time. The first data set is the list of known wide binary candidates in the Kepler field, and contains pairs of stars that have similar proper motions. We then crossmatch these systems with data on relative flare luminosity for ~200,000 stars in the original Kepler field, provided by an automated flare-finding algorithm. This combined data set allows us to compare flare activity, mass, and pair separation between stars in binary pairs. We preliminarily find that the flare rates for these stars do not show strong correlation, indicating either a large intrinsic scatter in the flare rate as these stars age, or that the formation mechanism of wide binaries somehow affects their dynamo evolution. As a goal for future development of this work, we hope to compare flare rates with gyrochronology in these key systems.

  15. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  16. Vector disparity sensor with vergence control for active vision systems.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Francisco; Diaz, Javier; Gibaldi, Agostino; Sabatini, Silvio P; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for computing vector disparity for active vision systems as used on robotics applications. The control of the vergence angle of a binocular system allows us to efficiently explore dynamic environments, but requires a generalization of the disparity computation with respect to a static camera setup, where the disparity is strictly 1-D after the image rectification. The interaction between vision and motor control allows us to develop an active sensor that achieves high accuracy of the disparity computation around the fixation point, and fast reaction time for the vergence control. In this contribution, we address the development of a real-time architecture for vector disparity computation using an FPGA device. We implement the disparity unit and the control module for vergence, version, and tilt to determine the fixation point. In addition, two on-chip different alternatives for the vector disparity engines are discussed based on the luminance (gradient-based) and phase information of the binocular images. The multiscale versions of these engines are able to estimate the vector disparity up to 32 fps on VGA resolution images with very good accuracy as shown using benchmark sequences with known ground-truth. The performances in terms of frame-rate, resource utilization, and accuracy of the presented approaches are discussed. On the basis of these results, our study indicates that the gradient-based approach leads to the best trade-off choice for the integration with the active vision system.

  17. Seal Investigations of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Taylor, Shawn; Oswald, Jay; DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to improve upon current thermal active clearance control methods, a first generation, fast-acting mechanically actuated, active clearance control system has been designed and installed into a non-rotating test rig. In order to harvest the benefit of tighter blade tip clearances, low-leakage seals are required for the actuated carrier segments of the seal shroud to prevent excessive leakage of compressor discharge (P3) cooling air. The test rig was designed and fabricated to facilitate the evaluation of these types of seals, identify seal leakage sources, and test other active clearance control system concepts. The objective of this paper is to present both experimental and analytical investigations into the nature of the face-seal to seal-carrier interface. Finite element analyses were used to examine face seal contact pressures and edge-loading under multiple loading conditions, varied E-seal positions and two new face seal heights. The analyses indicated that moving the E-seal inward radially and reducing face seal height would lead to more uniform contact conditions between the face seal and the carriers. Lab testing confirmed that moving the balance diameter inward radially caused a decrease in overall system leakage.

  18. Systemic blood coagulation activation in acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Undas, Anetta; Szułdrzyński, Konstanty; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Tracz, Wiesława; Zmudka, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated systemic alterations to the blood coagulation system that occur during a coronary thrombotic event. Peripheral blood coagulation in patients with acute coronary thrombosis was compared with that in people with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Blood coagulation and platelet activation at the microvascular injury site were assessed using immunochemistry in 28 non-anticoagulated patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus 28 stable CAD patients matched for age, sex, risk factors, and medications. AMI was associated with increased maximum rates of thrombin-antithrombin complex generation (by 93.8%; P < .001), thrombin B-chain formation (by 57.1%; P < .001), prothrombin consumption (by 27.9%; P = .012), fibrinogen consumption (by 27.0%; P = .02), factor (f) Va light chain generation (by 44.2%; P = .003), and accelerated fVa inactivation (by 76.1%; P < .001), and with enhanced release of platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand (by 44.4%; P < .001). FVa heavy chain availability was similar in both groups because of enhanced formation and activated protein C (APC)–mediated destruction. The velocity of coagulant reactions in AMI patients showed positive correlations with interleukin-6. Heparin treatment led to dampening of coagulant reactions with profiles similar to those for stable CAD. AMI-induced systemic activation of blood coagulation markedly modifies the pattern of coagulant reactions at the site of injury in peripheral vessels compared with that in stable CAD patients. PMID:18931343

  19. Visco-elastic Dynamics of an Active Polar Dynamic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2015-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction that are embedded in visco-elastic media. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria and molecular motors. Because the ordered state only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the velocity of the active units. The passive visco-elastic medium is described by a relaxing strain tensor. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this two-fluid (two-velocity) system. The dynamics is rather different compared to the case of passive, static polar order. In particular, we find a complicated normal mode structure that reflects the broken time-reversal symmetry due to the non-equilibrium situation, anisotropy of first sound and a possible second sound excitation due to the active velocity, and various manifestations of the visco-elastic relaxation. We discuss critically the role of the so-called active term in the stress tensor as well as the thermodynamically correct description of the hydrodynamic transport velocities.

  20. GT-CATS: Tracking Operator Activities in Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Mitchell, Christine M.; Palmer, Everett A.

    1999-01-01

    Human operators of complex dynamic systems can experience difficulties supervising advanced control automation. One remedy is to develop intelligent aiding systems that can provide operators with context-sensitive advice and reminders. The research reported herein proposes, implements, and evaluates a methodology for activity tracking, a form of intent inferencing that can supply the knowledge required for an intelligent aid by constructing and maintaining a representation of operator activities in real time. The methodology was implemented in the Georgia Tech Crew Activity Tracking System (GT-CATS), which predicts and interprets the actions performed by Boeing 757/767 pilots navigating using autopilot flight modes. This report first describes research on intent inferencing and complex modes of automation. It then provides a detailed description of the GT-CATS methodology, knowledge structures, and processing scheme. The results of an experimental evaluation using airline pilots are given. The results show that GT-CATS was effective in predicting and interpreting pilot actions in real time.

  1. A new active visual system for humanoid robots.

    PubMed

    Xu, De; Li, You Fu; Tan, Min; Shen, Yang

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a new active visual system is developed, which is based on bionic vision and is insensitive to the property of the cameras. The system consists of a mechanical platform and two cameras. The mechanical platform has two degrees of freedom of motion in pitch and yaw, which is equivalent to the neck of a humanoid robot. The cameras are mounted on the platform. The directions of the optical axes of the two cameras can be simultaneously adjusted in opposite directions. With these motions, the object's images can be located at the centers of the image planes of the two cameras. The object's position is determined with the geometry information of the visual system. A more general model for active visual positioning using two cameras without a neck is also investigated. The position of an object can be computed via the active motions. The presented model is less sensitive to the intrinsic parameters of cameras, which promises more flexibility in many applications such as visual tracking with changeable focusing. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  2. Active Ultrasound Pattern Injection System (AUSPIS) for Interventional Tool Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate tool tracking is a crucial task that directly affects the safety and effectiveness of many interventional medical procedures. Compared to CT and MRI, ultrasound-based tool tracking has many advantages, including low cost, safety, mobility and ease of use. However, surgical tools are poorly visualized in conventional ultrasound images, thus preventing effective tool tracking and guidance. Existing tracking methods have not yet provided a solution that effectively solves the tool visualization and mid-plane localization accuracy problem and fully meets the clinical requirements. In this paper, we present an active ultrasound tracking and guiding system for interventional tools. The main principle of this system is to establish a bi-directional ultrasound communication between the interventional tool and US imaging machine within the tissue. This method enables the interventional tool to generate an active ultrasound field over the original imaging ultrasound signals. By controlling the timing and amplitude of the active ultrasound field, a virtual pattern can be directly injected into the US machine B mode display. In this work, we introduce the time and frequency modulation, mid-plane detection, and arbitrary pattern injection methods. The implementation of these methods further improves the target visualization and guiding accuracy, and expands the system application beyond simple tool tracking. We performed ex vitro and in vivo experiments, showing significant improvements of tool visualization and accurate localization using different US imaging platforms. An ultrasound image mid-plane detection accuracy of ±0.3 mm and a detectable tissue depth over 8.5 cm was achieved in the experiment. The system performance is tested under different configurations and system parameters. We also report the first experiment of arbitrary pattern injection to the B mode image and its application in accurate tool tracking. PMID:25337784

  3. The East Pacific Rise: An Active Not Passive Spreading System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, D. B.; Rowan, C. J.; Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Grand, S. P.; Simmons, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    Traditional plate tectonic interpretations of mid-oceanic ridges regard spreading as an entirely passive phenomenon. From this one would assume that the oceanic ridges will move over the mantle in response to the geodynamics of the diverging plates, and do not remain fixed spatially over any protracted period of time. An analysis of the kinematics of ridge motions in the Indo-Atlantic hotspot frame of reference since 83 Ma generally supports this view, with the notable exception of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The Pacific-Nazca/Farallon segment of the EPR north of Easter Island (27°S) is oriented essentially N-S, and has produced more than 9500km of E-W spreading in the past 80 Ma, making it the dominant ridge in the world's plate system over this interval of time. Yet despite the large amount of E-W divergence, the spreading center has maintained its longitudinal position to within <±250 km of the current ridge axis. Global mantle convective flow modeling indicates that the EPR, unlike any other extensive segment of the mid-oceanic ridge system, is underlain by an active upwelling system extending from the core-mantle boundary to the surface. We suggest that the lack of E-W motion of the EPR apparent from the kinematics is a consequence of these mantle dynamics; this ridge is thus not behaving as a passive plate boundary, but is actively and directly linked to, and controlled by, whole mantle upwelling. This observation overturns the notion that ridges are always entirely passive features of the plate system. Subduction of the northern EPR beneath western North America has thus resulted in the overriding of an active upwelling system that has contributed significantly to the evolution of Basin and Range kinematics and superimposed dynamics, including significant contributions from dynamic topography.

  4. Active Learning for Directed Exploration of Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael C.; Wang, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Physics-based simulation codes are widely used in science and engineering to model complex systems that would be infeasible to study otherwise. Such codes provide the highest-fidelity representation of system behavior, but are often so slow to run that insight into the system is limited. For example, conducting an exhaustive sweep over a d-dimensional input parameter space with k-steps along each dimension requires k(sup d) simulation trials (translating into k(sup d) CPU-days for one of our current simulations). An alternative is directed exploration in which the next simulation trials are cleverly chosen at each step. Given the results of previous trials, supervised learning techniques (SVM, KDE, GP) are applied to build up simplified predictive models of system behavior. These models are then used within an active learning framework to identify the most valuable trials to run next. Several active learning strategies are examined including a recently-proposed information-theoretic approach. Performance is evaluated on a set of thirteen synthetic oracles, which serve as surrogates for the more expensive simulations and enable the experiments to be replicated by other researchers.

  5. Scene interpretation module for an active vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remagnino, P.; Matas, J.; Illingworth, John; Kittler, Josef

    1993-08-01

    In this paper an implementation of a high level symbolic scene interpreter for an active vision system is considered. The scene interpretation module uses low level image processing and feature extraction results to achieve object recognition and to build up a 3D environment map. The module is structured to exploit spatio-temporal context provided by existing partial world interpretations and has spatial reasoning to direct gaze control and thereby achieve efficient and robust processing using spatial focus of attention. The system builds and maintains an awareness of an environment which is far larger than a single camera view. Experiments on image sequences have shown that the system can: establish its position and orientation in a partially known environment, track simple moving objects such as cups and boxes, temporally integrate recognition results to establish or forget object presence, and utilize spatial focus of attention to achieve efficient and robust object recognition. The system has been extensively tested using images from a single steerable camera viewing a simple table top scene containing box and cylinder-like objects. Work is currently progressing to further develop its competences and interface it with the Surrey active stereo vision head, GETAFIX.

  6. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo applications. Further

  7. Energy management and control of active distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatzadeh, Farshid

    Advancements in the communication, control, computation and information technologies have driven the transition to the next generation active power distribution systems. Novel control techniques and management strategies are required to achieve the efficient, economic and reliable grid. The focus of this work is energy management and control of active distribution systems (ADS) with integrated renewable energy sources (RESs) and demand response (DR). Here, ADS mean automated distribution system with remotely operated controllers and distributed energy resources (DERs). DER as active part of the next generation future distribution system includes: distributed generations (DGs), RESs, energy storage system (ESS), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and DR. Integration of DR and RESs into ADS is critical to realize the vision of sustainability. The objective of this dissertation is the development of management architecture to control and operate ADS in the presence of DR and RES. One of the most challenging issues for operating ADS is the inherent uncertainty of DR and RES as well as conflicting objective of DER and electric utilities. ADS can consist of different layers such as system layer and building layer and coordination between these layers is essential. In order to address these challenges, multi-layer energy management and control architecture is proposed with robust algorithms in this work. First layer of proposed multi-layer architecture have been implemented at the system layer. Developed AC optimal power flow (AC-OPF) generates fair price for all DR and non-DR loads which is used as a control signal for second layer. Second layer controls DR load at buildings using a developed look-ahead robust controller. Load aggregator collects information from all buildings and send aggregated load to the system optimizer. Due to the different time scale at these two management layers, time coordination scheme is developed. Robust and deterministic controllers

  8. Automatic Video System for Continues Monitoring of the Meteor Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, Pavel; Fliegel, Karel; Vítek, Stanislav; Páta, Petr

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we present current progress in development of new observational instruments for the double station video experiment. The Meteor Automatic Imager and Analyser (MAIA) system is based on digital monochrome camera JAI CM-040 and well proved image intensifier XX1332. Both the observations as well as the data processing will be fully automatic. We are expecting the recorded data of better quality and both spatial and time resolution in comparison with currently used analogue system. The main goal of the MAIA project is to monitor activity of the meteor showers and sporadic meteor each night for the period of at least 3 years. First version of the system was already assembled and has been intensively tested in the optical laboratory. Optical properties were measured and the result confirmed our expectations according to image quality and resolution. First night sky observation was already carried out.

  9. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    PubMed

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care.

  10. Modified active disturbance rejection control for time-delay systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shen; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Industrial processes are typically nonlinear, time-varying and uncertain, to which active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has been shown to be an effective solution. The control design becomes even more challenging in the presence of time delay. In this paper, a novel modification of ADRC is proposed so that good disturbance rejection is achieved while maintaining system stability. The proposed design is shown to be more effective than the standard ADRC design for time-delay systems and is also a unified solution for stable, critical stable and unstable systems with time delay. Simulation and test results show the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed design. Linear matrix inequality (LMI) based stability analysis is provided as well.

  11. Smart active pilot-in-the-loop systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Segun

    1995-04-01

    Representation of on-orbit microgravity environment in a 1-g environment is a continuing problem in space engineering analysis, procedures development and crew training. A way of adequately depicting weightlessness in the performance of on-orbit tasks is by a realistic (or real-time) computer based representation that provides the look, touch, and feel of on-orbit operation. This paper describes how a facility, the Systems Engineering Simulator at the Johnson Space Center, is utilizing recent advances in computer processing power and multi- processing capability to intelligently represent all systems, sub-systems and environmental elements associated with space flight operations. It first describes the computer hardware and interconnection between processors; the computer software responsible for task scheduling, health monitoring, sub-system and environment representation; control room and crew station. It then describes, the mathematical models that represent the dynamics of contact between the Mir and the Space Shuttle during the upcoming US and Russian Shuttle/Mir space mission. Results are presented comparing the response of the smart, active pilot-in-the-loop system to non-time critical CRAY model. A final example of how these systems are utilized is given in the development that supported the highly successful Hubble Space Telescope repair mission.

  12. Implementation of active-type Lamina 3D display system.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangcheol; Baek, Hogil; Min, Sung-Wook; Park, Soon-Gi; Park, Min-Kyu; Yoo, Seong-Hyeon; Kim, Hak-Rin; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-06-15

    Lamina 3D display is a new type of multi-layer 3D display, which utilizes the polarization state as a new dimension of depth information. Lamina 3D display system has advanced properties - to reduce the data amount representing 3D image, to be easily made using the conventional projectors, and to have a potential being applied to the many applications. However, the system might have some limitations in depth range and viewing angle due to the properties of the expressive volume components. In this paper, we propose the volume using the layers of switchable diffusers to implement the active-type Lamina 3D display system. Because the diffusing rate of the layers has no relation with the polarization state, the polarizer wheel is applied to the proposed system in purpose of making the sectioned image synchronized with the diffusing layer at the designated location. The imaging volume of the proposed system consists of five layers of polymer dispersed liquid crystal and the total size of the implemented volume is 24x18x12 mm3(3). The proposed system can achieve the improvements of viewing qualities such as enhanced depth expression and widened viewing angle.

  13. Microfluidic on-chip fluorescence-activated interface control system.

    PubMed

    Haiwang, Li; Nguyen, N T; Wong, T N; Ng, S L

    2010-11-22

    A microfluidic dynamic fluorescence-activated interface control system was developed for lab-on-a-chip applications. The system consists of a straight rectangular microchannel, a fluorescence excitation source, a detection sensor, a signal conversion circuit, and a high-voltage feedback system. Aqueous NaCl as conducting fluid and aqueous glycerol as nonconducting fluid were introduced to flow side by side into the straight rectangular microchannel. Fluorescent dye was added to the aqueous NaCl to work as a signal representing the interface position. Automatic control of the liquid interface was achieved by controlling the electroosmotic effect that exists only in the conducting fluid using a high-voltage feedback system. A LABVIEW program was developed to control the output of high-voltage power supply according the actual interface position, and then the interface position is modified as the output of high-voltage power supply. At last, the interface can be moved to the desired position automatically using this feedback system. The results show that the system presented in this paper can control an arbitrary interface location in real time. The effects of viscosity ratio, flow rates, and polarity of electric field were discussed. This technique can be extended to switch the sample flow and droplets automatically.

  14. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity.

  15. A Robotic System for Actively Stiffening Flexible Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Loschak, Paul M; Burke, Stephen F; Zumbro, Emiko; Forelli, Alexandra R; Howe, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    A system for actively changing the stiffness of a long, thin, flexible robotic manipulator has been designed for cardiologists to use in a range of diagnosis and treatment procedures. Low-stiffness manipulators, such as catheters, are ideal for steering through vasculature with low risk of tissue injury. However, such instruments are not well-suited for applying force to tissue. The proposed system solves this problem by using a series of bead-shaped vertebrae containing pull wires to actively change the stiffness of the catheter, similar to gooseneck surgical retractors. Individual wires steer the catheter to a desired location. All wires are then tensioned to create friction between each vertebra and prevent sliding, therefore resisting motion. While this design concept has been implemented manually in various settings for decades, fine robotic control of the friction and stiffness of the system relies on a thorough understanding of the friction properties between vertebral segments. We have developed an analytical model to understand the interactions between vertebrae and determine the relationships between system parameters and the overall stiffness of the catheter. Experiments validated the calculations from the model and the functionality of the system by applying known loads to the tip of the catheter and measuring the catheter displacement. The catheter stiffness was measured to range from 100 N/m to 800 N/m, which is sufficient for performing many surgical tasks on tissue. This system can be useful in minimally invasive procedures involving direct instrument contact with tissue by improving accuracy, safety, and work flow.

  16. A Robotic System for Actively Stiffening Flexible Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Burke, Stephen F.; Zumbro, Emiko; Forelli, Alexandra R.; Howe, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    A system for actively changing the stiffness of a long, thin, flexible robotic manipulator has been designed for cardiologists to use in a range of diagnosis and treatment procedures. Low-stiffness manipulators, such as catheters, are ideal for steering through vasculature with low risk of tissue injury. However, such instruments are not well-suited for applying force to tissue. The proposed system solves this problem by using a series of bead-shaped vertebrae containing pull wires to actively change the stiffness of the catheter, similar to gooseneck surgical retractors. Individual wires steer the catheter to a desired location. All wires are then tensioned to create friction between each vertebra and prevent sliding, therefore resisting motion. While this design concept has been implemented manually in various settings for decades, fine robotic control of the friction and stiffness of the system relies on a thorough understanding of the friction properties between vertebral segments. We have developed an analytical model to understand the interactions between vertebrae and determine the relationships between system parameters and the overall stiffness of the catheter. Experiments validated the calculations from the model and the functionality of the system by applying known loads to the tip of the catheter and measuring the catheter displacement. The catheter stiffness was measured to range from 100 N/m to 800 N/m, which is sufficient for performing many surgical tasks on tissue. This system can be useful in minimally invasive procedures involving direct instrument contact with tissue by improving accuracy, safety, and work flow. PMID:26709364

  17. Vehicle active suspension system using skyhook adaptive neuro active force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyandoko, G.; Mailah, M.; Jamaluddin, H.

    2009-04-01

    This paper aims to highlight the practical viability of a new and novel hybrid control technique applied to a vehicle active suspension system of a quarter car model using skyhook and adaptive neuro active force control (SANAFC). The overall control system essentially comprises four feedback control loops, namely the innermost proportional-integral (PI) control loop for the force tracking of the pneumatic actuator, the intermediate skyhook and active force control (AFC) control loops for the compensation of the disturbances and the outermost proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control loop for the computation of the optimum target/commanded force. A neural network (NN) with a modified adaptive Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm was used to approximate the estimated mass and inverse dynamics of the pneumatic actuator in the AFC loop. A number of experiments were carried out on a physical test rig using a hardware-in-the-loop configuration that fully incorporates the theoretical elements. The performance of the proposed control method was evaluated and compared to examine the effectiveness of the system in suppressing the vibration effect on the suspension system. It was found that the simulation and experimental results were in good agreement, particularly for the sprung mass displacement and acceleration behaviours in which the proposed SANAFC scheme is found to outperform the PID and passive counterparts.

  18. Active chatter control system for long-overhang boring bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Douglas R.; Golioto, Igor; Thompson, Norman B.

    1997-05-01

    Some machining processes, such as boring, have been historically limited by excessive bar vibration, often resulting in poor surface finish and reduced tool life. A unique boring bar system has been developed to suppress bar vibration, or chatter, during machining using active control technology. Metal cutting test programs have shown proven, repeatable performance on hard-to-cut, aircraft industry high-temperature nickel alloys as well as more easily cut carbon steels. Critical bar length-to-diameter (L/D) ratios, depths-of-cuts, feed rates and cutting speeds far exceed those attainable from the best available passively-damped boring bars. This industry-ready system consists of three principle subsystems: active clamp, instrumented bar, and control electronics. The active clamp is a lathe-mountable body capable of supporting bars of varying sizes and articulating them in orthogonal directions from the base of the bar shank. The instrumented bar consists of a steel shank, standard insert head and imbedded accelerometers. Wire harnesses from both the bar and clamp connect to control electronics comprised of highly-efficient switched- capacitor amplifiers that drive the piezoelectric actuators, sensor signal conditioning, a PC-based program manager and two 32-bit floating-point DSPs. The program manager code runs on the host PC and distributes system identification and control functions to the two DSPs. All real-time signal processing is based on the principles of adaptive filter minimization. For the described system, cutting performance has extended existing chatter thresholds (cutting parameter combinations) for nickel alloys by as much as 400% while maintaining precision surface finish on the machined part. Bar L/D ratios as high as 11 have enabled deep boring operations on nickel workpieces that otherwise could not be performed free of chatter.

