Science.gov

Sample records for activation takes place

  1. Studying Activities That Take Place in Speech Interactions: A Theoretical and Methodological Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Dizier de Almeida, Valérie; Colletta, Jean-Marc; Auriac-Slusarczyk, Emmanuelle; Specogna, Antonietta; Simon, Jean-Pascal; Fiema, Gabriela; Luxembourger, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a theoretical and methodological framework based on a pluralistic, concerted approach to the study of activities that take place in and through speech interactions. The framework has a general scope, applying to any collective activity taking form through language interactions. It contributes to a fuller understanding of the…

  2. Place-focused physical activity research, human agency, and social justice in public health: taking agency seriously in studies of the built environment.

    PubMed

    Blacksher, Erika; Lovasi, Gina S

    2012-03-01

    Built environment characteristics have been linked to health outcomes and health disparities. However, the effects of an environment on behavior may depend on human perception, interpretation, motivation, and other forms of human agency. We draw on epidemiological and ethical concepts to articulate a critique of research on the built environment and physical activity. We identify problematic assumptions and enumerate both scientific and ethical reasons to incorporate subjective perspectives and public engagement strategies into built environment research and interventions. We maintain that taking agency seriously is essential to the pursuit of health equity and the broader demands of social justice in public health, an important consideration as studies of the built environment and physical activity increasingly focus on socially disadvantaged communities. Attention to how people understand their environment and navigate competing demands can improve the scientific value of ongoing efforts to promote active living and health, while also better fulfilling our ethical obligations to the individuals and communities whose health we strive to protect.

  3. Short communication: Little change takes place in Camembert-type cheese water activities throughout ripening in terms of relative humidity and salt.

    PubMed

    Leclercq-Perlat, M-N; Hélias, A; Corrieu, G

    2013-01-01

    Water activity (a(w)) affects the growth and activity of ripening microorganisms. Moreover, it is generally accepted that a(w) depends on relative humidity (RH) and salt content; these 3 variables were usually measured on a given day in a cheese without the microorganism layer and without accounting for a distinction between the rind, the underrind, and the core. However, a(w) dynamics have never been thoroughly studied throughout cheese ripening. Experimental Camembert cheeses were ripened under controlled and aseptic conditions (temperature, gaseous atmosphere, and RH) for 14 d. In this study, only RH was varied. Samples were taken from the cheese (microorganism layer)-air interface, the rind, and the core. The aw of the cheese-air interface did not change over ripening when RH varied between 91 and 92% or between 97 and 98%. However, on d 5, we observed a small but significant increase in a(w), which coincided with the beginning of growth of Penicillium camemberti mycelia. After d 3, no significant differences were found between the a(w) of the cheese-air interface, the rind, and the core. From d 0 to 3, cheese rind a(w) increased from 0.94 to 0.97, which was probably due to the diffusion of salt from the rind to the core: NaCl content in the rind decreased from 3.7 to 1.6% and NaCl content in the core increased from 0.0 to 1.6%. Nevertheless, aw did not significantly vary in the core, raising questions about the real effect of salt on a(w).

  4. Does olfactory specific satiety take place in a natural setting?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, P; Bensafi, M; Rouby, C; Giboreau, A

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory-specific satiety (OSS) is characterized by a specific decrease in the odor pleasantness of a food eaten to satiety or smelled without ingestion. The usual protocol for studying OSS takes place in laboratory, a setting rather removed from the real world. Here, we set out to examine OSS in a natural setting: during a meal in a restaurant. We hypothesized that an aroma contained in a food that is eaten at the beginning of a meal decreases the pleasantness of the flavor of a food with the same aroma eaten at the end of the meal. In the first experiment (Experiment 1), a test group received an appetizer flavored with a test aroma (anise) at the beginning of the meal. After the main dish, they received a dessert flavored with the same aroma. A control group received the same aromatized dessert, but after a non-aromatized appetizer. This experiment was replicated (Experiment 2) using verbena as the test aroma. For both experiments, results revealed that aroma pleasantness, but not intensity or familiarity, significantly decreased in the test groups vs. the control groups. These findings extend the concept of OSS to a realistic eating context. PMID:23079143

  5. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Where does an alcohol test take place? 40.221... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Testing Sites, Forms, Equipment and Supplies Used in Alcohol Testing § 40.221 Where does an alcohol test take place? (a) A DOT alcohol test must take place at...

  6. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Where does an alcohol test take place? 40.221... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Testing Sites, Forms, Equipment and Supplies Used in Alcohol Testing § 40.221 Where does an alcohol test take place? (a) A DOT alcohol test must take place at...

  7. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Where does an alcohol test take place? 40.221... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Testing Sites, Forms, Equipment and Supplies Used in Alcohol Testing § 40.221 Where does an alcohol test take place? (a) A DOT alcohol test must take place at...

  8. Kiwifruit: taking its place in the global fruit bowl.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carol; Courtney, David

    2013-01-01

    While the world total production of kiwifruit has increased by over 50% during the last decade, the kiwifruit remains a niche fruit, taking up an estimated 0.22% of the global fruit bowl, which is dominated by apples, oranges, and bananas. Even though kiwifruit's share of the global fruit bowl has remained largely unchanged over the past 15 years, the scope for growth in the category is significant, with the nutritional and production characteristics of kiwifruit being on the right side of key global consumer trends around health and sustainability. Taking advantage of these consumer trends is one of two key challenges for the global kiwifruit industry. The second challenge is to harness the diverse natural and cultivated range of kiwifruit varieties (colors, flavors, sizes, and shapes) to stimulate the interest of consumers and grow the share of kiwifruit in the fruit basket through selecting cultivars that can develop meaningful market segments and meet consumer demand.

  9. Kiwifruit: taking its place in the global fruit bowl.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carol; Courtney, David

    2013-01-01

    While the world total production of kiwifruit has increased by over 50% during the last decade, the kiwifruit remains a niche fruit, taking up an estimated 0.22% of the global fruit bowl, which is dominated by apples, oranges, and bananas. Even though kiwifruit's share of the global fruit bowl has remained largely unchanged over the past 15 years, the scope for growth in the category is significant, with the nutritional and production characteristics of kiwifruit being on the right side of key global consumer trends around health and sustainability. Taking advantage of these consumer trends is one of two key challenges for the global kiwifruit industry. The second challenge is to harness the diverse natural and cultivated range of kiwifruit varieties (colors, flavors, sizes, and shapes) to stimulate the interest of consumers and grow the share of kiwifruit in the fruit basket through selecting cultivars that can develop meaningful market segments and meet consumer demand. PMID:23394979

  10. 2012 CCCC Chair's Address: Stories Take Place--A Performance in One Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Malea

    2012-01-01

    This is a written version of the address that Malea Powell gave at the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) Convention in St. Louis, Missouri, on Thursday, March 22, 2012. This address is a collection of stories. According to her, stories take place. Stories practice place into space. Stories produce habitable spaces. She…

  11. [Marketing approval and market surveillance of medical devices in Germany: Where does policy integration take place?].

    PubMed

    Lang, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Since 2011 new regulatory measures regarding medical devices have been set up with the aim to eliminate obstacles to innovations and to find more coordinated ways to marketing authorisation and market surveillance. This essay investigates whether these new and existing coordination mechanisms build up to a Joined-up Government approach. The analysis shows that the regulatory process should be adjusted along several dimensions. First, many organisations lack awareness regarding their stakeholders and focus solely on their immediate organisational activities. Second, the regulatory process (marketing authorisation and market surveillance) is too fragmented for an effective communication to take place. Finally, the underlying strategy process is an ad-hoc approach lacking continuity and continued involvement of, in particular, the responsible federal ministries.

  12. [Marketing approval and market surveillance of medical devices in Germany: Where does policy integration take place?].

    PubMed

    Lang, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Since 2011 new regulatory measures regarding medical devices have been set up with the aim to eliminate obstacles to innovations and to find more coordinated ways to marketing authorisation and market surveillance. This essay investigates whether these new and existing coordination mechanisms build up to a Joined-up Government approach. The analysis shows that the regulatory process should be adjusted along several dimensions. First, many organisations lack awareness regarding their stakeholders and focus solely on their immediate organisational activities. Second, the regulatory process (marketing authorisation and market surveillance) is too fragmented for an effective communication to take place. Finally, the underlying strategy process is an ad-hoc approach lacking continuity and continued involvement of, in particular, the responsible federal ministries. PMID:25066351

  13. Place cell activation predicts subsequent memory.

    PubMed

    Robitsek, R Jonathan; White, John A; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-10-01

    A major quandary in memory research is how hippocampal place cells, widely recognized as elements of a spatial map, contribute to episodic memory, our capacity to remember unique experiences that depends on hippocampal function. Here we recorded from hippocampal neurons as rats performed a T-maze alternation task in which they were required to remember a preceding experience over a delay in order to make a subsequent spatial choice. As it has been reported previously in other variations of this task, we observed differential firing that predicted correct subsequent choices, even as the animal traversed identical locations prior to the choice. Here we also observed that most place cells also fired differently on correct as compared to error trials. Among these cells, a large majority fired strongly before the delay or during the retrieval phase but were less active or failed to activate when the animal subsequently made an error. These findings join the place cell phenomenon with episodic memory performance dependent on the hippocampus, revealing that memory accuracy can be predicted by the activation of single place cells in the hippocampus.

  14. Active place recognition using image signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelson, Sean P.

    1992-11-01

    For reliable navigation, a mobile robot needs to be able to recognize where it is in the world. We previously described an efficient and effective image-based representation of perceptual information for place recognition. Each place is associated with a set of stored image signatures, each a matrix of numbers derived by evaluating some measurement functions over large blocks of pixels. One difficulty, though, is the large number of inherently ambiguous signatures which bloats the database and makes recognition more difficult. Furthermore, since small differences in orientation can produce very different images, reliable recognition requires many images. These problems can be ameliorated by using active methods to select the best signatures to use for the recognition. Two criteria for good images are distinctiveness (is the scene distinguishable from others?) and stability (how much do small viewpoint motions change image recognizability?). We formulate several heuristic distinctiveness metrics which are good predictors of real image distinctiveness. These functions are then used to direct the motion of the camera to find locally distinctive views for use in recognition. This method also produces some modicum of stability, since it uses a form of local optimization. We present the results of applying this method with a camera mounted on a pan-tilt platform.

  15. Using PlacesOnline in Instructional Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longan, Michael W.; Owusu, Francis; Roseman, Curtis C.

    2008-01-01

    PlacesOnLine.org is a Web portal that provides easy access to high quality Web sites that focus on places from around the world. It is intended for use by a wide range of people, including professional geographers, teachers and students at all levels, and the general public. This article explores the potential uses of PlacesOnLine as an…

  16. Makro- and micromorphological evidence of processes taking place during Albeluvisol development in S Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Daniela; Schülli-Maurer, Isabelle; Sperstad, Ragnhild; Sørensen, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    We studied two soil chronosequences in S Norway to identify processes involved in Albeluvisol formation. For this purpose, field observation of vertical and horizontal sections of soil profiles, soil chemical and mineralogical analyses were carried out, and in particular, micromorphological analysis was applied. The study area is located at the western and eastern side of the Oslofjord, S Norway, in the counties Vestfold and Østfold. This region is characterized by continuous glacio-isostatic uplift over the entire Holocene. Hence, the age of the land surface continuously increases from the coast towards higher elevations. Twelve soil profiles in loamy marine sediments were studied. Based on macro- and micromorphological observations and analytical data progressive soil formation is characterized as follows: As soon as the land surface is raised above sea level, five major processes are initiated: 1) development of deep desiccation cracks, forming a polygonal pattern; 2) compaction, taking place as soon as the coarse pores have been drained; 3) pyrite oxidation and release of sulfuric acid; 4) carbonate dissolution by acids from pyrite and iron oxidation resulting in rapid decarbonatization of the originally calcareous sediments; 5) precipitation of iron hypocoatings and coatings in the capillary fringe Soon after these very early processes have taken place, limited water permeability of the fine-textured sediments leads to horizon differentiation into Ah, Eg and Btg horizons within less than 2.1 ka. Eg horizons become lighter in colour with time. Also illuvial clay is already observed in the 2.1 ka-old soil. Soil pH in the upper part of the E horizon of this soil is already too low for significant clay mobilization. Clay illuviation is still active in all soils studied, but the upper boundary of the zone where pH favours clay mobilization is at 20-50 cm depth. Progressive clay illuviation over time is recorded in increasing thickness of clay coatings and

  17. Questions and Answers Regarding Actions to Take When Ending Shelter-in-Place

    SciTech Connect

    Shumpert, B.

    2003-12-30

    Shelter-in-place has found increasing acceptance as an effective protective action option for communities participating in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program. Studies have confirmed that it can provide optimum protection under certain accident conditions. However, emergency managers and planners, as well as the public, continue to be troubled by the need to end sheltering when the plume has passed in order to avoid sustained exposure to the small amount of agent that has penetrated the shelter. One of the concerns posed by this necessity is uncertainty regarding what hazards will then be faced in the environment outside the shelter and what actions can be taken to avoid those hazards. This report attempts to address those uncertainties. It recognizes that there is an extremely low probability that the environment outside the shelter will be contaminated with chemical agent residue. However, as people comply with an official recommendation to leave their shelters, they probably can't be certain that the environment is free from contamination. Therefore, this report identifies and explains specific and simple actions they can take to avoid the possibility of exposure to chemical agent hazards outside their shelters. It addresses such issues as the actions people should take upon ending shelter-in-place, what clothing they should wear, how they should handle animals, and what they should do about food in their homes and produce in their gardens.

  18. 23 CFR 636.402 - What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place after... What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document? Certain types.... These communication methods are optional. Type of information exchange When Purpose Parties involved...

  19. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  20. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  1. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  2. 23 CFR 636.402 - What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place after... What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document? Certain types.... The following table summarizes the types of communications that will be discussed in this...

  3. 23 CFR 636.402 - What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place after... What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document? Certain types.... The following table summarizes the types of communications that will be discussed in this...

  4. 23 CFR 636.402 - What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place after... What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document? Certain types.... The following table summarizes the types of communications that will be discussed in this...

  5. Modeling place field activity with hierarchical slow feature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, Fabian; Wiskott, Laurenz

    2015-01-01

    What are the computational laws of hippocampal activity? In this paper we argue for the slowness principle as a fundamental processing paradigm behind hippocampal place cell firing. We present six different studies from the experimental literature, performed with real-life rats, that we replicated in computer simulations. Each of the chosen studies allows rodents to develop stable place fields and then examines a distinct property of the established spatial encoding: adaptation to cue relocation and removal; directional dependent firing in the linear track and open field; and morphing and scaling the environment itself. Simulations are based on a hierarchical Slow Feature Analysis (SFA) network topped by a principal component analysis (ICA) output layer. The slowness principle is shown to account for the main findings of the presented experimental studies. The SFA network generates its responses using raw visual input only, which adds to its biological plausibility but requires experiments performed in light conditions. Future iterations of the model will thus have to incorporate additional information, such as path integration and grid cell activity, in order to be able to also replicate studies that take place during darkness. PMID:26052279

  6. The 'taking place' of health and wellbeing: towards non-representational theory.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gavin J; Chen, Sandra; Myers, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    For the last two decades health geography has focused on the dynamics between health and place. Although the social constructivist perspective of much research has provided many insights into the meanings of health and health care arguably, mirroring progress in the parent discipline of human geography, there could be a far more serious engagement with non-representational theory and the 'taking place' of health and health care. To showcase the importance and potential of this broadly, the idea of wellbeing is re-approached. The paper reflects on the ways wellbeing has been treated in research primarily as a meaningful and relatively prescribed state of life, to the neglect of process. Based on this critique, a qualitative study then illustrates the most immediate and everyday ways wellbeing might arise through 'affect'; the pre-personal mobile energies and intensities that result from physical encounters within assemblages of bodies and objects. Indeed, theoretically the findings support the proposition that, at one level, wellbeing might not be taken from environment but instead might emerge as the affective environment. They certainly raise awareness of how much in health might originate at the surface, prior to meaning, within life's infinite spatial doings, and thus they launch some final thoughts on the wider challenges and opportunities for non-representational health geographies.

  7. What it Takes to Successfully Implement Technology for Aging in Place: Focus Groups With Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Eveline JM; Luijkx, Katrien G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus JM

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in empowering older adults to age in place by deploying various types of technology (ie, eHealth, ambient assisted living technology, smart home technology, and gerontechnology). However, initiatives aimed at implementing these technologies are complicated by the fact that multiple stakeholder groups are involved. Goals and motives of stakeholders may not always be transparent or aligned, yet research on convergent and divergent positions of stakeholders is scarce. Objective To provide insight into the positions of stakeholder groups involved in the implementation of technology for aging in place by answering the following questions: What kind of technology do stakeholders see as relevant? What do stakeholders aim to achieve by implementing technology? What is needed to achieve successful implementations? Methods Mono-disciplinary focus groups were conducted with participants (n=29) representing five groups of stakeholders: older adults (6/29, 21%), care professionals (7/29, 24%), managers within home care or social work organizations (5/29, 17%), technology designers and suppliers (6/29, 21%), and policy makers (5/29, 17%). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Stakeholders considered 26 different types of technologies to be relevant for enabling independent living. Only 6 out of 26 (23%) types of technology were mentioned by all stakeholder groups. Care professionals mentioned fewer different types of technology than other groups. All stakeholder groups felt that the implementation of technology for aging in place can be considered a success when (1) older adults’ needs and wishes are prioritized during development and deployment of the technology, (2) the technology is accepted by older adults, (3) the technology provides benefits to older adults, and (4) favorable prerequisites for the use of technology by older adults exist. While stakeholders seemed to have identical aims, several underlying

  8. Activity-dependent plasticity of hippocampal place maps

    PubMed Central

    Schoenenberger, Philipp; O'Neill, Joseph; Csicsvari, Jozsef

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons encode a cognitive map of space. These maps are thought to be updated during learning and in response to changes in the environment through activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here we examine how changes in activity influence spatial coding in rats using halorhodopsin-mediated, spatially selective optogenetic silencing. Halorhoposin stimulation leads to light-induced suppression in many place cells and interneurons; some place cells increase their firing through disinhibition, whereas some show no effect. We find that place fields of the unaffected subpopulation remain stable. On the other hand, place fields of suppressed place cells were unstable, showing remapping across sessions before and after optogenetic inhibition. Disinhibited place cells had stable maps but sustained an elevated firing rate. These findings suggest that place representation in the hippocampus is constantly governed by activity-dependent processes, and that disinhibition may provide a mechanism for rate remapping. PMID:27282121

  9. OECD Global Science Forum's Astronomy Workshop to take place in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    members of the national astronomical community. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) are explicitly represented. Experts from the world-wide astronomy community have been invited to set the stage and provide input for the discussions. The choice by Germany and the OECD to make Munich the venue of this Global Science Forum Workshop is no coincidence. It is a recognition of the important role played by many institutions in the Munich region in the field of Astronomy and Astrophysics. They include the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität where the Workshop will take place, the Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik and the European Southern Observatory. These institutions are all participating in large programmes and projects in astronomy. ESO, for its part, is at the leading edge of world astronomy with its flagship facility, the Very Large Telescope in Paranal (Chile) and the newly started ALMA project at Chajnantor (Chile), being carried out in partnership between Europe and North America. Public Talks (Munich) on December 1, 2003 As a prelude to the Workshop, two public keynote presentations will take place on December 1 at the Deutsches Museum in Munich at 18:00 CET. The speakers are Malcolm Longair, Jacksonian Professor of Natural Philosophy and Head of Laboratory, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (UK) and Martin Harwit, Professor Emeritus of Astronomy, Cornell University, and former Director of the National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC (USA). The talks will be given in English and the entry to this public event is free. Professor Longair will speak on "Astrophysics and Cosmology in the Twenty-First Century" and Professor Harwit will speak on "The Growth of Understanding of our Universe". You can find more informaton on the Public Talks web page.

  10. "Why Are We Here?" Taking "Place" into Account in UK Outdoor Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sam

    2010-01-01

    "Place" is an under-researched and poorly documented element of UK outdoor environmental education. In the international literature, North American and Australian researchers and practitioners show considerable attention to "place". Yet UK outdoor environmental educators and researchers seem to have neglected this area despite calls for increased…

  11. Note Taking as a Generative Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peper, Richard J.; Mayer, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the effects of note taking on "what is learned" by college undergraduates from videotaped lectures. The results suggest that note taking can result in a broader learning outcome, rather than just more learning overall, because an assimilative encoding process is encouraged. (Author/GDC)

  12. An Experimental Investigation of the Process of Isotope Exchange that Takes Place when Heavy Water Is Exposed to the Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the recently developed method for rapid measurement of maximum density temperature to determine the rate at which hydrogen and deuterium isotope exchange takes place when a sample of heavy water is exposed to the atmosphere. We also provide a simple explanation for the observed linear rate of transition. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. 23 CFR 636.402 - What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document? 636.402 Section 636.402 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTING Exchanges § 636.402 What types of information exchange may...

  14. 76 FR 58473 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... area in less than 1.8 m of water. The proposed survey will take place on Apache's leases in Cook Inlet... in deeper water is called Ocean Bottom Receiver Location, which uses a small volume air gun (10 in\\3... terms of SEL than from the single water gun impulse (estimated at 188 dB re 1 Pa\\2\\-s) in...

  15. 78 FR 37209 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC564 Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Marine Seismic Survey in the Beaufort Sea,...

  16. NLR activation takes a direct route.

    PubMed

    Monie, Tom P

    2013-03-01

    For the first time there is now clear biochemical and biophysical evidence indicating that members of the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing (NLR) family can be activated as a result of direct interaction between the receptor and ligand. NLRX1 leucine-rich repeats bind to RNA; murine NAIP (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory protein) 5 binds flagellin directly; and NOD (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing) 1 and NOD2 may interact directly with fragments of peptidoglycan. It remains to be seen if NLRP3 has a specific ligand, but progress has been made in addressing its mechanism of activation, with cellular imbalances and mitochondrial dysfunction being important. This review updates our understanding of NLR activation in light of these recent advances and their impact on the NLR research. PMID:23394939

  17. Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum functions take place in different subcellular compartments of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Bredeston, Luis M; Caffaro, Carolina E; Samuelson, John; Hirschberg, Carlos B

    2005-09-16

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes dysentery in developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The lack of a defined Golgi apparatus in E. histolytica as well as in other protists led to the hypothesis that they had evolved prior to the acquisition of such organelle even though glycoproteins, glycolipids, and antigens have been detected, the latter of which react with antibodies against Golgi apparatus proteins of higher eukaryotes. We here provide direct evidence for Golgi apparatus-like functions in E. histolytica as well as for components of glycoprotein folding quality control. Using a combination of bioinformatic, cell biological, and biochemical approaches we have (a) cloned and expressed the E. histolytica UDP-galactose transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; its K(m) for UDP-galactose is 2.9 microm; (b) characterized vesicles in an extract of the above protist, which transport UDP-galactose into their lumen with a K(m) of 2.7 microm;(c) detected galactosyltransferase activity(ies) in the lumen of the above vesicles with the K(m) for UDP-galactose, using endogenous acceptors, being 93 microm;(d) measured latent apyrase activities in the above vesicles, suggesting they are in the lumen; (e) characterized UDP-glucose transport activities in Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum-like vesicles with K(m)s for UDP-glucose of approximately 2-4 microm. Although the endoplasmic reticulum-like fraction showed UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase activity, the Golgi apparatus-like fraction did not. This fraction contained other glucosyltransferases. Together, these studies demonstrate that E. histolytica has different vesicles that play a role in protein glycosylation and folding quality control, analogous to the above organellar functions of higher eukaryotes.

  18. 78 FR 77433 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... one elephant seal has been observed at Pigeon Point. California Sea Lion California sea lions are not... to PISCO to take marine mammals incidental to these same proposed activities (77 FR 72327, December...

  19. Taking the High Ground: Geothermal's Place in the Revolving Energy Market

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, Richard

    1992-03-24

    It's a genuine privilege for me to be here today. As Dr. Mock mentioned, I have been President of California Energy for not yet three months and have a total tenure in the industry of only one year. As a newcomer to the industry, I am honored to address this group and share my views on ''The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy''. You will see that my outlook for our industry is generally optimistic, shaped in part, perhaps by a newcomer's enthusiasm, but largely I think by my analysis of the opportunities which are open to us as an industry. Many of you and your predecessors over the last 20 years pioneered the geothermal industry in the United States. The risks were great, the results sometimes rewarding, sometimes disappointing. Government and the private sector forged an alliance that moved the industry ahead. Developers, utilities and federal land managers worked together to bring projects on line. Government helped identify geothermal areas, in many cases doing exploration work. The geothermal pioneers had to form entirely new, multi-disciplinary teams to solve problems unique to this resource. From discovery of fields, to environmental mitigation, to management of reservoirs and all of the steps in between, new teams had to be assembled. Geologists, geochemists, hydrologists, reservoir engineers and drilling technologists now apply their skills. Even anthropologists and biologists routinely get into the act in the environmental assessment phase of development. The care that our industry is taking today to do the job right reflects a maturing industry with high standards of performance. To be sure, mistakes were made in the early years, but the industry learned from them. We all know the value of responsible development and resource management to the long-term future of our industry. Improvements in technology and more efficient operations have helped lower our costs and improve our competitiveness. Our industry's progress has also

  20. Systemic analysis of desertification processes taking place in the Limpopo river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Mario; Attorre, Fabio; Vitale, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Desertification and land degradation are phenomena that ranks among the greatest environmental challenges of our time. Desertification is a global issue, with serious implications worldwide for biodiversity, socio-economic stability and sustainable development. Biophysical indicators of land degradation and desertification, like Net Primary Productivity (NPP) and Total Ecosystem Respiration (Reco) were provided by remote sensing technology (MODIS). The study aims to evaluate the dynamical changes of NPP and Reco in the Limpopo river basin, a Southern African region that includes, Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe, during the time period 2001-2010. In particular, the relations between NPP, Reco, environmental, physiological and land use parameters have been widely investigated through the application of a new and powerful statistical classifier, the Random Forest Analysis (RFA), and a general non-linear model, the Response Surface Regression Model (GRM). RFA highlighted that Temperature is one of the most important predictors affecting NPP and Reco in the Limpopo river basin. Conversely, other environmental parameters like, Precipitation, Evapotranspiration and Vegetation cover rarely influence NPP and Reco. Our results provide information on desertification and land degradation phenomena and a first step for identifying practices to mitigate their negative impacts. However, it must be taken into account that NPP and Reco depend by a multitude of factors (e.g. human activities, socio-economic policies) and can vary in relation to spatial and temporal scale. In order to achieve a better understanding of land degradation and desertification processes, land use and socio-economic variables should be considered.

  1. Slow and fast capacitive process taking place at the ionic liquid/electrode interface.

    PubMed

    Roling, Bernhard; Drüschler, Marcel; Huber, Benediki

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to characterise the interface between the ultrapure room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate and a Au(111) working electrode at electrode potentials more positive than the open circuit potential (-0.14 V vs. Pt pseudo-reference). Plots of the potential-dependent data in the complex capacitance plane reveal the existence of a fast and a slow capacitive process. In order to derive the contribution of both processes to the overall capacitance, the complex capacitance data were fitted using an empirical Cole-Cole equation. The differential capacitance of the fast process is almost constant between -0.14 V and +0.2 V (vs. Pt pseudo-reference) and decreases at more positive potentials, while the differential capacitance of the slower process exhibits a maximum at +0.2 V. This maximum leads to a maximum in the overall differential capacitance. We attribute the slow process to charge redistributions in the innermost ion layer, which require an activation energy in excess of that for ion transport in the room temperature ionic liquid. The differential capacitance maximum of the slow process at +0.2 V is most likely caused by reorientations of the 1-butyl-1l-methylpyrrolidinium cations in the innermost layer with the positively charged ring moving away from the Au(111) surface and leaving behind voids which are then occupied by anions. In a recent Monte Carlo simulation by Federov, Georgi and Kornyshev (Electrochem. Commun. 2010, 12, 296), such a process was identified as the origin of a differential capacitance maximum in the anodic regime. Our results suggest that the time scales of capacitive processes at the ionic liquid/metal interface are an important piece of information and should be considered in more detail in future experimental and theoretical studies.

  2. The intersection of gender and place in online health activities.

    PubMed

    Goldner, Melinda; Hale, Timothy M; Cotten, Shelia R; Stern, Michael J; Drentea, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This study examines how rurality and gender are related to online health activities. Rural women face greater health risks and yet have access to a weaker health system infrastructure, which has resulted in a health disadvantage. New health information technologies may ameliorate some of these disparities; thus, the authors examine the relevance of gender and place in going online to search for health information, buy medicines, participate in health-related support groups, communicate with physicians, or maintain a personal health record. Analyzing data from the National Cancer Institute's 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey, the authors found that the relations between rurality and gender vary, depending on the specific type of online health activity, and that gender may be a more salient factor than rurality in determining whether individuals engage in particular types of online health activities. This study contributes to the literature by examining how gender and place are related to online health activities, a combined area neglected in past research, and advancing research on gender and technology. This research highlights the importance of expanding high-speed access in rural locations, increasing technological and health literacy, and tailoring the Internet to specific populations. PMID:23886026

  3. 23 CFR 636.401 - What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place prior... What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document? Verbal or written information exchanges (such as in the first-phase of a two-phase selection procedure) must...

  4. LIDAR for remote sensing of contaminations on water and earth surfaces taking place during oil-gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashayev, A.; Tagiyev, B.; Allahverdiyev, K.; Musayev, A.; Sadikhov, I.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing of contaminations on water and earth surfaces (oil spills, films) taking place during oil-gas extraction is an interesting and actual problem. This problem may be solved by using different methods of optical spectroscopy, including: •Raman scattering; •light induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS); •fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) LIDARs are successfully used for remote sensing of chemical and biological substances at atmosphere. A new laser induced fluorescence (LIF) KA-14 LIDAR system for detecting of oil spills on the sea surface was employed at the National Aviation Academy of Azerbaijan. LIDAR's parameters are as follows: •laser CFR 200- type QUANTEL, λ = 355 nm, beam Ø = 5.35 mm, f = 20 Hz, pulse duration τ = 7 ns, pulse power 60 mJ; •diameter of Newtonian- type telescope is 200 mm; •collimator expansion of the laser beam diameter- not less than 3; •angle range of telescope measurements relative to horizon: from -20 to +20 degree; •spectral range of measurements: from 380 to 750 nm, number of spectral channels- 32; •maximum range of measurements- not less than 250 m. This LIDAR is the first performing these kind of research not only on the Azerbaijan beach of Caspian sea, but also on the earth places of Absheron peninsula, where oil-gas production takes place. We hope that the performance of LIDAR will have an International recognition and will make noticeable input on the International Research of Caspian sea surfaces.

  5. 78 FR 18965 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... on OCS leases in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska, during the 2014 open-water season (78 FR 12542). NMFS... whether to issue an IHA. NMFS refers the reader to the February 22, 2013, Federal Register notice (78 FR... Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to an Exploration Drilling Program in the Chukchi...

  6. 78 FR 24731 - Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Proposed IHA, initiating a 30- day public comment period, on February 22, 2013 (78 FR 12542). We then published a notice extending the comment period by 45 days on March 28, 2013 (78 FR 18965). On April 22... Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to an Exploration Drilling Program in the Chukchi...

  7. 76 FR 4093 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... comment periods in the Federal Register on April 19, 2010 (74 FR 20482) for the Beaufort Sea request and May 7, 2010 (74 FR 25730) for the Chukchi Sea request. On May 27, 2010, following the April 20, 2010... Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Exploration Drilling Programs in the Chukchi...

  8. 75 FR 80773 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Space Vehicle and Missile Launch... to launching space launch vehicles, long-range ballistic target missiles, and other smaller missile... small numbers of marine mammals incidental to launching space launch vehicles, long-range...

  9. Sexual activity and risk-taking in later life.

    PubMed

    Gott, C M

    2001-03-01

    The primary study objective was to identify the prevalence of sexual activity and sexual risk-taking behaviour among a sample of older community-based adults. Secondary objectives included gathering data about past experiences of consultations regarding sexual health issues with general practitioners (GPs) and at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics, and exploring participants' STI and HIV/AIDS-related information needs. Individuals over the age of 50 were identified from four electoral wards within Sheffield, UK by means of a postal screen based on the electoral register. Respondents self completed a short postal questionnaire. Three hundred and nineteen individuals aged over 50 years selected at random from the general population responded. Approximately 80% of respondents were currently sexually active and 7% engaged in behaviours that may place them at risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Risk takers were typically male, aged between 50 and 60 years and married. Being male was also related to reporting current or past sexual health concerns. In total, of 75 respondents reporting such concerns, two thirds had discussed these concerns with their GP or attended a GUM clinic. Levels of satisfaction with such consultations were generally high, but declined with increasing age. Overall, most participants felt they had not received very much information about STIs and HIV, and about one quarter reported that they would like to receive more information on these topics. These data have implications for all health and social care professionals who work with older people and indicate a potential need for education to help professionals meet the sexual health needs of their older patients/clients. Further implications for sexual health promotion and the need for additional research in this field are also discussed.

  10. Structural and functional changes in the olfactory pathway of adult Drosophila take place at a critical age.

    PubMed

    Devaud, Jean-Marc; Acebes, Angel; Ramaswami, Mani; Ferrús, Alberto

    2003-07-01

    The olfactory system of several holometabolous insect species undergoes anatomical changes after eclosion of the imago, following those occurring during metamorphosis. In parallel, odor experience and learning performance also evolve with age. Here, we analyze the case of adult Drosophila females. Synaptogenesis in the antennal lobe (AL) starts in late pupa and continues during the first days of adult life, at the same time as the behavioral response to odors matures. Individual olfactory glomeruli (DM6, DM2, and V) display specific growth patterns between days 1 and 12 of adult life. Experience can modify the olfactory pathway both structurally and functionally as shown by adaptation experiments. The modifications associated with this form of nonassociative learning seem to take place at a critical age. Exposure to benzaldehyde at days 2-5 of adult life, but not at 8-11, causes behavioral adaptation as well as structural changes in DM2 and V glomeruli. Altered levels in intracellular cAMP, caused by dunce and rutabaga mutants, do not affect the normal changes in glomerular size, at least at day 6 of development, but they prevent those elicited by experience, establishing a molecular difference between glomerular changes of intrinsic versus environmental origin. Taken together, these data demonstrate an imprinting-like phenomenon in the olfactory pathway of young Drosophila adults, and illustrate its glomerulus-specific dynamics.

  11. Taking Exercise: Cultural Diversity and Physically Active Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Doune; Abbott, Rebecca; Knez, Kelly; Nelson, Alison

    2009-01-01

    "Taking exercise", whether it be recreational walking, participating in club sport, or joining in a physical education (PE) lesson, is a culturally loaded behaviour. We all see, do and talk about physical activity differently, yet, there has been relatively little research or theorising around difference in race, ethnicity, cultural diversity and…

  12. Assembly of the ligand-binding conformation of Mr 46,000 mannose 6- phosphate-specific receptor takes place before reaching the Golgi complex

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The early steps in the biosynthesis of Mr 46,000 mannose 6-phosphate- specific receptor (MPR 46) have been studied by in vivo labeling of transfected BHK cells. The acquisition of phosphomannan-binding activity was compared with changes in protein structure and posttranslational modifications of MPR 46. Intramolecular disulfide bonds were formed before MPR 46 acquired a ligand-binding conformation. A conformational change that resulted in increased trypsin resistance, formation of highly immunogenic epitopes and assembly to noncovalently linked homodimers was observed almost simultaneously with the acquisition of ligand-binding activity. MPR 46 was shown to acquire ligand-binding activity before N-linked oligosaccharides were processed to complex-type forms. Maturation of the ligand-binding conformation was observed under conditions where transport to the Golgi was blocked by lowering the temperature to 16 degrees C, or by addition of brefeldin A or dinitrophenol to the medium at 37 degrees C. This suggests that receptor maturation and assembly take place before reaching the Golgi complex. The affinity towards phosphomannan- containing ligands was shown to be similar for the high-mannose and complex-glycosylated forms of MPR 46. PMID:2157722

  13. Dissociating the past from the present in the activity of place cells.

    PubMed

    de Hoz, Livia; Wood, Emma R

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that declarative memories can be dependent on both an episodic and a semantic memory system. While the semantic system deals with factual information devoid of reference to its acquisition, the episodic system, characterized by mental time travel, deals with the unique past experience in which an event took place. Episodic memory is characteristically hippocampus-dependent. Place cells are recorded from the hippocampus of rodents and their firing reflects many of the key characteristics of episodic memory. For example, they encode information about "what" happens "where," as well as temporal information. However, when these features are expressed during an animal's behavior, the neuronal activity could merely be categorizing the present situation and could therefore reflect semantic memory rather than episodic memory. We propose that mental time travel is the key feature of episodic memory and that it should take a form, in the awake animal, similar to the replay of behavioral patterns of activity that has been observed in hippocampus during sleep. Using tasks designed to evoke episodic memory, one should be able to see memory reactivation of behaviorally relevant sequences of activity in the awake animal while recording from hippocampus and other cortical structures.

  14. Young People Take Their Rightful Places as Full and Contributing Members of a World Class Workforce: Philadelphia Youth Network Annual Report 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Youth Network, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The title of this year's annual report has particular meaning for all of the staff at the Philadelphia Youth Network. The phrase derives from Philadelphia Youth Network's (PYN's) new vision statement, developed as part of its recent strategic planning process, which reads: All of our city's young people take their rightful places as full and…

  15. 75 FR 25729 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...NMFS received an application from Shell Offshore Inc. (Shell) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to offshore exploration drilling on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to issue an IHA to Shell to take, by......

  16. 78 FR 12541 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ...NMFS received an application from ConocoPhillips Company (COP) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to offshore exploration drilling on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to issue an IHA to COP to take, by......

  17. 75 FR 8652 - Incidental Takes of Marine Mammals During Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ....S. The survey will take place in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the U.S. in water depths... transect lines within the CNMI (see Figure 1 of L-DEO's application). The survey will take place in water... varies with water depth. The pulse interval is 1 s, but a common mode of operation is to broadcast...

  18. 75 FR 24906 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ...: North Atlantic right whale; blue whale; fin whale; sei whale; minke whale; humpback whale; killer whale..., the North Atlantic right, blue, fin, sei, humpback, and sperm whales are all listed as endangered... the ``Estimated Take by Incidental Harassment'' section). Blue and sperm whales are not commonly......

  19. 77 FR 49921 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ...NMFS received an application from ION Geophysical (ION) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment only, incidental to a proposed marine seismic survey in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, Alaska, between October and December 2012. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to issue an IHA to ION to......

