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Sample records for activation therapy pat

  1. Photon activated therapy (PAT) using monochromatic Synchrotron x-rays and iron oxide nanoparticles in a mouse tumor model: feasibility study of PAT for the treatment of superficial malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background X-rays are known to interact with metallic nanoparticles, producing photoelectric species as radiosensitizing effects, and have been exploited in vivo mainly with gold nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of sensitizing effect of iron oxide nanoparticles for photon activated therapy. Methods X-rays photon activated therapy (PAT) was studied by treating CT26 tumor cells and CT26 tumor-bearing mice loaded with 13-nm diameter FeO NP, and irradiating them at 7.1 keV near the Fe K-edge using synchrotron x-rays radiation. Survival of cells was determined by MTT assay, and tumor regression assay was performed for in vivo model experiment. The results of PAT treated groups were compared with x-rays alone control groups. Results A more significant reduction in viability and damage was observed in the FeO NP-treated irradiated cells, compared to the radiation alone group (p < 0.04). Injection of FeO NP (100 mg/kg) 30 min prior to irradiation elevated the tumor concentration of magnetite to 40 μg of Fe/g tissue, with a tumor-to-muscle ratio of 17.4. The group receiving FeO NP and radiation of 10 Gy showed 80% complete tumor regression (CTR) after 15–35 days and relapse-free survival for up to 6 months, compared to the control group, which showed growth retardation, resulting in 80% fatality. The group receiving radiation of 40 Gy showed 100% CTR in all cases irrespective of the presence of FeO NP, but CTR was achieved earlier in the PAT-treated group compared with the radiation alone group. Conclusions An iron oxide nanoparticle enhanced therapeutic effect with relatively low tissue concentration of iron and 10 Gy of monochromatic X-rays. Since 7.1 keV X-rays is attenuated very sharply in the tissue, FeO NP-PAT may have promise as a potent treatment option for superficial malignancies in the skin, like chest wall recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:23111059

  2. Use of modified Fraser's stain in Promoting Activity Test (PAT).

    PubMed

    Borràs, M

    1988-09-01

    The Promoting Activity Test (PAT) requires a staining procedure that allows rapid, accurate and reliable counting of mitotic figures. We propose use of Fraser's kernechtrot-crystal violet technique, but eliminating the picric-alcoholic differentiation to avoid fading. This modified protocol gives higher mitotic counts in adult mouse adrenal cortex than the hematoxylin-eosin originally used, especially with respect to less conspicuous prophases. PMID:2464217

  3. Pat Mora.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsaro, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Discusses Pat Mora's career as a children's book author and aspects of her work: the Latino experience, bilingualism, family life, desert landscape, and folk tales. Provides classroom activities in art, creative writing, social studies, geography, drama. Provides a selected bibliography of Mora's work. (PEN)

  4. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  5. Workshop on photon activation therapy: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-04-18

    This Workshop was held concurrently with an IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on Exploration of the Possibility of High-LET Radiation for Non-conventional Radiotherapy in Cancer. The Workshop on Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) was given as a special session on April 18, as it was thoght PAT might eventually be found to be attractive to developing countries, which is a major concern of the IAEA. An effort was made to bring together representatives of the various groups known to be actively working on PAT; these included investigators from Sweden and Japan as well as the US. It is hoped that this compendium of papers will be of use to those currently active in this developing field, as well as to those who might join this area of endeavor in the future.

  6. Implementing PAT with Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramohan, Laakshmana Sabari; Doolla, Suryanarayana; Khaparde, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Perform Achieve Trade (PAT) is a market-based incentive mechanism to promote energy efficiency. The purpose of this work is to address the challenges inherent to inconsistent representation of business processes, and interoperability issues in PAT like cap-and-trade mechanisms especially when scaled. Studies by various agencies have highlighted that as the mechanism evolves including more industrial sectors and industries in its ambit, implementation will become more challenging. This paper analyses the major needs of PAT (namely tracking, monitoring, auditing & verifying energy-saving reports, and providing technical support & guidance to stakeholders); and how the aforesaid reasons affect them. Though current technologies can handle these challenges to an extent, standardization activities for implementation have been scanty for PAT and this work attempts to evolve them. The inconsistent modification of business processes, rules, and procedures across stakeholders, and interoperability among heterogeneous systems are addressed. This paper proposes the adoption of specifically two standards into PAT, namely Business Process Model and Notation for maintaining consistency in business process modelling, and Common Information Model (IEC 61970, 61968, 62325 combined) for information exchange. Detailed architecture and organization of these adoptions are reported. The work can be used by PAT implementing agencies, stakeholders, and standardization bodies.

  7. Community-based outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (CoPAT) for Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia with or without infective endocarditis: analysis of the randomized trial comparing daptomycin with standard therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Susan; Campion, Marilyn; Katz, David E.; Russo, Rene; Boucher, Helen W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Administering outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy in the community setting (CoPAT) is becoming more common with the increasing emphasis on controlling costs. However, few controlled trials have evaluated this treatment modality. Methods Using data from a recent randomized trial comparing daptomycin with standard therapy (semi-synthetic penicillin or vancomycin, each with initial low-dose gentamicin) for Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia and infective endocarditis (SAB/IE), patient characteristics and outcomes were evaluated. Patients receiving their full course of therapy in the hospital setting were compared with those who received some portion outside of the hospital (CoPAT). Results Among the 200 patients, 51.5% received CoPAT. These patients were generally younger (median age 50 versus 54 years, P = 0.028). In the CoPAT group, there tended to be fewer patients with endocardial involvement (8.7% versus 18.6%, P = 0.061) and pre-existing valvular heart disease (7.8% versus 15.5%, P = 0.120). CoPAT patients received longer therapy courses (mean 25.4 versus 13.5 days, P < 0.001) and had higher rates of therapy completion (90.3% versus 45.4%, P < 0.001) and clinical success (86.4% versus 55.7%, P < 0.001). Persisting or relapsing S. aureus was less frequent in the CoPAT group (3.9% versus 15.5%, P = 0.007) and there were fewer deaths (3.9% versus 18.6%, P = 0.001) 6 weeks after the end of therapy. Hospital readmission occurred for 18 of the 103 (17.5%) CoPAT patients. Clinical success rates were similar for CoPAT patients receiving daptomycin (90.0%) or standard therapy (83.0%). Conclusions With proper monitoring, stable patients can complete treatment for SAB/IE as outpatients in the community setting. Daptomycin is an appropriate option for this setting. PMID:19264792

  8. Proton-Assisted Amino Acid Transporter PAT1 Complexes with Rag GTPases and Activates TORC1 on Late Endosomal and Lysosomal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ögmundsdóttir, Margrét H.; Heublein, Sabine; Kazi, Shubana; Reynolds, Bruno; Visvalingam, Shivanthy M.; Shaw, Michael K.; Goberdhan, Deborah C. I.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by growth factor-regulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Rheb signalling and extracellular amino acids (AAs) to promote growth and proliferation. These AAs induce translocation of mTOR to late endosomes and lysosomes (LELs), subsequent activation via mechanisms involving the presence of intralumenal AAs, and interaction between mTORC1 and a multiprotein assembly containing Rag GTPases and the heterotrimeric Ragulator complex. However, the mechanisms by which AAs control these different aspects of mTORC1 activation are not well understood. We have recently shown that intracellular Proton-assisted Amino acid Transporter 1 (PAT1)/SLC36A1 is an essential mediator of AA-dependent mTORC1 activation. Here we demonstrate in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells that PAT1 is primarily located on LELs, physically interacts with the Rag GTPases and is required for normal AA-dependent mTOR relocalisation. We also use the powerful in vivo genetic methodologies available in Drosophila to investigate the regulation of the PAT1/Rag/Ragulator complex. We show that GFP-tagged PATs reside at both the cell surface and LELs in vivo, mirroring PAT1 distribution in several normal mammalian cell types. Elevated PI3K/Akt/Rheb signalling increases intracellular levels of PATs and synergistically enhances PAT-induced growth via a mechanism requiring endocytosis. In light of the recent identification of the vacuolar H+-ATPase as another Rag-interacting component, we propose a model in which PATs function as part of an AA-sensing engine that drives mTORC1 activation from LEL compartments. PMID:22574197

  9. Patent information analysis methods and their effective use : A study through activities of PAT-LIST Research Workshop adviser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Sakae

    For effective use of technical information, various analytical tools and methods (e.g., patent map analysis) have been proposed. It was against this background that the “PAT-LIST Research Workshop” (supported by Raytec Co., Ltd.) was established in 2006. This article discusses, as an example, some actual research subject that the author as an adviser to the forum has studied through our activities in the past six years, especially the subject for 2010 (unveiling intellectual property strategies of specified enterprises from technical information analysis results). Practically useful analysis methods will be proposed showing some points of notes in analysis about the methods. What is also introduced is macroanalysis using text mining tools and the significance of controlled technical classification in a problem/solution map for determining critical fields.

  10. Green synthesis and antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles using wild medicinal mushroom Ganoderma applanatum (Pers.) Pat. from Similipal Biosphere Reserve, Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Yugal Kishore; Singdevsachan, Sameer Kumar; Parida, Umesh Kumar; Panda, Sujogya Kumar; Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, green synthesis and cost effective approach of silver nanoparticles using wild medicinal mushroom Ganoderma applanatum (Pers.) Pat. from Similipal Biosphere Reserve, Odisha, India is reported. The biosynthesised AgNPs were characterised using UV-visible spectroscopy, particle analyser and scanning electron microscopy studies. It was found by dynamic light scattering analysis, that the average size and charges of the AgNPs were 133.0 ± 0.361 nm and -6.01 ± 5.30 mV, respectively. Moreover, the Fourier transform infrared study was also conducted to identify the biomolecules or functional groups responsible for the reduction of Ag and stabilisation of the AgNPs. The potential biomedical application with reference to antimicrobial activity of the synthesised AgNPs was investigated against some pathogenic microorganisms viz. Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Vibrio cholerae, Staphylococcus aureus and Shigella flexneri. PMID:27463787

  11. Differential expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporters (PAT[1] and PAT[2]) in tissues of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The PATs have been identified as growth-regulatory nutrient sensors in Drosophila and as activators of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in mammalian cell cultures. These studies suggest that, beyond their classical function as transporters of simple amino acids (AA), the PATs act as tranceptors,...

  12. Activity Therapy: An Alternative Therapy for Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of activity therapy for preteens and adolescents, where the client is engaged in nonverbal modes of relationship--games, free play, movement, drama, music, art or other activities, as the chief therapeutic media in which conflicts are resolved and intellectual and emotional energies freed. Reviews the literature, describes…

  13. (1R, 3S)-(−)-Trans-PAT: A novel full-efficacy serotonin 5-HT2C receptor agonist with 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptor inverse agonist/antagonist activity

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Raymond G.; Fang, Lijuan; Huang, Yingsu; Wilczynski, Andrzej; Sivendran, Sashikala

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors signal primarily through Gαq to activate phospholipase C (PLC) and formation of inositol phosphates (IP) and diacylglycerol. The human 5-HT2C receptor, expressed exclusively in the central nervous system, is involved in several physiological and psychological processes. Development of 5-HT2C agonists that do not also activate 5-HT2A or 5-HT2B receptors is challenging because transmembrane domain identity is about 75% among 5-HT2 subtypes. This paper reports 5-HT2 receptor affinity and function of (1R,3S)-(−)-trans-1-phenyl-3-dimethylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (PAT), a small molecule that produces anorexia and weight-loss after peripheral administration to mice. (−)-Trans-PAT is a stereoselective full-efficacy agonist at human 5-HT2C receptors, plus, it is a 5-HT2A/5-HT2B inverse agonist and competitive antagonist. The Ki of (−)-trans-PAT at 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C receptors is 410, 1200, and 37 nM, respectively. Functional studies measured activation of PLC/[3H]-IP formation in clonal cells expressing human 5-HT2 receptors. At 5-HT2C receptors, (−)-trans-PAT is an agonist (EC50 = 20 nM) comparable to serotonin in potency and efficacy. At 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, (−)-trans-PAT is an inverse agonist (IC50 = 490 and 1,000 nM, respectively) and competitive antagonist (KB = 460 and 1400 nM, respectively) of serotonin. Experimental results are interpreted in light of molecular modeling studies indicating the (−)-trans-PAT protonated amine can form an ionic bond with D3.32 of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors, but, not with 5-HT2B receptors. In addition to probing 5-HT2 receptor structure and function, (−)-trans-PAT is a novel lead regarding 5-HT2C agonist/5-HT2A inverse agonist drug development for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19397907

  14. The orally active antihyperglycemic drug beta-guanidinopropionic acid is transported by the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter hPAT1.

    PubMed

    Metzner, Linda; Dorn, Madlen; Markwardt, Fritz; Brandsch, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The orally administered creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (beta-GPA) decreases plasma glucose levels by increasing the sensitivity to insulin. This effect is based on a beta-GPA induced expression of mRNA and total protein content of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4. Although the oral availability of beta-GPA is well established, the underlying uptake mechanism has not yet been studied. We investigated whether the H(+)-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, which is expressed in the apical membrane of intestinal cells, accepts guanidine derivatives as substrates. Uptake of l-[(3)H]proline into Caco-2 cells expressing hPAT1 constitutively was strongly inhibited by beta-GPA and its derivatives guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and 4-guanidinobutyric acid (4-GBA). Competition assays revealed apparent affinity constants of about 1.5 mM. Electrophysiological measurements at hPAT1-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes unequivocally demonstrated that beta-GPA, GAA and 4-GBA are effectively transported by this transport system in an electrogenic manner. We conclude that hPAT1 might be responsible for the intestinal absorption of beta-GPA thereby allowing its oral administration. Moreover, with beta-GPA we identified a new high affinity hPAT1 substrate that might be an interesting starting point for future drug design-drug delivery strategies. PMID:19358571

  15. Activation of hormone-sensitive lipase requires two steps, protein phosphorylation and binding to the PAT-1 domain of lipid droplet coat proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Hu, Liping; Dalen, Knut; Dorward, Heidi; Marcinkiewicz, Amy; Russell, Deanna; Gong, Dawei; Londos, Constantine; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Holm, Cecilia; Rizzo, Mark A; Brasaemle, Dawn; Sztalryd, Carole

    2009-11-13

    Lipolysis is an important metabolic pathway controlling energy homeostasis through degradation of triglycerides stored in lipid droplets and release of fatty acids. Lipid droplets of mammalian cells are coated with one or more members of the PAT protein family, which serve important functions in regulating lipolysis. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms by which PAT family members, perilipin A, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADFP), and LSDP5, control lipolysis catalyzed by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), a major lipase in adipocytes and several non-adipose cells. We applied fluorescence microscopic tools to analyze proteins in situ in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and anisotropy Forster resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data show that ADFP and LSDP5 exchange between lipid droplet and cytoplasmic pools, whereas perilipin A does not. Differences in protein mobility do not correlate with PAT protein-mediated control of lipolysis catalyzed by HSL or endogenous lipases. Forster resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that each of the three PAT proteins bind HSL through interaction of the lipase with amino acids within the highly conserved amino-terminal PAT-1 domain. ADFP and LSDP5 bind HSL under basal conditions, whereas phosphorylation of serine residues within three amino-terminal protein kinase A consensus sequences of perilipin A is required for HSL binding and maximal lipolysis. Finally, protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of HSL increases lipolysis in cells expressing ADFP or LSDP5; in contrast, phosphorylation of perilipin A exerts the major control over HSL-mediated lipolysis when perilipin is the main lipid droplet protein. PMID:19717842

  16. Early development of PAT-SM6 for the treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Frank; Eckstein, Miriam; Rosenwald, Andreas; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2013-08-01

    Despite the recent development of novel therapies for patients with metastatic melanoma, this disease remains fatal in the majority of those who develop a relapse. Here, we report the preclinical and early clinical development of a novel IgM antibody PAT-SM6 that specifically binds to a cancer-specific isoform of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and low-density lipoprotein. Finding a GRP78 cancer-specific form on the surface of cancer cells, but not normal cells in vivo, presents an opportunity for cancer-specific targeting. PAT-SM6 binding to the cell surface induces apoptosis in a variety of tumors, including melanoma. Recent studies show the specificity of PAT-SM6 binding to the surface of melanoma cells and primary tissue but not to normal tissue. They also confirm, for the first time, cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis through classical apoptotic pathways as well as induction of lipid accumulation in melanoma cells. These in-vitro data are supported by positive in-vivo data using PAT-SM6 in a xenograft C8161 model. Furthermore, PAT-SM6 was well tolerated in pharmacokinetic/toxicology studies in monkeys. On the basis of these preclinical observations, a clinical study of PAT-SM6 was carried out in patients with 'in-transit' melanoma. Even with microdosing, histological analyses of tumor biopsies detected the presence of PAT-SM6 as well as apoptosis. Although there are many small molecules and monoclonal antibodies currently in clinical development for patients with melanoma, PAT-SM6 is the only therapeutic targeting the cancer-specific isoform of GRP78. These PAT-SM6 preclinical data and positive findings from the phase 1 safety study provide strong support for the further development of this novel antibody. PMID:23728394

  17. Polyamine Metabolism Is Altered in Unpollinated Parthenocarpic pat-2 Tomato Ovaries1

    PubMed Central

    Fos, Mariano; Proaño, Karina; Alabadí, David; Nuez, Fernando; Carbonell, Juan; García-Martínez, José L.

    2003-01-01

    Facultative parthenocarpy induced by the recessive mutation pat-2 in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) depends on gibberellins (GAs) and is associated with changes in GA content in unpollinated ovaries. Polyamines (PAs) have also been proposed to play a role in early tomato fruit development. We therefore investigated whether PAs are able to induce parthenocarpy and whether the pat-2 mutation alters the content and metabolism of PAs in unpollinated ovaries. Application of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine to wild-type unpollinated tomato ovaries (cv Madrigal [MA/wt]) induced partial parthenocarpy. Parthenocarpic growth of MA/pat-2 (a parthenocarpic near-isogenic line to MA/wt) ovaries was negated by paclobutrazol (GA biosynthesis inhibitor), and this inhibition was counteracted by spermidine. Application of α-difluoromethyl-ornithine (-Orn) and/or α-difluoromethyl-arginine (-Arg), irreversible inhibitors of the putrescine biosynthesis enzymes Orn decarboxylase (ODC) and Arg decarboxylase, respectively, prevented growth of unpollinated MA/pat-2 ovaries. α-Difluoromethyl-Arg inhibition was counteracted by putrescine and GA3, whereas that of α-difluoromethyl-Orn was counteracted by GA3 but not by putrescine or spermidine. In unpollinated MA/pat-2 ovaries, the content of free spermine was significantly higher than in MA/wt ovaries. ODC activity was higher in pat-2 ovaries than in MA/wt. Transcript levels of genes encoding ODC and spermidine synthase were also higher in MA/pat-2. All together, these results strongly suggest that the parthenocarpic ability of pat-2 mutants depends on elevated PAs levels in unpollinated mutant ovaries, which correlate with an activation of the ODC pathway, probably as a consequence of elevated GA content in unpollinated pat-2 tomato ovaries. PMID:12529543

  18. Activity Therapy Services and Chemical Dependency Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mark R.; Townsley, Robin K.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how music, occupational, and recreation therapies can contribute to comprehensive treatment programs for chemical dependency. Sees prime contribution of activity therapy as lying in nature of experiential education, applying insight gained in counseling sessions and discussion groups to practical real-life situations. (Author/NB)

  19. GRP78-directed immunotherapy in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma - results from a phase 1 trial with the monoclonal immunoglobulin M antibody PAT-SM6

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Leo; Duell, Johannes; Castro, Inês C.; Dubljevic, Valentina; Chatterjee, Manik; Knop, Stefan; Hensel, Frank; Rosenwald, Andreas; Einsele, Hermann; Topp, Max S.; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this phase 1 study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the anti-glucose regulated protein 78 monoclonal immunoglobulin M antibody PAT-SM6 in subjects with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. Twelve heavily pretreated patients received four intravenous infusions of PAT-SM6 at doses of 0.3, 1, 3, and 6 mg/kg within 2 weeks. Efficacy, pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity were followed up until the end of the trial (day 36). In addition, immune cell patterns in peripheral blood were assessed by flow cytometry and glucose regulated protein 78 expression status was evaluated in bone marrow specimens by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry at screening. All doses administered were found to be safe and well tolerated; the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The most common treatment emergent adverse event was leukopenia (grades 1 and 2) in eight out of the 12 multiple myeloma patients. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated dose-proportional increases in drug serum concentration. The terminal half-life ranged from 5.86 to 8.41 h, the apparent volume of distribution ranged from 101 to 150 mL/kg, and clearance ranged from 8.11 to 16.1 mL/h/kg. All patients showed glucose regulated protein 78 surface expression on multiple myeloma cells. Four out of the 12 patients (33.3 %) had stable disease, according to the International Myeloma Working Group criteria, after PAT-SM6 treatment across the doses 1, 3 and 6 mg/kg. In summary, single-agent PAT-SM6 was well tolerated with modest clinical activity in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. Further trials exploring the combination of PAT-SM6 with existing myeloma therapies are planned. Trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01727778 PMID:25637055

  20. Innovative Approaches to Plasminogen Activator Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Edgar; Quertermous, Thomas; Matsueda, Gary R.; Runge, Marschall S.

    1989-01-01

    Plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction has become standard medical practice. Bleeding complications, however, limit the utility of the currently available agents. This article reviews how the tools of molecular biology and protein engineering are being used to develop safer and more effective plasminogen activators.

  1. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airhart, Douglas L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University's Program of Special Education sponsors a "Super Saturday" of enrichment activities for gifted and talented students as well as students with learning disabilities. A session on horticulture was planned and arranged by students in a class on horticultural therapy who designed learning activities of two types:…

  2. Identification of homologues to the pathogenicity factor Pat-1, a putative serine protease of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Burger, Annette; Gräfen, Ines; Engemann, Jutta; Niermann, Erik; Pieper, Martina; Kirchner, Oliver; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Eichenlaub, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    Hybridization of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis total DNA against the pathogenicity gene pat-1 indicated the presence of pat-1 homologous nucleotide sequences on the chromosome and on plasmid pCM2. Isolation of the corresponding DNA fragments and nucleotide sequence determination showed that there are three pat-1 homologous genes: chpA (chromosome) and phpA and phpB (plasmid pCM2). The gene products share common characteristics, i.e. a signal sequence for Sec-dependent secretion, a serine protease motif, and six cysteine residues at conserved positions. Gene chpA located on the chromosome is a pseudogene since it contains a translational stop codon after 97 of 280 amino acids. In contrast to pat-1, cloning of the plasmid encoded homologs phpA and phpB into the avirulent plasmid free Cmm strain CMM100 did not result in a virulent phenotype. So far, no proteolytic activity could be demonstrated for Pat-1, however, site specific mutagenesis of pat-1 showed that the serine residue in the motif GDSGG is required for the virulent phenotype of pat-1 and thus Pat-1 could be a functional protease. PMID:16255147

  3. A Poetry Workshop in Print: Pat Mora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Lee Bennett

    2006-01-01

    After a successful career as a writer for adults, Pat Mora began creating books for children. Her first picture book, "Tomas and The Library Lady" (Knopf, 1997) is a tender story of a young migrant worker who unearths new worlds when he discovers the magic a public library holds. The text, cleverly interspersed with foreign words, became a…

  4. Antimatter/HiPAT Support Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Raymond A.

    2001-01-01

    Techniques were developed for trapping normal matter in the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT). Situations encountered included discharge phenomena, charge exchange and radial diffusion processes. It is important to identify these problems, since they will also limit the performance in trapping antimatter next year.

  5. Overview of the High Performance Antiproton (HiPAT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Sims, William H.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Fant, Wallace E.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Rodgers, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of matter with antimatter represents the highest energy density of any known reaction, producing 10(exp 8) MJ/g, approximately 10 orders of magnitude more energy per unit mass than chemical based combustion. To take the first step towards using this energy for propulsion applications the NASA MSFC Propulsion Research Center (PRC) has initiated a research activity examining the storage of low energy antiprotons. Storage was identified as a key enabling technology since it builds the experience base necessary to understand the handling of antiprotons for virtually all utilization and high-density storage concepts. To address this need, a device referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is under development at the NASA MSFC PRC. The HiPAT is an electromagnetic system (Penning-Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Tesla superconductor, a high voltage confinement electrode system (operation up to 20 KV), and an ultra high vacuum test section (operating in the 10(exp -12) torr range). The system was designed to be portable with an ultimate goal of maintaining 10(exp 12) charged particles with a half-life of 18 days. Currently, this system is being experimentally evaluated using normal matter ions which are cheap to produce and relatively easy to handle. These normal ions provide a good indication of overall trap behavior, with the exception of assessing annihilation losses. The ions are produced external to HiPAT using two hydrogen ion sources, with adjustable beam energy and current. Ion are transported in a beam line and controlled through the use of electrostatic optics. These optics serve to both focus and gate the incoming ions, providing microsecond-timed pulses that are dynamically captured by cycling the HiPAT electric containment field like a 'trap door'. The layout of this system more closely simulates the operations expected at an actual antiproton production facility where 'packets' of antiprotons with pulse widths measured in

  6. MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION SYNDROME AND CYTOKINE DIRECTED THERAPIES

    PubMed Central

    Grom, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is an episode of overwhelming inflammation that occurs most commonly in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is characterized by expansion and activation of T lymphocytes and hemophagocytic macrophages, and bears great similarity to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). This disorder has substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is frequently a delay in recognition and initiation of treatment. Here, we will review what is known about the pathogenesis of MAS and in particular its similarities to HLH. The development of MAS is characterized by a cytokine storm, with the elaboration of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. We will examine the evidence for various cytokines in the initiation and pathogenesis of MAS, and discuss how new biologic therapies may alter the risk of MAS. Finally we will review current treatment options for MAS, and examine how cytokine-directed therapy could serve as novel treatment modalities. PMID:24974063

  7. Medical Therapy of Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Martin; Schmidt, Carsten; Teich, Niels; Stallmach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Medical therapy of mild and moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) of any extent is evidence-based and standardized by national and international guidelines. However, patients with steroid-refractory UC still represent a challenge. Methods A literature search using PubMed (search terms: ulcerative colitis, therapy, new, 1-2008-2015) resulted in 821 publications. For the current article, 88 citations were extracted including 36 randomized controlled studies, 18 reviews, and 8 meta-analyses. Results In steroid-refractory UC, early intensive therapy using anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies or the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine and tacrolimus is indicated in any case to prevent progression to a toxic megacolon and/or to avoid proctocolectomy. In patients with chronic disease activity, treatment with anti-TNF antibodies has a higher level of evidence than azathioprine therapy and should therefore be preferred. However, there is a subgroup of UC patients who may achieve prolonged steroid-free remission on azathioprine monotherapy. The importance of vedolizumab, a newly registered inhibiting antibody against integrin, has not yet been fully clarified since direct comparison studies are lacking, in particular in relation to anti-TNF antibodies. Conclusion There is a great need for additional innovative therapies, especially in cases of primary non-response or secondary loss of response to anti-TNF antibodies. New small molecules (Janus kinase inhibitors) are promising with an acceptable safety profile and efficacy in UC. Further, strategies that target the intestinal microbiome are currently considered for patients with active or relapsing UC, and may in the future open up new therapeutic options. PMID:26557831

  8. The evaluation of Pat-Pat related injuries in the western black sea region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accidents caused by motorized vehicle in the agricultural sector are frequently observed. In Turkey; accidents arising from motorized vehicles, named Pat-Pat, which are used by farmers in the Western Black Sea region is not unusual. Methods One hundred five patients who were brought into the Emergency Department of Duzce University, Medical Faculty Hospital between September 2009 and August 2010 due to Pat-Pat related accidents were evaluated. Results The cases consisted of 73 (69.5%) males and 32 (30.5%) females, ranging from 2 to 73 years of age. In the 10-39 age group, a total of 63 (60.0%) cases were determined. The months when the greatest rate of cases applied to the hospital consisted of July, August, September and the season is summer. The cases were exposed to trauma in roads in 54 (51.4%), and 51 (48.6%) occurred in agricultural area without roads. Eighty seven (82.9%) cases were injured due to the overturning of vehicle. The patients were brought to the hospital using a private vehicle in 54 (51.4%) of the cases and in 51 (48.6%) cases, 112 ambulance system was used. The cases were determined to apply to the hospital most frequently between 6 pm-12 am. The injuries frequently consisted of head-neck and spine traumas, thorax traumas and upper extremity traumas. In 55 (52.4%) cases, open wound-laceration was determined. Seventy five (71.4%) cases were treated in the Emergency Department, and 28 (26.7%) were hospitalized. Three (2.9%) cases were deceased. Conclusions Serious injuries can occur in Pat-Pat related accidents, and careful systematic physical examination should be conducted. In order to prevent these accidents, education of farm operators and engineering studies on the mechanics and safety of these vehicles should be taken and legal regulations should be created. PMID:21699689

  9. Active music therapy and Parkinson's disease: methods.

    PubMed

    Pacchetti, C; Aglieri, R; Mancini, F; Martignoni, E; Nappi, G

    1998-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is an unconventional, multisensorial therapy poorly assessed in medical care but widely used to different ends in a variety of settings. MT has two branches: active and passive. In active MT the utilisation of instruments is structured to correspond to all sensory organs so as to obtain suitable motor and emotional responses. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effects of MT in the neurorehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), a common degenerative disorder involving movement and emotional impairment. Sixteen PD patients took part in 13 weekly sessions of MT each lasting 2 hours. At the beginning and at the end of the session, every 2 weeks, the patients were evaluated by a neurologist, who assessed PD severity with UPDRS, emotional functions with Happiness Measures (HM) and quality of life using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL). After every session a significant improvement in motor function, particularly in relation to hypokinesia, was observed both in the overall and in the pre-post session evaluations. HM, UPDRS-ADL and PDQL changes confirmed an improving effect of MT on emotional functions, activities of daily living and quality of life. In conclusion, active MT, operating at a multisensorial level, stimulates motor, affective and behavioural functions. Finally, we propose active MT as new method to include in PD rehabilitation programmes. This article describes the methods adopted during MT sessions with PD patients. PMID:9584875

  10. The effects of PAT on the Savannah River ecosystem, particularly fisheries

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the pre-startup activities at K-Reactor, i.e., Power Ascension Testing (PAT), have caused damage because of temperature rises in the Savannah River. Therefore, the biological studies were mainly aimed at providing information as to changes that might cause the damage of the fish population, and to other important organisms in the ecosystem. To determine if deleterious effects had occurred, one had to review the past studies to determine the condition and diversity of aquatic life before these PAT studies started. Therefore old reports were reviewed and a current study made in 1992.