  19. Photo-active collagen systems with controlled triple helix architecture.

    PubMed

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Russell, Stephen J; Wood, David J

    2013-08-14

    The design of photo-active collagen systems is presented as a basis for establishing biomimetic materials with varied network architecture and programmable macroscopic properties. Following in-house isolation of type I collagen, reaction with vinyl-bearing compounds of varied backbone rigidity, i.e. 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (4VBC) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), was carried out. TNBS colorimetric assay, (1)H-NMR and ATR-FTIR confirmed covalent and tunable functionalization of collagen lysines. Depending on the type and extent of functionalization, controlled stability and thermal denaturation of triple helices were observed via circular dichroism (CD), whereby the hydrogen-bonding capability of introduced moieties was shown to play a major role. Full gel formation was observed following photo-activation of functionalized collagen solutions. The presence of a covalent network only slightly affected collagen triple helix conformation (as observed by WAXS and ATR-FTIR), confirming the structural organization of functionalized collagen precursors. Photo-activated hydrogels demonstrated an increased denaturation temperature (DSC) with respect to native collagen, suggesting that the formation of the covalent network successfully stabilized collagen triple helices. Moreover, biocompatibility and mechanical competence of obtained hydrogels were successfully demonstrated under physiologically-relevant conditions. These results demonstrate that this novel synthetic approach enabled the formation of biocompatible collagen systems with defined network architecture and programmable macroscopic properties, which can only partially be obtained with current synthetic methods.

  20. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  1. Detection of physical activities using a physical activity monitor system for wheelchair users.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Intille, Stephen S; Kelleher, Annmarie; Cooper, Rory A; Ding, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Availability of physical activity monitors for wheelchair users can potentially assist these individuals to track regular physical activity (PA), which in turn could lead to a healthier and more active lifestyle. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate algorithms for a physical activity monitoring system (PAMS) to detect wheelchair based activities. The PAMS consists of a gyroscope based wheel rotation monitor (G-WRM) and an accelerometer device (wocket) worn on the upper arm or on the wrist. A total of 45 persons with spinal cord injury took part in the study, which was performed in a structured university-based laboratory environment, a semi-structured environment at the National Veterans Wheelchair Games, and in the participants' home environments. Participants performed at least ten PAs, other than resting, taken from a list of PAs. The classification performance for the best classifiers on the testing dataset for PAMS-Arm (G-WRM and wocket on upper arm) and PAMS-Wrist (G-WRM and wocket on wrist) was 89.26% and 88.47%, respectively. The outcomes of this study indicate that multi-modal information from the PAMS can help detect various types of wheelchair-based activities in structured laboratory, semi-structured organizational, and unstructured home environments.

  2. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Ram; Smith, Susan; Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Croft, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  3. Active vision system integrating fast and slow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrillon-Santana, Modesto; Guerra-Artal, C.; Hernandez-Sosa, J.; Dominguez-Brito, A.; Isern-Gonzalez, J.; Cabrera-Gamez, Jorge; Hernandez-Tejera, F. M.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes an Active Vision System whose design assumes a distinction between fast or reactive and slow or background processes. Fast processes need to operate in cycles with critical timeouts that may affect system stability. While slow processes, though necessary, do not compromise system stability if its execution is delayed. Based on this simple taxonomy, a control architecture has been proposed and a prototype implemented that is able to track people in real-time with a robotic head while trying to identify the target. In this system, the tracking mobile is considered as the reactive part of the system while person identification is considered a background task. This demonstrator has been developed using a new generation DSP (TMS320C80) as a specialized coprocessor to deal with fast processes, and a commercial robotic head with a dedicated DSP-based motor controller. These subsystems are hosted by a standard Pentium-Pro PC running Windows NT where slow processes are executed. The flexibility achieved in the design phase and the preliminary results obtained so far seem to validate the approach followed to integrate time- critical and slow tasks on a heterogeneous hardware platform.

  4. One active debris removal control system design and error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weilin; Chen, Lei; Li, Kebo; Lei, Yongjun

    2016-11-01

    The increasing expansion of debris presents a significant challenge to space safety and sustainability. To address it, active debris removal, usually involving a chaser performing autonomous rendezvous with targeted debris to be removed is a feasible solution. In this paper, we explore a mid-range autonomous rendezvous control system based on augmented proportional navigation (APN), establishing a three-dimensional kinematic equation set constructed in a rotating coordinate system. In APN, feedback control is applied in the direction of line of sight (LOS), thus analytical solutions of LOS rate and relative motion are expectedly obtained. To evaluate the effectiveness of the control system, we adopt Zero-Effort-Miss (ZEM) in this research as the index, the uncertainty of which is directly determined by that of LOS rate. Accordingly, we apply covariance analysis (CA) method to analyze the propagation of LOS rate uncertainty. Consequently, we find that the accuracy of the control system can be verified even with uncertainty and the CA method is drastically more computationally efficient compared with nonlinear Monte-Carlo method. Additionally, to justify the superiority of the system, we further discuss more simulation cases to show the robustness and feasibility of APN proposed in the paper.

  5. Modelling carbon oxidation in pulp mill activated sludge systems: calibration of Activated Sludge Model No 3.

    PubMed

    Barañao, P A; Hall, E R

    2004-01-01

    Activated Sludge Model No 3 (ASM3) was chosen to model an activated sludge system treating effluents from a mechanical pulp and paper mill. The high COD concentration and the high content of readily biodegradable substrates of the wastewater make this model appropriate for this system. ASM3 was calibrated based on batch respirometric tests using fresh wastewater and sludge from the treatment plant, and on analytical measurements of COD, TSS and VSS. The model, developed for municipal wastewater, was found suitable for fitting a variety of respirometric batch tests, performed at different temperatures and food to microorganism ratios (F/M). Therefore, a set of calibrated parameters, as well as the wastewater COD fractions, was estimated for this industrial wastewater. The majority of the calibrated parameters were in the range of those found in the literature.

  6. Dynamic phases of active matter systems with quenched disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sándor, Cs.; Libál, A.; Reichhardt, C.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.

    2017-03-01

    Depinning and nonequilibrium transitions within sliding states in systems driven over quenched disorder arise across a wide spectrum of size scales ranging from atomic friction at the nanoscale, flux motion in type II superconductors at the mesoscale, colloidal motion in disordered media at the microscale, and plate tectonics at geological length scales. Here we show that active matter or self-propelled particles interacting with quenched disorder under an external drive represents a class of system that can also exhibit pinning-depinning phenomena, plastic flow phases, and nonequilibrium sliding transitions that are correlated with distinct morphologies and velocity-force curve signatures. When interactions with the substrate are strong, a homogeneous pinned liquid phase forms that depins plastically into a uniform disordered phase and then dynamically transitions first into a moving stripe coexisting with a pinned liquid and then into a moving phase-separated state at higher drives. We numerically map the resulting dynamical phase diagrams as a function of external drive, substrate interaction strength, and self-propulsion correlation length. These phases can be observed for active matter moving through random disorder. Our results indicate that intrinsically nonequilibrium systems can exhibit additional nonequilibrium transitions when subjected to an external drive.

  7. Combining Users' Activity Survey and Simulators to Evaluate Human Activity Recognition Systems

    PubMed Central

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant. PMID:25856329

  8. Combining users' activity survey and simulators to evaluate human activity recognition systems.

    PubMed

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-04-08

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant.

  9. Transformation of fraud activities in procurement system in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiani, N.; Huda, S. N.; Pulungan, R.; Winarko, E.

    2017-03-01

    E-procurement has been applied in Indonesia since 2008 through the adoption of Electronic Procurement System (SPSE). The purpose of the use of SPSE in the procurement process is to improve the efficiency of goods or services procurement. In the bidding process, intensive communication and data exchange between providers and organizers are urgently needed. Through SPSE, the frequency of face to face meetings between providers and the committee can be reduced. This is expected to minimize potential fraud behaviors in the goods or services procurement conducted through the tender process. There exists a transformation of activities in the procurement through SPSE from the tender process that was previously done manually. In this paper, we analyze this transformation between manual procurement process and SPSE-based procurement process. The result of the analysis is exploited for investigating the possibility of fraud behavior transformations in every phase of e-procurement activities.

  10. A "Kane's Dynamics" Model for the Active Rack Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. D.; Beech, G. S.; Rao, N. N. S.; Rupert, J. K.; Kim, Y. K.

    2001-01-01

    Many microgravity space science experiments require vibratory acceleration levels unachievable without active isolation. The Boeing Corporation's Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) employs a novel combination of magnetic actuation and mechanical linkages to address these isolation requirements on the International Space Station (ISS). ARIS provides isolation at the rack (International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR)) level. Effective model-based vibration isolation requires: (1) an appropriate isolation device, (2) an adequate dynamic (i.e., mathematical) model of that isolator, and (3) a suitable, corresponding controller. ARIS provides the ISS response to the first requirement. This paper presents one response to the second, in a state space framework intended to facilitate an optimal-controls approach to the third. The authors use "Kane's Dynamics" to develop a state-space, analytical (algebraic) set of linearized equations of motion for ARIS.

  11. A "Kanes's Dynamics" Model for the Active Rack Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. David; Beech, Geoffrey

    1999-01-01

    Many microgravity space-science experiments require vibratory acceleration levels unachievable without active isolation. The Boeing Corporation's Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) employs a novel combination of magnetic actuation and mechanical linkages, to address these isolation requirements on the International Space Station (ISS). ARIS provides isolation at the rack (international Standard Payload Rack, or ISPR) level. Effective model-based vibration isolation requires (1) an appropriate isolation device, (2) an adequate dynamic (i.e., mathematical) model of that isolator, and (3) a suitable, corresponding controller. ARIS provides the ISS response to the first requirement. This paper presents one response to the second, in a state-space framework intended to facilitate an optimal-controls approach to the third. The authors use "Kane's Dynamics" to develop an state-space, analytical (algebraic) set of linearized equations of motion for ARIS.

  12. Comprehensive Design Reliability Activities for Aerospace Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christenson, R. L.; Whitley, M. R.; Knight, K. C.

    2000-01-01

    This technical publication describes the methodology, model, software tool, input data, and analysis result that support aerospace design reliability studies. The focus of these activities is on propulsion systems mechanical design reliability. The goal of these activities is to support design from a reliability perspective. Paralleling performance analyses in schedule and method, this requires the proper use of metrics in a validated reliability model useful for design, sensitivity, and trade studies. Design reliability analysis in this view is one of several critical design functions. A design reliability method is detailed and two example analyses are provided-one qualitative and the other quantitative. The use of aerospace and commercial data sources for quantification is discussed and sources listed. A tool that was developed to support both types of analyses is presented. Finally, special topics discussed include the development of design criteria, issues of reliability quantification, quality control, and reliability verification.

  13. Boswellia carterii liquisolid systems with promoted anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Dina Mahmoud; Ammar, Nagwa Mohammed; Abd El-Alim, Sameh Hosam; Kassem, Ahmed Alaa; Hussein, Rehab Ali; Awad, Gamal; El-Awdan, Sally Abdul-Wanees

    2015-01-01

    Boswellia carterii (BC) Birdwood oleogum resin is an ancient remedy of inflammation processes known since Ancient Egyptian time. Of boswellic acids, 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) is the most potent anti-inflammatory active principle. Liquisolid systems of the biologically active fraction of BC oleogum resin were prepared for improving dissolution properties using low dose oral delivery to achieve enhanced anti-inflammatory activity, in comparison with the standard oral anti-inflammatory; Indomethacin. AKBA was assayed, employing an accurate and sensitive HPLC method. Detection was carried out at 210 nm using UV/Vis detector. A solubility study for the bioactive fraction was conducted. Microcrystalline cellulose and Aeroperl®300 Pharma were used as carrier and coating materials. Angle of slide, liquid load factor and Carr's flow index were estimated. Six systems were prepared using polyethylene glycol 400, solvent and two drug loading concentrations; 20 and 40 %. For each concentration, three carrier: coat ratios were dispensed; 20:1, 10:1, and 5:1. Dissolution study was performed and two systems were selected for characterization and in vivo evaluation by investigating upper GIT ulcerogenic effect and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Results indicate absence of ulcers and significantly higher and prolonged anti-inflammatory efficacy for formulations F1 and F2, with carrier: coat ratio, 5:1 and drug loads of 20 and 40 %, respectively, compared with standard oral indomethacin. We conclude higher efficacy of BC bioactive fraction liquisolids compared with Indomethacin with greater safety on GIT, longer duration of action and hence better patient compliance.

  14. Meat-model system development for antibacterial activity determination.

    PubMed

    Vignolo, Graciela; Castellano, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Bacteriocins are antibacterial substances produced by many different bacterial species. Although the bacteriocins form a heterogenous group with respect to production of bacteria, antibacterial spectrum, mode of action, and chemical properties, they are by definition proteinaceous compounds that are bactericidal toward organisms taxonomically close to the producer. The ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to compete and finally dominate in mixed fermentations has been attributed to the production of several antimicrobial metabolites such as organic acids, carbon dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, diacetyl, and bacteriocins. The antimicrobial activities of the LAB have long been known, but their bacteriocins have received limited attention until recently. Numerous strains of lactic acid bacteria associated with food systems are capable of producing bacteriocins, or antibacterial proteins with activity against foodborne pathogens and contaminants. Recently, considerable enphasis has been placed on the physicochemical, biochemical, and genetic characterization of these proteins. Many methods for the detection of bacteriocin production as well as the determination of the potency of bacteriocin preparations have been described. All the usual techniques are based on the fact that bacteriocins can diffuse in solid or semisolid culture media, which are subsequently inoculated with a suitable indicator strain. This method has long been shown to have a good perfomance in the characterization of new bacteriocins. Although results obtained from broth systems show that bacteriocins inhibit target organisms, applied studies must be performed to confirm their effectiveness in food. As many lactic acid bacteria associated with meat products were described to be important natural bacteriocin producers, it has been necessary to assay their inhibitory efficacy in meat or meat products. Because of the complexity of these kinds of foods a simplified meat-model system was developed to

  15. Placebo-Activated Neural Systems are Linked to Antidepressant Responses

    PubMed Central

    Peciña, Marta; Bohnert, Amy S. B.; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Mickey, Brian J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2016-01-01

    Importance High placebo responses have been observed across a wide range of pathologies, severely impacting drug development. Objective Here we examined neurochemical mechanisms underlying the formation of placebo effects in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Participants Thirty-five medication-free MDD patients. Design and Intervention We performed a single-blinded two-week cross-over randomized controlled trial of two identical oral placebos (described as having either “active” or “inactive” fast-acting antidepressant-like effects) followed by a 10-week open-label treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or in some cases, another agent as clinically indicated. The volunteers were studied with PET and the μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-selective radiotracer [11C]carfentanil after each 1-week “inactive” and “active” oral placebo treatment. In addition, 1 mL of isotonic saline was administered intravenously (i.v.) within sight of the volunteer during PET scanning every 4 min over 20 min only after the 1-week active placebo treatment, with instructions that the compound may be associated with the activation of brain systems involved in mood improvement. This challenge stimulus was utilized to test the individual capacity to acutely activate endogenous opioid neurotransmision under expectations of antidepressant effect. Setting A University Health System. Main Outcomes and Measures Changes in depressive symptoms in response to “active” placebo and antidepressant. Baseline and activation measures of MOR binding. Results Higher baseline MOR binding in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was associated with better response to antidepressant treatment (r=0.48; p=0.02). Reductions in depressive symptoms after 1-week of “active” placebo treatment, compared to the “inactive”, were associated with increased placebo-induced μ-opioid neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress regulation, and the

  16. Active vibration and balance system for closed cycle thermodynamic machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass. A method is also provided.

  17. Spiral and never-settling patterns in active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Marenduzzo, D.; Marchetti, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined numerical and analytical study of pattern formation in an active system where particles align, possess a density-dependent motility, and are subject to a logistic reaction. The model can describe suspensions of reproducing bacteria, as well as polymerizing actomyosin gels in vitro or in vivo. In the disordered phase, we find that motility suppression and growth compete to yield stable or blinking patterns, which, when dense enough, acquire internal orientational ordering to give asters or spirals. We predict these may be observed within chemotactic aggregates in bacterial fluids. In the ordered phase, the reaction term leads to previously unobserved never-settling patterns which can provide a simple framework to understand the formation of motile and spiral patterns in intracellular actin systems.

  18. IASM: A System for the Intelligent Active Surveillance of Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Hechang; Gu, Xiao; Bai, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Malaria, a life-threatening infectious disease, spreads rapidly via parasites. Malaria prevention is more effective and efficient than treatment. However, the existing surveillance systems used to prevent malaria are inadequate, especially in areas with limited or no access to medical resources. In this paper, in order to monitor the spreading of malaria, we develop an intelligent surveillance system based on our existing algorithms. First, a visualization function and active surveillance were implemented in order to predict and categorize areas at high risk of infection. Next, socioeconomic and climatological characteristics were applied to the proposed prediction model. Then, the redundancy of the socioeconomic attribute values was reduced using the stepwise regression method to improve the accuracy of the proposed prediction model. The experimental results indicated that the proposed IASM predicted malaria outbreaks more close to the real data and with fewer variables than other models. Furthermore, the proposed model effectively identified areas at high risk of infection. PMID:27563343

  19. Engineering principles and concepts for active solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunn, B. D.; Carlisle, N.; Franta, G.; Kolar, W.

    1987-07-01

    This publication is a much refined and updated version of a solar design handbook originally prepared in 1978 to accompany a series of week-long courses conducted in support of the Solar Federal Buildings Program. The 1978 material was published in 1981 as the Solar Design Workbook (SERI/SP-62-308). This current document represents the culmination of an eight-year effort to compile a comprehensive state-of-the-art reference and instructional tool for practicing design professionals, architects, and engineers. It is intended to cover all phases of the design and installation of active solar energy systems for buildings. Although it contains many design guidelines, the emphasis is on providing sufficient knowledge of how these systems work to allow an engineer or architect to make well-informed decisions. It is aimed primarily at commercial building applications, but most of the material is also applicable to residential buildings.

  20. Design of active orthoses for a robotic gait rehabilitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa-Parra, A. C.; Broche, L.; Delisle-Rodríguez, D.; Sagaró, R.; Bastos, T.; Frizera-Neto, A.

    2015-09-01

    An active orthosis (AO) is a robotic device that assists both human gait and rehabilitation therapy. This work proposes portable AOs, one for the knee joint and another for the ankle joint. Both AOs will be used to complete a robotic system that improves gait rehabilitation. The requirements for actuator selection, the biomechanical considerations during the AO design, the finite element method, and a control approach based on electroencephalographic and surface electromyographic signals are reviewed. This work contributes to the design of AOs for users with foot drop and knee flexion impairment. However, the potential of the proposed AOs to be part of a robotic gait rehabilitation system that improves the quality of life of stroke survivors requires further investigation.

  1. Apparatus and method for gas turbine active combustion control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeh, Chukwueloka (Inventor); Kammer, Leonardo C. (Inventor); Shah, Minesh (Inventor); Fortin, Jeffrey B. (Inventor); Knobloch, Aaron (Inventor); Myers, William J. (Inventor); Mancini, Alfred Albert (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An Active Combustion Control System and method provides for monitoring combustor pressure and modulating fuel to a gas turbine combustor to prevent combustion dynamics and/or flame extinguishments. The system includes an actuator, wherein the actuator periodically injects pulsed fuel into the combustor. The apparatus also includes a sensor connected to the combustion chamber down stream from an inlet, where the sensor generates a signal detecting the pressure oscillations in the combustor. The apparatus controls the actuator in response to the sensor. The apparatus prompts the actuator to periodically inject pulsed fuel into the combustor at a predetermined sympathetic frequency and magnitude, thereby controlling the amplitude of the pressure oscillations in the combustor by modulating the natural oscillations.

  2. A simulation system for Space Station extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmolejo, Jose A.; Shepherd, Chip

    1993-01-01

    America's next major step into space will be the construction of a permanently manned Space Station which is currently under development and scheduled for full operation in the mid-1990's. Most of the construction of the Space Station will be performed over several flights by suited crew members during an extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Space Shuttle. Once fully operational, EVA's will be performed from the Space Station on a routine basis to provide, among other services, maintenance and repair operations of satellites currently in Earth orbit. Both voice recognition and helmet-mounted display technologies can improve the productivity of workers in space by potentially reducing the time, risk, and cost involved in performing EVA. NASA has recognized this potential and is currently developing a voice-controlled information system for Space Station EVA. Two bench-model helmet-mounted displays and an EVA simulation program have been developed to demonstrate the functionality and practicality of the system.

  3. An Overview of Research Activity at the Launch Systems Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Kandula, Max

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the acoustic testing and analysis activities at the Launch System Testbed (LST) of Kennedy Space Center (KSC). A major goal is to develop passive methods of mitigation of sound from rocket exhaust jets with ducted systems devoid of traditional water injection. Current testing efforts are concerned with the launch-induced vibroacoustic behavior of scaled exhaust jets. Numerical simulations are also developed to study the sound propagation from supersonic jets in free air and through enclosed ducts. Scaling laws accounting for the effects of important parameters such as jet Mach number, jet velocity, and jet temperature on the far-field noise are investigated in order to deduce full-scale environment from small-scale tests.

  4. Measuring cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity in children.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Aimée E; van Lien, René; van Eijsden, Manon; Gemke, Reinoud J B J; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; de Geus, Eco J

    2013-04-29

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls mainly automatic bodily functions that are engaged in homeostasis, like heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, salivation, perspiration and renal function. The ANS has two main branches: the sympathetic nervous system, preparing the human body for action in times of danger and stress, and the parasympathetic nervous system, which regulates the resting state of the body. ANS activity can be measured invasively, for instance by radiotracer techniques or microelectrode recording from superficial nerves, or it can be measured non-invasively by using changes in an organ's response as a proxy for changes in ANS activity, for instance of the sweat glands or the heart. Invasive measurements have the highest validity but are very poorly feasible in large scale samples where non-invasive measures are the preferred approach. Autonomic effects on the heart can be reliably quantified by the recording of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in combination with the impedance cardiogram (ICG), which reflects the changes in thorax impedance in response to respiration and the ejection of blood from the ventricle into the aorta. From the respiration and ECG signals, respiratory sinus arrhythmia can be extracted as a measure of cardiac parasympathetic control. From the ECG and the left ventricular ejection signals, the preejection period can be extracted as a measure of cardiac sympathetic control. ECG and ICG recording is mostly done in laboratory settings. However, having the subjects report to a laboratory greatly reduces ecological validity, is not always doable in large scale epidemiological studies, and can be intimidating for young children. An ambulatory device for ECG and ICG simultaneously resolves these three problems. Here, we present a study design for a minimally invasive and rapid assessment of cardiac autonomic control in children, using a validated ambulatory device (1-5), the VU University Ambulatory Monitoring System (VU

  5. Active Disaster Response System for a Smart Building

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yen; Chu, Edward T.-H; Ku, Lun-Wei; Liu, Jane W. S.