  20. 78 FR 52135 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... AFB, published in the Federal Register on June 4, 2013 (78 FR 33357). During the 30-day public comment... mammal takes was fully explained in the IHA application, the Notice of Proposed IHA (78 FR 33357, June 4..., and those straddling the 200 meter isobath were clipped to remove deep water areas. In...

  1. 77 FR 27321 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... of an incidental harassment authorization. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to Shell Gulf of Mexico Inc. (Shell) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental...

  2. 78 FR 28411 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Mexico Inc. (Shell) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by... not limited to, migration, breathing, nursing, breeding, feeding, or sheltering . Summary of Request.... For example, at the Guerreo Negro Lagoon in Baja California, Mexico, which is one of the...

  3. Placing the power of real options analysis into the hands of natural resource managers - taking the next step.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Rohan; Howden, Mark; Hayman, Peter

    2013-07-30

    This paper explores heuristic methods with potential to place the analytical power of real options analysis into the hands of natural resource managers. The complexity of real options analysis has led to patchy or ephemeral adoption even by corporate managers familiar with the financial-market origins of valuation methods. Intuitively accessible methods for estimating the value of real options have begun to evolve, but their evaluation has mostly been limited to researcher-driven applications. In this paper we work closely with Bush Heritage Australia to evaluate the potential of real options analysis to support the intuitive judgement of conservation estate managers in covenanting land with uncertain future conservation value due to climate change. The results show that modified decision trees have potential to estimate the option value of covenanting individual properties while time and ongoing research resolves their future conservation value. Complementing this, Luehrman's option space has potential to assist managers with limited budgets to increase the portfolio value of multiple properties with different conservation attributes.

  4. Placing the power of real options analysis into the hands of natural resource managers - taking the next step.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Rohan; Howden, Mark; Hayman, Peter

    2013-07-30

    This paper explores heuristic methods with potential to place the analytical power of real options analysis into the hands of natural resource managers. The complexity of real options analysis has led to patchy or ephemeral adoption even by corporate managers familiar with the financial-market origins of valuation methods. Intuitively accessible methods for estimating the value of real options have begun to evolve, but their evaluation has mostly been limited to researcher-driven applications. In this paper we work closely with Bush Heritage Australia to evaluate the potential of real options analysis to support the intuitive judgement of conservation estate managers in covenanting land with uncertain future conservation value due to climate change. The results show that modified decision trees have potential to estimate the option value of covenanting individual properties while time and ongoing research resolves their future conservation value. Complementing this, Luehrman's option space has potential to assist managers with limited budgets to increase the portfolio value of multiple properties with different conservation attributes. PMID:23702285

  5. The Learner, the Media and the Community: How Does Learning Take Place in the Other CALL Triangle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockett, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    In this research project, students in applied linguistics were asked to keep blogs over a three-month period in which they reported on their online informal learning of English through activities such as social networking, downloading films and TV series and listening to music on demand. The study is situated within the framework of complexity…

  6. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... United States. If the person who performed the activity on behalf of the FSC is an independent contractor... variable contract terms, such as price, credit terms, quantity, or time or manner of delivery, or specifies... new price. The written confirmation by the FSC of an oral agreement on a variable contract...

  7. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... United States. If the person who performed the activity on behalf of the FSC is an independent contractor... variable contract terms, such as price, credit terms, quantity, or time or manner of delivery, or specifies... new price. The written confirmation by the FSC of an oral agreement on a variable contract...

  8. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... United States. If the person who performed the activity on behalf of the FSC is an independent contractor... variable contract terms, such as price, credit terms, quantity, or time or manner of delivery, or specifies... new price. The written confirmation by the FSC of an oral agreement on a variable contract...

  9. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... United States. If the person who performed the activity on behalf of the FSC is an independent contractor... variable contract terms, such as price, credit terms, quantity, or time or manner of delivery, or specifies... new price. The written confirmation by the FSC of an oral agreement on a variable contract...

  10. 26 CFR 1.924(d)-1 - Requirement that economic processes take place outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... United States. If the person who performed the activity on behalf of the FSC is an independent contractor... variable contract terms, such as price, credit terms, quantity, or time or manner of delivery, or specifies... new price. The written confirmation by the FSC of an oral agreement on a variable contract...

  11. [Impact of market place activity on the spread of STI/AIDS in Sikasso, Mali].

    PubMed

    Maiga, Y; Cissoko, Y; Toloba, Y; Samake, A; Kampo, B; Bougoudogo, F

    2010-02-01

    Since the beginning of the global HIV pandemic, more than 47 million people have been infected and more than 14 millions of people have died with 95% living in developing countries. Mali is located in West Africa that has been relatively less affected. However Mali is a country with a migratory culture. This study was conducted in primary health care centers located on the main road to neighboring countries with higher HIV prevalence. Attention was focused on healthcare services provided around market places in the main cities where diverse populations converge on a weekly basis. Attendance measured at five health centers on market day was compared with attendance on the other days of the week. In addition the level of sexually transmitted infections (STI) diagnosed on market days was determined to compare prevalence in the resident versus non-resident population in function of market activity. Attendance at all the centers was significantly higher on market days. This increase was due mainly to the non-resident population (60.2% vs. 46.5%; p=0.005). Findings also showed that the proportion of STI diagnosed was higher in the non-resident than resident population, but the difference was not statistically significant (15.6% vs. 11.3%; p=0.320). These results indicate that migration has an impact on the spread of STI. This is probably the same for HIV since these pathologies are known to be linked. Control strategies to fight against STI/AIDS could be improved by taking into account market place activity that is common in all localities of Mali and Africa.

  12. 75 FR 5045 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ...) gunnery missions in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The USAF's activities are considered military readiness...'' provisions and amended the definition of ``harassment'' as it applies to a ``military readiness activity'' to... IHA and request for 30-day public comment published on January 23, 2006 (71 FR 3474). A 1-year IHA...

  13. 76 FR 43267 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... USAF's activities are considered military readiness activities. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal... geographical region'' provisions and amended the definition of ``harassment'' as it applies to a ``military... Notice of Proposed IHA and request for 30-day public comment published on January 23, 2006 (71 FR...

  14. 76 FR 62378 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ...) gunnery missions in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The USAF's activities are considered military readiness... geographical region'' provisions and amended the definition of ``harassment'' as it applies to a ``military... Notice of Proposed IHA and request for 30-day public comment published on January 23, 2006 (71 FR...

  15. 77 FR 65059 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... FR 49922). That notice described, in detail, ION's proposed activity, the marine mammal species that... Register notice for the proposed IHA (77 FR 49922; August 17, 2012), ION would start its seismic survey... proposed IHA (77 FR 49922; August 17, 2012), ION's in-ice seismic survey would be performed in a...

  16. 77 FR 12246 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... mammals incidental to black abalone (Haliotis cracherodii) research surveys. The first of five IHAs for the specified activities was issued to VanBlaricom on September 23, 2003 (68 FR 57427; October 3, 2003); the most recent of these was issued on January 18, 2008 (73 FR 4841; January 28, 2008),...

  17. 75 FR 41440 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... blue whales. Response: Section 7 consultation under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) was reinitiated in... sperm and blue whales in addition to the other cetacean species cited in the MMC's comment. The 2007 opinion concluded that those activities were not likely to adversely affect sperm and blue whales....

  18. 75 FR 53672 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ..., humpback, and fin whales, and is not likely to adversely affect sperm, sei, or blue whales and Kemp's..., and is not likely to adversely affect sperm, sei, or blue whales. National Environmental Policy Act... incidental harassment authorization for this activity pursuant to section 101(a)(5)(D) of the MMPA (74...

  19. 76 FR 9250 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Fin whale........ Endangered. B. musculus Blue whale....... Endangered. Suborder Odontoceti (toothed... for this activity, which was published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 (74 FR 33960... action contained in the proposed rule (74 FR 33960; July 14, 2009; pages 33961-33962) has not...

  20. 77 FR 68107 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... preliminary determinations and explained the basis for the proposal and preliminary determinations (77 FR... the Notice of Proposed IHA (77 FR 50990, August 23, 2012). Routine shore activity will continue to... additional information on the survey methodology (77 FR 50990, August 23, 2012). That information has...

  1. 78 FR 79403 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... proposal and preliminary determinations (78 FR 64918). The notice initiated a 30-day public comment period... incidental to these same proposed activities (77 FR 72327, December 5, 2012). That IHA expired on December 2... ADDRESSES) and the Notice of Proposed IHA (78 FR 64918, October 30, 2013). Community Structure...

  2. 75 FR 49709 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 27708). That notice described, in detail, Shell's proposed activity, the marine mammal... application, the notice of proposed IHA (75 FR 27708; May 18, 2010) and this document), NMFS determined that... the proposed IHA (75 FR 27708; May 18, 2010), the EA for the issuance of IHAs to Shell and Statoil...

  3. 77 FR 27720 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 58473) discussing the effects on marine mammals and making... the proposed IHA (76 FR 58473, September 21, 2011). The activities to be conducted have not changed... should refer to the proposed IHA notice (76 FR 58473, September 21, 2011), the IHA application...

  4. 78 FR 47495 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Register on May 14, 2012 (78 FR 28412). That notice described, in detail, Shell's proposed activity, the... serious injury (60 FR 28381, May 31, 1995). A private citizen further states that the marine survey is... limited to only those that may involve non-serious injury (60 FR 28379; May 31, 1995). While the...

  5. 75 FR 49759 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... FR 32379). That notice described, in detail, Statoil's proposed activity, the marine mammal species... application, the notice of proposed IHA (75 FR 32379; June 8, 2010) and this document), NMFS determined that... in the proposed IHA (75 FR 32379; June 18, 2010), the EA for the issuance of IHAs to Shell...

  6. 76 FR 46729 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... in the Federal Register notice for the proposed IHA (76 FR 30110; May 24, 2011). That information has... IHA (76 FR 30110; May 24, 2011). That information has not changed and is therefore not repeated here... Register on May 24, 2011 (76 FR 30110). That notice described, in detail, Statoil's proposed activity,...

  7. 75 FR 32379 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... mammals, readers are encouraged to review NMFS' response to comments on this matter found in 69 FR 74905 (December 14, 2004), 71 FR 43112 (July 31, 2006), 71 FR 50027 (August 24, 2006), and 71 FR 49418 (August 23... of 26 active airguns in 13 clusters. The difference in discharge volume would lead to an...

  8. 77 FR 40007 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... of 3D seismic images requires the deployment of many parallel cables spaced close together over the... on May 1, 2012 (77 FR 25830). That notice described, in detail, BP's proposed activity, the marine... that the language is consistent with that referenced in the main body of the Federal Register...

  9. 76 FR 30110 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... 410 ft), respectively. Therefore, it is unlikely that such effects would occur during Statoil's... Arctic Ocean or strand as a result of the proposed shallow hazards survey. Potential Effects From Active... have been proposed for Statoil's 2011 open water shallow hazards survey in the Chukchi Sea....

  10. 77 FR 2350 - Agency Information Collection (Request for Change of Program or Place of Training): Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ....Regulations.gov or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Request for Change of Program or Place of Training): Activity Under... INFORMATION: Title: Request for Change of Program or Place of Training, VA Form 22-1995. OMB Control...

  11. 76 FR 6406 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ...; proposed incidental harassment authorization; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS has received an application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to construction activities as part of a pile replacement project....

  12. 76 FR 79409 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...; proposed incidental harassment authorization; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS has received an application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to construction activities as part of a wharf construction...

  13. 77 FR 25408 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ...; proposed incidental harassment authorization; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS has received an application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to construction activities as part of a pile replacement project....

  14. 76 FR 4300 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ...; proposed incidental harassment authorization; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS has received an application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to pile driving activities as part of a test pile program. Pursuant to...

  15. 75 FR 42121 - Marine Mammals; Incidental Take During Specified Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... sea otters are listed as threatened under the ESA (42 FR 2965; January 14, 1977) and, because of their... applicant to incidentally take, by harassment, small numbers of southern sea otters for a period of 6 months... does not apply to southern sea otters. Section 101(a)(5)(D) of the MMPA established an...

  16. Place-Based Science Teaching and Learning: 40 Activities for K-8 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Cory A.; Provenzo, Eugene F., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in theory and best-practices research, this practical text provides elementary and middle school teachers with 40 place-based activities that will help them to make science learning relevant to their students. This text provides teachers with both a rationale and a set of strategies and activities for teaching science in a local context…

  17. A computerized system for the simultaneous monitoring of place conditioning and locomotor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Brockwell, N T; Ferguson, D S; Beninger, R J

    1996-02-01

    Place conditioning is one of the most popular behavioral methods for assessing the rewarding properties of various substances. Many substances that are rewarding also influence motor activity. This report describes a computerized system designed to simultaneously monitor both place conditioning and locomotor activity. The system consists of 4 independent conditioning boxes, each equipped with 6 pairs of photosensors connected to an Experiment Controller, an electronic board containing a microprocessor, a programable timer, and 16 K of RAM used to store both instructions and data. The effects of the stimulant (+)-amphetamine were assessed using this system and found to produce a place preference comparable to that obtained from a previously utilized mechanical timer system. The computerized system also demonstrated that amphetamine increased unconditioned activity. There are a number of advantages and broader applications of the new methodology.

  18. It Takes a Virtual Community: Promoting Collaboration through Student Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battista, Ludmila; Forrey, Carol; Stevenson, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Distance education provides many nontraditional students with the opportunity to pursue a college education not possible through traditional brick and mortar education. Although not meeting face-to-face, student activities help promote a stronger connection between the classroom and university community. This paper will discuss strategies for…

  19. More than Activities: Using a "Sense of Place" to Enrich Student Experience in Adventure Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leather, Mark; Nicholls, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in recent years in the significance of a sense of place in the literature of outdoor adventure education. In the UK relationships between outdoor education and the environment still appear largely focused on the science of the natural environment and the activity in question. In this paper, we present empirical…

  20. Place as Text: Approaches to Active Learning. 2nd Edition. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braid, Bernice, Ed.; Long, Ada, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The decade since publication of "Place as Text: Approaches to Active Learning" has seen an explosion of interest and productivity in the field of experiential education. This monograph presents a story of an experiment and a blueprint of sorts for anyone interested in enriching an existing program or willing to experiment with pedagogy…

  1. STS-113 crew members take part in CEIT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, STS-113 Mission Specialists John Herrington (left) and Michael Lopez-Alegria (center) practice working with equipment in Endeavour. The primary payloads on mission STS-113 are the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the International Space Station, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  2. STS-113 crew members take part in CEIT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - As part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, STS-113 Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria (left) and John Herrington (center) look over equipment that will be carried on the mission. The primary payloads on mission STS-113 are the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the International Space Station, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  3. STS-113 crew members take part in CEIT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, STS-113 Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria (left) and John Herrington (right) practice working with flight equipment in Endeavour. The primary payloads on mission STS-113 are the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the International Space Station, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  4. STS-113 crew members take part in CEIT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington looks over paperwork for equipment in Endeavour that will be carried on the mission. The primary payloads on mission STS-113 are the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the International Space Station, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  5. 75 FR 79342 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Navy Training Activities Conducted Within the Northwest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... preamble to the final rule (75 FR 69296, November 10, 2010), that the taking resulting from the activities... findings, described in the preamble to the final rule (75 FR 45527, August 3, 2010), that the taking... Training Activities Conducted Within the Northwest Training Range Complex (NWTRC) and Military...

  6. 78 FR 9373 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Construction at Orcas Island and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... pulled from the water and placed on a barge for transfer upland. Vibratory removal will take... on in-water measurements at the WSF Port Townsend Ferry Terminal (Laughlin 2011a), removal of 12-inch...-inch timber and plastic-faced piles will be 152 dB re 1 Pa (rms) at 16 m. Based on...

  7. Contribution of wood stoves and fire places to mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter inside homes.

    PubMed

    van Houdt, J J; Daenen, C M; Boleij, J S; Alink, G M

    1986-01-01

    Wood combustion produces compounds that are mutagenic in the Salmonella/microsome assay. As combustion products can be emitted in the home and the use of wood as a residential energy source is growing, an impact on human health might be of concern. In this study experiments were carried out to determine the contribution of wood combustion in stoves and fire places to indoor mutagenic activity under normal living conditions. Airborne particles from living rooms which were heated by stoves, or by fire places, and from outdoors were collected simultaneously. In each room two samples were collected during two consecutive weeks: one week the room was heated by central heating, the other week by wood combustion. Sampling took place in a total of 24 homes. Methanol extracts of the samples were tested in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay. Results show that mutagenic activity of outdoor air exceeds indoor mutagenicity. At the same time a correlation is found between in- and out-door mutagenicity, both with and without S9. However, a large difference is found between the ratio -S9/+S9 of in- and out-door mutagenic activity. Systematic differences in the ratio -S9/+S9 between control and experimental conditions are not observed. The use of wood stoves caused an increase of indoor mutagenicity in 8 out of 12 homes. It could be concluded that the use of an open fire consistently leads to an increase of mutagenic activity. This increase was caused by wood combustion products.

  8. A computer approach to measuring shuttle box activity and conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Bozarth, M A

    1983-12-01

    A procedure is described for measuring locomotor activity and place preference using an Apple II + computer. The interface consists of a single integrated circuit connected by a 16 pin jumper cable to the Apple's game I/O connector. This approach can be easily adapted to provide sequential reading of one to seven input lines from up to 16 different test boxes. The software is written in basic and doesn't require any knowledge of memory addressing or machine language programming.

  9. Take-Home Challenges: Extending Discovery-Based Activities beyond the General Chemistry Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, P. K.; Sarquis, A. M.

    1996-04-01

    In an effort to more effectively integrate the experimental nature of chemistry into our students' experiences, we are developing and implementing discovery-based activities into both the laboratory and lecture components of general chemistry. Below we describe and provide an example of a "take-home challenge" intended to supplement the lecture component of the course. These take-home challenges involve the student in chemistry exploration outside of class and extend the context of content and experimentation into a nontraditional laboratory environment. Over 25 take-home challenges have been developed to date. Preliminary evaluation of the impact of the take-home challenges shows that students reporting themselves as receiving a B or C grade in the course find the challenges very useful in helping them gain a conceptual understanding of the phenomena addressed. Students earning an A grade report little or no impact on their learning. Prepared as one-page handouts, each take-home challenge begins with a scene-setting introduction followed by pertinent background information, a list of materials to be collected, and any appropriate safety precautions. The exploration component of the activity integrates leading questions with the procedural instructions to help guide the students through the discovery process and challenge them to stretch their understanding of the chemistry. After completing a take-home challenge activity, students submit written reports containing responses to the questions posed, observations of data collected, and their responses to the challenge. The accompanying sample take-home challenge activity is provided as a novel adaptation of the belch phenomenon that challenges students to experiment in order to explain the factors that account for the observed behavior. Persons interested in field testing the take-home challenges with their classes should contact the authors. Belch Bottle Challenge: What factors are responsible for the behavior of a

  10. Ventral striatum activation to prosocial rewards predicts longitudinal declines in adolescent risk taking.

    PubMed

    Telzer, Eva H; Fuligni, Andrew J; Lieberman, Matthew D; Galván, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of intensified emotions and an increase in motivated behaviors and passions. Evidence from developmental neuroscience suggests that this heightened emotionality occurs, in part, due to a peak in functional reactivity to rewarding stimuli, which renders adolescents more oriented toward reward-seeking behaviors. Most prior work has focused on how reward sensitivity may create vulnerabilities, leading to increases in risk taking. Here, we test whether heightened reward sensitivity may potentially be an asset for adolescents when engaged in prosocial activities. Thirty-two adolescents were followed over a one-year period to examine whether ventral striatum activation to prosocial rewards predicts decreases in risk taking over a year. Results show that heightened ventral striatum activation to prosocial stimuli relates to longitudinal declines in risk taking. Therefore, the very same neural region that has conferred vulnerability for adolescent risk taking may also be protective against risk taking. PMID:23245219

  11. Peers Increase Adolescent Risk Taking by Enhancing Activity in the Brain's Reward Circuitry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chein, Jason; Albert, Dustin; O'Brien, Lia; Uckert, Kaitlyn; Steinberg, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    The presence of peers increases risk taking among adolescents but not adults. We posited that the presence of peers may promote adolescent risk taking by sensitizing brain regions associated with the anticipation of potential rewards. Using fMRI, we measured brain activity in adolescents, young adults, and adults as they made decisions in a…

  12. 75 FR 80471 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ...), for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment incidental to... incidentally harass, by Level B harassment only, four species of marine mammals during the specified activity... intentional, taking by harassment of small numbers of marine mammals of a species or population stock,...

  13. Places for Children - Children's Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Kim

    2004-01-01

    In their everyday lives, children largely stay within and relate to three settings - their homes, schools and recreational institutions. These environments have been created by adults and designated by them as "places for children". A more differentiated picture of children's spatial culture emerges when children discuss and take photographs of…

  14. Peers increase adolescent risk taking by enhancing activity in the brain’s reward circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Chein, Jason; Albert, Dustin; O’Brien, Lia; Uckert, Kaitlyn; Steinberg, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    The presence of peers increases risk taking among adolescents but not adults. We posited that the presence of peers may promote adolescent risk taking by sensitizing brain regions associated with the anticipation of potential rewards. Using fMRI, we measured brain activity in adolescents, young adults, and adults as they made decisions in a simulated driving task. Participants completed one task block while alone, and one block while their performance was observed by peers in an adjacent room. During peer observation blocks, adolescents selectively demonstrated greater activation in reward-related brain regions, including the ventral striatum and orbitofrontal cortex, and activity in these regions predicted subsequent risk taking. Brain areas associated with cognitive control were less strongly recruited by adolescents than adults, but activity in the cognitive control system did not vary with social context. Results suggest that the presence of peers increases adolescent risk taking by heightening sensitivity to the potential reward value of risky decisions. PMID:21499511

  15. Putting Activism in Its Place: The Neighborhood Context of Participation in Neighborhood-Focused Activism.

    PubMed

    Gilster, Megan E

    2014-02-01

    Neighborhood-focused activism is one way residents enact their vision for their community. This study examines the neighborhood socioeconomic antecedents of participation in neighborhood-focused activism in a diverse sample of residents of Chicago neighborhoods to test three theories of neighborhood socioeconomic context and participation: 1) affluence affords participation, 2) activism addresses neighborhood needs associated with disadvantage, and 3) socioeconomic inequality creates contention that necessitates participation. Measuring neighborhood socioeconomic status as two unique dimensions, neighborhood affluence and neighborhood disadvantage, and accounting for both individual and neighborhood characteristics, I find support for each theory. Neighborhood socioeconomic context matters for participation, regardless of individual socioeconomic characteristics. Only when these three perspectives are considered jointly can they fully capture the socioeconomic context of participation in neighborhood-focused activism.

  16. Taking a Step Back: Learning without the Facilitator on Solo Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report on the nature of student learning resulting from an open facilitation approach to solo activities. Three key moments of facilitator intervention were identified at which the facilitator was encouraged to take a step back from directing the experience. They are the pre-activity brief, the mid-activity visit…

  17. Lateralized human hippocampal activity predicts navigation based on sequence or place memory

    PubMed Central

    Iglói, Kinga; Doeller, Christian F.; Berthoz, Alain; Rondi-Reig, Laure; Burgess, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for both spatial navigation and episodic memory, suggesting that it provides a common function to both. Here we adapt a spatial paradigm, developed for rodents, for use with functional MRI in humans to show that activation of the right hippocampus predicts the use of an allocentric spatial representation, and activation of the left hippocampus predicts the use of a sequential egocentric representation. Both representations can be identified in hippocampal activity before their effect on behavior at subsequent choice-points. Our results suggest that, rather than providing a single common function, the two hippocampi provide complementary representations for navigation, concerning places on the right and temporal sequences on the left, both of which likely contribute to different aspects of episodic memory. PMID:20660746

  18. Using an Informal Cardiovascular System Activity to Study the Effectiveness of Science Education in Unexpected Places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzack, Elyssa Lynne; Petersen, Greta M. Zenner

    2011-08-01

    Venues for informal science education are usually those sought out by people who are specifically looking for an educational experience. Whether planning a trip to a museum or choosing a television program, these individuals are actively seeking an informal educational experience; they are a self-selected group. This paper investigates whether members of the public will respond to an informal science activity that is placed in a location where learning about science would be unexpected. This project developed and used an activity about the cardiovascular system in which participants were able to walk the path of blood flow through the heart, body, and lungs. This activity was tested in two types of settings: where science was either expected or unexpected. A non-traditional assessment method was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the activity in the unexpected versus the expected settings. Ultimately, the activity was found to be equally effective in both settings, providing evidence for success in bringing informal science education to the general population in non-traditional venues.

  19. 78 FR 14985 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... first issued an IHA, valid for a period of one year, on April 1, 2010 (75 FR 17382), and was subsequently issued IHAs for incidental take associated with the same activities on April 21, 2011 (76 FR 23306) and April 17, 2012 (77 FR 24471). The proposed activities include management of a naturally-...

  20. 75 FR 78228 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Columbia River Crossing Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... authorization to take marine mammals incidental to bridge construction and demolition activities at the Columbia... (MMPA), NMFS is announcing receipt of CRC's request for the development and implementation of... activities: Replacement of the existing Columbia River bridges with two new structures; Widening of...

  1. Affordances for Risk-Taking and Physical Activity in Australian Early Childhood Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Helen; Sweller, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Motor competence and physical activity (PA) patterns are established during the early childhood years. Early childhood education (ECE) settings are an important context for children's engagement in physically active play. This paper reports the findings from an online survey examining resources, spaces and affordances for PA and risk-taking in…

  2. Differential associations between impulsivity and risk-taking and brain activations underlying working memory in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Karni; Rutherford, Helena J.V.; Mencl, W. Einar; Lacadie, Cheryl M.; Potenza, Marc N.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2014-01-01

    Increased impulsivity and risk-taking are common during adolescence and relate importantly to addictive behaviors. However, the extent to which impulsivity and risk-taking relate to brain activations that mediate cognitive processing is not well understood. Here we examined the relationships between impulsivity and risk-taking and the neural correlates of working memory. Neural activity was measured in 18 adolescents (13–18 years) while they engaged in a working memory task that included verbal and visuospatial components that each involved encoding, rehearsal and recognition stages. Risk-taking and impulsivity were assessed using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) and the adolescent version of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale -11 (BIS-11A), respectively. We found overlapping as well as distinct regions subserving the different stages of verbal and visuospatial working memory. In terms of risk-taking, we found a positive correlation between BART scores and activity in subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, dorsal striatum) recruited during verbal rehearsal, and an inverse correlation between BART scores and cortical regions (e.g., parietal and temporal regions) recruited during visuospatial rehearsal. The BIS-11A evidenced that motor impulsivity was associated with activity in regions recruited during all stages of working memory, while attention and non-planning impulsivity was only associated with activity in regions recruited during recognition. In considering working memory, impulsivity and risk-taking together, both impulsivity and risk-taking were associated with activity in regions recruited during rehearsal; however, during verbal rehearsal, differential correlations were found. Specifically, positive correlations were found between: (1) risk-taking and activity in subcortical regions, including the thalamus and dorsal striatum; and, (2) motor impulsivity and activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus, insula, dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal

  3. Differential associations between impulsivity and risk-taking and brain activations underlying working memory in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Karni; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mencl, W Einar; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Potenza, Marc N; Mayes, Linda C

    2014-11-01

    Increased impulsivity and risk-taking are common during adolescence and relate importantly to addictive behaviors. However, the extent to which impulsivity and risk-taking relate to brain activations that mediate cognitive processing is not well understood. Here we examined the relationships between impulsivity and risk-taking and the neural correlates of working memory. Neural activity was measured in 18 adolescents (13-18 years) while they engaged in a working memory task that included verbal and visuospatial components that each involved encoding, rehearsal and recognition stages. Risk-taking and impulsivity were assessed using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) and the adolescent version of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11A), respectively. We found overlapping as well as distinct regions subserving the different stages of verbal and visuospatial working memory. In terms of risk-taking, we found a positive correlation between BART scores and activity in subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, dorsal striatum) recruited during verbal rehearsal, and an inverse correlation between BART scores and cortical regions (e.g., parietal and temporal regions) recruited during visuospatial rehearsal. The BIS-11A evidenced that motor impulsivity was associated with activity in regions recruited during all stages of working memory, while attention and non-planning impulsivity was only associated with activity in regions recruited during recognition. In considering working memory, impulsivity and risk-taking together, both impulsivity and risk-taking were associated with activity in regions recruited during rehearsal; however, during verbal rehearsal, differential correlations were found. Specifically, positive correlations were found between: (1) risk-taking and activity in subcortical regions, including the thalamus and dorsal striatum; and, (2) motor impulsivity and activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Therefore

  4. Mephedrone ('bath salt') elicits conditioned place preference and dopamine-sensitive motor activation.

    PubMed

    Lisek, Renata; Xu, Wei; Yuvasheva, Ekaterina; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Reitz, Allen B; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Rawls, Scott M

    2012-11-01

    Abuse of a dangerous street drug called mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) has become commonplace in the United States. Mephedrone is hypothesized to possess abuse liability, share pharmacological properties with psychostimulants, and display toxicity that has been linked to fatalities and non-fatal overdoses. Knowledge about the pharmacology of mephedrone has been obtained primarily from surveys of drug abusers and emergency room visits rather than experimental studies. The present study used motor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) assays to investigate behavioral effects of mephedrone. Acute mephedrone (3, 5, 10, 30 mg/kg, ip) administration increased ambulatory activity in rats. Mephedrone (5 mg/kg, ip)-induced ambulation was inhibited by pretreatment with a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist (SCH 23390) (0.5, 1, 2 mg/kg, ip) and enhanced by pretreatment with a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (sulpiride) (2 mg/kg, ip). Rats injected for 5 days with low dose mephedrone (0.5 mg/kg, ip) and then challenged with mephedrone (0.5 mg/kg, ip) following 10 days of abstinence displayed sensitization of ambulatory activity. In CPP experiments, mephedrone (30 mg/kg, ip) conditioning elicited a preference shift in both rats and mice. The CPP and dopamine-sensitive motor activation produced by mephedrone is suggestive of abuse liability and indicates commonalities between the neuropharmacological profiles of mephedrone and established drugs of abuse.

  5. Social observation enhances cross-environment activation of hippocampal place cell patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xiang; Ji, Daoyun

    2016-01-01

    Humans and animals frequently learn through observing or interacting with others. The local enhancement theory proposes that presence of social subjects in an environment facilitates other subjects' understanding of the environment. To explore the neural basis of this theory, we examined hippocampal place cells, which represent spatial information, in rats as they stayed in a small box while a demonstrator rat running on a separate, nearby linear track, and as they ran on the same track themselves. We found that place cell firing sequences during self-running on the track also appeared in the box. This cross-environment activation occurred even prior to any self-running experience on the track and was absent without a demonstrator. Our data thus suggest that social observation can facilitate the observer’s spatial representation of an environment without actual self-exploration. This finding may contribute to neural mechanisms of local enhancement. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18022.001 PMID:27692067

  6. The Influence of Prior Knowledge on the Retrieval-Directed Function of Note Taking in Prior Knowledge Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzels, Sandra A. J.; Kester, Liesbeth; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.; Broers, Nick J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Prior knowledge activation facilitates learning. Note taking during prior knowledge activation (i.e., note taking directed at retrieving information from memory) might facilitate the activation process by enabling learners to build an external representation of their prior knowledge. However, taking notes might be less effective in…

  7. 76 FR 41463 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ...NMFS has received an application from the University of Alaska Geophysics Institute (UAGI) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting a marine geophysical seismic survey in the Arctic Ocean during September- October 2011. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to......

  8. 78 FR 30273 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... potential area of effect for this project (London, 2006; see Figure 4-1 of the Navy's application.... waters and just south of the U.S.-Mexico border, and animals belonging to this population may be found... application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine...

  9. 78 FR 29705 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals....noaa.gov/pr/permits/incidental.htm . Supplemental documents provided by the U.S. Navy may be found at..., (301) 427-8401. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Sections 101(a)(5)(A) and (D) of the MMPA (16...

  10. 78 FR 56659 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... U.S. waters and just south of the U.S.-Mexico border, and animals belonging to this population may... from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for authorization to take marine mammals incidental to construction..., NMFS, (301) 427-8401. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Availability A copy of the Navy's application and...

  11. Dominance of the proximal coordinate frame in determining the locations of hippocampal place cell activity during navigation.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jennifer J; Neunuebel, Joshua P; Knierim, James J

    2008-01-01

    The place-specific activity of hippocampal cells provides downstream structures with information regarding an animal's position within an environment and, perhaps, the location of goals within that environment. In rodents, recent research has suggested that distal cues primarily set the orientation of the spatial representation, whereas the boundaries of the behavioral apparatus determine the locations of place activity. The current study was designed to address possible biases in some previous research that may have minimized the likelihood of observing place activity bound to distal cues. Hippocampal single-unit activity was recorded from six freely moving rats as they were trained to perform a tone-initiated place-preference task on an open-field platform. To investigate whether place activity was bound to the room- or platform-based coordinate frame (or both), the platform was translated within the room at an "early" and at a "late" phase of task acquisition (Shift 1 and Shift 2). At both time points, CA1 and CA3 place cells demonstrated room-associated and/or platform-associated activity, or remapped in response to the platform shift. Shift 1 revealed place activity that reflected an interaction between a dominant platform-based (proximal) coordinate frame and a weaker room-based (distal) frame because many CA1 and CA3 place fields shifted to a location intermediate to the two reference frames. Shift 2 resulted in place activity that became more strongly bound to either the platform- or room-based coordinate frame, suggesting the emergence of two independent spatial frames of reference (with many more cells participating in platform-based than in room-based representations).

  12. 50 CFR 18.27 - Regulations governing small takes of marine mammals incidental to specified activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... contained in the Act and in 50 CFR 18.3 and unless the context otherwise requires, in this section: Citizens.... (Complete definition of take is contained in 50 CFR 18.3.) Negligible impact is an impact resulting from the... marine mammals incidental to specified activities. 18.27 Section 18.27 Wildlife and Fisheries...

  13. 50 CFR 18.27 - Regulations governing small takes of marine mammals incidental to specified activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... contained in the Act and in 50 CFR 18.3 and unless the context otherwise requires, in this section: Citizens.... (Complete definition of take is contained in 50 CFR 18.3.) Negligible impact is an impact resulting from the... marine mammals incidental to specified activities. 18.27 Section 18.27 Wildlife and Fisheries...

  14. 50 CFR 18.27 - Regulations governing small takes of marine mammals incidental to specified activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... contained in the Act and in 50 CFR 18.3 and unless the context otherwise requires, in this section: Citizens.... (Complete definition of take is contained in 50 CFR 18.3.) Negligible impact is an impact resulting from the... marine mammals incidental to specified activities. 18.27 Section 18.27 Wildlife and Fisheries...

  15. 75 FR 67951 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Piling and Structure Removal in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... respect to the ecology and life history of potentially affected marine mammals (e.g., will harassment... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities... implementing the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), as amended, notification is hereby given that...

  16. 77 FR 15722 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... pressure waves felt as a result of surf as opposed to seismic refraction). Electric resistivity profiling... issued an IHA, valid for a period of one year, on April 1, 2010 (75 FR 17382) and was subsequently issued a second IHA for incidental take associated with the same activities on April 21, 2011 (76 FR...

  17. 77 FR 56613 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... this notice, the Observatory did not estimate take of endangered humpback, sei, blue, or fin whales or... regional authorization re: 1 Pa \\1\\ population \\2\\ Bryde's whale 1 0.01 \\4\\ 4 Blue whale 0 ... Authorization (77 FR 19242, March 30, 2012). The Observatory's proposed activities have not changed between...

  18. 76 FR 46724 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Seabird and Pinniped Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... areas of the national park. Description of the Specified Activity PRBO will conduct seabird and pinniped... Seashore The National Park Service in collaboration with PRBO monitors seabird breeding and roosting... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA534 Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental...

  19. 77 FR 24471 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... IHA, valid for a period of one year, on April 1, 2010 (75 FR 17382), and was subsequently issued a second IHA for incidental take associated with the same activities on April 21, 2011 (76 FR 23306..., 2012 (77 FR 15722). During the 30-day comment period, NMFS received a letter from the Marine...

  20. 78 FR 23746 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... a period of one year, on April 1, 2010 (75 FR 17382), and was subsequently issued IHAs for incidental take associated with the same activities on April 21, 2011 (76 FR 23306) and April 17, 2012 (77 FR... proposed IHA in the Federal Register on March 8, 2013 (78 FR 14985). During the 30-day comment period,...

  1. Is It Possible for Teachers to Take Students beyond a Rudimentary Introduction to an Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This brief article presents student and professor responses to the question: Is it possible for teachers to take students beyond a rudimentary introduction to an activity? [Responses to this question were provided by Kevin Reilly, Terra Marjonen, Scott A. G. M. Crawford, Jason S. Whitworth, Brianne Mahoney, Erin Sereduk, Sam Thielen, Matt Lassen,…

  2. 50 CFR 21.15 - Authorization of take incidental to military readiness activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Authorization of take incidental to military readiness activities. 21.15 Section 21.15 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS General...

  3. 75 FR 4774 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station Restoration and Maintenance on Northwest Seal Rock, in... INFORMATION: Background Section 101(a)(5)(D) of the MMPA (16 U.S.C. 1371 (a)(5)(D)) directs the Secretary of... shall be granted if NMFS finds that the taking will have a negligible impact on the species or...