  11. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The purpose of this SAR Addendum is to incorporate plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. The Pu metal is packed in an inner container (designated the T-Ampoule) that replaces the PC-1 inner container. The documentation and results from analysis contained in this addendum demonstrate that the replacement of the PC-1 and associated packaging material with the T-Ampoule and associated packaging with the addition of the plutonium metal content are not significant with respect to the design, operating characteristics, or safe performance of the containment system and prevention of criticality when the package is subjected to the tests specified in 10 CFR 71.71, 71.73 and 71.74.

  12. Exploring Group Activity Therapy with Ethnically Diverse Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paone, Tina R.; Malott, Krista M.; Maldonado, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    Group activity therapy has been promoted as an effective means of providing growth opportunities for adolescents through the use of structured, developmentally appropriate activities in a group setting. This article qualitatively explores outcomes of 12 sessions of group activity therapy with ethnically diverse adolescents in a school setting. The…

  13. Spinal Manipulative Therapy and Somatosensory Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Joel G; Bolton, Philip S

    2012-01-01

    Manually-applied movement and mobilisation of body parts as a healing activity has been used for centuries. A relatively high velocity, low amplitude force applied to the vertebral column with therapeutic intent, referred to as spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), is one such activity. It is most commonly used by chiropractors, but other healthcare practitioners including osteopaths and physiotherapists also perform SMT. The mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effects of SMT remain unclear. Early theories proposed that the nervous system mediates the effects of SMT. The goal of this article is to briefly update our knowledge regarding several physical characteristics of an applied SMT, and review what is known about the signalling characteristics of sensory neurons innervating the vertebral column in response to spinal manipulation. Based upon the experimental literature, we propose that SMT may produce a sustained change in the synaptic efficacy of central neurons by evoking a high frequency, bursting discharge from several types of dynamically-sensitive, mechanosensitive paraspinal primary afferent neurons. PMID:22349622

  14. FunPat: function-based pattern analysis on RNA-seq time series data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Dynamic expression data, nowadays obtained using high-throughput RNA sequencing, are essential to monitor transient gene expression changes and to study the dynamics of their transcriptional activity in the cell or response to stimuli. Several methods for data selection, clustering and functional analysis are available; however, these steps are usually performed independently, without exploiting and integrating the information derived from each step of the analysis. Methods Here we present FunPat, an R package for time series RNA sequencing data that integrates gene selection, clustering and functional annotation into a single framework. FunPat exploits functional annotations by performing for each functional term, e.g. a Gene Ontology term, an integrated selection-clustering analysis to select differentially expressed genes that share, besides annotation, a common dynamic expression profile. Results FunPat performance was assessed on both simulated and real data. With respect to a stand-alone selection step, the integration of the clustering step is able to improve the recall without altering the false discovery rate. FunPat also shows high precision and recall in detecting the correct temporal expression patterns; in particular, the recall is significantly higher than hierarchical, k-means and a model-based clustering approach specifically designed for RNA sequencing data. Moreover, when biological replicates are missing, FunPat is able to provide reproducible lists of significant genes. The application to real time series expression data shows the ability of FunPat to select differentially expressed genes with high reproducibility, indirectly confirming high precision and recall in gene selection. Moreover, the expression patterns obtained as output allow an easy interpretation of the results. Conclusions A novel analysis pipeline was developed to search the main temporal patterns in classes of genes similarly annotated, improving the sensitivity of

  15. Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Pat Thiel talks about her friend and colleague Dan Shechtman who received the 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

  16. Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman

    ScienceCinema

    Thiel, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Pat Thiel talks about her friend and colleague Dan Shechtman who received the 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

  17. Photodynamic Therapy in Pediatric Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Barbosa, Patricia; Duarte, Danilo Antônio; Leite, Mariana Ferreira; de Sant' Anna, Giselle Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Conservation of deciduous teeth with pulp alterations caused by caries and trauma is a major therapeutic challenge in pediatric dentistry as a result of the internal anatomy and life cycle characteristic. It is essential that the root canal procedures sanitizers have a performance in eliminating bacterial. In this context, antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PAT) is promising and emerging as adjuvant therapy in an attempt to eliminate the microorganisms persistent to chemi-mechanical preparation. Since there is presence of oxygen in cells, photosensitizer activated by light can react with molecules in its vicinity by electrons' or hydrogen's transfer, leading to microorganism death. This paper reports the case of 4-year-old patient, female, with early childhood caries. The proposed endodontic treatment incuded chemomechanical treatment allied to PAT in the decontamination of root canals using methylene blue dye 50 μg/mL during 3–5 minutes and 40 J/cm2 as energy density, taking into account the need for tissue penetration and effectiveness of PAT inside the dentinal tubules. PMID:25371829

  18. Exercise in Treating Hypertension: Tailoring Therapies for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chintanadilok, Jirayos

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can be definitive therapy for some, and adjunctive therapy for many, people with hypertension, though people with secondary hypertension may not derive as much benefit. Low-to- moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can help with mild hypertension and reduce drug dosages in more severe cases. For active patients requiring medication,…

  19. Physiological and Behavioral Responses of Horses to Wither Scratching and Patting the Neck When Under Saddle.

    PubMed

    Thorbergson, Zoë W; Nielsen, Sharon G; Beaulieu, Rodney J; Doyle, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    Riding is considered to be an arousing activity for horses. It has been suggested that wither scratching may be a more useful tool for relaxation compared with the common practice of neck patting. In the current study, 18 horses were exposed to 3 treatments, including control or no interaction, neck patting, and wither scratching, for 1 min each following a short obstacle course. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and a variety of behaviors were measured in the horses. Wither scratching produced a significantly longer duration of relaxed-type behaviors. Wither scratching could be a useful tool to help a horse relax while under saddle. Additionally, the study identified 2 ear positions that may be useful for future research in horse behavior. PMID:26958705

  20. PAT-2 (Plutonium Air-Transportable Model 2) safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.A.; Davis, E.J.; Duffey, T.A.; Dupree, S.A.; George, O.L. Jr.; Ortiz, Z.

    1981-07-01

    The PAT-2 package is designed for the safe transport of plutonium and/or uranium in small quantities. The PAT-2 package is resistant to severe accidents, including that of a high-speed jet aircraft crash, and is designed to withstand such environments as extreme impact, crushing, puncturing and slashing loads, severe hydrocarbon-fueled fires, and deep underwater immersion, with no escape of contents. The package meets the requirements of 10 CFR 71 for Fissile Class I packages with a cargo of 15 grams of Pu-239, or other isotopic forms described herein, not to exceed 2 watts of thermal activity. This SAR presents design and oprational information including evaluations and analyses, test results, operating procedures, maintenance, and quality assurance information.

  1. Multivariate PAT solutions for biopharmaceutical cultivation: current progress and limitations.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Sarah M; Diepenbroek, Bas; Wijffels, Rene H; Streefland, Mathieu

    2014-06-01

    Increasingly elaborate and voluminous datasets are generated by the (bio)pharmaceutical industry and are a major challenge for application of PAT and QbD principles. Multivariate data analysis (MVDA) is required to delineate relevant process information from large multi-factorial and multi-collinear datasets. Here the key role of MVDA for industrial (bio)process data is discussed, with a focus on progress and limitations of MVDA as a PAT solution for biopharmaceutical cultivation processes. MVDA based models were proven useful and should be routinely implemented for bioprocesses. It is concluded that although the highest level of PAT with process control within its design space in real-time during manufacturing is not reached yet, MVDA will be central to reach this ultimate objective for cell cultivations. PMID:24732022

  2. Drosophila PAT1 is required for Kinesin-1 to transport cargo and to maximize its motility

    PubMed Central

    Loiseau, Philippe; Davies, Tim; Williams, Lucy S.; Mishima, Masanori; Palacios, Isabel M.

    2010-01-01

    Kinesin heavy chain (KHC), the force-generating component of Kinesin-1, is required for the localization of oskar mRNA and the anchoring of the nucleus in the Drosophila oocyte. These events are crucial for the establishment of the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. KHC is also essential for the localization of Dynein and for all ooplasmic flows. Interestingly, oocytes without Kinesin light chain show no major defects in these KHC-dependent processes, suggesting that KHC binds its cargoes and is activated by a novel mechanism. Here, we shed new light on the molecular mechanism of Kinesin function in the germline. Using a combination of genetic, biochemical and motor-tracking studies, we show that PAT1, an APP-binding protein, interacts with Kinesin-1, functions in the transport of oskar mRNA and Dynein and is required for the efficient motility of KHC along microtubules. This work suggests that the role of PAT1 in cargo transport in the cell is linked to PAT1 function as a positive regulator of Kinesin motility. PMID:20630947

  3. Ion Dynamic Capture Experiments With The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Lewis, Raymond; Chakrabarti, Suman; Sims, William H.; Pearson, J. Boise; Fant, Wallace E.

    2002-01-01

    To take the first step towards using the energy produced from the matter-antimatter annihilation for propulsion applications, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) has initiated a research activity examining the storage of low energy antiprotons. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is an electromagnetic system (Penning-Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Tesla superconductor, a high voltage electrode confinement system, and an ultra high vacuum test section. It has been designed with an ultimate goal of maintaining 10(exp 12) charged particles with a half-life of 18 days. Currently, this system is being evaluated experimentally using normal matter ions that are cheap to produce, relatively easy to handle, and provide a good indication of overall trap behavior (with the exception of assessing annihilation losses). The ions are produced via a positive hydrogen ion source and transported to HiPAT in a beam line equipped with electrostatic optics. The optics serve to both focus and gate the incoming ions, providing microsecond-timed beam pulses that are dynamically captured by cycling the HiPAT forward containment field like a "trap door". Initial dynamic capture experiments have been successfully performed with beam energy and currents set to 1.9 kV and 23 micro-amps, respectively. At these settings up to 2x10(exp 9) ions have been trapped during a single dynamic cycle.

  4. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doutt, Kathleen M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University offers an enrichment program (consisting of a summer session and three Saturdays) in which gifted children and children with learning disabilities are grouped together for activities. Horticulture is one of the few enrichment activities adaptable to both groups. Children are allowed to engage in the same…

  5. Successful therapy of macrophage activation syndrome with dexamethasone palmitate.

    PubMed

    Nakagishi, Yasuo; Shimizu, Masaki; Kasai, Kazuko; Miyoshi, Mari; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potential life-threatening complication of childhood systemic inflammatory disorders. Corticosteroids are commonly used as the first-line therapy for MAS. We report four patients with MAS who were successfully treated with dexamethasone palmitate (DexP), a liposome-incorporated dexamethasone, much more efficient than free corticosteroids. DexP effectively inhibited inflammation in MAS patients in whom the response to pulse methylprednisolone was not sufficient to manage their diseases. DexP was also effective as the first-line therapy for MAS. Based on these findings, DexP is an effective therapy in treating MAS patients. PMID:24754272

  6. Photon activation therapy of RG2 glioma carrying Fischer rats using stable thallium and monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceberg, Crister; Jönsson, Bo-Anders; Prezado, Yolanda; Pommer, Tobias; Nittby, Henrietta; Englund, Elisabet; Grafström, Gustav; Edvardsson, Anneli; Stenvall, Anna; Strömblad, Susanne; Wingårdh, Karin; Persson, Bertil; Elleaume, Hélène; Baldetorp, Bo; Salford, Leif G.; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2012-12-01

    75 RG2 glioma-carrying Fischer rats were treated by photon activation therapy (PAT) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation and stable thallium. Three groups were treated with thallium in combination with radiation at different energy; immediately below and above the thallium K-edge, and at 50 keV. Three control groups were given irradiation only, thallium only, or no treatment at all. For animals receiving thallium in combination with radiation to 15 Gy at 50 keV, the median survival time was 30 days, which was 67% longer than for the untreated controls (p = 0.0020) and 36% longer than for the group treated with radiation alone (not significant). Treatment with thallium and radiation at the higher energy levels were not effective at the given absorbed dose and thallium concentration. In the groups treated at 50 keV and above the K-edge, several animals exhibited extensive and sometimes contra-lateral edema, neuronal death and frank tissue necrosis. No such marked changes were seen in the other groups. The results were discussed with reference to Monte Carlo calculated electron energy spectra and dose enhancement factors.

  7. Stimulant-Related Reductions of Growth Rates in the PATS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, James; Greenhill, Laurence; Wigal, Tim; Kollins, Scott; Stehli, Annamarie; Davies, Mark; Chuang, Shirley; Vitiello, Benedetto; Skrobala, Anne; Posner, Kelly; Abikoff, Howard; Oatis, Melvin; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Riddle, Mark; Ghuman, Jaswinder; Cunningham, Charles; Wigal, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate growth of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS) before and after initiation of treatment with methylphenidate at titrated doses (average, 14.2 mg/day) administered three times daily, 7 days/week for approximately equal to 1 year. Method: The heights and…

  8. Pat Thiel talks about attending the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony

    ScienceCinema

    Thiel, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Pat Thiel, Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, was invited to be a guest at the ceremony on December 10th, in Stockholm, Sweden, where Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory scientist, received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Following her return to the Lab, Thiel shared some of her recollections of the momentous event.

  9. Pat Mora, Fiction/Nonfiction Writer and Poet (Profile).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Rosalinda B.

    1998-01-01

    Offers a profile of Pat Mora, a writer whose work crosses the boundaries of audience, genre, and language. Notes that woven through her works are topics drawn from her life experience. Looks at her recent accomplishments and forthcoming books. Discusses her advocacy for cultural and linguistic diversity, and for more Latinos in all phases of…

  10. Stable phantoms for characterization of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Van de Sompel, Dominique; Bodapati, Sandhya; Kothapalli, Sri Rajasekhar; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-02-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging modality that combines the high contrast of optical imaging, with the spatial resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound, by exploiting the photoacoustic effect. As with any new imaging modality, reliable physical phantoms are needed to: calibrate instruments; validate performance; optimize signal-to-noise; perform routine quality control; and compare systems. Phantom materials for testing small animal PAT systems should also mimic both the optical and acoustic properties of soft tissue, while for calibration purposes should be resistant to degradation over long time periods. We show here that polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) phantoms enable calibration and performance validation using two PAT systems with distinct designs (Visualsonics Vevo LAZR and Endra Nexus 128) across a wavelength range of 680 nm - 950 nm. Inclusions between 2 and 3.2 mm in diameter were fabricated from PVCP using a range of dye concentrations (0 % to 0.256 % Black Plastic Color, BPC) in a custom mold. A calibration phantom was imaged repeatedly on both systems, over time scales of minutes, hours and days, to assess system stability. Both systems demonstrated good reproducibility over time, with the coefficient of variation in the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) being less than 15% over the course of 30 days. Imaging performance was optimized by plotting SNR as a function of different system parameters. The visualization of objects embedded in optically absorbing and scattering backgrounds was also assessed. PVCP is easy to work with and provides stable phantoms for assessing PAT system performance.

  11. Pat Thiel talks about attending the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Pat Thiel, Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, was invited to be a guest at the ceremony on December 10th, in Stockholm, Sweden, where Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory scientist, received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Following her return to the Lab, Thiel shared some of her recollections of the momentous event.

  12. The PATS Project: A State of Tennessee School Reform Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, E. Dean; And Others

    The first-year results of a Tennessee college-school partnership program to implement a data-based school improvement change model--the Positive Attitudes in Tennessee Schools Project (PATS)--are summarized in this report. Two major goals of the first year (1989-90) included assessing and improving school climate and enhancing student and teacher…

  13. 10. GLASS, SCHNEIDER & REZNER BRIDGE PATENT MODEL, PAT. NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. GLASS, SCHNEIDER & REZNER BRIDGE PATENT MODEL, PAT. NO. 71, 868, DECEMBER 10, 1867. THIS MODEL IS ONE OF A FEW THAT SURVIVED THE PATENT OFFICE FIRE OF 1877. IF REPRODUCED, CREDIT SHOULD BE GIVEN TO THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, NEGATIVE NO. 48660-D. - White Bowstring Arch Truss Bridge, Spanning Yellow Creek at Cemetery Drive (Riverside Drive), Poland, Mahoning County, OH

  14. Project Achieve Transition Services (PATS), 1993-94. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Phyllis

    Project Achieve Transition Services (PATS) is a four-year high school attendance improvement, dropout prevention project which targets late-entry students consisting primarily of immigrants, transfers, and long-term absentees. The program uses a case management approach to provide support services, instructional enhancements, and family outreach…

  15. Mutations in Genes patA and patL of Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 Result in Similar Phenotypes, and the Proteins Encoded by Those Genes May Interact ▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinjie; Wolk, C. Peter

    2011-01-01

    PatA resembles a response regulator protein with a defective DNA-binding domain, and PatL (All3305) is a pentapeptide repeat protein. A yeast two-hybrid library identified PatL as a protein with which PatA may interact. Heterocysts of patA and patL Anabaena sp. form nearly exclusively terminally in long filaments, further linking the genes. PMID:21890704

  16. Bioluminescence-Activated Deep-Tissue Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Rang; Kim, Seonghoon; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Homin; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Koh, Gou Young; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical energy can trigger a variety of photochemical processes useful for therapies. Owing to the shallow penetration of light in tissues, however, the clinical applications of light-activated therapies have been limited. Bioluminescence resonant energy transfer (BRET) may provide a new way of inducing photochemical activation. Here, we show that efficient bioluminescence energy-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) of macroscopic tumors and metastases in deep tissue. For monolayer cell culture in vitro incubated with Chlorin e6, BRET energy of about 1 nJ per cell generated as strong cytotoxicity as red laser light irradiation at 2.2 mW/cm2 for 180 s. Regional delivery of bioluminescence agents via draining lymphatic vessels killed tumor cells spread to the sentinel and secondary lymph nodes, reduced distant metastases in the lung and improved animal survival. Our results show the promising potential of novel bioluminescence-activated PDT. PMID:26000054

  17. Use of creative activities in occupational therapy practice in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Müllersdorf, Maria; Ivarsson, Ann Britt

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of creative activities in occupational therapy in Sweden and how often Swedish occupational therapists use creative activities as a means of intervention. A web-mail survey was sent to 2975 Swedish occupational therapists working in health care at regional, county council or primary health care level, and those working in vocational rehabilitation. A total of 1867 (63%) answered the questionnaire and showed that 44% did use creative activities as a means of intervention and most often by practitioners working in psychiatric health care. The most commonly used form of creative activity was arts and crafts followed by gardening. This web-mail survey was based on a limited amount of items regarding creative activities. Further research should focus on in-depth inquiries about how occupational therapists and their patients perceive the use of creative activities as a means of treatment in occupational therapy. PMID:22489029

  18. Persistence of endometrial activity after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, D.; Heller, P.; Dames, J.; Hoskins, W.; Gallup, D.; Park, R.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation therapy is a proved treatment for cervical carcinoma; however, it destroys ovarian function and has been thought to ablate the endometrium. Estrogen replacement therapy is often prescribed for patients with cervical carcinoma after radiation therapy. A review of records of six teaching hospitals revealed 16 patients who had endometrial sampling for uterine bleeding after standard radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. Fifteen patients underwent dilatation and curettage, and one patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy when a dilatation and curettage was unsuccessful. Six patients had fibrosis and inflammation of the endometrial cavity, seven had proliferative endometrium, one had cystic hyperplasia, one had atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and one had adenocarcinoma. Although the number of patients who have an active endometrium after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma is not known, this report demonstrates that proliferative endometrium may persist, and these patients may develop endometrial hyperplasia or adenocarcinoma. Studies have indicated that patients with normal endometrial glands have an increased risk of developing endometrial adenocarcinoma if they are treated with unopposed estrogen. Patients who have had radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma should be treated with estrogen and a progestational agent to avoid endometrial stimulation from unopposed estrogen therapy.

  19. Family Therapy: A Phenomenological and Active Directive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1978-01-01

    A "third force" in family therapy is outlined in this paper, which combines a phenomenological-humanistic approach with a highly active-directive attempt to help family members surrender their misperceptions of themselves and others and to make profound philosophic changes in their intrapersonal and interpersonal attitudes and behaviors. (Author)

  20. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  1. Dividing the pie: differential dung pat size utilization by sympatric Haematobia irritans and Musca autumnalis.

    PubMed

    Fowler, F E; Mullens, B A

    2016-06-01

    Horn flies [Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae) (L.)] and face flies [Musca autumnalis (Diptera: Muscidae) De Geer] use the same larval resource, but their interactions are poorly studied. Dung pats (n = 350) were core sampled in the summers of 2012 and 2013 from irrigated pastures in Pomona, California, U.S.A. (34°03'N, 117°48'W) and held for face fly and horn fly emergence. Surface areas and estimated weights were recorded for each whole pat. Almost half (42.0%) of the pat cores yielded neither fly, 29.7% yielded horn flies only, 12.9% yielded face flies only and 15.4% yielded both flies. Of the fly-positive pats, surface area and mass were larger for face fly-occupied pats, whereas horn fly-occupied pats were smaller. Pats shared by the two species were intermediate. Horn flies per positive core were unaffected by the absence/presence of face flies, but half as many face flies emerged when pats were co-inhabited by horn flies. Face flies inhabited larger pats, which might better resist heating and drying, to which they are susceptible; horn flies inhabited a broad pat size range. Horn fly tolerance of lower dung moisture probably allows horn flies to colonize and survive in a wide range of pats in dry areas like southern California. PMID:26947576

  2. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  3. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  4. PAT4 levels control amino-acid sensitivity of rapamycin-resistant mTORC1 from the Golgi and affect clinical outcome in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, S-J; Snell, C; Turley, H; Li, J-L; McCormick, R; Perera, S M W; Heublein, S; Kazi, S; Azad, A; Wilson, C; Harris, A L; Goberdhan, D C I

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells can use strategies that make them resistant to nutrient deprivation to outcompete their neighbours. A key integrator of the cell's responses to starvation and other stresses is amino-acid-dependent mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Activation of mTORC1 on late endosomes and lysosomes is facilitated by amino-acid transporters within the solute-linked carrier 36 (SLC36) and SLC38 families. Here, we analyse the functions of SLC36 family member, SLC36A4, otherwise known as proton-assisted amino-acid transporter 4 (PAT4), in colorectal cancer. We show that independent of other major pathological factors, high PAT4 expression is associated with reduced relapse-free survival after colorectal cancer surgery. Consistent with this, PAT4 promotes HCT116 human colorectal cancer cell proliferation in culture and tumour growth in xenograft models. Inducible knockdown in HCT116 cells reveals that PAT4 regulates a form of mTORC1 with two distinct properties: first, it preferentially targets eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), and second, it is resistant to rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, in HCT116 cells two non-essential amino acids, glutamine and serine, which are often rapidly metabolised by tumour cells, regulate rapamycin-resistant mTORC1 in a PAT4-dependent manner. Overexpressed PAT4 is also able to promote rapamycin resistance in human embryonic kidney-293 cells. PAT4 is predominantly associated with the Golgi apparatus in a range of cell types, and in situ proximity ligation analysis shows that PAT4 interacts with both mTORC1 and its regulator Rab1A on the Golgi. These findings, together with other studies, suggest that differentially localised intracellular amino-acid transporters contribute to the activation of alternate forms of mTORC1. Furthermore, our data predict that colorectal cancer cells with high PAT4 expression will be more resistant to depletion of serine and glutamine, allowing them to

  5. PAT4 levels control amino-acid sensitivity of rapamycin-resistant mTORC1 from the Golgi and affect clinical outcome in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, S-J; Snell, C; Turley, H; Li, J-L; McCormick, R; Perera, S M W; Heublein, S; Kazi, S; Azad, A; Wilson, C; Harris, A L; Goberdhan, D C I

    2016-06-01

    Tumour cells can use strategies that make them resistant to nutrient deprivation to outcompete their neighbours. A key integrator of the cell's responses to starvation and other stresses is amino-acid-dependent mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Activation of mTORC1 on late endosomes and lysosomes is facilitated by amino-acid transporters within the solute-linked carrier 36 (SLC36) and SLC38 families. Here, we analyse the functions of SLC36 family member, SLC36A4, otherwise known as proton-assisted amino-acid transporter 4 (PAT4), in colorectal cancer. We show that independent of other major pathological factors, high PAT4 expression is associated with reduced relapse-free survival after colorectal cancer surgery. Consistent with this, PAT4 promotes HCT116 human colorectal cancer cell proliferation in culture and tumour growth in xenograft models. Inducible knockdown in HCT116 cells reveals that PAT4 regulates a form of mTORC1 with two distinct properties: first, it preferentially targets eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), and second, it is resistant to rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, in HCT116 cells two non-essential amino acids, glutamine and serine, which are often rapidly metabolised by tumour cells, regulate rapamycin-resistant mTORC1 in a PAT4-dependent manner. Overexpressed PAT4 is also able to promote rapamycin resistance in human embryonic kidney-293 cells. PAT4 is predominantly associated with the Golgi apparatus in a range of cell types, and in situ proximity ligation analysis shows that PAT4 interacts with both mTORC1 and its regulator Rab1A on the Golgi. These findings, together with other studies, suggest that differentially localised intracellular amino-acid transporters contribute to the activation of alternate forms of mTORC1. Furthermore, our data predict that colorectal cancer cells with high PAT4 expression will be more resistant to depletion of serine and glutamine, allowing them to

  6. Stacking Multiple Ion Captures in The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Sims, William H.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Fant, Wallace E.

    2004-01-01

    The High performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) research project was initiated by the Marshall Space Flight Center's propulsion Research Center to examining the fundamental behavior of low energy antiprotons. Stored antiproton would ultimately be used for experimental demonstration of basic propulsive concepts. Matter-antimatter annihilation produces approximately 10(exp 8) MJ/g nearly 10 orders of magnitude more energy per unit mass than chemical based combustion, hence NASA's interest. To achieve containment, HiPAT utilizes a type of electromagnetic bottle know as a Penning trap positioned within an ultrahigh vacuum test section. Recently, the HiPAT hardware configuration has been enhanced to facilitate the capture of multiple normal matter ion burst. This endeavor is often referred to as "stacking" and used to increasing the number of captured particles. A prior normal matter experimental effort, successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of single burst capture. The stacking process is accomplished by manipulating the electric field generated by the confinement electrodes i.e. adjusting the well potential depth. These potential well values are initially configured to maximize the quantity of captured ions per burst; shallow wells with a depth of 100 volt or less (referenced to the incoming ion beam energy) are typically selected. Once captured, a cooling interval is required to reduce the energy of trapped particles below the lower extent of the "trap door" (or leading electrode) ion emitting potential. This is necessary such that a new burst of hot ions can be introduced while preventing those already inside from escaping. The cooling time is driven by a combination of mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation, background gas scattering, and resistive damping in a time scale on the order of minutes. A potential for reducing this hold period is to actively manipulate the electric field shape, using the power supply control system, to produce a deeper potential

  7. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    2007-05-01

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R&D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R&D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC.