    2014-01-01

    Disaster warning and surveillance systems have been widely applied to help the public be aware of an emergency. However, existing warning systems are unable to cooperate with household appliances or embedded controllers; that is, they cannot provide enough time for preparedness and evacuation, especially for disasters like earthquakes. In addition, the existing warning and surveillance systems are not responsible for collecting sufficient information inside a building for relief workers to conduct a proper rescue action after a disaster happens. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a proof of concept prototype, named the active disaster response system (ADRS), which automatically performs emergency tasks when an earthquake happens. ADRS can interpret Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) messages, published by an official agency, and actuate embedded controllers to perform emergency tasks to respond to the alerts. Examples of emergency tasks include opening doors and windows and cutting off power lines and gas valves. In addition, ADRS can maintain a temporary network by utilizing the embedded controllers; hence, victims trapped inside a building are still able to post emergency messages if the original network is disconnected. We conducted a field trial to evaluate the effectiveness of ADRS after an earthquake happened. Our results show that compared to manually operating emergency tasks, ADRS can reduce the operation time by up to 15 s, which is long enough for people to get under sturdy furniture, or to evacuate from the third floor to the first floor, or to run more than 100 m. PMID:25237897

  6. Active transmission isolation/rotor loads measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenigsberg, I. J.; Defelice, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Modifications were incorporated into a helicopter active transmission isolation system to provide the capability of utilizing the system as a rotor force measuring device. These included; (1) isolator redesign to improve operation and minimize friction, (2) installation of pressure transducers in each isolator, and (3) load cells in series with each torque restraint link. Full scale vibration tests performed during this study on a CH-53A helicopter airframe verified that these modifications do not degrade the systems wide band isolation characteristics. Bench tests performed on each isolator unit indicated that steady and transient loads can be measured to within 1 percent of applied load. Individual isolator vibratory load measurement accuracy was determined to be 4 percent. Load measurement accuracy was found to be independent of variations in all basic isolator operating characteristics. Full scale system load calibration tests on the CH-53A airframe established the feasibility of simultaneously providing wide band vibration isolation and accurate measurement of rotor loads. Principal rotor loads (lift, propulsive force, and torque) were measured to within 2 percent of applied load.

  7. A 32-channel wireless system for recording gastric electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Springston, Christopher S; Rui Bao; Farajidavar, Aydin

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a wireless system designed to collect, store and transmit gastric electrical activity, known as slow waves. The system is composed of a miniaturized front-end module that can record from up to 32 locations of the stomach, and a back-end module. The front-end could either store the recorded slow waves into a flash memory, or wirelessly transmit them to the back-end connected to a computer featuring a custom-made graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI displays signals in real time, and stores them for off-line analysis. The front-end with the dimensions of 12×48×4 mm3, allows for potential implantation through laparoscopic or endoscopic procedure. The system was successfully tested on rigorous bench-top experiments. The results of these tests showed that the system could run as designed and accurately map the signals collected by each sensor, as well as show that the flash memory could store data for almost 34 hours should wireless communication be lost.

  8. Tribotronic Transistor Array as an Active Tactile Sensing System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi Wei; Pang, Yaokun; Zhang, Limin; Lu, Cunxin; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-12-27

    Large-scale tactile sensor arrays are of great importance in flexible electronics, human-robot interaction, and medical monitoring. In this paper, a flexible 10 × 10 tribotronic transistor array (TTA) is developed as an active tactile sensing system by incorporating field-effect transistor units and triboelectric nanogenerators into a polyimide substrate. The drain-source current of each tribotronic transistor can be individually modulated by the corresponding external contact, which has induced a local electrostatic potential to act as the conventional gate voltage. By scaling down the pixel size from 5 × 5 to 0.5 × 0.5 mm(2), the sensitivities of single pixels are systematically investigated. The pixels of the TTA show excellent durability, independence, and synchronicity, which are suitable for applications in real-time tactile sensing, motion monitoring, and spatial mapping. The integrated tribotronics provides an unconventional route to realize an active tactile sensing system, with prospective applications in wearable electronics, human-machine interfaces, fingerprint identification, and so on.

  9. A new assay system for guinea pig interferon biological activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiko; Jeevan, Amminikutty; Ohishi, Kazue; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Umemori, Kiyoko; Yamamoto, Saburo; McMurray, David N

    2002-07-01

    We have developed an assay system for guinea pig interferon (IFN) based on reduction of viral cytopathic effect (CPE) in various cell lines. CPE inhibition was detected optimally in the guinea pig fibroblast cell line 104C1 infected with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). The amount of biologically active guinea pig IFN was quantified by estimating viable cell numbers colorimetrically by means of a tetrazolium compound, 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium monosodium salt (WST-1) and 1-methoxy-5-methylphenazinium methylsulfate (PMS). WST-1 color developed until stopped by the addition of sulfuric acid. This had no effect on the colorimetric assay, and the color was stable for at least 24 h. The acid also inactivated the EMCV and, thus, eliminated the viral hazard. Inhibition of CPE activity was highly correlated with the concentration of culture supernatants from BCG-vaccinated guinea pig splenocytes stimulated in vitro with tuberculin or an immunostimulatory oligoDNA. This assay detected guinea pig IFN and human IFN-alpha, but not IFN-gamma from human, mouse, rat, pig, or dog. This assay system has proved useful for the titration of guinea pig IFN, being easy to perform, free from viral hazard, relatively species specific, highly reproducible, and inexpensive.

  10. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 5: Integrated radiator/expendable cooling system tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheps, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to gather data on a space shuttle active control system (ATCS) incorporating both radiators and an expendable cooling device to provide vehicle heat removal. Two systems were tested and design information was provided for both nominal and limit conditions. The tests verified the concept that an integrated radiator/expendable cooling system can adequately maintain desired water quantities while responding to variations in heat loads and environments. In addition, the need for duct heating was demonstrated, while exhaust nozzle heating was also shown to be unnecessary.

  11. Tractor Mechanics. Maintaining and Servicing the Cooling System, Learning Activity Packages 34-40; Maintaining and Servicing Hydraulic Systems, Learning Activity Packages 41-48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This series of learning activity packages focuses on two areas of tractor mechanics: (1) maintaining and servicing the cooling system and (2) maintaining and servicing hydraulic systems. Each of the fifteen illustrated learning activity packages follows a typical format: introduction, directions, objectives, learning activities, tools and…

  12. Dynamic Docking Test System (DDTS) active table computer program NASA Advanced Docking System (NADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.; Jantz, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program was developed to describe the three-dimensional motion of the Dynamic Docking Test System active table. The input consists of inertia and geometry data, actuator structural data, forcing function data, hydraulics data, servo electronics data, and integration control data. The output consists of table responses, actuator bending responses, and actuator responses.

  13. Active control of multi-input hydraulic journal bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Jen-Chen; Chen, Chi-Yin; Tu, Jia-Ying

    2016-09-01

    Because of the advantages of high accuracy, high capacity, and low friction, the development of hydrostatic bearing for machine tool receives significant attention in the last decades. The mechanics and mechanical design of hydrostatic journal bearing with capillary restrictors has been discussed in literature. However, pragmatically, the undesired loading effects of cutting force tend to result in resonance and instability of the rotor and damage the shaft during operation. Therefore, multi-input, active flow control using state feedback design is proposed in this paper. To this purpose, the proportional pressure valves are added to the hydraulic system as active control devices, and the linearised models of the bearing and valve are discussed and identified. Simulation and experimental work is conducted to verify the proposed active control and parameter identification techniques. The results show that the unbalance responses of the rotor are reduced by the proposed state feedback controller, which is able to regulate the flow pressure effectively, thus enhancing the stability and accuracy of the hydraulic journal bearing.

  14. Autonomic nervous system activities during motor imagery in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kazuo; Maeshima, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI), a mental simulation of voluntary motor actions, has been used as a training method for athletes for many years. It is possible that MI techniques might similarly be useful as part of rehabilitative strategies to help people regain skills lost as a consequence of diseases or stroke. Mental activity and stress induce several different autonomic responses as part of the behavioral response to movement (e.g., motor anticipation) and as part of the central planning and preprogramming of movement. However, the interrelationships between MI, the autonomic responses, and the motor system have not yet been worked out. The authors compare a number of autonomic responses (respiration, heart rate, electro skin resistance) and motoneuron excitability (soleus H-reflex) in elite and nonelite speed skaters during MI. In contrast to the nonelite athletes, MI of elite speed skaters is characterized by larger changes in heart rate and respiration, a greater reliance on an internal perspective for MI, a more vivid MI, a more accurate correspondence between the MI and actual race times, and decreased motoneuron excitability. Two observations suggest that the changes in the autonomic responses and motoneuron excitability for the elite speed skaters are related to the effects of central motor programming: (1) there was no correlation between the autonomic responses for MI and those recorded during mental arithmetic; and (2) mental arithmetic did not significantly alter motoneuron activity. It is suggested that in elite speed skaters, the descending neural mechanisms that reduce motoneuron excitability are activated even when full, vivid MI is performed internally. These inhibitory responses of the motor system may enhance actual motor performance under conditions of remarkably high mental stress, such as that which occurs in the Olympic games.

  15. Queuine promotes antioxidant defence system by activating cellular antioxidant enzyme activities in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chandramani; Jaiswal, Yogesh K; Vinayak, Manjula

    2008-04-01

    Constant generation of Reactive oxygen species (ROS) during normal cellular metabolism of an organism is generally balanced by similar rate of consumption by antioxidants. Imbalance between ROS production and antioxidant defense results in increased level of ROS causing oxidative stress which leads to promotion of malignancy. Queuine is a hyper modified base analogue of guanine, found at first anti-codon position of Q- family of tRNAs. These tRNAs are completely modified with respect to queuosine in terminally differentiated somatic cells, however hypomodification of Q-tRNAs is close association with cell proliferation. Q-tRNA modification is essential for normal development, differentiation and cellular functions. Queuine is a nutrient factor to eukaryotes. It is found to promote cellular antioxidant defense system and inhibit tumorigenesis. The activities of antioxidant enzymes like catalase, SOD, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase are found to be low in Dalton's lymphoma ascites transplanted (DLAT) mouse liver compared to normal. However, exogenous administration of queuine to DLAT mouse improves the activities of antioxidant enzymes. The results suggest that queuine promotes antioxidant defense system by increasing antioxidant enzyme activities and in turn inhibits oxidative stress and tumorigenesis.

  16. P-NITROPHENOL METABOLISM BY JAPANESE MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) LIVER MICROSOMES AND S-9 FRACTION: ADDITIONAL EVIDENCE FOR THE EXISTENCE OF A CYP2E1-LIKE ISOFORM IN TELEOSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liver microsomes and S-9 fraction of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) metabolized the CYP2E1 specific substrate, p-nitrophenol (PNP), to a single hydroxylated product, 4-nitrocatechol. The use of liver S-9 fraction proved to be a viable alternative to liver microsomes and allowe...

  17. First principles modeling of Mo6S9 nanowires via condensation of Mo4S6 clusters and the effect of iodine doping on structural and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Laraib, Iflah; Karthikeyan, J; Murugan, P

    2016-02-21

    By employing first principles DFT calculations, we propose a new stable model for Mo6S9 nanowires (NWs) obtained by condensing tetrahedral Mo4S6 clusters rather than octahedral Mo6S8 clusters, which are known as magic clusters in the Mo-S polyhedral cluster family. The pristine NW is found to be metallic and its local structure and physical properties can be tuned by doping of iodine atoms. This doping increases the number of Mo-Mo bonds in the NW, thus, Mo4 tetrahedra are initially fused to the Mo6 octahedron, and then, to the Mo8 dodecahedron. Further, a close correlation among the Mo-Mo bonding in the local structure, mechanical and electronic properties, is observed from our study. Finally, the stability of the pristine and iodine doped Mo8S12-xIx NW structures obtained from condensation of Mo4 tetrahedra are found to be quite comparable with that of already reported Mo6S9-xIx NWs with Mo6 octahedra as building blocks.

  18. Testing the Wildlink activity-detection system on wolves and white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunkel, K.E.; Chapman, R.C.; Mech, L.D.; Gese, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    We tested the reliability and predictive capabilities of the activity meter in the new Wildlink Data Acquisition and Recapture System by comparing activity counts with concurrent observations of captive wolf (Canis lupus) and free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) activity. The Wildlink system stores activity data in a computer within a radio collar with which a biologist can communicate. Three levels of activity could be detected. The Wildlink system provided greater activity discrimination and was more reliable, adaptable, and efficient and was easier to use than conventional telemetry activity systems. The Wildlink system could be highly useful for determining wildlife energy budgets.

  19. Activation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Janke, Jürgen; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judy; Luft, Friedrich C; Sharma, Arya M; Jordan, Jens

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Activation of the central endocannabinoid system increases food intake and promotes weight gain. Blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) receptor reduces body weight in animals by central and peripheral actions; the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity is now being extensively investigated. We measured circulating endocannabinoid concentrations and studied the expression of CB-1 and the main degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), in adipose tissue of lean (n = 20) and obese (n = 20) women and after a 5% weight loss in a second group of women (n = 17). Circulating levels of anandamide and 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol were increased by 35 and 52% in obese compared with lean women (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue mRNA levels were reduced by -34% for CB-1 and -59% for FAAH in obese subjects (P < 0.05). A strong negative correlation was found between FAAH expression in adipose tissue and circulating endocannabinoids. Circulating endocannabinoids and CB-1 or FAAH expression were not affected by 5% weight loss. The expression of CB-1 and FAAH was increased in mature human adipocytes compared with in preadipocytes and was found in several human tissues. Our findings support the presence of a peripheral endocannabinoid system that is upregulated in human obesity.

  20. Lymphatic system: an active pathway for immune protection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shan; von der Weid, P Y

    2015-02-01

    Lymphatic vessels are well known to participate in the immune response by providing the structural and functional support for the delivery of antigens and antigen presenting cells to draining lymph nodes. Recent advances have improved our understanding of how the lymphatic system works and how it participates to the development of immune responses. New findings suggest that the lymphatic system may control the ultimate immune response through a number of ways which may include guiding antigen/dendritic cells (DC) entry into initial lymphatics at the periphery; promoting antigen/DC trafficking through afferent lymphatic vessels by actively facilitating lymph and cell movement; enabling antigen presentation in lymph nodes via a network of lymphatic endothelial cells and lymph node stroma cell and finally by direct lymphocytes exit from lymph nodes. The same mechanisms are likely also important to maintain peripheral tolerance. In this review we will discuss how the morphology and gene expression profile of the lymphatic endothelial cells in lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes provides a highly efficient pathway to initiate immune responses. The fundamental understanding of how lymphatic system participates in immune regulation will guide the research on lymphatic function in various diseases.

  1. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  2. Gold enrichment in active geothermal systems by accumulating colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannington, Mark; Harðardóttir, Vigdis; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Brown, Kevin L.

    2016-04-01

    The origins of high-grade hydrothermal ore deposits are debated, but active geothermal systems provide important clues to their formation. The highest concentrations of gold are found in geothermal systems with direct links to island arc magmatism. Yet, similar concentrations have also been found in the absence of any input from arc magmas, for example, in the Reykjanes geothermal field, Iceland. Here we analyse brine samples taken from deep wells at Reykjanes and find that gold concentrations in the reservoir zone have increased over the past seven years from an average of 3 ppb to 14 ppb. The metal concentrations greatly exceed the maximum solubility of gold in the reservoir under saturated conditions and are now nearly two orders of magnitude higher than in mid-ocean ridge black smoker fluids--the direct analogues of Reykjanes deep liquids. We suggest that ongoing extraction of brine, the resulting pressure drop, and increased boiling have caused gold to drop out of solution and become trapped in the reservoir as a colloidal suspension. This process may explain how the stock of metal in the reservoirs of fossil geothermal systems could have increased over time and thus become available for the formation of gold-rich ore deposits.

  3. Active Storage with Analytics Capabilities and I/O Runtime System for Petascale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Alok

    2015-03-18

    Computational scientists must understand results from experimental, observational and computational simulation generated data to gain insights and perform knowledge discovery. As systems approach the petascale range, problems that were unimaginable a few years ago are within reach. With the increasing volume and complexity of data produced by ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments, understanding the science is largely hampered by the lack of comprehensive I/O, storage, acceleration of data manipulation, analysis, and mining tools. Scientists require techniques, tools and infrastructure to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis, statistical analysis and knowledge discovery. The goal of this work is to enable more effective analysis of scientific datasets through the integration of enhancements in the I/O stack, from active storage support at the file system layer to MPI-IO and high-level I/O library layers. We propose to provide software components to accelerate data analytics, mining, I/O, and knowledge discovery for large-scale scientific applications, thereby increasing productivity of both scientists and the systems. Our approaches include 1) design the interfaces in high-level I/O libraries, such as parallel netCDF, for applications to activate data mining operations at the lower I/O layers; 2) Enhance MPI-IO runtime systems to incorporate the functionality developed as a part of the runtime system design; 3) Develop parallel data mining programs as part of runtime library for server-side file system in PVFS file system; and 4) Prototype an active storage cluster, which will utilize multicore CPUs, GPUs, and FPGAs to carry out the data mining workload.

  4. Chained Activation of the Motor System during Language Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Barbara F.; Borghi, Anna M.; Buccino, Giovanni; Riggio, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to investigate whether and how one important characteristic of the motor system, that is its goal-directed organization in motor chains, is reflected in language processing. This possibility stems from the embodied theory of language, according to which the linguistic system re-uses the structures of the motor system. The participants were presented with nouns of common tools preceded by a pair of verbs expressing grasping or observational motor chains (i.e., grasp-to-move, grasp-to-use, look-at-to-grasp, and look-at-to-stare). They decided whether the tool mentioned in the sentence was the same as that displayed in a picture presented shortly after. A primacy of the grasp-to-use motor chain over the other motor chains in priming the participants' performance was observed in both the experiments. More interestingly, we found that the motor information evoked by the noun was modulated by the specific motor-chain expressed by the preceding verbs. Specifically, with the grasping chain aimed at using the tool, the functional motor information prevailed over the volumetric information, and vice versa with the grasping chain aimed at moving the tool (Experiment 2). Instead, the functional and volumetric information were balanced for those motor chains that comprise at least an observational act (Experiment 1). Overall our results are in keeping with the embodied theory of language and suggest that understanding sentences expressing an action directed toward a tool drives a chained activation of the motor system. PMID:28265247

  5. Thermal neutron activation system for confirmatory nonmetallic land mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Cousins, Thomas; Jones, Trevor; Brisson, Jean R.; Jamieson, Terry; Waller, Ed; LeMay, Francois; Ing, Harry; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Selkirk, Barkley

    1998-09-01

    To detect and locate buried landmines, the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) is developing a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multisensor system called ILDP. In operation, a suite of 4 detectors scan ahead of the vehicle. Their outputs are combined through data fusion to indicate the possibility of a mine at a particular location, within a 30 cm radius. A thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor, mounted behind the vehicle, is used to confirm the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.83 MeV gamma-ray associated with neutron capture on 14N. The TNA system developed for this uses a 100 microgram 252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm X 7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. A combination of the use of state-of-the art radiation transport codes for design, judicious choice of specialized shielding materials and development of high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics has led to a system which can; (1) confirm the presence of all surface-laid or shallowly-buried anti-tank mines in a few seconds to a minute (depending on mass of explosive) (2) confirm the presence of anti-tank mines down to 20 cm depth in less than 5 minutes. (3) confirm the presence of large (greater than 100 g Nitrogen) anti-personnel mines in less than five minutes (4) operate in adverse climatic conditions. These results have been verified in field trials using the prototype sensor. Work is now ongoing to miniaturize the electronics, make the system robust and easy to use and investigate the use of an electronic neutron generator expected to enter service by the year 2000.

  6. Chained Activation of the Motor System during Language Understanding.

    PubMed

    Marino, Barbara F; Borghi, Anna M; Buccino, Giovanni; Riggio, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to investigate whether and how one important characteristic of the motor system, that is its goal-directed organization in motor chains, is reflected in language processing. This possibility stems from the embodied theory of language, according to which the linguistic system re-uses the structures of the motor system. The participants were presented with nouns of common tools preceded by a pair of verbs expressing grasping or observational motor chains (i.e., grasp-to-move, grasp-to-use, look-at-to-grasp, and look-at-to-stare). They decided whether the tool mentioned in the sentence was the same as that displayed in a picture presented shortly after. A primacy of the grasp-to-use motor chain over the other motor chains in priming the participants' performance was observed in both the experiments. More interestingly, we found that the motor information evoked by the noun was modulated by the specific motor-chain expressed by the preceding verbs. Specifically, with the grasping chain aimed at using the tool, the functional motor information prevailed over the volumetric information, and vice versa with the grasping chain aimed at moving the tool (Experiment 2). Instead, the functional and volumetric information were balanced for those motor chains that comprise at least an observational act (Experiment 1). Overall our results are in keeping with the embodied theory of language and suggest that understanding sentences expressing an action directed toward a tool drives a chained activation of the motor system.

  7. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) is a comprehensive, mid?term energy forecasting and policy analysis tool used by EIA. WEPS projects energy supply, demand, and prices by country or region, given assumptions about the state of various economies, international energy markets, and energy policies. The Global Activity Module (GLAM) provides projections of economic driver variables for use by the supply, demand, and conversion modules of WEPS . GLAM’s baseline economic projection contains the economic assumptions used in WEPS to help determine energy demand and supply. GLAM can also provide WEPS with alternative economic assumptions representing a range of uncertainty about economic growth. The resulting economic impacts of such assumptions are inputs to the remaining supply and demand modules of WEPS .

  8. Modeling and Control for an Asymmetric Hydraulic Active Suspension System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Won, Sangchul

    In this paper we present a model for an automotive active suspension system which includes the dynamics of an asymmetric hydraulic actuator. In this model the force exerted by a single-rod cylinder is regarded as an internal state, and the sum of the oil flow rates through the orifice of a servo valve as the control input. We obtain a linear time-invariant (LTI) state state equation and propose a force-tracking-free one-step control method which can accept various linear control techniques. An optimal state-feedback control is applied as an example. Quarter car test rig experiment results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in modeling and control.

  9. Effectiveness of classroom response systems within an active learning environment.

    PubMed

    Welch, Susan

    2013-11-01

    In nursing education, the inclusion of pedagogical tools is necessary to transform Millennial classrooms. One such pedagogical tool currently offered is classroom response systems (CRS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CRS as a pedagogical tool in improving nursing students' examination performance within an active learning environment. A pretest-posttest design was used to determine whether there was a relationship between the use of CRS (independent variable) and nursing students' examination performance in a first-year Professional Practice course (dependent variable). Paired t tests revealed no greater improvement in posttest scores. Therefore, the use of CRS technology was not effective in increasing nursing students' examination scores in the Professional Practice course. Additional research is needed to provide adequate understanding of the effectiveness of CRS within the nursing education classroom.