  4. Place and Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannatella, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Do places matter educationally? When Edward Casey remarks: "The world is, minimally and forever, a place-world", we might take this statement as presupposing without argument that places exist as a given, that we know what a place is, a point that Aristotle would have never taken for granted and in fact neither does Casey. I find Casey's remark…

  5. Risk taking as a predictor of adolescent sexual activity and use of contraception.

    PubMed

    White, H R; Johnson, V

    1988-01-01

    A hypothesis of high-risk behaviors associated with adolescent sexual activity and lack of contraceptive use was tested in a longitudinal random sample of both male and female youths. The data were part of the Rutgers Health and Human Development Project. 1380 subjects were ascertained by random telephone calling were given self-report questionnaires and personality profiles including the Zuckerman's Sensation Seeking Scale, and Jackson's Personality Research Form in 1979 and 1981. Incidence of sexual activity and use of contraceptives increased with age from age 12-21. Cohort effects were apparent with use of some contraceptive methods. Of the variables indicating risk- taking, disinhibition, impulsivity and experience seeking, there were significant associations between sexual activity and disinhibition and experience seeking, for females. There were no significant associations between these variables and sexual activity in males. Contrary to the hypothesis, there were no relationships between either consistency of birth control use or reliability of the method used and behavioral indicators of risk-taking. Thus this 1st study in the field that included both males and females from the general population, as opposed to college students, found that sexually active adolescents were higher risk-takers than virgins, but no relationship between risk-taking and effectiveness of contraception was observed. PMID:12342680

  6. Differences in neural activation as a function of risk-taking task parameters.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Eliza; Bato, Angelica A; Schonberg, Tom; Mumford, Jeanette A; Karlsgodt, Katherine H; Sabb, Fred W; London, Edythe D; Cannon, Tyrone D; Bilder, Robert M; Poldrack, Russell A

    2013-01-01

    Despite evidence supporting a relationship between impulsivity and naturalistic risk-taking, the relationship of impulsivity with laboratory-based measures of risky decision-making remains unclear. One factor contributing to this gap in our understanding is the degree to which different risky decision-making tasks vary in their details. We conducted an fMRI investigation of the Angling Risk Task (ART), which is an improved behavioral measure of risky decision-making. In order to examine whether the observed pattern of neural activation was specific to the ART or generalizable, we also examined correlates of the Balloon Analog Risk Taking (BART) task in the same sample of 23 healthy adults. Exploratory analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between neural activation, performance, impulsivity and self-reported risk-taking. While activation in a valuation network was associated with reward tracking during the ART but not the BART, increased fronto-cingulate activation was seen during risky choice trials in the BART as compared to the ART. Thus, neural activation during risky decision-making trials differed between the two tasks, and this observation was likely driven by differences in task parameters, namely the absence vs. presence of ambiguity and/or stationary vs. increasing probability of loss on the ART and BART, respectively. Exploratory association analyses suggest that sensitivity of neural response to the magnitude of potential reward during the ART was associated with a suboptimal performance strategy, higher scores on a scale of dysfunctional impulsivity (DI) and a greater likelihood of engaging in risky behaviors, while this pattern was not seen for the BART. Our results suggest that the ART is decomposable and associated with distinct patterns of neural activation; this represents a preliminary step toward characterizing a behavioral measure of risky decision-making that may support a better understanding of naturalistic risk-taking.

  7. Stormwater chemical contamination caused by cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) infrastructure rehabilitation activities.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Matthew L; Newman, Derrick; Whelton, Andrew J

    2014-09-16

    Cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) is becoming a popular U.S. stormwater culvert rehabilitation method. Several State transportation agencies have reported that CIPP activities can release styrene into stormwater, but no other contaminants have been monitored. CIPP's stormwater contamination potential and that of its condensate waste was characterized. Condensate completely dissolved Daphnia magna within 24 h. Condensate pH was 6.2 and its chemical oxygen demand (COD) level was 36,000 ppm. D. magna mortality (100%) occurred in 48 h, even when condensate was diluted by a factor of 10,000 and styrene was present at a magnitude less than its LC50. Condensate and stormwater contained numerous carcinogenic solvents used in resin synthesis, endocrine disrupting contaminants such as plasticizers, and initiator degradation products. For 35 days, COD levels at the culvert outlets and downstream ranged from 100 to 375 ppm and styrene was 0.01 to 7.4 ppm. Although contaminant levels generally reduced with time, styrene levels were greatest 50 ft downstream, not at the culvert outlet. Cured CIPP extraction tests confirmed that numerous contaminants other than styrene were released into the environment and their persistence and toxicity should be investigated. More effective contaminant containment and cleaner installation processes must be developed to protect the environment.

  8. Effect of MDMA (ecstasy) on activity and cocaine conditioned place preference in adult and adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Aberg, Maria; Wade, Dean; Wall, Erin; Izenwasser, Sari

    2007-01-01

    MDMA (ecstasy) is a drug commonly used in adolescence, and many users of MDMA also use other illicit drugs. It is not known whether MDMA during adolescence alters subsequent responses to cocaine differently than in adults. This study examined the effects of MDMA in adolescent and adult rats on cocaine conditioned reward. At the start of these experiments, adolescent rats were at postnatal day (PND) 33 and adult rats at PND 60. Each rat was treated for 7 days with MDMA (2 or 5 mg/kg/day or vehicle) and locomotor activity was measured. Five days later cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) was begun. Rats were trained for 3 days, in the morning with saline and in the afternoon with 10 mg/kg cocaine in 30 min sessions, and tested on the fourth day. MDMA stimulated activity in both age groups, but with a greater effect in the adult rats. Sensitization to the locomotor-stimulant effects of the lower dose of MDMA occurred in adult rats and in both groups to the higher dose. Cocaine did not produce a CPP in vehicle-treated adolescent rats, but a significant CPP was observed subsequent to treatment with MDMA. In contrast, cocaine-induced CPP was diminished after MDMA in adult rats. These effects were still evident 2 weeks later upon retest. Thus, under the present conditions, MDMA increased cocaine conditioned reward in adolescent and decreased it in adult rats. These findings suggest that exposure to MDMA during this critical developmental period may carry a greater risk than during adulthood and that male adolescents may be particularly vulnerable to the risk of stimulant abuse after use of MDMA.

  9. Spatial Polygamy and Contextual Exposures (SPACEs): Promoting Activity Space Approaches in Research on Place and Health.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Stephen A; Yang, Tse-Chuan

    2013-08-01

    Exposure science has developed rapidly and there is an increasing call for greater precision in the measurement of individual exposures across space and time. Social science interest in an individual's environmental exposure, broadly conceived, has arguably been quite limited conceptually and methodologically. Indeed, we appear to lag behind our exposure science colleagues in our theories, data, and methods. In this paper we discuss a framework based on the concept of spatial polygamy to demonstrate the need to collect new forms of data on human spatial behavior and contextual exposures across time and space. Adopting new data and methods will be essential if we want to better understand social inequality in terms of exposure to health risks and access to health resources. We discuss the opportunities and challenges focusing on the potential seemingly offered by focusing on human mobility, and specifically the utilization of activity space concepts and data. A goal of the paper is to spatialize social and health science concepts and research practice vis-a-vis the complexity of exposure. The paper concludes with some recommendations for future research focusing on theoretical and conceptual development, promoting research on new types of places and human movement, the dynamic nature of contexts, and on training. "When we elect wittingly or unwittingly, to work within a level … we tend to discern or construct - whichever emphasis you prefer - only those kinds of systems whose elements are confined to that level."Otis Dudley Duncan (1961, p. 141)."…despite the new ranges created by improved transportation, local government units have tended to remain medieval in size."Torsten Hägerstrand (1970, p.18)"A detective investigating a crime needs both tools and understanding. If he has no fingerprint powder, he will fail to find fingerprints on most surfaces. If he does not understand where the criminal is likely to have put his fingers, he will not look in the right

  10. Spatial Polygamy and Contextual Exposures (SPACEs): Promoting Activity Space Approaches in Research on Place and Health

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Stephen A.; Yang, Tse-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Exposure science has developed rapidly and there is an increasing call for greater precision in the measurement of individual exposures across space and time. Social science interest in an individual’s environmental exposure, broadly conceived, has arguably been quite limited conceptually and methodologically. Indeed, we appear to lag behind our exposure science colleagues in our theories, data, and methods. In this paper we discuss a framework based on the concept of spatial polygamy to demonstrate the need to collect new forms of data on human spatial behavior and contextual exposures across time and space. Adopting new data and methods will be essential if we want to better understand social inequality in terms of exposure to health risks and access to health resources. We discuss the opportunities and challenges focusing on the potential seemingly offered by focusing on human mobility, and specifically the utilization of activity space concepts and data. A goal of the paper is to spatialize social and health science concepts and research practice vis-a-vis the complexity of exposure. The paper concludes with some recommendations for future research focusing on theoretical and conceptual development, promoting research on new types of places and human movement, the dynamic nature of contexts, and on training. “When we elect wittingly or unwittingly, to work within a level … we tend to discern or construct – whichever emphasis you prefer – only those kinds of systems whose elements are confined to that level.”Otis Dudley Duncan (1961, p. 141). “…despite the new ranges created by improved transportation, local government units have tended to remain medieval in size.”Torsten Hägerstrand (1970, p.18) “A detective investigating a crime needs both tools and understanding. If he has no fingerprint powder, he will fail to find fingerprints on most surfaces. If he does not understand where the criminal is likely to have put his fingers, he will not

  11. 45 CFR 287.115 - When a NEW grantee serves TANF recipients, what coordination should take place with the Tribal or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Exchange of case file information; (c) Changes in client status that result in a loss of cash assistance, food stamps, Medicaid or other medical coverage; (d) Identification of work activities that may...

  12. 45 CFR 287.115 - When a NEW grantee serves TANF recipients, what coordination should take place with the Tribal or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Exchange of case file information; (c) Changes in client status that result in a loss of cash assistance, food stamps, Medicaid or other medical coverage; (d) Identification of work activities that may...

  13. 78 FR 44539 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... ] notice of proposed authorization (78 FR 30873; May 23, 2013; hereafter, the FR notice); please see that... activities described herein and in the FR notice. Pier demolition and construction and relocation of the MMP... of sound sources in general was provided in the FR notice (78 FR 30873; May 23, 2013)....

  14. 76 FR 33721 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Harbor Activities Related to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... 3, 2010 (74 FR 46742, September 11, 2009). The Delta IV/EELV launch vehicle is comprised of a common... activities). NMFS outlined the purpose of the program in the Notice of Proposed IHA (76 FR 21862, April 19, 2011). The activities to be conducted have not changed between the Notice of Proposed IHA (76 FR...

  15. 76 FR 21862 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Harbor Activities Related to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... not limited to, migration, breathing, nursing, breeding, feeding, or sheltering . Summary of Request... support Delta IV/EELV launch activities from the Space Launch Complex at VAFB Harbor and would occur in... the same activities from 2002 to 2010, with the last IHA expiring on September 3, 2010 (74 FR...

  16. Effects of proton irradiation on a gas phase in which condensation takes place. I Negative Mg-26 anomalies and Al-26. [applied to solar and meteoritic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.; Walker, A.; Huss, G.; Morgan, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper, isotopic effects in magnesium generated in a proton-irradiated gas phase are examined, taking only (p,n), (p,d), and (p, alpha) reactions in magnesium, aluminum, and silicon into consideration. In the presence of proton radiation, the three elements are 'removed' from the gas phase by condensation. It is required that a value of Al-26/Al-27 greater than 6 times 10 to the -5th must be reached, consistent with the value deduced by Lee Papanastassiou, and Wasserburg (1976) from their studies of the Allende meteorite. The calculations show that fast aluminum condensation reduces the required proton fluence substantially, that a significant fraction of aluminum remains uncondensed when the above value of the Al-26/Al-27 ratio is reached, that a detectable MG-24 excess is very likely to occur, that detectable negative MG-28 anomalies can be generated, and that proton fluxes and irradiation times can be varied simultaneously, and over a wide range of values, without significant changes in the required proton fluence.

  17. 78 FR 6977 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Part 218 Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing... Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing Activities in the Hawaii-Southern... information. SUMMARY: NMFS has received a request from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for authorization to take...

  18. Risk-taking behavior: dopamine D2/D3 receptors, feedback, and frontolimbic activity.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Milky; Ghahremani, Dara G; Morales, Angelica M; Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Morgan, Andrew T; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making involves frontolimbic and dopaminergic brain regions, but how prior choice outcomes, dopamine neurotransmission, and frontostriatal activity are integrated to affect choices is unclear. We tested 60 healthy volunteers using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In the BART, participants can pump virtual balloons to increase potential monetary reward or cash out to receive accumulated reward; each pump presents greater risk and potential reward (represented by the pump number). In a separate session, we measured striatal D2/D3 dopamine receptor binding potential (BPND) with positron emission tomography in 13 of the participants. Losses were followed by fewer risky choices than wins; and during risk-taking after loss, amygdala and hippocampal activation exhibited greater modulation by pump number than after a cash-out event. Striatal D2/D3 BPND was positively related to the modulation of ventral striatal activation when participants decided to cash out and negatively to the number of pumps in the subsequent trial; but negatively related to the modulation of prefrontal cortical activation by pump number when participants took risk, and to overall earnings. These findings provide in vivo evidence for a potential mechanism by which dopaminergic neurotransmission may modulate risk-taking behavior through an interactive system of frontal and striatal activity. PMID:23966584

  19. Leaf processing behaviour in Atta leafcutter ants: 90% of leaf cutting takes place inside the nest, and ants select pieces that require less cutting.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Ryan W; Carlson, Katherine A; Goggans, Matthew Scott; Nesson, Michael H; Shepard, Christopher A; Schofield, Robert M S

    2016-01-01

    Leafcutter ants cut trimmings from plants, carry them to their underground nests and cut them into smaller pieces before inoculating them with a fungus that serves as a primary food source for the colony. Cutting is energetically costly, so the amount of cutting is important in understanding foraging energetics. Estimates of the cutting density, metres of cutting per square metre of leaf, were made from samples of transported leaf cuttings and of fungal substrate from field colonies of Atta cephalotes and Atta colombica. To investigate cutting inside the nest, we made leaf-processing observations of our laboratory colony, A. cephalotes. We did not observe the commonly reported reduction of the leaf fragments into a pulp, which would greatly increase the energy cost of processing. Video clips of processing behaviours, including behaviours that have not previously been described, are linked. An estimated 2.9 (±0.3) km of cutting with mandibles was required to reduce a square metre of leaf to fungal substrate. Only about 12% (±1%) of this cutting took place outside of the nest. The cutting density and energy cost is lower for leaf material with higher ratios of perimeter to area, so we tested for, and found that the laboratory ants had a preference for leaves that were pre-cut into smaller pieces. Estimates suggest that the energy required to transport and cut up the leaf material is comparable to the metabolic energy available from the fungus grown on the leaves, and so conservation of energy is likely to be a particularly strong selective pressure for leafcutter ants. PMID:26909161

  20. Leaf processing behaviour in Atta leafcutter ants: 90% of leaf cutting takes place inside the nest, and ants select pieces that require less cutting

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Ryan W.; Carlson, Katherine A.; Goggans, Matthew Scott; Nesson, Michael H.; Shepard, Christopher A.; Schofield, Robert M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Leafcutter ants cut trimmings from plants, carry them to their underground nests and cut them into smaller pieces before inoculating them with a fungus that serves as a primary food source for the colony. Cutting is energetically costly, so the amount of cutting is important in understanding foraging energetics. Estimates of the cutting density, metres of cutting per square metre of leaf, were made from samples of transported leaf cuttings and of fungal substrate from field colonies of Atta cephalotes and Atta colombica. To investigate cutting inside the nest, we made leaf-processing observations of our laboratory colony, A. cephalotes. We did not observe the commonly reported reduction of the leaf fragments into a pulp, which would greatly increase the energy cost of processing. Video clips of processing behaviours, including behaviours that have not previously been described, are linked. An estimated 2.9 (±0.3) km of cutting with mandibles was required to reduce a square metre of leaf to fungal substrate. Only about 12% (±1%) of this cutting took place outside of the nest. The cutting density and energy cost is lower for leaf material with higher ratios of perimeter to area, so we tested for, and found that the laboratory ants had a preference for leaves that were pre-cut into smaller pieces. Estimates suggest that the energy required to transport and cut up the leaf material is comparable to the metabolic energy available from the fungus grown on the leaves, and so conservation of energy is likely to be a particularly strong selective pressure for leafcutter ants. PMID:26909161

  1. Inhibition of urokinase plasminogen activator “uPA” activity alters ethanol consumption and conditioned place preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Al Maamari, Elyazia; Al Ameri, Mouza; Al Mansouri, Shamma; Bahi, Amine

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator, uPA, is a serine protease implicated in addiction to drugs of abuse. Using its specific inhibitor, B428, we and others have characterized the role of uPA in the rewarding properties of psychostimulants, including cocaine and amphetamine, but none have examined the role of uPA in ethanol use disorders. Therefore, in the current study, we extended our observations to the role of uPA in ethanol consumption and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference. The general aim of the present series of experiments was to investigate the effects of the administration of the B428 on voluntary alcohol intake and ethanol conditioned reward. A two-bottle choice, unlimited-access paradigm was used to compare ethanol intake between vehicle- and 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg B428-administered mice. For this purpose, the mice were presented with an ethanol solution (2.5%–20%) and water, at each concentration for 4 days, and their consumption was measured daily. Consumption of saccharin and quinine solutions was also measured. Systemic administration of B428 dose-dependently decreased ethanol intake and preference. Additionally, B428 mice did not differ from vehicle mice in their intake of graded solutions of tastants, suggesting that the uPA inhibition did not alter taste function. Also, ethanol metabolism was not affected following B428 injection. More importantly, 1.5 g/kg ethanol-induced conditioned place preference acquisition was blocked following B428 administration. Taken together, our results are the first to implicate uPA inhibition in the regulation of ethanol consumption and preference, and suggest that uPA may be considered as a possible therapeutic drug target for alcoholism and abstinence. PMID:25258509

  2. Validation of an Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Take-off and Landing analysis (AGFATL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation using a computer program for active gear, flexible aircraft take off and landing analysis (AGFATL) are compared with experimental data from shaker tests, drop tests, and simulated landing tests to validate the AGFATL computer program. Comparison of experimental and analytical responses for both passive and active gears indicates good agreement for shaker tests and drop tests. For the simulated landing tests, the passive and active gears were influenced by large strut binding friction forces. The inclusion of these undefined forces in the analytical simulations was difficult, and consequently only fair to good agreement was obtained. An assessment of the results from the investigation indicates that the AGFATL computer program is a valid tool for the study and initial design of series hydraulic active control landing gear systems.

  3. Giving and taking: Representational building blocks of active resource-transfer events in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Tatone, Denis; Geraci, Alessandra; Csibra, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Active resource transfer is a pervasive and distinctive feature of human sociality. We hypothesized that humans possess an action schema of giving specific for representing social interactions based on material exchange, and specified the set of necessary assumptions about giving events that this action schema should be equipped with. We tested this proposal by investigating how 12-month-old infants interpret abstract resource-transfer events. Across eight looking-time studies using a violation-of-expectation paradigm we found that infants were able to distinguish between kinematically identical giving and taking actions. Despite the surface similarity between these two actions, only giving was represented as an object-mediated social interaction. While we found no evidence that infants expected the target of a giving or taking action to reciprocate, the present results suggest that infants interpret giving as an inherently social action, which they can possibly use to map social relations via observing resource-transfer episodes. PMID:25614012

  4. 77 FR 38587 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Harbor Activities Related to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... 2002 to 2011, with the last Authorization expiring on June 6, 2012 (76 FR 33721, June 9, 2011). United... associated with these activities. Pinnipeds sometimes show startle reactions when exposed to sudden brief... core off-loading procedures, may elicit such a reaction. In addition, the movements of cranes...

  5. A backup role of DNA polymerase kappa in Ig gene hypermutation only takes place in the complete absence of DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    Faili, Ahmad; Stary, Anne; Delbos, Frédéric; Weller, Sandra; Aoufouchi, Said; Sarasin, Alain; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2009-05-15

    Patients with the variant form of xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) syndrome have a genetic deficiency in DNA polymerase (Pol) eta, and display accordingly an increased skin sensitivity to UV light, as well as an altered mutation pattern of their Ig V genes in memory B cells, alteration that consists in a reduced mutagenesis at A/T bases. We previously suggested that another polymerase with a different mutation signature, Pol kappa, is used as backup for Ig gene hypermutation in both humans and mice in cases of complete Pol eta deficiency, a proposition supported in this study by the analysis of Pol eta x Pol kappa double-deficient mice. We also describe a new XPV case, in which a splice site mutation of the first noncoding exon results in a decreased mRNA expression, a mRNA that otherwise encodes a normal Pol eta protein. Whereas the Pol eta mRNA level observed in patient's fibroblasts is one-twentieth the value of healthy controls, it is only reduced to one-fourth of the normal level in activated B cells. Memory B cells from this patient showed a 50% reduction in A/T mutations, with a spectrum that still displays a strict Pol eta signature. Pol eta thus appears as a dominant enzyme in hypermutation, its presence precluding the use of a substitute enzyme even in conditions of reduced availability. Such a dominant behavior may explain the lack of Pol kappa signature in Ig gene mutations of some XPV patients previously described, for whom residual Pol eta activity might exist. PMID:19414788

  6. 76 FR 67558 - Proposed Information Collection (Request for Change of Program or Place of Training) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... comments on the information needed to determine a claimant's eligibility for continued educational... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Request for Change of Program or Place... approved collection. Abstract: Claimants receiving educational benefits complete VA Form 22-1995 to...

  7. The Body and the Place of Physical Activity in Education: Some Classical Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozolinš, Janis

    2013-01-01

    The place of physical education has been contested in recent times and it has been argued that its justification as part of school curricula seems to be marginal at best. Such justifications as have been offered, propose that physical education is justified because of its contribution to moral development or because it is capable of being studied…

  8. The Greenhouse: A Place for Year-Round Plant Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanif, Muhammad

    1989-01-01

    Activities that may take place in a greenhouse are discussed. Included are learning how to grow plants, plant growth, soil, vegetative reproduction, and plant habitat adaptations. Materials, procedures, and results are presented for the activities. (CW)

  9. Taking up physical activity in later life and healthy ageing: the English longitudinal study of ageing

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Mark; Lavoie, Kim L; Bacon, Simon L

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activity is associated with improved overall health in those people who survive to older ages, otherwise conceptualised as healthy ageing. Previous studies have examined the effects of mid-life physical activity on healthy ageing, but not the effects of taking up activity later in life. We examined the association between physical activity and healthy ageing over 8 years of follow-up. Methods Participants were 3454 initially disease-free men and women (aged 63.7±8.9 years at baseline) from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a prospective study of community dwelling older adults. Self-reported physical activity was assessed at baseline (2002–2003) and through follow-up. Healthy ageing, assessed at 8 years of follow-up (2010-2011), was defined as those participants who survived without developing major chronic disease, depressive symptoms, physical or cognitive impairment. Results At follow-up, 19.3% of the sample was defined as healthy ageing. In comparison with inactive participants, moderate (OR, 2.67, 95% CI 1.95 to 3.64), or vigorous activity (3.53, 2.54 to 4.89) at least once a week was associated with healthy ageing, after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, alcohol, marital status and wealth. Becoming active (multivariate adjusted, 3.37, 1.67 to 6.78) or remaining active (7.68, 4.18 to 14.09) was associated with healthy ageing in comparison with remaining inactive over follow-up. Conclusions Sustained physical activity in older age is associated with improved overall health. Significant health benefits were even seen among participants who became physically active relatively late in life. PMID:24276781

  10. Localization of genes influencing ethanol-induced conditioned place preference and locomotor activity in BXD recombinant inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C L

    1995-07-01

    Genetic differences in ethanol's ability to induce conditioned place preference were studied in 20 BXD Recombinant Inbred (RI) mouse strains and in the C57BL/6J and DBA/2J progenitor strains. Male mice from each strain were exposed to a Pavlovian conditioning procedure in which a distinctive floor stimulus (CS+) was paired four times with ethanol (2 g/kg). A different floor stimulus (CS-) was paired with saline. Control mice were injected only with saline. Floor preference testing without ethanol revealed significant genetic differences in conditioned place preference, with some strains spending nearly 80% time on the ethanol-paired floor while others spent only 50% (i.e., no preference). Control mice showed genetic differences in unconditioned preference for the floor cues, but unconditioned preference was not genetically correlated with conditioned preference. There were also substantial genetic differences in ethanol-stimulated activity, but contrary to psychomotor stimulant theory, ethanol-induced activity on conditioning trials was not positively correlated with strength of conditioned place preference. However, there was a significant negative genetic correlation (r = -0.42) between test session activity and preference. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses showed strong associations (P < 0.01) between conditioned place preference and marker loci on chromosomes 4, 8, 9, 18 and 19. Weaker associations (0.01 < P < 0.05) were identified on several other chromosomes. Analysis also yielded several significant QTL for unconditioned preference, ethanol-stimulated activity, and sensitization. Overall, these data support the conclusion that genotype influences ethanol-induced conditioned place preference, presumably via genetic differences in sensitivity to ethanol's rewarding effects. Moreover, several chromosomal regions containing candidate genes of potential relevance to ethanol-induced conditioned place preference have been identified.

  11. Episodic-like memory trace in awake replay of hippocampal place cell activity sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory retrieval of events at a specific place and time is effective for future planning. Sequential reactivation of the hippocampal place cells along familiar paths while the animal pauses is well suited to such a memory retrieval process. It is, however, unknown whether this awake replay represents events occurring along the path. Using a subtask switching protocol in which the animal experienced three subtasks as 'what' information in a maze, I here show that the replay represents a trial type, consisting of path and subtask, in terms of neuronal firing timings and rates. The actual trial type to be rewarded could only be reliably predicted from replays that occurred at the decision point. This trial-type representation implies that not only 'where and when' but also 'what' information is contained in the replay. This result supports the view that awake replay is an episodic-like memory retrieval process. PMID:26481131

  12. Episodic-like memory trace in awake replay of hippocampal place cell activity sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory retrieval of events at a specific place and time is effective for future planning. Sequential reactivation of the hippocampal place cells along familiar paths while the animal pauses is well suited to such a memory retrieval process. It is, however, unknown whether this awake replay represents events occurring along the path. Using a subtask switching protocol in which the animal experienced three subtasks as 'what' information in a maze, I here show that the replay represents a trial type, consisting of path and subtask, in terms of neuronal firing timings and rates. The actual trial type to be rewarded could only be reliably predicted from replays that occurred at the decision point. This trial-type representation implies that not only 'where and when' but also 'what' information is contained in the replay. This result supports the view that awake replay is an episodic-like memory retrieval process.

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... substance activity took place on the property, the reporting agency must include information on the type and.... The reporting agency must also advise the disposal agency if all remedial action necessary to protect... the date the property was reported excess. If such action was not taken, the reporting agency...

  14. Medial temporal lobe activation during autobiographical context memory retrieval of time and place and its dependency upon recency.

    PubMed

    Lux, Silke; Bindrich, Valeska N; Markowitsch, Hans J; Fink, Gereon R

    2015-02-01

    The contribution of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) to the retrieval of autobiographical memories is widely accepted. Results of former patient studies and functional imaging studies suggest different involvement of the MTL during the retrieval of autobiographical context information and the remoteness of these. Varying recency, the MTL contribution during chronological and locational autobiographical context information processing was investigated in this study. Thirteen males (mean = 25 years) judged the event's place or time in a two-choice recognition task. Subjects made significantly more errors on chronological judgments. Retrieval of chronological information activated the left MTL, while retrieval of locational information activated the MTL bilaterally. Retrieval of more recent than remote context information activated especially the right MTL. Our results underline different MTL contributions on the retrieval of autobiographical context information, depending on the content and on the remoteness of the event that took place.

  15. Episodic-like memory trace in awake replay of hippocampal place cell activity sequences

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory retrieval of events at a specific place and time is effective for future planning. Sequential reactivation of the hippocampal place cells along familiar paths while the animal pauses is well suited to such a memory retrieval process. It is, however, unknown whether this awake replay represents events occurring along the path. Using a subtask switching protocol in which the animal experienced three subtasks as ‘what’ information in a maze, I here show that the replay represents a trial type, consisting of path and subtask, in terms of neuronal firing timings and rates. The actual trial type to be rewarded could only be reliably predicted from replays that occurred at the decision point. This trial-type representation implies that not only ‘where and when’ but also ‘what’ information is contained in the replay. This result supports the view that awake replay is an episodic-like memory retrieval process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08105.001 PMID:26481131

  16. Healthy places, active transport and path dependence: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Melissa; Mateo-Babiano, Derlie; Minnery, John

    2014-12-01

    Children walking to school, people cycling to the shops or work and neighbours chatting in the street, these are some of the gauges of an active and healthy community that can be achieved through utilising good design principles. But are these principles being applied in urban developments or are policy-makers following a 'path dependent' trajectory that severely limits the best practice outcomes sought? This review examines current research on path dependence to determine how this concept advances our understanding of barriers to change in the built environment, active transport and healthy communities. An online database search of scholarly bibliographic records identified 22 relevant articles for a critical review of studies that evaluated path dependence in the urban and built environment literature with a focus on transport, urban planning and health. A thematic analysis of the articles showed that different types of path dependence have contributed to the dominance of policies and designs supporting car-based transport to the detriment of public transport and active transport modes, leading to sub-optimal development patterns becoming 'locked-in'. However, the outcomes for active transport and physical activity are not all dire, and path dependence theory does provide some guidance on changing policy to achieve better outcomes. This review suggests that path dependence is one of the best theoretical frameworks to help health promoters understand barriers to change and can provide insights into developing future successful public health interventions. Future studies could focus further on active transport, local neighbourhood development and physical activity.

  17. Using MapMyFitness to Place Physical Activity into Neighborhood Context.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jana A; James, Peter; Robinson, Jamaica R M; Eastman, Kyler M; Conley, Kevin D; Evenson, Kelly R; Laden, Francine

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to obtain detailed information on the context of physical activity at large geographic scales, such as the entire United States, as well as over long periods of time, such as over years. MapMyFitness is a suite of interactive tools for individuals to track their workouts online or using global positioning system in their phones or other wireless trackers. This method article discusses the use of physical activity data tracked using MapMyFitness to examine patterns over space and time. An overview of MapMyFitness, including data tracked, user information, and geographic scope, is explored. We illustrate the utility of MapMyFitness data using tracked physical activity by users in Winston-Salem, NC, USA between 2006 and 2013. Types of physical activities tracked are described, as well as the percent of activities occurring in parks. Strengths of MapMyFitness data include objective data collection, low participant burden, extensive geographic scale, and longitudinal series. Limitations include generalizability, behavioral change as the result of technology use, and potential ethical considerations. MapMyFitness is a powerful tool to investigate patterns of physical activity across large geographic and temporal scales.

  18. Using MapMyFitness to Place Physical Activity into Neighborhood Context

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jana A.; James, Peter; Robinson, Jamaica R. M.; Eastman, Kyler M.; Conley, Kevin D.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Laden, Francine

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to obtain detailed information on the context of physical activity at large geographic scales, such as the entire United States, as well as over long periods of time, such as over years. MapMyFitness is a suite of interactive tools for individuals to track their workouts online or using global positioning system in their phones or other wireless trackers. This method article discusses the use of physical activity data tracked using MapMyFitness to examine patterns over space and time. An overview of MapMyFitness, including data tracked, user information, and geographic scope, is explored. We illustrate the utility of MapMyFitness data using tracked physical activity by users in Winston-Salem, NC, USA between 2006 and 2013. Types of physical activities tracked are described, as well as the percent of activities occurring in parks. Strengths of MapMyFitness data include objective data collection, low participant burden, extensive geographic scale, and longitudinal series. Limitations include generalizability, behavioral change as the result of technology use, and potential ethical considerations. MapMyFitness is a powerful tool to investigate patterns of physical activity across large geographic and temporal scales. PMID:24653982

  19. 50 CFR 216.161 - Specified activity and incidental take levels by species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Shock Testing... one full ship-shock trial (FSST) of the USS MESA VERDE (LPD 19) during the time period between July...

  20. Activity recognition using a single accelerometer placed at the wrist or ankle

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Andrea; Intille, Stephen S.; Rosenberger, Mary; Sabatini, Angelo M.; Haskell, William

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Large physical activity surveillance projects such as the UK Biobank and NHANES are using wrist-worn accelerometer-based activity monitors that collect raw data. The goal is to increase wear time by asking subjects to wear the monitors on the wrist instead of the hip, and then to use information in the raw signal to improve activity type and intensity estimation. The purpose of this work is obtaining an algorithm to process wrist and ankle raw data and classify behavior into four broad activity classes: ambulation, cycling, sedentary and other. METHODS Participants (N = 33) wearing accelerometers on the wrist and ankle performed 26 daily activities. The accelerometer data were collected, cleaned, and preprocessed to extract features that characterize 2 s, 4 s, and 12.8 s data windows. Feature vectors encoding information about frequency and intensity of motion extracted from analysis of the raw signal were used with a support vector machine classifier to identify a subject’s activity. Results were compared with categories classified by a human observer. Algorithms were validated using a leave-one-subject-out strategy. The computational complexity of each processing step was also evaluated. RESULTS With 12.8 s windows, the proposed strategy showed high classification accuracies for ankle data (95.0%) that decreased to 84.7% for wrist data. Shorter (4 s) windows only minimally decreased performances of the algorithm on the wrist to 84.2%. CONCLUSIONS A classification algorithm using 13 features shows good classification into the four classes given the complexity of the activities in the original dataset. The algorithm is computationally-efficient and could be implemented in real-time on mobile devices with only 4 s latency. PMID:23604069

  1. Attributing activity space as risky and safe: The social dimension to the meaning of place for urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mason, Michael J

    2010-09-01

    The social dimension of urban adolescents' interpretation of their activity space was investigated by examining reasons for attributing place as risky and safe, and analyzing these reasons by social network quality. Activity space and social network data were collected on 301 teens presenting for routine medical check-ups. SPSS Text Analysis for Surveys performed linguistic analyses on open-ended survey responses, applying concept derivation, concept inclusion, semantic networks, and co-occurrence rules. Results produced 13 categories of reasons for locations attributed as risky and safe. Categories were then transformed into dichotomous variables and analyzed with chi-square tests by social network quality. Results indicated two categories of reasons for locations attributed as risky: alcohol and drugs and Illegal activity, which were dependent upon social network quality. Two categories of reasons for locations attributed as safe, namely protective place and Neighborhood, were also dependent upon social network quality. These findings assert that adolescents' social networks influence their interpretations of risk and safety, highlighting a social dimension to the meaning of place.

  2. Promoting active transportation as a partnership between urban planning and public health: the columbus healthy places program.

    PubMed

    Green, Christine Godward; Klein, Elizabeth G

    2011-01-01

    Active transportation has been considered as one method to address the American obesity epidemic. To address obesity prevention through built-environment change, the local public health department in Columbus, Ohio, established the Columbus Healthy Places (CHP) program to formally promote active transportation in numerous aspects of community design for the city. In this article, we present a case study of the CHP program and discuss the review of city development rezoning applications as a successful strategy to link public health to urban planning. Prior to the CHP review, 7% of development applications in Columbus included active transportation components; in 2009, 64% of development applications adopted active transportation components specifically recommended by the CHP review. Active transportation recommendations generally included adding bike racks, widening or adding sidewalks, and providing sidewalk connectivity. Recommendations and lessons learned from CHP are provided.

  3. Place Disparities in Supportive Environments for Extracurricular Physical Activity in North Carolina Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Michael B.; Bocarro, Jason N.; Kanters, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Disadvantaged rural youth may be especially at risk for obesity and poorer health due to physical inactivity. Research suggests that extracurricular school programs can increase physical activity for this population. This study sought to determine whether local differences existed in the availability of supportive environments for extracurricular…

  4. Does Father Absence Place Daughters at Special Risk for Early Sexual Activity and Teenage Pregnancy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John; Pettit, Gregory S.; Woodward, Lianne

    2003-01-01

    Longitudinal studies in two countries investigated impact of father absence on girls' early sexual activity (ESA) and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicated that greater exposure to father absence strongly related to elevated ESA and adolescent pregnancy risk. Elevated risk was not explained (U.S. sample) or only partly explained (New Zealand…

  5. Using an Informal Cardiovascular System Activity to Study the Effectiveness of Science Education in Unexpected Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monzack, Elyssa Lynne; Zenner Petersen, Greta M.

    2011-01-01

    Venues for informal science education are usually those sought out by people who are specifically looking for an educational experience. Whether planning a trip to a museum or choosing a television program, these individuals are actively seeking an informal educational experience; they are a self-selected group. This paper investigates whether…

  6. Public Libraries as Places for Empowering Women through Autonomous Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this research is to investigate the significance of public libraries as educational institutions. The meaning of lifelong learning in public libraries from the perspective of women's autonomous activities is re-examined. Method. The literature of the grassroots library movement and that of the empowerment of women…

  7. [Analyses of the activities of home care supporting clinics in Tokyo from the standpoint of place of death].

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Chihiro; Hanabusa, Hiroo; Akiyama, Akiko

    2013-12-01

    We examined the activities of home care supporting clinics (HCSC) in Tokyo, Japan, from the standpoint of the place of death. The number of HCSCs in Tokyo was 1,246 in 2010. Fifteen HCSCs cared for > or = 50 patients who died at home in a year. In contrast, the 19 HCSCs in the top 10 percentile for the number of patients (> or = 176) did not have any patients who died at home. Their patients died at hospitals or facilities. These results suggest that the activities of HCSCs in Tokyo are diverse.

  8. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator "tPA" in ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned-place preference.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is one of the most abused drugs in the western societies. It is well established that mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons mediate the rewarding properties of ethanol. In our previous studies we have shown that the serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is involved in the rewarding properties of morphine and amphetamine. In the current study, we investigated the role of tPA in ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization and conditioned-place preference (CPP). Ethanol treatment dose-dependently induced tPA enzymatic activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In addition, ethanol-induced increase in tPA activity was completely inhibited by pre-treatment with the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and raclopride respectively. Furthermore, ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation, behavioral sensitization and conditioned-place preference were enhanced following tPA over-expression in the NAc using a lentiviral vector. In contrast, tPA knock down in the NAc with specific shRNA blocked the rewarding properties of ethanol. The defect of locomotor stimulation in shRNA-injected mice was reversed by microinjections of exogenous recombinant tPA into the nucleus accumbens. Collectively, these results indicate, for the first time, that activation of tPA is effective in enhancing the rewarding effects of ethanol. Targeting the tissue plasminogen activator system would provide new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of alcoholism.

  9. Elbow and wrist joint contact forces during occupational pick and place activities.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, E K; Nicol, A C

    2000-05-01

    A three-dimensional, mathematical model of the elbow and wrist joints, including 15 muscle units, 3 ligaments and 4 joint forces, has been developed. A new strain gauge transducer has been developed to measure functional grip forces. The device measures radial forces divided into six components and forces of up to 250N per segment can be measured with an accuracy of +/-1%. Ten normal volunteers were asked to complete four tasks representing occupational activities, during which time their grip force was monitored. Together with kinematic information from the six-camera Vicon data, the moment effect of these loads at the joints was calculated. These external moments are assumed to be balanced by the internal moments, generated by the muscles, passive soft tissue and bone contact. The effectiveness of the body's internal structures in generating joint moments was assessed by studying the geometry of a simplified model of the structures, where information about the lines of action and moment arms of muscles, tendons and ligaments is contained. The assumption of equilibrium between these external and internal joint moments allows formulation of a set of equations from which muscle and joint forces can be calculated. A two stage, linear optimisation routine minimising the overall muscle stress and the sum of the joint forces has been used to overcome the force-sharing problem. Humero-ulnar forces of up to 1600N, humero-radial forces of up to 800N and wrist joint forces of up to 2800N were found for moderate level activity. The model was validated by comparison with other studies.