  8. The cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor Pat1 is required for rRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Muppavarapu, Mridula; Huch, Susanne; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    Pat1 is a key cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor, the loss of which severely increases mRNA half-lives. Several recent studies have shown that Pat1 can enter the nucleus and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. As a result, many nuclear roles have been proposed for Pat1. In this study, we analyzed four previously suggested nuclear roles of Pat1 and show that Pat1 is not required for efficient pre-mRNA splicing or pre-mRNA decay in yeast. However, lack of Pat1 results in accumulation of pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Intriguingly, we identified a novel genetic relationship between Pat1 and the rRNA decay machinery, specifically the exosome and the TRAMP complex. While the pre-rRNA processing intermediates that accumulate in the pat1 deletion mutant are, at least to some extent, recognized as aberrant by the rRNA degradation machinery, it is unlikely that these accumulations are the cause of their synthetic sick relationship. Here, we show that the dysregulation of the levels of mRNAs related to ribosome biogenesis could be the cause of the accumulation of the pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Although our results support a role for Pat1 in transcription, they nevertheless suggest that the primary cause of the dysregulated mRNA levels is most likely due to Pat1's role in mRNA decapping and mRNA degradation. PMID:26918764

  9. The syndrome of continuous muscle fibre activity following gold therapy.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Mamoli, B

    1984-01-01

    A 72-year-old man suffering from arthritis received a total dose of 500 mg sodium aurothiomalate during a period of 5 months. His clinical state then deteriorated and he had to be hospitalized. Upon admission he was bedridden, his level of consciousness was slightly impaired, he was confused and respiration was laboured. Continuous muscle activity was noted on all extremities and at first, erroneously, fasciculations were diagnosed. The EMG exhibited continuous muscle fibre activity consisting of duplets, triplets and multiplets. The discharges occurred in an irregular pattern; when various muscles were examined at the same time no synchronicity could be observed between muscle discharges. In the left m. deltoideus an increased percentage of polyphasic potentials was found, whereas mean duration of motor unit potentials was normal. Spontaneous activity remained unchanged during sleep and administration of intravenous diazepam or phenytoin. Blocking of ulnar nerve at either elbow or wrist level did not stop spontaneous activity in m. abductor digiti quinti. Ischaemia increased the amount of discharges after 7 min. Within 4 months after termination of gold therapy the patient's condition improved and he was discharged from hospital. Regular EMG follow-up after 8 months showed complete cessation of abnormal spontaneous activities. Nerve conduction velocities were normal except for markedly reduced compound action potential in peroneal nerves. Continuous muscle fibre activity as a side-effect of gold therapy is described. PMID:6440953

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of tomato carpel development reveals alterations in ethylene and gibberellin synthesis during pat3/pat4 parthenocarpic fruit set

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Laura; Blanca, Jose M; Cañizares, Joaquin; Nuez, Fernado

    2009-01-01

    Background Tomato fruit set is a key process that has a great economic impact on crop production. We employed the Affymetrix GeneChip Tomato Genome Array to compare the transcriptome of a non-parthenocarpic line, UC82, with that of the parthenocarpic line RP75/59 (pat3/pat4 mutant). We analyzed the transcriptome under normal conditions as well as with forced parthenocarpic development in RP75/59, emasculating the flowers 2 days before anthesis. This analysis helps to understand the fruit set in tomato. Results Differentially expressed genes were extracted with maSigPro, which is designed for the analysis of single and multiseries time course microarray experiments. 2842 genes showed changes throughout normal carpel development and fruit set. Most of them showed a change of expression at or after anthesis. The main differences between lines were concentrated at the anthesis stage. We found 758 genes differentially expressed in parthenocarpic fruit set. Among these genes we detected cell cycle-related genes that were still activated at anthesis in the parthenocarpic line, which shows the lack of arrest in the parthenocarpic line at anthesis. Key genes for the synthesis of gibberellins and ethylene, which were up-regulated in the parthenocarpic line were also detected. Conclusion Comparisons between array experiments determined that anthesis was the most different stage and the key point at which most of the genes were modulated. In the parthenocarpic line, anthesis seemed to be a short transitional stage to fruit set. In this line, the high GAs contends leads to the development of a parthenocarpic fruit, and ethylene may mimic pollination signals, inducing auxin synthesis in the ovary and the development of a jelly fruit. PMID:19480705

  11. Combination therapies improve the anticancer activities of retinoids in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Belamy B

    2015-01-01

    Most therapeutic protocols for child cancers use cytotoxic agents which have a narrow therapeutic index, and resulting in severe acute and chronic toxicities to normal tissues. Despite the fact that most child cancer patients achieve complete remission after chemotherapy, death still occurs due to relapse of persistent minimal residual disease (MRD) which remaining after initial cytotoxic chemotherapy. Advanced neuroblastoma (NB) is a leading cause of cancer deaths in young children. Retinoids are an important component of advanced NB therapy at the stage of MRD, yet half of all patients treated with 13-cis-retinoic acid still relapse and die. More effective combination therapies, with a lower side-effect profile, are required to improve outcomes for NB. Fenretinide or N-4-hydroxyphenyl retinamide is a synthetic derivative of retinoic acid which works on cancer cells through nuclear receptor-dependent and -independent signalling mechanisms. Moreover, several histone deacetylase inhibitors have entered early phase trials, and, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid has been approved for use in adult cutaneous T cell lymphoma. A number of studies suggest that retinoid signal activation is necessary for histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. A better understanding of their mechanism of actions will lead to more evidence-based retinoid combination therapies. PMID:26677433

  12. Rescue baroreflex activation therapy after Stanford B aortic dissection due to therapy-refractory hypertension.

    PubMed

    Weipert, Kay F; Most, Astrid; Dörr, Oliver; Helmig, Inga; Elzien, Meshal; Krombach, Gabriele; Hamm, Christian W; Erkapic, Damir; Schmitt, Joern

    2016-06-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated significant and durable reduction in arterial pressure from baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) in patients with resistant arterial hypertension. There is a lack of data, however, concerning the use of BAT in a rescue approach during therapy-refractory hypertensive crisis resulting in life-threatening end-organ damage. Here, we describe the first case in which BAT was applied as a rescue procedure in an intensive care setting after ineffective maximum medical treatment. A 34-year-old male patient presented with Stanford B aortic dissection and hypertensive crisis. The dissection membrane extended from the left subclavian artery down to the right common iliac artery, resulting in a total arterial occlusion of the right leg. After emergency thoracic endovascular aortic repair and femorofemoral crossover bypass, the patient developed a compartment syndrome of the right lower limb, ultimately leading to amputation of the right leg above the knee. Even under deep sedation recurrent hypertensive crises of up to 220 mm Hg occurred that could not be controlled by eight antihypertensive drugs of different classes. Screening for secondary hypertension was negative. Eventually, rescue implantation of right-sided BAT was performed as a bailout procedure, followed by immediate activation of the device. After a hospital stay of a total of 8 weeks, the patient was discharged 2 weeks after BAT initiation with satisfactory blood pressure levels. After 1-year follow-up, the patient has not had a hypertensive crisis since the onset of BAT and is currently on fourfold oral antihypertensive therapy. The previously described bailout procedures for the treatment of life-threatening hypertensive conditions that are refractory to drug treatment have mainly comprised the interventional denervation of renal arteries. The utilization of BAT is new in this emergency context and showed a significant, immediate, and sustained reduction of blood pressure

  13. Unpacking Pat Parker: Intersections and Revolutions in "Movement in Black".

    PubMed

    Washburn, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This article explores Pat Parker's poem "Movement in Black." It examines the ways in which she emblematizes intersectionality and simultaneity as forms of revolution in struggles of self and society. It begins with a theoretical and historical apparatus to contextualize Parker as an artist and activist. Then it offers a literary analysis of the poem, focusing on themes of time and space, marginalization and movement, difference and power, visibility and invisibility, and history and memory. It argues that Parker uses autobiographical writing to fuse personal and political sites of resistance. PMID:26075685

  14. Macrophage activation syndrome in the era of biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grom, Alexei A; Horne, AnnaCarin; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) refers to acute overwhelming inflammation caused by a 'cytokine storm'. Although increasingly recognized as a life-threatening complication of various rheumatic diseases, clinically, MAS is strikingly similar to primary and secondary forms of haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Not surprisingly, many rheumatologists prefer the term secondary HLH rather than MAS to describe this condition, and efforts to change the nomenclature are in progress. The pathophysiology of MAS remains elusive, but observations in animal models, as well as data on the effects of new anticytokine therapies on rates and clinical presentations of MAS in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), provide clues to the understanding of this perplexing clinical phenomenon. In this Review, we explore the latest available evidence and discuss potential diagnostic challenges in the era of increasing use of biologic therapies. PMID:27009539

  15. The redox-active nanomaterial toolbox for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Irene L; Notcovich, Cintia; Catalano, Paolo N; Bellino, Martín G; Durán, Hebe

    2015-04-01

    Advances in nanomaterials science contributed in recent years to develop new devices and systems in the micro and nanoscale for improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Substantial evidences associate cancer cells and tumor microenvironment with reactive oxygen species (ROS), while conventional cancer treatments and particularly radiotherapy, are often mediated by ROS increase. However, the poor selectivity and the toxicity of these therapies encourage researchers to focus efforts in order to enhance delivery and to decrease side effects. Thus, the development of redox-active nanomaterials is an interesting approach to improve selectivity and outcome of cancer treatments. Herein, we describe an overview of recent advances in redox nanomaterials in the context of current and emerging strategies for cancer therapy based on ROS modulation. PMID:25597786

  16. Activation of endogenous neural stem cells for multiple sclerosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Iliana; de Vries, Helga E; Hol, Elly M; van Strien, Miriam E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens, consist of immunomodulatory agents aiming to reduce the rate of relapses. However, these agents are usually insufficient to treat chronic neurological disability. A promising perspective for future therapy of MS is the regeneration of lesions with replacement of the damaged oligodendrocytes or neurons. Therapies targeting to the enhancement of endogenous remyelination, aim to promote the activation of either the parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells or the subventricular zone-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Less studied but highly potent, is the strategy of neuronal regeneration with endogenous NSCs that although being linked to numerous limitations, is anticipated to ameliorate cognitive disability in MS. Focusing on the forebrain, this review highlights the role of NSCs in the regeneration of MS lesions. PMID:25653584

  17. Activation of endogenous neural stem cells for multiple sclerosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Iliana; de Vries, Helga E.; Hol, Elly M.; van Strien, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens, consist of immunomodulatory agents aiming to reduce the rate of relapses. However, these agents are usually insufficient to treat chronic neurological disability. A promising perspective for future therapy of MS is the regeneration of lesions with replacement of the damaged oligodendrocytes or neurons. Therapies targeting to the enhancement of endogenous remyelination, aim to promote the activation of either the parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells or the subventricular zone-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Less studied but highly potent, is the strategy of neuronal regeneration with endogenous NSCs that although being linked to numerous limitations, is anticipated to ameliorate cognitive disability in MS. Focusing on the forebrain, this review highlights the role of NSCs in the regeneration of MS lesions. PMID:25653584

  18. Factor XI and Contact Activation as Targets for Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gailani, David; Bane, Charles E.; Gruber, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Summary The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa, or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and factor X. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally-induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on factor XII, the zymogen of a protease (factor XIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces; and factor XI, the zymogen of the protease factor XIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of factor XI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of factor XI may be more effective than low-molecular-weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here we review data on the role of factor XI and factor XII in thrombosis, and results of pre-clinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins. PMID:25976012

  19. The structure of the cyanobactin domain of unknown function from PatG in the patellamide gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Greg; Koehnke, Jesko; Bent, Andrew F.; Graham, Rachael; Houssen, Wael; Jaspars, Marcel; Schwarz-Linek, Uli; Naismith, James H.

    2014-11-14

    The highly conserved domain of unknown function in the cyanobactin superfamily has a novel fold. The protein does not appear to bind the most plausible substrates, leaving questions as to its role. Patellamides are members of the cyanobactin family of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified cyclic peptide natural products, many of which, including some patellamides, are biologically active. A detailed mechanistic understanding of the biosynthetic pathway would enable the construction of a biotechnological ‘toolkit’ to make novel analogues of patellamides that are not found in nature. All but two of the protein domains involved in patellamide biosynthesis have been characterized. The two domains of unknown function (DUFs) are homologous to each other and are found at the C-termini of the multi-domain proteins PatA and PatG. The domain sequence is found in all cyanobactin-biosynthetic pathways characterized to date, implying a functional role in cyanobactin biosynthesis. Here, the crystal structure of the PatG DUF domain is reported and its binding interactions with plausible substrates are investigated.

  20. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  1. Virtual reality exposure therapy for active duty soldiers.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Gahm, Gregory A

    2008-08-01

    Virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy is a promising treatment for a variety of anxiety disorders and has recently been extended to the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, the authors briefly review the rationale for VRE and its key processes. They illustrate the treatment with an active-duty Army soldier diagnosed with combat-related PTSD. Six sessions of VRE were provided using an immersive simulation of a military convoy in Iraq. Self-reported PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were reduced at posttreatment relative to pretreatment reports, as assessed by the PTSD Checklist-Military Version and the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale-24. The case outcomes parallel those reported in the research with other disorders and suggest the applicability of VRE in treating active duty soldiers with combat-related PTSD. PMID:18612993

  2. [Practice of Behavioral Activation in Cognitive-behavioral Therapy].

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Nobuki

    2015-01-01

    An approach focusing on behavioral activation (BA) was adopted in the cognitive therapy of A. T. Beck, and it came to be considered that BA can play an important role in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression. Therefore, in recent years, BA based on clinical behavior analysis has been developed as a new treatment (Martell, et al.). The core characteristics are as follows: 1) focusing attention on context in daily life to promote the behavior control of patients and avoidance of a hatred experience ; 2) breaking the vicious circle; 3) promoting the behavior according to the purpose that the patients originally expect; 4) recognizing a relationship between behavior and the situation (contingency), thereby recovering self-efficacy tied to the long-term results that one originally expects. This does not increase pleasant activity at random when the patient is inactive, or give a sense of accomplishment. We know that depression is maintained by conducting functional analysis of detailed life behavior, and encourage the patients to have healthy behavior according to individual values. We help them to complete schedules regardless of mood and reflect on the results patiently. It is considered that those processes are important. BA may be easy to apply in clinical practice and effective for the chronic cases, or the patients in a convalescent stage. Also, in principle in the CBT for major depression, it may be effective that behavioral activation is provided in an early stage, and cognitive reconstruction in a latter stage. However, an approach to carry out functional analysis by small steps with careful activity monitoring is essential when the symptoms are severe. Furthermore, it should be considered that the way of psychoeducation requires caution because we encourage rest in the treatment of depression in our country. In particular, we must be careful not to take an attitude that an inactive behavior pattern is unproductive only based model cases. PMID

  3. The Preschool Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Treatment Study (PATS) 6-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Mark A.; Yershova, Kseniya; Lazzaretto, Deborah; Paykina, Natalya; Yenokyan, Gayane; Greenhill, Laurence; Abikoff, Howard; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wigal, Tim; McCracken, James T.; Kollins, Scott H.; Murray, Desiree W.; Wigal, Sharon; Kastelic, Elizabeth; McGough, James J.; dosReis, Susan; Bauzo-Rosario, Audrey; Stehli, Annamarie; Posner, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical course of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom severity and diagnosis from ages 3 to 5 up to 9 to 12 years during a 6-year follow-up after the original Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS). Method: A total of 207 participants (75% male) from the original PATS, assessed at baseline (mean age,…

  4. Rationale, Design, and Methods of the Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollins, Scott; Greenhill, Laurence; Swanson, James; Wigal, Sharon; Abikoff, Howard; McCracken, James; Riddle, Mark; McGough, James; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wigal, Tim; Skrobala, Anne; Posner, Kelly; Ghuman, Jaswinder; Davies, Mark; Cunningham, Charles; Bauzo, Audrey

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the rationale and design of the Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS). Method: PATS was a National Institutes of Mental Health-funded, multicenter, randomized, efficacy trial designed to evaluate the short-term (5 weeks) efficacy and long-term (40 weeks) safety of methylphenidate (MPH) in preschoolers with…

  5. A Training Program for Pat Frisking Female Inmates for New York City Department of Correction Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Brenda M.

    A training program was developed for male correction officers confronted with pat frisking female inmates. The training goal was to have correction officers in women's prisons identify female inmates' contraband and be able to determine alternatives for male correction officers who were confronted with pat frisking female inmates. The Dick and…

  6. "Anything That Gets Me in My Heart": Pat Parker's Poetry of Justice.

    PubMed

    Green, David B

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that love and justice are interlocking themes that undergird and motivate the poetry and activism of the Black lesbian feminist Pat Parker. Parker was a prolific working-class poet, a committed Black lesbian feminist, and an international trailblazer whose poems, like her famous "Womanslaughter" discussed in this article, document the many injustices that Black women endured in an anti-Black, rabidly homophobic, and patriarchal U.S. during the last decades of the twentieth century. In a political moment where righteous cries of #BlackLivesMatter are heard across the United States I use this article to remind us all of the historical importance that Black lesbians played and continue to play in the struggles of anti-racist justice in America. PMID:26075686

  7. Simulated Medication Therapy Management Activities in a Pharmacotherapy Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Joshua M.; Trapskin, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To measure the impact of medication therapy management (MTM) learning activities on students’ confidence and intention to provide MTM using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Design. An MTM curriculum combining lecture instruction and active-learning strategies was incorporated into a required pharmacotherapy laboratory course. Assessment. A validated survey instrument was developed to evaluate student confidence and intent to engage in MTM services using the domains comprising the Theory of Planned Behavior. Confidence scores improved significantly from baseline for all items (p < 0.00), including identification of billable services, documentation, and electronic billing. Mean scores improved significantly for all Theory of Planned Behavior items within the constructs of perceived behavioral control and subjective norms (p < 0.05). At baseline, 42% of students agreed or strongly agreed that they had knowledge and skills to provide MTM. This percentage increased to 82% following completion of the laboratory activities. Conclusion. Implementation of simulated MTM activities in a pharmacotherapy laboratory significantly increased knowledge scores, confidence measures, and scores on Theory of Planned Behavior constructs related to perceived behavioral control and subjective norms. Despite these improvements, intention to engage in future MTM services remained unchanged. PMID:21829269

  8. X-Ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy (X-PACT).

    PubMed

    Oldham, Mark; Yoon, Paul; Fathi, Zak; Beyer, Wayne F; Adamson, Justus; Liu, Leihua; Alcorta, David; Xia, Wenle; Osada, Takuya; Liu, Congxiao; Yang, Xiao Y; Dodd, Rebecca D; Herndon, James E; Meng, Boyu; Kirsch, David G; Lyerly, H Kim; Dewhirst, Mark W; Fecci, Peter; Walder, Harold; Spector, Neil L

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates X-PACT (X-ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy): a new approach for the treatment of solid cancer. X-PACT utilizes psoralen, a potent anti-cancer therapeutic with current application to proliferative disease and extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) of cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma. An immunogenic role for light-activated psoralen has been reported, contributing to long-term clinical responses. Psoralen therapies have to-date been limited to superficial or extracorporeal scenarios due to the requirement for psoralen activation by UVA light, which has limited penetration in tissue. X-PACT solves this challenge by activating psoralen with UV light emitted from novel non-tethered phosphors (co-incubated with psoralen) that absorb x-rays and re-radiate (phosphoresce) at UV wavelengths. The efficacy of X-PACT was evaluated in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. In-vitro studies utilized breast (4T1), glioma (CT2A) and sarcoma (KP-B) cell lines. Cells were exposed to X-PACT treatments where the concentrations of drug (psoralen and phosphor) and radiation parameters (energy, dose, and dose rate) were varied. Efficacy was evaluated primarily using flow cell cytometry in combination with complimentary assays, and the in-vivo mouse study. In an in-vitro study, we show that X-PACT induces significant tumor cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity, unlike psoralen or phosphor alone (p<0.0001). We also show that apoptosis increases as doses of phosphor, psoralen, or radiation increase. Finally, in an in-vivo pilot study of BALBc mice with syngeneic 4T1 tumors, we show that the rate of tumor growth is slower with X-PACT than with saline or AMT + X-ray (p<0.0001). Overall these studies demonstrate a potential therapeutic effect for X-PACT, and provide a foundation and rationale for future studies. In summary, X-PACT represents a novel treatment approach in which well-tolerated low doses of x-ray radiation are delivered to a specific tumor site to generate UVA light which

  9. Subgenual cingulate cortical activity predicts the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Argyelan, M; Lencz, T; Kaliora, S; Sarpal, D K; Weissman, N; Kingsley, P B; Malhotra, A K; Petrides, G

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for depression, yet its mechanism of action is unknown. Our goal was to investigate the neurobiological underpinnings of ECT response using longitudinally collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) in 16 patients with treatment-resistant depression and 10 healthy controls. Patients received bifrontal ECT 3 times a week under general anesthesia. We acquired rs-fMRI at three time points: at baseline, after the 1st ECT administration and after the course of the ECT treatment; depression was assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The primary measure derived from rs-fMRI was fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF), which provides an unbiased voxel-wise estimation of brain activity. We also conducted seed-based functional connectivity analysis based on our primary findings. We compared treatment-related changes in HAM-D scores with pre- and post-treatment fALFF and connectivity measures. Subcallosal cingulate cortex (SCC) demonstrated higher BOLD signal fluctuations (fALFF) at baseline in depressed patients, and SCC fALFF decreased over the course of treatment. The baseline level of fALFF of SCC predicted response to ECT. In addition, connectivity of SCC with bilateral hippocampus, bilateral temporal pole, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex was significantly reduced over the course of treatment. These results suggest that the antidepressant effect of ECT may be mediated by downregulation of SCC activity and connectivity. SCC function may serve as an important biomarker of target engagement in the development of novel therapies for depression that is resistant to treatment with standard medications. PMID:27115120

  10. Subgenual cingulate cortical activity predicts the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Argyelan, M; Lencz, T; Kaliora, S; Sarpal, D K; Weissman, N; Kingsley, P B; Malhotra, A K; Petrides, G

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for depression, yet its mechanism of action is unknown. Our goal was to investigate the neurobiological underpinnings of ECT response using longitudinally collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) in 16 patients with treatment-resistant depression and 10 healthy controls. Patients received bifrontal ECT 3 times a week under general anesthesia. We acquired rs-fMRI at three time points: at baseline, after the 1st ECT administration and after the course of the ECT treatment; depression was assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The primary measure derived from rs-fMRI was fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF), which provides an unbiased voxel-wise estimation of brain activity. We also conducted seed-based functional connectivity analysis based on our primary findings. We compared treatment-related changes in HAM-D scores with pre- and post-treatment fALFF and connectivity measures. Subcallosal cingulate cortex (SCC) demonstrated higher BOLD signal fluctuations (fALFF) at baseline in depressed patients, and SCC fALFF decreased over the course of treatment. The baseline level of fALFF of SCC predicted response to ECT. In addition, connectivity of SCC with bilateral hippocampus, bilateral temporal pole, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex was significantly reduced over the course of treatment. These results suggest that the antidepressant effect of ECT may be mediated by downregulation of SCC activity and connectivity. SCC function may serve as an important biomarker of target engagement in the development of novel therapies for depression that is resistant to treatment with standard medications. PMID:27115120

  11. Selecting patients with severe sepsis for drotrecogin alfa (activated) therapy.

    PubMed

    Sollet, Jean-Pierre; Garber, Gary E

    2002-12-01

    Selecting patients for drotrecogin alfa (activated) (Xigris; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) therapy outside of a clinical trial setting requires knowledge of the rationale that led the Protein C Worldwide Evaluation in Severe Sepsis (PROWESS) investigators to select the various entry criteria for the trial. Enrollment criteria for the study included a known or suspected infection, presence of at least 3 systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and dysfunction of > or =1 organ or system. The infection criteria used in PROWESS were designed to be straightforward and were based on common clinical and radiological data. Although previous definitions of sepsis required only 2 SIRS criteria, the PROWESS trial investigators required the presence of > or =3 SIRS criteria to improve the sensitivity and specificity of these criteria for the diagnosis of sepsis. Acute organ dysfunction, the diagnostic criterion for severe sepsis, was used to define the study population because it identifies patients at significant risk of death. Characteristics of drotrecogin alfa (activated)-treated patients, including infection, modified SIRS criteria, and organ dysfunction, were similar to those of the placebo group and the general sepsis population. Proper clinical judgment and use of the these inclusion criteria as a guide will help clinicians select and treat sepsis patients with drotrecogin alfa (activated). PMID:12521613

  12. Monte Carlo modelling of daylight activated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. L.; Wood, K.; Valentine, R. M.; Brown, C. T. A.; Moseley, H.

    2015-05-01

    The treatment of superficial skin lesions via daylight activated photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been explored theoretically with three dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo radiation transfer simulations. For similar parameters and conditions, daylight activated PDT was compared to conventional PDT using a commercially available light source. Under reasonable assumptions for the optical properties of the tissue, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) concentration and a treatment dose of 75 J cm-2, it was found that during a clear summer day an effective treatment depth of over 2 mm can be achieved after 30 min of daylight illumination at a latitude of 56 degrees North. The same light dose would require 2.5 h of daylight illumination during an overcast summer day where a treatment depth of about 2 mm can be achieved. For conventional PDT the developed model suggests that 15 min of illumination is required to deliver a light dose of 75 J cm-2, which would result in an effective treatment depth of about 3 mm. The model developed here allows for the determination of photo-toxicity in skin tissue as a function of depth for different weather conditions as well as for conventional light sources. Our theoretical investigation supports clinical studies and shows that daylight activated PDT has the potential for treating superficial skin lesions during different weather conditions.

  13. PAT Program Description. Parent-Child Programs. District 742 Community Education's Early Childhood Family Education Project [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoodecheck, Jeanne; Kearns, Ellen

    Project PAT (Parents Are Teachers), a program for parents and their children from birth through 3 years, is described. PAT is a nationally validated Title III, Elementary and Secondary Education Act demonstration project in the St. Cloud Community Schools district of Minnesota. The focus of PAT is the quality of the parent-child relationship and…

  14. Issues in development, evaluation, and use of the NASA Preflight Adaptation Trainer (PAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Norman E.; Kennedy, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    The Preflight Adaptation Trainer (PAT) is intended to reduce or alleviate space adaptation syndrome by providing opportunities for portions of that adaptation to occur under normal gravity conditions prior to space flight. Since the adaptation aspects of the PAT objectives involve modification not only of the behavior of the trainee, but also of sensiomotor skills which underly the behavioral generation, the defining of training objectives of the PAT utilizes four mechanisms: familiarization, demonstration, training and adaptation. These mechanisms serve as structural reference points for evaluation, drive the content and organization of the training procedures, and help to define the roles of the PAT instructors and operators. It was determined that three psychomotor properties are most critical for PAT evaluation: reliability; sensitivity; and relevance. It is cause for concern that the number of measures available to examine PAT effects exceed those that can be properly studied with the available sample sizes; special attention will be required in selection of the candidate measure set. The issues in PAT use and application within a training system context are addressed through linking the three training related mechanisms of familiarization, demonstration and training to the fourth mechanism, adaptation.

  15. Structural insights into HetR−PatS interaction involved in cyanobacterial pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-Xi; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Zhao, Meng-Xi; Cai, Kun; Liu, Sanling; Wen, Bin; Lv, Pei; Zhang, Yonghui; Peng, Junhui; Zhong, Hui; Yu, Hong-Mei; Ren, Yan-Min; Zhang, Zhiyong; Tian, Changlin; Wu, Qingfa; Oliveberg, Mikael; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The one-dimensional pattern of heterocyst in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is coordinated by the transcription factor HetR and PatS peptide. Here we report the complex structures of HetR binding to DNA, and its hood domain (HetRHood) binding to a PatS-derived hexapeptide (PatS6) at 2.80 and 2.10 Å, respectively. The intertwined HetR dimer possesses a couple of novel HTH motifs, each of which consists of two canonical α-helices in the DNA-binding domain and an auxiliary α-helix from the flap domain of the neighboring subunit. Two PatS6 peptides bind to the lateral clefts of HetRHood, and trigger significant conformational changes of the flap domain, resulting in dissociation of the auxiliary α-helix and eventually release of HetR from the DNA major grove. These findings provide the structural insights into a prokaryotic example of Turing model. PMID:26576507

  16. Laser light triggered-activated carbon nanosystem for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Maoquan; Peng, Jinliang; Zhao, Jiajia; Liang, Shanlu; Shao, Yuxiang; Wu, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Among carbon-based nanomaterials, activated carbon (AC) may be an ideal candidate as a carrier for tumor therapeutic agents. Here we found a new property of nanoscale activated carbon (NAC) with narrow size distribution, namely the rapid conversion of light to thermal energy both in vitro and in vivo. An aqueous suspension of 200 μL of NAC (1 mg/mL) exhibited a rapid temperature increase of more than 35 °C after irradiation for 20 min with a 655-nm laser; this was within the temperature range for effective tumor treatment. We demonstrated that lung cancer cells (H-1299) incubated with bamboo nano-AC (BNAC) were killed with high efficiency after laser irradiation. In addition, mouse tumors with sizes smaller than the laser spot that had been injected with BNAC disappeared after irradiation. For tumors larger than the laser spot area, the incorporation of the photosensitizer ZnPc obviously increased the tumor growth inhibition efficiency of BNAC. BNAC-ZnPc was found to exhibit a synergistic effect when photothermal and photodynamic therapies were administered in combination. These results indicated that NAC can be used for high efficiency cancer phototherapy. PMID:23228422

  17. Active immunization therapies for Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Achim; Tierney, Lanay; Mandler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Vaccination is increasingly being investigated as a potential treatment for synucleinopathies, a group of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and dementia with Lewy bodies associated with α-synuclein pathology. All lack a causal therapy. Development of novel, disease-altering treatment strategies is urgently needed. Vaccination has positioned itself as a prime strategy for addressing these diseases because it is broadly applicable, requires infrequent administration, and maintains low production costs for treating a large population or as a preventive measure. Current evidence points to a causal role of misfolded α-synuclein in the development and progression of synucleinopathies. In the past decade, significant progress in active immunization against α-synuclein has been shown both in preclinical animal models and in early clinical development. In this review, we describe the state-of-the-art in active immunization approaches to synucleinopathies, with a focus on advances in Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple-system atrophy (MSA). We first review preclinical animal models, highlighting their progress in translation to the clinical setting. We then discuss current clinical applications, stressing different approaches taken to address α-synuclein pathology. Finally, we address challenges, trends, and future perspectives of current vaccination programs. PMID:26260853

  18. Pointing, acquisition and tracking (PAT) subsystems and components for optical space communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, R. H.; Kugel, U.

    1989-10-01

    The pointing, acquisition, and tracking (PAT) subsystem that will be incorporated by optical space communications transceivers must furnish very precise beam steering due to the highly collimated nature of the laser beams employed. The PAT subsystem must also be able to cover an angular rate of more than a full hemisphere, if it is intended for use on a LEO satellite which communicates with another in GEO. The present PAT is composed of a coarse-pointing assembly, a fine-pointing assembly, and a point-ahead assembly; their interactive operation is managed by a control law electronics unit. A CO2 laser is assumed to be the transmitter.

  19. Oracle Applications Patch Administration Tool (PAT) Beta Version

    2002-01-04

    PAT is a Patch Administration Tool that provides analysis, tracking, and management of Oracle Application patches. This includes capabilities as outlined below: Patch Analysis & Management Tool Outline of capabilities: Administration Patch Data Maintenance -- track Oracle Application patches applied to what database instance & machine Patch Analysis capture text files (readme.txt and driver files) form comparison detail report comparison detail PL/SQL package comparison detail SQL scripts detail JSP module comparison detail Parse and loadmore » the current applptch.txt (10.7) or load patch data from Oracle Application database patch tables (11i) Display Analysis -- Compare patch to be applied with current Oracle Application installed Appl_top code versions Patch Detail Module comparison detail Analyze and display one Oracle Application module patch. Patch Management -- automatic queue and execution of patches Administration Parameter maintenance -- setting for directory structure of Oracle Application appl_top Validation data maintenance -- machine names and instances to patch Operation Patch Data Maintenance Schedule a patch (queue for later execution) Run a patch (queue for immediate execution) Review the patch logs Patch Management Reports« less

  20. Oracle Applications Patch Administration Tool (PAT) Beta Version

    SciTech Connect

    2002-01-04

    PAT is a Patch Administration Tool that provides analysis, tracking, and management of Oracle Application patches. This includes capabilities as outlined below: Patch Analysis & Management Tool Outline of capabilities: Administration Patch Data Maintenance -- track Oracle Application patches applied to what database instance & machine Patch Analysis capture text files (readme.txt and driver files) form comparison detail report comparison detail PL/SQL package comparison detail SQL scripts detail JSP module comparison detail Parse and load the current applptch.txt (10.7) or load patch data from Oracle Application database patch tables (11i) Display Analysis -- Compare patch to be applied with current Oracle Application installed Appl_top code versions Patch Detail Module comparison detail Analyze and display one Oracle Application module patch. Patch Management -- automatic queue and execution of patches Administration Parameter maintenance -- setting for directory structure of Oracle Application appl_top Validation data maintenance -- machine names and instances to patch Operation Patch Data Maintenance Schedule a patch (queue for later execution) Run a patch (queue for immediate execution) Review the patch logs Patch Management Reports

  1. Integrating Therapy Dog Teams in a Physical Activity Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obrusnikova, Iva; Bibik, Janice M.; Cavalier, Albert R.; Manley, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    The use of therapy-dog teams in programs for children with disabilities is becoming increasingly popular in school and therapeutic settings and has been shown to provide physical, social, and emotional benefits for the children. This article describes the basic steps for implementing therapy dog-assisted activities in physical activity programs…

  2. Solid state laser communications in space (SOLACOS) position, acquisition, and tracking (PAT) subsystem implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemmig, Joerg; Pribil, Klaus

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents the concept and implementation aspects of the Pointing, Acquisition and Tracking Subsystem (PAT) which is developed in the frame of the SOLACOS (Solid State Laser Communications in Space) program.

  3. Discharge diversion in the Patía River delta, the Colombian Pacific: Geomorphic and ecological consequences for mangrove ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan D.; Cantera, Jaime R.