  10. Active System for Electromagnetic Perturbation Monitoring in Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoi, Adrian Marian; Helerea, Elena

    Nowadays electromagnetic environment is rapidly expanding in frequency domain and wireless services extend in terms of covered area. European electromagnetic compatibility regulations refer to limit values regarding emissions, as well as procedures for determining susceptibility of the vehicle. Approval procedure for a series of cars is based on determining emissions/immunity level for a few vehicles picked randomly from the entire series, supposing that entire vehicle series is compliant. During immunity assessment, the vehicle is not subjected to real perturbation sources, but exposed to electric/magnetic fields generated by laboratory equipment. Since current approach takes into account only partially real situation regarding perturbation sources, this paper proposes an active system for determining electromagnetic parameters of vehicle's environment, that implements a logical diagram for measurement, satisfying the imposed requirements. This new and original solution is useful for EMC assessment of hybrid and electrical vehicles.

  11. Efficient active depth sensing by laser speckle projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuanwu; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo; Liao, Qingmin

    2014-01-01

    An active depth sensing approach by laser speckle projection system is proposed. After capturing the speckle pattern with an infrared digital camera, we extract the pure speckle pattern using a direct-global separation method. Then the pure speckles are represented by Census binary features. By evaluating the matching cost and uniqueness between the real-time image and the reference image, robust correspondences are selected as support points. After that, we build a disparity grid and propose a generative graphical model to compute disparities. An iterative approach is designed to propagate the messages between blocks and update the model. Finally, a dense depth map can be obtained by subpixel interpolation and transformation. The experimental evaluations demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach.

  12. Optical ordance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    SciTech Connect

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt III perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetranitro -- 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  13. Optical ordnance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merson, J. A.; Salas, F. J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt(III) perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro- 1,3,5,7 - tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  14. SMART: a system supporting medical activities in real-time.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, D M; Consorti, F; Merialdo, P

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the system SMART whose goal is real-time assistance to physicians who execute diagnostic or therapeutic protocols in a clinical context. SMART is able to retrieve a protocol from its knowledge base and to monitor its execution step by step for a single patient. Different protocols for different patients can be followed at the same time in a health care structure. The prototype realized supports the execution of protocols for evaluating surgical risks. It has been implemented according to the specifications given by the 4th Surgical Clinic of "Policlinico Umberto I" and reflects the activities actually performed in that hospital. However, the protocol model defined is general purpose and we envisage an easy application to other contexts and therefore to the informatization of other protocols.

  15. Robust stabilization of rotor-active magnetic bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoxin

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) are emerging as a beneficial technology for high-speed and high-performance suspensions in rotating machinery applications. A fundamental feedback control problem is robust stabilization in the presence of uncertain destabilizing mechanisms in aeroelastic, hydroelastic dynamics, and AMB feedback. As rotating machines are evolving in achieving high speed, high energy density, and high performance, the rotor and the support structure become increasingly flexible, and highly coupled. This makes rotor-AMB system more challenging to stabilize. The primary objective of this research is to develop a systematic control synthesis procedure for achieving highly robust stabilization of rotor-AMB systems. Of special interest is the stabilization of multivariable systems such as the AMB supported flexible rotors and gyroscopic rotors, where the classical control design may encounter difficulties. To this end, we first developed a systematic modeling procedure. This modeling procedure exploited the best advantages of technology developed in rotordynamics and the unique system identification tool provided by the AMBs. A systematic uncertainty model for rotor-AMB systems was developed, eliminating the iterative process of selecting uncertainty structures. The consequences of overestimation or underestimation of uncertainties were made transparent to control engineers. To achieve high robustness, we explored the fundamental performance/robustness limitations due to rotor-AMB system unstable poles. We examined the mixed sensitivity performance that is closely related to the unstructured uncertainty. To enhance transparency of the synthesis, we analyzed multivariable controllers from classical control perspectives. Based on these results, a systematic robust control synthesis procedure was established. For a strong gyroscopic rotor over a wide speed range, we applied the advanced gain-scheduled synthesis, and compared two synthesis frameworks in

  16. Differential effects of defibrillation on systemic and cardiac sympathetic activity

    PubMed Central

    Bode, F; Wiegand, U; Raasch, W; Richardt, G; Potratz, J

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the effect of defibrillation shocks on cardiac and circulating catecholamines.
Design—Prospective examination of myocardial catecholamine balance during dc shock by simultaneous determination of arterial and coronary sinus plasma concentrations. Internal countershocks (10-34 J) were applied in 30 patients after initiation of ventricular fibrillation for a routine implantable cardioverter defibrillator test. Another 10 patients were externally cardioverted (50-360 J) for atrial fibrillation.
Main outcome measures—Transcardiac noradrenaline, adrenaline, and lactate gradients immediately after the shock.
Results—After internal shock, arterial noradrenaline increased from a mean (SD) of 263 (128) pg/ml at baseline to 370 (148) pg/ml (p = 0.001), while coronary sinus noradrenaline fell from 448 (292) to 363 (216) pg/ml (p = 0.01), reflecting a shift from cardiac net release to net uptake. After external shock delivery, there was a similar increase in arterial noradrenaline, from 260 (112) to 459 (200) pg/ml (p = 0.03), while coronary sinus noradrenaline remained unchanged. Systemic adrenaline increased 11-fold after external shock (p = 0.01), outlasting the threefold rise following internal shock (p = 0.001). In both groups, a negative transmyocardial adrenaline gradient at baseline decreased further, indicating enhanced myocardial uptake. Cardiac lactate production occurred after ventricular fibrillation and internal shock, but not after external cardioversion, so the neurohumoral changes resulted from the defibrillation process and not from alterations in oxidative metabolism.
Conclusions—A dc shock induces marked systemic sympathoadrenal and sympathoneuronal activation, but attenuates cardiac sympathetic activity. This might promote the transient myocardial depression observed after electrical discharge to the heart.

 Keywords: defibrillation;  autonomic cardiac function;  catecholamines;  lactate

  17. Design considerations in an active medical product safety monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Joshua J; Fireman, Bruce; Ryan, Patrick B; Maclure, Malcolm; Gerhard, Tobias; Toh, Sengwee; Rassen, Jeremy A; Nelson, Jennifer C; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Active medical product monitoring systems, such as the Sentinel System, will utilize electronic healthcare data captured during routine health care. Safety signals that arise from these data may be spurious because of chance or bias, particularly confounding bias, given the observational nature of the data. Applying appropriate monitoring designs can filter out many false-positive and false-negative associations from the outset. Designs can be classified by whether they produce estimates based on between-person or within-person comparisons. In deciding which approach is more suitable for a given monitoring scenario, stakeholders must consider the characteristics of the monitored product, characteristics of the health outcome of interest (HOI), and characteristics of the potential link between these. Specifically, three factors drive design decisions: (i) strength of within-person and between-person confounding; (ii) whether circumstances exist that may predispose to misclassification of exposure or misclassification of the timing of the HOI; and (iii) whether the exposure of interest is predominantly transient or sustained. Additional design considerations include whether to focus on new users, the availability of appropriate active comparators, the presence of an exposure time trend, and the measure of association of interest. When the key assumptions of self-controlled designs are fulfilled (i.e., lack of within-person, time-varying confounding; abrupt HOI onset; and transient exposure), within-person comparisons are preferred because they inherently avoid confounding by fixed factors. The cohort approach generally is preferred in other situations and particularly when timing of exposure or outcome is uncertain because cohort approaches are less vulnerable to biases resulting from misclassification.

  18. Maternal rearing environment impacts autonomic nervous system activity.

    PubMed

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Moadab, Gilda; Capitanio, John P

    2017-04-03

    While it is now well known that social deprivation during early development permanently perturbs affective responding, accumulating evidence suggests that less severe restriction of the early social environment may also have deleterious effects. In the present report, we evaluate the affective responding of rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) infants raised by their mothers in restricted social environments or by their mothers in large social groups by indexing autonomic nervous system activity. Following a 25-hr evaluation of biobehavioral organization, electrocardiogram, and an index of respiration were recorded for 10 min. This allowed for an evaluation of both heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), an index of parasympathetic activity, during a challenging situation. Three- to four-month-old infants raised in restricted social environments had significantly higher heart rates and lower RSA as compared to infants raised in unrestricted social environments, consistent with a more potent stress response to the procedure. These results are consistent with mounting evidence that the environment in which individuals are raised has important consequences for affective processing.

  19. A latchable thermally activated phase change actuator for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    Complex microfluidic systems often require a high number of individually controllable active components like valves and pumps. In this paper we present the development and optimization of a latchable thermally controlled phase change actuator which uses a solid/liquid phase transition of a phase change medium and the displacement of the liquid phase change medium to change and stabilize the two states of the actuator. Because the phase change is triggered by heat produced with ohmic resistors the used control signal is an electrical signal. In contrast to pneumatically activated membrane valves this concept allows the individual control of several dozen actuators with only two external pressure lines. Within this paper we show the general working principle of the actuator and demonstrate its general function and the scalability of the concept at an example of four actuators. Additionally we present the complete results of our studies to optimize the response behavior of the actuator - the influence of the heating power as well as the used phase change medium on melting and solidifying times.

  20. Observing shadow motions: resonant activity within the observer's motor system?

    PubMed

    Alaerts, Kaat; Van Aggelpoel, Tinne; Swinnen, Stephan P; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2009-09-25

    Several studies have demonstrated that the human motor cortex is activated by the mere observation of actions performed by others. In the present study, we explored whether the perception of 'impoverished motion stimuli', such as shadow animations, is sufficient to activate motor areas. To do so, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied over the hand area of the primary motor cortex (M1) while subjects observed shadow animations depicting finger motions. Data showed that resonant motor responses in M1 were only found when a biological effector was recognized from the observed shadow animation. Interestingly, M1 responses were similar for observing shadow or real motions. Therefore, the loss of 'pictorial' movement features in a shadow animation appeared to have no effect on motor resonance in M1. In summary, these findings suggest that the 'recognition' of biological motion from sparse visual input is both necessary and sufficient to recruit motor areas. This supports the hypothesis that the motor system is involved in recognizing the actions performed by others.

  1. Experimental study on active vibration control of a gearbox system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yuan H.; Lim, Teik C.; Steve Shepard, W.

    2005-04-01

    An active internal gearbox structure is developed and evaluated experimentally to suppress gear pair vibration due to transmission error excitation. The approach is based on an active shaft transverse vibration control concept that was theoretically analyzed in an earlier study and determined to be one of the most feasible methods. The system comprises of a piezoelectric stack actuator for applying control forces to the shaft via a rolling element-bearing, and a highly efficient, enhanced delayed-x LMS control algorithm to generate the appropriate control signals. To avoid the aliasing effects of higher frequency signals and reduce the phase delay of conventional filters, a multi-rate minimum-phase low-pass digital filter is also integrated into the controller. The experimental results yield 8-13 dB attenuation in the gearbox housing vibration levels and correspondingly 5-8 dB reduction in measured gear whine noise levels at the first and second operating gear mesh frequencies.

  2. Activation of the Renin-Angiotensin System Promotes Colitis Development

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yongyan; Liu, Tianjing; He, Lei; Dougherty, Urszula; Chen, Li; Adhikari, Sarbani; Alpert, Lindsay; Zhou, Guolin; Liu, Weicheng; Wang, Jiaolong; Deb, Dilip K.; Hart, John; Liu, Shu Q.; Kwon, John; Pekow, Joel; Rubin, David T.; Zhao, Qun; Bissonnette, Marc; Li, Yan Chun

    2016-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays pathogenic roles in renal and cardiovascular disorders, but whether it is involved in colitis is unclear. Here we show that RenTgMK mice that overexpress active renin from the liver developed more severe colitis than wild-type controls. More than 50% RenTgMK mice died whereas all wild-type mice recovered. RenTgMK mice exhibited more robust mucosal TH17 and TH1/TH17 responses and more profound colonic epithelial cell apoptosis compared to wild-type controls. Treatment with aliskiren (a renin inhibitor), but not hydralazine (a smooth muscle relaxant), ameliorated colitis in RenTgMK mice, although both drugs normalized blood pressure. Chronic infusion of angiotensin II into wild-type mice mimicked the severe colitic phenotype of RenTgMK mice, and treatment with losartan [an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker (ARB)] ameliorated colitis in wild-type mice, confirming a colitogenic role for the endogenous RAS. In human biopsies, pro-inflammatory cytokines were suppressed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were on ARB therapy compared to patients not receiving ARB therapy. These observations demonstrate that activation of the RAS promotes colitis in a blood pressure independent manner. Angiotensin II appears to drive colonic mucosal inflammation by promoting intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and mucosal TH17 responses in colitis development. PMID:27271344

  3. Anxiety, not anger, induces inflammatory activity: An avoidance/approach model of immune system activation.

    PubMed

    Moons, Wesley G; Shields, Grant S

    2015-08-01

    Psychological stressors reliably trigger systemic inflammatory activity as indexed by levels of proinflammatory cytokines. This experiment demonstrates that one's specific emotional reaction to a stressor may be a significant determinant of whether an inflammatory reaction occurs in response to that stressor. Based on extant correlational evidence and theory, a causal approach was used to determine whether an avoidant emotion (anxiety) triggers more inflammatory activity than an approach emotion (anger). In an experimental design (N = 40), a 3-way Emotion Condition × Time × Analyte interaction revealed that a writing-based anxiety induction, but not a writing-based anger induction, increased mean levels of interferon-γ (IFN- γ) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), but not interleukin-6 (IL-6) in oral mucous, F(2, 54) = 4.64, p = .01, ηp(²) = .15. Further, self-reported state anxiety predicted elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, all ΔR(²) >.06, ps <.04, but self-reported state anger did not. These results constitute the first evidence to our knowledge that specific negative emotions can differentially cause inflammatory activity and support a theoretical model explaining these effects based on the avoidance or approach motivations associated with emotions.

  4. Active Mining from Process Time Series by Learning Classifier System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurahashi, Setsuya; Terano, Takao

    Continuation processes in chemical and/or biotechnical plants always generate a large amount of time series data. However, since conventional process models are described as a set of control models, it is difficult to explain the complicated and active plant behaviors. Based on the background, this research proposes a novel method to develop a process response model from continuous time-series data. The method consists of the following phases: 1) Collect continuous process data at each tag point in a target plant; 2) Normalize the data in the interval between zero and one; 3) Get the delay time, which maximizes the correlation between given two time series data; 4) Select tags with the higher correlation; 5) Develop a process response model to describe the relations among the process data using the delay time and the correlation values; 6) Develop a process prediction model via several tag points data using a neural network; 1) Discover control rules from the process prediction model using Learning Classifier system. The main contribution of the research is to establish a method to mine a set of meaningful control rules from Learning Classifier System using the Minimal Description Length criteria. The proposed method has been applied to an actual process of a biochemical plant and has shown the validity and the effectiveness.

  5. Development of an Active Plasma Control System for Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongard, M. W.

    2005-10-01

    The Phase II Pegasus ST experiment includes fully programmable power supplies for all magnet coils. These will be integrated with a digital feedback plasma control system (PCS), based on the PCS in use on DIII-D, to provide active feedback control of the plasma evolution. The initial goal is to control Ip(t), R(t), and Z(t). The feedback cycle consists of: 1) sampling magnetic diagnostics, 2) applying a response matrix derived from equilibrium reconstructions, 3) accounting for induced vessel currents and power supply frequency responses, and 4) adjusting the current demand, all on a timescale that is fast compared to the shot duration of ˜25 ms. Data is sampled via a 500 kHz, 96-channel CPCI digitizer from DTACQ Solutions, Ltd. The power supply control signals are generated by 16 analog waveform generators, with the option to utilize 32 digital I/O lines in the future. The PCS digitizer is controlled via a system of Linux-based computers that perform requisite computation-intensive tasks and interface to the existing LabVIEW control codes via a TCP/IP network link.

  6. Systemic activation of the immune system in HIV infection: The role of the immune complexes (hypothesis).

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, Larisa B; Shmagel, Konstantin V; Shmagel, Nadezhda G; Saidakova, Evgeniya V

    2016-03-01

    Currently, immune activation is proven to be the basis for the HIV infection pathogenesis and a strong predictor of the disease progression. Among the causes of systemic immune activation the virus and its products, related infectious agents, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and regulatory CD4+ T cells' decrease are considered. Recently microbial translocation (bacterial products yield into the bloodstream as a result of the gastrointestinal tract mucosal barrier integrity damage) became the most popular hypothesis. Previously, we have found an association between immune complexes present in the bloodstream of HIV infected patients and the T cell activation. On this basis, we propose a significantly modified hypothesis of immune activation in HIV infection. It is based on the immune complexes' participation in the immunocompetent cells' activation. Immune complexes are continuously formed in the chronic phase of the infection. Together with TLR-ligands (viral antigens, bacterial products coming from the damaged gut) present in the bloodstream they interact with macrophages. As a result macrophages are transformed into the type II activated forms. These macrophages block IL-12 production and start synthesizing IL-10. High level of this cytokine slows down the development of the full-scale Th1-response. The anti-viral reactions are shifted towards the serogenesis. Newly synthesized antibodies' binding to viral antigens leads to continuous formation of the immune complexes capable of interacting with antigen-presenting cells.

  7. Evaluating the effectiveness of active vehicle safety systems.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eunbi; Oh, Cheol

    2017-03-01

    Advanced vehicle safety systems have been widely introduced in transportation systems and are expected to enhance traffic safety. However, these technologies mainly focus on assisting individual vehicles that are equipped with them, and less effort has been made to identify the effect of vehicular technologies on the traffic stream. This study proposed a methodology to assess the effectiveness of active vehicle safety systems (AVSSs), which represent a promising technology to prevent traffic crashes and mitigate injury severity. The proposed AVSS consists of longitudinal and lateral vehicle control systems, which corresponds to the Level 2 vehicle automation presented by the National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA). The effectiveness evaluation for the proposed technology was conducted in terms of crash potential reduction and congestion mitigation. A microscopic traffic simulator, VISSIM, was used to simulate freeway traffic stream and collect vehicle-maneuvering data. In addition, an external application program interface, VISSIM's COM-interface, was used to implement the AVSS. A surrogate safety assessment model (SSAM) was used to derive indirect safety measures to evaluate the effectiveness of the AVSS. A 16.7-km freeway stretch between the Nakdong and Seonsan interchanges on Korean freeway 45 was selected for the simulation experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of AVSS. A total of five simulation runs for each evaluation scenario were conducted. For the non-incident conditions, the rear-end and lane-change conflicts were reduced by 78.8% and 17.3%, respectively, under the level of service (LOS) D traffic conditions. In addition, the average delay was reduced by 55.5%. However, the system's effectiveness was weakened in the LOS A-C categories. Under incident traffic conditions, the number of rear-end conflicts was reduced by approximately 9.7%. Vehicle delays were reduced by approximately 43.9% with 100% of market penetration rate (MPR). These results

  8. A simple wavelength division multiplexing system for active learning teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zghal, Mourad; Ghalila, Hassen; Ben Lakhdar, Zohra

    2009-06-01

    The active learning project consists in a series of workshops for educators, researchers and students and promotes an innovative method of teaching physics using simple, inexpensive materials that can be fabricated locally. The objective of the project is to train trainers and inspire students to learn physics. The workshops are based on the use of laboratory work and hands-on activities in the classroom. The interpretation of these experiments is challenging for some students, and the experiments can lead to a significant amount of discussion. The workshops are organized within the framework of the project ``Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP) mainly funded by UNESCO, with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE. ALOP workshops offer high school, college or university physics teachers the opportunity to improve their conceptual understanding of optics. These workshops usually run for five days and cover several of the topics usually found in any introductory university physics program. Optics and photonics are used as subject matter because it is relevant as well as adaptable to research and educational conditions in many developing countries [1]. In this paper, we will mainly focus on a specific topic of the ALOP workshops, namely optical communications and Wavelength Division Multiplexing technology (WDM). This activity was originally developed by Mazzolini et al [2]. WDM is a technology used in fibre-optic communications for transmitting two or more separate signals over a single fibre optic cable by using a separate wavelength for each signal. Multiple signals are carried together as separate wavelengths of light in a multiplexed signal. Simple and inexpensive WDM system was implemented in our laboratory using light emitting diodes or diode lasers, plastic optical fibres, a set of optical filters and lenses, prism or grating, and photodiodes. Transmission of audio signals using home-made, simple

  9. Selective inhibitory effect of (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine and 2'-nor-cyclic GMP on adenovirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baba, M; Mori, S; Shigeta, S; De Clercq, E

    1987-02-01

    The inhibitory effects of 20 selected antiviral compounds on the replication of adenoviruses (types 1 to 8) in vitro were investigated. While 18 compounds were ineffective, 2 compounds, namely (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA] and 9-[(2-hydroxy-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl)oxymethyl]guanine P-oxide (2'-nor-cyclic GMP), were highly effective against all adenovirus types assayed in human embryonic fibroblast cultures. Their 50% inhibitory doses were 1.1 microgram/ml for (S)-HPMPA and 4.1 micrograms/ml for 2'-nor-cyclic GMP. They were nontoxic for the host cells at the effective antiviral doses.

  10. Selective inhibitory effect of (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine and 2'-nor-cyclic GMP on adenovirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, M; Mori, S; Shigeta, S; De Clercq, E

    1987-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of 20 selected antiviral compounds on the replication of adenoviruses (types 1 to 8) in vitro were investigated. While 18 compounds were ineffective, 2 compounds, namely (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA] and 9-[(2-hydroxy-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl)oxymethyl]guanine P-oxide (2'-nor-cyclic GMP), were highly effective against all adenovirus types assayed in human embryonic fibroblast cultures. Their 50% inhibitory doses were 1.1 microgram/ml for (S)-HPMPA and 4.1 micrograms/ml for 2'-nor-cyclic GMP. They were nontoxic for the host cells at the effective antiviral doses. PMID:3566256

  11. Efficacy of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Kuffer, M; Balzarini, J; Naesens, L; Goldberg, M; Erfle, V; Goebel, F D; De Clercq, E; Jindrich, J; Holy, A; Bischofberger, N; Kraft, W

    1998-02-01

    The acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) were evaluated for their efficacy and side effects in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial using naturally occurring feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats. This natural retrovirus animal model is considered highly relevant for the pathogenesis and chemotherapy of HIV in humans. Both PMEA and FPMPA proved effective in ameliorating the clinical symptoms of FIV-infected cats, as measured by several clinical parameters including the incidence and severity of stomatitis, Karnofsky's score, immunologic parameters such as relative and absolute CD4+ lymphocyte counts, and virologic parameters including proviral DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of drug-treated animals. In contrast with PMEA, FPMPA showed no hematologic side effects at a dose that was 2.5-fold higher than PMEA.