  10. “Fair Play”: A Videogame Designed to Address Implicit Race Bias Through Active Perspective Taking

    PubMed Central

    Kaatz, Anna; Chu, Sarah; Ramirez, Dennis; Samson-Samuel, Clem; Carnes, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Having diverse faculty in academic health centers will help diversify the healthcare workforce and reduce health disparities. Implicit race bias is one factor that contributes to the underrepresentation of Black faculty. We designed the videogame “Fair Play” in which players assume the role of a Black graduate student named Jamal Davis. As Jamal, players experience subtle race bias while completing “quests” to obtain a science degree. We hypothesized that participants randomly assigned to play the game would have greater empathy for Jamal and lower implicit race bias than participants randomized to read narrative text describing Jamal's experience. Materials and Methods: University of Wisconsin–Madison graduate students were recruited via e-mail and randomly assigned to play “Fair Play” or read narrative text through an online link. Upon completion, participants took an Implicit Association Test to measure implicit bias and answered survey questions assessing empathy toward Jamal and awareness of bias. Results: As hypothesized, gameplayers showed the least implicit bias but only when they also showed high empathy for Jamal (P=0.013). Gameplayers did not show greater empathy than text readers, and women in the text condition reported the greatest empathy for Jamal (P=0.008). However, high empathy only predicted lower levels of implicit bias among those who actively took Jamal's perspective through gameplay (P=0.014). Conclusions: A videogame in which players experience subtle race bias as a Black graduate student has the potential to reduce implicit bias, possibly because of a game's ability to foster empathy through active perspective taking. PMID:26192644

  11. Identifying Place Histories from Activity Traces with an Eye to Parameter Impact.

    PubMed

    Andrienko, Gennady; Andrienko, Natalia; Mladenov, Martin; Mock, Michael; Pölitz, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Events that happened in the past are important for understanding the ongoing processes, predicting future developments, and making informed decisions. Important and/or interesting events tend to attract many people. Some people leave traces of their attendance in the form of computer-processable data, such as records in the databases of mobile phone operators or photos on photo sharing web sites. We developed a suite of visual analytics methods for reconstructing past events from these activity traces. Our tools combine geocomputations, interactive geovisualizations, and statistical methods to enable integrated analysis of the spatial, temporal, and thematic components of the data, including numeric attributes and texts.We also support interactive investigation of the sensitivity of the analysis results to the parameters used in the computations. For this purpose, statistical summaries of computation results obtained with different combinations of parameter values are visualized in a way facilitating comparisons. We demonstrate the utility of our approach on two large real data sets, mobile phone calls in Milano during 9 days and flickr photos made on British Isles during 5 years.

  12. The Volunteering-in-Place (VIP) Program: Providing meaningful volunteer activity to residents in assisted living with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Resnick, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Volunteering-in-Place (VIP) Program was developed to provide individualized meaningful volunteer activities matched to interests and capabilities for older adults with MCI in assisted living. The purposes of this single-site pre-test/post-test pilot study were to (1) establish feasibility of the VIP Program based on treatment fidelity (design, treatment, delivery, enactment); and (2) evaluate preliminary efficacy via improvement in psychological health (depressive symptoms, usefulness, purpose, resilience, and life satisfaction) and decreased sedentary activity (survey and Fitbit) at 3 and 6 months. Ten residents participated. The majority was white, female and educated, and on average 88 years old. The VIP Program was feasible and most participants continued to volunteer at 6 months. There were non-significant improvements in depressive symptoms, usefulness, purpose, resilience and recreational physical activity. The results of this study provide support for the feasibility of the VIP Program. Further study is necessary to examine efficacy.

  13. 50 CFR 18.27 - Regulations governing small takes of marine mammals incidental to specified activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... best scientific evidence available, that the total taking during the specified time period will have a... methods of taking and other means of effecting the least practicable adverse impact on the species and its... Collection Clearance Officer at the address provided at 50 CFR 2.1(b). (c) Definitions. In addition...

  14. 78 FR 1838 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... ] (Society), for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment... Harassment Authorization to the Society to incidentally harass, by Level B harassment only, four species of... limited to harassment. We shall grant authorization for the incidental taking of small numbers of...

  15. 76 FR 79157 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...), for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment incidental to... SGRLPS to incidentally harass, by Level B harassment only, four species of marine mammals during the... Commerce to authorize, upon request, the incidental, but not intentional, taking by harassment of...

  16. Social Science Theories on Adolescent Risk-Taking: The Relevance of Behavioral Inhibition and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeersch, Hans; T'Sjoen, Guy; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    The major social science theories on adolescent risk-taking--strain, social control, and differential association theories--have received substantial empirical support. The relationships between variables central to these theories and individual differences in temperament related to risk-taking, however, have not been adequately studied. In a…

  17. [Yearly change of the relationship between the place of death and activity of home care supporting clinics in Tokyo, Japan].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Akiko; Hanabusa, Hiroo; Mikami, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    We examined a yearly change of the relationship between the place of death and the activity of home care supporting clinics(HCSC)in Tokyo, Japan. The number of HCSCs by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare has edged up slightly from 1, 166 in 2008 to 1, 246 in 2010. The number of total patients provided the care by HCSC has increased by 24. 4% from 2009 to 2010. There was a 9. 3% increase in the patients provided the care by HCSC, and died at home from 2009 to 2010. These results suggested that the home care support system has proceeded gradually in Tokyo, Japan.

  18. [Relationship between the activity of home care supporting clinics and the place of death in Tokyo, Japan].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Akiko; Hanabusa, Hiroo; Mikami, Hiroshi

    2010-12-01

    We examined the relation between the activity of home care supporting clinics and the place of death in Tokyo, Japan. Of 1,209 clinics certified home care supporting clinics by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, 9.1% were not functioning for a year and 34.7% of them did not deal with patient's home death. Of patients who died at home, 64.3% utilized home care supporting clinics which dealt with 11 or more patient's death at home per year.

  19. Double Take

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper begins by discussing the results of two studies recently conducted in Australia. According to the two studies, taking a gap year between high school and college may help students complete a degree once they return to school. The gap year can involve such activities as travel, service learning, or work. Then, the paper presents links to…

  20. Supramammillary serotonin reduction alters place learning and concomitant hippocampal, septal, and supramammillar theta activity in a Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, J Jesús; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Blanca E; López-Vázquez, Miguel Á; Olvera-Cortés, María E

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta activity is related to spatial information processing, and high-frequency theta activity, in particular, has been linked to efficient spatial memory performance. Theta activity is regulated by the synchronizing ascending system (SAS), which includes mesencephalic and diencephalic relays. The supramamillary nucleus (SUMn) is located between the reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum (MS), in close relation with the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PHn), all of which are part of this ascending system. It has been proposed that the SUMn plays a role in the modulation of hippocampal theta-frequency; this could occur through direct connections between the SUMn and the hippocampus or through the influence of the SUMn on the MS. Serotonergic raphe neurons prominently innervate the hippocampus and several components of the SAS, including the SUMn. Serotonin desynchronizes hippocampal theta activity, and it has been proposed that serotonin may regulate learning through the modulation of hippocampal synchrony. In agreement with this hypothesis, serotonin depletion in the SUMn/PHn results in deficient spatial learning and alterations in CA1 theta activity-related learning in a Morris water maze. Because it has been reported that SUMn inactivation with lidocaine impairs the consolidation of reference memory, we asked whether changes in hippocampal theta activity related to learning would occur through serotonin depletion in the SUMn, together with deficiencies in memory. We infused 5,7-DHT bilaterally into the SUMn in rats and evaluated place learning in the standard Morris water maze task. Hippocampal (CA1 and dentate gyrus), septal and SUMn EEG were recorded during training of the test. The EEG power in each region and the coherence between the different regions were evaluated. Serotonin depletion in the SUMn induced deficient spatial learning and altered the expression of hippocampal high-frequency theta activity. These results provide evidence in

  1. Supramammillary serotonin reduction alters place learning and concomitant hippocampal, septal, and supramammillar theta activity in a Morris water maze

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pérez, J. Jesús; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Blanca E.; López-Vázquez, Miguel Á.; Olvera-Cortés, María E.

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta activity is related to spatial information processing, and high-frequency theta activity, in particular, has been linked to efficient spatial memory performance. Theta activity is regulated by the synchronizing ascending system (SAS), which includes mesencephalic and diencephalic relays. The supramamillary nucleus (SUMn) is located between the reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum (MS), in close relation with the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PHn), all of which are part of this ascending system. It has been proposed that the SUMn plays a role in the modulation of hippocampal theta-frequency; this could occur through direct connections between the SUMn and the hippocampus or through the influence of the SUMn on the MS. Serotonergic raphe neurons prominently innervate the hippocampus and several components of the SAS, including the SUMn. Serotonin desynchronizes hippocampal theta activity, and it has been proposed that serotonin may regulate learning through the modulation of hippocampal synchrony. In agreement with this hypothesis, serotonin depletion in the SUMn/PHn results in deficient spatial learning and alterations in CA1 theta activity-related learning in a Morris water maze. Because it has been reported that SUMn inactivation with lidocaine impairs the consolidation of reference memory, we asked whether changes in hippocampal theta activity related to learning would occur through serotonin depletion in the SUMn, together with deficiencies in memory. We infused 5,7-DHT bilaterally into the SUMn in rats and evaluated place learning in the standard Morris water maze task. Hippocampal (CA1 and dentate gyrus), septal and SUMn EEG were recorded during training of the test. The EEG power in each region and the coherence between the different regions were evaluated. Serotonin depletion in the SUMn induced deficient spatial learning and altered the expression of hippocampal high-frequency theta activity. These results provide evidence in

  2. Nicotine-induced place conditioning and locomotor activity in an adolescent animal model of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Watterson, Elizabeth; Daniels, Carter W; Watterson, Lucas R; Mazur, Gabriel J; Brackney, Ryan J; Olive, M Foster; Sanabria, Federico

    2015-09-15

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a risk factor for tobacco use and dependence. This study examines the responsiveness to nicotine of an adolescent model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). The conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure was used to assess nicotine-induced locomotion and conditioned reward in SHR and the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) control strain over a range of nicotine doses (0.0, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg). Prior to conditioning, SHRs were more active and less biased toward one side of the CPP chamber than WKY rats. Following conditioning, SHRs developed CPP to the highest dose of nicotine (0.6 mg/kg), whereas WKYs did not develop CPP to any nicotine dose tested. During conditioning, SHRs displayed greater locomotor activity in the nicotine-paired compartment than in the saline-paired compartment across conditioning trials. SHRs that received nicotine (0.1, 0.3, 0.6 mg/kg) in the nicotine-paired compartment showed an increase in locomotor activity between conditioning trials. Nicotine did not significantly affect WKY locomotor activity. These findings suggest that the SHR strain is a suitable model for studying ADHD-related nicotine use and dependence, but highlights potential limitations of the WKY control strain and the CPP procedure for modeling ADHD-related nicotine reward.

  3. 76 FR 77782 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... Pacific plate. The objective is to understand the water cycle within subduction-zone systems. Subduction... Federal Register (75 FR 8652) with preliminary determinations and a proposed IHA. Ship maintenance issues... place in water depths ranging from 2,000 m to greater than 8,000 m and consists of approximately...

  4. Negative Urgency Mediates the Relationship between Amygdala and Orbitofrontal Cortex Activation to Negative Emotional Stimuli and General Risk-Taking

    PubMed Central

    Cyders, Melissa A.; Dzemidzic, Mario; Eiler, William J.; Coskunpinar, Ayca; Karyadi, Kenny A.; Kareken, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The tendency toward impulsive behavior under emotional duress (negative and positive urgency) predicts a wide range of maladaptive risk-taking and behavioral disorders. However, it remains unclear how urgency relates to limbic system activity as induced from emotional provocation. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the relationship between brain responses to visual emotional stimuli and urgency traits. Twenty-seven social drinkers (mean age = 25.2, 14 males) viewed negative (Neg), neutral (Neu), and positive (Pos) images during 6 fMRI scans. Brain activation was extracted from a priori limbic regions previously identified in studies of emotional provocation. The right posterior orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and left amygdala were activated in the [Neg>Neu] contrast, whereas the left posterior OFC was activated in the [Pos>Neu] contrast. Negative urgency was related to the right lateral OFC (r = 0.43, P = 0.03) and the left amygdala (r = 0.39, P = 0.04) [Neg>Neu] activation. Negative urgency also mediated the relationship between [Neg>Neu] activation and general risk-taking (regression weights = 3.42 for right OFC and 2.75 for the left amygdala). Emotional cue-induced activation in right lateral OFC and left amygdala might relate to emotion-based risk-taking through negative urgency. PMID:24904065

  5. Students Taking Charge: Inside the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulla, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Teachers and administrators who recognize the needs of today's society and students, and their impact on teaching and learning, can use this book to create student-centered classrooms that make technology a vital part of their lessons. Filled with practical examples and step-by-step guidelines, "Students Taking Charge" will help educators design…

  6. Perspective Taking of Immigrant Children: Utilizing Children's Literature and Related Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, Malerie; Bhavnagri, Navaz Peshotan

    2012-01-01

    Perspective taking, which is seeing a viewpoint other than one's own, is critical in interpersonal understanding and in cross-cultural communication. It is especially crucial in diverse societies such as the United States as well as in countries where immigrants from other nations are living as one community. Hence, this article focuses on…

  7. 76 FR 71940 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Physical Oceanographic Studies in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...NMFS has received an application from the United States Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting physical oceanographic studies in the southwest Indian Ocean, January through February, 2012. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to issue an IHA to the......

  8. 77 FR 4014 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Physical Oceanographic Studies in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ...-listed marine mammals that may potentially occur in the survey area, blue and southern right whale... well known in the southern hemisphere. However, no take of blue whales was requested because of the low... the blue, fin, humpback, sei, southern right, and sperm whales. Under section 7 of the ESA, the...

  9. 76 FR 26255 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... species for which no takes are being requested (i.e., North Pacific right, sei, blue, and beluga whales) are sighted at any distance from the vessel. Ramp-up will only begin if the whale has not been seen..., killer, and beaked whales). During airgun operations following a power-down (or shut-down) whose...

  10. 77 FR 47603 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Construction and Race Event...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Federal Register notice of proposed authorization (hereafter, the FR notice; 77 FR 32573; June 1, 2012... greater detail in the FR notice. Temporary floating docks will be installed utilizing 18-in steel pipe... provided in the FR notice. Because we do not plan to authorize take of marine mammals incidental to...

  11. 78 FR 78824 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Rockaway Delivery Lateral Project off...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... proposes to expand its pipeline system to meet immediate and future demand for natural gas in the New York... have received an application from Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC (Transco) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to expanding a...

  12. 77 FR 59211 - Marine Mammals; Incidental Take During Specified Activities; Proposed Incidental Harassment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... (Level A harassment) for cetaceans (70 FR 1871, January 11, 2005). In the absence of data on which to... and ramp-up procedures would prevent Level A harassment and limit the number of incidental takes by... measures are thus expected to prevent any Level A harassment and to minimize Level B harassment. It...

  13. 75 FR 17382 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... Federal Register (74 FR 58248) for the take of marine mammals incidental to Estuary water level management... notice (74 FR 58248). In summary, harbor seals are the most abundant marine mammal found at the mouth of... published on November 12, 2009 (74 FR 58248). During the 30-day public comment period, six members of...

  14. 76 FR 67419 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Piling and Structure Removal in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... affected species or stocks, NMFS considers a number of criteria regarding the impact of the proposed action... Natural Resources (DNR) to incidentally harass, by Level B harassment only, small numbers of harbor seals... Commerce to authorize, upon request, the incidental, but not intentional, taking of small numbers of...

  15. 78 FR 7049 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Gulf of Mexico (GOMEX) EIS/OEIS (U.S. Department of the Navy, 2011). These documents, among others, and... effects analysis presented in the Navy's LOA application differ from the quantified results presented in... Part 218 Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and...

  16. Acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in a patient taking dabigatran with radiographic evidence of recanalization.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Navdeep; El Khoury, Ramy; Misra, Vivek; Lopez, George

    2012-11-01

    Dabigatran etexelate is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. A 51-year-old man with a history of atrial fibrillation who was taking dabigatran presented with an acute ischemic stroke. The patient had a normal international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, and an elevated thrombin time of 26.4 seconds. Recanalization of the middle cerebral artery with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was apparent on digital subtraction angiography, and there was no evidence of intracerebral hemorrhage on the repeat computed tomographic scan. This is the first report of a patient who was taking dabigatran etexilate and who had an ischemic stroke caused by a middle cerebral artery occlusion, with an elevated thrombin time and radiographic recanalization with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator without evidence of hemorrhagic transformation. PMID:22683118

  17. Exercise Level and Energy Expenditure in the Take 10![R] In-Class Physical Activity Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, James A.; Dennison, David A.; Kohl, Harold W., III; Doyle, J. Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an innovative, classroom-based physical activity prevention program designed to integrate academic curriculum elements along with a physical activity program in providing moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. A convenience sample of three public school classrooms (one first, third, and fifth…

  18. Places to Go: Moodle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Educators are becoming increasingly interested in alternatives to learning management systems (LMS) Blackboard and WebCT. Stephen Downes's column Places to Go turns to one internationally popular open source LMS--Moodle. Downes takes the reader through Moodle's Web site, which is simultaneously a Web site about its LMS and an example of what its…

  19. Taking It to the Classroom: Number Board Games as a Small Group Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramani, Geetha B.; Siegler, Robert S.; Hitti, Aline

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether a theoretically based number board game could be translated into a practical classroom activity that improves Head Start children's numerical knowledge. Playing the number board game as a small group learning activity promoted low-income children's number line estimation, magnitude comparison, numeral identification, and…

  20. Take Pride in America's Health: Volunteering as a Gateway to Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Librett, John; Yore, Michelle M.; Buchner, David M.; Schmid, Thomas L.

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss the role that volunteer programs may play in increasing levels of physical activity. In some cases volunteer programs may simultaneously improve individual health, benefit the environment and increase the public's opportunities for physical activity. From a survey of 2,032 respondents, results suggest that volunteers are more…

  1. Taking a New Look at the Physical Activity Program on the College and University Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPoint, James D., Ed.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Physical activity programs at the college level should aim toward: (1) maintenance of physical fitness; (2) refinement of skills; (3) introduction to new skills; and (4) development of healthy lifestyles. Innovative activity courses such as aerobic dance, weight lifting, and adventure programs are also being offered to reach these goals. (JN)

  2. Executive function is necessary for the regulation of the stepping activity when stepping in place in older adults.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Christopher; Sciadas, Ria; Nantel, Julie

    2016-10-01

    To determine the effect of age on stepping performance and to compare the cognitive demand required to regulate repetitive stepping between older and younger adults while performing a stepping in place task (SIP). Fourteen younger (25.4 ± 6.5) and 15 older adults (71.0 ± 9.0) participated in this study. They performed a seated category fluency task and Stroop test, followed by a 60 s SIP task. Following this, both the cognitive and motor tasks were performed simultaneously. We assessed cognitive performance, SIP cycle duration, asymmetry, and arrhythmicity. Compared to younger adults, older adults had larger SIP arrhythmicity both as a single task and when combined with the Category (p < 0.001) and Stroop (p < 0.01) tasks. Older adults also had larger arrhythmicity when dual tasking compared to SIP alone (p < 0.001). Older adults showed greater SIP asymmetry when combined with Category (p = 0.006) and Stroop (p = 0.06) tasks. Finally, they had lower cognitive performance than younger adults in both single and dual tasks (p < 0.01). Age and type of cognitive task performed with the motor task affected different components of stepping. While SIP arrhythmicity was larger for all conditions in older compared to younger adults, cycle duration was not different, and asymmetry tended to be larger during SIP when paired with a verbal fluency task. SIP does not require a high level of control for dynamic stability, therefore demonstrating that higher-level executive function is necessary for the regulation of stepping activity independently of the regulation of postural balance. Furthermore, older adults may lack the cognitive resources needed to adequately regulate stepping activity while performing a cognitive task relying on the executive function.

  3. Wind as an abiotic factor of Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) flight take-off activity under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Boiteau, G; Mccarthy, P C; MacKinley, P D

    2010-10-01

    The flight take-off activity of Colorado potato beetles, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), was significantly higher at a landscape-protected than at semiexposed and exposed sites in a 2-yr field study. In both years, mean daylight temperature, solar radiation, and relative humidity were generally similar at all sites, but wind speed was lower at the protected site than at the exposed sites. Results suggest that wind was the limiting abiotic factor for flight take-off at the exposed site. Caged beetles exposed to constant wind speeds of 3.4, 4.7, and 7.0 m/s showed a significant corresponding decrease in number of flight take-off. There was no cumulative effect of wind exposure on the readiness of the beetles to fly, suggesting that wind acts as a physical barrier to flight take-off. It should be possible to reduce Colorado potato beetle flight dispersal by selecting fields most exposed to wind over landscape-protected fields when rotating potato, Solanum tuberosum L., crops.

  4. Dyadic social interaction inhibits cocaine-conditioned place preference and the associated activation of the accumbens corridor.

    PubMed

    Zernig, Gerald; Pinheiro, Barbara S

    2015-09-01

    Impaired social interaction is a hallmark symptom of many psychiatric disorders. In substance use disorders, impaired social interaction is triply harmful (a) because addicts increasingly prefer the drug of abuse to the natural reward of drug-free social interaction, thus worsening the progression of the disease by increasing their drug consumption, (b) because treatment adherence and, consequently, treatment success itself depends on the ability of the recovering addict to maintain social interaction and adhere to treatment, and (c) because socially interacting with an individual suffering from a substance use disorder may be harmful for others. Helping the addict reorient his/her behavior away from the drug of abuse toward social interaction would therefore be of considerable therapeutic benefit. This article reviews our work on the neural basis of such a reorientation from cocaine, as a prototypical drug of abuse, toward dyadic (i.e. one-to-one) social interaction and compares our findings with the effects of other potentially beneficial interventions, that is, environmental enrichment or paired housing, on the activation of the accumbens and other brain regions involved in behavior motivated by drugs of abuse or nondrug stimuli. Our experimental models are based on the conditioned place preference paradigm. As the therapeutically most promising finding, only four 15 min episodes of dyadic social interaction were able to inhibit both the subsequent reacquisition/re-expression of preference for cocaine and the neural activation associated with this behavior, that is, an increase in the expression of the immediate early gene Early Growth Response protein 1 (EGR1, Zif268) in the nucleus accumbens, basolateral and central amygdala, and the ventral tegmental area. The time spent in the cocaine-associated conditioning compartment was correlated with the density of EGR1-activated neurons not only in the medial core (AcbCm) and medial shell (AcbShm) of the nucleus

  5. Conditioned place preference and locomotor activity in response to methylphenidate, amphetamine and cocaine in mice lacking dopamine D4 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Thanos, P.K.; Bermeo, C.; Rubinstein, M.; Suchland, K.L.; Wang, G.-J.; Grandy, D.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) and amphetamine (AMPH) are the most frequently prescribed medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Both drugs are believed to derive their therapeutic benefit by virtue of their dopamine (DA)-enhancing effects, yet an explanation for the observation that some patients with ADHD respond well to one medication but not to the other remains elusive. The dopaminergic effects of MP and AMPH are also thought to underlie their reinforcing properties and ultimately their abuse. Polymorphisms in the human gene that codes for the DA D4 receptor (D4R) have been repeatedly associated with ADHD and may correlate with the therapeutic as well as the reinforcing effects of responses to these psychostimulant medications. Conditioned place preference (CPP) for MP, AMPH and cocaine were evaluated in wild-type (WT) mice and their genetically engineered littermates, congenic on the C57Bl/6J background, that completely lack D4Rs (knockout or KO). In addition, the locomotor activity in these mice during the conditioning phase of CPP was tested in the CPP chambers. D4 receptor KO and WT mice showed CPP and increased locomotor activity in response to each of the three psychostimulants tested. D4R differentially modulates the CPP responses to MP, AMPH and cocaine. While the D4R genotype affected CPP responses to MP (high dose only) and AMPH (low dose only) it had no effects on cocaine. Inasmuch as CPP is considered an indicator of sensitivity to reinforcing responses to drugs these data suggest a significant but limited role of D4Rs in modulating conditioning responses to MP and AMPH. In the locomotor test, D4 receptor KO mice displayed attenuated increases in AMPH-induced locomotor activity whereas responses to cocaine and MP did not differ. These results suggest distinct mechanisms for D4 receptor modulation of the reinforcing (perhaps via attenuating dopaminergic signalling) and locomotor properties of these stimulant drugs

  6. Dyadic social interaction inhibits cocaine-conditioned place preference and the associated activation of the accumbens corridor

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired social interaction is a hallmark symptom of many psychiatric disorders. In substance use disorders, impaired social interaction is triply harmful (a) because addicts increasingly prefer the drug of abuse to the natural reward of drug-free social interaction, thus worsening the progression of the disease by increasing their drug consumption, (b) because treatment adherence and, consequently, treatment success itself depends on the ability of the recovering addict to maintain social interaction and adhere to treatment, and (c) because socially interacting with an individual suffering from a substance use disorder may be harmful for others. Helping the addict reorient his/her behavior away from the drug of abuse toward social interaction would therefore be of considerable therapeutic benefit. This article reviews our work on the neural basis of such a reorientation from cocaine, as a prototypical drug of abuse, toward dyadic (i.e. one-to-one) social interaction and compares our findings with the effects of other potentially beneficial interventions, that is, environmental enrichment or paired housing, on the activation of the accumbens and other brain regions involved in behavior motivated by drugs of abuse or nondrug stimuli. Our experimental models are based on the conditioned place preference paradigm. As the therapeutically most promising finding, only four 15 min episodes of dyadic social interaction were able to inhibit both the subsequent reacquisition/re-expression of preference for cocaine and the neural activation associated with this behavior, that is, an increase in the expression of the immediate early gene Early Growth Response protein 1 (EGR1, Zif268) in the nucleus accumbens, basolateral and central amygdala, and the ventral tegmental area. The time spent in the cocaine-associated conditioning compartment was correlated with the density of EGR1-activated neurons not only in the medial core (AcbCm) and medial shell (AcbShm) of the nucleus

  7. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) and Ligand Choreography: Newcomers Take the Stage.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Guasch, Laura; Tomas-Hernández, Sarah; del Bas, Josep Maria; Ollendorff, Vincent; Arola, Lluís; Pujadas, Gerard; Mulero, Miquel

    2015-07-23

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) full agonists that have been widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite the demonstrated beneficial effect of reducing glucose levels in the plasma, TZDs also induce several adverse effects. Consequently, the search for new compounds with potent antidiabetic effects but fewer undesired effects is an active field of research. Interestingly, the novel proposed mechanisms for the antidiabetic activity of PPARγ agonists, consisting of PPARγ Ser273 phosphorylation inhibition, ligand and receptor mutual dynamics, and the presence of an alternate binding site, have recently changed the view regarding the optimal characteristics for the screening of novel PPARγ ligands. Furthermore, transcriptional genomics could bring essential information about the genome-wide effects of PPARγ ligands. Consequently, facing the new mechanistic scenario proposed for these compounds is essential for resolving the paradoxes among their agonistic function, antidiabetic activities, and side effects and should allow the rational development of better and safer PPARγ-mediated antidiabetic drugs. PMID:25734377

  8. 76 FR 56172 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Piling and Structure Removal in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... February 28, 2011 (75 FR 67951). The specified activity includes all or part of the following actions... haul-out choice (Harris et al., 2003). Behavior and Ecology--Harbor seals are typically seen in small... invertebrates (Bigg, 1981; Roffe and Mate, 1984; Orr et al., 2004). Although harbor seals in the...

  9. 50 CFR 21.15 - Authorization of take incidental to military readiness activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in a significant adverse effect on a population of a migratory bird species, the Armed Forces must... minimize or mitigate such significant adverse effects. (2) When conservation measures implemented under... a proposed military readiness activity is likely to result in a significant adverse effect on...

  10. 77 FR 59904 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Driving for Honolulu Seawater...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... implementing regulations, NMFS issued a notice in the Federal Register on July 24, 2012 (77 FR 43259... description of the specified activity may be found in NMFS' proposed IHA notice in the Federal Register (77 FR... offshore seawater discharge pipe, a land-based pump station, and a land-based chilled water...

  11. 78 FR 47282 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Research, Development, Test and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... such behavioral patterns are abandoned or significantly altered [Level B harassment]. Section 101(a)(5... June 6, 2013, NMFS published a notice in the Federal Register (78 FR 34047) making preliminary... information on the demolition and construction activities at the Children's Pool Lifeguard Station...

  12. The Dynamic Density Bottle: A Make-and-Take, Guided Inquiry Activity on Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    An activity is described wherein students observe dynamic floating and sinking behavior of plastic pieces in various liquids. The liquids and solids are all contained within a plastic bottle; the entire assembly is called a "density bottle". After completing a series of experiments that guides students to think about the relative…

  13. 76 FR 38621 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    .... On May 6, 2011, NMFS published a notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 26255) disclosing the effects... notice for the proposed IHA (76 FR 26255, May 6, 2011). The activities to be conducted have not changed... reader should refer to the proposed IHA notice (76 FR 26255, May 6, 2011), the IHA application, EA,...

  14. 75 FR 44770 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... the program in a previous notice for the proposed IHA (75 FR 28568, May 21, ] 2010). The activities to... acoustic source specifications, the reader should refer to the proposed IHA notice (75 FR 28568, May 21... published in the Federal Register on May 21, 2010 (75 FR 28568). During the comment period, NMFS...

  15. 75 FR 8677 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Seabird and Pinniped Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... of the activity in the notice of the proposed IHA (74 FR 61109, November 23, 2009). No changes have..., 2009 (74 FR 61109). During the 30-day comment period, NMFS received a letter from the Marine Mammal... coordinating visits to the island) as described in NMFS' November 23, 2009 (74 FR 61109), notice of...

  16. 75 FR 74687 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Construction of the Parsons Slough...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... regulations, NMFS issued a notice in the Federal Register on October 5, 2010 (75 FR 61432), requesting... of the specified activity may be found in NMFS' proposed IHA notice in the Federal Register (75 FR... October 5, 2010 (75 FR 61432). During the 30-day public comment period, NMFS received comments from...

  17. 75 FR 45527 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Military Training Activities and Research, Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... under ] the MMPA: Blue whale; fin whale; humpback whale; sei whale; sperm whale; North Pacific right... activity, which was published in the Federal Register on October 20, 2009 (74 FR 53796). This information... individuals of 2 species by Level A Harassment annually, and 10 individual beaked whales by mortality over...

  18. 76 FR 33705 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Register (76 FR 18167) disclosing the effects on marine mammals, making preliminary determinations and... for the proposed IHA (76 FR 18167, April 1, 2011). The activities to be conducted have not changed... reader should refer to the proposed IHA notice (76 FR 18167, April 1, 2011), the IHA application...

  19. 77 FR 25693 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... proposed IHA (77 FR 4765, January 31, 2012). The activities to be conducted have not changed between the... refer to the notice of the proposed IHA (77 FR 4765, January 31, 2012), the application, and associated... Federal Register on January 31, 2012 (77 FR 4765). During the 30-day public comment period, NMFS...

  20. 76 FR 10564 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... of a report with a data table, any other significant observations related to marine mammals, and a... notice for the proposed IHA (75 FR 80471 December 22, 2010). The planned activities have not changed... reader should refer to the proposed IHA notice (75 FR 8047, December 22, 2010). Comments and...

  1. Student's Reflections on Their Learning and Note-Taking Activities in a Blended Learning Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakayama, Minoru; Mutsuura, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Hiroh

    2016-01-01

    Student's emotional aspects are often discussed in order to promote better learning activity in blended learning courses. To observe these factors, course participant's self-efficacy and reflections upon their studies were surveyed, in addition to the surveying of the metrics of student's characteristics during a Bachelor level credit course.…

  2. 78 FR 72643 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities: Mukilteo Ferry Terminal Construction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... stock through effects on annual rates of recruitment or survival.'' Section 101(a)(5)(D) of the MMPA... removing the pile slowly; or if using direct pull, keep the rate at which piles are removed low enough to... location within the ZOI, and their reaction (if any) to pile-driving activities will be documented....

  3. 78 FR 72655 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Bremerton Ferry Terminal Wingwall...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ..., adversely affect the species or stock through effects on annual rates of recruitment or survival.'' Section... activities (78 FR 36527; June 18, 2013). The IHA covers the duration between September 1, 2013, and August 31... the Strait of Juan de Fuca). The population across Washington increased at an average annual rate...

  4. 75 FR 48941 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Piling and Structure Removal in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... reactions with the second and third highest causes being canoes and kayaks, respectively. The scientists.... However, sudden presence of a disturbance source (e.g., kayaker) can induce strong behavioral reactions. To avoid inducing strong reactions, the WA DNR would conduct activities such that the piles...

  5. 77 FR 39999 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Placement for Fishermen's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ..., NMFS issued a notice in the Federal Register on March 13, 2012 (77 FR 14736), requesting comments from... specified activity may be found in NMFS' proposed IHA notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 14736, March 13... FR 14736). During the 30-day public comment period, the Marine Mammal Commission...

  6. 76 FR 23306 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... IHA, valid for a period of one year, on April 1, 2010 (75 FR 17382). Management activities include... March 18, 2011 (76 FR 14924). During the 30-day comment period, NMFS received comment from three private... these stocks and their occurrence in the action area in the notice of the proposed IHA (76 FR...

  7. 76 FR 80891 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Cape Wind's High Resolution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... that NOAA ask the Department of the Interior (DOI) to defer further action on offshore wind leasing... IHA (76 FR 56735, September 14, 2011). The activities to be conducted have not changed between the IHA... proposed IHA notice (76 FR 56735, September 14, 2011), the application, and associated documents...

  8. 78 FR 36527 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Construction at Bremerton Ferry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Ferry Terminal is provided in the Federal Register notice for the proposed IHA (78 FR 11844; February 20... Federal Register notice for the proposed IHA (78 FR 11844; February 20, 2013). Please refer to that... FR 11844). That notice described, in detail, WSDOT's activity, the marine mammal species that may...

  9. 76 FR 14924 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ..., valid for a period of one year, on April 1, 2010 (75 FR 17382). Management activities include management... (61 FR 56138), SCWA and the Corps engaged NMFS in pre-consultation technical assistance to evaluate... the current velocities to erode a wider and deeper channel and downcut into the barrier beach....

  10. 76 FR 28733 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile-Driving and Renovation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... environmental damping due to non-forest vegetation, structures, topography, etc. and corresponds to the rate... Activities The Trinidad Pier, located on Trinidad Bay, is an antiquated structure that requires... existing structure. The 165 m (540 ft) long pier is located on tidelands granted by the State of...

  11. 76 FR 50457 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Military Training Activities and Research Conducted Within...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... became effective on August 3, 2010 (75 FR 45527, August 3, 2010), and remain in effect through August 3... under regulations issued on August 3, 2010 (75 FR 45527). The Navy has complied with the measures...; Military Training Activities and Research Conducted Within the Mariana Islands Range Complex...

  12. 77 FR 73989 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Seabird and Pinniped Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... FR 59377, September 27, 2012). The activities to be conducted and their locations have not changed... refer to the notice of the proposed IHA (77 FR 59377, September 27, 2012), the application, and... of PRBO's application and proposed IHA in the Federal Register on September 27, 2012 (77 FR...

  13. 78 FR 71576 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... activities in a previous notice for the proposed authorization (78 FR 1838, January 9, 2013). The proposed... authorization (78 FR 1838, January 9, 2013). Comments and Responses We published a notice of receipt of the Society's application and proposed Authorization in the Federal Register on January 9, 2013 (78 FR...

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) and Ligand Choreography: Newcomers Take the Stage.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Guasch, Laura; Tomas-Hernández, Sarah; del Bas, Josep Maria; Ollendorff, Vincent; Arola, Lluís; Pujadas, Gerard; Mulero, Miquel

    2015-07-23

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) full agonists that have been widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite the demonstrated beneficial effect of reducing glucose levels in the plasma, TZDs also induce several adverse effects. Consequently, the search for new compounds with potent antidiabetic effects but fewer undesired effects is an active field of research. Interestingly, the novel proposed mechanisms for the antidiabetic activity of PPARγ agonists, consisting of PPARγ Ser273 phosphorylation inhibition, ligand and receptor mutual dynamics, and the presence of an alternate binding site, have recently changed the view regarding the optimal characteristics for the screening of novel PPARγ ligands. Furthermore, transcriptional genomics could bring essential information about the genome-wide effects of PPARγ ligands. Consequently, facing the new mechanistic scenario proposed for these compounds is essential for resolving the paradoxes among their agonistic function, antidiabetic activities, and side effects and should allow the rational development of better and safer PPARγ-mediated antidiabetic drugs.

  15. Exciting New Take on a Classic: Crash Test Activity Puts the Egg in the Driver's Seat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board, Keith

    2011-01-01

    An excellent common activity in technology and engineering classes involves dropping an egg from a significant height in a protective device designed and built by students. This article describes how the author uses the classic "egg drop" as an inspiration to have students modify a small crash test vehicle that speeds down a track and crashes into…

  16. Exciting New Take on a Classic: Crash Testing Activity Puts the Egg in the Driver's Seat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board, Keith

    2011-01-01

    An excellent common activity in technology and engineering classes involves dropping an egg from a significant height in a protective device designed and built by students. This article describes how the author uses the classic "egg drop" as an inspiration to have students modify a small crash test vehicle that speeds down a track and crashes into…

  17. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Heather D., Ed.; Kohl , Harold W., III, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a key determinant of health across the lifespan. A lack of activity increases the risk of heart disease, colon and breast cancer, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression and others diseases. Emerging literature has suggested that in terms of mortality, the global population health burden of…

  18. 78 FR 34069 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... published a notice in the Federal Register (78 FR 17359) making preliminary determinations and proposing to... program in a previous notice for the proposed IHA (78 FR 17359, March 21, 2013). The activities to be... source specifications, the reader should refer to the notice for the proposed IHA (78 FR 17539, March...

  19. Adolescent mouse takes on an active transcriptomic expression during postnatal cerebral development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xin, Chengqi; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jun; Cui, Peng; Hu, Songnian

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axonrepulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum.