    2013-10-01

    In the Patía River delta, the best-developed delta on the western margin of South America, a major water diversion started in 1972. The diversion of the Patía flow to the Sanquianga River, the latter a small stream draining internal lakes from the Pacific lowlands, shifted the active delta plain from the south to the north and changed the northern estuarine system into an active delta plain. The Sanquianga Mangrove National Park, a mangrove reserve measuring 800 km2, lies in this former estuary, where major hydrologic and sedimentation changes are occurring. Overall, major environmental consequences of this discharge diversion in terms of geomorphic changes along distributary channels and ecological impacts on mangrove ecosystems are evidenced by: (1) distributary channel accretion by operating processes such as sedimentation, overbank flow, increasing width of levees, sedimentation in crevasses, interdistributary channel fill, and colonization of pioneer mangrove; (2) freshening conditions in the Sanquianga distributary channel, a hydrologic change that has shifted the upper estuarine region (salinity <1%) downstream; (3) downstream advance of freshwater vegetation, which is invading channel banks in the lower and mixing estuarine zones; (4) die-off of approximately 5200 ha of mangrove near the delta apex at Bocas de Satinga, where the highest sediment accumulation rates occur; and (5) recurrent periods of mangrove defoliation due to a worm plague. Further analyses indicate strong mangrove erosion along transgressive barrier islands on the former delta plain. Here tectonic-induced subsidence, relative sea-level rise, and sediment starving conditions due to the channel diversion, are the main causes of the observed retreating conditions of mangrove communities. Our data also indicate that the Patía River has the highest sediment load (27 × 106 t yr-1) and basin-wide sediment yield (1500 t km-2 yr-1) on the west coast of South America. Erosion rates from the Pat

  4. Air transport of plutonium metal: content expansion initiative for the plutonium air transportable (PAT01) packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Caviness, Michael L; Mann, Paul T

    2010-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has submitted an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the air shipment of plutonium metal within the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging. The PAT-1 packaging is currently authorized for the air transport of plutonium oxide in solid form only. The INMM presentation will provide a limited overview of the scope of the plutonium metal initiative and provide a status of the NNSA application to the NRC.

  5. Air transport of plutonium metal : content expansion initiative for the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Paul T.; Caviness, Michael L.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki

    2010-06-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has submitted an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the air shipment of plutonium metal within the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging. The PAT-1 packaging is currently authorized for the air transport of plutonium oxide in solid form only. The INMM presentation will provide a limited overview of the scope of the plutonium metal initiative and provide a status of the NNSA application to the NRC.

  6. GeoPAT: A toolbox for pattern-based information retrieval from large geospatial databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiewicz, Jarosław; Netzel, Paweł; Stepinski, Tomasz

    2015-07-01

    Geospatial Pattern Analysis Toolbox (GeoPAT) is a collection of GRASS GIS modules for carrying out pattern-based geospatial analysis of images and other spatial datasets. The need for pattern-based analysis arises when images/rasters contain rich spatial information either because of their very high resolution or their very large spatial extent. Elementary units of pattern-based analysis are scenes - patches of surface consisting of a complex arrangement of individual pixels (patterns). GeoPAT modules implement popular GIS algorithms, such as query, overlay, and segmentation, to operate on the grid of scenes. To achieve these capabilities GeoPAT includes a library of scene signatures - compact numerical descriptors of patterns, and a library of distance functions - providing numerical means of assessing dissimilarity between scenes. Ancillary GeoPAT modules use these functions to construct a grid of scenes or to assign signatures to individual scenes having regular or irregular geometries. Thus GeoPAT combines knowledge retrieval from patterns with mapping tasks within a single integrated GIS environment. GeoPAT is designed to identify and analyze complex, highly generalized classes in spatial datasets. Examples include distinguishing between different styles of urban settlements using VHR images, delineating different landscape types in land cover maps, and mapping physiographic units from DEM. The concept of pattern-based spatial analysis is explained and the roles of all modules and functions are described. A case study example pertaining to delineation of landscape types in a subregion of NLCD is given. Performance evaluation is included to highlight GeoPAT's applicability to very large datasets. The GeoPAT toolbox is available for download from

  7. The Formation and Chronology of the PAT 91501 Impact-Melt L-Chondrite with Vesicle-Metal-Sulfide Assemblages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedix, G. K.; Ketcham, R. A.; Wilson, L.; McCoy, T. J.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Herzog, G. F.; Xue, S.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    2007-01-01

    The L chondrite Patuxent Range (PAT) 41 91501 is an 8.5-kg unshocked, homogeneous, igneous-textured impact melt that cooled slowly compared to other meteoritic impact melts in a crater floor melt sheet or sub-crater dike. We conducted mineralogical and tomographic studies of previously unstudied mm- to cm-sized metal-sulfide-vesicle assemblages and chronologic studies of the silicate host. Metal-sulfide clasts constitute about 1 vol.%, comprise zoned taenite, troilite and pentlandite, and exhibit a consistent orientation between metal and sulfide and of metal-sulfide contacts. Vesicles make up approximately 2 vol.% and exhibit a similar orientation of long axes. Ar-39-Ar-40 measurements date the time of impact at 4.461 +/- 0.008 Gyr B.P. Cosmogenic noble gases and Be-10 and Al-2l activities suggest a pre-atmospheric radius of 40-60 cm and a cosmic ray exposure age of 25-29 Myr, similar to ages of a cluster of L chondrites. PAT 91501 dates the oldest known impact on the L chondrite parent body. The dominant vesicle-forming gas was S2 (approximately 15-20 ppm), which formed in equilibrium with impact-melted sulfides. The meteorite formed in an impact melt dike beneath a crater, as did other impact melted L chondrites, such as Chico. Cooling and solidification occurred over approximately 2 hours. During this time, approximately 90% of metal and sulfide segregated from the local melt. Remaining metal and sulfide grains oriented themselves in the local gravitational field, a feature nearly unique among meteorites. Many of these metal sulfide grains adhered to vesicles to form aggregates that may have been close to neutrally buoyant. These aggregates would have been carried upward with the residual melt, inhibiting further buoyancy-driven segregation. Although similar processes operated individually in other chondritic impact melts, their interaction produced the unique assemblage observed in PAT 91501.

  8. Active Negative Pressure Peritoneal Therapy After Abbreviated Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Derek J.; Faris, Peter D.; Ball, Chad G.; Kubes, Paul; Tiruta, Corina; Xiao, Zhengwen; Holodinsky, Jessalyn K.; McBeth, Paul B.; Doig, Christopher J.; Jenne, Craig N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether active negative pressure peritoneal therapy with the ABThera temporary abdominal closure device reduces systemic inflammation after abbreviated laparotomy. Background: Excessive systemic inflammation after abdominal injury or intra-abdominal sepsis is associated with poor outcomes. Methods: We conducted a single-center, randomized controlled trial. Forty-five adults with abdominal injury (46.7%) or intra-abdominal sepsis (52.3%) were randomly allocated to the ABThera (n = 23) or Barker's vacuum pack (n = 22). On study days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 28, blood and peritoneal fluid were collected. The primary endpoint was the difference in the plasma concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) 24 and 48 hours after temporary abdominal closure application. Results: There was a significantly lower peritoneal fluid drainage from the ABThera at 48 hours after randomization. Despite this, there was no difference in plasma concentration of IL-6 at baseline versus 24 (P = 0.52) or 48 hours (P = 0.82) between the groups. There was also no significant intergroup difference in the plasma concentrations of IL-1β, −8, −10, or −12 p70 or tumor necrosis factor α between these time points. The cumulative incidence of primary fascial closure at 90 days was similar between groups (hazard ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.82–3.0; P = 0.17). However, 90-day mortality was improved in the ABThera group (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.11–0.93; P = 0.04). Conclusions: This trial observed a survival difference between patients randomized to the ABThera versus Barker's vacuum pack that did not seem to be mediated by an improvement in peritoneal fluid drainage, fascial closure rates, or markers of systemic inflammation. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01355094. PMID:25536308

  9. Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available Data and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Marcel; Fritz, Thorsten; Madershahian, Navid; Pfister, Roman; Reuter, Hannes

    2016-04-01

    Progression of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is promoted by sympathovagal imbalance. Baroreflex activation therapy, i.e., electrical stimulation of baroreceptors at the carotid sinus, can restore sympathovagal balance. Large animal studies of baroreflex activation therapy revealed improvements in cardiac function, susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias, and a survival benefit as compared to untreated controls. Recently, the first randomized and controlled trial of optimal medical and device therapy alone or plus baroreflex activation therapy in patients suffering from HFrEF was published. It demonstrated a reasonable safety profile in this severely ill patient population. Moreover, the study found significant improvements in New York Heart Association class, quality of life, 6-min walk distance, and NT-proBNP levels. This review provides an overview on baroreflex activation therapy for the treatment of HFrEF-from the concept and preclinical findings to most recent clinical data and upcoming trials. PMID:26879389

  10. [Highly Active AntiRetroviral Therapy and opportunistic protozoan infections].

    PubMed

    Pozio, E

    2004-06-01

    Opportunistic parasite infections (OPIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in persons infected with HIV. In industrialised countries, the use of Highly Active AntiRetroviral Therapy (HAART) results to be effective in suppressing the HIV viral load, with a quantitative and qualitative improvement in the CD4+ T-cell count followed by a strong reduction of opportunistic infections including those caused by parasites. These successes have been mainly attributed to the reconstitution of the cell immunity, which play the most important role in controlling OPIs. However, there are many clinical reports and several laboratory results, which suggest that the control of OPIs in HIV-positive persons under HAART is also induced by the anti-HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), which inhibit the aspartyl proteases of the parasites. The non-conventional use of HIV-PIs seems to be an alternative way for the treatment of parasitic infections, which should be deeply investigated. Of five longitudinal studies carried out before and after the introduction of HAART, four studies showed a strong reduction of toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) in HIV-positive persons under HAART, whereas in another study, no difference was observed in the incidence rate of TE before and after the introduction of HAART. The influence of HAART in reducing TE has been also confirmed in a randomised, controlled clinical trial, which showed that there is no increase in the risk of developing TE after beginning HAART, even though HIV-infected persons with TE had a discontinuing prophylaxis for Toxoplasma gondii. Four HIV protease inhibitors were tested against the T. gondii virulent RH strain in vitro, alone or in association with pyrimethamine or sulfadiazine. Ritonavir and nelfinavir were highly inhibitory for the parasite growth. Furthermore, none of the antiviral drugs negatively affected the anti-Toxoplasma activity of pyrimethamine or sulfadiazine. In HIV-Leishmania co-infections, a changing pattern

  11. Multifunctional Gold Nanostars for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Fales, Andrew; Register, Janna; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS) exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), two-photon photoluminescence (TPL) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  12. Multifunctional gold nanostars for molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Fales, Andrew M.; Register, Janna K.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS) exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), two-photon photoluminescence (TPL), and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy (PDT). This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed. PMID:26322306

  13. Enfermedad diarreica aguda por Escherichia coli patógenas en Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G.

    2014-01-01

    Resumen Las cepas de E. coli patógenas intestinales son causas importantes de la enfermedad diarreica aguda (EDA) en niños menores de 5 años en América Latina, África y Asia y están asociadas a alta mortalidad en niños en las comunidades más pobres de África y el Sudeste Asiático. Estudios sobre el papel de las E. coli patógenas intestinales en la EDA infantil en Colombia y otros países de América Latina son limitados debido a la carencia de ensayos para detección de estos patógenos en los laboratorios clínicos de centros de salud. Estudios recientes han reportado la detección de E. coli patógenas intestinales en Colombia, siendo la E. coli enterotoxigénica la cepa más frecuentemente asociada a diarrea en niños menores de 5 años. Otros patógenos detectados en estos pacientes incluyen las E. coli enteroagregativa, enteropatógena, productora de toxina Shiga, y de adherencia difusa. Con base en estudios que reportan la presencia de E. coli productora de toxina Shiga y E. coli enteroagregativa en carnes y vegetales en supermercados, se cree que productos alimentarios contaminados contribuyen a la transmisión de estos patógenos y a la infección del huésped susceptible. Más estudios son necesarios para evaluar los mecanismos de transmisión, el impacto en la epidemiologia de la EDA, y las pautas de manejo y prevención de estos patógenos que afectan la población pediátrica en Colombia. PMID:25491457

  14. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K.; Cifuente, Javier O.; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E.

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl–CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl–CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  15. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K; Cifuente, Javier O; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl-CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl-CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  16. PAATCH: Program of Auditory Articulation Therapy for Children. Expanded Version. New Carryover Home Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Diane Pagnotto

    This program of auditory articulation therapy de-emphasizes production-oriented therapy in working with unintelligible 3-to-6-year-old children. It proposes auditory training activities, which train the child's ears on all sounds in error in order to facilitate readiness for correct production of sounds. Production training is then suggested for…

  17. Human induced discharge diversion in a tropical delta and its environmental implications: The Patía River, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan D.; Kettner, Albert

    2012-03-01

    SummaryThe Patía River, the number one in terms of sediment yield ˜1500 t km-2 yr-1 draining the western South America, has the most extensive and well developed delta on the Pacific coast, measuring 1700 km2. During the Holocene, nature forced the Patía delta to the south; however, a major water diversion, starting in 1972, diverted the Patía flow to the Sanguianga River, the latter, a small stream draining internal lakes from the Pacific lowlands. This human induced discharge diversion shifted the active delta plain back to the north and changed the northern estuarine system into an active delta plain. Overall, major environmental consequences of this discharge diversion in terms of morphological changes along the delta coast and distributary channels, are evidenced by: (1) coastal retreat along the abandoned delta lobe; 63% of the southern shoreline is retreating at maximum rates of 7 m yr-1, with a corresponding coastal land loss of 106 m yr-1; (2) transgressive barrier islands with exposed peat soils in the surf zone; (3) abandonment of former active distributaries in the southern delta plain with associated closing of inlets and formation of ebb tidal deltas; (4) breaching events on barrier islands; and (5) distributary channel accretion in the northern delta plain by morphological processes such as sedimentation (also in crevasses), overbank flow, increasing width of levees, interdistributary channel fill, and colonization of pioneer mangrove. The Sanguianga Mangrove National Park (SMNP), the largest mangrove reserve in Colombia, measuring 800 km2, lies in this former estuary, where major hydrologic and sedimentation changes are occurring. Observed environmental changes in the SMNP, include (1) seaward advance of the sub-aqueous delta front at the Sanquianga inlet evidenced by an increase in tidal flat area from 5.4 Mm2 in 1986 to 14 Mm2 in 2001; (2) freshening conditions in the Sanguianga distributary channel, a hydrologic change that has shifted the

  18. The Catalytic Mechanism of the Marine-Derived Macrocyclase PatGmac.

    PubMed

    Brás, Natércia F; Ferreira, Pedro; Calixto, Ana R; Jaspars, Marcel; Houssen, Wael; Naismith, James H; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ramos, Maria J

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic peptides are a class of compounds with high therapeutic potential, possessing bioactivities including antitumor and antiviral (including anti-HIV). Despite their desirability, efficient design and production of these compounds has not been achieved to date. The catalytic mechanism of patellamide macrocyclization by the PatG macrocyclase domain has been computationally investigated by using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methodology, specifically ONIOM(M06/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff94//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff94). The mechanism proposed herein begins with a proton transfer from Ser783 to His 618 and from the latter to Asp548. Nucleophilic attack of Ser783 on the substrate leads to the formation of an acyl-enzyme covalent complex. The leaving group Ala-Tyr-Asp-Gly (AYDG) of the substrate is protonated by the substrate's N terminus, leading to the breakage of the P1-P1' bond. Finally, the substrate's N terminus attacks the P1 residue, decomposing the acyl-enzyme complex forming the macrocycle. The formation and decomposition of the acyl-enzyme complex have the highest activation free energies (21.1 kcal mol(-1) and 19.8 kcal mol(-1) respectively), typical of serine proteases. Understanding the mechanism behind the macrocyclization of patellamides will be important to the application of the enzymes in the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries. PMID:27389424

  19. Investigating 3-body Decays of Cluster States with the PAT-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Lisa; Ayyad Limonge, Y.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bradt, J.; Cortesi, M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Kolata, J. J.; Meisel, Z.; Bechetti, F. D.; Fritsch, A.; Howard, A.

    2016-03-01

    Recent model calculations with most advanced methods for cluster states have shown the need of experimental data to probe the structure of light exotic nuclei, including those with α-clustering, such as 14C. The Prototype Active Target Time Projection Chamber (PAT-TPC) allows us to investigate these types of structures, giving access to the full excitation function with a single beam energy. This type of experiment measures resonances in 14C that can be compared to the models. With an improved Micromegas pad plane with a circular backgammon design we are able to investigate 3-body decays in addition to 2-body scattering. The measurements were carried out by resonant alpha-scattering on 10Be beam delivered by the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame. We also observed the 3-body decay of the Hoyle State in 12C from a 12N or 12B beam with the same device. Preliminary results will be presented. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  20. Inline monitoring and a PAT strategy for pharmaceutical hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patrick R; Treffer, Daniel; Mohr, Stefan; Roblegg, Eva; Koscher, Gerold; Khinast, Johannes G

    2013-10-15

    Implementation of continuous manufacturing in the pharmaceutical industry requires tight process control. This study focuses on a PAT strategy for hot melt extrusion of vegetable calcium stearate (CaSt) as matrix carrier and paracetamol as active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). The extrusion was monitored using in-line near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. A NIR probe was located in the section between the extrusion screws and the die, using a novel design of the die channel. A chemometric model was developed based on premixes at defined concentrations and was implemented in SIPAT for real time API concentration monitoring. Subsequently, step experiments were performed for different API concentrations, screw speeds and screw designs. The predicted API concentration was in good agreement with the pre-set concentrations. The transition from one API plateau to another was a smooth curve due to the mixing behaviour of the extruder. The accuracy of the model was confirmed via offline HPLC analysis. The screw design was determined as the main influential factor on content uniformity (CU). Additionally the influence of multiple feeders had a significant impact on CU. The results demonstrate that in-line NIR measurements is a powerful tool for process development (e.g., mixing characterization), monitoring and further control strategies. PMID:23911343

  1. Clinical Usefulness of Watch-PAT for Assessing the Surgical Results of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Yoon; Hong, Joon Hyeong; Lee, Jae Heon; Lee, Kyu Eun; Cho, Hyun Sang; Lim, Su Jin; Kwak, Jin Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the accuracy and clinical efficacy of a wrist-worn device that is based on peripheral arterial tonometry (watch-PAT) to evaluate the surgical results of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome subjects. Study Design and Method: Thirty-five subjects who were diagnosed with OSA and underwent sleep surgeries such as septoplasty, tonsillectomy, or uvuloplasty to correct their airway collapse, participated in this study; the watch-PAT-derived respiratory disturbance index (RDI), apnea and hypopnea index (AHI), lowest oxygen saturation, and valid sleep time were measured after the sleep surgery. Results: The present study showed that RDI (32.8 ± 10.7 vs 14.8 ± 7.5), AHI (30.3 ± 8.6 vs 13.4 ± 8.2 events/h), lowest oxygen saturation (78.2% ± 8.4% vs 90.5% ± 7.1%), and valid sleep time (329.1 ± 47.2 min and a postoperative value of 389.1 ± 50.1 min) recovered to within a normal range after surgery in 28 subjects. In addition, good agreement was found between watch-PAT-derived factors and visual analogue scales for changes in subjective symptoms, such as snoring, apnea, and daytime somnolence. Seven of the 35 subjects showed no improvement for their subjective symptoms and complained of snoring and apnea after surgery. We found that the RDI and AHI of those 7 subjects were not reduced, and the changes between pre- and postoperative values which were measured with watch-PAT were minimal. Their postoperative lowest oxygen saturation and valid sleep time were not elevated per the watch-PAT. The results support a strong correlation between the findings from watch-PAT and improved symptoms after surgical correction of an airway collapse. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that the factors measured by the watch-PAT might be reliable indicators of symptomatic changes in OSA subjects after sleep surgery and also shows that the watch-PAT is a highly sensitive portable device for estimating treatment results in OSA. Citation: Park CY

  2. PAT: a protein analysis toolkit for integrated biocomputing on the web

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Jérôme; Chiche, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    PAT, for Protein Analysis Toolkit, is an integrated biocomputing server. The main goal of its design was to facilitate the combination of different processing tools for complex protein analyses and to simplify the automation of repetitive tasks. The PAT server provides a standardized web interface to a wide range of protein analysis tools. It is designed as a streamlined analysis environment that implements many features which strongly simplify studies dealing with protein sequences and structures and improve productivity. PAT is able to read and write data in many bioinformatics formats and to create any desired pipeline by seamlessly sending the output of a tool to the input of another tool. PAT can retrieve protein entries from identifier-based queries by using pre-computed database indexes. Users can easily formulate complex queries combining different analysis tools with few mouse clicks, or via a dedicated macro language, and a web session manager provides direct access to any temporary file generated during the user session. PAT is freely accessible on the Internet at . PMID:15980554

  3. Simulation model and on-ground performances validation of the PAT system for SILEX program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosson, Francois; Doubrere, Patrick; Perez, Eric

    1991-06-01

    A description of the simulation model and the on-ground performances validation of the Acquisition and Tracking (PAT) subsystem and of the European SILEX program is presented. The SILEX scenario is composed of two terminals mounted on LEO orbit (SPOT 4) and geostationary orbit (ARTEMIS) spacecrafts. The PAT subsystem is in charge of the initialization of the link, of the tracking of the incoming beam and of the pointing of the emitted laser beam. A short description of the retained strategies (phases of the PAT mission and operating modes) and functional architecture (control laws and sampling frequencies) is presented. In order to validate the PAT performance assessment, a complete simulation software is developed. The model (equipment modeling, dynamical simulation of the terminal structure, and operating modes management) and the associated outputs are examined in detail. The chosen design and architecture of the PAT validation on a system testbed (STB) are described. The validation of a pointing system for optical intersatellite communication, thanks to the combination of simulations and STB measurements, is shown.

  4. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  5. Heterocyst-Specific Expression of patB, a Gene Required for Nitrogen Fixation in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn M.; Buikema, William J.; Haselkorn, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The patB gene product is required for growth and survival of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 in the absence of combined nitrogen. A patB::gfp fusion demonstrated that this gene is expressed exclusively in heterocysts. patB mutants have a normal initial pattern of heterocyst spacing along the filament but differentiate excess heterocysts after several days in the absence of combined nitrogen. Expression of hetR and patS, two critical regulators of the heterocyst development cascade, are normal for patB mutants, indicating that patB acts downstream of them in the differentiation pathway. A patB deletion mutant suffers an almost complete cessation of growth and nitrogen fixation within 24 h of combined nitrogen removal. In contrast, a new PatB mutant that is defective in its N-terminal ferredoxin domain, or a previously described mutant that has a frameshift removing its C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain, grows very slowly and differentiates multiple contiguous heterocysts under nitrogen-deficient conditions. PMID:12644502

  6. The Effects of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy on Activities Important to Independent School Participation of Children with Hemiparesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of constraint-induced movement therapy (CI therapy) on activities important to school participation in children with hemiparesis. Four children, ages 4-0 to 7-10 participated in an intensive CI therapy program in a clinical setting. Constraining casts were worn 24 hours daily. Therapy was delivered 6 hours…

  7. Biologic therapy improves psoriasis by decreasing the activity of monocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Keiichi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Yamagiwa, Akisa; Saeki, Hidehisa; Kondo, Makoto; Gabazza, Esteban C; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    Therapy with monoclonal antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the interleukin (IL)-12/23 p40 subunit has significantly improved the clinical outcome of patients with psoriasis. These antibodies inhibit the effects of the target cytokines and thus the major concern during their use is the induction of excessive immunosuppression. Recent studies evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of biologic therapy in psoriasis have shown no significant appearance of serious adverse effects including infections and malignancies. However, the immunological consequence and the mechanism by which the blockade of a single cytokine by biologics can successfully control the activity of psoriasis remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effect of biologic therapy on cytokine production of various lymphocytes and on the activity of monocytes and neutrophils in psoriatic patients. Neutrophils, monocytes and T cells were purified from heparinized peripheral venous blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and γ-interferon, TNF-α and IL-17 production from lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometer. The activation maker of neutrophils and the activated subsets of monocytes were also analyzed. Biologic therapy induced no significant changes in the cytokine production by lymphocytes from the skin and gut-homing T cells. However, neutrophil activity and the ratio of activated monocyte population increased in severely psoriatic patients were normalized in psoriatic patients receiving biologic therapy. The present study showed that biologic therapy ameliorates clinical symptoms and controls the immune response in patients with psoriasis. PMID:25099154

  8. RF Manipulation and Detection of Protons in the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Lewis, Raymond A.; Pearson, J. Boise; Sims, W. Herb; Chakrabarti, Suman; Fant, Wallace E.; Stan McDonald

    2003-01-01

    HiPAT is a Penning-Malmberg trap designed to contain 10(exp 12) particles diagnostics of the plasma. Destructive particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and colliding them with a microchannel plate detector (providing number and energy information). The improved RF system has been used to detect various plasma modes for both electron and ion plasmas in the two traps at MSFC, including axd, cyclotron, and diocotron modes. New diagnostics are also being added to HiPAT to measure the axial density distribution of the trapped cloud to match measured RF plasma modes to plasma conditions. In addition, plasma modeling efforts have been started using the XOOPIC code.

  9. Overview of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Sims, W. Herbert; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace; Rodgers, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A general overview of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment is presented. The topics include: 1) Why Antimatter? 2) HiPAT Applicability; 3) Approach-Goals; 4) HiPAT General Layout; 5) Sizing For Containment; 6) Laboratory Operations; 7) Vacuum System Cleaning; 8) Ion Production Via Electron Gun; 9) Particle Capture Via Ion Sources; 10) Ion Beam Steering/Focusing; 11) Ideal Ion Stacking Sequence; 12) Setup For Dynamic Capture; 13) Dynamic Capture of H(+) Ions; 14) Dynamic Capture; 15) Radio Frequency Particle Detection; 16) Radio Frequency Antenna Modeling; and 17) R.F. Stabilization-Low Frequencies. A short presentation of propulsion applications of Antimatter is also given. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  10. Immune activation by combination human lymphokine-activated killer and dendritic cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, E J; Scott, K J; Jennings, V A; Melcher, A A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Optimal cellular immunotherapy for cancer should ideally harness both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. Lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAKs) can trigger early innate killing of tumour targets, whereas long-term adaptive-specific tumour control requires priming of CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) following acquisition of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). As DCs stimulate both innate and adaptive effectors, combination cell therapy using LAKs and DCs has the potential to maximise anti-tumour immune priming. Methods: Reciprocal activation between human clinical grade LAKs and DCs on co-culture, and its immune consequences, was monitored by cell phenotype, cytokine release and priming of both innate and adaptive cytotoxicity against melanoma targets. Results: Co-culture of DCs and LAKs led to phenotypic activation of natural killer (NK) cells within the LAK population, which was associated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and enhanced innate cytotoxicity against tumour cell targets. The LAKs reciprocally matured DCs, and the combination of LAKs and DCs, on addition of melanoma cells, supported priming of specific anti-tumour CTLs better than DCs alone. Conclusion: Clinical-grade LAKs/DCs represents a practical, effective combination cell immunotherapy for stimulation of both innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity in cancer patients. PMID:21847125

  11. Aptamers: Active Targeting Ligands for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment. PMID:25699094

  12. Reduction of salivary tissue factor (thromboplastin) activity by warfarin therapy.

    PubMed

    Zacharski, L R; Rosenstein, R

    1979-03-01

    The coagulant of normal human saliva has been identified as tissue factor (thromboplastin, TF) by virtue of its ability to cause rapid coagulation in plasmas deficient in first-stage coagulation factors and to activate factor x in the presence of factor VII and by virtue of the fact that its activity is expressed only in the presence of factor VII and is inhibited by an antibody to TF. The TF is related to cells and cell fragments in saliva. Salivary TF activity has been found to be significantly reduced in patients taking warfarin. The decline in TF activity during induction of warfarin anticoagulation occurs during the warfarin-induced decline in vitamin-K-dependent clotting factor activity, as judged by the prothrombin time. The decrease in TF activity is not related to a reduction in salivary cell count or total protein content or to a direct effect of warfarin on the assay. It is hypothesized that the mechanism by which warfarin inhibits TF activity may be related to the mechanism by which it inhibits expression of the activity of the vitamin-K-dependent clotting factors. Inhibition of the TF activity may be involved in the antithrombotic effect of warfarin. PMID:760859

  13. [Therapy of activated gonarthrosis with etofenamate cream (Rheumon cream)].