  12. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  13. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this Subpart... agreeable schedule of AMRAP projects and activities in Alaska units of the National Park System....

  14. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this Subpart... agreeable schedule of AMRAP projects and activities in Alaska units of the National Park System....

  15. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this Subpart... agreeable schedule of AMRAP projects and activities in Alaska units of the National Park System....

  16. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this Subpart... agreeable schedule of AMRAP projects and activities in Alaska units of the National Park System....

  17. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this Subpart... agreeable schedule of AMRAP projects and activities in Alaska units of the National Park System....

  18. Effect of postural stimulation on systemic hemodynamics and sympathetic nervous activity in systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Izzo, J L; Sander, E; Larrabee, P S

    1990-02-01

    The contributions of the carotid sinus and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes to the interindividual variation in sympathetic nervous system activation caused by postural adaptation were indirectly assessed in 68 mild hypertensive subjects. Supine and upright plasma norepinephrine (NE), blood pressure (cuff) and cardiac output (acetylene rebreathing) were measured. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), carotid sinus pressure, stroke volume and systemic vascular resistance were calculated. Stroke volume was assumed to be proportional to the degree of stretch of cardiac mechanoreceptors, carotid sinus MAP was assumed to be proportional to carotid sinus stretch and plasma NE to reflect sympathetic nervous activity. Plasma NE correlated inversely with stroke volume (r = -0.62, p less than 10(-14] and estimated carotid sinus MAP (r = -0.33, p less than 0.0002) and positively with systemic vascular resistance (r = 0.59, p less than 10(-10]. Holding systemic vascular resistance constant by partial regression, the inverse relation between plasma NE and stroke volume remained (partial r = -0.36, p less than 0.02). Multiple linear regression yielded the equation: plasma NE (pg/ml) = 720 + 4.3 age - 5.1 stroke volume (ml) - 1.0 carotid sinus MAP (mm Hg). Substituting mean supine and upright values for stroke volume and carotid sinus MAP in this equation, it can be roughly estimated that changes in stroke volume account for as much as 60% of the postural variation in plasma NE in hypertensives, whereas only 15% of this variation is caused by changes in carotid sinus pressure. These findings suggest that cardiopulmonary baroreflexes are primary activators of the sympathetic nervous system during postural adaptation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Systemic interleukin 12 displays anti-tumour activity in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Kishima, H.; Shimizu, K.; Miyao, Y.; Mabuchi, E.; Tamura, K.; Tamura, M.; Sasaki, M.; Hakakawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    In various systemic cancers, interleukin 12 (IL-12) induces anti-tumour immunity mediated by T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. To determine whether IL-12 has anti-tumour activity against malignant gliomas in the central nervous system (CNS), which is considered to be an immunologically privileged site, we treated mice with meningeal gliomatosis by intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) administration of recombinant murine IL-12. Although untreated mice revealed symptoms, such as body weight loss or paraplegia as a result of the meningeal gliomatosis within 8 days after tumour inoculation, 80% of the mice treated with IL-12 at 0.5 microg i.p. were cured. Many lymphocytes, mostly CD4+ and CD8+ cells, infiltrated to the tumours of IL-12-treated mice. The numbers of these cells increased in the cervical lymph nodes, into which the cerebrospinal fluid drains, and there they secreted a considerable amount of interferon-gamma. Mice cured by IL-12 rejected subcutaneous or i.t. rechallenge with their original glioma cells, but the same mice were not able to reject other syngeneic tumour cells. These results indicate that the immune system recognizes malignant glioma cells in the subarachnoid space of the CNS and that systemic IL-12 may produce effective anti-tumour activity and long-lasting tumour-specific immunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9716025

  20. Active alignment and vibration control system for a large airborne optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienholz, David A.

    2000-04-01

    Airborne optical or electro-optical systems may be too large for all elements to be mounted on a single integrating structure, other than the aircraft fuselage itself. An active system must then be used to maintain the required alignment between elements. However the various smaller integrating structures (benches) must still be isolated from high- frequency airframe disturbances that could excite resonances outside the bandwidth of the alignment control system. The combined active alignment and vibration isolation functions must be performed by flight-weight components, which may have to operate in vacuum. A testbed system developed for the Air Force Airborne Laser program is described. The payload, a full-scale 1650-lb simulated bench, is mounted in six degrees- of-freedom to a vibrating platform by a set of isolator- actuators. The mounts utilize a combination of pneumatics and magnetics to perform the dual functions of low-frequency alignment and high-frequency isolation. Test results are given and future directions for development are described.

  1. Model identification of stomatognathic muscle system activity during mastication

    PubMed Central

    Kijak, Edward; Margielewicz, Jerzy; Lietz-Kijak, Danuta; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, Katarzyna; Kucharzewski, Marek; Śliwiński, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the numeric projection of the function of the mandible and muscle system during mastication. An experimental study was conducted on a healthy 47 year-old subject. On clinical examination no functional disorders were observed. To evaluate the activity of mastication during muscle functioning, bread cubes and hazelnuts were selected (2 cm2 and 1.2/1.3 cm in diameter, respectively) for condyloid processing. An assessment of the activity of mastication during muscle functioning was determined on the basis of numeric calculations conducted with a novel software programme, Kinematics 3D, designed specifically for this study. The efficacy of the model was verified by ensuring the experimentally recorded trajectories were concordant with those calculated numerically. Experimental measurements of the characteristic points of the mandible trajectory were recorded six times. Using the configuration coordinates that were calculated, the dominant componential harmonics of the amplitude-frequency spectrum were identified. The average value of the dominant frequency during mastication of the bread cubes was ~1.16±0.06 Hz, whereas in the case of the hazelnut, this value was nearly two-fold higher at 1.84±0.07 Hz. The most asymmetrical action during mastication was demonstrated to be carried out by the lateral pterygoid muscles, provided that their functioning was not influenced by food consistency. The consistency of the food products had a decisive impact on the frequency of mastication and the number of cycles necessary to grind the food. Model tests on the function of the masticatory organ serve as effective tools since they provide qualitative and quantitative novel information on the functioning of the human masticatory organ. PMID:28123482

  2. Model identification of stomatognathic muscle system activity during mastication.

    PubMed

    Kijak, Edward; Margielewicz, Jerzy; Lietz-Kijak, Danuta; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, Katarzyna; Kucharzewski, Marek; Śliwiński, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the numeric projection of the function of the mandible and muscle system during mastication. An experimental study was conducted on a healthy 47 year-old subject. On clinical examination no functional disorders were observed. To evaluate the activity of mastication during muscle functioning, bread cubes and hazelnuts were selected (2 cm(2) and 1.2/1.3 cm in diameter, respectively) for condyloid processing. An assessment of the activity of mastication during muscle functioning was determined on the basis of numeric calculations conducted with a novel software programme, Kinematics 3D, designed specifically for this study. The efficacy of the model was verified by ensuring the experimentally recorded trajectories were concordant with those calculated numerically. Experimental measurements of the characteristic points of the mandible trajectory were recorded six times. Using the configuration coordinates that were calculated, the dominant componential harmonics of the amplitude-frequency spectrum were identified. The average value of the dominant frequency during mastication of the bread cubes was ~1.16±0.06 Hz, whereas in the case of the hazelnut, this value was nearly two-fold higher at 1.84±0.07 Hz. The most asymmetrical action during mastication was demonstrated to be carried out by the lateral pterygoid muscles, provided that their functioning was not influenced by food consistency. The consistency of the food products had a decisive impact on the frequency of mastication and the number of cycles necessary to grind the food. Model tests on the function of the masticatory organ serve as effective tools since they provide qualitative and quantitative novel information on the functioning of the human masticatory organ.

  3. Immune System Activation and Depression: Roles of Serotonin in the Central Nervous System and Periphery.

    PubMed

    Robson, Matthew J; Quinlan, Meagan A; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-04-03

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has long been recognized as a key contributor to the regulation of mood and anxiety and is strongly associated with the etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although more known for its roles within the central nervous system (CNS), 5-HT is recognized to modulate several key aspects of immune system function that may contribute to the development of MDD. Copious amounts of research have outlined a connection between alterations in immune system function, inflammation status, and MDD. Supporting this connection, peripheral immune activation results in changes in the function and/or expression of many components of 5-HT signaling that are associated with depressive-like phenotypes. How 5-HT is utilized by the immune system to effect CNS function and ultimately behaviors related to depression is still not well understood. This Review summarizes the evidence that immune system alterations related to depression affect CNS 5-HT signaling that can alter MDD-relevant behaviors and that 5-HT regulates immune system signaling within the CNS and periphery. We suggest that targeting the interrelationships between immune and 5-HT signaling may provide more effective treatments for subsets of those suffering from inflammation-associated MDD.

  4. Vehicle Systems Engineering and Integration Activities - Phase 5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-31

    A Modular Open Systems Approach to Acquisition Version 2, Open Systems Joint Task Force, http://www.acq.osd.mil/osjtf/pmguide.html, 2004...System (MTRS) PoR. The acquisition agent for the MTRS PoR is the Robotic System Joint Program Office (RS-JPO), under the TACOM Program Executive...Systems Approach to Acquisition Version 2, Open Systems Joint Task Force, http://www.acq.osd.mil/osjtf/pmguide.html, 2004). Systems engineering

  5. Electronic security systems and active implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Irnich, Werner

    2002-08-01

    How do active implantable medical devices react in the presence of strong magnetic fields in the frequency range between extremely low frequency (ELF) to radiofrequency (RF) as they are emitted by electronic security systems (ESS)? There are three different sorts of ESSs: electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices, metal detector (MDS) devices, and radiofrequency identification (RFID) systems. Common to all is the production of magnetic fields. There is an abundance of literature concerning interference by ESS gates with respect to if there is an influence possible and if such an influence can bear a risk for the AIMD wearers. However, there has been no attempt to study the physical mechanism nor to develop a model of how and under which conditions magnetic fields can influence pacemakers and defibrillators and how they could be disarmed by technological means. It is too often assumed that interference of AIMD with ESS is inevitable. Exogenous signals of similar intensity and rhythm to heart signals can be misinterpreted and, thus, confuse the implant. Important for the interference coupling mechanism is the differentiation between a "unipolar" and a "bipolar" system. With respect to magnetic fields, the left side implanted pacemaker is the most unfavorable case as the lead forms approximately a semicircular area of maximum 225 cm2 into which a voltage can be induced. This assumption yields an interference coupling model that can be expressed by simple mathematics. The worst-case conditions for induced interference voltages are a coupling area of 225 cm2 that is representative for a large human, a homogeneous magnetic field perpendicular to the area formed by the lead, and a unipolar ventricular pacemaker system that is implanted on the left side of the thorax and has the highest interference sensitivity. In bipolar systems the fields must be 17 times larger when compared to a unipolar system to have the same effect. The magnetic field for interfering with ICDs

  6. Assessing physical activity during youth sport: the Observational System for Recording Activity in Children: Youth Sports.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alysia; McDonald, Samantha; McIver, Kerry; Pate, Russell; Trost, Stewart

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and interrater reliability of the Observational System for Recording Activity in Children: Youth Sports (OSRAC:YS). Children (N = 29) participating in a parks and recreation soccer program were observed during regularly scheduled practices. Physical activity (PA) intensity and contextual factors were recorded by momentary time-sampling procedures (10-second observe, 20-second record). Two observers simultaneously observed and recorded children's PA intensity, practice context, social context, coach behavior, and coach proximity. Interrater reliability was based on agreement (Kappa) between the observer's coding for each category, and the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for percent of time spent in MVPA. Validity was assessed by calculating the correlation between OSRAC:YS estimated and objectively measured MVPA. Kappa statistics for each category demonstrated substantial to almost perfect interobserver agreement (Kappa = 0.67-0.93). The ICC for percent time in MVPA was 0.76 (95% C.I. = 0.49-0.90). A significant correlation (r = .73) was observed for MVPA recorded by observation and MVPA measured via accelerometry. The results indicate the OSRAC:YS is a reliable and valid tool for measuring children's PA and contextual factors during a youth soccer practice.

  7. An active attitude control system for a drag sail satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn, Willem Herman; Jordaan, Hendrik Willem

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the development and simulation results of a full ADCS subsystem for the deOrbitSail drag sail mission. The deOrbitSail satellite was developed as part of an European FP7 collaboration research project. The satellite was launched and commissioning started on 10th July 2015. Various new actuators and sensors designed for this mission will be presented. The deOrbitSail satellite is a 3U CubeSat to deploy a 4 by 4 m drag sail from an initial 650 km circular polar low earth orbit. With an active attitude control system it will be shown that by maximising the drag force, the expected de-orbiting period from the initial altitude will be less than 50 days. A future application of this technology will be the use of small drag sails as low-cost devices to de-orbit LEO satellites, when they have reached their end of life, without having to use expensive propulsion systems. Simulation and Hardware-in-Loop experiments proved the feasibility of the proposed attitude control system. A magnetic-only control approach using a Y-Thomson spin, is used to detumble the 3U Cubesat with stowed sail and subsequently to 3-axis stabilise the satellite to be ready for the final deployment phase. Minituarised torquer rods, a nano-sized momentum wheel, attitude sensor hardware (magnetometer, sun, earth) developed for this phase will be presented. The final phase will be to deploy and 3-axis stabilise the drag sail normal to the satellite's velocity vector, using a combined Y-momentum wheel and magnetic controller. The design and performance improvements when using a 2-axis translation stage to adjust the sail centre-of-pressure to satellite centre-of-mass offset, will also be discussed, although for launch risk reasons this stage was not included in the final flight configuration. To accurately determine the drag sail's attitude during the sunlit part of the orbit, an accurate wide field of view dual sensor to measure both the sun and nadir vector direction was developed for

  8. Digital active control law synthesis for aeroservoelastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivekananda

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a formulation for synthesis of digital active control laws for aeroservoelastic systems, which are typically modeled by large order equations in order to accurately represent the rigid and flexible body modes, unsteady aerodynamic forces, actuator dynamics, and gust spectra. The control law is expected to satisfy multiple design requirements on the dynamic loads, responses, actuator deflection and rate limitations, as well as maintain certain stability margins, yet should be simple enough to be implemented by an onboard digital microprocessor. The synthesis procedure minimizes a linear quadratic Gaussian type cost function, by updating selected free parameters of the control law, while satisfying a set of inequality constraints on the design loads, responses and stability margins. A stable classical control law or an estimator based full or reduced order control law can be used as an initial design starting point. The gradients of the cost function and the constraints, with respect to the digital control law design variables are derived analytically, to facilitate rapid convergence. Selected design responses can be treated as constraints instead of lumping them into the cost function, in order to satisfy individual root-mean-square load and response limitations. Constraints are also imposed on the minimum singular value requirements for stability robustness improvement.

  9. Structural integrity evaluation of high activity moderator system evaporator

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.

    1994-05-01

    The High Activity Moderator (HAM) system is wanted in a batch mode in which the evaporator tank is filled with 70{degrees}F cold moderator (D{sub 2}O) every 4 hours. This operation induces thermal shock to the wall of the tank. Thermal and structural analyses are performed to evaluate the impact of this thermal shock on the 220{degrees}F hot evaporator tank walls. Conservative thermal models are analyzed. Case 1 analyzes a 4 in. wide strip of D{sub 2}O running down the tank walls during the filling process and Case 2 analyzes the tank being filled instantly with 70{degrees}F D{sub 2}O. It is found that Case 1 results in larger temperature gradients are then input into the structural model for calculating the thermal stresses. The structural analysis shows that the maximum stress intensity due to combined pressure and thermal loading is about 17240 psi which is well below the yield stress (21000 psi) of the evaporator tank wall material, stainless steel 304L. The fatigue life is evaluated in accordance with the criteria given in ASME Code, Section VIII. It is found that at the stress level of 17240 psi plus any residual stresses that might be present at the welded attachments to the tank wall, the fatigue life is about 4{times}10{sup 6} cycles. If the evaporator tank is filled every 4 hours, the tank fatigue life is well above the anticipated batch operation period of 2 years.

  10. Toward high-dynamic active mirrors for LGS refocusing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Vives, Sébastien; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Cuby, Jean Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    In the frame of the E-ELT-EAGLE instrument phase A studies, we designed a convex VCM able to compensate for the focus variation on the Laser Guide Star (LGS) wavefront sensor, due to the elevation of the telescope and the fixed sodium layer altitude. We present an original optical design including this active convex mirror, providing a large sag variation on a spherical surface with a 120mm clear aperture, with an optical quality better than lambda/5 RMS up to 820μm of sag and better than lambda/4 RMS up to 1000μm of sag. Finite element analysis (FEA) allowed an optimisation of the mirror's variable thickness distribution to compensate for geometrical and material non linearity. Preliminary study of the pre-stressing has also been performed by FEA, showing that a permanent deformation remains after removal of the loads. Results and comparison with the FEA are presented in the article of F.Madec et al (AS10-7736-119, this conference), with an emphasis on the system approach.

  11. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication.

  12. Development of a Practical Broadband Active Vibration Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Perey, Daniel F.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop robust, lightweight, and low-power control units that can be used to suppress structural vibration in flexible aerospace structures. In particular, this paper focuses on active damping, which is implemented using compact decentralized control units distributed over the structure. Each control unit consists of a diamond-shaped piezoelectric patch actuator, three miniature accelerometers, and analog electronics. The responses from the accelerometers are added together and then integrated to give a signal proportional to velocity. The signal is then inverted, amplified, and applied to the actuator, which generates a control force that is out of phase with the measured velocity. This paper describes the development of the control system, including a detailed description of the control and power electronics. The paper also presents experimental results acquired on a Plexiglas window blank. Five identical control units installed around the perimeter of the window achieved 10 dB peak reductions and a 2.4 dB integrated reduction of the spatially averaged velocity of the window between 500 and 3000 Hz.

  13. Active vision in marmosets: a model system for visual neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jude F; Reynolds, John H; Miller, Cory T

    2014-01-22

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a small-bodied New World primate, offers several advantages to complement vision research in larger primates. Studies in the anesthetized marmoset have detailed the anatomy and physiology of their visual system (Rosa et al., 2009) while studies of auditory and vocal processing have established their utility for awake and behaving neurophysiological investigations (Lu et al., 2001a,b; Eliades and Wang, 2008a,b; Osmanski and Wang, 2011; Remington et al., 2012). However, a critical unknown is whether marmosets can perform visual tasks under head restraint. This has been essential for studies in macaques, enabling both accurate eye tracking and head stabilization for neurophysiology. In one set of experiments we compared the free viewing behavior of head-fixed marmosets to that of macaques, and found that their saccadic behavior is comparable across a number of saccade metrics and that saccades target similar regions of interest including faces. In a second set of experiments we applied behavioral conditioning techniques to determine whether the marmoset could control fixation for liquid reward. Two marmosets could fixate a central point and ignore peripheral flashing stimuli, as needed for receptive field mapping. Both marmosets also performed an orientation discrimination task, exhibiting a saturating psychometric function with reliable performance and shorter reaction times for easier discriminations. These data suggest that the marmoset is a viable model for studies of active vision and its underlying neural mechanisms.

  14. Source characterization of nervous system active pharmaceutical ingredients in healthcare wastewaters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nervous system active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including anti-depressants and opioids, are important clinically administered pharmaceuticals within healthcare facilities. Concentrations and mass loadings of ten nervous system APIs and three nervous system API metaboli...

  15. The Influence of Climate Change in Active Convergent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarselli, S.; Simpson, G. H.; Allen, P. A.; Minelli, G.

    2006-12-01

    The link between tectonics, surface erosion, and climate in the evolution of mountain belts has been observed in several natural systems (Sinclair & Allen, 1992; Norris & Cooper, 1997; Pavlis et al., 1997; Willett et al., 2006) and numerous theoretical and applied studies have been carried out in the last several years ( Willett et al., 2002; Simpson, 2004 a, c). This relation is particularly sensitive in active convergent orogenic wedges where the efficiency of surface mass transport and climatic change controls the spatial distribution of deformation and sedimentation and degree of crustal thickening (Beaumont et al., 1992; Willett, 1999; Simpson, 2006). This study focus on the effect of climatic changes, leading to palaeogeographic changes, in an active convergent system. In particular, the effects produced by relative sea-level changes and efficiency of the erosional processes have been tested using a two dimensional mechanical model (Simpson, 2006). The model is suited to study deformation, erosion and sedimentation in fold-thrust belts and foreland basins. Two effects of the relative sea-level changes, and in particular in the case of the relative sea-level drop occurring during deformation, can be potentially important for the mechanical behavior of the surrounding crust. Firstly, gravitational water loads above the deforming rocks could be decreased. Secondly, the replacement of submarine with subaerial conditions could probably increase erosion rates, especially within the river system. Both effects would tend to amplify local deformation rates leading to a major pulse of deformation (Simpson, 2006) and to the formation of complex three dimensional deformation patterns (Simpson, 2004). Finally, this model has been used to evaluate the effect of the Messinian salinity crisis in the Mediterranean basin and in particular in the Northern Apennines evolution (Italy). References: Beaumont, C.; Fullsack, P. & Hamilton J., (1992). In: Thrust Tectonics (Ed by K

  16. System identification and control of the JPL active structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Lurie, B. J.; O'Brien, J. F.; Chu, C.-C.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent advances in structural quieting technology as applied to active truss structures intended for high precision space based optics applications. Collocated active damping control loops are designed in order to impedance match piezoelectric active members to the structure. Noncollocated control loops are also studied in relation to controlling lightly damped structures.

  17. Teacher's Psycho-Diagnostic Activities in School Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minakhmetova, Albina Z.; Pyanova, Ekaterina N.; Akhmetshina, Enze M.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem stated in the article stems from the fact that in modern conditions the study of the psycho-diagnostic component of the teacher's activities is relevant in practical terms, since the functions of these activities affect the efficiency of pedagogical activity and the educational process itself, including the effectiveness…

  18. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  19. Selection of active elements in system reduction of vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, K.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents non-classical method of design of mechatronic systems. The purpose of this paper is also introduces synthesis of mechatronic system understand as design of mechatronic systems. The synthesis may be applied to modify the already existing systems in order to achieve a desired result. The system was consisted from mechanical and electrical elements. Electrical elements were used as subsystem reducing unwanted vibration of mechanical system. Electrical elements can be realized in the form of coils with movable core. The system was modelled in Matlab Simulink.