  20. Neuroimaging supports behavioral personality assessment: Overlapping activations during reflective and impulsive risk taking.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Belinda; M Ortner, Tuulia

    2016-09-01

    Personality assessment has been challenged by the fact that different assessment methods (implicit measures, behavioral measures and explicit rating scales) show little or no convergence in behavioral studies. In this neuroimaging study we address for the first time, whether different assessment methods rely on separate or overlapping neuronal systems. Fifty nine healthy adult participants completed two objective personality tests of risk propensity: the more implicit Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) and the more explicit Game of Dice Task (GDT). Significant differences in activation, as well as connectivity patterns between both tasks were observed. In both tasks, risky decisions yielded significantly stronger activations than safe decisions in the bilateral caudate, as well as the bilateral Insula. The finding of overlapping brain areas validates different assessment methods, despite their behavioral non-convergence. This suggests that neuroimaging can be an important tool of validation in the field of personality assessment.

  1. Neuroimaging supports behavioral personality assessment: Overlapping activations during reflective and impulsive risk taking.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Belinda; M Ortner, Tuulia

    2016-09-01

    Personality assessment has been challenged by the fact that different assessment methods (implicit measures, behavioral measures and explicit rating scales) show little or no convergence in behavioral studies. In this neuroimaging study we address for the first time, whether different assessment methods rely on separate or overlapping neuronal systems. Fifty nine healthy adult participants completed two objective personality tests of risk propensity: the more implicit Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) and the more explicit Game of Dice Task (GDT). Significant differences in activation, as well as connectivity patterns between both tasks were observed. In both tasks, risky decisions yielded significantly stronger activations than safe decisions in the bilateral caudate, as well as the bilateral Insula. The finding of overlapping brain areas validates different assessment methods, despite their behavioral non-convergence. This suggests that neuroimaging can be an important tool of validation in the field of personality assessment. PMID:27373370

  2. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound. PMID:27095146

  3. Willingness to Take PrEP and Potential for Risk Compensation Among Highly Sexually Active Gay and Bisexual Men.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Whitfield, Thomas H F; Rendina, H Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2015-12-01

    Once-daily Truvada (Emtricitabine/Tenofovir) as a method of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is one of the most promising biomedical interventions to eliminate new HIV infections; however, uptake among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men has been slow amidst growing concern in popular/social media that PrEP use will result in reduced condom use (i.e., risk compensation). We investigated demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial differences in willingness to use PrEP as well as the perceived impact of PrEP on participants' condom use in a sample of 206 highly sexually active HIV-negative gay and bisexual men. Nearly half (46.1 %) said they would be willing to take PrEP if it were provided at no cost. Although men willing to take PrEP (vs. others) reported similar numbers of recent casual male partners (<6 weeks), they had higher odds of recent receptive condomless anal sex (CAS)-i.e., those already at high risk of contracting HIV were more willing to take PrEP. Neither age, race/ethnicity, nor income were associated with willingness to take PrEP, suggesting equal acceptability among subpopulations that are experiencing disparities in HIV incidence. There was limited evidence to suggest men would risk compensate. Only 10 % of men who had not engaged in recent CAS felt that PrEP would result in them starting to have CAS. Men who had not tested for HIV recently were also significantly more likely than others to indicate willingness to take PrEP. Offering PrEP to men who test infrequently may serve to engage them more in routine HIV/STI testing and create a continued dialogue around sexual health between patient and provider in order to prevent HIV infection.

  4. Variability in nucleus accumbens activity mediates age-related suboptimal financial risk taking

    PubMed Central

    Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R.; Kuhnen, Camelia M.; Yoo, Daniel J.; Knutson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    As human life expectancy continues to rise, financial decisions of aging investors may have an increasing impact on the global economy. In this study, we examined age differences in financial decisions across the adult life span by combining functional neuroimaging with a dynamic financial investment task. During the task, older adults made more suboptimal choices than younger adults when choosing risky assets. This age-related effect was mediated by a neural measure of temporal variability in nucleus accumbens activity. These findings reveal a novel neural mechanism by which aging may disrupt rational financial choice. PMID:20107069

  5. A woman's rightful place?

    PubMed

    1993-04-01

    Rural development projects in sub-Saharan Africa tend not to succeed because they do not consider women's role and their significance, even though women constitute 70% of agricultural workers, 80% of food producers, 100% of people who prepare meals, and 60-90% do food marketing. Development specialists ignore women because they are not involved in political activities and in decision making. As long as women and women's contributions are not considered, rural development projects will remain inefficient and development will not take place. Thus, projects must include women as agents and beneficiaries of development in key sectors of the economy. Rural development specialists must also consider the effect male labor emigration has on rural women. For example, drought has forced many men to leave their villages, leaving a work force consisting of 95% women to fight desertification. All too often, women have no or limited land ownership rights, thereby keeping them from improving the land, e.g., planting perennial fruit crops. They also tend to be hired hands rather than food producers. They cannot obtain bank loans because they do not own land, and because they are often illiterate (over 90% female illiteracy in 28 African countries), they can neither understand nor complete bank loan forms. Rural development projects further alienate women by aiming training programs to men or by using male agricultural extension agents. Women react to this alienation by rejecting projects that do not benefit them and follow more profitable activities which sometimes interfere with projects. Thus, rural development programs need to invest in women to ensure viable and efficient sustainable development.

  6. European active surveillance study of women taking HRT (EURAS-HRT): study protocol [NCT00214903

    PubMed Central

    Dinger, Juergen C; Heinemann, Lothar AJ

    2006-01-01

    Background The post marketing safety surveillance program for a drug containing a new chemical entity should assess both, the safety outcomes that relate specifically to the targeted population, as well as those that could potentially be related to special pharmacological characteristics of the drug. Active safety surveillance using valid epidemiological study designs has been proven to be a pertinent and reliable method to approach this endeavor. Methods/design The primary objective of the study is to compare incidence rates of serious adverse events in users of all types of newly prescribed oral HRT products. This active surveillance study will assess pertinent cardiovascular outcomes - in particular venous and arterial thromboembolism - and other serious adverse events (SAEs) in new HRT users over a period of several years. One product under surveillance is Angeliq®, which contains the novel progestagen drospirenone (DRSP) combined with estradiol. In addition, all other oral combined HRT products with a novel progestagen or estrogen that will be newly marketed during the study period will be studied. These new HRT products will be compared with established HRT products. The combined cohort will include at least 30,000 women recruited in several European countries. At least 90,000 years of observation are expected from the field work which started in early 2002 and will end around 2008. The participating women will complete a baseline survey using a self-administered questionnaire to describe the baseline risk. After 6 months, 12 months, and then on an annual basis, they will fill out a questionnaire in which they record complaints and events during the use of the prescribed HRTs. All adverse outcomes occurring during the observational period will be evaluated. Discussion A complete lifetime medical history, individually validated SAEs over time, and a low loss to follow-up rate are essential for a robust safety assessment. Therefore, the lifetime history of

  7. Multiple Behavior Change among Church Members Taking Part in the Faith, Activity, and Nutrition Program

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the extent to which participants in a combined physical activity (PA) and dietary intervention achieved changes in multiple health behaviors. Design Group randomized trial; includes participants assigned to the intervention group only. Setting 36 churches in South Carolina. Participants 360 African American church members. Intervention 15-month PA and dietary intervention, guided by the structural ecological model, targeting environmental (i.e. social, cultural, physical) and organizational (i.e. policies, practices) changes within the church. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported PA, fruit and vegetable consumption, fat-, and fiber-related behaviors. Analysis Change in each behavior was defined as unadjusted pretest-posttest improvement ≥0.20 of the baseline standard deviation. The total number and each combination of behaviors changed were calculated. Results 19.2% changed no health behaviors as defined above, 31.4% changed one health behavior, 30.8% changed two health behaviors, 13.3% changed three health behaviors, and 5.3% changed all four of the targeted health behaviors. Combinations of multiple behavior change included PA and dietary behaviors, suggesting both behaviors can be changed simultaneously. Conclusions and Implications Nearly half of participants changed at least two health behaviors. Faith-based interventions targeting environmental and organizational change can successfully change multiple behaviors, potentially leading to greater improvements in public health. PMID:23769297

  8. Privileged Girls: The Place of Femininity and Femininity in Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahey, Johannah

    2014-01-01

    Constructions of femininity and attendant notions of feminism are being produced in different ways in different places around the world. This is a complicated global process that cannot be reduced to analyses that take place in nation states. This paper seeks to respond to and enhance Angela McRobbie's compelling argument about understandings…

  9. What is taking place in science classrooms?: A case study analysis of teaching and learning in seventh-grade science of one Alabama school and its impact on African American student learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Lashaunda Renea

    This qualitative case study investigated the teaching strategies that improve science learning of African American students. This research study further sought the extent the identified teaching strategies that are used to improve African American science learning reflect culturally responsive teaching. Best teaching strategies and culturally responsive teaching have been researched, but there has been minimal research on the impact that both have on science learning, with an emphasis on the African American population. Consequently, the Black-White achievement gap in science persists. The findings revealed the following teaching strategies have a positive impact on African American science learning: (a) lecture-discussion, (b) notetaking, (c) reading strategies, (d) graphic organizers, (e) hands-on activities, (f) laboratory experiences, and (g) cooperative learning. Culturally responsive teaching strategies were evident in the seventh-grade science classrooms observed. Seven themes emerged from this research data: (1) The participating teachers based their research-based teaching strategies used in the classroom on all of the students' learning styles, abilities, attitudes towards science, and motivational levels about learning science, with no emphasis on the African American student population; (2) The participating teachers taught the state content standards simultaneously using the same instructional model daily, incorporating other content areas when possible; (3) The participating African American students believed their seventh-grade science teachers used a variety of teaching strategies to ensure science learning took place, that science learning was fun, and that science learning was engaging; (4) The participating African American students genuinely liked their teacher; (5) The participating African American students revealed high self-efficacy; (6) The African American student participants' parents value education and moved to Success Middle School

  10. Normalization of EEG activity among previously institutionalized children placed into foster care: A 12-year follow-up of the Bucharest Early Intervention Project.

    PubMed

    Vanderwert, Ross E; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A

    2016-02-01

    Extreme social and cognitive deprivation as a result of institutional care has profound effects on developmental outcomes across multiple domains for many abandoned or orphaned children. The Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP) examines the outcomes for children originally placed in institutions who were assessed comprehensively and then randomized to foster care (FCG) or care as usual (CAUG) and followed longitudinally. Here we report on the brain electrical activity (electroencephalogram: EEG) of 12-year-old children enrolled in the BEIP. Previous reports suggested improvement in resting EEG activity for the group of children placed in the foster care intervention, particularly those placed before 24 months of age compared to children who were randomized to CAUG or those placed into families after this age. At 12 years, differences between those in the FCG and those in the CAUG persist in the alpha band (8-13 Hz), but not in higher frequency bands (i.e. in the beta band; 15-30 Hz), except in those children placed into the FCG who remained in high quality care environments over the course of the study. These findings highlight the importance of maintaining a stable high quality caregiving environment, particularly for children exposed to early psychosocial deprivation, for promoting healthy brain development.

  11. Normalization of EEG activity among previously institutionalized children placed into foster care: A 12-year follow-up of the Bucharest Early Intervention Project.

    PubMed

    Vanderwert, Ross E; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A

    2016-02-01

    Extreme social and cognitive deprivation as a result of institutional care has profound effects on developmental outcomes across multiple domains for many abandoned or orphaned children. The Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP) examines the outcomes for children originally placed in institutions who were assessed comprehensively and then randomized to foster care (FCG) or care as usual (CAUG) and followed longitudinally. Here we report on the brain electrical activity (electroencephalogram: EEG) of 12-year-old children enrolled in the BEIP. Previous reports suggested improvement in resting EEG activity for the group of children placed in the foster care intervention, particularly those placed before 24 months of age compared to children who were randomized to CAUG or those placed into families after this age. At 12 years, differences between those in the FCG and those in the CAUG persist in the alpha band (8-13 Hz), but not in higher frequency bands (i.e. in the beta band; 15-30 Hz), except in those children placed into the FCG who remained in high quality care environments over the course of the study. These findings highlight the importance of maintaining a stable high quality caregiving environment, particularly for children exposed to early psychosocial deprivation, for promoting healthy brain development. PMID:26724564

  12. The use of parent involved take-home science activities during student teaching: Understanding the challenges of implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarazinski, Jill

    The purpose of this study was to identify student teachers use and implementation of Science in a Bag when it was no longer a required course-based assessment. This take-home science activity acted as the elaboration component of the 5Es lesson teacher candidates designed and taught in the classroom, utilized household items, and directly involved parents in their child's education. The purposeful sample was comprised of six teacher candidates during their student teaching practicum, the last semester of the childhood education teacher certification program. This collective case study centered on student teachers' use of the focused activity, Science in a Bag, in order to gain knowledge of challenges faced in applying take-home science kits and working with parents. Data collection was comprised of student teacher and parent interviews, candidate reflections, as well as in-class observations and discussions carried out during weekly seminars. Data collection occurred throughout the seven-week student teaching practicum. The four research questions were: 1) What factors do teacher candidates identify as interfering with their ability to implement Science in a Bag during student teaching placements? 2) What factors do teacher candidates identify as enhancing their ability to carry out Science in a Bag? 3) What forms of support do teacher candidates believe are important to their success in implementing Science in a Bag during student teaching? 4) How do teacher candidates deal with obstacles when implementing Science in a Bag? Despite the fact that no student teacher was prohibited from implementing Science in a Bag, the level to which candidates valued and utilized this instructional strategy varied compared to how they were taught and practiced it during the science methods course. Some student teachers attempted to hide their feelings toward Science in a Bag, however their actions revealed that they were simply carrying out the instructional strategy because they

  13. The insanity of place.

    PubMed

    Scull, Andrew

    2004-12-01

    This paper uses English examples to scrutinize the complex interrelations of insanity and place over the past three centuries, taking as its starting point the late Erving Goffman's paper of the same title. From eighteenth-century Bedlam and the emerging trade in lunacy, through the county asylums and licensed madhouses of the nineteenth century to the return of the the mentally ill to the 'community' in the last half of the twentieth century, the place occupied by insanity has varied sharply, symbolically as well as concretely. These various techniques of containment and damage limitation must be understood as a response to the threats, symbolic and practical, that serious mental illness poses to the social order, at both the micro- and macroscopic levels of analysis.

  14. Places where preschoolers are (in)active: An observational study on Latino preschoolers and their parents using objective measures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To combat the disproportionately higher risk of childhood obesity in Latino preschool-aged children, multilevel interventions targeting physical (in)activity are needed. These require the identification of environmental and psychosocial determinants of physical (in)activity for this ethnic group. Th...

  15. A place for play? The influence of the home physical environment on children's physical activity and sedentary behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maitland, Clover; Stratton, Gareth; Foster, Sarah; Braham, Rebecca; Rosenberg, Michael

    2013-08-17

    The home environment is an important influence on the sedentary behaviour and physical activity of children, who have limited independent mobility and spend much of their time at home. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the influence of the home physical environment on the sedentary behaviour and physical activity of children aged 8-14 years. A literature search of peer reviewed articles published between 2005 and 2011 resulted in 38 observational studies (21 with activity outcomes, 23 with sedentary outcomes) and 11 experimental studies included in the review. The most commonly investigated behavioural outcomes were television watching and moderate to vigorous physical activity. Media equipment in the home and to a lesser extent the bedroom were positively associated with children's sedentary behaviour. Physical activity equipment and the house and yard were not associated with physical activity, although environmental measures were exclusively self-reported. On the other hand, physical activity equipment was inversely associated with sedentary behaviours in half of studies. Observational studies that investigated the influence of the physical and social environment within the home space, found that the social environment, particularly the role of parents, was important. Experimental studies that changed the home physical environment by introducing a television limiting device successfully decreased television viewing, whereas the influence of introducing an active video game on activity outcomes was inconsistent. Results highlight that the home environment is an important influence on children's sedentary behaviour and physical activity, about which much is still unknown. While changing or controlling the home physical environment shows promise for reducing screen based sedentary behaviour, further interventions are needed to understand the broader impact of these changes. Future studies should prioritise investigating the influence of the home

  16. A place for play? The influence of the home physical environment on children's physical activity and sedentary behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maitland, Clover; Stratton, Gareth; Foster, Sarah; Braham, Rebecca; Rosenberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The home environment is an important influence on the sedentary behaviour and physical activity of children, who have limited independent mobility and spend much of their time at home. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the influence of the home physical environment on the sedentary behaviour and physical activity of children aged 8-14 years. A literature search of peer reviewed articles published between 2005 and 2011 resulted in 38 observational studies (21 with activity outcomes, 23 with sedentary outcomes) and 11 experimental studies included in the review. The most commonly investigated behavioural outcomes were television watching and moderate to vigorous physical activity. Media equipment in the home and to a lesser extent the bedroom were positively associated with children's sedentary behaviour. Physical activity equipment and the house and yard were not associated with physical activity, although environmental measures were exclusively self-reported. On the other hand, physical activity equipment was inversely associated with sedentary behaviours in half of studies. Observational studies that investigated the influence of the physical and social environment within the home space, found that the social environment, particularly the role of parents, was important. Experimental studies that changed the home physical environment by introducing a television limiting device successfully decreased television viewing, whereas the influence of introducing an active video game on activity outcomes was inconsistent. Results highlight that the home environment is an important influence on children's sedentary behaviour and physical activity, about which much is still unknown. While changing or controlling the home physical environment shows promise for reducing screen based sedentary behaviour, further interventions are needed to understand the broader impact of these changes. Future studies should prioritise investigating the influence of the home

  17. A place for play? The influence of the home physical environment on children’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The home environment is an important influence on the sedentary behaviour and physical activity of children, who have limited independent mobility and spend much of their time at home. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the influence of the home physical environment on the sedentary behaviour and physical activity of children aged 8–14 years. A literature search of peer reviewed articles published between 2005 and 2011 resulted in 38 observational studies (21 with activity outcomes, 23 with sedentary outcomes) and 11 experimental studies included in the review. The most commonly investigated behavioural outcomes were television watching and moderate to vigorous physical activity. Media equipment in the home and to a lesser extent the bedroom were positively associated with children’s sedentary behaviour. Physical activity equipment and the house and yard were not associated with physical activity, although environmental measures were exclusively self-reported. On the other hand, physical activity equipment was inversely associated with sedentary behaviours in half of studies. Observational studies that investigated the influence of the physical and social environment within the home space, found that the social environment, particularly the role of parents, was important. Experimental studies that changed the home physical environment by introducing a television limiting device successfully decreased television viewing, whereas the influence of introducing an active video game on activity outcomes was inconsistent. Results highlight that the home environment is an important influence on children’s sedentary behaviour and physical activity, about which much is still unknown. While changing or controlling the home physical environment shows promise for reducing screen based sedentary behaviour, further interventions are needed to understand the broader impact of these changes. Future studies should prioritise investigating the influence of the

  18. Relationships among genetic makeup, active ingredient content, and place of origin of the medicinal plant Gastrodia tuber.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jun; Luo, Zhi-yong; Msangi, Chikira Ismail; Shu, Xiao-shun; Wen, Li; Liu, Shui-ping; Zhou, Chang-quan; Liu, Rui-xin; Hu, Wei-xin

    2009-02-01

    Gastrodia tuber and its component gastrodin have many pharmacological effects. The chemical fingerprints and gastrodin contents of eight Gastrodia populations were determined, and the genomic DNA polymorphism of the populations was investigated. Genetic distance coefficients among the populations were calculated using the DNA polymorphism data. A dendrogram of the genetic similarities between the populations was constructed using the genetic distance coefficients. The results indicated that the genomic DNA of Gastrodia tubers was highly polymorphic; the eight populations clustered into three major groups, and the gastrodin content varied greatly among these groups. There were obvious correlations among genetic makeup, gastrodin content, and place of origin. The ecological environments in Guizhou and Shanxi may be conducive to evolution and to gastrodin biosynthesis, and more suitable for cultivation of Gastrodia tubers. These findings may provide a scientific basis for overall genetic resource management and for the selection of locations for cultivating Gastrodia tubers.

  19. Taking Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merson, Martha, Ed.; Reuys, Steve, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Following an introduction on "Taking Risks" (Martha Merson), this journal contains 11 articles on taking risks in teaching adult literacy, mostly by educators in the Boston area. The following are included: "My Dreams Are Bigger than My Fears Now" (Sharon Carey); "Making a Pitch for Poetry in ABE [Adult Basic Education]" (Marie Hassett); "Putting…

  20. Risk-Taking Behavior in a Computerized Driving Task: Brain Activation Correlates of Decision-Making, Outcome, and Peer Influence in Male Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Victor; Kwon, Myoung Soo; Moe, Dagfinn; Parkkola, Riitta; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Increased propensity for risky behavior in adolescents, particularly in peer groups, is thought to reflect maturational imbalance between reward processing and cognitive control systems that affect decision-making. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain functional correlates of risk-taking behavior and effects of peer influence in 18-19-year-old male adolescents. The subjects were divided into low and high risk-taking groups using either personality tests or risk-taking rates in a simulated driving task. The fMRI data were analyzed for decision-making (whether to take a risk at intersections) and outcome (pass or crash) phases, and for the influence of peer competition. Personality test-based groups showed no difference in the amount of risk-taking (similarly increased during peer competition) and brain activation. When groups were defined by actual task performance, risk-taking activated two areas in the left medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) significantly more in low than in high risk-takers. In the entire sample, risky decision-specific activation was found in the anterior and dorsal cingulate, superior parietal cortex, basal ganglia (including the nucleus accumbens), midbrain, thalamus, and hypothalamus. Peer competition increased outcome-related activation in the right caudate head and cerebellar vermis in the entire sample. Our results suggest that the activation of the medial (rather than lateral) PFC and striatum is most specific to risk-taking behavior of male adolescents in a simulated driving situation, and reflect a stronger conflict and thus increased cognitive effort to take risks in low risk-takers, and reward anticipation for risky decisions, respectively. The activation of the caudate nucleus, particularly for the positive outcome (pass) during peer competition, further suggests enhanced reward processing of risk-taking under peer influence. PMID:26052943

  1. Risk-Taking Behavior in a Computerized Driving Task: Brain Activation Correlates of Decision-Making, Outcome, and Peer Influence in Male Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyev, Victor; Kwon, Myoung Soo; Moe, Dagfinn; Parkkola, Riitta; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Increased propensity for risky behavior in adolescents, particularly in peer groups, is thought to reflect maturational imbalance between reward processing and cognitive control systems that affect decision-making. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain functional correlates of risk-taking behavior and effects of peer influence in 18–19-year-old male adolescents. The subjects were divided into low and high risk-taking groups using either personality tests or risk-taking rates in a simulated driving task. The fMRI data were analyzed for decision-making (whether to take a risk at intersections) and outcome (pass or crash) phases, and for the influence of peer competition. Personality test-based groups showed no difference in the amount of risk-taking (similarly increased during peer competition) and brain activation. When groups were defined by actual task performance, risk-taking activated two areas in the left medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) significantly more in low than in high risk-takers. In the entire sample, risky decision-specific activation was found in the anterior and dorsal cingulate, superior parietal cortex, basal ganglia (including the nucleus accumbens), midbrain, thalamus, and hypothalamus. Peer competition increased outcome-related activation in the right caudate head and cerebellar vermis in the entire sample. Our results suggest that the activation of the medial (rather than lateral) PFC and striatum is most specific to risk-taking behavior of male adolescents in a simulated driving situation, and reflect a stronger conflict and thus increased cognitive effort to take risks in low risk-takers, and reward anticipation for risky decisions, respectively. The activation of the caudate nucleus, particularly for the positive outcome (pass) during peer competition, further suggests enhanced reward processing of risk-taking under peer influence. PMID:26052943

  2. Dizocilpine (MK-801) impairs learning in the active place avoidance task but has no effect on the performance during task/context alternation.

    PubMed

    Vojtechova, Iveta; Petrasek, Tomas; Hatalova, Hana; Pistikova, Adela; Vales, Karel; Stuchlik, Ales

    2016-05-15

    The prevention of engram interference, pattern separation, flexibility, cognitive coordination and spatial navigation are usually studied separately at the behavioral level. Impairment in executive functions is often observed in patients suffering from schizophrenia. We have designed a protocol for assessing these functions all together as behavioral separation. This protocol is based on alternated or sequential training in two tasks testing different hippocampal functions (the Morris water maze and active place avoidance), and alternated or sequential training in two similar environments of the active place avoidance task. In Experiment 1, we tested, in adult rats, whether the performance in two different spatial tasks was affected by their order in sequential learning, or by their day-to-day alternation. In Experiment 2, rats learned to solve the active place avoidance task in two environments either alternately or sequentially. We found that rats are able to acquire both tasks and to discriminate both similar contexts without obvious problems regardless of the order or the alternation. We used two groups of rats, controls and a rat model of psychosis induced by a subchronic intraperitoneal application of 0.08mg/kg of dizocilpine (MK-801), a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors. Dizocilpine had no selective effect on parallel/sequential learning of tasks/contexts. However, it caused hyperlocomotion and a significant deficit in learning in the active place avoidance task regardless of the task alternation. Cognitive coordination tested by this task is probably more sensitive to dizocilpine than spatial orientation because no hyperactivity or learning impairment was observed in the Morris water maze.

  3. Mountain Hike North of Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, Begining at the S-Turn at Mill B., Near Hidden Falls, and Taking Trail Leading to Mt. Raymond and Other Intersting Places.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Keith L.

    2004-11-01

    Our first objective is to leave the highway via Mill B North Fork by taking the Big Cottonwood Canyon trail that leads to Maxfield Basin, where 3 trails intersect, just s. of Mount Raymond (Elev. 10,241 ft.) the n. trail takes us down to the Mill Creek Canyon Road, at about 1 mi. (+) east of intersection with Church Park Picnic Ground road. At Maxfield Basin, again, the east trail skirts around Mt. Raymond and has another intersection with a trail running n. thru the area of Gobblers Knob (elev. 10,246 ft.), to White Fir Pass and turns w. at Bowman Fk. until it connects with Porter Fork and then the Mill Creek Road. The remaining trail at Mill A Basin, just e. of Mount Raymond, long before Gobblers Knob is seen, runs east past a spring, and connects to Butler Fork (which begins at 3.775 mi., measured along highway from Mill B, North Fork), which leads directly to Dog Lake. Evidently both Dog Lake and Lake Desolation (changing U.S. Geological Survey maps from Mount Aire, Utah to Park City West, Utah) have connected outlets, at least during certain times of the year. Following the trail s. e. (down) that follows near Summit Co. and Salt Lake County, we pass by the radio transmitters shown on Park City, West, Utah, map and finally enter the Brighton, Utah map with Scott Hill, Scott Pass, the important highway leading to Midway Reservoir, and beyond, Bloods Lake ( 9500 ft.), Clayton Peak (10,721 ft.) and Lake Lackawaxen ( 9980 ft.), our final destination showing through. One may easily walk the distance to lake Lackawaxen from Bloods Lake by staying south of the ridgecrest and by following the hollow down for a while. This completes our destination. Recall that the main roadway here was already passed over about 1/2 mile n. of Bloods Lake; this thoroughfare has its beginning at about 0.4 miles below (or North) of the Brighton Loop, where the road to city of Midway leaves the main Big Cottonwood Highway going n. and runs e., on the average, going past Midway Reservoir

  4. The Place of Sport and Physical Activity in Young People's Lives and Its Implications for Health: Some Sociological Comments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Green, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory paper seeks, first, to offer some critical sociological comments on the common-sense, or rather ideological, claims surrounding two supposedly emerging "crises": namely, the alleged poor health and declining sport and physical activity participation levels of young people. In this regard, it is suggested that while young people…

  5. The use of parent involved take-home science activities during student teaching: Understanding the challenges of implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarazinski, Jill

    The purpose of this study was to identify student teachers use and implementation of Science in a Bag when it was no longer a required course-based assessment. This take-home science activity acted as the elaboration component of the 5Es lesson teacher candidates designed and taught in the classroom, utilized household items, and directly involved parents in their child's education. The purposeful sample was comprised of six teacher candidates during their student teaching practicum, the last semester of the childhood education teacher certification program. This collective case study centered on student teachers' use of the focused activity, Science in a Bag, in order to gain knowledge of challenges faced in applying take-home science kits and working with parents. Data collection was comprised of student teacher and parent interviews, candidate reflections, as well as in-class observations and discussions carried out during weekly seminars. Data collection occurred throughout the seven-week student teaching practicum. The four research questions were: 1) What factors do teacher candidates identify as interfering with their ability to implement Science in a Bag during student teaching placements? 2) What factors do teacher candidates identify as enhancing their ability to carry out Science in a Bag? 3) What forms of support do teacher candidates believe are important to their success in implementing Science in a Bag during student teaching? 4) How do teacher candidates deal with obstacles when implementing Science in a Bag? Despite the fact that no student teacher was prohibited from implementing Science in a Bag, the level to which candidates valued and utilized this instructional strategy varied compared to how they were taught and practiced it during the science methods course. Some student teachers attempted to hide their feelings toward Science in a Bag, however their actions revealed that they were simply carrying out the instructional strategy because they

  6. Taking antacids

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnesium may cause diarrhea. Brands with calcium or aluminum may cause constipation. Rarely, brands with calcium may ... you take large amounts of antacids that contain aluminum, you may be at risk for calcium loss, ...

  7. Factors impacting the activity of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens against take-all of wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Take-all, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, is an important soilborne disease of wheat worldwide. Pseudomonas fluorescens producing the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) are biocontrol agents of take-all and provide natural suppression of the disease during wheat monocul...

  8. Winner-take-all networks - Time-based versus activation-based mechanisms for various selection goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnden, John; Srinivas, Kankanahalli; Daharmavaratha, Dronpadi

    1990-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional winner-take-all mechanisms, the paper presents a temporal winner-take-all mecahnism with O(n) space complexity and roughly O(log n) time complexity. It exploits systematic and stochastic differences between time delays within different units and connections.

  9. Decreasing Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Activity During Sequential Risk-Taking: An fMRI Investigation of the Balloon Analog Risk Task

    PubMed Central

    Schonberg, Tom; Fox, Craig R.; Mumford, Jeanette A.; Congdon, Eliza; Trepel, Christopher; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    Functional imaging studies examining the neural correlates of risk have mainly relied on paradigms involving exposure to simple chance gambles and an economic definition of risk as variance in the probability distribution over possible outcomes. However, there is little evidence that choices made during gambling tasks predict naturalistic risk-taking behaviors such as drug use, extreme sports, or even equity investing. To better understand the neural basis of naturalistic risk-taking, we scanned participants using fMRI while they completed the Balloon Analog Risk Task, an experimental measure that includes an active decision/choice component and that has been found to correlate with a number of naturalistic risk-taking behaviors. In the task, as in many naturalistic settings, escalating risk-taking occurs under uncertainty and might be experienced either as the accumulation of greater potential rewards, or as exposure to increasing possible losses (and decreasing expected value). We found that areas previously linked to risk and risk-taking (bilateral anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) were activated as participants continued to inflate balloons. Interestingly, we found that ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) activity decreased as participants further expanded balloons. In light of previous findings implicating the vmPFC in value calculation, this result suggests that escalating risk-taking in the task might be perceived as exposure to increasing possible losses (and decreasing expected value) rather than the increasing potential total reward relative to the starting point of the trial. A better understanding of how neural activity changes with risk-taking behavior in the task offers insight into the potential neural mechanisms driving naturalistic risk-taking. PMID:22675289

  10. Taking Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Two people take turns selecting from an even number of items. Their relative preferences over the items can be described as a permutation, then tools from algebraic combinatorics can be used to answer various questions. We describe each person's optimal selection strategies including how each could make use of knowing the other's preferences. We…

  11. ETHANOL-INDUCED LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY IN ADOLESCENT RATS AND THE RELATIONSHIP WITH ETHANOL-INDUCED CONDITIONED PLACE PREFERENCE AND CONDITIONED TASTE AVERSION

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, María Belén; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.; Molina, Juan C.; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent rats exhibit ethanol-induced locomotor activity (LMA), which is considered an index of ethanol’s motivational properties likely to predict ethanol self-administration, but few studies have reported or correlated ethanol-induced LMA with conditioned place preference by ethanol at this age. The present study assessed age-related differences in ethanol’s motor stimulating effects and analysed the association between ethanol-induced LMA and conventional measures of ethanol-induced reinforcement. Experiment 1 compared ethanol-induced LMA in adolescent and adult rats. Subsequent experiments analyzed ethanol-induced conditioned place preference and conditioned taste aversion in adolescent rats evaluated for ethanol-induced LMA. Adolescent rats exhibit a robust LMA after high-dose ethanol. Ethanol-induced LMA was fairly similar across adolescents and adults. As expected, adolescents were sensitive to ethanol’s aversive reinforcement, but they also exhibited conditioned place preference. These measures of ethanol reinforcement, however, were not related to ethanol-induced LMA. Spontaneous LMA in an open field was, however, negatively associated with ethanol-induced CTA. PMID:22592597

  12. Brazilian physicists take centre stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Susan

    2014-06-01

    With the FIFA World Cup taking place in Brazil this month, Susan Curtis travels to South America's richest nation to find out how its physicists are exploiting recent big increases in science funding.

  13. A Case Study of How Teaching Practice Process Takes Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalin Ucar, Meltem

    2012-01-01

    The process of "learning" carries an important role in the teaching practice which provides teacher candidates with professional development. Being responsible for the learning experiences in that level, cooperating teacher, teacher candidate, mentor and practice school are the important variables which determine the quality of the teaching…

  14. Using Personalized Education to Take the Place of Standardized Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Pengyu

    2014-01-01

    Economic model has been greatly shifted from labor demanding to innovation demanding, which requires education system has to produce creative people. This paper illustrates how traditional education model accrued and developed based on satisfying the old economic model for labor demanding but did not meet the new social requirement for innovation…

  15. "Numbers, Numerals, Numeration": Activities Using Numeration Cards with Emphasis on Place Value, 100 Board Activities, and Number Words. (Grades 1-4.) Title I Elementary Mathematics Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxberger, Nancy; Sollenbarger, Sherry

    Mathematics activities and materials for teaching and reinforcing number concepts are presented. The activities, which rely primarily on number cards, are divided into the following sections: (1) sets less than ten; (2) the teen numbers; (3) sets and numerals to 100; (4) numeration; and (5) words that represent numbers (e.g., "one=1"). An…

  16. 75 FR 64276 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... equip combat-ready naval forces capable of winning wars, deterring aggression, and maintaining freedom... variation, these same areas might not be the center of sea lion distribution every year. Costa et al. (2007... produces impact sound (i.e., pile driving) results in potential take of marine mammals by harassment (70...

  17. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... approved by the Service and denoted on the permit, monitoring consists of periodic site visits, during the... noting whether eagles continue to nest, roost, or forage there. The periodic monitoring is required for... be likely to result in take, periodic monitoring may be required for as long as the data are...

  18. 77 FR 19242 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ...NMFS has received an application from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (L-DEO), a part of Columbia University, for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting a low-energy marine geophysical survey in the central Pacific Ocean, May through June, 2012. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting......

  19. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), a bald eagle egg, or a golden eagle egg. (c) Permit conditions. In addition...: the take is unavoidable even though advanced conservation practices are being implemented. (b... conservation measures, not to exceed what is reasonable to meet the primary purpose of the monitoring, which...

  20. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), a bald eagle egg, or a golden eagle egg. (c) Permit conditions. In addition...: the take is unavoidable even though advanced conservation practices are being implemented. (b... conservation measures, not to exceed what is reasonable to meet the primary purpose of the monitoring, which...

  1. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), a bald eagle egg, or a golden eagle egg. (c) Permit conditions. In addition...: the take is unavoidable even though advanced conservation practices are being implemented. (b... conservation measures, not to exceed what is reasonable to meet the primary purpose of the monitoring, which...

  2. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), a bald eagle egg, or a golden eagle egg. (c) Permit conditions. In addition...: the take is unavoidable even though advanced conservation practices are being implemented. (b... conservation measures, not to exceed what is reasonable to meet the primary purpose of the monitoring, which...

  3. 78 FR 24161 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    .... ACTION: Notice; proposed incidental harassment authorization; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS has received a complete application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting training exercises at the...

  4. 77 FR 19231 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    .... ACTION: Notice; additional information for the proposed incidental harassment authorization; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS has received an application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting training exercises at...

  5. 76 FR 66274 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pier 36/Brannan Street Wharf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ..., gray whale, harbor porpoise, humpback whale (Megaptera noveangliae), and sea otter (Enhydra lutris... present in the project vicinity during pile driving. Sea otters are managed by the United States Fish and... take, by Level B harassment, of small numbers of Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), California...

  6. 77 FR 55459 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Piling and Fill Removal in Woodard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... proposed IHA (77 FR 44583; July 30, 2012) for a summary of previous monitoring. Mitigation In order to... if the permissible methods of taking and requirements pertaining to the mitigation, monitoring and... that was valid from November 1, 2010, through February 28, 2011 (75 FR 67951), and was...

  7. The Effect of Recreational Activities on the Elimination of State-Trait Anxiety of the Students Who Will Take the SBS Placement Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birtürk, Atilay; Karagün, Elif

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether recreational activities have an effect on the elimination of state-trait anxiety of the students who will take the "SBS Placement Test" which is an exam for transition from secondary school to high school. For this purpose, as well as an information survey which determined the…

  8. Physical activity among Norwegian adolescents- a multilevel analysis of how place of residence is associated with health behaviour: the Young-HUNT study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this article is to investigate whether and to what degree participation in physical activity among adolescents is associated with area economic deprivation in the municipality where they live. In the study we took account of aggregated informal social capital at the municipality level and compositional effects due to spatial concentration of individual variables known to be associated with physical activity. These include informal social participation, participation in other cultural activities, and family affluence. Methods The study was based on a secondary analysis of data from the Norwegian HUNT study and municipality characteristics from the Norwegian Social Science Data Service ‘Commune Database’ from 2006. The sample consisted of 8114 adolescents whose ages ranged from 13 to 19. The explanatory power of the independent variables on the dependent variable was assessed using a multilevel analysis in which individuals comprised the first level and were nested within the municipality level. Results The average level of physical activity was not negatively associated with the level of area economic deprivation when we adjusted for informal social participation at the community level. Adjusting for area economic deprivation, we found that informal social participation at the community level was associated with a higher level of participation in physical activity at p< .01. Conclusion For adolescents in a given municipality, informal social participation is more strongly associated with a higher level of physical activity than the degree of area economic deprivation. This finding supports our social capital hypothesis, which states that the amount of social capital is strengthening the individual’s ability to take part in physical activity. PMID:23883144

  9. Places for Pedagogies, Pedagogies for Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhn, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Working with an understanding of assemblage as the ad hoc groupings of vibrant materials and elements, this article argues that conceptualizing place as an assemblage opens possibilities for bridging the gap between subjects and objects that continue to structure pedagogy. Considering "place" as an assemblage of humans and their multiple "others"…

  10. In-place electrically heated regeneration of vapor-phase activated carbon. Final report, 11 July 1989-11 April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.; Hicks, R.E.; Gold, H.