    PubMed

    Gross, W

    1983-11-17

    In a multicenter single-blind study on 60 patients with unilateral gonarthrosis the efficacy and tolerance of etofenamate cream were compared to a commonly used ointment containing salicylic acid and other ingredients. With respect to therapeutic success etofenamate was superior to the control medication. Mobility and circumference of the knee joint as well as pain parameters improved more rapidly in the etofenamate group, whereby the difference between both groups frequently was statistically significant. With the control medication therapy failed in three cases, with etofenamate cream clinical symptoms improved in all patients. With the exception of a transient local reddening of the skin in one patient of the etofenamate group no adverse drug reactions were observed. PMID:6654301

  14. The PATS Peer Support Program: Prevention/Early Intervention for Adolescents Who Have a Parent with Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, John; Bond, Lyndal; O'Brien, Matt; Forer, Danielle; Davies, Liz

    2008-01-01

    PATS (Paying Attention to Self) is a peer support program for adolescent children of parents with a diagnosed mental illness. The program aims to promote positive mental health, reduce the likelihood of mental health difficulties, increase young people's coping skills and empower them to meet their own and their families' needs. PATS combines peer…

  15. Occupational, Physical, and Speech Therapy Treatment Activities during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Dijkers, Marcel P.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Horn, Susan D.; Giuffrida, Clare G.; Timpson, Misti L.; Carroll, Deborah M.; Smout, Randy J.; Hammond, Flora M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe use of Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT) and Speech Therapy (ST) treatment activities throughout the acute rehabilitation stay of patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Design Multi-site prospective observational cohort study. Setting 9 U.S. and 1 Canadian inpatient rehabilitation settings. Participants 2130 patients admitted for initial acute rehabilitation following TBI. Patients were categorized based on admission FIM cognitive scores, resulting in 5 fairly homogenous groups. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Percentage of patients engaged in specific activities and mean time patients engaged in the activities, per 10-hour block of time for OT, PT, and ST combined. Results Therapy activities in OT, PT, and ST across all 5 cognitive groups had a primary focus on basic activities. While advanced activities occurred in each discipline and within each cognitive group, these advanced activities occurred with fewer patients and usually only toward the end of the rehabilitation stay. Conclusions The pattern of activities engaged in was both similar to and different from patterns seen in previous PBE studies with different rehabilitation diagnostic groups. PMID:26212399

  16. The formation and chronology of the PAT 91501 impact-melt L chondrite with vesicle metal sulfide assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedix, G. K.; Ketcham, R. A.; Wilson, L.; McCoy, T. J.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Herzog, G. F.; Xue, S.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    2008-05-01

    The L chondrite Patuxent Range (PAT) 91501 is an 8.5-kg unshocked, homogeneous, igneous-textured impact melt that cooled slowly compared to other meteoritic impact melts in a crater floor melt sheet or sub-crater dike [Mittlefehldt D. W. and Lindstrom M. M. (2001) Petrology and geochemistry of Patuxent Range 91501 and Lewis Cliff 88663. Meteoritics Planet. Sci. 36, 439-457]. We conducted mineralogical and tomographic studies of previously unstudied mm- to cm-sized metal-sulfide-vesicle assemblages and chronologic studies of the silicate host. Metal-sulfide clasts constitute about 1 vol.%, comprise zoned taenite, troilite, and pentlandite, and exhibit a consistent orientation between metal and sulfide and of metal-sulfide contacts. Vesicles make up ˜2 vol.% and exhibit a similar orientation of long axes. 39Ar- 40Ar measurements probably date the time of impact at 4.461 ± 0.008 Gyr B.P. Cosmogenic noble gases and 10Be and 26Al activities suggest a pre-atmospheric radius of 40-60 cm and a cosmic ray exposure age of 25-29 Myr, similar to ages of a cluster of L chondrites. PAT 91501 dates the oldest known impact on the L chondrite parent body. The dominant vesicle-forming gas was S 2 (˜15-20 ppm), which formed in equilibrium with impact-melted sulfides. The meteorite formed in an impact melt dike beneath a crater, as did other impact melted L chondrites, such as Chico. Cooling and solidification occurred over ˜2 h. During this time, ˜90% of metal and sulfide segregated from the local melt. Remaining metal and sulfide grains oriented themselves in the local gravitational field, a feature nearly unique among meteorites. Many of these metal-sulfide grains adhered to vesicles to form aggregates that may have been close to neutrally buoyant. These aggregates would have been carried upward with the residual melt, inhibiting further buoyancy-driven segregation. Although similar processes operated individually in other chondritic impact melts, their interaction produced

  17. Design and Fabrication of Cryostat Interface and Electronics for High Performance Antimatter Trap (HI-PAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gerald A.

    1999-01-01

    Included in Appendix I to this report is a complete set of design and assembly schematics for the high vacuum inner trap assembly, cryostat interfaces and electronic components for the MSFC HI-PAT. Also included in the final report are summaries of vacuum tests, and electronic tests performed upon completion of the assembly.

  18. THz spectroscopy: An emerging technology for pharmaceutical development and pharmaceutical Process Analytical Technology (PAT) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huiquan; Khan, Mansoor

    2012-08-01

    As an emerging technology, THz spectroscopy has gained increasing attention in the pharmaceutical area during the last decade. This attention is due to the fact that (1) it provides a promising alternative approach for in-depth understanding of both intermolecular interaction among pharmaceutical molecules and pharmaceutical product quality attributes; (2) it provides a promising alternative approach for enhanced process understanding of certain pharmaceutical manufacturing processes; and (3) the FDA pharmaceutical quality initiatives, most noticeably, the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) initiative. In this work, the current status and progress made so far on using THz spectroscopy for pharmaceutical development and pharmaceutical PAT applications are reviewed. In the spirit of demonstrating the utility of first principles modeling approach for addressing model validation challenge and reducing unnecessary model validation "burden" for facilitating THz pharmaceutical PAT applications, two scientific case studies based on published THz spectroscopy measurement results are created and discussed. Furthermore, other technical challenges and opportunities associated with adapting THz spectroscopy as a pharmaceutical PAT tool are highlighted.

  19. Teacher's PAT? Multiple-Role Principal-Agent Theory, Education Politics, and Bureaucrat Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhuysse, Pieter; Sulitzeanu-Kenan, Raanan

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to current debates about political power and agency relationships in education and other public sectors. In a recent clarion call for a major redirection of political principal-agent theories (PAT), Terry Moe has argued that standard information asymmetries ought no longer to be regarded as the sole foundation of…

  20. Comparing EndoPAT and BIOPAC measurement of vascular responses to mental stress.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Nelson, Rebecca E; Felmlee-Devine, M Donna; Brown, Troy E; Lerman, Amir

    2011-06-01

    There are currently no comparison measurements of stress-induced changes in vascular function during acute mental stress tests to measurements made by BIOPAC MP150 systems technology, a standard polygraph device used to detect deception during polygraph examinations in military or law enforcement applications. Vascular responses to reactive hyperaemia and acute mental stress in 25 healthy subjects were measured by both peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT) and a blood pressure cuff attached to a pressure transducer (BIOPAC) and compared. Reactive hyperaemia was performed at baseline and following three acute mental stress tests. There was no difference in vascular reactivity at baseline and following acute mental stress, as measured by EndoPAT or BIOPAC systems (p > 0·05). Mental stress ratios measured by EndoPAT were significantly different than those measured by BIOPAC (p < 0·01). These data suggest that EndoPAT measurements of vascular responses to acute mental stress may be more specific and sensitive than measurements using the BIOPAC system. PMID:21671245

  1. Pat Conroy's "Gutter Language": "Prince of Tides" in a Lowcountry High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the controversy sparked by Pat Conroy's novel "The Prince of Tides" when it was included in a reading list for an advanced-placement eleventh grade English class. Discusses Conroy's approach to writing and his experience as an unconventional teacher. (PRA)

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beer Spoilage Bacterium Megasphaera cerevisiae Strain PAT 1T

    PubMed Central

    Kutumbaka, Kirthi K.; Pasmowitz, Joshua; Mategko, James; Reyes, Dindo; Friedrich, Alex; Han, Sukkyun; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Janagama, Harish K.; Nadala, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    The genus Megasphaera harbors important spoilage organisms that cause beer spoilage by producing off flavors, undesirable aroma, and turbidity. Megasphaera cerevisiae is mainly found in nonpasteurized low-alcohol beer. In this study, we report the draft genome of the type strain of the genus, M. cerevisiae strain PAT 1T. PMID:26358606

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beer Spoilage Bacterium Megasphaera cerevisiae Strain PAT 1T.

    PubMed

    Kutumbaka, Kirthi K; Pasmowitz, Joshua; Mategko, James; Reyes, Dindo; Friedrich, Alex; Han, Sukkyun; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Janagama, Harish K; Nadala, Cesar; Samadpour, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    The genus Megasphaera harbors important spoilage organisms that cause beer spoilage by producing off flavors, undesirable aroma, and turbidity. Megasphaera cerevisiae is mainly found in nonpasteurized low-alcohol beer. In this study, we report the draft genome of the type strain of the genus, M. cerevisiae strain PAT 1(T). PMID:26358606

  4. Reconstruction of undersampled radial PatLoc imaging using Total Generalized Variation

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Florian; Schultz, Gerrit; Bredies, Kristian; Gallichan, Daniel; Zaitsev, Maxim; Hennig, Jürgen; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    In the case of radial imaging with nonlinear spatial encoding fields, a prominent star-shaped artifact has been observed if a spin distribution is encoded with an undersampled trajectory. This work presents a new iterative reconstruction method based on the total generalized variation (TGV), which reduces this artifact. For this approach, a sampling operator (as well as its adjoint) is needed that maps data from PatLoc k-space to the final image space. It is shown that this can be realized as a Type-3 non-uniform FFT, which is implemented by a combination of a Type-1 and Type-2 non-uniform FFT. Using this operator, it is also possible to implement an iterative conjugate gradient (CG) SENSE based method for PatLoc reconstruction, which leads to a significant reduction of computation time in comparison to conventional PatLoc image reconstruction methods. Results from numerical simulations and in-vivo PatLoc measurements with as few as 16 radial projections are presented, which demonstrate significant improvements in image quality with the TGV based approach. PMID:22847824

  5. Combined Alloreactive CTL Cellular Therapy with Prodrug Activator Gene Therapy in a Model of Breast Cancer Metastatic to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michelle J.; Malone, Colin C.; Erickson, Kate L.; Lin, Amy; Soto, Horacio; Ha, Edward T.; Kamijima, Shuichi; Inagaki, Akihito; Takahashi, Masamichi; Kato, Yuki; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Mueller, Barbara M.; Kruse, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Individual or combined strategies of cellular therapy with alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (alloCTL) and gene therapy employing retroviral replicating vectors (RRV) encoding a suicide prodrug activating gene were explored for the treatment of breast tumors metastatic to the brain. Experimental Design AlloCTL, sensitized to the human leukocyte antigens of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, were examined in vitro for anti-tumor functionality toward breast cancer targets. RRV encoding the yeast cytosine deaminase (CD) gene was tested in vivo for virus spread, ability to infect, and kill breast cancer targets when exposed to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Individual and combination treatments were tested in subcutaneous and intracranial xenograft models with 231BR, a brain tropic variant. Results AlloCTL preparations were cytotoxic, proliferated and produced interferon-gamma when coincubated with target cells displaying relevant HLA. In vivo, intratumorally-placed alloCTL trafficked through one established intracranial 231BR focus to another in contralateral brain and induced tumor cell apoptosis. RRV-CD efficiently spread in vivo, infected 231BR and induced their apoptosis upon 5-FC exposure. Subcutaneous tumor volumes were significantly reduced in alloCTL and/or gene therapy treated groups compared to control groups. Mice with established intracranial 231BR tumors treated with combined alloCTL and RRV-CD had a median survival of 97.5 days compared with single modalities (50–83 days); all experimental treatment groups survived significantly longer than sham-treated groups (median survivals 31.5 or 40 days) and exhibited good safety/toxicity profiles. Conclusion The results indicate combining cellular and suicide gene therapies is a viable strategy for the treatment of established breast tumors in the brain. PMID:23780889

  6. Impact of preoperative antithrombotic therapy on blood management after implantation of primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Lukas; Musser, Ewald; Kastner, Norbert; Friesenbichler, Jörg; Hirzberger, Daniela; Radl, Roman; Leithner, Andreas; Sadoghi, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell concentrates (RCC) substitution after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is correlated with multifold of complications and an independent predictor for higher postoperative mortality. TKA is mainly performed in elderly patients with pre-existing polymorbidity, often requiring permanent preoperative antithrombotic therapy (PAT). The aim of this retrospective analysis was to investigate the impact of demand for PAT on inpatient blood management in patients undergoing TKA. In this study 200 patients were retrospectively evaluated after TKA for differences between PAT and non-PAT regarding demographic parameters, preoperative ASA score > 2, duration of operation, pre-, and intraoperative hemoglobin level, and postoperative parameters including amount of wound drainage, RCC requirement, and inpatient time. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis the independent influences of PAT, demographic parameters, ASA score > 2, and duration of the operation on RCC demand following TKA were analyzed. Patients with PAT were significantly older, more often had an ASA > 2 at surgery, needed a higher number of RCCs units and more frequently and had lower perioperative hemoglobin levels. Multivariate logistic regression revealed PAT was an independent predictor for RCC requirement. PAT patients are more likely to require RCC following TKA and should be accurately monitored with respect to postoperative blood loss. PMID:27488941

  7. Impact of preoperative antithrombotic therapy on blood management after implantation of primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Lukas; Musser, Ewald; Kastner, Norbert; Friesenbichler, Jörg; Hirzberger, Daniela; Radl, Roman; Leithner, Andreas; Sadoghi, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell concentrates (RCC) substitution after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is correlated with multifold of complications and an independent predictor for higher postoperative mortality. TKA is mainly performed in elderly patients with pre-existing polymorbidity, often requiring permanent preoperative antithrombotic therapy (PAT). The aim of this retrospective analysis was to investigate the impact of demand for PAT on inpatient blood management in patients undergoing TKA. In this study 200 patients were retrospectively evaluated after TKA for differences between PAT and non-PAT regarding demographic parameters, preoperative ASA score > 2, duration of operation, pre-, and intraoperative hemoglobin level, and postoperative parameters including amount of wound drainage, RCC requirement, and inpatient time. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis the independent influences of PAT, demographic parameters, ASA score > 2, and duration of the operation on RCC demand following TKA were analyzed. Patients with PAT were significantly older, more often had an ASA > 2 at surgery, needed a higher number of RCCs units and more frequently and had lower perioperative hemoglobin levels. Multivariate logistic regression revealed PAT was an independent predictor for RCC requirement. PAT patients are more likely to require RCC following TKA and should be accurately monitored with respect to postoperative blood loss. PMID:27488941

  8. Effectiveness of virtual reality exposure therapy for active duty soldiers in a military mental health clinic.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Holloway, Kevin M; Candy, Colette; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Difede, JoAnn; Rizzo, Albert A; Gahm, Gregory A

    2011-02-01

    Exposure therapy is an evidence-based treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but research evaluating its effectiveness with active duty service members is limited. This report examines the effectiveness of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRE) for active duty soldiers (N = 24) seeking treatment following a deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. Relative to their pretreatment self-reported symptoms on the PTSD Checklist, Military Version (M = 60.92; SD = 11.03), patients reported a significant reduction at posttreatment (M = 47.08; SD = 12.70; p < .001). Sixty-two percent of patients (n = 15) reported a reliable change of 11 points or more. This study supports the effectiveness of exposure therapy for active duty soldiers and extends previous research on VRE to this population. PMID:21294166

  9. [Evaluating influence of Captopril therapy on occupational activity of engine operators with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Serikov, V V; Kolyagin, V Ya; Bogdanova, V E

    2016-01-01

    The article covers results of study concerning influence of Captopril (25 mg) therapy on occupational activity of locomotive crew workers in real night travels model on training complex "EP1M locomotive operator cabin". Findings are that single use of Captopril (25 mg) in modelled railway activity enabled to increase reliability of occupational activity, that manifested in lower number of errors in locomotive operators' actions at night, and in psychophysiologic regulation of various psychic acts. PMID:27396147

  10. A Process Analytical Technology (PAT) approach to control a new API manufacturing process: development, validation and implementation.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Cédric; Clicq, David; Lecomte, Clémence; Merschaert, Alain; Norrant, Edith; Fotiadu, Frédéric

    2014-03-01

    Pharmaceutical companies are progressively adopting and introducing Process Analytical Technology (PAT) and Quality-by-Design (QbD) concepts promoted by the regulatory agencies, aiming the building of the quality directly into the product by combining thorough scientific understanding and quality risk management. An analytical method based on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was developed as a PAT tool to control on-line an API (active pharmaceutical ingredient) manufacturing crystallization step during which the API and residual solvent contents need to be precisely determined to reach the predefined seeding point. An original methodology based on the QbD principles was designed to conduct the development and validation of the NIR method and to ensure that it is fitted for its intended use. On this basis, Partial least squares (PLS) models were developed and optimized using chemometrics methods. The method was fully validated according to the ICH Q2(R1) guideline and using the accuracy profile approach. The dosing ranges were evaluated to 9.0-12.0% w/w for the API and 0.18-1.50% w/w for the residual methanol. As by nature the variability of the sampling method and the reference method are included in the variability obtained for the NIR method during the validation phase, a real-time process monitoring exercise was performed to prove its fit for purpose. The implementation of this in-process control (IPC) method on the industrial plant from the launch of the new API synthesis process will enable automatic control of the final crystallization step in order to ensure a predefined quality level of the API. In addition, several valuable benefits are expected including reduction of the process time, suppression of a rather difficult sampling and tedious off-line analyses. PMID:24468350

  11. Constitutive expression of McCHIT1-PAT enhances resistance to rice blast and herbicide, but does not affect grain yield in transgenic glutinous rice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiao-Fang; Li, Lei; Li, Jian-Rong; Zhao, De-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To produce new rice blast- and herbicide-resistant transgenic rice lines, the McCHIT1 gene encoding the class I chitinase from Momordica charantia and the herbicide resistance gene PAT were introduced into Lailong (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Japonica), a glutinous local rice variety from Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China. Transgenic lines were identified by ß-glucuronidase (GUS) histochemical staining, PCR, and Southern blot analyses. Agronomic traits, resistance to rice blast and herbicide, chitinase activities, and transcript levels of McCHIT1 were assessed in the T2 progeny of three transgenic lines (L1, L8, and L10). The results showed that the introduction of McCHIT1-PAT into Lailong significantly enhanced herbicide and blast resistance. After infection with the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, all of the T2 progeny exhibited less severe lesion symptoms than those of wild type. The disease indices were 100% for wild type, 65.66% for T2 transgenic line L1, 59.69% for T2 transgenic line L8, and 79.80% for T2 transgenic line L10. Transgenic lines expressing McCHIT1-PAT did not show a significant difference from wild type in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA) content, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the leaves. However, after inoculation with M. oryzae, transgenic plants showed significantly higher SOD and PPO activities and lower MDA contents in leaves, compared with those in wild-type leaves. The transgenic and the wild-type plants did not show significant differences in grain yield parameters including plant height, panicles per plant, seeds per panicle, and 1000-grain weight. Therefore, the transgenic plants showed increased herbicide and blast resistance, with no yield penalty. PMID:25639923

  12. [Ergotism due to simultaneous use of ergot alkaloids and high activity antiretroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes M, Daniel; Blanco L, Sergio; Ramírez F, Camila

    2016-06-01

    High activity antiretroviral therapy may exacerbate the activity of ergot alkaloids due to an inhibition of cytochrome P450. We report a 57 years old female with AIDS treated with lamivudine, zidovudine, atazanavir, ritonavir and cotrimoxazole presenting with ischemic signs in the four limbs. There was acrocyanosis and weak radial and ulnar pulses. A family member referred that the patient used ergot alkaloids for headaches. An ergotism due to the simultaneous use of ergot alkaloids and antiretroviral therapy was suspected. The latter was discontinued and intravenous nitroglycerin, nifedipine and pentoxifyline were started with good results. PMID:27598502

  13. Unilateral baroreceptor activation therapy: the beauty of asymmetry.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    With respect to paired internal organs, we commonly think that these are symmetrical and have identical physiological functions. This, however, appears not to be the case. A particular organ where asymmetry comes to expression is the baroreceptor system. Clinical data in patients with resistant hypertension who are treated with device-based baroreceptor activation clearly show that there are functional differences between the left and the right baroreceptor systems. This has implications for our understanding of certain diseases. PMID:26106932

  14. Asymmetric thoracic metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) activity due to prior radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xia; Yang, Hua; Zhuang, Hongming

    2015-06-01

    A 5-year-old patient suffered Horner syndrome, which was caused by a neuroblastoma in the left apex of the lung shown on the initial I-MIBG scan. After the surgical resection and external radiation to the left lung field, a follow-up I-MIBG scan revealed significantly less MIBG activity in the left upper chest compared to the contralateral right upper chest. PMID:25742240

  15. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  16. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  17. Bicalutamide-activated oncolytic adenovirus for the adjuvant therapy of high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T J; Höti, N; Liu, C; Chowdhury, W H; Li, Y; Zhang, Y; Lupold, S E; Deweese, T; Rodriguez, R

    2013-07-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) utilize tissue-specific promoters to control the expression of the early genes, E1A and E1B, to preferentially replicate and lyse tumor cells (oncolysis). Previous CRAds used in prostate cancer (PCa) gene therapy require androgens to activate prostate-specific promoters and induce viral replication. Unfortunately, these CRAds have reduced activity in patients on androgen-suppressive therapy. We describe a novel prostate-specific CRAd generated by fusing the E1A gene to the androgen receptor (AR) cDNA with a point mutation in codon 685 (C685Y). The E1A-AR fusion neutralizes the previously described mutual inhibition of E1A and AR, and the C685Y point mutation alters specificity of steroid ligand binding to the AR, such that both androgens and nonsteroidal anti-androgens can activate viral replication. We demonstrate that the mutated E1A-AR retained the ability to function in regulating AR-responsive genes and E1A-responsive viral genes. In combination therapy of virus, bicalutamide (anti-androgen) and radiation, a profound impact on cell death by viral oncolysis was seen both in vitro and tumor xenografts. To our knowledge, this is the first gene therapy engineered to be enhanced by anti-androgens and a particularly attractive adjuvant strategy for intensity-modulated radiation therapy of high-risk PCas. PMID:23764901

  18. Bicalutamide Activated Oncolytic Adenovirus for the Adjuvant Therapy of High Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara Jane; Hoti, Naser Uddin; Liu, Chunyan; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yonggang; Lupold, Shawn E.; DeWeese, Theodore; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) utilize tissue specific promoters to control the expression of the early genes, E1A and E1B, to preferentially replicate and lyse tumor cells (oncolysis). Previous CRAds used in prostate cancer gene therapy require androgens to activate prostate specific promoters and induce viral replication. Unfortunately, these CRAds have reduced activity in patients on androgen suppressive therapy. We describe a novel prostate specific CRAd generated by fusing the E1A gene to the androgen receptor (AR) cDNA with a point mutation in codon 685 (C685Y). The E1A-AR fusion neutralizes the previously described mutual inhibition of E1A & AR, and the C685Y point mutation alters specificity of steroid ligand binding to the AR, such that both androgens and non-steroidal anti-androgens can activate viral replication. We demonstrate that the mutated E1A-AR retained the ability to function in regulating AR responsive genes and E1A responsive viral genes. In combination therapy of virus, bicalutamide (anti-androgen) and radiation, a profound impact on cell death by viral oncolysis was seen both in vitro and tumor xenografts. To our knowledge, this is the first gene therapy engineered to be enhanced by anti-androgens, and a particularly attractive adjuvant strategy for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of high-risk prostate cancers. PMID:23764901

  19. Photodynamic therapy for cancer and activation of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT for cancer due to the acute inflammatory response, exposure and presentation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins and other danger signals. Nevertheless effective, powerful tumor-specific immune response in both animal models and also in patients treated with PDT for cancer, is the exception rather than the rule. Research in our laboratory and also in others is geared towards identifying reasons for this sub-optimal immune response and discovering ways of maximizing it. Reasons why the immune response after PDT is less than optimal include the fact that tumor-antigens are considered to be self-like and poorly immunogenic, the tumor-mediated induction of CD4+CD25+foxP3+ regulatory T-cells (T-regs), that are able to inhibit both the priming and the effector phases of the cytotoxic CD8 T-cell anti-tumor response and the defects in dendritic cell maturation, activation and antigen-presentation that may also occur. Alternatively-activated macrophages (M2) have also been implicated. Strategies to overcome these immune escape mechanisms employed by different tumors include combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments such as products obtained from pathogenic microorganisms against which mammals have evolved recognition systems such as PAMPs and toll-like receptors (TLR). This paper will cover the use of CpG oligonucleotides (a TLR9 agonist found in bacterial DNA) to reverse dendritic cell dysfunction and methods to remove the immune suppressor effects of T-regs that are under active study.

  20. Nuclear microprobe determination of platinum quantitative distribution in rat brain tumors after cisplatin or carboplatin injection for PAT treatment of glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Biston, M.-C.; Devès, G.; Bohic, S.; Carmona, A.

    2005-04-01

    Conventional radiotherapy of high-grade glioma is unsuccessful since less than 50% of patients survive at 6 months, therefore glioma treatment is still challenging. A new radiotherapy procedure has been recently proposed, the photoactivation therapy (PAT), associating synchrotron radiation with a chemotherapy agent, such as cisplatin. PAT aims at using the monochromaticity and the very high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation for selective excitation of a high-Z compound introduced in tumor cell DNA to maximize the photoelectric effect probability, thus increasing local toxicity. Synchrotron irradiation of cisplatin at the platinum absorption K-edge resulted in a dramatic increase in life span relative to median survival time in the F98 glioma model in Fisher rat. In the purpose to optimize the platinum concentration into the tumor, the platinum content of irradiated target needs to be quantified. These results will enable to correlate injected dose to cellular platinum content in the tumor at the time of irradiation, and to study the spatial diffusion and distribution of the platinum into the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissues from the point of injection. Male Fisher 344 rats were inoculated with 103 F98 glioma cells. Thirteen days after stereotactic inoculation, intracerebral injection at the tumor site of 40 μg of carboplatin and 3 or 5 μg of cisplatin was performed. Platinum quantitative distribution in tumors and adjacent brain tissues was determined using μ-PIXE and μ-RBS analysis.

  1. Chlorotoxin: Structure, activity, and potential uses in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Paola G; Wang, Conan K; Craik, David J

    2016-01-01

    Chlorotoxin is a disulfide-rich stable peptide from the venom of the Israeli scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus, which has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of cancer. Its ability to preferentially bind to tumor cells has been harnessed to develop an imaging agent to help visualize tumors during surgical resection. In addition, chlorotoxin has attracted interest as a vehicle to deliver anti-cancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. Given its interesting structural and biological properties, chlorotoxin also has the potential to be used in a variety of other biotechnology and biomedical applications. Here, we review the structure, activity and potential applications of chlorotoxin as a drug design scaffold. PMID:26418522

  2. Application of a novel phosphinothricin N-acetyltransferase (RePAT) gene in developing glufosinate-resistant rice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying; Liu, Ziduo; Li, Yue; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Currently, only few glufosinate-resistant genes are available for commercial application. Thus, developing novel glufosinate-resistant genes with commercial feasibility is extremely important and urgent for agricultural production. In this study, we transferred a newly isolated RePAT gene into a japonica rice variety Zhonghua11, resulting in a large number of independent T0 transgenic plants, most of which grew normally under high-concentration glufosinate treatment. Four transgenic plants with one intact RePAT expression cassette integrated into the intergenic region were selected. Agronomic performances of their T2 progenies were investigated, and the results suggested that the expression of RePAT had no adverse effect on the agronomic performance. Definite glufosinate resistance of the selected transgenic plants was further confirmed to be related to the expression of RePAT by assay on the medium and qRT-PCR. The inheritance and expression of RePAT in two transgenic plants were confirmed to be stable. Finally, the two-year field assay of glufosinate resistance suggested that the agronomic performance of the transgenic plant (PAT11) was not affected by high dosage of glufosinate (5000 g/ha). Collectively, our study proves the high resistance of a novel gene RePAT to glufosinate and provides a glufosiante-resistant rice variety with agricultural application potential. PMID:26879398

  3. Application of a novel phosphinothricin N-acetyltransferase (RePAT) gene in developing glufosinate-resistant rice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ying; Liu, Ziduo; Li, Yue; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Currently, only few glufosinate-resistant genes are available for commercial application. Thus, developing novel glufosinate-resistant genes with commercial feasibility is extremely important and urgent for agricultural production. In this study, we transferred a newly isolated RePAT gene into a japonica rice variety Zhonghua11, resulting in a large number of independent T0 transgenic plants, most of which grew normally under high-concentration glufosinate treatment. Four transgenic plants with one intact RePAT expression cassette integrated into the intergenic region were selected. Agronomic performances of their T2 progenies were investigated, and the results suggested that the expression of RePAT had no adverse effect on the agronomic performance. Definite glufosinate resistance of the selected transgenic plants was further confirmed to be related to the expression of RePAT by assay on the medium and qRT-PCR. The inheritance and expression of RePAT in two transgenic plants were confirmed to be stable. Finally, the two-year field assay of glufosinate resistance suggested that the agronomic performance of the transgenic plant (PAT11) was not affected by high dosage of glufosinate (5000 g/ha). Collectively, our study proves the high resistance of a novel gene RePAT to glufosinate and provides a glufosiante-resistant rice variety with agricultural application potential. PMID:26879398

  4. Pat1 protects centromere-specific histone H3 variant Cse4 from Psh1-mediated ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant K.; Guo, Jiasheng; Dittman, Lauren E.; Haase, Julian; Yeh, Elaine; Bloom, Kerry; Basrai, Munira A.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved histone H3 variant Cse4 and its homologues are essential components of specialized centromere (CEN)-specific nucleosomes and serve as an epigenetic mark for CEN identity and propagation. Cse4 is a critical determinant for the structure and function of the kinetochore and is required to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. The kinetochore protein Pat1 regulates the levels and spatial distribution of Cse4 at centromeres. Deletion of PAT1 results in altered structure of CEN chromatin and chromosome segregation errors. In this study, we show that Pat1 protects CEN-associated Cse4 from ubiquitination in order to maintain proper structure and function of the kinetochore in budding yeast. PAT1-deletion strains exhibit increased ubiquitination of Cse4 and faster turnover of Cse4 at kinetochores. Psh1, a Cse4-specific E3-ubiquitin ligase, interacts with Pat1 in vivo and contributes to the increased ubiquitination of Cse4 in pat1∆ strains. Consistent with a role of Psh1 in ubiquitination of Cse4, transient induction of PSH1 in a wild-type strain resulted in phenotypes similar to a pat1∆ strain, including a reduction in CEN-associated Cse4, increased Cse4 ubiquitination, defects in spatial distribution of Cse4 at kinetochores, and altered structure of CEN chromatin. Pat1 interacts with Scm3 and is required for its maintenance at kinetochores. In conclusion, our studies provide novel insights into mechanisms by which Pat1 affects the structure of CEN chromatin and protects Cse4 from Psh1-mediated ubiquitination for faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:25833709

  5. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer in the United kingdom: a review of activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual meeting 2015.

    PubMed

    Gilham, David Edward; Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-05-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service. PMID:25860661

  6. Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Cancer in the United Kingdom: A Review of Activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy Annual Meeting 2015

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service. PMID:25860661

  7. Community-based treatment of advanced HIV disease: introducing DOT-HAART (directly observed therapy with highly active antiretroviral therapy).