  20. Tsunamigenic potential of Mediterranean fault systems and active subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, Patrizio; Babeyko, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Since the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System (NEAMTWS) is under development by the European scientific community, it becomes necessary to define guidelines for the characterization of the numerous parameters must be taken into account in a fair assessment of the risk. Definition of possible tectonic sources and evaluation of their potential is one of the principal issues. In this study we systematically evaluate tsunamigenic potential of up-to-now known real fault systems and active subduction interfaces in the NEAMTWS region. The task is accomplished by means of numerical modeling of tsunami generation and propagation. We have simulated all possible uniform-slip ruptures populating fault and subduction interfaces with magnitudes ranging from 6.5 up to expected Mmax. A total of 15810 individual ruptures were processed. For each rupture, a tsunami propagation scenario was computed in linear shallow-water approximation on 1-arc minute bathymetric grid (Gebco_08) implying normal reflection boundary conditions. Maximum wave heights at coastal positions (totally - 23236 points of interest) were recorded for four hours of simulation and then classified according to currently adopted warning level thresholds. The resulting dataset allowed us to classify the sources in terms of their tsunamigenic potential as well as to estimate their minimum tsunamigenic magnitude. Our analysis shows that almost every source in the Mediterranean Sea is capable to produce local tsunami at the advisory level (i.e., wave height > 20 cm) starting from magnitude values of Mw=6.6. In respect to the watch level (wave height > 50 cm), the picture is less homogeneous: crustal sources in south-west Mediterranean as well as East-Hellenic arc need larger magnitudes (around Mw=7.0) to trigger watch levels even at the nearby coasts. In the context of the regional warning (i.e., source-to-coast distance > 100 km) faults also behave more heterogeneously in respect to the minimum

  1. Physical activity promotion in the health care system.

    PubMed

    Vuori, Ilkka M; Lavie, Carl J; Blair, Steven N

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET) have great potential in the prevention, management, and rehabilitation of a variety of diseases, but this potential has not been fully realized in clinical practice. The health care system (HCS) could do much more to support patients in increasing their PA and ET. However, counseling on ET is not used widely by the HCS owing partly to attitudes but mainly to practical obstacles. Extensive searches of MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and ScienceDirect for literature published between January 1, 2000, and January 31, 2013, provided data to assess the critical characteristics of ET counseling. The evidence reveals that especially brief ET counseling is an efficient, effective, and cost-effective means to increase PA and ET and to bring considerable clinical benefits to various patient groups. Furthermore, it can be practiced as part of the routine work of the HCS. However, there is a need and feasible means to increase the use and improve the quality of ET counseling. To include PA and ET promotion as important means of comprehensive health care and disease management, a fundamental change is needed. Because exercise is medicine, it should be seen and dealt with in the same ways as pharmaceuticals and other medical interventions regarding the basic and continuing education and training of health care personnel and processes to assess its needs and to prescribe and deliver it, to reimburse the services related to it, and to fund research on its efficacy, effectiveness, feasibility, and interactions and comparability with other preventive, therapeutic, and rehabilitative modalities. This change requires credible, strong, and skillful advocacy inside the medical community and the HCS.

  2. Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System on Parabolic Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenbo; Pletser, Vladimir; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System (MAIS) aims at reducing on-orbit vibrations, providing a better controlled lower gravity environment for microgravity physical science experiments. The MAIS will be launched on Tianzhou-1, the first cargo ship of the China Manned Space Program. The principle of the MAIS is to suspend with electro-magnetic actuators a scientific payload, isolating it from the vibrating stator. The MAIS's vibration isolation capability is frequency-dependent and a decrease of vibration of about 40dB can be attained. The MAIS can accommodate 20kg of scientific payload or sample unit, and provide 30W of power and 1Mbps of data transmission. The MAIS is developed to support microgravity scientific experiments on manned platforms in low earth orbit, in order to meet the scientific requirements for fluid physics, materials science, and fundamental physics investigations, which usually need a very quiet environment, increasing their chances of success and their scientific outcomes. The results of scientific experiments and technology tests obtained with the MAIS will be used to improve future space based research. As the suspension force acting on the payload is very small, the MAIS can only be operative and tested in a weightless environment. The 'Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.' (DLR, German Aerospace Centre) granted a flight opportunity to the MAIS experiment to be tested during its 27th parabolic flight campaign of September 2015 performed on the A310 ZERO-G aircraft managed by the French company Novespace, a subsidiary of the 'Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales' (CNES, French Space Agency). The experiment results confirmed that the 6 degrees of freedom motion control technique was effective, and that the vibration isolation performance fulfilled perfectly the expectations based on theoretical analyses and simulations. This paper will present the design of the MAIS and the experiment results obtained during the

  3. Microbial Community Dynamics and Activity Link to Indigo Production from Indole in Bioaugmented Activated Sludge Systems

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qin, Yujia; Zhou, Jiti; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the popular dyestuff indigo from indole has been comprehensively studied using pure cultures, but less has been done to characterize the indigo production by microbial communities. In our previous studies, a wild strain Comamonas sp. MQ was isolated from activated sludge and the recombinant Escherichia coli nagAc carrying the naphthalene dioxygenase gene (nag) from strain MQ was constructed, both of which were capable of producing indigo from indole. Herein, three activated sludge systems, G1 (non-augmented control), G2 (augmented with Comamonas sp. MQ), and G3 (augmented with recombinant E. coli nagAc), were constructed to investigate indigo production. After 132-day operation, G3 produced the highest yields of indigo (99.5 ± 3.0 mg/l), followed by G2 (27.3 ± 1.3 mg/l) and G1 (19.2 ± 1.2 mg/l). The microbial community dynamics and activities associated with indigo production were analyzed by Illumina Miseq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The inoculated strain MQ survived for at least 30 days, whereas E. coli nagAc was undetectable shortly after inoculation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis suggested the abundance of naphthalene dioxygenase gene (nagAc) from both inoculated strains was strongly correlated with indigo yields in early stages (0–30 days) (P < 0.001) but not in later stages (30–132 days) (P > 0.10) of operation. Based on detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity test results, the communities underwent a noticeable shift during the operation. Among the four major genera (> 1% on average), the commonly reported indigo-producing populations Comamonas and Pseudomonas showed no positive relationship with indigo yields (P > 0.05) based on Pearson correlation test, while Alcaligenes and Aquamicrobium, rarely reported for indigo production, were positively correlated with indigo yields (P < 0.05). This study should provide new insights into our understanding of indigo bio-production by microbial communities

  4. Injury causation in the great outdoors: A systems analysis of led outdoor activity injury incidents.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Paul M; Goode, Natassia; Lenné, Michael G; Finch, Caroline F; Cassell, Erin

    2014-02-01

    Despite calls for a systems approach to assessing and preventing injurious incidents within the led outdoor activity domain, applications of systems analysis frameworks to the analysis of incident data have been sparse. This article presents an analysis of 1014 led outdoor activity injury and near miss incidents whereby a systems-based risk management framework was used to classify the contributing factors involved across six levels of the led outdoor activity 'system'. The analysis identified causal factors across all levels of the led outdoor activity system, demonstrating the framework's utility for accident analysis efforts in the led outdoor activity injury domain. In addition, issues associated with the current data collection framework that potentially limited the identification of contributing factors outside of the individuals, equipment, and environment involved were identified. In closing, the requirement for new and improved data systems to be underpinned by the systems philosophy and new models of led outdoor activity accident causation is discussed.

  5. Development and Testing of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children: Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIver, Kerry L.; Brown, William H.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the development and pilot testing of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity-Elementary School (OSRAC-E) Version. Method: This system was developed to observe and document the levels and types of physical activity and physical and social contexts of physical activity in elementary school students…

  6. The Systemic-Structural Theory of Activity: Applications to the Study of Human Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedny, Gregory Z.; Harris, Steven Robert

    2005-01-01

    This article offers an introduction to the central concepts and principles of the Systemic-Structural Theory of Activity (SSTA), an activity-theoretical approach specifically tailored to the analysis and design of human work. In activity theory, cognition is understood both as a process and as a structured system of actions. Building on the…

  7. a Hybrid-Type Active Vibration Isolation System Using Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, K. G.; Pahk, H. J.; Jung, M. Y.; Cho, D. W.

    1996-05-01

    Vibration isolation of mechanical systems is achieved through either passive or active vibration control systems. Although a passive vibration isolation system offers simple and reliable means to protect mechanical systems from a vibration environment, it has inherent performance limitations, that is, its controllable frequency range is limited and the shape of its transmissibility does not change. Recently, in some applications, such as active suspensions or precise vibration systems, active vibration isolation systems have been employed to overcome the limitations of the passive systems. In this paper, a hybrid-type active vibration isolation system that uses electromagnetic and pneumatic force is developed, and a new control algorithm adopting neural networks is proposed. The characteristics of the hybrid system proposed in the paper were investigated via computer simulation and experiments. It was shown that the transmissibility of the vibration isolation system could be kept below 0.63 over the entire frequency range, including the resonance frequency.

  8. New gastroprotective labdeneamides from (4S,9R,10R) methyl 18-carboxy-labda-8,13(E)-diene-15-oate.

    PubMed

    Olate, Verónica Rachel; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Theoduloz, Cristina; Yesilada, Erdem; Monsalve, Francisco; González, Paulo; Droguett, Daniel; Richomme, Pascal; Hadi, A Hamid; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2012-03-01

    Starting from the diterpene (4S,9R,10R) methyl 18-carboxy-labda-8,13(E)-dien-15-oate (PMD) and its 8(9)-en isomer [PMD 8(9)-en], 11 amides were prepared and assessed for a gastroprotective effect in the ethanol/HCl-induced gastric lesions model in mice. Basal cytotoxicity of the compounds was determined on the following human cell lines: normal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5), gastric epithelial adenocarcinoma (AGS), and hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep G2). All compounds are described for the first time. At the single oral dose of 0.1 mg/kg, compounds 1, 10, and 11 presented a strong gastroprotective effect, at least comparable with that of the reference compound lansoprazole at 1 mg/kg, reducing gastric lesions by 76.7, 67.7, and 77.2 %, respectively. The leucyl amide methyl ester 3, tryptophanyl amide methyl ester 5, and benzyl amide 6 of PMD presented a selective basal cytotoxicity on Hep G2 cells with IC₅₀ values of 136.8, 105.3, and 94.2 µM, respectively, while the IC₅₀ values towards AGS cells were 439.5, 928.0, and 937.3 µM, respectively. The three compounds did not affect fibroblast viability with IC₅₀ values > 1000 µM. Compounds 7, 8, 10, and 11 showed no toxic effect against the three selected cell lines.

  9. EURAMET.M.P-S9 / EURAMET 1170, LOOP2. Comparison in the negative gauge pressure range -950 to 0 hPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otal, P.; Boineau, F.; Medina, N.; Pražák, D.; Wüthrich, C.; Saxholm, S.; Sabuga, W.; Kocas, I.; Durgut, Y.

    2017-01-01

    This report gives the results of a comparison of pressure standards of seven European National Metrology institutes in the range of negative gauge pressure from -950 hPa to 0 hPa. This comparison was piloted by LNE and was carried out from January 2011 to March 2012. This work is a part of the EURAMET project 1170 and is registered as a supplementary comparison EURAMET.M.P-S9. The transfer standard used was a pressure monitor RPM4 A160Ks manufactured by DH Instruments Inc., with a resolution of 0.1 Pa. The reference values have been determined from the weighted mean of the deviations reported by the participants for each specified pressure. Seventy-three of the seventy-seven values (96%) reported by the laboratories agree with the reference values within the expanded uncertainties with a coverage factor k = 2. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Continued Development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) System for Advanced Extravehicular Activity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer; Jeng, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Development activities related to the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Humidity control system have progressed to the point of integrating the RCA into an advanced Primary Life Support System (PLSS 2.0) to evaluate the interaction of the RCA among other PLSS components in a ground test environment. The RCA 2.0 assembly (integrated into PLSS 2.0) consists of a valve assembly with commercial actuator motor, a sorbent canister, and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based process node controller. Continued design and development activities for RCA 3.0 have been aimed at optimizing the canister size and incorporating greater fidelity in the valve actuator motor and valve position feedback design. Further, the RCA process node controller is envisioned to incorporate a higher degree of functionality to support a distributed PLSS control architecture. This paper will describe the progression of technology readiness levels of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 along with a review of the design and manufacturing successes and challenges for 2.0 and 3.0 units. The anticipated interfaces and interactions with the PLSS 2.0/2.5/3.0 assemblies will also be discussed.

  11. From Concept-to-Flight: An Active Active Fluid Loop Based Thermal Control System for Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gajanana C.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bame, David; Karlmann, Paul; Mastropietro, A. J.; Liu, Yuanming; Miller, Jennifer; Pauken, Michael; Lyra, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, which was launched on November 26, 2011, incorporates a novel active thermal control system to keep the sensitive electronics and science instruments at safe operating and survival temperatures. While the diurnal temperature variations on the Mars surface range from -120 C to +30 C, the sensitive equipment are kept within -40 C to +50 C. The active thermal control system is based on a single-phase mechanically pumped fluid loop (MPFL) system which removes or recovers excess waste heat and manages it to maintain the sensitive equipment inside the rover at safe temperatures. This paper will describe the entire process of developing this active thermal control system for the MSL rover from concept to flight implementation. The development of the rover thermal control system during its architecture, design, fabrication, integration, testing, and launch is described.

  12. Midazolam microdose to determine systemic and pre-systemic metabolic CYP3A activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Nicolas; Kocheise, Franziska; Carls, Alexandra; Burhenne, Jürgen; Haefeli, Walter E; Mikus, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Aim We aimed to establish a method to assess systemic and pre-systemic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A activity using ineffective microgram doses of midazolam. Methods In an open, one sequence, crossover study, 16 healthy participants received intravenous and oral midazolam at microgram (0.001 mg intravenous and 0.003 mg oral) and regular milligram (1 mg intravenous and 3 mg oral) doses to assess the linearity of plasma and urine pharmacokinetics. Results Dose-normalized AUC and Cmax were 37.1 ng ml−1 h [95% CI 35.5, 40.6] and 39.1 ng ml−1 [95% CI 30.4, 50.2] for the microdose and 39.0 ng ml−1 h [95% CI 36.1, 42.1] and 37.1 ng ml−1 [95% CI 26.9, 51.3] for the milligram dose. CLmet was 253 ml min−1 [95% CI 201, 318] vs. 278 ml min−1 [95% CI 248, 311] for intravenous doses and 1880 ml min−1 [95% CI 1590, 2230] vs. 2050 ml min−1 [95% CI 1720, 2450] for oral doses. Oral bioavailability of a midazolam microdose was 23.4% [95% CI 20.0, 27.3] vs. 20.9% [95% CI 17.1, 25.5] after the regular dose. Hepatic and gut extraction ratios for microgram doses were 0.44 [95% CI 0.39, 0.49] and 0.53 [95% CI 0.45, 0.63] and compared well with those for milligram doses (0.43 [95% CI 0.37, 0.49] and 0.61 [95% CI 0.53, 0.70]). Conclusion The pharmacokinetics of an intravenous midazolam microdose is linear to the applied regular doses and can be used to assess safely systemic CYP3A activity and, in combination with oral microdoses, pre-systemic CYP3A activity. PMID:25588320

  13. Effect of Knowledge Integration Activities on Students' Perception of the Earth's Crust as a Cyclic System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kali, Yael; Orion, Nir; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2003-01-01

    Characterizes students' understanding of the rock cycle system. Examines effects of a knowledge integration activity on their system thinking. Interprets answers to an open-ended test using a systems thinking continuum ranging from a completely static view of the system to an understanding of the system's cyclic nature. Reports meaningful…

  14. 77 FR 52317 - Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active Sonar

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active... Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) sonar systems with certain...

  15. Teaching Tip: Using Activity Diagrams to Model Systems Analysis Techniques: Teaching What We Preach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lending, Diane; May, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Activity diagrams are used in Systems Analysis and Design classes as a visual tool to model the business processes of "as-is" and "to-be" systems. This paper presents the idea of using these same activity diagrams in the classroom to model the actual processes (practices and techniques) of Systems Analysis and Design. This tip…

  16. Design and Implementation of an Object Oriented Learning Activity System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Huan-Yu; Tseng, Shian-Shyong; Weng, Jui-Feng; Su, Jun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    With the development of e-learning technology, many specifications of instructional design have been proposed to make learning activity sharable and reusable. With the specifications and sufficient learning resources, the researches further focus on how to provide learners more appropriate learning activities to improve their learning performance.…

  17. Geomorphological analysis of the drainage system on the active convergent system in Azerbaijan, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaveh Firouz, Amaneh; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Giachetta, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    are related to active fault systems.

  18. Control system of a dispersed fringe type sensing system of active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yajun; Zhang, Zhenchao; Zhang, Yong

    2010-07-01

    Active optics plays an important part in segmented mirrors of astronomy telescopes. A dispersed fringe sensor(DFS) using a broadband point source is an efficient method for cophasing and is also highly automated and robust. DFS can estimate the piston between segments only through the spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion and therefore can replace the edge sensors. So we build an system in our lab to experiment the DFS method. The whole control system of DFS is put forward, including control of displacement actuators and control of shifting the optical fiber. Control of displacement actuators consists in industry computer, HY-6120 I/O card, six stepper motor and other parts. Some theoretical analysis and experiment tests reveal that the actuator could be controlled to 5nm and without backlash by this control strategy. The optical fiber could be shifted out of optical path or shifted in part or whole of optical path so that the spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion could alter. When six actuators are moving, the piston is changing, and the spectrum is also moving and altering. And the whole control of DFS system is constructed now and seems well. Further test and experiment will be carry out.

  19. Building Better Buildings: Sustainable Building Activities in California Higher Education Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowell, Arnold; Eichel, Amanda; Alevantis, Leon; Lovegreen, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    This article outlines the activities and recommendations of California's sustainable building task force, discusses sustainable building activities in California's higher education systems, and highlights key issues that California is grappling with in its implementation of sustainable building practices. (EV)

  20. MSFC Skylab airlock module, volume 2. [systems design and performance, systems support activity, and reliability and safety programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    System design and performance of the Skylab Airlock Module and Payload Shroud are presented for the communication and caution and warning systems. Crew station and storage, crew trainers, experiments, ground support equipment, and system support activities are also reviewed. Other areas documented include the reliability and safety programs, test philosophy, engineering project management, and mission operations support.

  1. An activity systemic approach to augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Hedvall, Per-Olof; Rydeman, Bitte

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and highlight how Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) can contribute to the understanding of the different factors at play when a person is using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). It is based on data from a 3-year project concerning activity-based vocabulary design of voice output communication aids (VOCAs). Four persons who used AAC and their assistants were interviewed about shopping activities and their views about a vocabulary that included pre-stored phrases. A CHAT model, the Activity Diamond, was applied in an analysis of the data. The result was a multiplicity of human, artifactual, and natural factors, in which six themes were identified: Attitude/Preference, Expectation/Trust, Goal/Power, Place/Space, Time/Learning, and Usability/Accessibility. The themes are exemplified and discussed in relation to AAC.

  2. System and method for collisional activation of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Belov, Mikhail E; Prior, David C

    2013-09-24

    A collision cell is disclosed that provides ion activation in various selective modes. Ion activation is performed inside selected segments of a segmented quadrupole that provides maximum optimum capture and collection of fragmentation products. The invention provides collisional cooling of precursor ions as well as product fragments and further allows effective transmission of ions through a high pressure interface into a coupled mass analysis instrument.

  3. NIRS-based neurofeedback learning systems for controlling activity of the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Sakatani, Kaoru; Takemoto, N; Tsujii, T; Yanagisawa, K; Tsunashima, H

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a NIRS-based neurofeedback system to modulate activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). We evaluated the effectiveness of the system in terms of separability of changes in oxy-Hb and its derivative. Training with neurofeedback resulted in higher separability than training without neurofeedback or no training, suggesting that the neurofeedback system could enhance self-control of PFC activity. Interestingly, the dorsolateral PFC exhibited enhanced activity and high separability after neurofeedback training. These observations suggest that the neurofeedback system might be useful for training subjects to regulate emotions by self-control of dorsolateral PFC activity.

  4. Built-in active sensing diagnostic system for civil infrastructure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2001-07-01

    A reliable, robust monitoring system can improve the maintenance of and provide safety protection for civil structures and therefore prolong their service lives. A built-in, active sensing diagnostic technique for civil structures has been under investigation. In this technique, piezoelectric materials are used as sensors/actuators to receive and generate signals. The transducers are embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) beams and are designed to detect damage, particularly debonding damage between the reinforcing bars and concrete. This paper presents preliminary results from a feasibility study of the technology. Laboratory experiments performed on RC beams, with piezo-electric sensors and actuators mounted on reinforced steel bars, have clearly demonstrated that the proposed technique could detect debonding damage. Analytical work, using a special purpose finite-element software, PZFlex, was also conducted to interpret the relationship between the measured data and actual debonding damage. Effectiveness of the proposed technique for detecting debonding damage in civil structures has been demonstrated.

  5. Usability Engineering: Domain Analysis Activities for Augmented Reality Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses our usability engineering process for the Battlefield Augmented Reality System (BARS). Usability engineering is a structured...management principals and techniques, formal and semiformal evaluation techniques, and computerized tools. BARS is an outdoor augmented reality system...originally developed the process in the context of virtual reality applications, but in this work we are adapting the procedures to an augmented

  6. Towards Next Generation Activity-Based Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G.; Karampiperis, Pythagoras

    2006-01-01

    The need for e-learning systems that support a diverse set of pedagogical requirements has been identified as an important issue in web-based education. Until now, significant research and development effort has been devoted to aiming towards web-based educational systems tailored to specific pedagogical approaches. The most advanced of them are…

  7. Outline of the Solar System: Activities for elementary students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartsfield, J.; Sellers, M.

    1990-01-01

    An introduction to the solar system for the elementary school student is given. The introduction contains historical background, facts, and pertinent symbols concerning the sun, the nine major planets and their moons, and information about comets and asteroids. Aids to teaching are given, including a solar system crossword puzzle with answers.

  8. A mobile system for active otpical pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunesson, A.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.; Uneus, L.; Wendt, W.; Fredriksson, K.

    1986-01-01

    The remote monitoring of atmospheric pollutants can now be performed in several ways. Laser radar techniques have proven their ability to reveal the spatial distribution of different species or particles. Classical optical techniques can also be used, but yield the average concentration over a given path and hence no range resolution. One such technique is Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy, DOAS. Such schemes can be used to monitor paths that a preliminary lidar investigation has shown to be of interest. Having previously had access to a mobile lidar system, a new system has been completed. The construction builds on experience from using the other system and it is meant to be more of a mobile optical laboratory than just a lidar system. A complete system description is given along with some preliminary usage. Future uses are contemplated.

  9. 78 FR 6081 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: National Student Loan Data System...

  10. 76 FR 78673 - New Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Exercise Information System (EXIS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration New Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Exercise Information System (EXIS) AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS. ACTION: 30-day... burden for the TSA Exercise Information System (EXIS). EXIS is a web portal designed to...

  11. [Glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, E V; Popova, T S; Sal'nikov, P S

    2015-01-01

    The review include actual facts, demonstrating high probability of glutamatergic neurotransmitter system role in the regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity. These facts suggest significant role of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system dysfunction in forming motor activity disorders of the digestive tract, including in patients in critical condition. The analysis is based on results of multiple experimental and clinical researches of glutamic acid and other components of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in central nervous system and autonomic nervous system (with the accent on the enteral nervous system) in normal conditions and with functioning changes of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in case of inflammation, hupoxia, stress and in critical condition.