    1990-09-01

    The Air Force is using the air stripping process to remove a variety of volatile organic contaminants from groundwater. Vapor-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) has proven successful in treating the contaminated air stream emanating from air stripping columns. but conventional regeneration methods are expensive, require transfer of the carbon. and degrade the carbon. The objective of this experimental program was to determine the feasibility of using electrically-heated processes for the in-place regeneration of vapor-phase GAC. Two processes were considered, namely microwave heating and electric resistance heating using the carbon itself as the resistance. The microwave heating equipment used gave nonuniform heating over the length of the carbon column and was not pursued further. Electric resistance, or Rintoul, heating is a commercially proven process that has been applied to the high-temperature regeneration of liquid-phase GAC in special purpose furnaces. The experimental program demonstrated that the Rintoul process can be efficiently applied to low-temperature, low energy, in-place regeneration of vapor-phase GAO. Repeated loading and regeneration of the carbon column showed no loss of adsorption capacity. Two methods of collecting TCE in a concentrated form were also successfully tested. Both processes involved recovery of the TCE in a condensate.

  11. Diverging frequency-modulated 50-kHz vocalization, locomotor activity and conditioned place preference effects in rats given repeated amphetamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Taracha, Ewa; Kaniuga, Ewelina; Chrapusta, Stanisław J; Maciejak, Piotr; Sliwa, Lech; Hamed, Adam; Krząścik, Paweł

    2014-08-01

    Behavioral sensitization and tolerance to repetitive exposure to addictive drugs are commonly used for the assessment of the early stages of the drug dependence progress in animals. The orchestra of tools for studying the progress of drug dependence in laboratory rodents has been considerably enriched in the 1980s by the introduction of ultrasonic vocalization (USV) detection and characterization. However, the relationship between the results of this technology and those of traditional behavioral tests is not clear. We attempted to elucidate some of the respective ambiguities by comparing the effects of an intermittent amphetamine treatment, which was aimed both at the induction of sensitization and tolerance to this drug and at testing the persistence of these effects, on the locomotor activity and 50-kHz USV responses to both the drug and the context of drug exposure in adult male rats showing diverging susceptibility for sensitization to amphetamine. Categorization of the rats into low and high responders/callers based on sensitization of their frequency-modulated 50-kHz USV responsiveness showed some correspondence with conditioned place preference effects, but not with responses to amphetamine. The study showed distinct changes in the rate and latency of the frequency-modulated 50-kHz USV responses to repetitive amphetamine treatment, which were reminiscent of classical behavioral signs of sensitization and tolerance. These results show the utility of the appetitive USV for monitoring of early phases of complex processes leading to drug dependence. However, USV, locomotor activity and conditioned place preference seem to reflect different aspects of these phenomena.

  12. Frequency and rates of outdoor activities, and perceptions of places to perform these activities by Native Americans and Caucasians interviewed in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Marchioni, Meredith

    2012-12-01

    Activity patterns and perceptions play a key role in human health risk, management, and planning. A sample of 233 people attending a Native American festival in Cookeville, Tennessee was interviewed to determine the types, percent participation, and outdoor activities rates, and their perceptions of the importance of characteristics of nuclear sites. Results indicate that: (1) a high percentage of respondents used outdoor environments, (2) they used them for consumptive (hunting, fishing), non-consumptive (hiking, walking, bird-watching), and religious/sacred activities, (3) a higher percentage of respondents engaged in non-consumptive than consumptive activities, (4) praying or meditating, communing with nature, and bird-watching had the highest uses rates (5) the environmental characteristics rated the highest were lack of radionuclides that presented a health risk, no visible smog, clean air, and unpolluted water, (6) the presence of people, buildings and roads were rated the lowest, and (7) Native Americans had higher outdoor participation rates, participated more frequently, and evaluated environmental characteristics higher than did Caucasians. This information can be used by managers to create and maintain outdoor habitats that fit the needs of local people. Planning and management require information on public policy, human needs and requirements, and human perceptions and evaluations of environmental characteristics. PMID:23229153

  13. Frequency and rates of outdoor activities, and perceptions of places to perform these activities by Native Americans and Caucasians interviewed in Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2015-01-01

    Activity patterns and perceptions play a key role in human health risk, management, and planning. A survey of 233 people attending a Native American festival in Cookeville Tennessee were interviewed to determine the types, percent participation, and outdoor activities rates, and their perceptions of the importance of characteristics of sites. The indicate that: 1) a high percentage of respondents used outdoor environments, 2) they used them for consumptive (hunting, fishing), non-consumptive (hiking, walking, bird-watching), and religious/sacred activities, 3) a higher percentage of respondents engaged in non-consumptive than consumptive activities, 4) praying or meditating, communing with nature, and bird-watching had the highest uses rates 5) the environmental characteristics rated the highest were lack of radionuclides that presented a health risk, no visible smog, clean air, and unpolluted water, 6) presence of people, buildings and roads were rated the lowest and 7) Native Americans had higher participation rates, participated more frequently, and evaluated environmental characteristics higher than did Caucasians. This information can be used by managers to create and maintain outdoor habitats that fit the needs of local people. Planning and management require information on public policy, human needs and requirements, and human perceptions and evaluations of environmental characteristics. PMID:23229153

  14. Frequency and rates of outdoor activities, and perceptions of places to perform these activities by Native Americans and Caucasians interviewed in Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2015-01-01

    Activity patterns and perceptions play a key role in human health risk, management, and planning. A survey of 233 people attending a Native American festival in Cookeville Tennessee were interviewed to determine the types, percent participation, and outdoor activities rates, and their perceptions of the importance of characteristics of sites. The indicate that: 1) a high percentage of respondents used outdoor environments, 2) they used them for consumptive (hunting, fishing), non-consumptive (hiking, walking, bird-watching), and religious/sacred activities, 3) a higher percentage of respondents engaged in non-consumptive than consumptive activities, 4) praying or meditating, communing with nature, and bird-watching had the highest uses rates 5) the environmental characteristics rated the highest were lack of radionuclides that presented a health risk, no visible smog, clean air, and unpolluted water, 6) presence of people, buildings and roads were rated the lowest and 7) Native Americans had higher participation rates, participated more frequently, and evaluated environmental characteristics higher than did Caucasians. This information can be used by managers to create and maintain outdoor habitats that fit the needs of local people. Planning and management require information on public policy, human needs and requirements, and human perceptions and evaluations of environmental characteristics. PMID:23229153

  15. Frequency and rates of outdoor activities, and perceptions of places to perform these activities by Native Americans and Caucasians interviewed in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Marchioni, Meredith

    2012-12-01

    Activity patterns and perceptions play a key role in human health risk, management, and planning. A sample of 233 people attending a Native American festival in Cookeville, Tennessee was interviewed to determine the types, percent participation, and outdoor activities rates, and their perceptions of the importance of characteristics of nuclear sites. Results indicate that: (1) a high percentage of respondents used outdoor environments, (2) they used them for consumptive (hunting, fishing), non-consumptive (hiking, walking, bird-watching), and religious/sacred activities, (3) a higher percentage of respondents engaged in non-consumptive than consumptive activities, (4) praying or meditating, communing with nature, and bird-watching had the highest uses rates (5) the environmental characteristics rated the highest were lack of radionuclides that presented a health risk, no visible smog, clean air, and unpolluted water, (6) the presence of people, buildings and roads were rated the lowest, and (7) Native Americans had higher outdoor participation rates, participated more frequently, and evaluated environmental characteristics higher than did Caucasians. This information can be used by managers to create and maintain outdoor habitats that fit the needs of local people. Planning and management require information on public policy, human needs and requirements, and human perceptions and evaluations of environmental characteristics.

  16. [Risk-taking behaviors among young people].

    PubMed

    Le Breton, David

    2004-01-01

    Risk-taking behaviors are often an ambivalent way of calling for help from close friends or family - those who count. It is an ultimate means of finding meaning and a system of values; it is a sign of an adolescent's active resistance and attempts to re-establish his or her place in the world. It contrasts with the far more incisive risk of depression and the radical collapse of meaning. In spite of the suffering it engenders, risk-taking nevertheless has a positive side, fostering independence in adolescents and a search for reference points. It leads to a better self-image and is a means of developing one's identity. It is nonetheless painful in terms of its repercussions in terms of injuries, death or addiction. The turbulence caused by risk-taking behaviors illustrates a determination to be rid of one's suffering and to fight on so that life can, at last, be lived. PMID:15918660

  17. Physical Activity on Medical Prescription: A Qualitative Study of Factors Influencing Take-Up and Adherence in Chronically Ill Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasparini, William; Knobé, Sandrine; Didierjean, Romaine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to determine the effects of an innovative public health programme offering physical and sports activities on medical prescription to chronically ill patients. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with programme participants at two time points: at the start of their activity (n?=?33) and 3?months after the…

  18. 76 FR 4637 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; U.S. Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ...&E) activities to be conducted within the Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST) Study Area for... Integrated Comprehensive Management Program (ICMP) Plan, which is intended for use as a planning tool to... contacts listed here. The mailbox address for providing e-mail comments on the ICMP Plan is...

  19. 77 FR 60678 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for HSTT was made available to the public on May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27743...) analyzing the effects on the human environment of implementing their preferred alternative (among others... Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing Activities in the Hawaii-Southern California...

  20. Temporal and spatial strategies in an active place avoidance task on Carousel: a study of effects of stability of arena rotation speed in rats.

    PubMed

    Bahník, Štěpán; Stuchlík, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    The active place avoidance task is a dry-arena task used to assess spatial navigation and memory in rodents. In this task, a subject is put on a rotating circular arena and avoids an invisible sector that is stable in relation to the room. Rotation of the arena means that the subject's avoidance must be active, otherwise the subject will be moved in the to-be-avoided sector by the rotation of the arena and a slight electric shock will be administered. The present experiment explored the effect of variable arena rotation speed on the ability to avoid the to-be-avoided sector. Subjects in a group with variable arena rotation speed learned to avoid the sector with the same speed and attained the same avoidance ability as rats in a group with a stable arena rotation speed. Only a slight difference in preferred position within the room was found between the two groups. No difference was found between the two groups in the dark phase, where subjects could not use orientation cues in the room. Only one rat was able to learn the avoidance of the to-be-avoided sector in this phase. The results of the experiment suggest that idiothetic orientation and interval timing are not crucial for learning avoidance of the to-be-avoided sector. However, idiothetic orientation might be sufficient for avoiding the sector in the dark. PMID:26417540

  1. Blockage of acquisition and expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in rats due to activation of glutamate receptors type II/III in nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Baharlouei, Negar; Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Komaki, Alireza; Shahidi, Siamak; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is an essential neurotransmitter for the extension of morphine-induced place preference. mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors in the NAc have important roles in the reward pathway. However, less is known about the role of this glutamate receptor subtype in morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). In this study, we examined the effects of bilateral intra-accumbal administration of LY379268, an mGlu2/3 receptor agonist on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced CPP in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (n=136; 220-250g) were evaluated in a CPP paradigm. Doses of LY379268 (0.3, 1 and 3μg/0.5μL saline per side) were administered into the NAc on both sides during the 3days of the conditioning (acquisition) or post-conditioning (expression) phase. The results show that bilateral intra-accumbal administration of LY379268 (0.3, 1 and 3μg) markedly decreased the acquisition of morphine-induced CPP in a dose-dependent manner. In a second series of experiments, we determined that injection of LY379268 into the NAc considerably attenuated the expression of morphine CPP only at the highest dose (3μg). Our findings suggest that activation of mGlu2/3 receptors in the NAc dose-dependently blocked both the establishment and the maintenance of morphine-induced CPP and confirmed the role of this system as a potential therapeutic target for addiction.

  2. Re(Place) Your Typical Writing Assignment: An Argument for Place-Based Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Elliot

    2011-01-01

    Place-based writing affords students an opportunity to write meaningfully about themselves, grounded in a place that they know. Place-based writing is versatile and can be additive--taking just a week or two within a semester of different projects--or transformative, if positioned as the theme for an entire course. If students can learn to write…

  3. Embodied Experiences of Place: A Study of History Learning with Mobile Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, S.; Jewitt, C.; Sakr, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an empirical study that takes a multimodal analytical approach to examine how mobile technologies shape students' exploration and experience of place during a history learning activity in situ. In history education, mobile technologies provide opportunities for authentic experiential learning activities that have the potential…

  4. Wheel-running mitigates psychomotor sensitization initiation but not post-sensitization conditioned activity and conditioned place preference induced by cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Geuzaine, Annabelle; Tirelli, Ezio

    2014-04-01

    Previous literature suggests that physical exercise allowed by an unlimited access to a running wheel for several weeks can mitigate chronic neurobehavioral responsiveness to several addictive drugs in rodents. Here, the potential preventive effects of unlimited wheel-running on the initiation of psychomotor sensitization and the acquisition and extinction of conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by 10 mg/kg cocaine in C56BL/6J mice were assessed in two independent experiments. To this end, half of the mice were singly housed with a running wheel at 28 days of age for 10 weeks prior to psychopharmacological tests, during which housing conditions did not change, and the other half of mice were housed without running wheel. In Experiment 1, prior to initiating sensitization, psychomotor activity on the two first drug-free once-daily sessions was not affected by wheel-running. This was also found for the acute psychomotor-activating effect of cocaine on the first sensitization session. Psychomotor sensitization readily developed over the 9 following once-daily sessions in mice housed without wheel, whereas it was inhibited in mice housed with a wheel. However, that difference did not transfer to post-sensitization conditioned activity. In contrast with the sensitization results, mice housed with a wheel still expressed a clear-cut CPP which did not extinguish differently from that of the other group, a result in disaccord with previous studies reporting either an attenuating or an increasing effect of wheel-running on cocaine-induced conditioned reward. The available results together indicate that interactions between wheel-running and cocaine effects are far from being satisfactorily characterized.

  5. Discussion of impact of relics activation on protection and utilization approaches-take the old summer palace as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoqi, J.

    2015-08-01

    As the popularization of cultural relics and the rapid development of cultural tourism industry, a large number of cultural relic tourism resources goes into public eyes. Activation of relics has became an important way for tourist to contact and understand culture relics. The way of how to properly interpret the historical sense and cultural uniqueness to the masses of tourists in order to achieve social service functions of relic resources has always been research focal point of site protection and utilization, so nowadays it has important significance to protection and utilization of heritage resources in our country. From the point of activation of relics and based on the analysis of resource characteristic, the paper in depth discuss ways of activation of relics of the Old Summer Palace, in order to provide reference for sustainable development of sites tourism in China.

  6. How to Cope with Sheltering in Place

    MedlinePlus

    ... your own or a relative’s home, school, or work. Sheltering in place may be required because of an emergency such ... things to keep yourself calm while sheltering in place. Relax your body often by doing things that work for you—take deep breaths, stretch, meditate or ...

  7. Keep Taking the Tablets? Assessing the Use of Tablet Devices in Learning and Teaching Activities in the Further Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabian, Khristin; MacLean, Donald

    2014-01-01

    This article summarises the methodology and outcomes of an interventionist/action research project to assess the benefits, and potential pitfalls, of the use of mobile devices in learning and teaching activities in a Further Education environment. A bank of 15 tablet devices were purchased and prepared for classroom use. Staff members were…

  8. 78 FR 58524 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Study Area AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Islands Training and Testing (MITT) Study Area from July 2015 through July 2020. Pursuant to the Marine... incidental to Navy training and testing activities to be conducted in the MITT Study Area over 5 years....

  9. 76 FR 68720 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... slope, 13,620 to 18,680 EN D 0 physalus). pelagic. \\9\\. 0 0 Blue whale (Balaneoptera Pelagic, shelf, NA... published a notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 45518) making preliminary determinations and proposing to... previous notice for the proposed IHA (76 FR 45518, July 29, 2011). The activities to be conducted have...

  10. 78 FR 78105 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... (78 FR 6978). Further, more generally, NMFS is committed to the use of the best available science... Activities The proposed rule (78 FR 6978, January 31, 2013) and HSTT FEIS/OEIS include a complete description... proposed rule and HSTT FEIS/OEIS (78 FR 6978, January 31, 2013; pages 6987-6988;...

  11. 78 FR 42042 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Marine Corps Training Exercises...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... Corps for the conduct of the same activities from 2010 to 2012 (75 FR 72807, November 26, 2010; 77 FR... the purpose of the program in a previous notice for the proposed Authorization (78 FR 19224, Friday, March 29, 2013). Refer to the notice of the proposed Authorization (78 FR 19224, Friday, March 29,...

  12. 78 FR 49729 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Air Force Launches, Aircraft and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... Related to Launch Vehicles From Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), California AGENCY: National Marine... incidental to launching space launch vehicles, intercontinental ballistic and small missiles, aircraft and helicopter operations, and harbor activities related to the Delta IV/Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle...

  13. 75 FR 5055 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; U.S. Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... to AFAST training, maintenance, and RDT&E became effective on January 22, 2009 (74 FR 4843, January... conducted within the AFAST Study Area under regulations issued on January 22, 2009 (74 FR 4843, January 27.... Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST) AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...

  14. 78 FR 60852 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Construction of the East Span of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... previously issued to CALTRANS for this activity on January 8, 2013 (78 FR 2371; January 11, 2013), based on... proposed IHA (77 FR 50473; August 21, 2012), and the Federal Register notice for the issuance of that IHA (78 FR 2371; January 11, 2013). Refer to these documents for a detailed description of CALTRANS'...

  15. 77 FR 32943 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Driving in the Columbia River, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... notice in the Federal Register on August 19, 2011 (76 FR 51947), requesting comments from the public on... activity may be found in NMFS' proposed IHA document in the Federal Register (76 FR 51947, August 19, 2011... comment on the application and proposed authorization was published on August 19, 2011 (76 FR...

  16. 78 FR 2371 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Construction of the East Span of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... notice for the proposed IHA (77 FR 50473; August 21, 2012). An IHA was previously issued to CALTRANS for this activity on February 7, 2011 and it expired on February 6, 2012 (76 FR 7156, February 9, 2011). No... for the proposed IHA (77 FR 50473, August 21, 2012), and there is no change to the description of...

  17. 78 FR 33811 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... exclusion zones for the airgun array to be used in the intermediate and deep water of the Gulf of Mexico... in deep water; however, SIO proposes to use the buffer and exclusion zones predicted by L-DEO's model... Specified Activities; Low- Energy Marine Geophysical Survey in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean,...

  18. 77 FR 50473 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Construction of the East Span of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... February 6, 2012 (76 FR 7156, February 9, 2011). No in-water construction activity was conducted during the... provided in the January 26, 2006 (71 FR 4352), Federal Register notice. Potential Effects on Marine Mammals... SPL) in the world's ocean from pre-industrial periods, and most of these increases are from...

  19. Place and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, David

    2013-01-01

    David Orr's classic article links education to living in the outdoors and studying all disciplines through the unifying lens of place. Pedagogy of place counters abstraction, it is the natural world embodying principles of learning that involve direct observation, investigation, experimentation, and manual skills. Place is the laboratory providing…

  20. Online sexual activities and sexual risk-taking among adolescents and young adults in Lagos Metropolis, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Michael, Kunnuji

    2012-06-01

    As internet penetration surges in different parts of the world, access to a wide range of subject matters also increases. Matters of sexuality are no exceptions. While there is ample empirical evidence that youths seek knowledge about sexuality, and get involved in sexually stimulating and/or gratifying activities on the internet, the relationship between involvement in these online sexual activities (OSAs) and real life sexual behaviour remains a matter of polemic. Modelling theorists contend that exposure to sexuality related information propel acting out such information. Catharsis on the other hand holds the view that exposure to such information serves as safety valves for the peaceful release of imperfectly sublimated antisocial sexual drives. Using data gathered from adolescent internet users involved in OSAs as well as those not involved within the city of Lagos, this study concludes that OSA is associated with involvement in risk-bearing sexual behaviours.

  1. Take Pride in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Center for School Improvement and Performance.

    During the 1987-88 school year the Indiana Department of Education assisted the United States Department of the Interior and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources with a program which asked students to become involved in activities to maintain and manage public lands. The 1987 Take Pride in America (TPIA) school program encouraged volunteer…

  2. Taking inquiry to the next level: Tablet PC's to stimulate active learning and unify introductory physics curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Tikhon; Kosheleva, Yelena

    2009-03-01

    A project has been started in 2005 to design innovative curriculum for the intro physics courses at McMurry University. The project is rooted in science education research and ideas from the NFW. The goal is to achieve better integration of traditional course components by means of instructional design and technology. First, a system of flexible curriculum modules with emphasis on inquiry-based teaching has been introduced. Second, technology is used to improve continuity among module components (lecture/lab/discussion) and stimulate active learning. Enabling technology suite incorporates Tablet PC's and software applications including java-based Physlets, tablet-adapted personal response systems, and PASCO data acquisition systems. Lab curriculum has been modified to accommodate for different learning styles, and levels of baseline knowledge. Activity options and pre-lab Physlet-based assignments were added. To enhance knowledge generalization, multiple experiments are used to illustrate different aspects of the same physics phenomenon. Physlet-based problems were adapted for student peer group discussions. Student feedback showed that modifications were beneficial. Student knowledge assessment, performed with the FCI test, indicated improvement in student learning.

  3. Hurt but still alive: Residual activity in the parahippocampal cortex conditions the recognition of familiar places in a patient with topographic agnosia☆

    PubMed Central

    van Assche, Mitsouko; Kebets, Valeria; Lopez, Ursula; Saj, Arnaud; Goldstein, Rachel; Bernasconi, Françoise; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Assal, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The parahippocampal cortex (PHC) participates in both perception and memory. However, the way perceptual and memory processes cooperate when we navigate in our everyday life environment remains poorly understood. We studied a stroke patient presenting a brain lesion in the right PHC, which resulted in a mild and quantifiable topographic agnosia, and allowed us to investigate the role of this structure in overt place recognition. Photographs of personally familiar and unfamiliar places were displayed during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Familiar places were either recognized or unrecognized by the patient and 6 age- and education-matched controls in a visual post-scan recognition test. In fMRI, recognized places were associated with a network comprising the fusiform gyrus in the intact side, but also the right anterior PHC, which included the lesion site. Moreover, this right PHC showed increased connectivity with the left homologous PHC in the intact hemisphere. By contrasting recognized with unrecognized familiar places, we replicate the finding of the joint involvement of the retrosplenial cortex, occipito-temporal areas, and posterior parietal cortex in place recognition. This study shows that the ability for left and right anterior PHC to communicate despite the neurological damage conditioned place recognition success in this patient. It further highlights a hemispheric asymmetry in this process, by showing the fundamental role of the right PHC in topographic agnosia. PMID:26909331

  4. Hurt but still alive: Residual activity in the parahippocampal cortex conditions the recognition of familiar places in a patient with topographic agnosia.

    PubMed

    van Assche, Mitsouko; Kebets, Valeria; Lopez, Ursula; Saj, Arnaud; Goldstein, Rachel; Bernasconi, Françoise; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Assal, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The parahippocampal cortex (PHC) participates in both perception and memory. However, the way perceptual and memory processes cooperate when we navigate in our everyday life environment remains poorly understood. We studied a stroke patient presenting a brain lesion in the right PHC, which resulted in a mild and quantifiable topographic agnosia, and allowed us to investigate the role of this structure in overt place recognition. Photographs of personally familiar and unfamiliar places were displayed during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Familiar places were either recognized or unrecognized by the patient and 6 age- and education-matched controls in a visual post-scan recognition test. In fMRI, recognized places were associated with a network comprising the fusiform gyrus in the intact side, but also the right anterior PHC, which included the lesion site. Moreover, this right PHC showed increased connectivity with the left homologous PHC in the intact hemisphere. By contrasting recognized with unrecognized familiar places, we replicate the finding of the joint involvement of the retrosplenial cortex, occipito-temporal areas, and posterior parietal cortex in place recognition. This study shows that the ability for left and right anterior PHC to communicate despite the neurological damage conditioned place recognition success in this patient. It further highlights a hemispheric asymmetry in this process, by showing the fundamental role of the right PHC in topographic agnosia.

  5. Hurt but still alive: Residual activity in the parahippocampal cortex conditions the recognition of familiar places in a patient with topographic agnosia.

    PubMed

    van Assche, Mitsouko; Kebets, Valeria; Lopez, Ursula; Saj, Arnaud; Goldstein, Rachel; Bernasconi, Françoise; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Assal, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The parahippocampal cortex (PHC) participates in both perception and memory. However, the way perceptual and memory processes cooperate when we navigate in our everyday life environment remains poorly understood. We studied a stroke patient presenting a brain lesion in the right PHC, which resulted in a mild and quantifiable topographic agnosia, and allowed us to investigate the role of this structure in overt place recognition. Photographs of personally familiar and unfamiliar places were displayed during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Familiar places were either recognized or unrecognized by the patient and 6 age- and education-matched controls in a visual post-scan recognition test. In fMRI, recognized places were associated with a network comprising the fusiform gyrus in the intact side, but also the right anterior PHC, which included the lesion site. Moreover, this right PHC showed increased connectivity with the left homologous PHC in the intact hemisphere. By contrasting recognized with unrecognized familiar places, we replicate the finding of the joint involvement of the retrosplenial cortex, occipito-temporal areas, and posterior parietal cortex in place recognition. This study shows that the ability for left and right anterior PHC to communicate despite the neurological damage conditioned place recognition success in this patient. It further highlights a hemispheric asymmetry in this process, by showing the fundamental role of the right PHC in topographic agnosia. PMID:26909331

  6. Immune polarization by hookworms: taking cues from T helper type 2, type 2 innate lymphoid cells and alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nair, Meera G; Herbert, De'Broski R

    2016-06-01

    Cellular and molecular investigation of parasitic helminth infections has greatly accelerated the understanding of type 2 immune responses. However, there remains considerable debate regarding the specific leucocytes that kill parasites and whether these mechanisms are distinct from those responsible for tissue repair. Herein, we chronicle discoveries over the past decade highlighting current paradigms in type 2 immunity with a particular emphasis upon how CD4(+) T helper type 2 cells, type 2 innate lymphoid cells and alternatively activated macrophages coordinately control helminth-induced parasitism. Primarily, this review will draw from studies of the murine nematode parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, which bears important similarities to the human hookworms Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. Given that one or more hookworm species currently infect millions of individuals across the globe, we propose that vaccine and/or pharmaceutical-based cure strategies targeting these affected human populations should incorporate the conceptual advances outlined herein. PMID:26928141

  7. Taking centre stage...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    HAMLET (Highly Automated Multimedia Light Enhanced Theatre) was the star performance at the recent finals of the `Young Engineer for Britain' competition, held at the Commonwealth Institute in London. This state-of-the-art computer-controlled theatre lighting system won the title `Young Engineers for Britain 1998' for David Kelnar, Jonathan Scott, Ramsay Waller and John Wyllie (all aged 16) from Merchiston Castle School, Edinburgh. HAMLET replaces conventional manually-operated controls with a special computer program, and should find use in the thousands of small theatres, schools and amateur drama productions that operate with limited resources and without specialist expertise. The four students received a £2500 prize between them, along with £2500 for their school, and in addition they were invited to spend a special day with the Royal Engineers. A project designed to improve car locking systems enabled Ian Robinson of Durham University to take the `Working in industry award' worth £1000. He was also given the opportunity of a day at sea with the Royal Navy. Other prizewinners with their projects included: Jun Baba of Bloxham School, Banbury (a cardboard armchair which converts into a desk and chair); Kobika Sritharan and Gemma Hancock, Bancroft's School, Essex (a rain warning system for a washing line); and Alistair Clarke, Sam James and Ruth Jenkins, Bishop of Llandaff High School, Cardiff (a mechanism to open and close the retractable roof of the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff). The two principal national sponsors of the competition, which is organized by the Engineering Council, are Lloyd's Register and GEC. Industrial companies, professional engineering institutions and educational bodies also provided national and regional prizes and support. During this year's finals, various additional activities took place, allowing the students to surf the Internet and navigate individual engineering websites on a network of computers. They also visited the

  8. Administration of activated glial condition medium in the nucleus accumbens extended extinction and intensified reinstatement of methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Arezoomandan, Reza; Moradi, Marzieh; Attarzadeh-Yazdi, Ghassem; Tomaz, Carlos; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant drug with significant abuse potential and neurotoxic effects. A high percentage of users relapse to use after detoxification and no effective medication has been developed for treatment of METH addiction. Developing evidences indicated the role of glial cells in drugs abused related phenomena. However, little is known about the role of these cells in the maintenance and reinstatement of METH-seeking behaviors. Therefore, the current study was conducted to clarify the role of glial cells in the maintenance and reinstatement of METH-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats. Astrocyte condition medium (ACM) and neuroglia conditioned medium (NCM) are liquid mediums prepared from primary astrocyte and neuroglia cells. These mediums seem to contain many factors that release by glia cells. CPP was induced by systemic administration of METH (1mg/kg for 5days, s.c.). Following the establishment of CPP, the rats were given daily bilateral injections (0.5μl/side) of either vehicle, ACM or NCM into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and then were tested for the maintenance and reinstatement. Intra-NAc administration of ACM treated with METH, could extend the extinction period and also, intensified the magnitude of METH reinstatement. Furthermore, intra-accumbal administration of NCM treated with METH notably delayed the extinction period by four days and significantly increased the magnitude of CPP score in the reinstatement phase compared to the post-test phase. Collectively, these findings suggested that activation of glial cells may be involved in the maintenance and reinstatement of METH-seeking behaviors. It provides new evidence that glia cells might be considered as a potential target for the treatment of METH addiction. PMID:27346277

  9. A Role for p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase-mediated Threonine 30-dependent Norepinephrine Transporter Regulation in Cocaine Sensitization and Conditioned Place Preference*

    PubMed Central

    Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; NarasimhaNaidu, Kamalakkannan; Damaj, Mohamad Imad; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Jayanthi, Lankupalle Damodara

    2015-01-01

    The noradrenergic and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) systems are implicated in cocaine-elicited behaviors. Previously, we demonstrated a role for p38 MAPK-mediated norepinephrine transporter (NET) Thr30 phosphorylation in cocaine-induced NET up-regulation (Mannangatti, P., Arapulisamy, O., Shippenberg, T. S., Ramamoorthy, S., and Jayanthi, L. D. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 20239–20250). The present study explored the functional interaction between p38 MAPK-mediated NET regulation and cocaine-induced behaviors. In vitro cocaine treatment of mouse prefrontal cortex synaptosomes resulted in enhanced NET function, surface expression, and phosphorylation. Pretreatment with PD169316, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In mice, in vivo administration of p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 completely blocked cocaine-induced NET up-regulation and p38 MAPK activation in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. When tested for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference (CPP), mice receiving SB203580 on cocaine challenge day or on postconditioning test day exhibited significantly reduced cocaine sensitization and CPP. A transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide strategy was utilized to test the involvement of the NET-Thr30 motif. In vitro treatment of synaptosomes with TAT-NET-Thr30 (wild-type peptide) completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In vivo administration of TAT-NET-Thr30 peptide but not TAT-NET-T30A (mutant peptide) completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In the cocaine CPP paradigm, mice receiving TAT-NET-Thr30 but not TAT-NET-T30A on postconditioning test day exhibited significantly reduced cocaine CPP. Following extinction, TAT-NET-Thr30 when given prior to cocaine challenge significantly reduced reinstatement of cocaine CPP. These results demonstrate that the direct inhibition of p38

  10. The Space Place: Adventures in Informal Education - and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D.; Leon, N.

    2001-12-01

    Informal education settings provide unique opportunities to convey Earth and space science learning to a variety of audiences. The NASA Space Place suite of outreach products and activities include deliverables to both the formal and the informal education arenas. The question is, how can Earth and space science efforts best create high-quality products and activities for the informal education sector- and how can these products and activities be effectively disseminated to these audiences? This session will describe the approach by a small outreach team for NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) Space Place effort. The Space Place team's approach has been three-fold: 1) develop a suite of products designed to appeal to (and educate) the informal education audience, 2) disseminate these products through leveraged distribution channels which serve the informal education community, and 3) invite participation by missions beyond those within NMP, but rather NASA-wide - for a richer and broader message, and a greater variety of content The informal education audience served by the Space Place can be found in science centers, museums, planetariums, libraries, community centers, and community organizations. This informal education audience seeks to be entertained as well as to be educated, and this audience often includes multiple generations. Personnel at informal education venues may or may not have a science background, may or may not have significant training in conducting activities, and may, as often as not, be volunteers. As a result of valuable lessons learned, Space Place materials developed for informal education settings attempt to be adaptable for multiple age groups, and easy to administer. Dissemination to the informal education community could be a daunting effort. But another lesson learned by the Space Place team is the value of alliances with national organizations within that community. These alliances make distribution of the Space Place activities and

  11. The value of place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-03-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate environment is clear, and we are presented with examples of how they strive to make connections between the content and what they are familiar with—namely their surroundings. "Place" is identified as a term with complex meanings and interpretations, even in the scope of place-based science education, and understanding how the term is used in any given scenario is essential to understanding the implications of place-based education. Is place used as a location, locale or a sense of place? To understand "place" is to acknowledge that for the individual, it is highly situational, cultural and personal. It is just such attributes that make place-based education appealing, and potentially powerful, pedagogically on one hand, yet complex for implementation on the other. The argument is posed that place is particularly important in the context of education about the environment, which in its simplest manifestation, connects formal science curriculum to resources that are local and tangible to students. The incorporation of place in such a framework seeks to bridge the gap between formal school science subjects and students' lived experiences, yet acknowledges the tensions that can arise between accommodating place meanings and the desire to acculturate students into the language of the scientific community. The disconnect between guiding policy frameworks and the reality of the Next Generation Science Standards is addressed opening an avenue for further discussion of the importance of socio-cultural frameworks of science learning in an ever increasing era of accountability.

  12. Agrobacterium radiobacter and related organisms take up fructose via a binding-protein-dependent active-transport system.

    PubMed

    Williams, S G; Greenwood, J A; Jones, C W

    1995-10-01

    Washed cells of Agrobacterium radiobacter prepared from a fructose-limited continuous culture (D 0.045 h-1) transported D(-)[U-14C]fructose in a linear manner for up to 4 min at a rate several-fold higher than the rate of fructose utilization by the growing culture. D(-)[U-14C]Fructose transport exhibited a high affinity for fructose (KT < 1 microM) and was inhibited to varying extents by osmotic shock, by the uncoupling agent carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, and by unlabelled sugars (D-fructose/D-mannose > D-ribose > D-sorbose > D-glucose/D-galactose/D-xylose; no inhibition by D-arabinose). Prolonged growth of A. radiobacter in fructose-limited continuous culture led to the selection of a novel strain (AR100) which overproduced a fructose-binding protein (FBP) and showed an increased rate of fructose transport. FBP was purified from osmotic-shock fluid using anion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). The monomeric protein (M(r) 34,200 by SDS-PAGE and 37,700 by gel-filtration FPLC) bound D-[U-14C]-fructose stoichiometrically (1.17 nmol nmol FBP-1) and with high affinity (KD 0.49 microM) as shown by equilibrium dialysis. Binding of D-[U-14C]fructose by FBP was variably inhibited by unlabelled sugars (D-fructose/D-mannose > D-ribose > D-sorbose; no inhibition by D-glucose, D-galactose or D-arabinose). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of FBP (ADTSVCLI-) was similar to that of several sugar-binding proteins from other species of bacteria. Fructose transport and FBP were variably induced in batch cultures of A. radiobacter by growth on different carbon sources (D-fructose > D-ribose/D-mannose > D-glucose; no induction by succinate). An immunologically similar protein to FBP was produced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and various species of Rhizobium following growth on fructose. It is concluded that fructose is transported into A. radiobacter and related organisms via a periplasmic fructose/mannose-binding-protein-dependent active

  13. The Mushroom Place. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlichter, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The final installment of a series of articles on the "Mushroom Place" learning center program, which involves creative thinking activities for young, gifted students, describes "Doing It the Hard Way," a performance task which involves the actual construction of objects from a selected set of materials in the absence of the usual project tools.…

  14. Place as Library?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Digital technology is redrawing the library's blueprint. Planners are thinking in new ways about how to design libraries as places for learning rather than primarily as storehouses of information. This thinking has given rise to much discussion--and to many publications--about the "library as place." In this article, the author asks why not also…

  15. The Case for Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2012-01-01

    Bookstores, record stores, libraries, Facebook: these places--both physical and virtual--demonstrate an established and essential purpose as centers of community, expertise, convenience, immediacy, and respect. Yet as digital, mobile, and social shifts continue to transform culture and interactions, these spaces and places transform, too.…

  16. Teaching Bodies in Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Stephanie; Woglom, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context: This piece draws on literature in justice-oriented teacher education, feminist pedagogy, and postmodern notions of bodies and place to make sense of data generated from a three-year study of an undergraduate teacher education course. A feminist lens was used to engage a body- and place-focused pedagogy that aimed to engage…

  17. Understanding Place Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Linda L.; Tomayko, Ming C.

    2011-01-01

    Developing an understanding of place value and the base-ten number system is considered a fundamental goal of the early primary grades. For years, teachers have anecdotally reported that students struggle with place-value concepts. Among the common errors cited are misreading such numbers as 26 and 62 by seeing them as identical in meaning,…

  18. Schooling Out of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConaghy, Cathryn

    2006-01-01

    Education in rural communities is an interesting site for an analysis of the relationship between place and the cultural politics of schooling. In particular the movements of people, ideas and practices to and from, and also within, rural places suggest the need for theorizing on rural education to consider the relevance of new mobility…

  19. Analytic Hierarchy Process to Define the Most Important Factors and Related Technologies for Empowering Elderly People in Taking an Active Role in their Health.

    PubMed

    Fico, G; Gaeta, E; Arredondo, M T; Pecchia, L

    2015-09-01

    Successful management of health conditions in older population is determined by strategic involvement of a professional team of careers and by empowering patients and their caregivers to take over a central role and responsibility in the daily management of condition. Identifying, structuring and ranking the most important needs related to these aspects could pave the way for improved strategies in designing systems and technological solutions supporting user empowerment. This paper presents the preliminary results of a study aiming to elicit these needs. Healthcare professionals, working together in the European and Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP-AHA) initiative, have defined a set of needs and factors that have been organized in two hierarchies around the concepts of patient activation and proactive and prepared care team, defined in the Chronic Care Model. The two hierarchies have been mapped, by a team of experts in computer science, with technologies and solutions that could facilitate the achievement of the identified needs.