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, P.; Léandre, F.; Mukherjee, J.; Gupta, R.; Tarter, L.; Kim, J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) overtook tuberculosis (TB) as the world's leading infectious cause of adult deaths. In affluent countries, however, AIDS mortality has dropped sharply, largely because of the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Antiretroviral agents are not yet considered essential medications by international public health experts and are not widely used in the poor countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) takes its greatest toll. Arguments against the use of HAART have mainly been based on the high cost of medications and the lack of the infrastructure necessary for using them wisely. We re- examine these arguments in the setting of rising AIDS mortality in developing countries and falling drug prices, and describe a small community-based treatment programme based on lessons gained in TB control. With the collaboration of Haitian community health workers experienced in the delivery of home-based and directly observed treatment for TB, an AIDS-prevention project was expanded to deliver HAART to a subset of HIV patients deemed most likely to benefit. The inclusion criteria and preliminary results are presented. We conclude that directly observed therapy (DOT) with HAART, "DOT-HAART", can be delivered effectively in poor settings if there is an uninterrupted supply of high-quality drugs. PMID:11799447

  8. Selective photodetection and photodynamic therapy for prostate cancer through targeting of proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zuluaga, Maria-Fernanda; Sekkat, Nawal; Gabriel, Doris; van den Bergh, Hubert; Lange, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Frequent side effects of radical treatment modalities and the availability of novel diagnostics have raised the interest in focal therapies for localized prostate cancer. To improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficacy of such therapies, we developed a minimally invasive procedure based on a novel polymeric photosensitizer prodrug sensitive to urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). The compound is inactive in its prodrug form and accumulates passively at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. There, the prodrug is selectively converted to its photoactive form by uPA, which is overexpressed by prostate cancer cells. Irradiation of the activated photosensitizer exerts a tumor-selective phototoxic effect. The prodrug alone (8 μmol/L) showed no toxic effect on PC-3 cells, but upon irradiation the cell viability was reduced by 90%. In vivo, after systemic administration of the prodrug, PC-3 xenografts became selectively fluorescent. This is indicative of the prodrug accumulation in the tumor and selective local enzymatic activation. Qualitative analysis of the activated compound confirmed that the enzymatic cleavage occurred selectively in the tumor, with only trace amounts in the neighboring skin or muscle. Subsequent photodynamic therapy studies showed complete tumor eradication of animals treated with light (150 J/cm(2) at 665 nm) 16 hours after the injection of the prodrug (7.5 mg/kg). These promising results evidence the excellent selectivity of our prodrug with the potential to be used for both imaging and therapy for localized prostate cancer. PMID:23270928

  9. Health Occupations--Respiration Therapy Technician. Kit No. 66. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Janette

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on respiration therapy technician are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture,…

  10. Mirror therapy in a patient with a fractured wrist and no active wrist extension.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Eric L; Hu, Jeong

    2008-01-01

    We report a patient in whom mirror therapy, training moving both hands while watching the reflection of the present or good hand in a parasaggital mirror - a method used for phantom limb and stroke patients - was extremely useful after a fractured wrist with good passive, but no active, extension. PMID:18335358

  11. Real-Time Assessment of Autonomic Nerve Activity During Adaptive Servo-Ventilation Support or Waon Therapy.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Nitta, Daisuke; Komuro, Issei

    2016-07-27

    Adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy are recently developed non-pharmacological and noninvasive therapies for patients with heart failure refractory to guideline-directed medical therapy. These therapies decrease both preload and afterload, increase cardiac output, and appear to ameliorate autonomic nerve activity. However, the time course of autonomic nerve activity during these therapies remains unclear. We performed heart rate variability analysis using the MemCalc power spectral density method (MemCalc system; Suwa Trust Co, Tokyo) to assess autonomic nerve activity during adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy in two different cases and determined the time course of autonomic nerve activity during these therapies. During both therapies, we found a drastic increase in parasympathetic nerve activity and continuous suppression of sympathetic nerve activity. Heart rate variability analysis using the MemCalc method may be promising for the assessment of the efficacy of various treatments, including adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy, from the viewpoint of autonomic nerve activity. PMID:27385607

  12. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

  13. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Pearson, J. Boise; Sims, W. Herb; Chakrabarti, Suman; Fant, Wallace E.; McDonald, Stan

    2003-01-01

    Many space propulsion concepts exist that use matter-antimatter reactions. Current antiproton production rates are enough to conduct proof-of-principle evaluation of these concepts. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, to transport antiprotons to experimental facilities. To address this need, HiPAT is being developed, with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. HiPAT is a Penning-Malmberg trap with a 4 Tesla superconductor, 20kV electrodes, radio frequency (RF) network, and 10(exp -13) Torr vacuum. 'Normal' matter is being used to evaluate the system. An electron beam ionizes background gas in situ, and particle beams are captured dynamically. The experiment examines ion storage lifetimes, RF plasma diagnostics, charge exchange with background gases, and dynamic ion beam capture.

  14. Quantifying Beetle-Mediated Effects on Gas Fluxes from Dung Pats

    PubMed Central

    Penttilä, Atte; Slade, Eleanor M.; Simojoki, Asko; Riutta, Terhi; Minkkinen, Kari; Roslin, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the largest contributors of the anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) responsible for global warming. Measurements of gas fluxes from dung pats suggest that dung is a source of GHGs, but whether these emissions are modified by arthropods has not been studied. A closed chamber system was used to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from dung pats with and without dung beetles on a grass sward. The presence of dung beetles significantly affected the fluxes of GHGs from dung pats. Most importantly, fresh dung pats emitted higher amounts of CO2 and lower amounts of CH4 per day in the presence than absence of beetles. Emissions of N2O showed a distinct peak three weeks after the start of the experiment – a pattern detected only in the presence of beetles. When summed over the main grazing season (June–July), total emissions of CH4 proved significantly lower, and total emissions of N2O significantly higher in the presence than absence of beetles. While clearly conditional on the experimental conditions, the patterns observed here reveal a potential impact of dung beetles on gas fluxes realized at a small spatial scale, and thereby suggest that arthropods may have an overall effect on gas fluxes from agriculture. Dissecting the exact mechanisms behind these effects, mapping out the range of conditions under which they occur, and quantifying effect sizes under variable environmental conditions emerge as key priorities for further research. PMID:23940758

  15. Outcome From a Randomized Controlled Trial of Group Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder: Comparing Dialectical Behavior Therapy Adapted for Binge Eating to an Active Comparison Group Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Debra L.; Robinson, Athena Hagler; Jo, Booil

    2011-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder (DBT-BED) aims to reduce binge eating by improving adaptive emotion-regulation skills. Preliminary findings have been promising but have only compared DBT-BED to a wait-list. To control for the hypothesized specific effects of DBT-BED, the present study compared DBT-BED to an active comparison group therapy (ACGT). Men and women (n = 101) meeting DSM-IV BED research criteria were randomly assigned to 20 group sessions of DBT-BED (n = 50) or ACGT (n = 51). DBT-BED had a significantly lower dropout rate (4%) than ACGT (33.3%). Linear Mixed Models revealed that posttreatment binge abstinence and reductions in binge frequency were achieved more quickly for DBT-BED than for ACGT (posttreatment abstinence rate = 64% for DBT-BED vs. 36% for ACGT) though differences did not persist over the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up assessments (e.g., 12-month follow-up abstinence rate = 64% for DBT-BED vs. 56% for ACGT). Secondary outcome measures revealed no sustained impact on emotion regulation. Although both DBT-BED and ACGT reduced binge eating, DBT-BED showed significantly fewer dropouts and greater initial efficacy (e.g., at posttreatment) than ACGT. The lack of differential findings over follow-up suggests that the hypothesized specific effects of DBT-BED do not show long-term impact beyond those attributable to nonspecific common therapeutic factors. PMID:20171332

  16. X-PAT: a multiplatform patient referral data management system for small healthcare institution requirements.

    PubMed

    Masseroli, Marco; Marchente, Mario

    2008-07-01

    We present X-PAT, a platform-independent software prototype that is able to manage patient referral multimedia data in an intranet network scenario according to the specific control procedures of a healthcare institution. It is a self-developed storage framework based on a file system, implemented in eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and PHP Hypertext Preprocessor Language, and addressed to the requirements of limited-dimension healthcare entities (small hospitals, private medical centers, outpatient clinics, and laboratories). In X-PAT, healthcare data descriptions, stored in a novel Referral Base Management System (RBMS) according to Health Level 7 Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 (CDA R2) standard, can be easily applied to the specific data and organizational procedures of a particular healthcare working environment thanks also to the use of standard clinical terminology. Managed data, centralized on a server, are structured in the RBMS schema using a flexible patient record and CDA healthcare referral document structures based on XML technology. A novel search engine allows defining and performing queries on stored data, whose rapid execution is ensured by expandable RBMS indexing structures. Healthcare personnel can interface the X-PAT system, according to applied state-of-the-art privacy and security measures, through friendly and intuitive Web pages that facilitate user acceptance. PMID:18632322

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of gallium polyaminothiols (PAT).

    PubMed

    John, C S; Kinuya, S; Minear, G; Keast, R K; Paik, C H

    1993-02-01

    Two polyaminothiol ligands, one hexadentate, N,N',N"-tris[2-methyl(2-propanethiol)]-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (TACN), and another potentially heptadentate, tris[2-methyl(2-propanethiol)]aminoethylamine (TMAE), were synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic and analytical methods. Both ligands were labeled with gallium-67 at pH 3.0-3.5 in high yields. The resulting gallium chelates were lipophilic. The biodistribution studies for both the chelates showed hepatic uptake and biliary clearance. The total % ID activity for [67Ga]TACN in liver and intestine at 5 min was 33.86 increasing gradually to 61.4% at 30 min. The chelates were in vivo stable to plasma-transferrin transchelation as confirmed by scintigraphic images obtained by [67Ga]TACN in rats and by plasma incubation of the chelates. These results indicate that Ga-TACN is a potentially useful tracer for hepatobiliary imaging using PET. No brain uptake was found. PMID:8448576

  18. [Automated kinetic assay of plasmatic L-asparaginase activity undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orsonneau, J-L; Brassart, E A; Lecame, M; Thomare, P; Delaroche, O; Dudouet, D

    2004-01-01

    The L-asparaginase is a critical drug for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, that achieves blood L-asparagin depletion. However, such a therapy is associated with a high rate of negative side effects, particularly antibody synthesis against L-asparaginase. This therefore decreases therapy efficiency requiring the monitoring of L-asparaginase activity since L-asparagin determination is not easy. We compared here the results obtained with an automated kinetic enzymatic method to those obtained with the most commonly used Nessler reagent method. The correlation coefficient, r = 0,992, obtained was very good, and the allometric regression line was y = 1,038x - 0,37 microkat/L. We also showed that the specificity and the precision were better with the enzymatic method than the Nessler one. Moreover, the enzymatic method was easier and required less time to perform. Finally, the method appears able to perform real time monitoring of the therapy. PMID:15355807

  19. Activation of photodynamic therapy in vitro with Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Brad A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R.

    2016-03-01

    Translation of photodynamic therapy to the clinical setting has primarily been limited to easily accessible and/or superficial diseases where traditional light delivery can be performed noninvasively. Cerenkov luminescence, as generated from medically relevant radionuclides, has been suggested as a means to deliver light to deeper tissues noninvasively in order to overcome this depth limitation. We report on the use of Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 as a means to active the photodynamic therapy process in monolayer tumor cell cultures. The current study investigates the utility of Cerenkov luminescence for activating both the clinically relevant aminolevulinic acid at 1.0 mM and also the more efficient photosensitizer TPPS2a at 1.2 µM. Cells were incubated with aminolevulinic acid for 6 hours prior to radionuclide addition, as well as additional daily treatments for three days. TPPS2a was delivered as a single treatment with an 18 hour incubation time before radionuclide addition. Experiments were completed for both C6 glioma cells and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells. Although aminolevulinic acid proved ineffective for generating a therapeutic effect at any activity for either cell line, TPPS2a produced at least a 20% therapeutic effect at activities ranging from 6 to 60 µCi/well for the C6 cell line. Current results demonstrate that it may be possible to generate a therapeutic effect in vivo using Cerenkov luminescence to activate the photodynamic therapy process with clinically relevant photosensitizers.

  20. Interdisciplinary therapy changes superoxide dismutase activity and adiponectin in obese adolescents: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nunes, João Elias Dias; Cunha, Heitor Santos; Freitas, Zulmária Rezende; Nogueira, Ana Maria Caixeta; Dâmaso, Ana Raimunda; Espindola, Foued Salmen; Cheik, Nadia Carla

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of interdisciplinary therapy in the parameters of the oxidative stress and the anti-inflammatory responses of obese adolescents. We selected 57 participants, who were randomly divided into 2 groups: interdisciplinary therapy group and a control group. After 6 months of intervention, 17 participants of the interdisciplinary therapy group and 8 of the control group returned for re-evaluation. The interdisciplinary therapy group participated in a treatment with 4 weekly sessions of exercise, a weekly group therapy session and a weekly nutritional education session. Blood parameters of oxidative stress and anti-inflammatory response were evaluated. The results demonstrated that there were significant increases in the interdisciplinary therapy group for superoxide dismutase activity (6.56 ± 3.22 to 11.40 ± 7.49) and ferric-reducing antioxidant potential concentration (532.91 ± 106.48 to 573.25 ± 112.57), although adiponectin levels did not reduce (40.9 ± 29.34 to 49.05 ± 41.22). A significant decrease in nitrite levels was also found (14.23 ± 8.48 to 11.45 ± 6.05). In the control group, significant reduction was found in adiponectin (31.56 ± 18.88 to 18.01 ± 11.66). This study suggests that interdisciplinary therapy for 6 months was effective in improving the anti-inflammatory responses and the antioxidant defences in obese adolescents. PMID:26367325

  1. The influence of statin therapy on platelet activity markers in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Henryk; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Baj, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been reported to increase platelet activation. Reducing the level of LDL-C with statins induces important pleiotropic effects such as platelet inhibition. This association between platelet activity and statin therapy may be clinically important in reducing the risk of ischemic stroke. We investigated the effect of simvastatin therapy on platelet activation markers (platelet CD62P, sP-selectin, and platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs)) in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke. Material and methods The study group consisted of 21 hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke confirmed by CT, and 20 healthy subjects served as controls. We assessed the CD62P expression on resting and thrombin-activated blood platelets. CD62P and PDMPs were analyzed by the use of monoclonal antibodies anti-CD61 and anti-CD62 on a flow cytometer. The level of sP-selectin in serum was measured by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. All markers were re-analyzed after 6 months of treatment with simvastatin (20 mg/day). Results Hyperlipidemic patients presented a significantly higher percentage of CD62+ platelets and higher reactivity to thrombin compared to control subjects. After simvastatin therapy hyperlipidemic patients showed a reduction of the percentage of resting CD62P(+) platelets (p = 0.005) and a reduction of expression and percentage of CD62P(+) platelets after activation by thrombin (median p < 0.05; percentage: p = 0.001). A decrease of sP-selectin levels (p = 0.001) and percentage of PDMPs (p < 0.05) in this group was also observed. Conclusions HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy in stroke patients with hyperlipidemia may be useful not only due to the lipid-lowering effect but also because of a significant role in reduction of platelet activation and reactivity. PMID:25861297

  2. Ion Storage Tests with the High Performance Antimatter Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Centers (NASA/MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) is evaluating an antiproton storage system, referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT). This interest stems from the sheer energy represented by matter/antimatter annihilation process with has an energy density approximately 10 order of magnitude above that of chemical propellants. In other terms, one gram of antiprotons contains the equivalent energy of approximately 23 space shuttle external tanks or ET's (each ET contains roughly 740,000 kgs of fuel and oxidizer). This incredible source of stored energy, if harnessed, would be an enabling technology for deep space mission where both spacecraft weight and propulsion performance are key to satisfying aggressive mission requirements. The HiPAT hardware consists of a 4 Tesla superconductor system, an ultra high vacuum test section (vacuum approaching 10(exp -12) torr), and a high voltage confinement electrode system (up to 20 kvolts operation). The current laboratory layout is illustrated. The HiPAT designed objectives included storage of up to 1 trillion antiprotons with corresponding lifetimes approaching 18 days. To date, testing has centered on the storage of positive hydrogen ions produced in situ by a stream of high-energy electrons that passes through the trapping region. However, due to space charge issues and electron beam compression as it passes through the HiPAT central field, current ion production is limited to less then 50,000 ions. Ion lifetime was determined by counting particle populations at the end of various storage time intervals. Particle detection was accomplished by destructively expelling the ions against a micro-channel plate located just outside the traps magnetic field. The effect of radio frequency (RF) stabilization on the lifetime of trapped particles was also examined. This technique, referred to as a rotating wall, made use of a segmented electrode located near the center of the trap

  3. Expression of PAT and NPT II proteins during the developmental stages of a genetically modified pepper developed in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Si Myung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Ryu, Tae Hun; Suh, Seok Cheol; Cho, Hyun Suk

    2010-10-27

    Estimation of the protein levels introduced in a biotechnology-derived product is conducted as part of an overall safety assessment. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyze phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPT II) protein expression in a genetically modified (GM) pepper plant developed in Korea. PAT and NPT II expression levels, based on both dry weight and fresh weight, were variable among different plant generations and plant sections from isolated genetically modified organism (GMO) fields at four developmental stages. PAT expression was highest in leaves at anthesis (11.44 μg/gdw and 2.17 μg/gfw) and lowest in roots (0.12 μg/gdw and 0.01 μg/gfw). NPT II expression was also highest in leaves at anthesis (17.31 μg/gdw and 3.41 μg/gfw) and lowest in red pepper (0.65 μg/gdw and 0.12 μg/gfw). In pollen, PAT expression was 0.59-0.62 μg/gdw, while NPT II was not detected. Both PAT and NPT II showed a general pattern of decreased expression with progression of the growing season. As expected, PAT and NPT II protein expression was not detectable in control pepper plants. PMID:20873787

  4. The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex promotes viral RNA translation and replication by differential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jungfleisch, Jennifer; Chowdhury, Ashis; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Tharun, Sundaresan; Díez, Juana

    2015-01-01

    The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds to the 3′ end of cellular mRNAs and promotes 3′ end protection and 5′–3′ decay. Interestingly, this complex also specifically binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences of viral positive-strand RNA genomes promoting their translation and subsequent recruitment from translation to replication. Yet, how the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex regulates these two processes remains elusive. Here, we show that Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex acts differentially in these processes. By using a collection of well-characterized lsm1 mutant alleles and a system that allows the replication of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) in yeast we show that the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex integrity is essential for both, translation and recruitment. However, the intrinsic RNA-binding ability of the complex is only required for translation. Consistent with an RNA-binding-independent function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex on BMV RNA recruitment, we show that the BMV 1a protein, the sole viral protein required for recruitment, interacts with this complex in an RNA-independent manner. Together, these results support a model wherein Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds consecutively to BMV RNA regulatory sequences and the 1a protein to promote viral RNA translation and later recruitment out of the host translation machinery to the viral replication complexes. PMID:26092942

  5. Performance characterization of low-cost, high-speed, portable pulsed laser diode photoacoustic tomography (PLD-PAT) system

    PubMed Central

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography systems that uses Q-switched Nd:YAG/OPO pulsed lasers are expensive, bulky, and hence limits its use in clinical applications. The low pulse repetition rate of these lasers makes it unsuitable for real-time imaging when used with single-element ultrasound detector. In this work, we present a pulsed laser diode photoacoustic tomography (PLD-PAT) system that integrates a compact PLD inside a single-detector circular scanning geometry. We compared its performance against the traditional Nd:YAG/OPO based PAT system in terms of imaging depth, resolution, imaging time etc. The PLD provides near-infrared pulses at ~803 nm wavelength with pulse energy ~1.4 mJ/pulse at 7 kHz repetition rate. The PLD-PAT system is capable of providing 2D image in scan time as small as 3 sec with a signal-to-noise ratio ~30. High-speed and deep-tissue imaging is demonstrated on phantoms and biological samples. The PLD-PAT system is inexpensive, portable, allows high-speed PAT imaging, and its performance is as good as traditional expensive OPO based PAT system. Therefore, it holds promises for future translational biomedical imaging applications. PMID:26504659

  6. HIV-infected patients' adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Mohammadpour, Ali; Yekta, Zohre Parsa; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Ali R

    2010-12-01

    Adherence to the treatment regimen is essential to the success of highly active antiretroviral therapy for patients who are infected with HIV. The evidence suggests that poor adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy is a major problem that has the potential to diminish effective viral suppression, promote viral resistance, and place patients at risk for hospitalization, opportunistic infections, and an increased risk of HIV transmission. The primary aim of this study was to understand patients' experiences regarding their adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy. Thus, 19 participants were recruited for in-depth interviews regarding their adherence to drug regimens. All the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by using Benner's phenomenological analysis approach. Four main themes emerged from the data: (i) choosing to live and the decision to start taking medications; (ii) strategies for adhering to the regimen and managing the side-effects; (iii) relationships with healthcare providers; and (iv) advantages of the medications as a motivator to continue one's adherence to the regimen. Studying and understanding the experiences of patients can provide new insights and strategies in order to enhance patients' adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:21210925

  7. The relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate ('self'-directed) complement activation.

    PubMed

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Adjei, Jonathan Kofi; Aryeh, Claudia; Kpentey, George

    2016-12-01

    The complement system is an enzyme cascade that helps defend against infection. Many complement proteins occur in serum as inactive enzyme precursors or reside on cell surfaces. Complement components have many biologic functions and their activation can eventually damage the plasma membranes of cells and some bacteria. Although a direct link between complement activation and autoimmune diseases has not been found, there is increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases that may have autoimmune linkage. The inhibition of complement may therefore be very important in a variety of autoimmune diseases since their activation may be detrimental to the individual involved. However, a complete and long-term inhibition of complement may have some contra side effects such as increased susceptibility to infection. The site of complement activation will, however, determine the type of inhibitor to be used, its route of application and dosage level. Compared with conventional drugs, complement inhibitors may be the best option for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The review takes a critical look at the relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate complement activation that are likely to result in sporadic autoimmune diseases or worsen already existing one. It covers the complement system, general aspects of complement inhibition therapy, therapeutic strategies and examples of complement inhibitors. It concludes by highlighting on the possibility that a better inhibitor of complement activation when found will help provide a formidable treatment for autoimmune diseases as well as preventing one. PMID:26935316

  8. Monocyte Activation in Immunopathology: Cellular Test for Development of Diagnostics and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Several highly prevalent human diseases are associated with immunopathology. Alterations in the immune system are found in such life-threatening disorders as cancer and atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation followed by macrophage polarization is an important step in normal immune response to pathogens and other relevant stimuli. Depending on the nature of the activation signal, macrophages can acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes that are characterized by the expression of distinct patterns of secreted cytokines and surface antigens. This process is disturbed in immunopathologies resulting in abnormal monocyte activation and/or bias of macrophage polarization towards one or the other phenotype. Such alterations could be used as important diagnostic markers and also as possible targets for the development of immunomodulating therapy. Recently developed cellular tests are designed to analyze the phenotype and activity of living cells circulating in patient's bloodstream. Monocyte/macrophage activation test is a successful example of cellular test relevant for atherosclerosis and oncopathology. This test demonstrated changes in macrophage activation in subclinical atherosclerosis and breast cancer and could also be used for screening a panel of natural agents with immunomodulatory activity. Further development of cellular tests will allow broadening the scope of their clinical implication. Such tests may become useful tools for drug research and therapy optimization. PMID:26885534

  9. Pharmacodynamic monitoring of immunosuppressive effects indicates reduced cyclosporine activity during telaprevir therapy.

    PubMed

    Roos, Katja; Gotthardt, Daniel; Giese, Thomas; Schnitzler, Paul; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Czock, David; Eisenbach, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    Drug interactions with immunosuppressive drugs are a major problem associated with protease inhibitor-based antiviral triple therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection after liver transplantation. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed biomarkers of the immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporine A (CSA) by quantifying nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-regulated gene expression during telaprevir (TVR) therapy in 5 liver transplant patients. Furthermore, dose adjustments and blood concentrations of CSA as well as the clinical course were analyzed. We observed a clear impact of TVR not only on doses and blood concentrations but also on the immunosuppressive effects of CSA. Despite apparently adequate CSA trough concentrations, the CSA peak concentration decreased to 68% (range = 44%-90%). This was associated with a 1.9-fold (1.6- to 4.1-fold) increase in the residual gene activity of NFAT-regulated genes, which indicated reduced immunosuppressive activity of CSA with TVR co-medication. The median dose of CSA was reduced to 25% (range = 16%-48%) and 31% (range = 22%-64%) after 1 and 2 weeks, respectively. The CSA drug clearance was reduced to 38.7% (range = 31.0%-49.4%). We report excellent antiviral efficacy. At the end of the observation period, all patients were HCV RNA-negative (1 patient at 18 weeks, 1 patient at 12 weeks, and 3 patients at 4 weeks after the end of therapy). Safety was acceptable, with mild acute rejection and reactivation of cytomegalovirus being the most serious adverse events. One patient with histologically proven recurrent cholestatic hepatitis before therapy underwent retransplantation during the course of antiviral therapy. In conclusion, the immunomonitoring of NFAT-regulated gene expression indicated reduced immunosuppressive activity of CSA during antiviral therapy with TVR in our cohort of liver transplant patients. Thus, the immunosuppressive effects of CSA may be overestimated if one is looking

  10. Enhanced antitumoral efficacy by intratumoral perfusion of activated macrophages associated with photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, Vasile F.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Laky, Dezideriu; Ionescu, Paul; Dima, Stefan V.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed on five batches of Wistar inbred rats with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma receiving photodynamic therapy (PDT), rMuIFN-gamma activated macrophages (AM(Phi) ) or associated therapy (PDT-AM(Phi) -A; PDT-AM(Phi) -B); the control batch (HBSS) consisted of animals with untreated Walker-256 tumors. The results were as follows: the sole treatment (PDT, AM(Phi) ) gave survival rates between 57.2 and 57.7% and cure rates ranging from 23.1 to 34.3%. The 'combined' therapy in multiple doses increased significantly (87.9%) the survival rate of tumor bearing rats as well as the rate of complete tumor regression (72.7%). Cell-mediated immunity test values in batches III and IV exposed to multiple doses of PDT-AM(Phi) showed higher values as compared to the values noticed in batches I - II and the control batch V, performed at 12 and 21 days post-treatment. Summing up, these results demonstrate that 'combined' photodynamic treatment and biotherapy with interferon activated macrophages stimulate cell-mediated antitumoral activity, increase survival rates and reduce incidence of Walker-256 carcinosarcoma in rat model.

  11. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene therapies. In particular, we found that these engineered AD-MSCs retained their innate ability to proliferate, differentiate, and, most importantly, home to tumors, making them ideal cellular carriers. Moreover, exposure of the engineered AD-MSCS to mild magnetic hyperthermia resulted in the selective expression of TRAIL from the engineered AD-MSCs and, as a result, induced significant ovarian cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26720500

  12. Activity of matrix metalloproteinases during antimycobacterial therapy in mice with simulated tuberculous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sumenkova, D V; Russkikh, G S; Poteryaeva, O N; Polyakov, L M; Panin, L E

    2013-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis inflammation. In the early stages of BCG-granuloma formation in mouse liver and lungs, the serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 7 increased by 4.5 times and remained unchanged while the pathology developed. Antimycobacterial therapy with isoniazid reduced enzyme activity almost to the level of intact control. The decrease in activity of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 7 that play the most prominent role in the development of destructive forms of tuberculosis is of great therapeutic importance. PMID:23667866

  13. Active theater as a complementary therapy for Parkinson's disease rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Modugno, Nicola; Iaconelli, Sara; Fiorlli, Mariagrazia; Lena, Francesco; Kusch, Imogen; Mirabella, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Most medical treatments of Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at the reduction of motor symptoms. However, even when motor improvements are evident, patients often report a deterioration of their daily lives. Thus, to achieve a global improvement in personal well-being, not only drugs, but also complementary therapies, such as physical exercise, occupational and speech therapy, and active music therapy, have been used. We hypothesized that theater could reduce clinical disability and improve the quality of life of PD patients (primary end points) more efficiently than other complementary therapies because (1) in order to impersonate a character, patients are forced to regain the control of their bodies; and (2) while being part of a group, patients have a high degree of social interaction. The need to regain the control of their bodies and their social functioning is very likely to deeply motivate patients. To assess this hypothesis, we ran a randomized, controlled, and single-blinded study that lasted 3 years, on 20 subjects affected by a moderate form of idiopathic PD, in stable treatment with L-dopa and L-dopa agonists, and without severe sensory deficits. Ten patients were randomly assigned to an active theater program (in which patients were required to participate), while the others underwent physiotherapy (control group), the most common nonpharmacological treatment for PD rehabilitation. Patients of both groups were evaluated at the beginning of each year, using five clinical rating scales (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS], Schwab and England Scale, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life [PDQ39] Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). The theater patients showed progressive improvements and, at the end of the third year, they showed significant improvements in all clinical scales. Conversely, the control patients did not exhibit significant ameliorations with time. Thus, the present study provides the first

  14. A micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Y.; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2015-03-01

    To achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT), massive transducer arrays and data acquisition (DAQ) electronics are needed to receive the PA signals simultaneously, which results in complex and high-cost ultrasound receiver systems. To address this issue, we have developed a new PA data acquisition approach using acoustic time delay. Optical fibers were used as parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs) to create different time delays in multiple channels of PA signals. This makes the PA signals reach a single-element transducer at different times. As a result, they can be properly received by single-channel DAQ electronics. However, due to their small diameter and fragility, using optical fiber as acoustic delay lines poses a number of challenges in the design, construction and packaging of the PADLs, thereby limiting their performances and use in real imaging applications. In this paper, we report the development of new silicon PADLs, which are directly made from silicon wafers using advanced micromachining technologies. The silicon PADLs have very low acoustic attenuation and distortion. A linear array of 16 silicon PADLs were assembled into a handheld package with one common input port and one common output port. To demonstrate its real-time PAT capability, the silicon PADL array (with its output port interfaced with a single-element transducer) was used to receive 16 channels of PA signals simultaneously from a tissue-mimicking optical phantom sample. The reconstructed PA image matches well with the imaging target. Therefore, the silicon PADL array can provide a 16× reduction in the ultrasound DAQ channels for real-time PAT.