  12. Predicting active slip systems in β-Sn from ideal shear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Y.; Matsushima, H.; Ohno, N.

    2012-04-01

    We analyse the ideal shear resistances of 15 nonequivalent slip systems in β-Sn using first-principles density functional theory. From the ideal shear resistance and Schmid's law, the orientation dependence of active slip systems in a β-Sn single crystal subjected to uniaxial tension is investigated. We find that (1\\,0\\,1)[\\bar{1}\\,0\\,1] has the lowest ideal shear resistance among the 15 slip systems. Our calculations indicate that, depending on crystal orientation, uniaxial tension activates seven nonequivalent groups of slip systems. The active slip systems for [1 0 0] and [1 1 0] orientations determined in this study agree with the experimental results.

  13. A Low Power, Parallel Wearable Multi-Sensor System for Human Activity Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuecheng; Jia, Wenyan; Yu, Tianjian; Luan, Bo; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the design of a low power heterogeneous wearable multi-sensor system, built with Zynq System-on-Chip (SoC), for human activity evaluation is presented. The powerful data processing capability and flexibility of this SoC represent significant improvements over our previous ARM based system designs. The new system captures and compresses multiple color images and sensor data simultaneously. Several strategies are adopted to minimize power consumption. Our wearable system provides a new tool for the evaluation of human activity, including diet, physical activity and lifestyle.

  14. A Low Power, Parallel Wearable Multi-Sensor System for Human Activity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuecheng; Jia, Wenyan; Yu, Tianjian; Luan, Bo; Mao, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a low power heterogeneous wearable multi-sensor system, built with Zynq System-on-Chip (SoC), for human activity evaluation is presented. The powerful data processing capability and flexibility of this SoC represent significant improvements over our previous ARM based system designs. The new system captures and compresses multiple color images and sensor data simultaneously. Several strategies are adopted to minimize power consumption. Our wearable system provides a new tool for the evaluation of human activity, including diet, physical activity and lifestyle. PMID:26185409

  15. Electromechanical simulation and testing of actively controlled rotordynamic systems with piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Reng Rong; Palazzolo, A. B.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, G. T.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for simulating the coupled 'electromechanical' system to predict rotordynamic stability and unbalance response along with control system stability. The piezoelectric actuators and their amplifiers are represented as equivalent linear electrical circuits. The electromechanical system modeling approach is utilized to correlate test results from a double overhung rotor rig. The test results also show the effectiveness of the control system for suppressing the unbalance response of two modes using active stiffness and active damping.

  16. A snake-like serine proteinase (PmSnake) activates prophenoloxidase-activating system in black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Monwan, Warunthorn; Amparyup, Piti; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2017-02-01

    Clip domain serine proteinases (ClipSPs) play critical roles in the activation of proteolytic cascade in invertebrate immune systems including the prophenoloxidase (proPO) activating system. In this study, we characterized a snake-like serine protease, namely PmSnake, from the shrimp Penaeus monodon which has previously been identified based on the subtractive cDNA library of proPO double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-treated hemocytes. An open reading frame of PmSnake contains 1068 bp encoding a predicted protein of 355 amino acid residues with a putative signal peptide of 22 amino acids and two conserved domains (N-terminal clip domain and C-terminal trypsin-like serine proteinase domain). Sequence analysis revealed that PmSnake was closest to the AeSnake from ant Acromyrmex echinatior (53% similarity), but was quite relatively distant from other shrimp PmclipSPs. PmSnake transcript was mainly expressed in shrimp hemocytes and up-regulated after systemic Vibrio harveyi infection indicating that it is an immune-responsive gene. Suppression of PmSnake expression by dsRNA interference reduced both transcript and protein levels leading to a reduction of the hemolymph phenoloxidase (PO) activity (36%), compared to the control, suggesting that the PmSnake functions as a clip-SP in shrimp proPO system. Western blot analysis using anti-PmSnake showed that the PmSnake was detected in hemocytes but not in cell-free plasma. In vitro PO activity and serine proteinase activity assays showed that adding rPmSnake into the shrimp hemolymph could increase PO activity as well as serine proteinase activity suggesting that the rPmSnake activates the proPO system via serine proteinase cascade.

  17. Application of active controls technology to aircraft bide smoothing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapins, M.; Jacobson, I. D.

    1975-01-01

    A critical review of past efforts in the design and testing of ride smoothing and gust alleviation systems is presented. Design trade offs involving sensor types, choice of feedback loops, human comfort, and aircraft handling-qualities criteria are discussed. Synthesis of a system designed to employ direct-lift and side-force producing surfaces is reported. Two STOL aircraft and an executive transport are considered. Theoretically predicted system performance is compared with hybrid simulation and flight test data. Pilot opinion rating, pilot workload, and passenger comfort rating data for the basic and augmented aircraft are included.

  18. Application of Active Controls Technology to Aircraft Ride Smoothing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapins, Maris; Jacobson, Ira D.

    1975-01-01

    A critical review of past efforts in the design and testing of ride smoothing and gust alleviation systems is presented. Design trade-offs involving sensor types, choice of feedback loops, human comfort and aircraft handling-qualities criteria are discussed. Synthesis of a system designed to employ direct-lift and side-force producing surfaces is reported. Two STOL-class aircraft and an executive transport are considered. Theoretically-predicted system performance is compared with hybrid simulation and flight test data. Pilot opinion rating, pilot workload, and passenger comfort rating data for the basic and augmented aircraft are included.

  19. Developing active noise control systems for noise attenuation in ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Rosely V.; Ivo, Rodrigo C.; Medeiros, Eduardo B.

    2002-11-01

    The present work describes some of the research effort on Active Noise Control (ANC) being jointly developed by the Catholic University of Minas Gerais (PUC-MINAS) and the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG). Considerations about the implementation of Digital Signal Processing for noise control in ducts has been presented. The objective is to establish a study on Active Noise Control in ducts combining geometry and acoustic parameters modification together with adaptive digital filtering implementation. Both algorithm and digital signal processing details are also discussed. The main results for a typical application where real attenuation has been obtained are presented and considered according to their use in developing real applications. The authors also believe that the present text should provide an interesting overview for both designers and students concerned about Active Noise Control in ducts. (To be presented in Portuguese.)

  20. Cardiovascular symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Kolck, Ulrich W; Haenisch, Britta; Molderings, Gerhard J

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, mast cell activation disease (MCAD) has been considered as just one rare (neoplastic) disease, mastocytosis, focused on the mast cell (MC) mediators tryptase and histamine and the suggestive, blatant symptoms of flushing and anaphylaxis. Recently another form of MCAD, the MC activation syndrome, has been recognized featuring inappropriate MC activation with little to no neoplasia and likely much more heterogeneously clonal and far more prevalent than mastocytosis. Increasing expertise and appreciation has been established for the truly very large menagerie of MC mediators and their complex patterns of release, engendering complex, nebulous presentations of chronic and acute illness best characterized as multisystem polymorbidity of generally inflammatory ± allergic theme. We describe the pathogenesis of MCAD with a particular focus on clinical cardiovascular symptoms and the therapeutic options for MC mediator-induced cardiovascular symptoms.

  1. Arginine vasotocin activates phosphoinositide signal transduction system and potentiates N-acetyltransferase activity in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Novotná, R; Jác, M; Hájek, I; Novotný, I

    1999-03-05

    The pineal gland is innervated by pinealopetal peptidergic fibers originating in the hypothalamic nuclei which release arginine vasopressin (AVP) and arginine vasotocin (AVT) from their endings. Since the mechanism of AVT action on the pineal signal transduction and melatonin synthesis has not been determined so far, we examined the effect of AVT on the phosphoinositide signalling system and the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity in the rat pineal gland. The effect of AVP 4-9 fragment and AVP analogue desmopressin was also tested. The phosphoinositide signalling system was studied by measuring 32P labelling of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) which reflects PI cycle activation. AVT (10(-5) and 10(-4) M) induced a significant increase in 32P labelling of PI, PIP and PIP2. The AVT mediated activation of the PI signal cascade was supressed by the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist. The desmopressin and AVP 4-9 fragment were without the effect on PI signalling. To assess the AVT role in the melatonin synthesis we studied the daily pattern of the pineal NAT activity in rats treated by AVT (10 microg/100 g b.w). AVT application in the dark period of the day significantly increased nocturnal NAT activity. It can be summarized that AVT activates PI signalling system and potentiates NAT activity in the rat pineal gland.

  2. Modelling Cr(VI) removal by a combined carbon-activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Orozco, A Micaela Ferro; Contreras, Edgardo M; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-01-15

    The combined carbon-activated sludge process has been proposed as an alternative to protect the biomass against toxic substances in wastewaters; however, the information about the effect of powdered-activated carbon (PAC) addition in activated sludge reactors for the treatment of wastewaters containing Cr(VI) is limited. The objectives of the present study were: (a) to evaluate the removal of hexavalent chromium by (i) activated sludge microorganisms in aerobic batch reactors, (ii) powdered-activated carbon, and (iii) the combined action of powdered-activated carbon and biomass; (b) to propose mathematical models that interpret the experimental results. Different Cr(VI) removal systems were tested: (S1) biomass (activated sludge), (S2) PAC, and (S3) the combined activated carbon-biomass system. A Monod-based mathematical model was used to describe the kinetics of Cr(VI) removal in the system S1. A first-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI) and PAC respectively, was proposed to model the removal of Cr(VI) in the system S2. Cr(VI) removal in the combined carbon-biomass system (S3) was faster than both Cr(VI) removal using PAC or activated sludge individually. Results showed that the removal of Cr(VI) using the activated carbon-biomass system (S3) was adequately described by combining the kinetic equations proposed for the systems S1 and S2.

  3. The crew activity planning system bus interface unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The hardware and software designs used to implement a high speed parallel communications interface to the MITRE 307.2 kilobit/second serial bus communications system are described. The primary topic is the development of the bus interface unit.

  4. Calc-silicate mineralization in active geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; McDowell, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    The detailed study of calc-silicate mineral zones and coexisting phase relations in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system were used as examples for thermodynamic evaluation of phase relations among minerals of variable composition and to calculate the chemical characteristics of hydrothermal solutions compatible with the observed calc-silicate assemblages. In general there is a close correlation between calculated and observed fluid compositions. Calculated fugacities of O{sub 2} at about 320{degrees}C in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system are about five orders of magnitude less than that at the nearby Salton Sea geothermal system. This observation is consistent with the occurrence of Fe{sup 3+} rich epidotes in the latter system and the presence of prehnite at Cerro Prieto.

  5. Active waste-injection systems in Florida, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vecchioli, John; McKenzie, D.J.; Pascale, C.A.; Wilson, W.E.

    1979-01-01

    As of the end of 1976, seven systems were injecting liquid wastes into Florida 's subsurface environment at a combined average rate of 15 million gallons per day. This report presents for each of these systems information on the kind and amount of waste injected and type of pretreatment, construction characteristics of the injection and monitor wells, type of test and monitoring data available, and brief discussion of any operational problems experienced. (Kosco-USGS)

  6. Hybrid architecture active wavefront sensing and control system, and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D. (Inventor); Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor); Hyde, Tristram T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    According to various embodiments, provided herein is an optical system and method that can be configured to perform image analysis. The optical system can comprise a telescope assembly and one or more hybrid instruments. The one or more hybrid instruments can be configured to receive image data from the telescope assembly and perform a fine guidance operation and a wavefront sensing operation, simultaneously, on the image data received from the telescope assembly.

  7. Wounding systemically activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase in forage and turf grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage and turf grasses are continually cut and grazed by livestock, however very little is known concerning the perception or molecular responses to wounding. Mechanical wounding rapidly activated a 46 kDa and a 44 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in six different grass species. In the m...

  8. Model Activity Systems: Dialogic Teacher Learning for Social Justice Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman-Kipp, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Interest of teacher educators working in the field of social justice focuses on the ways in which teachers learn to inscribe their professional activity within social movements (for progressive change. The community of practice (COP) approach to understanding learning as a social process has a lot of currency right now in teacher education…

  9. Programming biological operating systems: genome design, assembly and activation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    The DNA technologies developed over the past 20 years for reading and writing the genetic code converged when the first synthetic cell was created 4 years ago. An outcome of this work has been an extraordinary set of tools for synthesizing, assembling, engineering and transplanting whole bacterial genomes. Technical progress, options and applications for bacterial genome design, assembly and activation are discussed.

  10. Nitroxide delivery system for Nrf2 activation and skin protection.

    PubMed

    Ben Yehuda Greenwald, Maya; Frušić-Zlotkin, Marina; Soroka, Yoram; Sasson, Shmuel Ben; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet; Bitton, Ronit; Kohen, Ron

    2015-08-01

    Cyclic nitroxides are a large group of compounds composed of diverse stable radicals also known as synthetic antioxidants. Although nitroxides are valuable for use in several skin conditions, in in vivo conditions they have several drawbacks, such as nonspecific dispersion in normal tissue, preferential renal clearance and rapid reduction of the nitroxide to the corresponding hydroxylamine. However, these drawbacks can be easily addressed by encapsulating the nitroxides within microemulsions. This approach would allow nitroxide activity and therefore their valuable effects (e.g. activation of the Keap1-Nrf2-EpRE pathway) to continue. In this work, nitroxides were encapsulated in a microemulsion composed of biocompatible ingredients. The nanometric size and shape of the vehicle microemulsion and nitroxide microemulsion displayed high similarity, indicating that the stability of the microemulsions was preserved. Our studies demonstrated that nitroxide microemulsions were more potent inducers of the Keap1-Nrf2-EpRE pathway than the free nitroxides, causing the activation of phase II enzymes. Moreover, microemulsions containing nitroxides significantly reduced UVB-induced cytotoxicity in the skin. Understanding the mechanism of this improved activity may expand the usage of many other Nrf2 modulating molecules in encapsulated form, as a skin protection strategy against oxidative stress-related conditions.

  11. How Activity Systems Evolve: Making / Saving Salmon in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yew-Jin; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the history of a state-sponsored salmon enhancement project in British Columbia and to explicate the development of the former using cultural historical activity theory. We make thematic the notion of inner contradictions, which express themselves outwardly as a function of both quantitative and…

  12. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for fluoroelastomer/chlorofluorocarbon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paciorek, K.J.L.; Masuda, S.R.; Nakahara, J.H. ); Snyder, C.E. Jr.; Warner, W.M. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on swell, tensile, and modulus data that were determined for a fluoroelastomer after exposure to a series of chlorofluorocarbon model fluids. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) were developed for the swell as a function of the number of carbons and chlorines and for tensile strength as a function of carbon number and chlorine positions in the chlorofluorocarbons.

  13. Reinforcement active learning in the vibrissae system: optimal object localization.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Goren; Dorfman, Nimrod; Ahissar, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Rats move their whiskers to acquire information about their environment. It has been observed that they palpate novel objects and objects they are required to localize in space. We analyze whisker-based object localization using two complementary paradigms, namely, active learning and intrinsic-reward reinforcement learning. Active learning algorithms select the next training samples according to the hypothesized solution in order to better discriminate between correct and incorrect labels. Intrinsic-reward reinforcement learning uses prediction errors as the reward to an actor-critic design, such that behavior converges to the one that optimizes the learning process. We show that in the context of object localization, the two paradigms result in palpation whisking as their respective optimal solution. These results suggest that rats may employ principles of active learning and/or intrinsic reward in tactile exploration and can guide future research to seek the underlying neuronal mechanisms that implement them. Furthermore, these paradigms are easily transferable to biomimetic whisker-based artificial sensors and can improve the active exploration of their environment.

  14. Education on antibiotic use. Education systems and activities that work.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, José Miguel; Cobo, Javier; San Juan, Rafael; Montejo, Miguel; Fariñas, M Carmen

    2013-09-01

    Education is a cornerstone of antimicrobial stewardships programs, because 50% of inappropriate antimicrobial prescriptions are a consequence of an imbalance between the high levels of knowledge required for the appropriate use of antibiotics and the scarce training offered to medical specialists. For this reason, programs optimizing antimicrobial (PROA) are essentially based on support and educational activities for prescribers. The educational activities are difficult to evaluate. In our country, the application of educational activities in antimicrobial training programs is very heterogeneous, although it has improved in recent years. We recommend the following educational measures, which are prioritized in order of effectiveness. Interactive educational interventions are the most effective. These are non-compulsory interventions based on real prescriptions in clinical practice and include educational outreach visits, audits and counseling interviews with feedback and multifaceted interventions. Passive educational strategies, with posters, newsletters, and dissemination of guidelines, are only marginally effective in changing antimicrobial prescribing practices and have not shown a sustained effect. These measures need extensive professional involvement and should be combined with more active approaches. Currently, interventions can be enhanced with some teaching tools in electronic format. Both interactive and passive educational measures should be integrated into the PROA and should have institutional support. Finally, we recommend including antimicrobials in the training plans of all clinical specialties.

  15. Hybrid Active/Passive Jet Engine Noise Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parente, C. A.; Arcas, N.; Walker, B. E.; Hersh, A. S.; Rice, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel adaptive segmented liner concept has been developed that employs active control elements to modify the in-duct sound field to enhance the tone-suppressing performance of passive liner elements. This could potentially allow engine designs that inherently produce more tone noise but less broadband noise, or could allow passive liner designs to more optimally address high frequency broadband noise. A proof-of-concept validation program was undertaken, consisting of the development of an adaptive segmented liner that would maximize attenuation of two radial modes in a circular or annular duct. The liner consisted of a leading active segment with dual annuli of axially spaced active Helmholtz resonators, followed by an optimized passive liner and then an array of sensing microphones. Three successively complex versions of the adaptive liner were constructed and their performances tested relative to the performance of optimized uniform passive and segmented passive liners. The salient results of the tests were: The adaptive segmented liner performed well in a high flow speed model fan inlet environment, was successfully scaled to a high sound frequency and successfully attenuated three radial modes using sensor and active resonator arrays that were designed for a two mode, lower frequency environment.

  16. Mutagenicity testing on chinese hamster V79 cells treated in the in vitro liver perfusion system. Comparative investigation of different in vitro metabolising systems with dimethylnitrosamine and benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Jenssen, D; Beije, B; Ramel, C

    1979-09-01

    A comparative study of three in vitro metabolising systems was performed in combination with Chinese hamster V79 cells, at which point mutation to 6-thioguanine resistance was scored. The three metabolising systems used were: (1) rat liver microsomal fraction (S9-mix); (2) feeder layer of primary embryonic golden hamster cells, according to Hubermann's system; (3) in vitro perfusion of rat liver according to the system of Beije et al. As model substances dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) and benzo[a]pyrene (BP) was used. The liver perfusion was more efficient than S9-mix as an activating system of DMN, while the feeder layer of embryonic cells was unable to activate this compound. The activation of DMN with S9-mix was dependent on the presence of NADP. By exposing the target cells in the liver perfusion at different distances from the liver the biological half life of the active metabolite of DMN could be estimated to less than 5 s. With BP the three metabolising systems showed reversed results as compared with DMN--both the feeder layer cells and S9-mix activated BP, the feeder layer cells being most efficient. With liver perfusion, the perfusate itself was totally negative. Only the bile showed a week mutagenic effect. These results are in accordance with the notion that intact liver cells perform both an activation and a subsequent deactivation of BP. Because of the importance of hepatic bio-transformation in chemical mutagenesis and carcinogenesis it is emphasied that a liver perfusion system could be used in a testing protocol for genotoxic effects as a valuable tool in order to analyse the mechanism of action of mutagenic and carcinogenic compounds detected in other test systems, for instance bacterial/microsomal tests.

  17. Systemic activation of NF-κB driven luciferase activity in transgenic mice fed advanced glycation end products modified albumin.

    PubMed

    Nass, Norbert; Bayreuther, Kristina; Simm, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are stable end products of the Maillard reaction and accumulate with progressing ageing and degenerative diseases. Significant amounts of AGE-modified peptides are also consumed with processed food. AGEs bind to specific receptors, especially the receptor of AGEs (RAGE). Activation of RAGE then evokes intracellular signalling, finally resulting in the activation of the NF-κB transcription factor and therefore a proinflammatory state. We here analysed, whether NF-κB is activated in short term upon feeding an AGE-modified protein in-vivo. Transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of an NF-κB responsive promoter were intraperitoneally injected or fed with AGE-modified- or control albumin and luciferase expression was analysed by in-vivo imaging and by in-vitro by determination of luciferase enzyme activity in heart, lung, gut, spleen, liver and kidney. In all organs, an activation of the luciferase reporter gene was observed in response to AGE-BSA feeding, however with different intensity and timing. The gut exhibited highest luciferase activity and this activity peaked 6-8 h post AGE-feeding. In heart and kidney, luciferase activity increased for up to 12 h post feeding. All other organs tested, exhibited highest activity at 10 h after AGE-consumption. Altogether, these data demonstrate that feeding AGE-modified protein resulted in a transient and systemic activation of the NF-κB reporter.

  18. The Adipose Renin-Angiotensin System Modulates Systemic Markers of Insulin Sensitivity and Activates the Intrarenal Renin-Angiotensin System

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Suyeon; Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid; Quignard-Boulange, Annie; ...

    2006-01-01

    Background . The adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to regulation of fat mass and may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. Methods and results . A panel of mouse models including mice lacking angiotensinogen, Agt ( Agt -KO), mice expressing Agt solely in adipose tissue (aP2- Agt/Agt -KO), and mice overexpressing Agt in adipose tissue (aP2- Agt ) was studied. Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin, and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt -KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. aP2- Agt mice exhibited increased adipositymore » and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT) controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also elevated in kidney of aP2- Agt mice. Conclusion . These findings demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly impact both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.« less

  19. Active multispectral imaging system for photodiagnosis and personalized phototherapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, M. F.; Chávarri, L.; Briz, S.; Padrón, V. M.; García-Cuesta, E.

    2014-10-01

    The proposed system has been designed to identify dermatopathologies or to apply personalized phototherapy treatments. The system emits electromagnetic waves in different spectral bands in the range of visible and near infrared to irradiate the target (skin or any other object) to be spectrally characterized. Then, an imaging sensor measures the target response to the stimulus at each spectral band and, after processing, the system displays in real time two images. In one of them the value of each pixel corresponds to the more reflected wavenumber whereas in the other image the pixel value represents the energy absorbed at each band. The diagnosis capability of this system lies in its multispectral design, and the phototherapy treatments are adapted to the patient and his lesion by measuring his absorption capability. This "in situ" absorption measurement allows us to determine the more appropriate duration of the treatment according to the wavelength and recommended dose. The main advantages of this system are its low cost, it does not have moving parts or complex mechanisms, it works in real time, and it is easy to handle. For these reasons its widespread use in dermatologist consultation would facilitate the work of the dermatologist and would improve the efficiency of diagnosis and treatment. In fact the prototype has already been successfully applied to pathologies such as carcinomas, melanomas, keratosis, and nevi.