  20. Increased conditioned place preference for cocaine in high anxiety related behavior (HAB) mice is associated with an increased activation in the accumbens corridor

    PubMed Central

    Prast, Janine M.; Schardl, Aurelia; Sartori, Simone B.; Singewald, Nicolas; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and substance use disorders are strongly associated in humans. Accordingly, a widely held but controversial concept in the addiction field, the so-called “self-medication hypothesis,” posits that anxious individuals are more vulnerable for drug dependence because they use drugs of abuse to alleviate their anxiety. We tested this hypothesis under controlled experimental conditions by quantifying the conditioned place preference (CPP) to 15 mg/kg i.p. cocaine given contingently (COCAINE) in CD1 mice selectively bred for high anxiety-related behavior (HAB) vs. normal anxiety-related behavior (NAB). Cocaine was conditioned to the initially non-preferred compartment in an alternate day design (cocaine vs. saline, four pairings each). HAB and NAB mice were also tested for the effects of non-contingent (NONCONT) cocaine administration. HAB mice showed a slightly higher bias for one of the conditioning compartments during the pretest than NAB mice that became statistically significant (p = 0.045) only after pooling COCAINE and NONCONT groups. Cocaine CPP was higher (p = 0.0035) in HAB compared to NAB mice. The increased cocaine CPP was associated with an increased expression of the immediate early genes (IEGs) c-Fos and Early Growth Related Protein 1 (EGR1) in the accumbens corridor, i.e., a region stretching from the anterior commissure to the interhemispheric border and comprising the medial nucleus accumbens core and shell, the major island of Calleja and intermediate part of the lateral septum, as well as the vertical limb of the diagonal band and medial septum. The cocaine CPP-induced EGR1 expression was only observed in D1- and D2-medium spiny neurons, whereas other types of neurons or glial cells were not involved. With respect to the activation by contingent vs. non-contingent cocaine EGR1 seemed to be a more sensitive marker than c-Fos. Our findings suggest that cocaine may be more rewarding in high anxiety individuals, plausibly due to an

  1. Sharing Knowledge About Places as Community Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Katharine S.; O'Hara, Kenton; Giles, Thierry; Marianek, Mike

    Our experience of places is one that goes hand-in-hand with social exchange. It is rare that we visit a place purely to experience it as an isolated encounter with a physical setting. Instead, we visit places in groups, use a myriad of ways to tell others about the experience, and we often seek out and take pleasure from encounters with local people in the setting. Our experience of place is embedded within a social framework for sharing knowledge. In this chapter, we discuss the motivations for sharing place-based knowledge and how this can contribute to community building. We then proceed to review three projects that create platforms for knowledge exchange and discuss their different approaches. This is followed by a discussion on the range of practices for sharing knowledge about places and in particular those that support social frameworks in a community setting. In conclusion, we propose directions for future work in the area.

  2. About Maggie's Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmens, Carol E.

    1982-01-01

    Describes "Maggie's Place," the library computer system of the Pikes Peak Library District, Colorado Springs, Colorado, noting its use as an electronic card catalog and community information file, accessibility by home users and library users, and terminal considerations. (EJS)

  3. Artist Place Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrino, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Art history can be a little dry at times, but the author is always trying to incorporate new ways of teaching it. In this article, she describes a project in which students were to create a place setting out of clay that had to be unified through a famous artist's style. This place setting had to consist of at least five pieces (dinner plate, cup…

  4. Changes in Familiarity with and Willingness to Take Preexposure Prophylaxis in a Longitudinal Study of Highly Sexually Active Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Whitfield, Thomas H.F.; Ventuneac, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: For gay and bisexual men (GBM), research suggests that familiarity with preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been increasing since being approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2012. However, it is less clear how willingness to start using PrEP has changed over time. Likewise, some have expressed concerns regarding the potential for risk compensation (i.e., reduced condom use) were one to start PrEP; however, again, it is unclear how risk compensation may have changed over time. Methods: We conducted baseline and 12-month assessments with 158 highly sexually active HIV-negative GBM in New York City who were assessed between 2011 and 2014. We examined change over time both between participants (based on when they entered the study), as well as within each participant (over the 12 months of his involvement). Results: Familiarity with PrEP increased over time (both between and within participants); however, willingness to take PrEP did not change (neither between nor within participants). Few men believed taking PrEP would cause their condomless anal sex (CAS) to increase and this did not change over time. However, a majority believed PrEP would increase temptation for CAS, and this did not change over time within participants. Sexual compulsivity symptomology was associated with higher willingness to take PrEP and perceiving that PrEP would increase one's temptations for CAS. Furthermore, recent CAS was associated with greater willingness to take PrEP, a perception that PrEP would increase one's likelihood to engage in CAS, and a perception that being on PrEP would increase one's temptation for CAS. Conclusions: Participants became more familiar with PrEP over time; however, willingness to start PrEP did not change, and this may serve as an opportunity for providers to discuss PrEP with their patients. Men who engaged in CAS were interested in PrEP and preexisting patterns of sexual behavior may be the primary determinant of CAS

  5. Spatial mapping takes time.

    PubMed

    Whishaw, I Q

    1998-01-01

    The experiment tested the prediction that spatial mapping takes time and asked whether time use is reflected in the overt behavior of a performing animal. The study examines this question by exploiting the expected behavioral differences of control rats and rats with hippocampal formation damage induced with fimbria-fornix (FF) lesions on a spatial navigation task. Previous studies have shown that control rats use a mapping strategy, in which they use the relative positions of environmental cues to reach places in space, whereas FF rats use a cue-based strategy, in which they are guided by a single cue or their own body orientation. Therefore, control and FF rats were overtrained on a complex foraging task in which they left a burrow to retrieve eight food pellets hidden around the perimeter of a circular table. The control rats retrieved the food pellets in order of their distance from the burrow, took direct routes to the food, and made few errors, all of which suggested they used a spatial strategy. The FF rats were less likely to retrieve food as a function of its distance, took a circular path around the perimeter of the table, and made many errors, suggesting they used a cue-based strategy. Despite taking shorter routes than the FF rats, the control rats had proportionally slower response speeds. Their slow response speeds support the hypothesis that spatial mapping takes time and that mapping time is reflected in behavior. The results are discussed in relation to their relevance to spatial mapping theory, hippocampal function, and the evolution of foraging strategies.

  6. Place learning by mechanical contact.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Steven J; Turvey, Michael T

    2010-05-01

    For some animals (e.g. the night-active wandering spider) the encounters with the habitat that result in place learning are predominantly mechanical. We asked whether place learning limited to mechanical contact, like place learning in general, entails vectors tied to individual landmarks and relations between landmarks. We constructed minimal environments for blindfolded human participants. Landmarks were raised steps. 'Home' was a mechanically indistinct location. Travel was linear. The mechanical contacts were those of walking, stepping, and probing with a soft-tipped cane. Home-orienting activities preceded tests of finding home from a given location with landmarks unchanged or (unbeknown to participants) shifted. In a one-landmark environment, perceived home shifted in the same direction, with the same magnitude, as the shifted landmark. In an environment of two landmarks located in the same direction from home, shifting the further landmark toward home resulted in a change in home's perceived location that preserved the original ratio of distances separating home, nearer landmark, and further landmark. Both findings were invariant over the travel route to the test location and repetitions of testing. It seems, therefore, that for humans (and, perhaps, for wandering spiders), mechanical contact can reveal the vectors and relations specifying places.

  7. Healthy Youth Places: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Determine the Effectiveness of Facilitating Adult and Youth Leaders to Promote Physical Activity and Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzewaltowski, David A.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Welk, Greg; Hill, Jennie; Milliken, George; Karteroliotis, Kostas; Johnston, Judy A.

    2009-01-01

    The Healthy Youth Places (HYP) intervention targeted increased fruit and vegetable consumption (FV) and physical activity (PA) through building the environmental change skills and efficacy of adults and youth. HYP included group training for adult school site leaders, environmental change skill curriculum, and youth-led FV and PA environment…

  8. Gateway to New Atlantis Attraction Takes Shape

    NASA Video Gallery

    The home of space shuttle Atlantis continues taking shape at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Crews placed the nose cone atop the second of a replica pair of solid rocket boosters. A life-...

  9. Taking Action for Healthy Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Jill E.

    2003-01-01

    Summarizes research on relationship between physical activity, good nutrition, and academic performance. Offers several recommendations for how schools can take action to improve the nutrition and fitness of students. (PKP)

  10. Finding Place in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Chris

    2011-01-01

    As a society, we are less and less comfortable in our localities. We have embraced the idea of a globalized placelessness, where everything, everywhere, resonates with a sameness. What do we lose, educationally and in society at large, when we reduce our inhabited places to those components that provide material wealth alone? If students and…

  11. Schools as Dangerous Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    When students set off for school each day how many of them or their caregivers consider for a moment that they will spend the day at a potentially dangerous place? On the contrary, students and caregivers probably view schools as safe havens, and official research suggests that this is the case for the majority of teachers and pupils. However,…

  12. Tracking Self into Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piersol, Laura

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to figure out what it means to educate "ecologically," I decided to track down some of the stories that I was living, telling and making as an educator. I ended up lost in the house of environmental education, stuck within the rooms of ecological science and political advocacy. Outside on the lawn sat the story of place based…

  13. Teaching With Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Ronald M., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Designed for social studies educators, this theme issue presents 11 articles about historic places that feature a variety of ideas for elementary and secondary lesson plans, curricula, and program development. The articles are: (1) "Where did History Happen?" (Beth M. Boland); (2) "Creating a Partnership" (Carol D. Shull); (3) "Heritage Education:…

  14. The Value of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate…

  15. Designing Places for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Anne, Ed.

    This book presents information about the condition of schools around the United States. It also describes the link between architecture and academic success and offers suggestions for improving the design of existing and future school buildings. Eleven articles look at schools as places of deep meaning and show how that view can alter approaches…

  16. Creativity: Does Place Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Finbarr

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that creativity has the greatest potential to flourish if a learning environment is embedded within a community that emphasises a deep sense of place. Yet in a globalised world, rootedness is often regarded as antithetical to creativity. But far from representing dead artefacts that are anti-modern and non-economic, culture and…

  17. Universities Are Funny Places!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Universities are funny places. They have a strong sense of hierarchy and rank. They have an amazing disparity in salary levels and status between staff, are class conscious, and are run by a large bureaucracy that oils and keeps the machinery going. They operate as educational institutions and yet also are entrepreneurial, marketing themselves in…

  18. Systematic Risk-Taking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neihart, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Describes systematic risk-taking, a strategy designed to develop skills and increase self-esteem, confidence, and courage in gifted youth. The steps of systematic risk-taking include understanding the benefits, initial self-assessment for risk-taking categories, identifying personal needs, determining a risk to take, taking the risk, and…

  19. Settings: In a Variety of Place. . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairo, Peter; And Others

    This document consists of the fourth section of a book of readings on issues related to adult career development. The four chapters in this fourth section focus on settings in which adult career development counseling may take place. "Career Planning and Development in Organizations" (Peter Cairo) discusses several concepts and definitions…

  20. The Right Place, The Right Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, William G.; Irish, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    Superintendents are in the right place at the right time to take advantage of a golden opportunity to reverse a trend that threatens the nation's schools and communities. They are now uniquely positioned to stop the retreat of good-hearted, well-intentioned citizens from public life. In this article, the authors present perpetual traps that…

  1. Space Place Prime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Austin J.; Novati, Alexander; Fisher, Diane K.; Leon, Nancy J.; Netting, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Space Place Prime is public engagement and education software for use on iPad. It targets a multi-generational audience with news, images, videos, and educational articles from the Space Place Web site and other NASA sources. New content is downloaded daily (or whenever the user accesses the app) via the wireless connection. In addition to the Space Place Web site, several NASA RSS feeds are tapped to provide new content. Content is retained for the previous several days, or some number of editions of each feed. All content is controlled on the server side, so features about the latest news, or changes to any content, can be made without updating the app in the Apple Store. It gathers many popular NASA features into one app. The interface is a boundless, slidable- in-any-direction grid of images, unique for each feature, and iconized as image, video, or article. A tap opens the feature. An alternate list mode presents menus of images, videos, and articles separately. Favorites can be tagged for permanent archive. Face - book, Twitter, and e-mail connections make any feature shareable.

  2. Take Steps Toward a Healthier Life | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is promoting wellness by encouraging individuals to take the stairs. In an effort to increase participation in this program, NIH has teamed up with Occupational Health Services (OHS). OHS is placing NIH-sponsored “Take the Stairs” stickers on stair entrances, stair exits, and elevators.

  3. Urban Environmental Education and Sense of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudryavtsev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Urban environmental educators are trying to connect students to the urban environment and nature, and thus develop a certain sense of place. To do so, educators involve students in environmental stewardship, monitoring, activism, and outdoor recreation in cities. At the same time, sense of place has been linked to pro-environmental behaviors and…

  4. The Take Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The Take Action Project (TAP) was created to help middle school students take informed and effective action on science-related issues. The seven steps of TAP ask students to (1) choose a science-related problem of interest to them, (2) research their problem, (3) select an action to take on the problem, (4) plan that action, (5) take action, (6)…

  5. System-Events Toolbox--Activating Urban Places for Social Cohesion through Designing a System of Events That Relies on Local Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fassi, Davide; Motter, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a reflection on the use of public spaces in towns and the development of a system-events toolbox to activate them towards social cohesion. It is the result of a 1 year action research developed together with POLIMI DESIS Lab of the Department of Design to develop design solutions to open up the public spaces of the campus to the…

  6. Shatter the Glassy Stare: Implementing Experiential Learning in Higher Education--"A Companion Piece to Place as Text: Approaches to Active Learning." National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machonis, Peter A., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This monograph presents in some detail the ways in which Faculty Institutes--professional development opportunities where instructors immerse themselves in site-specific learning activities exactly as students would, though only for several days--allow participants to acquire the skill to design such adventures elsewhere for their own students.…

  7. Just Being Kids: Supports and Services for Infants and Toddlers and Their Families in Everyday Routines, Activities, and Places. [Videotape with Facilitator's Guide].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Larry

    Each of the six stories on this 50-minute videotape demonstrates recommended practices as therapists and early childhood specialists work collaboratively with families to achieve meaningful goals for their children in everyday routines and activities. "Just Being Kids" was developed for use in both pre-service and in-service training programs with…

  8. Activation of antigen-exposed iMC-DCs at the "right place" and "right time" promotes potent anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Spencer, David M

    2012-05-01

    To better control the "licensing" of pro-Th1 dendritic cells (DCs), Spencer and colleagues have developed a synthetic ligand-inducible chimeric receptor, iMyD88/CD40 (iMC), incorporating synergistic Toll-like receptor (TLR) and costimulatory signaling elements, permitting DC regulation in vivo within the context of an immunological synapse. This novel technology results in potent anti-cancer activity.

  9. Children and Place: A Natural Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Valerie G.; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents seven outdoor activities on the environment and ecology to be used at the K-12 grade level. Connects students with the environment they live in and develops the critical sense of place. (Contains 26 references.) (YDS)

  10. SR-71 Taking Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    One of three U.S. Air Force SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft originally retired from operational service and loaned to NASA for a high-speed research program retracts its landing gear after taking off from NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. One of the SR-71As was later returned to the Air Force for active duty in 1995. Data from the SR-71 high-speed research program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic/hypersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of

  11. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, kK.; Elliott, J.; Bettencourt, B.; Slawski, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in- place penetration test is practical.

  12. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Elliott, J.

    1997-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in-place penetration test is practical. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Breastfeeding in public places.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, E; Turnbull, D; Hiller, J E

    1999-06-01

    This study reports the results of a survey of restaurant and shopping center managers concerning breastfeeding in their facilities. Managers from 66 restaurants and 27 shopping centers were interviewed by telephone. One-third of the restaurant managers and 48% of the shopping center managers stated that a mother could breastfeed anywhere in their facility regardless of what other customers might say. The remaining managers would either discourage breastfeeding anywhere in their facility, suggest a mother move to a more secluded area if she wished to breastfeed, or were unsure how they would react. The variability in support for breastfeeding by managers of restaurants and shopping centers will continue to create uncertainty for mothers wishing to breastfeed in these public places.

  14. Place memory in crickets

    PubMed Central

    Wessnitzer, Jan; Mangan, Michael; Webb, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Certain insect species are known to relocate nest or food sites using landmarks, but the generality of this capability among insects, and whether insect place memory can be used in novel task settings, is not known. We tested the ability of crickets to use surrounding visual cues to relocate an invisible target in an analogue of the Morris water maze, a standard paradigm for spatial memory tests on rodents. Adult female Gryllus bimaculatus were released into an arena with a floor heated to an aversive temperature, with one hidden cool spot. Over 10 trials, the time taken to find the cool spot decreased significantly. The best performance was obtained when a natural scene was provided on the arena walls. Animals can relocate the position from novel starting points. When the scene is rotated, they preferentially approach the fictive target position corresponding to the rotation. We note that this navigational capability does not necessarily imply the animal has an internal spatial representation. PMID:18230590

  15. Corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor mediates the activity of the reward system evoked by morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Lasheras, M Carmen; Laorden, M Luisa; Milanés, M Victoria; Núñez, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Different neurotransmitter systems are involved in behavioural and molecular responses to morphine. The brain stress system is activated by acute administration of drugs of abuse, being CRF the main neuropeptide of this circuitry. In this study we have studied the role of CRF1R in the rewarding effects of morphine using the CPP paradigm. For that, animals were treated with a CRF1R antagonist (CP-154,526) or vehicle during 6 days. Thirty min after receiving the antagonist, mice were injected with morphine on the same days that CP-154,526 was administered; another group received saline on the same days that vehicle was administered, and both groups were immediately conditioned. Control animals received vehicle and saline every day. On day 7, animals were tested for morphine-induced CPP. c-Fos, TH and OXA immunohistochemistry, NA turnover (HPLC), and corticosterone plasma concentration (RIA) were evaluated. Administration of a CRF1R antagonist CP-154,526 blocked the morphine-induced CPP and the increased NA turnover in the NAc in morphine-paired mice. CP-154-526 antagonised the enhancement in c-Fos expression evoked by morphine-induced CPP in the VTA and NAc, and the activation of the orexinergic neurons in the LLH. Present work demonstrates that morphine-induced CPP activates different brain areas involved in reward, and points out a critical role of CRF1R in molecular changes involved in morphine-conducted behaviours. Thus, our study supports a therapeutic potential of CRF1R antagonists in addictive disorders. PMID:25556110

  16. Corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor mediates the activity of the reward system evoked by morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Lasheras, M Carmen; Laorden, M Luisa; Milanés, M Victoria; Núñez, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Different neurotransmitter systems are involved in behavioural and molecular responses to morphine. The brain stress system is activated by acute administration of drugs of abuse, being CRF the main neuropeptide of this circuitry. In this study we have studied the role of CRF1R in the rewarding effects of morphine using the CPP paradigm. For that, animals were treated with a CRF1R antagonist (CP-154,526) or vehicle during 6 days. Thirty min after receiving the antagonist, mice were injected with morphine on the same days that CP-154,526 was administered; another group received saline on the same days that vehicle was administered, and both groups were immediately conditioned. Control animals received vehicle and saline every day. On day 7, animals were tested for morphine-induced CPP. c-Fos, TH and OXA immunohistochemistry, NA turnover (HPLC), and corticosterone plasma concentration (RIA) were evaluated. Administration of a CRF1R antagonist CP-154,526 blocked the morphine-induced CPP and the increased NA turnover in the NAc in morphine-paired mice. CP-154-526 antagonised the enhancement in c-Fos expression evoked by morphine-induced CPP in the VTA and NAc, and the activation of the orexinergic neurons in the LLH. Present work demonstrates that morphine-induced CPP activates different brain areas involved in reward, and points out a critical role of CRF1R in molecular changes involved in morphine-conducted behaviours. Thus, our study supports a therapeutic potential of CRF1R antagonists in addictive disorders.

  17. Application of industrial hygiene techniques for work-place exposure assessment protocols related to petro-chemical exploration and production field activities

    SciTech Connect

    Koehn, J.

    1995-12-31

    Standard industrial hygiene techniques for recognition, evaluation, and control can be directly applied to development of technical protocols for workplace exposure assessment activities for a variety of field site locations. Categories of occupational hazards include chemical and physical agents. Examples of these types of hazards directly related to oil and gas exploration and production workplaces include hydrocarbons, benzene, oil mist, hydrogen sulfide, Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), asbestos-containing materials, and noise. Specific components of well process chemicals include potential hazardous chemical substances such as methanol, acrolein, chlorine dioxide, and hydrochloric acid. Other types of exposure hazards may result from non-routine conduct of sandblasting and painting operations.

  18. Deprivation amplification revisited; or, is it always true that poorer places have poorer access to resources for healthy diets and physical activity?

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Background It has commonly been suggested (including by this author) that individual or household deprivation (for example, low income) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of affordable nutritious food or facilities for physical activity in the neighbourhood). Discussion The idea of deprivation amplification has some intuitive attractiveness and helps divert attention away from purely individual determinants of diet and physical activity, and towards health promoting or health damaging features of the physical and social environment. Such environmental features may be modifiable, and environmental changes may help promote healthier behaviors. However, recent empirical examination of the distribution of facilities and resources shows that location does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods. This suggests that we need: a) to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date empirical evidence on the socio-economic distribution of neighbourhood resources, and b) to engage in further research on the relative importance of, and interactions between, individual and environmental factors in shaping behavior. Summary In this debate paper I suggest that it may not always be true that poorer neighbourhoods are more likely to lack health promoting resources, and to be exposed to more health damaging resources. The spatial distribution of environmental resources by area socioeconomic status may vary between types of resource, countries, and time periods. It may also be that the presence or absence of resources is less important than their quality, their social meaning, or local perceptions of their accessibility and relevance. PMID:17683624

  19. [Effect of iontophoretically administered L-DOPA and ketamin on the impulse activity of the somatomotor cortex neurons during the conditioned placing movements].

    PubMed

    Khorievin, V I

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between the neuronal dopamine and NMDA glutamate receptors were investigated by iontophoresis of L-DOPA and ketamin to 19 single cortical neurons of the somatomotor cortex neurons in cats performing the operant reflex. L-DOPA producing bursts of 8-12 impulses that led to the significant increase of the total number of spikes related to the movements and insignificant decreased the power or the average number of spikes in a conditional response. Effects of ketamin on impulse activity were multidirectional resulting in most cases (16 cells) in the significant increase of the response power and in other three cells producing the suppression of discharges related to movements. It is supposed that following the ketamin iontophoresis the facilitation of conditional responses was caused by the blocking of the NMDA-glutamatergic transmission to intracortical inhibitory neurons, whereas inhibition of conditioned responses of other cortical cells was produced by blocking NMDA-glutamatergic transmission to pyramidal neurons. The total number of spikes associated with the performance of movements following the joint application of L-DOPA and ketamin was significantly higher compared with the effect of the isolated L-DOPA iontophoresis. These data indicate the NMDA-glutamatergic transmission, which plays an important role in shaping the cortical neuron responses in the performance of behavioral reactions may be modulated by L-DOPA.

  20. Rover Takes a Sunday Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation, made with images from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit hazard-identification camera, shows the rover's perspective of its first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday. Engineers drove Spirit approximately 3 meters (10 feet) toward its first rock target, a football-sized, mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack. The drive took approximately 30 minutes to complete, including time stopped to take images. Spirit first made a series of arcing turns totaling approximately 1 meter (3 feet). It then turned in place and made a series of short, straightforward movements totaling approximately 2 meters (6.5 feet).

  1. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 9-12 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  2. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 7&8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 7-8 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  3. Creating Sacred Places for Children in Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian children in grades 4-6 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  4. Apply an Augmented Reality in a Mobile Guidance to Increase Sense of Place for Heritage Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Lien; Hou, Huei-Tse; Pan, Chao-Yang; Sung, Yao-Ting; Chang, Kuo-En

    2015-01-01

    Based on the sense of place theory and the design principles of guidance and interpretation, this study developed an augmented reality mobile guidance system that used a historical geo-context-embedded visiting strategy. This tool for heritage guidance and educational activities enhanced visitor sense of place. This study consisted of 3 visitor…

  5. Taking the Long View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Robert B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Legal studies faculty need to take the long view in their academic and professional lives. Taking the long view would seem to be a cliched piece of advice, but too frequently legal studies faculty, like their students, get focused on meeting the next short-term hurdle--getting through the next class, grading the next stack of papers, making it…

  6. Taking a Stand as a Student-Centered Research University: Active and Collaborative Learning Meets Scholarship of Teaching at the University of Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the University of Alabama, outlines efforts in the scholarship of teaching and active and collaborative learning, and describes plans for continuing the instructional focus as a student-centered research university, where teaching is viewed as a scholarly activity and students are actively engaged in their learning.

  7. Crowdsourcing a Collective Sense of Place.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Andrew; Croitoru, Arie; Crooks, Andrew T; Stefanidis, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Place can be generally defined as a location that has been assigned meaning through human experience, and as such it is of multidisciplinary scientific interest. Up to this point place has been studied primarily within the context of social sciences as a theoretical construct. The availability of large amounts of user-generated content, e.g. in the form of social media feeds or Wikipedia contributions, allows us for the first time to computationally analyze and quantify the shared meaning of place. By aggregating references to human activities within urban spaces we can observe the emergence of unique themes that characterize different locations, thus identifying places through their discernible sociocultural signatures. In this paper we present results from a novel quantitative approach to derive such sociocultural signatures from Twitter contributions and also from corresponding Wikipedia entries. By contrasting the two we show how particular thematic characteristics of places (referred to herein as platial themes) are emerging from such crowd-contributed content, allowing us to observe the meaning that the general public, either individually or collectively, is assigning to specific locations. Our approach leverages probabilistic topic modelling, semantic association, and spatial clustering to find locations are conveying a collective sense of place. Deriving and quantifying such meaning allows us to observe how people transform a location to a place and shape its characteristics. PMID:27050432

  8. Crowdsourcing a Collective Sense of Place

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Andrew; Croitoru, Arie; Crooks, Andrew T.; Stefanidis, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Place can be generally defined as a location that has been assigned meaning through human experience, and as such it is of multidisciplinary scientific interest. Up to this point place has been studied primarily within the context of social sciences as a theoretical construct. The availability of large amounts of user-generated content, e.g. in the form of social media feeds or Wikipedia contributions, allows us for the first time to computationally analyze and quantify the shared meaning of place. By aggregating references to human activities within urban spaces we can observe the emergence of unique themes that characterize different locations, thus identifying places through their discernible sociocultural signatures. In this paper we present results from a novel quantitative approach to derive such sociocultural signatures from Twitter contributions and also from corresponding Wikipedia entries. By contrasting the two we show how particular thematic characteristics of places (referred to herein as platial themes) are emerging from such crowd-contributed content, allowing us to observe the meaning that the general public, either individually or collectively, is assigning to specific locations. Our approach leverages probabilistic topic modelling, semantic association, and spatial clustering to find locations are conveying a collective sense of place. Deriving and quantifying such meaning allows us to observe how people transform a location to a place and shape its characteristics. PMID:27050432

  9. Orion Spacecraft Takes Shape

    NASA Video Gallery

    Technicians move the two halves of the Orion crew exploration vehicle's crew module into place to fuse them together at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, La. The Lockheed Martin Orio...

  10. Give/Take

    SciTech Connect

    2007-09-12

    Give and Take are set of companion utilities that allow a secure transfer of files from one user to another without exposing the files to third parties. The named files are copied to a spool area. The reciever can retrieve the files by running the "take" program. Ownership of the files remains with the giver until they are taken. Certain users may be limited to take files only from specific givers. For these users, files may only be taken from givers who are members of the gt-uid-group where uid is the UNIX id of the limited user.

  11. Give/Take

    2007-09-12

    Give and Take are set of companion utilities that allow a secure transfer of files from one user to another without exposing the files to third parties. The named files are copied to a spool area. The reciever can retrieve the files by running the "take" program. Ownership of the files remains with the giver until they are taken. Certain users may be limited to take files only from specific givers. For these users, filesmore » may only be taken from givers who are members of the gt-uid-group where uid is the UNIX id of the limited user.« less

  12. Expressing freedom and taking liberties: the paradoxes of aberrant science.

    PubMed

    Little, M

    2006-06-01

    Complete freedom does not exist, despite people's preparedness to die for it. Scientific freedom is much defended and yet much misunderstood. Scientists have limits imposed on their freedom by the disciplines and discourse communities in which they place themselves. Freedom within these socially constructed constraints needs to be distinguished from taking liberties with the rules and practices that make up these constraints, and validate the activities of special groups within society. Scientists (and the public) perceive taking liberties with science's rules and practices as aberrant science, and they often react punitively. Aberrant science can be broadly examined under four headings: wicked science, naughty science, dysfunctional science, and ideologically unacceptable science. When we examine examples of perceived aberrant science, we find that these categories of "misconduct" are connected and often confused. Scientific freedom needs to be redefined with due regard to current understandings of scientists as human beings facing powerful social pressures to deliver results of a particular kind.

  13. Teachable Moment: Google Earth Takes Us There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ann; Davinroy, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the current educational climate, where clearly articulated learning objectives are required, it is clear that the spontaneous teachable moment still has its place. Authors Ann Williams and Thomas Davinroy think that instructors from almost any discipline can employ Google Earth as a tool to take advantage of teachable moments through the…

  14. Taking a Pulse on Your Practice.

    PubMed

    Hoagland-Smith, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Each medical practice, like a living organism, occasionally requires reading of its vital signs. As with human beings, one of those vital signs is the pulse. For your medical practice, just like your patients, there are numerous places from which to take that reading. This article reviews seven key pulses that provide insight into what is happening within the workplace culture of your practice.

  15. Case study of McCormick place cogeneration project

    SciTech Connect

    Overstreet, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    In the authors business of providing district energy services, competition is the key to his being able to have a positive impact on the environment, business stability, and economic activity. In the district energy industry, the competitive options are for property owners to continue to self generate energy to meet their needs, purchase energy from a company that utilizes electricity during off-peak hours to produce chilled water or take advantage of a total solution of purchasing tri-generation energy from Trigen-Peoples District Energy Company. Tri-generation is an innovative technology which involves the simultaneous production of steam, chilled water, and electricity. The McCormick Place cogeneration project calls for producing steam and chilled water (co-) for use by the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority (MPEA). The plant will produce electricity (tri-) to run the production equipment.

  16. Take Your Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... better, the antibiotic is working in killing the bacteria, but it might not completely give what they call a "bactericidal effect." That means taking the bacteria completely out of the system. It might be ...

  17. Adjusting to New Places: International Student Adjustment and Place Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrazas-Carrillo, Elizabeth C.; Hong, Ji Y.; Pace, Terry M.

    2014-01-01

    Using data obtained from in-depth semistructured interviews, we examined international students' attachments to place in the local American Midwestern community where they have attended college for at least 2 years. The results of this study suggest that participants engage in a process of renegotiation of meanings attached to new places in…

  18. Make Your School Library a Noisy Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braxton, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    A common stereotype of a library is that of a place wherein people are required to be quiet. However, the author prefers a noisy and active library wherein books and ideas are discussed, recommended, and shared. The author believes that speaking is inextricably intertwined with thinking, and reading requires reflection on and a response to someone…

  19. What Kind of Place Is Secondary School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Monie; Vivian, Craig

    2008-01-01

    Secondary school introduces students to a public space that differs from the private spaces commonly found in elementary schools. One of the markers signaling a transition from private to public space is the use of discourse. Secondary schools are places where social practices reject the democratic and caring activities found in the elementary…

  20. Parentally Placed Private School Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sopko, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    This document focuses on state education agency (SEA) support for child find, consultation and provision of equitable service provisions for parentally placed private school students with disabilities. Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) completed this activity as part of its cooperative…

  1. PLACE NAMES IN THE CLASSROOM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HARDER, KELSIE B.

    ALTHOUGH "PLACE-NAMING" IS A BASIC HUMAN FUNCTION, THE STUDY OF THE ORIGIN OF PROPER NAMES OF PERSONS AND PLACES (ONOMASTICS) HAS BEEN LARGELY IGNORED BY AMERICAN PHILOLOGISTS AND TEACHERS OF ENGLISH. DESPITE A PAUCITY OF RESEARCH, HOWEVER, ANY ENGLISH TEACHER WHO WANTS TO INTEREST STUDENTS IN ONOMASTIC INVESTIGATION CAN EXPLOIT THE GREAT BODY OF…

  2. Protein kinase C and P2Y12 take center stage in thrombin-mediated activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Moore, S F; Hunter, R W; Hers, I

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1), reduces platelet spreading, thrombus stability, and clot retraction. Despite an important role of mTORC1 in platelet function, little is known about how it is regulated. The objective of this study was to determine the signaling pathways that regulate mTORC1 in human platelets. Methods Mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 activation was assessed by measuring the phosphorylation of its downstream substrate ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K). Results Thrombin or the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbal 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulated activation of mTORC1 in a PKC-dependent, Akt-independent manner that correlated with phosphorylation of tuberin/tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) (Ser939 and Thr1462). In contrast, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)–stimulated TSC2 phosphorylation was completely dependent on phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3 kinase)/Akt but did not result in any detectable mTORC1 activation. Early (Ser939 and Thr1462) and late (Thr1462) TSC2 phosphorylation in response to thrombin were directly PKC dependent, whereas later TSC2 (Ser939) and p70S6K phosphorylation were largely dependent on paracrine signaling through P2Y12. PKC-mediated adenosine diphosphate (ADP) secretion was essential for thrombin-stimulated mTORC1 activation, as (i) ADP rescued p70S6K phosphorylation in the presence of a PKC inhibitor and (ii) P2Y12 antagonism prevented thrombin-mediated mTORC1 activation. Rescue of mTORC1 activation with exogenous ADP was completely dependent on the Src family kinases but independent of PI3 kinase/Akt. Interestingly, although inhibition of Src blocked the ADP rescue, it had little effect on thrombin-stimulated p70S6K phosphorylation under conditions where PKC was not inhibited. Conclusion These results demonstrate that thrombin activates the mTORC1 pathway in human platelets through PKC-mediated ADP secretion and subsequent activation of P2Y12, in a manner

  3. When perspective taking increases taking: reactive egoism in social interaction.

    PubMed

    Epley, Nicholas; Caruso, Eugene; Bazerman, Max H

    2006-11-01

    Group members often reason egocentrically, believing that they deserve more than their fair share of group resources. Leading people to consider other members' thoughts and perspectives can reduce these egocentric (self-centered) judgments such that people claim that it is fair for them to take less; however, the consideration of others' thoughts and perspectives actually increases egoistic (selfish) behavior such that people actually take more of available resources. A series of experiments demonstrates this pattern in competitive contexts in which considering others' perspectives activates egoistic theories of their likely behavior, leading people to counter by behaving more egoistically themselves. This reactive egoism is attenuated in cooperative contexts. Discussion focuses on the implications of reactive egoism in social interaction and on strategies for alleviating its potentially deleterious effects. PMID:17059307

  4. Taking a Broader View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2005-01-01

    A study on stem cells is presented by understanding the environment in which they are found, the support cells and blood vessels as well as the protein scaffolds and other molecules. Researchers found that stem cells in reproductive tissue are surrounded by a pocket of support cells that hold them in place and align them to divide properly, so…

  5. Evolution Takes a Leap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Bernie

    2005-01-01

    Thirty years ago most resource sharing took place between libraries, with a few formal organizations (library consortia) providing logistical support. Today there are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of organizations around the world facilitating resource sharing. Automation has greatly accelerated the growth of resource sharing. As access to…

  6. Simulating Price-Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Lucas M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a price-takers' market simulation geared toward principles-level students. This simulation demonstrates that price-taking behavior is a natural result of the conditions that create perfect competition. In trials, there is a significant degree of price convergence in just three or four rounds. Students find this…

  7. Take a Bow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Greg; Ogurek, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Performing-arts centers can provide benefits at the high school and collegiate levels, and administrators can take steps now to get the show started. When a new performing-arts center comes to town, local businesses profit. Events and performances draw visitors to the community. Ideally, a performing-arts center will play many roles: entertainment…

  8. Teach Kids Test-Taking Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers can do something to help ensure students will do better on tests. They can actively teach test-taking skills so pupils will be better armed in the battle to acquire knowledge. The author challenges teachers to use the suggestions provided in this article in the classroom, and to share them with their students. Test-taking strategies will…

  9. Place recognition using batlike sonar.

    PubMed

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map. PMID:27481189

  10. Place recognition using batlike sonar.

    PubMed

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map.

  11. Aging in place: knowing where you are.

    PubMed

    Rosel, Natalie

    2003-01-01

    Research on aging in place appropriately emphasizes the value of familiar surroundings. The current study contributes an exploration of elders' personal knowledge of where and with whom they are aging in place, knowledge actively accumulated from a lifetime spent in the same area. Structured conversations over a four-month period with 10 elders living on a peninsula in northern Maine provide richly detailed narratives of physical and social particulars of where they live. I use Rowles's (1978) image of concentric circles radiating out from home to organize the information gathered regarding each elder's dwelling, neighborhood and community. Most notable is the depth and detail of their personal knowledge of where they are and with whom they are growing old. I conclude that both the knowledge itself, and the sharing of that knowledge with others, contribute to the implicit and explicit support deemed so valuable for elders who age in place.

  12. China takes an active role in combating an Ebola outbreak: On-site observations and reflections from a Chinese healthcare provider

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-01-01

    Summary As one of the active participants in the global fight against the 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, China supplied many resources, including medical experts and scientists as well as medical supplies, to the affected countries. A member of the first contingent of Chinese public health experts who worked in Sierra Leone for 65 days, I am pleased to have this opportunity to review the major work done by our team to help deal with the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. This is the first time that a Chinese public health training team has worked in West Africa. The team provides trainings for people from local communities in an effort to encourage local residents to get involved in the war against Ebola. However, the implementation of active measures against Ebola in West Africa was hampered somewhat by certain drawbacks in the area in terms of the health system, the shortage of medical resources, the high illiteracy rate, unhealthy lifestyles, and traditional funeral rites. All of these aspects need to be gradually improved in the aftermath of Ebola, and I believe that this is an area in which the Chinese public health system can play an important role. PMID:26668785

  13. China takes an active role in combating an Ebola outbreak: On-site observations and reflections from a Chinese healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-11-01

    As one of the active participants in the global fight against the 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, China supplied many resources, including medical experts and scientists as well as medical supplies, to the affected countries. A member of the first contingent of Chinese public health experts who worked in Sierra Leone for 65 days, I am pleased to have this opportunity to review the major work done by our team to help deal with the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. This is the first time that a Chinese public health training team has worked in West Africa. The team provides trainings for people from local communities in an effort to encourage local residents to get involved in the war against Ebola. However, the implementation of active measures against Ebola in West Africa was hampered somewhat by certain drawbacks in the area in terms of the health system, the shortage of medical resources, the high illiteracy rate, unhealthy lifestyles, and traditional funeral rites. All of these aspects need to be gradually improved in the aftermath of Ebola, and I believe that this is an area in which the Chinese public health system can play an important role.