  15. Dispersion and Transport of Cryptosporidium Oocysts from Fecal Pats under Simulated Rainfall Events

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Cheryl M.; Ferguson, Christobel M.; Kaucner, Christine; Krogh, Martin; Altavilla, Nanda; Deere, Daniel A.; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2004-01-01

    The dispersion and initial transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts from fecal pats were investigated during artificial rainfall events on intact soil blocks (1,500 by 900 by 300 mm). Rainfall events of 55 mm h−1 for 30 min and 25 mm h−1 for 180 min were applied to soil plots with artificial fecal pats seeded with approximately 107 oocysts. The soil plots were divided in two, with one side devoid of vegetation and the other left with natural vegetation cover. Each combination of event intensity and duration, vegetation status, and degree of slope (5° and 10°) was evaluated twice. Generally, a fivefold increase (P < 0.05) in runoff volume was generated on bare soil compared to vegetated soil, and significantly more infiltration, although highly variable, occurred through the vegetated soil blocks (P < 0.05). Runoff volume, event conditions (intensity and duration), vegetation status, degree of slope, and their interactions significantly affected the load of oocysts in the runoff. Surface runoff transported from 100.2 oocysts from vegetated loam soil (25-mm h−1, 180-min event on 10° slope) to up to 104.5 oocysts from unvegetated soil (55-mm h−1, 30-min event on 10° slope) over a 1-m distance. Surface soil samples downhill of the fecal pat contained significantly higher concentrations of oocysts on devegetated blocks than on vegetated blocks. Based on these results, there is a need to account for surface soil vegetation coverage as well as slope and rainfall runoff in future assessments of Cryptosporidium transport and when managing pathogen loads from stock grazing near streams within drinking water watersheds. PMID:14766600

  16. Targeted Aucore-Agshell nanorods as a dual-functional contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yiwen; Peng, Dong; Wang, Kun; Chai, Xinyu; Ren, Qiushi; Tian, Jie; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing contrast enhancement is essential for producing specific signals in biomedical imaging and therapy. The potential of using Aucore-Agshell nanorods (Au@Ag NRs) as a dual-functional theranostic contrast agent is demonstrated for effective cancer imaging and treatments. Due to its strong NIR absorption and high efficiency of photothermal conversion, effects of both photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) are enhanced significantly. The PAT signal grows by 45.3% and 82% in the phantom and in vivo experiments, respectively, when compared to those using Au NRs. In PTT, The maximum increase of tissue temperature treated with Au@Ag NRs is 22.8 °C, twice that with Au NRs. Results of the current study show the feasibility of using Au@Ag NRs for synergetic PAT with PTT. And it will enhance the potential application on real-time PAT guided PTT, which will greatly benefit the customized PTT treatment of cancer. PMID:27231624

  17. Monitoring the autonomic nervous activity as the objective evaluation of music therapy for severely and multiply disabled children.

    PubMed

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Kudo, Takashi; Koga, Mikitoshi; Togo, Michita; Katayama, Sotetsu; Hiramatsu, Kozaburo; Mori, Shunsuke; Takamura, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    Severely and multiply disabled children (SMDC) are frequently affected in more than one area of development, resulting in multiple disabilities. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of music therapy in SMDC using monitoring changes in the autonomic nervous system, by the frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability. We studied six patients with SMDC (3 patients with cerebral palsy, 1 patient with posttraumatic syndrome after head injury, 1 patient with herpes encephalitis sequelae, and 1 patient with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome characterized by frequent seizures, developmental delay and psychological and behavioral problems), aged 18-26 (mean 22.5 ± 3.5). By frequency domain method using electrocardiography, we measured the high frequency (HF; with a frequency ranging from 0.15 to 0.4 Hz), which represents parasympathetic activity, the low frequency/high frequency ratio, which represents sympathetic activity between the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, and heart rate. A music therapist performed therapy to all patients through the piano playing for 50 min. We monitored each study participant for 150 min before therapy, 50 min during therapy, and 10 min after therapy. Interestingly, four of 6 patients showed significantly lower HF components during music therapy than before therapy, suggesting that these four patients might react to music therapy through the suppression of parasympathetic nervous activities. Thus, music therapy can suppress parasympathetic nervous activities in some patients with SMDC. The monitoring changes in the autonomic nervous activities could be a powerful tool for the objective evaluation of music therapy in patients with SMDC. PMID:22729251

  18. The effect of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Hee-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects were each assigned to a mirror therapy group and a sham therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment and the Box and Block Test were performed to compare paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities. The functional independence measurement was conducted to compare abilities to perform activities of daily living. [Results] Paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities were significantly different between the mirror therapy and sham therapy groups. Intervention in the mirror therapy group was more effective than in the sham therapy group for improving the ability to perform activities of daily living. Self-care showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy is effective in improving paretic upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26180297

  19. EARLY IMPACT MELTING AND SPACE EXPOSURE HISTORY OF THE PAT91501 LCHONDRITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, D. H.; Herzog, G. F.; Xue, S.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    2004-01-01

    Collisions probably occurred frequently in the early history of the asteroid belt. Their effects, which should be recorded in meteorites, must have included heating and melting along with shock alteration of mineral textures. Some non-chondritic meteorite types e.g., eucrites and IIE and IAB irons - do indeed give evidence of extensive impact heating more than 3.4 Gyr ago. The ordinary chondrites, in contrast, show little evidence of early impact heating. The Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr ages of ordinary chondrites that experienced intense shock are for the most part relatively young, many less than 1.5 Gyr. The numerous L-chondrites with Ar- Ar ages clustering near 0.5 Gy are a well-known example. One of them, the 105-kg Chico Lchondrite, shows the effects of unusually intense heating. It is approximately 60% impact melt and likely formed as a dyke beneath a large crater when the L-chondrite parent body underwent a very large impact approximately 0.5 Gyr ago. In rare instances, older shock dates are indicated for ordinary chondrites. Dixon et al show early impact resetting of Ar-Ar ages of a few LL-chondrites including MIL 99301 at 4.23 0.03 Gyr, but in none of these stones did shock lead to extensive melting. As of 2003, searches for chondritic melts attributable to early shock had turned up only the Shaw L-chondrite, which has an Ar-Ar age of approximately 4.42 Gyr. PAT91501 is an 8.55-kg L-chondrite containing vesicles and metal-troilite nodules. It is a unique, near-total impact melt, unshocked, depleted in siderophile and chalcophile elements, and contains only approximately 10% relic chondritic material. The authors conclude that PAT91501 crystallized rapidly and from a much more homogeneous melt than did Shaw. They suggest that PAT resembles Chico and likely formed as an impact melt vein within an impact crater. To define the history of PAT, we have determined its Ar-39-Ar-40 age and measured several radioactive and stable nuclides produced during its space exposure to

  20. Petrology and Geochemistry of LEW 88663 and PAT 91501: High Petrologic L Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Field, S. W.

    1993-07-01

    Primitive achondrites (e.g., Acapulco, Lodran) are believed to be highly metamorphosed chondritic materials, perhaps up to the point of anatexis in some types. Low petrologic grade equivalents of these achondrites are unknown, so the petrologic transition from chondritic to achondritic material cannot be documented. However, there are rare L chondrites of petrologic grade 7 that may have experienced igneous processes, and study of these may yield information relevant to the formation of primitive achondrites, and perhaps basaltic achondrites, from chondritic precursors. We have begun the study of the L7 chondrites LEW 88663 and PAT 91501 as part of our broader study of primitive achondrites. Here, we present our preliminary petrologic and geochemical data on these meteorites. Petrology and Mineral Compositions: LEW 88663 is a granular achondrite composed of equant, subhedral to anhedral olivine grains poikilitically enclosed in networks of orthopyroxene and plagioclase. Small grains of clinopyroxene are spatially associated with orthopyroxene. Troilite occurs as large anhedral and small rounded grains. The smaller troilite grains are associated with the orthopyroxene-plagioclase networks. PAT 91501 is a vesicular stone containing centimeter-sized troilite +/- metal nodules. Its texture consists of anhedral to euhedral olivine grains, anhedral orthopyroxene grains (some with euhedral clinopyroxene overgrowths), anhedral to euhedral clinopyroxene, and interstitial plagioclase and SiO2-Al2O3-K2O- rich glass. In some areas, olivine is poikilitically enclosed in orthopyroxene. Fine-grained troilite, metal, and euhedral chromite occur interstitial to the silicates. Average mineral compositions for LEW 88663 are olivine Fo(sub)75.8, orthopyroxene Wo(sub)3.4En(sub)76.2Fs(sub)20.4, clinopyroxene Wo(sub)42.6En(sub)47.8Fs(sub)9.6, plagioclase Ab(sub)75.0An(sub)21.6Or(sub)3.4. Mineral compositions for PAT 91501 are olivine Fo(sub)73.8, orthopyroxene Wo(sub)4.5En(sub)74.8Fs

  1. The Killer Will Remain Free: On Pat Parker and the Poetics of Madness.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kazim

    2015-01-01

    Poet and scholar Kazim Ali reads Pat Parker's Movement in Black intimately, one poet to another, uncovering the shadow-fact of the lives of most people of color: not only the anger that is somehow sublimated into every part of our lives but also the issue that carrying this feeling around has on our mental health itself-that "anger" and "madness" might have sources in one another. Ali concludes that Parker offers a brutal and clear-eyed and ultimately hopeful assessment of the conditions that were faced at the time, and even now, by communities of color. PMID:26075690

  2. The patA gene product, which contains a region similar to CheY of Escherichia coli, controls heterocyst pattern formation in the cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J; Scappino, L; Haselkorn, R

    1992-01-01

    In Anabaena 7120, heterocysts (cells specialized for nitrogen fixation) develop at the ends of filaments and at intervals within each filament. We have isolated a mutant Anabaena strain that develops heterocysts mostly at the ends of filaments. This mutant, PAT-1, grows poorly under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The wild-type gene that complements the mutation in PAT-1, called patA, was cloned and sequenced. The predicted PatA protein contains 379 amino acids distributed among three "domains" based on predictions of hydropathy and flexibility. The carboxyl-terminal domain is very similar to that of CheY and other response regulators in two-component regulatory systems in eubacteria. The patA mutation suppresses the multiheterocyst phenotype produced by extra copies of the wild-type hetR gene described previously, suggesting that PatA and HetR are components of the same environment-sensing regulatory circuit in Anabaena. Images PMID:1608976

  3. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected inmates.

    PubMed

    Inés, Sandra M; Moralejo, Leticia; Marcos, Miguel; Fuertes, Aurelio; Luna, Guillermo

    2008-03-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been scarcely studied in correctional settings. Our study aims to evaluate the relationship between adherence and virological outcome and to determine factors related to adherence in correctional settings. A cross-sectional retrospective study was performed in Topas prison (Salamanca, Spain). 50 inmates starting HAART were studied. Adherence was estimated through a self-report questionnaire and variables related to adherence (covering individual factors, the illness itself and the therapeutic regimen) were recorded. HIV-RNA levels and CD4 lymphocyte count were measured before starting therapy and six months after. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and multivariate methods. 21 inmates (42%) were considered adherent and 29 (58%) were non-adherent. Adherence to treatment, as measured by our questionnaire, was the only significant and independent factor associated with an undetectable viral load at six months of therapy. Five variables were significantly associated with adherence to treatment, four of them as predictor factors for good adherence: an active occupation inside prison, the absence of HIV-related symptoms, a good or average acceptance of treatment, and a higher academic background; previous injection drug use as a risk factor for HIV transmission was associated with non-adherence. A simple self-report questionnaire may be useful for assessing adherence in prison inmates. Recognizing variables associated with adherence is essential to identify prisoners at high risk of being non-adherents in order to develop strategies for improving compliance. PMID:18336264

  4. Regulation of complement and modulation of its activity in monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Saskia; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Boross, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is a powerful tool of the innate immune system to eradicate pathogens. Both in vitro and in vivo evidence indicates that therapeutic anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can activate the complement system by the classical pathway. However, the contribution of complement to the efficacy of mAbs is still debated, mainly due to the lack of convincing data in patients. A beneficial role for complement during mAb therapy is supported by the fact that cancer cells often upregulate complement-regulatory proteins (CRPs). Polymorphisms in various CRPs were previously associated with complement-mediated disorders. In this review the role of complement in anti-tumor mAb therapy will be discussed with special emphasis on strategies aiming at modifying complement activity. In the future, clinical efficacy of mAbs with enhanced effector functions together with comprehensive analysis of polymorphisms in CRPs in mAb-treated patients will further clarify the role of complement in mAb therapy. PMID:25517299

  5. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  6. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  7. The conserved P body component HPat/Pat1 negatively regulates synaptic terminal growth at the larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sarala J; Nesler, Katherine R; Rosen, Sarah F; Kato, Yasuko; Nakamura, Akira; Ramaswami, Mani; Barbee, Scott A

    2012-12-15

    The temporal and spatial regulation of protein synthesis plays an important role in the control of neural physiology. In axons and dendrites, translationally repressed mRNAs are actively transported to their destinations in a variety of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). A subset of these neuronal RNPs has been shown to contain proteins associated with mRNA processing bodies (P bodies). P bodies are a class of highly conserved cytoplasmic granules that have been linked to both mRNA decay and translational repression via general and miRNA-mediated pathways. Here, we characterize functions for HPat/Pat1 (also known as Patr-1), a core component of P bodies, at the glutamatergic larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We show that hpat mutants exhibit a strong synaptic hyperplasia at the NMJ. The synaptic defects observed in hpat mutants are associated with rearrangement of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton suggesting that HPat negatively regulates presynaptic microtubule-based growth during NMJ development. Consistent with this, overexpression of HPat also blocks the rapid growth of presynaptic boutons induced by spaced depolarization. Finally, we demonstrate that HPat interacts genetically with the catalytic subunit of the deadenylase complex (twin/CCR4) and the miRNA pathway (Argonaute 1) to control bouton formation. We propose that HPat is required to target mRNAs involved in the control of microtubule architecture and synaptic terminal growth for repression, presumably in P bodies, via both general and miRNA-mediated mechanisms. PMID:23097047

  8. The conserved P body component HPat/Pat1 negatively regulates synaptic terminal growth at the larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sarala J.; Nesler, Katherine R.; Rosen, Sarah F.; Kato, Yasuko; Nakamura, Akira; Ramaswami, Mani; Barbee, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The temporal and spatial regulation of protein synthesis plays an important role in the control of neural physiology. In axons and dendrites, translationally repressed mRNAs are actively transported to their destinations in a variety of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). A subset of these neuronal RNPs has been shown to contain proteins associated with mRNA processing bodies (P bodies). P bodies are a class of highly conserved cytoplasmic granules that have been linked to both mRNA decay and translational repression via general and miRNA-mediated pathways. Here, we characterize functions for HPat/Pat1 (also known as Patr-1), a core component of P bodies, at the glutamatergic larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We show that hpat mutants exhibit a strong synaptic hyperplasia at the NMJ. The synaptic defects observed in hpat mutants are associated with rearrangement of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton suggesting that HPat negatively regulates presynaptic microtubule-based growth during NMJ development. Consistent with this, overexpression of HPat also blocks the rapid growth of presynaptic boutons induced by spaced depolarization. Finally, we demonstrate that HPat interacts genetically with the catalytic subunit of the deadenylase complex (twin/CCR4) and the miRNA pathway (Argonaute 1) to control bouton formation. We propose that HPat is required to target mRNAs involved in the control of microtubule architecture and synaptic terminal growth for repression, presumably in P bodies, via both general and miRNA-mediated mechanisms. PMID:23097047

  9. Proton-assisted amino acid transporters are conserved regulators of proliferation and amino acid-dependent mTORC1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Heublein, S; Kazi, S; Ögmundsdóttir, M H; Attwood, E V; Kala, S; Boyd, C A R; Wilson, C; Goberdhan, D C I

    2011-01-01

    The PI3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and downstream mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling cascades promote normal growth and are frequently hyperactivated in tumour cells. mTORC1 is also regulated by local nutrients, particularly amino acids, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Unexpectedly, members of the proton-assisted amino acid transporter (PAT or SLC36) family emerged from in vivo genetic screens in Drosophila as transporters with uniquely potent effects on mTORC1-mediated growth. Here we show the two human PATs that are widely expressed in normal tissues and cancer cell lines, PAT1 and PAT4, behave similarly to fly PATs when expressed in Drosophila. siRNA knockdown reveals that these molecules are required for activation of mTORC1 targets and for proliferation in human MCF-7 breast cancer and HEK-293 embryonic kidney cell lines. Furthermore, activation of mTORC1 in starved HEK-293 cells stimulated by amino acids requires PAT1 and PAT4, and is elevated in PAT1-overexpressing cells. Importantly, in HEK-293 cells, PAT1 is highly concentrated in intracellular compartments, including endosomes, where mTOR shuttles upon amino acid stimulation. Our data are therefore consistent with a model in which PATs modulate mTORC1's activity not by transporting amino acids into the cell, but by modulating the intracellular response to amino acids. PMID:20498635

  10. Bridging the gap between PAT concepts and implementation: An integrated software platform for fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chopda, Viki R; Gomes, James; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-01-01

    Bioreactor control significantly impacts both the amount and quality of the product being manufactured. The complexity of the control strategy that is implemented increases with reactor size, which may vary from thousands to tens of thousands of litres in commercial manufacturing. The Process Analytical Technology (PAT) initiative has highlighted the need for having robust monitoring tools and effective control schemes that are capable of taking real time information about the critical quality attributes (CQA) and the critical process parameters (CPP) and executing immediate response as soon as a deviation occurs. However, the limited flexibility that present commercial software packages offer creates a hurdle. Visual programming environments have gradually emerged as potential alternatives to the available text based languages. This paper showcases development of an integrated programme using a visual programming environment for a Sartorius BIOSTAT® B Plus 5L bioreactor through which various peripheral devices are interfaced. The proposed programme facilitates real-time access to data and allows for execution of control actions to follow the desired trajectory. Major benefits of such integrated software system include: (i) improved real time monitoring and control; (ii) reduced variability; (iii) improved performance; (iv) reduced operator-training time; (v) enhanced knowledge management; and (vi) easier PAT implementation. PMID:26647285

  11. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Helen H.W.; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chiung-Hui; Guo, How-Ran; Lee, Wen-Ying; Su, Wu-Chou

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor ({>=}4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance of

  12. Cognitive-behavioral therapy with simultaneous nutritional and physical activity education in obese patients with binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Fossati, M; Amati, F; Painot, D; Reiner, M; Haenni, C; Golay, A

    2004-06-01

    An important problem with obese patients suffering from binge eating disorders (BED) is to treat their dysfunctional eating patterns while initiating a weight loss. We propose to assess a cognitive-behavioral therapy combined with a nutritional and a physical activity program. Our purpose is to verify that the addition of a nutritional and a physical program leads to a significant weight loss and enables psychological improvement. The patients (n=61) participated in a 12 weekly sessions group treatment of either a purely cognitive-behavioral therapy, or a cognitive-behavioral therapy associated to a nutritional approach mainly focused on fat restriction, or to a cognitive-behavioral therapy combined with a nutritional and a physical activity approach. The mean weight loss is significant (p<0.01) after the association of the cognitive-behavioral therapy and the nutritional education, but is even more significant (p<0.001) after the combination of a cognitive-behavioral therapy with a nutritional education and a physical activity program. Depression scores decrease in the three approaches, anxiety (p<0.05) results improve only in the combined nutritional, physical activity and cognitive-behavioral approach. Eating disorders improved significantly in all three approaches even if improvements in subscales seem more important in the combined approach. Finally, exercise seems to be a positive addition to the nutritional cognitive-behavioral therapy since it decreases negative mood, improves eating disorders and leads to an effective body weight loss. PMID:15330081

  13. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase in human cells by the mycotoxin patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.-S.; Yu, F.-Y.; Su, C.-C.; Kan, J.-C.; Chung, C.-P.; Liu, B.-H. . E-mail: bingliu@csmu.edu.tw

    2005-09-01

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin produced by certain species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, is often detectable in moldy fruits and their derivative products. PAT led to a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Exposure of HEK293 cells to concentrations above 5 {mu}M PAT for 30 min induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation; activation of ERK1/2 was also observed after 24 h incubation with 0.05 {mu}M of PAT. Treatment of human PBMCs for 30 min with 30 {mu}M PAT dramatically increased the phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. Both MEK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suppressed ERK1/2 activation in either HEK293 or MDCK cells. In HEK293 cells, U0126-mediated inhibition of PAT-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation resulted in a significant decrease in levels of DNA damage, expressed as tail moment values, in the single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Conversely, U0126 did not affect cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the DNA synthesis rate in PAT-treated cultures. Exposure of HEK293 cells for 90 min to 15 {mu}M PAT elevated the levels of early growth response gene-1 (egr-1) mRNA, but not of c-fos, fosB, and junB mRNAs. These results indicate that in human cells, PAT causes a rapid and persistent activation of ERK1/2 and this signaling pathway plays an important role in mediating PAT-induced DNA damage and egr-1 gene expression.

  14. Activities in connection with quality assurance in radiation therapy performed in Argentina: physical aspects.

    PubMed

    González, R O

    1984-06-01

    Quality assurance in radiotherapy is performed in different ways in Argentina than in other countries. A part of this program is carried out by the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL-WHO/IAEA), which is a part of the Atomic Energy Commission. This laboratory organizes TLD postal intercomparison; calibrates and checks radiotherapy units and dosimeters; gives education in the physics of radiotherapy; has collaborated in the production of rules for the operation of radiation therapy units and maintains the application of these rules. Other activities in connection with quality assurance, such as personnel, dosimetry, radiation surveys or those related to treatment planning are performed by other groups of the Atomic Energy Commission, by other institutions or by people working in radiotherapy centers. A description of the activities of the SSDL and a brief explanation about the other activities, the present situation and future plans are discussed. PMID:6735801

  15. Highly active antiretroviral therapy and tuberculosis control in Africa: synergies and potential.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Hargreaves, Nicola J.; Chimzizi, Rehab; Salaniponi, Felix M.

    2002-01-01

    HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and TB (tuberculosis) are two of the world's major pandemics, the brunt of which falls on sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts aimed at controlling HIV/AIDS have largely focused on prevention, little attention having been paid to care. Work on TB control has concentrated on case detection and treatment. HIV infection has complicated the control of tuberculosis. There is unlikely to be a decline in the number of cases of TB unless additional strategies are developed to control both this disease and HIV simultaneously. Such strategies would include active case-finding in situations where TB transmission is high, the provision of a package of care for HIV-related illness, and the application of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The latter is likely to have the greatest impact, but for this therapy to become more accessible in Africa the drugs would have to be made available through international support and a programme structure would have to be developed for its administration. It could be delivered by means of a structure based on the five-point strategy called DOTS, which has been adopted for TB control. However, it may be unrealistic to give TB control programmes the responsibility for running such a programme. A better approach might be to deliver highly active antiretroviral therapy within a comprehensive HIV/AIDS management strategy complementing the preventive work already being undertaken by AIDS control programmes. TB programmes could contribute towards the development and implementation of this strategy. PMID:12132003

  16. TLR3 agonist and Sorafenib combinatorial therapy promotes immune activation and controls hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Ho, Victor; Lim, Tong Seng; Lee, Justin; Steinberg, Jeffrey; Szmyd, Radoslaw; Tham, Muly; Yaligar, Jadegoud; Kaldis, Philipp; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Chew, Valerie

    2015-09-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with high mortality and the current therapy for advanced HCC, Sorafenib, offers limited survival benefits. Here we assessed whether combining the TLR3 agonist: lysine-stabilized polyinosinic-polycytidylic-acid (poly-ICLC) with Sorafenib could enhance tumor control in HCC. Combinatorial therapy with poly-ICLC and Sorafenib increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation of HCC cell lines in vitro, in association with impaired phosphorylation of AKT, MEK and ERK. In vivo, the combinatorial treatment enhanced control of tumor growth in two mouse models: one transplanted with Hepa 1-6 cells, and the other with liver tumors induced using the Sleeping beauty transposon. Tumor cell apoptosis and host immune responses in the tumor microenvironment were enhanced. Particularly, the activation of local NK cells, T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells was enhanced. Decreased expression of the inhibitory signaling molecules PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and tumor cells, respectively. Tumor infiltration by monocytic-myeloid derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSC) was also reduced indicating the reversion of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Our data demonstrated that the combinatorial therapy with poly-ICLC and Sorafenib enhances tumor control and local immune response hence providing a rationale for future clinical studies. PMID:26287667

  17. Hypericin-based photodynamic therapy: antitumor activity, accumulation potential, and induced cell death pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luksiene, Zivile; Vaitkuviene, Aurelija

    2004-09-01

    In this study the main interest was focused on the to investigation the photodynamic efficacy of hypericin, three other photosensitizers and 5 aminolevulinic acid-induced protopofirin IX in their ability to block the growth of rather aggressive tumor - Ehrlich ascite carcinoma in mice as well as Reh cells in humans (B-leukemia). Hypericin was found to exhibit the highest phototoxicity and antitumor activity in treating Ehrlich ascite carcinoma. The different photosensitizers were ranked as follows: Hypericin > hematoporphyrin dimethyl ether > Photofrin II > meso-tetra (para-sulfophenyl)porphin > 5-aminolevulinic acid. The most important is that just after Hyp-based photodynamic therapy 75% of mice survived a 4 month-period, and no recurrence of tumor within this period was detected in 25% of the treated mice. The clear cut correlation observed between intracellular dye concentration in the tumor cells and efficiency of photodynamic therapy, supports the idea that the intracellular accumulation of the photosensitizer is one of the most important factors in determining the benefit of photodynamic therapy. Hence, the accumulation of the photosensitizer in the tumor cells should be considered as one of the prognostic factors for the determination of the therapeutic outcome. Eventually, one of the most significant result is that hypericin is effective photosensitizer for human B-leukemia cells and induces apoptosis after photosensitization.

  18. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mou, K.H.; Han, D.; Liu, W.L.; Li, P.

    2016-01-01

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  19. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mou, K H; Han, D; Liu, W L; Li, P

    2016-07-25

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  20. Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Congestive Heart Failure: Novel Findings and Future Insights.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Brambilla, GianMaria; Pizzalla, Daniela Prata; Seravalle, Gino

    2016-08-01

    Congestive heart failure is characterized by hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic abnormalities, the latter including an activation of the sympathetic influences to the heart and peripheral circulation coupled with an impairment of baroreceptor control of autonomic function. Evidence has been provided that both these alterations are hallmark features of the disease with a specific relevance for the disease progression as well as for the development of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, a number of studies have documented in heart failure the adverse prognostic role of the sympathetic and baroreflex alterations, which both are regarded as major independent determinants of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This represents the pathophysiological and clinical background for the use of carotid baroreceptor activation therapy in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Promising data collected in experimental animal models of heart failure have supported the recent performance of pilot small-scale clinical studies, aimed at providing initial information in this area. The results of these studies demonstrated the clinical safety and efficacy of the intervention which has been tested in large-scale clinical studies. The present paper will critically review the background and main results of the published studies designed at defining the clinical impact of baroreflex activation therapy in congestive heart failure patients. Emphasis will be given to the strengths and limitations of such studies, which represent the background for the ongoing clinical trials testing the long-term effects of the device in heart failure patients. PMID:27334011

  1. Successful Interferon Therapy Reverses Enhanced Hepatic Progenitor Cell Activation in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Hidenao; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Ooba, Yukimasa; Matsunaga, Erika; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Shimoyama, Shin; Yamazaki, Satoru; Chida, Takeshi; Kawata, Kazuhito; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    The enhanced accumulation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) is related to the risk of progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interferon (IFN) treatment reduces HCC risk in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of IFN treatment on HPC activation in HCV patients. Immunohistochemical detection and computer-assisted quantitative image analyses of cytokeratin 7 (CK7) were performed to evaluate HPC activation in paired pre- and post-treatment liver biopsies from 18 HCV patients with sustained virological response (SVR) to IFN-based therapy and from 23 patients without SVR, as well as normal liver tissues obtained from surgical resection specimens of 10 patients. Pretreatment HCV livers showed increased CK7 immunoreactivity, compared with normal livers (HCV: median, 1.38%; normal: median, 0.69%, P=0.006). IFN treatment reduced hepatic CK7 immunoreactivity (median, 1.57% pre-IFN vs. 0.69% post-IFN, P=0.006) in SVR patients, but not in non-SVR patients. The development of HCC following IFN treatment was encountered in 3 non-SVR patients who showed high post-IFN treatment CK7 immunoreactivity (>4%). Successful IFN therapy can reverse enhanced HPC activation in HCV patients, which may contribute to the reduced risk of HCC development in these patients. PMID:26308703

  2. Adenoviral vectors for prodrug activation-based gene therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Doloff, Joshua C.; Waxman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is a common feature - both between patients diagnosed with the same cancer and within an individual patient’s tumor - and leads to widely different response rates to cancer therapies and the potential for the emergence of drug resistance. Diverse therapeutic approaches have been developed to combat the complexity of cancer, including individual treatment modalities designed to target tumor heterogeneity. This review discusses adenoviral vectors and how they can be modified to replicate in a cancer-specific manner and deliver therapeutic genes under multi-tiered regulation to target tumor heterogeneity, including heterogeneity associated with cancer stem cell-like subpopulations. Strategies that allow for combination of prodrug-activation gene therapy with a novel replication-conditional, heterogeneous tumor-targeting adenovirus are discussed, as are the benefits of using adenoviral vectors as tumor-targeting oncolytic vectors. While the anticancer activity of many adenoviral vectors has been well established in preclinical studies, only limited successes have been achieved in the clinic, indicating a need for further improvements in activity, specificity, tumor cell delivery and avoidance of immunogenicity. PMID:23869779

  3. Occupational therapy for patients with problems in personal activities of daily living after stroke: systematic review of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Avril; Leonardi-Bee, Jo; Gladman, J R F; Donkervoort, Mireille; Edmans, Judi; Gilbertson, Louise; Jongbloed, Lyn; Logan, Pip; Sackley, Catherine; Walker, Marion; Langhorne, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine whether occupational therapy focused specifically on personal activities of daily living improves recovery for patients after stroke. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources The Cochrane stroke group trials register, the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycLIT, AMED, Wilson Social Sciences Abstracts, Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation, Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Dissertations Abstracts register, Occupational Therapy Research Index, scanning reference lists, personal communication with authors, and hand searching. Review methods Trials were included if they evaluated the effect of occupational therapy focused on practice of personal activities of daily living or where performance in such activities was the target of the occupational therapy intervention in a stroke population. Original data were sought from trialists. Two reviewers independently reviewed each trial for methodological quality. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results Nine randomised controlled trials including 1258 participants met the inclusion criteria. Occupational therapy delivered to patients after stroke and targeted towards personal activities of daily living increased performance scores (standardised mean difference 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.32, P=0.01) and reduced the risk of poor outcome (death, deterioration or dependency in personal activities of daily living) (odds ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.87, P=0.003). For every 100 people who received occupational therapy focused on personal activities of daily living, 11 (95% confidence interval 7 to 30) would be spared a poor outcome. Conclusions Occupational therapy focused on improving personal activities of daily living after stroke can improve performance and reduce the risk of deterioration in these abilities. Focused occupational therapy should be available to everyone who has had a stroke. PMID