  20. Active multispectral imaging system for photodiagnosis and personalized phototherapies

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte, M. F. E-mail: sbriz@fis.uc3m.es; Chávarri, L.; Padrón, V. M.; García-Cuesta, E.

    2014-10-15

    The proposed system has been designed to identify dermatopathologies or to apply personalized phototherapy treatments. The system emits electromagnetic waves in different spectral bands in the range of visible and near infrared to irradiate the target (skin or any other object) to be spectrally characterized. Then, an imaging sensor measures the target response to the stimulus at each spectral band and, after processing, the system displays in real time two images. In one of them the value of each pixel corresponds to the more reflected wavenumber whereas in the other image the pixel value represents the energy absorbed at each band. The diagnosis capability of this system lies in its multispectral design, and the phototherapy treatments are adapted to the patient and his lesion by measuring his absorption capability. This “in situ” absorption measurement allows us to determine the more appropriate duration of the treatment according to the wavelength and recommended dose. The main advantages of this system are its low cost, it does not have moving parts or complex mechanisms, it works in real time, and it is easy to handle. For these reasons its widespread use in dermatologist consultation would facilitate the work of the dermatologist and would improve the efficiency of diagnosis and treatment. In fact the prototype has already been successfully applied to pathologies such as carcinomas, melanomas, keratosis, and nevi.

  1. Activities of the Pilot Land Data System project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sircar, J. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The University of Maryland's Remote Sensing Systems Laboratory submitted to NASA/Goddard an interim progress report on the work being conducted within its Pilot Land Data System IPLDS project. The Remote Sensing Systems Laboratory addressed the following tasks: (1) identify data types and data sources needed to describe the selected test sites in collaboration with Goddard's Hydrological Sciences Branch; (2) define the procedures necessary to access/acquire this data; (3) conduct meetings with the PLDS Systems Engineering Group to identify functional specification priorities for PLDS development; (4) assemble documentation on historical remotely sensed imagery and transfer of such information to the PLDS Data Management Group; (5) collect data identified by Goodard's Hydrological Sciences Branch for data set inventory in PLD; (6) develop a Workstation-PLDS system interface over high speed lines, (7) develop and test through a Phase 1 demonstration of a micro workstation to access PLDS; and (8) establish interdepartmental agreement of development of computer link for electronic access of water resources data from USGS.

  2. Image change detection using a SWIR active imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Armin L.; Monnin, David; Laurenzis, Martin; Christnacher, Frank

    2013-10-01

    We are currently developing a system consisting of a GPS receiver, a three-axis magnetic compass as well as a digital video camera in order to visualize changes occuring along a regularily used itinerary. This is done by comparing actual images with images from the same scene, which have been acquired during a previous measurement. The luminosity of images from two different passages however can be quite different (due to different meteorological conditions). Whereas the global luminosity can be adjusted using non-linear luminosity correction, the treatment of shadows is more di cult. Since meteorological conditions cannot be controlled, we are investigating the possibility of using a Laser Gated Viewing system in the SWIR domain to illuminate the scene. Using appropriate filters for the camera, we are completely independent of natural illumination and in addition, the system can also be used at night.

  3. Categorisation through evidence accumulation in an active vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirolli, Marco; Ferrauto, Tomassino; Nolfi, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we present an artificial vision system that is trained with a genetic algorithm for categorising five different kinds of images (letters) of different sizes. The system, which has a limited field of view, can move its eye so as to explore the images visually. The analysis of the system at the end of the training process indicates that correct categorisation is achieved by (1) exploiting sensory-motor coordination so as to experience stimuli that facilitate discrimination, and (2) integrating perceptual and/or motor information over time through a process of accumulation of partially conflicting evidence. We discuss our results with respect to the possible different strategies for categorisation and to the possible roles that action can play in perception.

  4. Active disturbance rejection control in steering by wire haptic systems.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Angeles, A; Garcia-Antonio, J A

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces a steering by wired haptic system based on disturbance rejection control techniques. High gain Generalized Proportional Integral (GPI) observers are considered for the estimation of tire and steering wheel dynamic disturbances. These disturbances are on line canceled to ensure tracking between the commanded steering wheel angle and the tire orientation angle. The estimated disturbances at the steering rack are feedback to the steering wheel to provide a haptic interface with the driver. The overall system behaves as a bilateral master-slave system. Very few sensors and minimum knowledge of the dynamic model are required. Experimental results are presented on a prototype platform that consists on: (1) half of the steering rack of a beetle VW vehicle, (2) a steering wheel.

  5. BEACHES: An Observational System for Assessing Children's Eating and Physical Activity Behaviors and Associated Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The Behaviors of Eating and Activity for Children's Health Evaluation System (BEACHES) codes direct observations of children's dietary and physical activity behaviors and associated environmental events, including physical location, antecedents, and consequences. The system's reliability and validity was assessed in a study of 42 children (ages…

  6. Marital Conflict and Growth in Children's Internalizing Symptoms: The Role of Autonomic Nervous System Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Keiley, Margaret; Erath, Stephen; Dyer, W. Justin

    2013-01-01

    We assessed trajectories of children's internalizing symptoms, indexed through anxiety and depression, with a focus on the role of interactions between interparental marital conflict, children's sympathetic nervous system activity indexed by skin conductance level (SCL), and parasympathetic nervous system activity indexed by respiratory sinus…

  7. The Activity System of School-Teaching Mathematics and Mathematical Modelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julie, Cyril

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the activity system of school-teaching mathematics and the impact of mathematical modeling. Describes the Applications of and Modeling in School Mathematics Project (AMSMAP) which investigates teachers' mathematical modeling and its relationship to a hypothesized school mathematical modeling activity system. Discusses the notion of an…

  8. Disturbance observer based sliding mode control of active suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Vaijayanti S.; Mohan, B.; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel scheme to reduce the acceleration of the sprung mass, used in combination with sliding mode control, is proposed. The proposed scheme estimates the effects of the uncertain, nonlinear spring and damper, load variation and the unknown road disturbance. The controller needs the states of sprung mass only, obviating the need to measure the states of the unsprung mass. The ultimate boundedness of the overall suspension system is proved. The efficacy of the method is verified through simulations for three different types of road profiles and load variation and the scheme is validated on an experimental setup. The results are compared with passive suspension system.

  9. Triton burnup measurements in KSTAR using a neutron activation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jungmin; Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Jun Young; Rhee, T.; Kim, Junghee; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of the time-integrated triton burnup for deuterium plasma in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) have been performed following the simultaneous detection of the d-d and d-t neutrons. The d-d neutrons were measured using a 3He proportional counter, fission chamber, and activated indium sample, whereas the d-t neutrons were detected using activated silicon and copper samples. The triton burnup ratio from KSTAR discharges is found to be in the range 0.01%-0.50% depending on the plasma conditions. The measured burnup ratio is compared with the prompt loss fraction of tritons calculated with the Lorentz orbit code and the classical slowing-down time. The burnup ratio is found to increase as plasma current and classical slowing-down time increase.

  10. Active flutter suppression - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency in the mathematical model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a roll maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  11. Antitussive activity and respiratory system effects of levodropropizine in man.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Braga, P C; Centanni, S; Legnani, D; Moavero, N E; Allegra, L

    1988-08-01

    Antitussive activity of the new antitussive drug, levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in healthy volunteers by the classical method of citric acid-induced coughing. Levodropropizine dose-dependently reduced cough frequency. Maximal inhibition was observed at 6 h after administration. Cough intensity was also reduced, as shown by the analysis of cough noise. Levodropropizine, at the dosage of 60 mg t.i.d., had no adverse effects on respiratory function nor on airway clearance mechanisms: in fact, it did not affect spirometric parameters. Levodropropizine had no effects on the rheological properties of mucus nor on ciliary activity of airway epithelium.

  12. Development of Active Catheter,Active Guide Wire and Micro Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Y.; Mineta, T.; Totsu, K.; Makishi, W.; Esashi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Summary Active catheters and active guide wires which move like a snake have been developed for catheter-based minimally invasive diagnosis and therapy. Communication and control IC chips in the active catheter reduce the number of lead wires for control. The active catheter can be not only bent but also torsioned and extended. An ultra minature fiber-optic pressure sensor; a forward-looking ultrasonic probe and a magnetic position and orientation sensor have been developed for catheters and guide wires. These moving mechanisms and several sensors which are fitted near the tip of the catheter and the guide wire will provide detailed information near the tip and enable delicate and effective catheter intervention. PMID:20663389

  13. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in the report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjunction with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. Excessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed ...

  14. Systemic endothelial function is preserved in men with both active and inactive variant angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Akita, H; Kanazawa, K; Yamada, S; Shiga, N; Terashima, M; Matsuda, Y; Takai, E; Iwai, C; Takaoka, H; Yokoyama, M

    1999-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that coronary spasm could be a coronary manifestation of systemic endothelial dysfunction and that the activity of coronary spasm could influence systemic endothelial function, we examined brachial flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and nitroglycerin-induced endothelium-independent vasodilation with high-resolution ultrasound in 11 men with variant angina pectoris (6 active and 5 inactive) without established coronary atherosclerosis. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in peripheral circulation was preserved in men with active and inactive variant angina pectoris, suggesting that systemic endothelial dysfunction is not involved in either the pathogenesis or the activity of coronary spasm.

  15. A computerized system for localizing sources of cardiac activation.

    PubMed

    Salu, Y; Mehrotra, P

    1984-06-01

    A noninvasive method for locating a source of cardiac electrical activity is described. The data acquisition and its preliminary processing is done with the aid of a microcomputer, while lengthier calculations are done on a large computer. The method was tested on 18 patients, and the results indicate that it is reliable, and with further technical refinements it could be used in research and clinical settings.

  16. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  17. Framing: Supporting Change for a System as an External Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    a division of labour that specifies how the motive is transformed into the outcome. 21 DSTO-RR-0127 Tools _J Motive J C Individual...Cnr Transformation Outcome ^ Process Rules nmunit) Division of Labour VL ^ Figure 2.3 Incorporating the social aspects in Activity Theory...these capabilities, creates roles by the division of labour , allocates tasks to roles, creates an organisational structure and formal management

  18. Managing Suspicious Activity Reporting Systems at Small Agency Police Departments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    61,571 53 Mountain view X 72,222 54 Napa X X 75,279 54 Suspicious Activity Reporting Population: 50,000–99,999 Agency SAR on...Montebello Napa Novato Perris Pittsburg Rancho Santa Margarita Redondo Beach Rosemead San Mateo Santa...Friday FBI’s LE Officers Killed and Assaulted(LEOKA) Napa , CA July 10-11, 2012; Tuesday - Wednesday Enhanced Threat and Risk Assessment

  19. Data Systems and Reports as Active Participants in Data Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Jenny Grant

    2016-01-01

    Most data-informed decision-making in education is undermined by flawed interpretations. Educator-driven interventions to improve data use are beneficial but not omnipotent, as data misunderstandings persist at schools and school districts commended for ideal data use support. Meanwhile, most data systems and reports display figures without…

  20. Control of flexible rotor systems with active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Shuliang; Palazzolo, Alan

    2008-07-01

    An approach is presented for the analysis and design of magnetic suspension systems with large flexible rotordynamics models including dynamics, control, and simulation. The objective is to formulate and synthesize a large-order, flexible shaft rotordynamics model for a flywheel supported with magnetic bearings. A finite element model of the rotor system is assembled and then employed to develop a magnetic suspension compensator to provide good reliability and disturbance rejection. Stable operation over the complete speed range and optimization of the closed-loop rotordynamic properties are obtained via synthesis of eigenvalue analysis, Campbell plots, waterfall plots, and mode shapes. The large order of the rotor model and high spin speed of the rotor present a challenge for magnetic suspension control. A flywheel system is studied as an example for realizing a physical controller that provides stable rotor suspension and good disturbance rejection in all operating states. The baseline flywheel system control is determined from extensive rotordynamics synthesis and analysis for rotor critical speeds, mode shapes, frequency responses, and time responses.

  1. Teaching Systems Biology: An Active-Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Anuj

    2005-01-01

    With genomics well established in modern molecular biology, recent studies have sought to further the discipline by integrating complementary methodologies into a holistic depiction of the molecular mechanisms underpinning cell function. This genomic subdiscipline, loosely termed "systems biology," presents the biology educator with both…

  2. Activation and Resolution of Periodontal Inflammation and Its Systemic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a highly organized event impacting upon organs, tissues and biological systems. Periodontal diseases are characterized by dysregulation or dysfunction of resolution pathways of inflammation resulting in a failure of healing and a dominant chronic, progressive, destructive and predominantly unresolved inflammation. The biological consequences of inflammatory processes may be independent of the etiological agents such as trauma, microbial organisms and stress. The impact of the inflammatory pathological process depends upon the affected tissues or organ system. Whilst mediators are similar, there is a tissue specificity for the inflammatory events. It is plausible that inflammatory processes in one organ could directly lead to pathologies in another organ or tissue. Communication between distant parts of the body and their inflammatory status is also mediated by common signaling mechanisms mediated via cells and soluble mediators. This review focuses on periodontal inflammation, its systemic associations and advances in therapeutic approaches based on mediators acting through orchestration of natural pathway to resolution of inflammation. We also discuss a new treatment concept where natural pathways of resolution of periodontal inflammation can be used to limit systemic inflammation and promote healing and regeneration. PMID:26252412

  3. A study of amplitude information-frequency characteristics for underwater active electrolocation system.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiegang

    2015-11-04

    Weakly electric fish sense their surroundings in complete darkness by their active electrolocation system. For biologists, the active electrolocation system has been investigated for near 60 years. And for engineers, bio-inspired active electrolocation sensor has been investigated for about 20 years. But how the amplitude information response will be affected by frequencies of detecting electric fields in the active electrolocation system was rarely investigated. In this paper, an electrolocation experiment system has been built. The amplitude information-frequency characteristics (AIFC) of the electrolocation system for sinusoidal electric fields of varying frequencies have been investigated. We find that AIFC of the electrolocation system have relevance to the material properties and geometric features of the probed object and conductivity of surrounding water. Detect frequency dead zone (DFDZ) and frequency inflection point (FIP) of AIFC for the electrolocation system were found. The analysis model of the electrolocation system has been investigated for many years, but DFDZ and FIP of AIFC can be difficult to explain by those models. In order to explain those AIFC phenomena for the electrolocation system, a simple relaxation model based on Cole-Cole model which is not only a mathematical explanation but it is a physical one for the electrolocation system was advanced. We also advance a hypothesis for physical mechanism of weakly electrical fish electrolocation system. It may have reference value for physical mechanism of weakly electrical fish active electrolocation system.

  4. A Critical Analysis of Active Learning and an Alternative Pedagogical Framework for Introductory Information Systems Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Active learning has been championed in academic circles as the pedagogical fix to boring lectures typically found in introduction to information systems courses. However, the literature on active learning is mixed. In this paper, we critically examine active learning research and discover a misplaced emphasis leading to paradoxical findings in…

  5. Use of an open-loop system to increase physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an open-loop system that reinforces physical activity with TV watching to increase children’s physical activity. Non-overweight, sedentary boys and girls (8-12 y) were randomized to a group that received feedback of activity counts + reinforcement for physic...

  6. An Activity Theory Approach to Analyze Barriers to a Virtual Management Information Systems (MIS) Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaradat, Suhair; Qablan, Ahmad; Barham, Areej

    2011-01-01

    This paper explains how the activity theory is used as a framework to analyze the barriers to a virtual Management Information Stream (MIS) Curriculum in Jordanian schools, from both the sociocultural and pedagogical perspectives. Taking the activity system as a unit of analysis, this study documents the processes by which activities shape and are…

  7. Active beam shaping in multi-levels amplification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tianzhuo; Fan, Zhongwei; Qiu, Jisi; Tang, Xiongxin; Lin, Weiran; Zhang, Hongbo

    2016-09-01

    Using Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator (LC-SLM) as a beam shaping device to improve beam quality in high-gain amplification system is reported. 1.6 nJ injected small-size signal Gaussian beam can be amplified to 5 J by 4 stages amplification, and finally output beam is a 50mm×50mm square spot with flat-top intensity distribution. In the amplification system we designed, LC-SLM is placed after the second level of amplifier, where the signal laser energy is about 20mJ, and beam size is 10mm×10mm. The structure of Fourier image transfer is also implemented in this amplifications system to be capable of maintaining high-quality image transmission in the amplification process. The LC-SLM as an object, is imaged by beam expand lenses and spatial filters lenses in the amplifications system to get good quality of imaging. By catching output spot and making a feed-back, transmission efficiency of each pixel on LC-SLM is modulated, high energy density area can be decreased to realize flat-top intensity distribution. A spot modulation function is defined as, using the maximum grey value on spot area divided by the average grey value of the image after background correction. By this, amplified laser obtains the spot modulation of 1.24 on central 90% area of the spot. Furthermore, un-uniform distribution on the full spot, soften effects of spot edge, and output beam shape can also be optimized by the LC-SLM shaping scheme in the amplification system.

  8. Development and Testing of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children: Elementary School

    PubMed Central

    McIver, Kerry L.; Brown, William H.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study describes the development and pilot testing of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity-Elementary School (OSRAC-E) version. Methods This system was developed to observe and document the levels and types of physical activity and physical and social contexts of physical activity in elementary school students during the school day. Inter-observer agreement scores and summary data were calculated. Results All categories had Kappa statistics above 0.80, with the exception of the activity initiator category. Inter-observer agreement scores were 96% or greater. The OSRAC-E was shown to be a reliable observation system that allows researchers to assess physical activity behaviors, the contexts of those behaviors, and the effectiveness of physical activity interventions in the school environment. Conclusion The OSRAC-E can yield data with high interobserver reliability and provide relatively extensive contextual information about physical activity of students in elementary schools. PMID:26889587

  9. Micro-Stirling Active Cooling Module (MS/ACM) for DoD Electronics Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Micro- Stirling Active Cooling Module (MS/ACM) for DoD Electronics Systems Douglas S. Beck Beck Engineering , Inc. 1490 Lumsden Road, Port Orchard...refrigerator. We are developing for DARPA a cm-scale Micro- Stirling Active Cooling Module (MS/ACM) micro- refrigerator to benefit the DoD systems. Under...a DARPA contract, we are designing, building, and demonstrating a breadboard MS/ACM. Keywords: Stirling ; cooler; active cooling module; micro

  10. Impact on quality activities of measurement systems meeting an L:1 rule

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, M. S.; Burkhardt, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    This study considers the impact of a measurement system that meets an L:1 rule on various quality activities. These activities include inspection, acceptance sampling, and control charting. A measurement system that meets a 10:1 rule performs much better than one that meets a 4:1 rule. R code is provided so that the practitioner is able to evaluate these activities to his or her particular situation.

  11. 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase activity determined using an image analyzer detection system.

    PubMed

    Jacks, A S; Jones, M A

    1990-02-01

    The activity of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase (CNPase) was assayed using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and an image analyzer detection system. The assay system was used to study a possible inhibitory effect by aminoguanidine on CNPase specific activity. One advantage of using a fixed-time HPTLC system over a real-time spectrophotometric system for an enzyme activity study was that apparent inhibition of the enzyme due to interference of the assay system (chromophore inhibition, etc.) was avoided. In addition, due to the increased accuracy of the image analyzer over conventional methods of TLC plate analysis, a rapid and more accurate measurement of HPTLC plates was possible which required only nanomole amounts of substrate. Also, a digital image of each plate analyzed was stored indefinitely in the computer's memory for future reference. The measurements of CNPase specific activity made using this system compared favorably to those found in recent literature.

  12. Active thermal control systems for lunar and Martian exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewert, Michael K.; Petete, Patricia A.; Dzenitis, John

    1990-01-01

    Several ATCS options including heat pumps, radiator shading devices, and single-phase flow loops were considered. The ATCS chosen for both lunar and Martian habitats consists of a heat pump integral with a nontoxic fluid acquisition and transport loop, and vertically oriented modular reflux-boiler radiators. The heat pump operates only during the lunar day. The lunar and Martian transfer vehicles have an internal single-phase water-acquisition loop and an external two-phase ammonia rejection system with rotating inflatable radiators. The lunar and Martian excursion vehicles incorporate internal single-phase water acquisition, which is connected via heat exchangers to external body-mounted single-phase radiators. A water evaporation system is used for the transfer vehicles during periods of high heating.

  13. Information systems as a tool to improve legal metrology activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Filho, B. A.; Soratto, A. N. R.; Gonçalves, R. F.

    2016-07-01

    This study explores the importance of information systems applied to legal metrology as a tool to improve the control of measuring instruments used in trade. The information system implanted in Brazil has also helped to understand and appraise the control of the measurements due to the behavior of the errors and deviations of instruments used in trade, allowing the allocation of resources wisely, leading to a more effective planning and control on the legal metrology field. A study case analyzing the fuel sector is carried out in order to show the conformity of fuel dispersers according to maximum permissible errors. The statistics of measurement errors of 167,310 fuel dispensers of gasoline, ethanol and diesel used in the field were analyzed demonstrating the accordance of the fuel market in Brazil to the legal requirements.

  14. Central-station applications: System and subsystem research activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a number of photovoltaic central power-station studies are summarized. Analysis based upon vendor quotes and construction contractor bids indicate that $50/m2 for area related costs for flat-plate arrays is achievable. Electrical design tradeoffs for multimegawatt systems are considered. The values of photovoltaic central-station plants for various regions are determined from an energy scenario effects study.

  15. Range gated active night vision system for automobiles.

    PubMed

    David, Ofer; Kopeika, Norman S; Weizer, Boaz

    2006-10-01

    Night vision for automobiles is an emerging safety feature that is being introduced for automotive safety. We develop what we believe is an innovative new night vision system using gated imaging principles. The concept of gated imaging is described and its basic advantages, including the backscatter reduction mechanism for improved vision through fog, rain, and snow. Evaluation of performance is presented by analyzing bar pattern modulation and comparing Johnson chart predictions.

  16. Active Solar Energy System Design, Installation and Maintenance Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    material choice that meets these requirements is ethylene- propylene-diene-monomer ( EPDM ) rubber. Ease of installation is the second item to be considered...allowing a single thermometer to be moved from row to row for testing . * The thermometer should be Installed Initially on the same row - as the collector...require the flushing and pressure testing of the solar system piping. 7. Define responsibility for coordination of the contractor’s work. 8. Operational

  17. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  18. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  19. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  20. The Serum Complement System: A Simplified Laboratory Exercise to Measure the Activity of an Important Component of the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Jordan E.; Radziwon, Kimberly A.; Maniero, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    The immune system is a vital physiological component that affords animals protection from disease and is composed of innate and adaptive mechanisms that rely on cellular and dissolved components. The serum complement system is a series of dissolved proteins that protect against a variety of pathogens. The activity of complement in serum can be…