  14. Factors Associated with Participation, Active Refusals and Reasons for Not Taking Part in a Mortality Followback Survey Evaluating End-of-Life Care

    PubMed Central

    Calanzani, Natalia; Higginson, Irene J; Koffman, Jonathan; Gomes, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background Examination of factors independently associated with participation in mortality followback surveys is rare, even though these surveys are frequently used to evaluate end-of-life care. We aimed to identify factors associated with 1) participation versus non-participation and 2) provision of an active refusal versus a silent refusal; and systematically examine reasons for refusal in a population-based mortality followback survey. Methods Postal survey about the end-of-life care received by 1516 people who died from cancer (aged ≥18), identified through death registrations in London, England (response rate 39.3%). The informant of death (a relative in 95.3% of cases) was contacted 4–10 months after the patient died. We used multivariate logistic regression to identify factors associated with participation/active refusals and content analysis to examine refusal reasons provided by 205 nonparticipants. Findings The odds of partaking were higher for patients aged 90+ (AOR 3.48, 95%CI: 1.52–8.00, ref: 20–49yrs) and female informants (AOR 1.70, 95%CI: 1.33–2.16). Odds were lower for hospital deaths (AOR 0.62, 95%CI: 0.46–0.84, ref: home) and proxies other than spouses/partners (AORs 0.28 to 0.57). Proxies of patients born overseas were less likely to provide an active refusal (AOR 0.49; 95% CI: 0.32–0.77). Refusal reasons were often multidimensional, most commonly study-related (36.0%), proxy-related and grief-related (25.1% each). One limitation of this analysis is the large number of nonparticipants who did not provide reasons for refusal (715/920). Conclusions Our survey better reached proxies of older patients while those dying in hospitals were underrepresented. Proxy characteristics played a role, with higher participation from women and spouses/partners. More information is needed about the care received by underrepresented groups. Study design improvements may guide future questionnaire development and help develop strategies to increase

  15. Take the "C" Train

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, the author recalls several of her experiences in which she successfully pulled her boats out of river holes by throwing herself to the water as a sea-anchor. She learned this trick from her senior guides at a spring training. Her guides told her, "When you're stuck in a hole, take the "C" train."" "Meaning?" The author asked her…

  16. Don't Take This with That!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Drugs Resources for You Special Features Don't take this with that! Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... bushel of problems. How it does or doesn’t work Depending on the active ingredient, grapefruit can ...

  17. John Dewey and a Pedagogy of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayanandhan, Stephanie Raill

    2009-01-01

    If asked to define the idea of "place" one might struggle. Yet people across time and cultures readily share examples of important places or safe places or "foreign" places with one another and offer heartfelt descriptions in literature and art of childhood places, favorite places, strange places. Akinbola Akinwumi, paraphrasing Yi-Fu Tuan,…

  18. Promoting physical activity in schools.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, N

    1993-10-01

    Neil Armstrong, director of the Coronary Prevention in Children Project, argues for a comprehensive programme for promoting children's physical activity. The project's survey of adult coronary risk factors in British children revealed a worryingly low level of physical activity among British schoolchildren. Schools are ideally placed to encourage children to take physical exercise, he writes, but parental role models also play an important part.

  19. Take Your Class Outdoors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shellenberger, Barbara R.

    1981-01-01

    Offers suggestions for designing outdoor activities to provide students with opportunities for exploring, observing, and discovering. Outlines several science activities for each of the following topics: trees, rocks, soil, insects, wild flowers, grasses, lichens, and clouds. (DS)

  20. Taking Care of Yourself

    MedlinePlus

    ... of moderate-intensity physical activity (brisk walking, jogging, cycling, etc.) at least 3 to 4 days per ... of moderate-intensity physical activity (brisk walking, jogging, cycling, etc.) at least 3 to 4 days per ...

  1. Integration of a microbial fuel cell with activated sludge process for energy-saving wastewater treatment: taking a sequencing batch reactor as an example.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Wei; Wang, Yong-Peng; Huang, Yu-Xi; Sun, Xue-Fei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Zeng, Raymond J; Li, Feng; Dong, Fang; Wang, Shu-Guang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-06-01

    In the research and application of microbial fuel cell (MFC), how to incorporate MFCs into current wastewater infrastructure is an importance issue. Here, we report a novel strategy of integrating an MFC into a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to test the energy production and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal. The membrane-less biocathode MFC is integrated with the SBR to recover energy from the aeration in the form of electricity and thus reduce the SBR operation costs. In a lab-scale integrated SBR-MFC system, the maximum power production of the MFC was 2.34 W/m(3) for one typical cycle and the current density reached up to 14 A/m(3) . As a result, the MFC contributed to the 18.7% COD consumption of the integrated system and also recovered energy from the aeration tank with a volume fraction of only 12% of the SBR. Our strategy provides a feasible and effective energy-saving and -recovering solution to upgrade the existing activated sludge processes.

  2. The Path Is Place: Skateboarding, Graffiti and Performances of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on two performances of place involving graffiti and skateboarding: the first looks at a graffiti intervention by SKL0, an urban artist in Singapore, and the second examines the "Long Live Southbank" ("LLSB") campaign to resist the relocation of Southbank's Undercroft, an appropriated skate space in London.…

  3. Consumer views about aging-in-place

    PubMed Central

    Grimmer, Karen; Kay, Debra; Foot, Jan; Pastakia, Khushnum

    2015-01-01

    Background Supporting older people’s choices to live safely and independently in the community (age-in-place) can maximize their quality of life and minimize unnecessary hospitalizations and residential care placement. Little is known of the views of older people about the aging-in-place process, and how they approach and prioritize the support they require to live in the community accommodation of their choice. Purpose To explore and synthesize the experiences and perspectives of older people planning for and experiencing aging-in-place. Methods Two purposively sampled groups of community-dwelling people aged 65+ years were recruited for individual interviews or focus groups. The interviews were semistructured, audio-recorded, and transcribed. Themes were identified by three researchers working independently, then in consort, using a qualitative thematic analysis approach. Results Forty-two participants provided a range of insights about, and strategies for, aging-in-place. Thematic saturation was reached before the final interviews. We identified personal characteristics (resilience, adaptability, and independence) and key elements of successful aging-in-place, summarized in the acronym HIPFACTS: health, information, practical assistance, finance, activity (physical and mental), company (family, friends, neighbors, pets), transport, and safety. Discussion This paper presents rich, and rarely heard, older people’s views about how they and their peers perceive, characterize, and address changes in their capacity to live independently and safely in the community. Participants identified relatively simple, low-cost, and effective supports to enable them to adapt to change, while retaining independence and resilience. The findings highlighted how successful aging-in-place requires integrated, responsive, and accessible primary health and community services. PMID:26604723

  4. Physics Take-Outs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riendeau, Diane; Hawkins, Stephanie; Beutlich, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Most teachers want students to think about their course content not only during class but also throughout their day. So, how do you get your students to see how what they learn in class applies to their lives outside of class? As physics teachers, we are fortunate that our students are continually surrounded by our content. How can we get them to notice the physics around them? How can we get them to make connections between the classroom content and their everyday lives? We would like to offer a few suggestions, Physics Take-Outs, to solve this problem.

  5. Why It Takes Prevention, Not Detection, to Fight Bioterrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janata, Jiri (Art)

    2005-01-01

    Following the events which took place on September 11, 2001, and the anthrax attacks which occurred after that date, US authorities became concerned with the idea that an assault with chemical or biological weapons could take place on American territory or in American ships or planes. A worrisome model for such an assault was the 1995 terrorist…

  6. Cluster II quartet take the stage together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    prime contractor Dornier Satellitensysteme. On completion, they were sent to IABG in Ottobrunn, near Munich, for intensive vibration, thermal, vacuum and magnetic testing. The European ground segment for the mission is just as important. A vast amount of data - equivalent to 290 million printed pages - will be returned to Earth over the mission's two-year lifetime. Signals to and from the spacecraft will be sent via a 15 metre antenna at Villafranca in Spain and processed at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) at Darmstadt, Germany. The main control room at ESOC will be used during the launch and early phases of the mission, with teams of operators working round the clock. About two weeks after the second Cluster II pair are placed in their operational orbits, mission operations will switch to a smaller, dedicated control room at ESOC. The Joint Science Operations Centre at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK will co-ordinate the scientific investigations. Its main task will be to combine all requirements from the 11 science instrument teams into an overall plan. The flow of information returned by the 44 instruments will be distributed to eight national data centres, six in Europe, one in the USA and the other in China. Solar Maximum Cluster II is part of an international programme to find out more about how the Sun influences the Earth. The four Cluster II satellites will join an armada of spacecraft from many countries, which are already studying the Sun and high speed wind of charged particles (mainly electrons and protons) which it continually blasts into space. Ulysses and SOHO, both joint ESA-NASA missions, and ESA's Cluster II , when it will be there, are the flagships of this armada. The timing of the mission is ideal, since it will take place during a period of peak activity in the Sun's 11-year cycle, when sunspots and solar radiation reach a maximum. Cluster II will measure the effects of this activity on near-Earth space as incoming energetic

  7. Correlates of Intellectual Risk Taking in Elementary School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    This study had the goal of exploring factors associated with elementary students' (N = 585) reports of intellectual risk taking in science. Intellectual risk taking (IRT) was defined as engaging in adaptive learning behaviors (sharing tentative ideas, asking questions, attempting to do and learn new things) that placed the learner at risk of…

  8. A Place on the Shelf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Devon

    2007-01-01

    If we read to discover new worlds, we also read to find ourselves. For gays and lesbians, this act of discovery can be problematic: literature has so often excluded them. In the last decades, as gays and lesbians have grown increasingly vocal in the effort to secure their rightful place in society, a broad range of fiction has emerged that…

  9. Creative Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Ronald M., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This journal contains articles and materials to help teachers instruct students about U.S. historical and cultural heritage. Articles and teaching materials are: "History in the Hands of Tomorrow's Citizens" (C. D. Shull; B. M. Boland); "On-Site Learning--The Power of Historic Places" (J. O. Horton); "Visualizing History--Inquiring Minds Want To…

  10. Sense of Place in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnow, Pat, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This journal issue contains interviews, essays, short stories, and poetry focusing on sense of place in Appalachia. In interviews, author Wilma Dykeman discussed past and recent novels set in Appalachia with interviewer Sandra L. Ballard; and novelist Lee Smith spoke with interviewer Pat Arnow about how Appalachia has shaped her writing. Essays…

  11. Place recognition using batlike sonar

    PubMed Central

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14188.001 PMID:27481189

  12. Perspective-taking as part of narrative comprehension: a functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Mano, Yoko; Harada, Tokiko; Sugiura, Motoaki; Saito, Daisuke N; Sadato, Norihiro

    2009-02-01

    During narrative comprehension, readers understand the emotions of the protagonist by taking the perspective of the character, which is an essential component of empathy. Spatial perspective-taking is crucial to understanding the standpoints and perceptions of others, and gives clues as to what the protagonist knows. As a default, a "here and now" point-of-view is adopted to make sense of the narrative. If the protagonist is in a different location while an event takes place ("there and now"), in order to comprehend the narrative the reader must take an allocentric perspective, which places greater demands on spatial perspective-taking. Utilizing this phenomenon, we evaluated the neural substrates of perspective-taking in emotional narrative comprehension using functional MRI in 18 normal adults. The subjects read short stories followed by a target sentence, which described an event that might evoke an emotional response in the protagonist if the character were present. The stories involved a scenario in which the character was either present at the same location ("here and now") or at a distant location ("there and now") during the event. The "there and now" scenario activated the posterior cingulate cortex and the right temporo-parietal junction more prominently than the "here and now" condition. In contrast to the control tasks, both scenarios activated the well-known mentalizing network including the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, temporal pole, posterior cingulate cortex and temporo-parietal junction. Along with the mentalizing network, the posterior cingulate cortex and the right temporo-parietal junction are involved in spatial perspective-taking during emotional narrative comprehension.

  13. Assessment Takes Wing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail

    1992-01-01

    Describes teacher activities for a unit on birds and the stations for performance-based assessment of student learning. Activities include predicting a birds habitat based on the foot shape, predicting the food of a bird based on its beak, identifying a bird by its song, and identifying bird skins using a field guide. (PR)

  14. More than 40% of those not taking antiseizure medication with recent seizures reported that epilepsy or its treatment interfered with their recent activities, 2010 and 2013 US National Health Interview Surveys.

    PubMed

    Kobau, Rosemarie; Cui, Wanjun; Zack, Matthew M

    2016-09-01

    From the combined 2010 and 2013 National Health Interview Surveys, we estimated US national age-standardized prevalence of adults with active epilepsy who reported that a nervous system/sensory organ condition caused a limitation (e.g., walking; memory; or physical, mental, or emotional problems) and, separately, that epilepsy interfered with their activities (e.g., working, schooling, or socializing) during the 30days preceding the survey. Sixty-one percent of adults who took antiseizure medication and had recent seizures and 51% of those who took medication and had no seizures reported having limitations caused by a nervous system/sensory organ condition. Sixty-two percent of adults who took antiseizure medication and had recent seizures and 20% of those who took medication and had no seizures reported that epilepsy or its treatment interfered with their recent activities. Forty-one percent of those who did not take medication and had recent seizures also reported that epilepsy interfered with their activities. To reduce activity limitations in people with epilepsy, health and social service providers can ensure that adequate policies and practices that promote access to high quality care and social participation are in effect in organizations and communities. PMID:27459033

  15. The place of care in ethical theory.

    PubMed

    Veatch, R M

    1998-04-01

    The concept of care and a related ethical theory of care have emerged as increasingly important in biomedical ethics. This essay outlines a series of questions about the conceptualization of care and its place in ethical theory. First, it considers the possibility that care should be conceptualized as an alternative principle of right action; then as a virtue, a cluster of virtues, or as a synonym for virtue theory. The implications for various interpretations of the debate of the relation of care and justice are then explored, suggesting three possible meanings for that contrast. Next, the possibility that care theorists are taking up the debate over the relation between principles and cases is considered. Finally, it is suggested that care theorists may be pressing for consideration of an entirely new question in moral theory: the assessment of the normative appropriateness of relationships. Issues needing to be addressed in an ethic of relationships are suggested.

  16. The Magical Place Called Opera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raplenovich, Kay

    1996-01-01

    "Create Your Own," month-long "Artist in Education" residencies sponsored by the Ohio Arts Council, are used to guide students and teachers through the process of taking the vision of an original opera conceived by students and turning it into a reality. A local opera company is actually created. "Create Your Own" shows children that opera can be…

  17. There's No Place Like School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, the principal of a rural Oregon elementary school used a 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant and Title I funds to design a program to address homeless children's personal and social well-being. Kids eat a nutritious breakfast, take showers, get clothes washed, receive positive feedback, and participate in after-school…

  18. Microgravity Smoldering Combustion Takes Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment lifted off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in September 1995 on the STS-69 mission. This experiment is part of series of studies focused on the smolder characteristics of porous, combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a nonflaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of combustible materials. Common examples of smoldering are nonflaming embers, charcoal briquettes, and cigarettes. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smoldering, both in microgravity and Earth gravity. As with other forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of air and the transport of heat, and therefore, the rate of combustion. Results of the microgravity experiments will be compared with identical experiments carried out in Earth's gravity. They also will be used to verify present theories of smoldering combustion and will provide new insights into the process of smoldering combustion, enhancing our fundamental understanding of this frequently encountered combustion process and guiding improvement in fire safety practices.

  19. After Dark in the Antipodes: Pedagogy, Place and Queer Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Vicki; Rasmussen, Mary Lou

    2010-01-01

    This paper pursues issues of pedagogy, place and queer phenomenology in the context of what might be meant by the term "after-queer" or "what falls outside queer" as we currently theorise, practice and locate queer. Inspired by Sara Ahmed's account of how bodies become oriented by the ways in which they take up time and space, this paper…

  20. Places to Go: Google's Search Results for "Net Generation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In his Places to Go column for a special issue on the Net Generation, Stephen Downes takes an unexpected trip--to Google. According to Downes, Google epitomizes the essence of the Net Generation. Infinitely searchable and adaptable, Google represents the spirit of a generation raised in the world of the Internet, a generation that adapts…

  1. Descending the Watershed: Rethinking the "Place" of Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Employs a first-person phenomenological approach to describe an expedition for teachers from the uppermost beginning of a Northern Rocky Mountain watershed to its river output at the bottom. Focuses on the roles of people and place in the construction of new knowledge about the environment. Takes traditional curriculum theory a step beyond simple…

  2. Taking human life.

    PubMed

    Brock, Dan W

    1985-07-01

    Alan Donagan's position regarding the morality of taking innocent human life, that it is impermissible regardless of the wishes of the victim, is criticized by Brock who argues for a rights-based alternative. His argument appeals to the nature of persons' actual interest in life and gives them an additional element of control which they lack if a nonwaivable moral duty not to kill prevails. The author rejects Donagan's view that stopping a life-sustaining treatment, even when a competent patient has consented, is morally wrong and that there is no moral difference between killing and allowing to die. A rights-based position permits stopping treatment of incompetent patients based on what the patient would have wanted or what is in his or her best interest, and allows the withholding of treatment from a terminally ill person, with the patient's consent and for a benevolent motive, to be evaluated as morally different from killing that patient.

  3. The effect of early environmental manipulation on locomotor sensitivity and methamphetamine conditioned place preference reward.

    PubMed

    Hensleigh, E; Pritchard, L M

    2014-07-15

    Early life stress leads to several effects on neurological development, affecting health and well-being later in life. Instances of child abuse and neglect are associated with higher rates of depression, risk taking behavior, and an increased risk of drug abuse later in life. This study used repeated neonatal separation of rat pups as a model of early life stress. Rat pups were either handled and weighed as controls or separated for 180 min per day during postnatal days 2-8. In adulthood, male and female rats were tested for methamphetamine conditioned place preference reward and methamphetamine induced locomotor activity. Tissue samples were collected and mRNA was quantified for the norepinephrine transporter in the prefrontal cortex and the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens. Results indicated rats given methamphetamine formed a conditioned place preference, but there was no effect of early separation or sex. Separated males showed heightened methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity, but there was no effect of early separation for females. Overall females were more active than males in response to both saline and methamphetamine. No differences in mRNA levels were observed across any conditions. These results suggest early neonatal separation affects methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity in a sex-dependent manner but has no effects on methamphetamine conditioned place preference. PMID:24713150

  4. To impose enhanced penalties for certain drug offense that take place on Federal property.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Nunes, Devin [R-CA-22

    2013-06-05

    07/15/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Pairing K-12 Teachers with Geographic Researchers: Why It Should Take Place and How It Can.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orvis, Kenneth H.; Horn, Sally P.; Jumper, Sidney R.

    1999-01-01

    Contends that excitement can be infused into the K-12 geography curriculum by involving teachers in real research projects led by professional geographers. Describes a project where K-12 teachers and geographers participated in geography field research in the mountain highlands of the Valle Nuevo Scientific Reserve of the Dominican Republic. (CMK)

  6. When Private Schools Take Public Dollars: What's the Place of Accountability in School Voucher Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Hentges, Christina M.; Petrilli, Michael J.; Winkler, Amber M.

    2009-01-01

    Critics of school voucher programs argue that private schools that receive taxpayer dollars should be held accountable to the same standards as public schools. School choice supporters counter that private schools should be left alone to answer to the parents of their students. The authors advocate for a re-visit to the discussion of…

  7. Translational Science at the National Institute of Mental Health: Can Social Work Take Its Rightful Place?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekke, John S.; Ell, Kathleen; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2007-01-01

    Several recent national reports have noted that there is a 20-year gap between knowledge generated from our best clinical research and the utilization of that knowledge in our health and mental health care sectors. One solution to this dilemma has been the emergence of translational science. Translational science has become a top priority of the…

  8. A Reaction that Takes Place in Beakers but not in Conical Flasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin; Ophardt, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Inductors are substances that undergo a reaction and in so doing markedly accelerate or induce a simultaneous reaction. An experiment showing a reaction involving the oxidation of iodide to iodine by chromium (VI) found to be slow in the absence of acid, but which proceeded rapidly when iron (II) was induced is demonstrated.

  9. Does Reflective Learning Take Place in Online MBA Introductory Quantitative Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Blake A.; Walsh, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Online education has grown dramatically over the past 15 years. At the university level, researchers have shown that online education has both its advantages--greater flexibility and access to student--and disadvantages--like disconnection with other students and faculty. Another possible drawback for the students enrolled in an online course is…

  10. In what time scale proton transfer takes place in a live CHO cell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumdar, Supratik Sen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2013-06-01

    Excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate, HPTS) in a live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell is studied by time resolved confocal microscopy. The cytoplasm region of the cell is stained by a photoacid, HPTS (HA). The time constant of initial proton transfer (τPT) in the cell is found to be ˜10 times longer than that in bulk water, while the time constants of recombination (τrec) and dissociation (τdiss) in the cell are ˜3 times and ˜2 times longer, respectively. The slower rate of proton transfer (˜10 times) inside the CHO cell compared to that in bulk water is ascribed to slower solvation dynamics, lower availability of free water molecules, and disruption of hydrogen-bond network inside the cell. Translational and rotational diffusion of HPTS inside a single CHO cell have been investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and picosecond anisotropy measurement, respectively. Both the translational and rotational diffusion slow down inside the live cell. FCS studies indicate that HPTS remains tightly bound to a macromolecule inside the cell.

  11. Look What I Am Doing: Does Observational Learning Take Place in Evocative Task-Sharing Situations?

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Luca; Iani, Cristina; Mariani, Michele; Nicoletti, Roberto; Gallese, Vittorio; Rubichi, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether physical and observational practice in task-sharing entail comparable implicit motor learning. To this end, the social-transfer-of-learning (SToL) effect was assessed when both participants performed the joint practice task (Experiment 1 – complete task-sharing), or when one participant observed the other performing half of the practice task (Experiment 2 – evocative task-sharing). Since the inversion of the spatial relations between responding agent and stimulus position has been shown to prevent SToL, in the present study we assessed it in both complete and evocative task-sharing conditions either when spatial relations were kept constant or changed from the practice to the transfer session. The same pattern of results was found for both complete and evocative task-sharing, thus suggesting that implicit motor learning in evocative task-sharing is equivalent to that obtained in complete task-sharing. We conclude that this motor learning originates from the simulation of the complementary (rather than the imitative) action. PMID:22905256

  12. Where Does the Transformation of Precipitated Ceria Nanoparticles in Hydroponic Plants Take Place?

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhui; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Xiao; Zhang, Junzhe; Ding, Yayun; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Guo, Zhi; Zhang, Lijuan; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have been found to be partly biotransformed from Ce(IV) to Ce(III) in plants, yet the transformation process and mechanism are not fully understood. Here, we try to clarify the specific site and necessary conditions for the transformation of precipitated CeO2 NPs in hydroponic cucumber plants. Three different treatment modes were adopted according to whether the NPs were incubated with roots all the time or not. Results showed that exposure modes significantly affect the translocation and transformation of CeO2 NPs. In the normal exposure mode, Ce was present as a Ce(IV) and Ce(III) mixture in the roots and shoots, and the proportion of Ce(III) in the shoots was enhanced obviously with the increase of exposure time. The results of short-time incubation and petiole exposure modes suggested that CeO2 NPs could not be reduced within a short incubation time (3 h) or be further reduced inside the plant tissues. It was deduced that root surfaces are the sites, and the physicochemical interaction between the NPs and root exudates at the nanobio interface is the necessary condition for the transformation of CeO2 NPs in plant systems. These results will contribute to understanding the transformation mechanism of CeO2 and other metal-based NPs and properly evaluate their ecological effects. PMID:26237071

  13. Where Does the Transformation of Precipitated Ceria Nanoparticles in Hydroponic Plants Take Place?

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhui; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Xiao; Zhang, Junzhe; Ding, Yayun; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Guo, Zhi; Zhang, Lijuan; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have been found to be partly biotransformed from Ce(IV) to Ce(III) in plants, yet the transformation process and mechanism are not fully understood. Here, we try to clarify the specific site and necessary conditions for the transformation of precipitated CeO2 NPs in hydroponic cucumber plants. Three different treatment modes were adopted according to whether the NPs were incubated with roots all the time or not. Results showed that exposure modes significantly affect the translocation and transformation of CeO2 NPs. In the normal exposure mode, Ce was present as a Ce(IV) and Ce(III) mixture in the roots and shoots, and the proportion of Ce(III) in the shoots was enhanced obviously with the increase of exposure time. The results of short-time incubation and petiole exposure modes suggested that CeO2 NPs could not be reduced within a short incubation time (3 h) or be further reduced inside the plant tissues. It was deduced that root surfaces are the sites, and the physicochemical interaction between the NPs and root exudates at the nanobio interface is the necessary condition for the transformation of CeO2 NPs in plant systems. These results will contribute to understanding the transformation mechanism of CeO2 and other metal-based NPs and properly evaluate their ecological effects.

  14. When Private Schools Take Public Dollars: What's the Place of Accountability in School Voucher Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Hentges, Christina M.; Petrilli, Michael J.; Winkler, Amber M.

    2009-01-01

    Of all the arguments that critics of school voucher programs advance, the one that may resonate loudest with the public concerns school accountability. Opponents say it's not fair to hold public schools accountable for their results (under No Child Left Behind and similar systems) and then let private schools receive taxpayer dollars--however…

  15. Look what I am doing: does observational learning take place in evocative task-sharing situations?

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Luca; Iani, Cristina; Mariani, Michele; Nicoletti, Roberto; Gallese, Vittorio; Rubichi, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether physical and observational practice in task-sharing entail comparable implicit motor learning. To this end, the social-transfer-of-learning (SToL) effect was assessed when both participants performed the joint practice task (Experiment 1--complete task-sharing), or when one participant observed the other performing half of the practice task (Experiment 2--evocative task-sharing). Since the inversion of the spatial relations between responding agent and stimulus position has been shown to prevent SToL, in the present study we assessed it in both complete and evocative task-sharing conditions either when spatial relations were kept constant or changed from the practice to the transfer session. The same pattern of results was found for both complete and evocative task-sharing, thus suggesting that implicit motor learning in evocative task-sharing is equivalent to that obtained in complete task-sharing. We conclude that this motor learning originates from the simulation of the complementary (rather than the imitative) action.

  16. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... alcohol testing site, you must ensure that it provides visual and aural privacy to the employee being tested, sufficient to prevent unauthorized persons from seeing or hearing test results. (d) If you are... privacy requirements of paragraph (c) is not readily available, this part allows a reasonable suspicion...

  17. Taking Center Stage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Describes Ohio's 390,000 square-foot Perry High School and Community Fitness Center and its ability to accommodate all segments of both school and community group activities. A list of companies that supply the center is included. (GR)

  18. Taking the Plunge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Stanley

    1987-01-01

    Describes why lake hikes practiced at Girl Scout Camp Bonnie Brae (Massachusetts) are an ideal camp activity to teach aquatic ecology and engage the senses. Discusses program benefits: camper/counselor interaction, personal and group challenge, and conflict resolution. (NEC)

  19. Letting Thoughts Take Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Chuck; Wheeler, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Scientists are conducting research into electroencephalograms (EEGs) of brainwave activity, and electromyography (EMG) of muscle activity, in order to develop systems which can control an aircraft with only a pilot's thoughts. This article describes some EEG and EMG signals, and how they might be analyzed and interpreted to operate an aircraft. The development of a system to detect and interpret fine muscle movements is also profiled in the article.

  20. Nursing Research--Taking an Active Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverly, Dankay

    1998-01-01

    In Britain, nurses' attitudes toward research are changing. Schools of nursing must consider the following research issues: funding, contracts, support, publication, and staff recruitment and retention. (SK)

  1. Place prioritization for biodiversity content.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Aggarwal, Anshu; Garson, Justin; Margules, Chris R; Zeidler, Juliane

    2002-07-01

    The prioritization of places on the basis of biodiversity content is part of any systematic biodiversity conservation planning process. The place prioritization procedure implemented in the ResNet software package is described. This procedure is primarily based on the principles of rarity and complementarity. Application of the procedure is demonstrated with two analyses, one data set consisting of the distributions of termite genera in Namibia, and the other consisting of the distributions of bird species in the Islas Malvinas/Falkland Islands. The attributes that data sets should have for the effective and reliable application of such procedures are discussed. The procedure used here is compared to some others that are also currently in use. PMID:12177533

  2. There's no place like home.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T

    1996-02-01

    When the school system in tiny Colby, Kans., signed onto a health plan that excluded the only hospital in the entire county, its citizens learned an important lesson. ¿If we're not working together,¿ says the hospital's administrator, ¿health plans and medical centers are going to come in here and take business away from us.¿ Here's what they learned about keeping rural health care rural.

  3. There's no place like home.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T

    1996-02-01

    When the school system in tiny Colby, Kans., signed onto a health plan that excluded the only hospital in the entire county, its citizens learned an important lesson. ¿If we're not working together,¿ says the hospital's administrator, ¿health plans and medical centers are going to come in here and take business away from us.¿ Here's what they learned about keeping rural health care rural. PMID:8616497

  4. Take My Kids, Pleeze!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushweller, Kevin

    1996-01-01

    Increasing numbers of parents are "dumping" parental responsibilities at the school-house door. However, a highly vocal and politically active minority of parents are demanding that schools relinquish those responsibilities. One helpful role the schools can play is to offer parent-education classes that provide specific tips on disciplining…

  5. Take a Planet Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Dwight

    2008-01-01

    Physical models in the classroom "cannot be expected to represent the full-scale phenomenon with complete accuracy, not even in the limited set of characteristics being studied" (AAAS 1990). Therefore, by modifying a popular classroom activity called a "planet walk," teachers can explore upper elementary students' current understandings; create an…

  6. Taking Student Government Seriously.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolen, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the student government at La Mesa Middle School (California) that was modeled after the three-branch U.S. government as a means for increasing students' civic understanding. Describes the structure of the legislative, judicial, and executive branches, the different activities of the student government, and the reasons for the hiatus.…

  7. Take Math Outdoors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schall, William E.

    1984-01-01

    Scavenger hunts, collecting bottle caps, observing shadows, and other outdoor activities can be developed into a mathematics unit that motivates students to acquire basic mathematical skills. A variety of natural ways to collect data are offered to help foster learning. (DF)

  8. An anthropologist in unexpected places

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Johan Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Much contemporary anthropology has turned away from exclusive focus on so-called “primitive” tribes in far-away places. The study of urban people has become more prominent, and some researchers have also turned their gaze towards marginalized minorities in their communities. Philippe Bourgois is an example of this. He is well known for studying crack dealers in East Harlem, New York ( In Search of Respect) and homeless heroin addicts in San Francisco (Righteous Dopefiend). Kula Kula was lucky enough to catch him in his office, and had a chat via skype. PMID:25436019

  9. Place of nutrition in yoga.

    PubMed

    Desai, B P

    1990-01-01

    Nutrition plays a very vital role in our life. Yoga and Ayurveda had laid down the foundations of dietetics. The valuable guidelines regarding various food articles and diet for Yoga Sadhaka, to achieve maximum benefits, are given in traditional yoga texts like Hatha Pradipika and Gheranda Samhitha. Now is the time to evaluate the place of nutrition in Yoga and to study how the dietetic principles in yoga will help to eradicate the national problem of Mal-nutrition and poverty which is the pressing need of the moment. PMID:22557690

  10. Multiway In-Place Merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffert, Viliam; Gajdoš, Jozef

    We present an algorithm for asymptotically efficient k-way merging. Given an array A containing sorted subsequences A 1,...,A k of respective lengths n 1,...,n k , where sum_{i=1}kn_i = n, our algorithm merges A 1,...,A k in-place, into a single sorted sequence, performing lceil{lg k}rceil \\cdot n + o(n) element comparisons and 3·n + o(n) element moves. That is, our algorithm runs in linear time, with the number of moves independent of k, the number of input sequences.

  11. PLACE OF NUTRITION IN YOGA

    PubMed Central

    Desai, B.P.

    1990-01-01

    Nutrition plays a very vital role in our life. Yoga and Ayurveda had laid down the foundations of dietetics. The valuable guidelines regarding various food articles and diet for Yoga Sadhaka, to achieve maximum benefits, are given in traditional yoga texts like Hatha Pradipika and Gheranda Samhitha. Now is the time to evaluate the place of nutrition in Yoga and to study how the dietetic principles in yoga will help to eradicate the national problem of Mal-nutrition and poverty which is the pressing need of the moment. PMID:22557690

  12. A Place Pedagogy for "Global Contemporaneity"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret J.

    2010-01-01

    Around the globe people are confronted daily with intransigent problems of space and place. Educators have historically called for place-based or place-conscious education to introduce pedagogies that will address such questions as how to develop sustainable communities and places. These calls for place-conscious education have included liberal…

  13. Taking Care of Your Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Friend Who Cuts? Taking Care of Your Vision KidsHealth > For Teens > Taking Care of Your Vision ... are important parts of keeping your peepers perfect. Vision Basics One of the best things you can ...

  14. Cluster II quartet take the stage together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    prime contractor Dornier Satellitensysteme. On completion, they were sent to IABG in Ottobrunn, near Munich, for intensive vibration, thermal, vacuum and magnetic testing. The European ground segment for the mission is just as important. A vast amount of data - equivalent to 290 million printed pages - will be returned to Earth over the mission's two-year lifetime. Signals to and from the spacecraft will be sent via a 15 metre antenna at Villafranca in Spain and processed at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) at Darmstadt, Germany. The main control room at ESOC will be used during the launch and early phases of the mission, with teams of operators working round the clock. About two weeks after the second Cluster II pair are placed in their operational orbits, mission operations will switch to a smaller, dedicated control room at ESOC. The Joint Science Operations Centre at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK will co-ordinate the scientific investigations. Its main task will be to combine all requirements from the 11 science instrument teams into an overall plan. The flow of information returned by the 44 instruments will be distributed to eight national data centres, six in Europe, one in the USA and the other in China. Solar Maximum Cluster II is part of an international programme to find out more about how the Sun influences the Earth. The four Cluster II satellites will join an armada of spacecraft from many countries, which are already studying the Sun and high speed wind of charged particles (mainly electrons and protons) which it continually blasts into space. Ulysses and SOHO, both joint ESA-NASA missions, and ESA's Cluster II , when it will be there, are the flagships of this armada. The timing of the mission is ideal, since it will take place during a period of peak activity in the Sun's 11-year cycle, when sunspots and solar radiation reach a maximum. Cluster II will measure the effects of this activity on near-Earth space as incoming energetic

  15. Finding a Place to Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information and student activities on bird habitats, how birds have adapted to living in these habitats, and bird migration. Each activity includes an objective, recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. Ready-to-copy student materials (puzzles and worksheets) are included. (JN)

  16. STS-99 Commander Kregel places sign identifying mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the White Room attached to the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A, STS-99 Commander Kevin Kregel gets ready to place a sign identifying the mission at the entrance to the orbiter Endeavour. Other crew members gathered around are (left to right) Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele, Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri (behind Kregel), and Pilot Dominic Gorie (at right). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST.

  17. Targeting condom distribution at high risk places increases condom utilization-evidence from an intervention study in Livingstone, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The PLACE-method presumes that targeting HIV preventive activities at high risk places is effective in settings with major epidemics. Livingstone, Zambia, has a major HIV epidemic despite many preventive efforts in the city. A baseline survey conducted in 2005 in places where people meet new sexual partners found high partner turnover and unprotected sex to be common among guests. In addition, there were major gaps in on-site condom availability. This study aimed to assess the impact of a condom distribution and peer education intervention targeting places where people meet new sexual partners on condom use and sexual risk taking among people socializing there. Methods The 2005 baseline survey assessed the presence of HIV preventive activities and sexual risk taking in places where people meet new sexual partners in Livingstone. One township was selected for a non-randomised intervention study on condom distribution and peer education in high risk venues in 2009. The presence of HIV preventive activities in the venues during the intervention was monitored by an external person. The intervention was evaluated after one year with a follow-up survey in the intervention township and a comparison township. In addition, qualitative interviews and focus group discussions were conducted. Results Young people between 17-32 years of age were recruited as peer educators, and 40% were females. Out of 72 persons trained before the intervention, 38 quit, and another 11 had to be recruited. The percentage of venues where condoms were reported to always be available at least doubled in both townships, but was significantly higher in the intervention vs. the control venues in both surveys (84% vs. 33% in the follow-up). There was a reduction in reported sexual risk taking among guests socializing in the venues in both areas, but reporting of recent condom use increased more among people interviewed in the intervention (57% to 84%) than in the control community (55% to 68

  18. The place and time of drugs.

    PubMed

    Duff, Cameron

    2014-05-01

    'Context' is one of the most enduring analytical devices in social science accounts of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, although its elaboration tends to emphasise macro-structural processes (like economic change, law enforcement, health policy, racism or stigma) at the expense of more finely-grained understandings of the place and time of consumption. Drawing on Gilles Deleuze's notion of the assemblage, and its reception in recent critical geographies of AOD use, I will characterise context as an assemblage of social, affective and material forces. Such a characterisation is not indifferent to the range of structural forces that are often understood to mediate AOD use. Rather, it is concerned to document how these forces actually participate in the modulations of consumption. The assemblage will thus be construed in ways that align context with the 'real conditions' (place and time) of drug use. I will develop this argument by way of a case study drawn from a recent qualitative study of the social contexts of methamphetamine use in Melbourne. My goal is to document the ways 'context' is produced in the activity of drug use, and how 'context' so constructed, comes to modulate this use. By contrasting traditional approaches to the analysis of context with methods borrowed from Deleuze, I aim to transcend structural understandings of context in order to clarify the active, local and contingent role of contexts in the mediation of what bodies do 'on' and 'with' drugs.

  19. 50 CFR 217.72 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.72 Section 217.72 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKE OF MARINE MAMMALS INCIDENTAL TO SPECIFIED ACTIVITIES Taking...

  20. 50 CFR 217.13 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.13 Section 217.13 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKE OF MARINE MAMMALS INCIDENTAL TO SPECIFIED ACTIVITIES Taking...