  4. Nerve Growth Factor Gene Therapy Activates Neuronal Responses in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, Mark H.; Yang, Jennifer H.; Barba, David; U, H S.; Bakay, Roy; Pay, Mary M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Conner, James M.; Kobalka, Peter; Roy, Subhojit; Nagahara, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, and lacks effective disease modifying therapies. In 2001 we initiated a clinical trial of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) gene therapy in AD, the first effort at gene delivery in an adult neurodegenerative disorder. This program aimed to determine whether a nervous system growth factor prevents or reduces cholinergic neuronal degeneration in AD patients. We present post-mortem findings in 10 subjects with survival times ranging from 1 to 10 years post-treatment. OBJECTIVE To determine whether degenerating neurons in AD retain an ability to respond to a nervous system growth factor delivered after disease onset. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS 10 patients with early AD underwent NGF gene therapy using either ex vivo or in vivo gene transfer. The brains of all eight patients in the first Phase 1 ex vivo trial and two patients in a subsequent Phase 1 in vivo trial were examined. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Brains were immunolabeled to evaluate in vivo gene expression, cholinergic neuronal responses to NGF, and activation of NGF-related cell signaling. In two cases, NGF protein levels were measured by ELISA. RESULTS Degenerating neurons in the AD brain respond to NGF. All patients exhibited a trophic response to NGF, in the form of axonal sprouting toward the NGF source. Comparing treated and non-treated sides of the brain in three patients that underwent unilateral gene transfer, cholinergic neuronal hypertrophy occurred on the NGF-treated side (P>0.05). Activation of cellular signaling and functional markers were present in two patients that underwent AAV2-mediated NGF gene transfer. Neurons exhibiting tau pathology as well as neurons free of tau expressed NGF, indicating that degenerating cells can be infected with therapeutic genes with resulting activation of cell signaling. No adverse pathological effects related to NGF were observed. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings indicate that

  5. Calibration of low activity caesium tubes and needles traceable to the therapy level standard.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, N A; Wilkinson, J M

    1994-02-01

    A technique for deriving the reference air kerma rate for low activity brachytherapy sources that is traceable to the therapy level standard at the National Physical Laboratory is presented. Correction factors have been generated to account for the finite source and detector size. The air kerma rate calibration of the secondary standard for caesium quality has been derived by polynomial curve fitting. The reference air kerma rates for several caesium tubes and needles have been determined and the results compared with the manufacturers' source test reports. For all the source types used the agreement between methods was within 2%. PMID:8130983

  6. Ophthalmic manifestations of HIV in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Mowatt, L

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related eye disease can be classified as retinal HIV microangiopathy, opportunistic infections, neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and unusual malignancies. There is a 52-100% lifetime accumulative risk of HIV patients developing eye problems. Seventy-seven per cent of patients with ocular manifestations of HIV had CD4 counts < 200 cells/μL. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most prevalent opportunistic infection, however, Africa has a low incidence of this, and more commonly squamous cell carcinoma, compared to the western hemisphere. Due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the anti-CMV therapy may be discontinued if the CD4+ T cell count is > 100 cells/μL for a minimum of three months. Despite HAART, patients with a CD4 count < 50 cells/μL have a similar risk of developing CMV retinitis as compared to the pre-HAART era. Opportunistic infections include CMV, herpetic retinopathy (progressive outer retinal necrosis - PORN), less commonly toxoplasmosis, pneumocystis and cryptococcus. Malignancies associated with HIV include Kaposi's sarcoma and conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma. Cranial nerve palsies, optic disc swelling and atrophy are characteristic neuro-ophthalmic features. They usually occur secondary to meningitis/encephalitis (from cryptococcus and tuberculosis). With the advent of HAART, new complications have developed in CMV retinitis: immune recovery uveitis (IRU) and cystoid macula oedema (CMO). Immune recovery uveitis occurs in 71% of patients if HAART is started before the induction of the anti-CMV treatment. However, this is reduced to 31% if HAART is started after the induction treatment. Molluscum contagiosum and Kaposi's sarcoma can spontaneously resolve on HAART. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy has reduced the frequencies of opportunistic infections and improved the remission duration in HIV patients. PMID:24756590

  7. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  8. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India: barriers, facilitators and identification of target groups.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Mark S; Douglas, G W; Sabitha Rani, G P; Chakraborty, Apurba

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the barriers and facilitators to highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and determined their prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients in Hyderabad, India. We conducted a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected adults prescribed highly active antiretroviral therapy and receiving care from nine clinics. Depression was screened using Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and facilitators of HIV medication adherence were assessed using an 11-item scale which yielded a total positive attitude to disease score. Prevalence ratios of non-adherence between different categories of potential risk factors were calculated. We compared mean 'facilitators to adherence' scores between the adherent and non-adherent population. Multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify independent risk factors. Among the 211 respondents, nearly 20% were non-adherent, approximately 8% had either moderately severe or severe depression and mean score for combined facilitators to medication adherence was 33.35 (±7.88) out of a possible 44 points. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included older age, female sex worker, moderate-to-severe depression and the combined facilitators to medication adherence score. These data from a broad range of clinical settings in Hyderabad reveal that key groups to focus on for adherence intervention are female sex workers, older persons and those with depression. PMID:25801316

  9. An implantable active-targeting micelle-in-nanofiber device for efficient and safe cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yi; Li, Long; Guo, Xing; Zhou, Shaobing

    2015-02-24

    Nanocarriers have attracted broad attention in cancer therapy because of their ability to carry drugs preferentially into cancer tissue, but their application is still limited due to the systemic toxicity and low delivery efficacy of intravenously delivered chemotherapeutics. In this study, we develop a localized drug delivery device with combination of an active-targeting micellar system and implantable polymeric nanofibers. This device is achieved first by the formation of hydrophobic doxorubicin (Dox)-encapsulated active-targeting micelles assembled from a folate-conjugated PCL-PEG copolymer. Then, fabrication of the core-shell polymeric nanofibers is achieved with coaxial electrospinning in which the core region consists of a mixture of poly(vinyl alcohol) and the micelles and the outer shell layer consists of cross-linked gelatin. In contrast to the systematic administration of therapeutics via repeatedly intravenous injections of micelles, this implantable device has these capacities of greatly reducing the drug dose, the frequency of administration and side effect of chemotherapeutic agents while maintaining highly therapeutic efficacy against artificial solid tumors. This micelle-based nanofiber device can be developed toward the next generation of nanomedicine for efficient and safe cancer therapy. PMID:25602381

  10. Systematic review of occupational therapy-related interventions for people with multiple sclerosis: part 1. Activity and participation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chih-Huang; Mathiowetz, Virgil

    2014-01-01

    This article is the first part of a systematic review of studies on occupational therapy-related intervention for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this systematic review was to critically appraise and synthesize the applicable findings to address the following focused question: What is the evidence for the effectiveness of interventions within the scope of occupational therapy practice for people with multiple sclerosis? This article focuses on occupational therapy interventions aimed at activity and participation, including programs (e.g., inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation) in which an occupational therapy practitioner was one member of the team. Part 2 (Yu & Mathiowetz, 2014) focuses on interventions within the scope of occupational therapy to remediate impairment (e.g., exercise, cognition, emotional regulation). PMID:24367952

  11. A novel approach to the antimicrobial activity of maggot debridement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Anders S.; Sandvang, Dorthe; Schnorr, Kirk M.; Kruse, Thomas; Neve, Søren; Joergensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Commercially produced sterile green bottle fly Lucilia sericata maggots are successfully employed by practitioners worldwide to clean a multitude of chronic necrotic wounds and reduce wound bacterial burdens during maggot debridement therapy (MDT). Secretions from the maggots exhibit antimicrobial activity along with other activities beneficial for wound healing. With the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria, new approaches to identifying the active compounds responsible for the antimicrobial activity within this treatment are imperative. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use a novel approach to investigate the output of secreted proteins from the maggots under conditions mimicking clinical treatments. Methods cDNA libraries constructed from microdissected salivary glands and whole maggots, respectively, were treated with transposon-assisted signal trapping (TAST), a technique selecting for the identification of secreted proteins. Several putative secreted components of insect immunity were identified, including a defensin named lucifensin, which was produced recombinantly as a Trx-fusion protein in Escherichia coli, purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC, and tested in vitro against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Results Lucifensin was active against Staphylococcus carnosus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC 2 mg/L), as well as Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 16 mg/L). The peptide did not show antimicrobial activity towards Gram-negative bacteria. The MIC of lucifensin for the methicillin-resistant S. aureus and glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus isolates tested ranged from 8 to >128 mg/L. Conclusions The TAST results did not reveal any highly secreted compounds with putative antimicrobial activity, implying an alternative antimicrobial activity of MDT. Lucifensin showed antimicrobial activities comparable to other defensins and could have potential as a future drug

  12. Radioiodine therapy in patients with hyperthyroid disorder: standard versus dosimetric activity application.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, P; Zimny, M; Schaefer, W; Mueller, B; Buell, U; Sabri, O

    2003-12-01

    Due to its high success rate and non-invasive character, an increasing demand for radioiodine therapy can be seen. This study was conducted to determine whether standardized 131I activities can be used to facilitate management of patients with hyperthyroid disorder or whether a pre-therapeutic radioiodine test is advisable to determine an adequate therapeutic activity. The therapeutic uptake of 218 patients with benign thyroid disorders were determined and compared with 24 h and 48 h test uptake measurements as well as with calculated standard uptake values. Since there is a linear relationship between iodine uptake and delivered radiation dose, the effect of the different therapeutic approaches on the latter parameter was analysed. Special care was taken to assess possible differences between the various thyroid disorders. A mean deviation between pre-therapeutic test uptake and actual therapeutic uptake of 14.7% was observed in contrast to one of 29.1% when using disease specific standard values per millilitre of thyroid tissue. Furthermore, the proportion of patients with large deviations of more than 40% increased drastically when using standard uptake values (with radioiodine test, 4.1%; with standard values, 18.8%). In conclusion, the dosimetric approach with a pre-therapeutic radioiodine test proved to be the most accurate therapeutic procedure. Both the 24 h and 48 h test uptake measurements gave analogous results and yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.91 when compared with the therapeutic uptake. While it may be tempting to use standard activities to facilitate patient management, the findings of this study confirm that, for precise therapy planning, a pre-therapeutic radioiodine test is advised. Since no significant difference could be found between the 24 h and 48 h test uptake values, an early measurement 24 h after administration of the test activity is recommended. PMID:14627852

  13. The Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT2.0): Psychometric Properties of a Screener for Psychosocial Distress in Families of Children Newly Diagnosed with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Ahna L. H.; Patiño-Fernández, Anna Maria; McSherry, Mary; Beele, David; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Reilly, Anne T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Kazak, Anne E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Psychometric properties of the Psychosocial Assessment Tool 2.0 (PAT2.0), a brief screener for psychosocial risk in families of children with cancer, are presented. Methods Female (N =132) and male (N =72) caregivers of 141 children newly diagnosed with cancer completed the PAT2.0 and measures of child behavior symptoms, anxiety, acute stress, and family functioning to establish validity. Internal consistency and test–retest reliability of the PAT2.0 were also examined. Results Internal consistency and two-week test–retest for the PAT2.0 Total score was strong. Validity for the PAT2.0 was supported by significant correlations between the PAT2.0 subscales and measures of corresponding constructs. PAT2.0 Total scores were correlated with acute stress and child behavior symptoms for both mothers and fathers. Receiver-Operating Characteristic curves provided preliminary support for the proposed cutoffs. Conclusion The PAT2.0 Total score is a useful screening tool for family psychosocial risk in the pediatric oncology population. PMID:17609228

  14. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  15. A new method to evaluate the residual activity in patients undergoing (131)I thyroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Ostinelli, A; Duchini, M; Conti, V; Bonfanti, P; Rossi, S; Cacciatori, M

    2015-12-01

    The radioiodine administration is a standard therapeutic approach to both benign thyroid diseases, such as hyperthyroidism, and carcinomas. The high administered (131)I activities are of radiation protection concern, due to relevant patient residual contamination. The aim of this work was to develop a new procedure based on external radiometric surveys and on a mathematical model in order to estimate the (131)I activity in patients undergoing hyperthyroidism radioiodine therapy. In the first stage of this study, a suitable detector was chosen and its response vs. activity was characterized. The experimental verification was performed measuring the ambient dose equivalent rate from patients receiving radioiodine administration. The results confirm the reliability of the proposed method, as shown by the slight differences between the administered activities and the ones calculated from external measurements. Furthermore, the same procedure was applied to detect the percentage residual activity in patients at two preset time intervals: 4 hours and 4 days after the radioiodine administration. The obtained results clearly highlight that the method can ensure a level of reliability compatible with the radiation protection purposes. PMID:26429386

  16. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  17. Photodynamic Quenched Cathepsin Activity Based Probes for Cancer Detection and Macrophage Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Nun, Yael; Merquiol, Emmanuelle; Brandis, Alexander; Turk, Boris; Scherz, Avigdor; Blum, Galia

    2015-01-01

    Elevated cathepsins levels and activities are found in several types of human cancer, making them valuable biomarkers for detection and targeting therapeutics. We designed small molecule quenched activity-based probes (qABPs) that fluoresce upon activity-dependent covalent modification, yielding cell killing by Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). These novel molecules are highly selective theranostic probes that enable both detection and treatment of cancer with minimal side effects. Our qABPs carry a photosensitizer (PS), which is activated by light, resulting in oxidative stress and subsequent cell ablation, and a quencher that when removed by active cathepsins allow the PS to fluoresce and demonstrate PD properties. Our most powerful and stable PS-qABP, YBN14, consists of a selective cathepsin recognition sequence, a QC-1 quencher and a new bacteriochlorin derivative as a PS. YBN14 allowed rapid and selective non-invasive in vivo imaging of subcutaneous tumors and induced specific tumor macrophage apoptosis by light treatment, resulting in a substantial tumor shrinkage in an aggressive breast cancer mouse model. These results demonstrate for the first time that the PS-qABPs technology offers a functional theranostic tool, which can be applied to numerous tumor types and other inflammation-associated diseases. PMID:26000057

  18. Clinical features of active tuberculosis that developed during anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Wook; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kang, Sang Bum; Koo, Ja Seol; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, You Sun; Joo, Young Eun; Chang, Sae Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for active ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased risks of tuberculosis (TB) infection. We analyzed the incidence and clinical features of Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who developed active TB during anti-TNF therapy. Methods Ten cases of active TB developed in patients treated with infliximab (n=592) or adalimumab (n=229) for UC (n=160) or CD (n=661) were reviewed. We analyzed demographics, interval between start of anti-TNF therapy and active TB development, tests for latent TB infection (LTBI), concomitant medications, and the details of diagnosis and treatments for TB. Results The incidence of active TB was 1.2% (10/821): 1.5% (9/592) and 0.4% (1/229) in patients receiving infliximab and adalimumab, respectively. The median time to the development of active TB after initiation of anti-TNF therapy was three months (range: 2–36). Three patients had past histories of treatment for TB. Positive findings in a TB skin test (TST) and/or interferon gamma releasing assay (IGRA) were observed in three patients, and two of them received anti-TB prophylaxis. Two patients were negative by both TST and IGRA. The most common site of active TB was the lungs, and the active TB was cured in all patients. Conclusions Active TB can develop during anti-TNF therapy in IBD patients without LTBI, and even in those with histories of TB treatment or LTBI prophylaxis. Physicians should be aware of the potential for TB development during anti-TNF therapy, especially in countries with a high prevalence of TB. PMID:27175115

  19. PAT: From Western solid dosage forms to Chinese materia medica preparations using NIR-CI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luwei; Xu, Manfei; Wu, Zhisheng; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) is an emerging technology that combines traditional near-infrared spectroscopy with chemical imaging. Therefore, NIR-CI can extract spectral information from pharmaceutical products and simultaneously visualize the spatial distribution of chemical components. The rapid and non-destructive features of NIR-CI make it an attractive process analytical technology (PAT) for identifying and monitoring critical control parameters during the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. This review mainly focuses on the pharmaceutical applications of NIR-CI in each unit operation during the manufacturing processes, from the Western solid dosage forms to the Chinese materia medica preparations. Finally, future applications of chemical imaging in the pharmaceutical industry are discussed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25877484

  20. PAT1.1; Pinellas Action Tracking System; Tracks Audit Findings and Corrective Actions

    SciTech Connect

    Mellican, P.L.

    1993-04-09

    PAT was derived from a system that began at the Rocky Flats Plant and was further enhanced at the Mound Plant. Pinellas Plant obtained this system in 1990 to track Tiger Team Findings; it has been expanded to include new modules which encompass a wide range of related functions. Functionality includes tracking of findings and associated corrective actions from various sources such as line operations, self-assessments, oversight assessments, and external organizations. Other functionality includes Management Walk-About tracking, NEPA prioritization, Occurrence/incident Report corrective action tracking, and Management Action Item Tracking. The system utilizes state of the art relational database technology with pop-up windows for table lookups and entry of descriptive text. Standards such as assessment identification numbers, area designations, and finding category codes have been developed to provide enhanced query capabilities and the ability to group findings for trending purposes on a plant-wide basis.

  1. Resistance of Cancer Cells to Targeted Therapies Through the Activation of Compensating Signaling Loops.

    PubMed

    von Manstein, Viktoria; Yang, Chul Min; Richter, Diane; Delis, Natalia; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of low molecular weight kinase inhibitors as "targeted" drugs has led to remarkable advances in the treatment of cancer patients. The clinical benefits of these tumor therapies, however, vary widely in patient populations and with duration of treatment. Intrinsic and acquired resistance against such drugs limits their efficacy. In addition to the well studied mechanisms of resistance based upon drug transport and metabolism, genetic alterations in drug target structures and the activation of compensatory cell signaling have received recent attention. Adaptive responses can be triggered which counteract the initial dependence of tumor cells upon a particular signaling molecule and allow only a transient inhibition of tumor cell growth. These compensating signaling mechanisms are often based upon the relief of repression of regulatory feedback loops. They might involve cell autonomous, intracellular events or they can be mediated via the secretion of growth factor receptor ligands into the tumor microenvironment and signal induction in an auto- or paracrine fashion. The transcription factors Stat3 and Stat5 mediate the biological functions of cytokines, interleukins and growth factors and can be considered as endpoints of multiple signaling pathways. In normal cells this activation is transient and the Stat molecules return to their non-phosphorylated state within a short time period. In tumor cells the balance between activating and de-activating signals is disturbed resulting in the persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5. The constant activation of Stat3 induces the expression of target genes, which cause the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, as well as their migration and invasive behavior. Activating components of the Jak-Stat pathway have been recognized as potentially valuable drug targets and important principles of compensatory signaling circuit induction during targeted drug treatment have been discovered in the context of kinase

  2. The Preschool Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Treatment Study (PATS) 6-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Mark A.; Yershova, Kseniya; Lazzaretto, Deborah; Paykina, Natalya; Yenokyan, Gayane; Greenhill, Laurence; Abikoff, Howard; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wigal, Tim; McCracken, James T.; Kollins, Scott H.; Murray, Desiree W.; Wigal, Sharon; Kastelic, Elizabeth; McGough, James J.; dosReis, Susan; Bauzó-Rosario, Audrey; Stehli, Annamarie; Posner, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical course of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom severity and diagnosis from ages 3–5 to 9–12 years during a 6-year follow-up after the original Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS). Method 207 participants (75% male) from the original PATS, assessed at Baseline (mean age 4.4 years, when all met criteria for ADHD) and 3-months later (prior to medication treatment), were re-evaluated in three follow-up assessment visits (Year 3, mean age 7.4 years; Year 4, 8.3 years and Year 6, 10.4 years). Parents and teachers rated symptom severity and clinicians established psychiatric diagnoses. Analyses examined longitudinal changes in symptom severity and ADHD diagnosis. Results Parent- and teacher-rated symptom severity decreased from Baseline to Year 3 but remained relatively stable and in the moderate-to-severe clinical range through Year 6. Girls showed generally steeper decreases in symptom T-scores. At Year 6, 89% (160/180) of remaining participants met ADHD symptom and impairment diagnostic criteria. Comorbidity of oppositional defiant disorder and/or conduct disorder was associated with a 30% higher risk of having an ADHD diagnosis at Year 6 in the multiple logistic model. Medication status during follow-up, on vs. off, did not predict symptom severity change from Year 3 to Year 6 after adjustment for other variables. Conclusions ADHD in preschoolers is a relatively stable diagnosis over a 6-year period. The course is generally chronic, with high symptom severity and impairment, in very young children with moderate-to-severe ADHD, despite treatment with medication. Development of more effective ADHD intervention strategies is needed for this age group. PMID:23452683

  3. RF Manipulation of Ions in the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Martin, James J.; Sims, William H.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond A.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of antimatter provides the highest mass specific energy of any other known reaction. Proper harnessing of this energy holds great promise for future space propulsion systems. Many different propulsion concepts have been proposed that take advantage of antimatter, either using matter-antimatter as the primary fuel, or as a 'spark plug' for fusion and fission systems. In order to begin to address these concepts experimentally, a method of storing and transporting antimatter must be developed. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is a first-generation storage and transportation device designed to store and transport 10(exp 12) antiprotons with a storage half-life of 18 days. It uses a Penning-Malmberg ion trap with a 4T magnetic field and 20 kV potential. This will enable researchers much more flexibility in the design of antimatter experiments related to propulsion. Ions cannot be stored indefinitely in a real trap, as ion cloud instabilities develop from imperfections in manufacturing and misalignments in assembly. Previous work has been done at both the National Institute of Standards and University of California in San Diego in using RF (radio frequency) signals to both diagnose and confine the ion cloud. Two electrodes in the trap have been segmented to allow both reception and transmission of RF waves in the ion cloud. Experiments are underway to determine the number of ions and density in the cloud by "listening" to protons contained in the HiPAT. Currently we believe the density of ions stored in the trap is roughly 10(exp 15) m(exp -3). Development of non-destructive techniques is vital to the project goals, enabling continuous monitoring of the quantities stored in the system. Experimental work is also being done in identifying RF transmission frequencies that can manipulate the density of the cloud, by exchanging energy and momentum between the RF wave and the ions. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated this interaction.

  4. Plasminogen activation system in oral cancer: Relevance in prognosis and therapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Wyganowska-Świątkowska, Marzena; Jankun, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Research on carcinogenesis and progress in cancer treatment have reduced mortality of cancer patients. Mortality rates decreased by 1.5% per year from 2001 through 2010 for most types of cancer in men and women. However, oral cancer is still a significant global health problem since incidence and mortality rates are increasing. Oral cavity cancer is ranked the 8th in men and the 14th in women based on data collected between 2006 and 2010 by the National Institute of Health. Furthermore, an increasing incidence of head and neck neoplasms, particularly the tongue cancer among young adults has been reported recently. It is most likely due to increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) infection or the early start of tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment of oral cancer patients is mainly surgical and often leads to esthetic and functional deformities, with severe impact on the quality of life. Thus, novel form of treatments and selection of patients with high and low risk of mortality is of high priority for clinical studies. The expression of proteolytic enzymes in tumor and stromal tissues has been shown to have prognostic significance in many human cancers and inhibiting proteolysis can reduce tumor growth in many in vivo and in vitro models. Plasmin, with its activators and inhibitors are of great importance in many human malignances and collectively are called plasminogen activation system (PAS). In this comprehensive review we examine expression, possible prognostic markers and importance for therapy of the PAS members in oral cancer. Literature review suggests that overexpression of urokinase and its receptor are markers of poor outcome, thus, their inhibition can be explored in oral cancer therapy. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is complex and depends on its concentration. Overexpression of PAI-1 favors angiogenesis, metastasis and poor prognosis, although when applied in very high concentrations it inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth, the

  5. mini-PAT (Peer Assessment Tool): A Valid Component of a National Assessment Programme in the UK?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Julian; Norcini, John; Southgate, Lesley; Heard, Shelley; Davies, Helena

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To design, implement and evaluate a multisource feedback instrument to assess Foundation trainees across the UK. Methods: mini-PAT (Peer Assessment Tool) was modified from SPRAT (Sheffield Peer Review Assessment Tool), an established multisource feedback (360 [degree]) instrument to assess more senior doctors, as part of a blueprinting…

  6. CIO of the Year 2006: Pat Renzulli--The School District of Philadelphia's Top Technology Officer Puts Students First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article profiles Pat Renzulli, CIO for the School District of Philadelphia, who was selected as David Kearns CIO of the Year 2006. Among other accomplishments, she developed a process for principals to receive key performance indicators, lead the implementation of an instructional management system, rolled out a district-wide technology…

  7. At-line process analytical technology (PAT) for more efficient scale up of biopharmaceutical microfiltration unit operations.

    PubMed

    Watson, Douglas S; Kerchner, Kristi R; Gant, Sean S; Pedersen, Joseph W; Hamburger, James B; Ortigosa, Allison D; Potgieter, Thomas I

    2016-01-01

    Tangential flow microfiltration (MF) is a cost-effective and robust bioprocess separation technique, but successful full scale implementation is hindered by the empirical, trial-and-error nature of scale-up. We present an integrated approach leveraging at-line process analytical technology (PAT) and mass balance based modeling to de-risk MF scale-up. Chromatography-based PAT was employed to improve the consistency of an MF step that had been a bottleneck in the process used to manufacture a therapeutic protein. A 10-min reverse phase ultra high performance liquid chromatography (RP-UPLC) assay was developed to provide at-line monitoring of protein concentration. The method was successfully validated and method performance was comparable to previously validated methods. The PAT tool revealed areas of divergence from a mass balance-based model, highlighting specific opportunities for process improvement. Adjustment of appropriate process controls led to improved operability and significantly increased yield, providing a successful example of PAT deployment in the downstream purification of a therapeutic protein. The general approach presented here should be broadly applicable to reduce risk during scale-up of filtration processes and should be suitable for feed-forward and feed-back process control. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:108-115, 2016. PMID:26519135

  8. Simultaneous binding of the anti-cancer IgM monoclonal antibody PAT-SM6 to low density lipoproteins and GRP78.

    PubMed

    Rosenes, Zachary; Mok, Yee-Foong; Yang, Shuo; Griffin, Michael D W; Mulhern, Terrence D; Hatters, Danny M; Hensel, Frank; Howlett, Geoffrey J

    2013-01-01

    The tumour-derived monoclonal IgM antibody PAT-SM6 specifically kills malignant cells by an apoptotic mechanism linked to the excessive uptake of plasma lipids. The mechanism is postulated to occur via the multi-point attachment of PAT-SM6 to the unfolded protein response regulator GRP78, located on the surface of tumour cells, coupled to the simultaneous binding of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL). We prepared and characterised LDL and oxidized LDL using sedimentation velocity and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) techniques indicated apparent dissociation constants of approximately 20 nM for the binding of LDL or oxidized LDL to PAT-SM6. ELISA experiments showed cross competition with LDL inhibiting PAT-SM6 binding to immobilised GRP78, while, in the reverse experiment, GRP78 inhibited PAT-SM6 binding to immobilized LDL. In contrast to the results of the ELISA experiments, sedimentation velocity experiments indicated relatively weak interactions between LDL and PAT-SM6, suggesting immunoabsorbance to the microtiter plate is driven by an avidity-based binding mechanism. The importance of avidity and the multipoint attachment of antigens to PAT-SM6 was further investigated using antigen-coated polystyrene beads. Absorption of GRP78 or LDL to polystyrene microspheres led to an increase in the inhibition of PAT-SM6 binding to microtiter plates coated with GRP78 or LDL, respectively. These results support the hypothesis that the biological action of PAT-SM6 in tumour cell apoptosis depends on the multivalent nature of PAT-SM6 and the ability to interact simultaneously with LDL and multiple GRP78 molecules clustered on the tumour cell surface. PMID:23620733

  9. ROS-Responsive Activatable Photosensitizing Agent for Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy of Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Youngmi; Kim, In-Hoo; Kim, Kyungtae; Choi, Yongdoo

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of macrophage-targeted theranostic nanoparticles (MacTNP) prepared from a Chlorin e6 (Ce6)-hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugate can be activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in macrophage cells. MacTNP are nonfluorescent and nonphototoxic in their native state. However, when treated with ROS, especially peroxynitrite, they become highly fluorescent and phototoxic. In vitro cell studies show that MacTNP emit near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence inside activated macrophages. The NIR fluorescence is quenched in the extracellular environment. MacTNP are nontoxic in macrophages up to a Ce6 concentration of 10 μM in the absence of light. However, MacTNP become phototoxic upon illumination in a light dose-dependent manner. In particular, significantly higher phototoxic effect is observed in the activated macrophage cells compared to human dermal fibroblasts and non-activated macrophages. The ROS-responsive MacTNP, with their high target-to-background ratio, may have a significant potential in selective NIR fluorescence imaging and in subsequent photodynamic therapy of atherosclerosis with minimum side effects. PMID:24396511

  10. Activity-Based Restorative Therapies after Spinal Cord Injury: Inter-institutional conceptions and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Dolbow, David R; Gorgey, Ashraf S; Recio, Albert C; Stiens, Steven A; Curry, Amanda C; Sadowsky, Cristina L; Gater, David R; Martin, Rebecca; McDonald, John W

    2015-08-01

    This manuscript is a review of the theoretical and clinical concepts provided during an inter-institutional training program on Activity-Based Restorative Therapies (ABRT) and the perceptions of those in attendance. ABRT is a relatively recent high volume and intensity approach toward the restoration of neurological deficits and decreasing the risk of secondary conditions associated with paralysis after spinal cord injury (SCI). ABRT is guided by the principle of neuroplasticity and the belief that even those with chronic SCI can benefit from repeated activation of the spinal cord pathways located both above and below the level of injury. ABRT can be defined as repetitive-task specific training using weight-bearing and external facilitation of neuromuscular activation. The five key components of ABRT are weight-bearing activities, functional electrical stimulation, task-specific practice, massed practice and locomotor training which includes body weight supported treadmill walking and water treadmill training. The various components of ABRT have been shown to improve functional mobility, and reverse negative body composition changes after SCI leading to the reduction of cardiovascular and other metabolic disease risk factors. The consensus of those who received the ABRT training was that ABRT has much potential for enhancement of recovery of those with SCI. Although various institutions have their own strengths and challenges, each institution was able to initiate a modified ABRT program. PMID:26236547

  11. Activity-Based Restorative Therapies after Spinal Cord Injury: Inter-institutional conceptions and perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Dolbow, David R.; Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Recio, Albert C.; Stiens, Steven A.; Curry, Amanda C.; Sadowsky, Cristina L.; Gater, David R.; Martin, Rebecca; McDonald, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript is a review of the theoretical and clinical concepts provided during an inter-institutional training program on Activity-Based Restorative Therapies (ABRT) and the perceptions of those in attendance. ABRT is a relatively recent high volume and intensity approach toward the restoration of neurological deficits and decreasing the risk of secondary conditions associated with paralysis after spinal cord injury (SCI). ABRT is guided by the principle of neuroplasticity and the belief that even those with chronic SCI can benefit from repeated activation of the spinal cord pathways located both above and below the level of injury. ABRT can be defined as repetitive-task specific training using weight-bearing and external facilitation of neuromuscular activation. The five key components of ABRT are weight-bearing activities, functional electrical stimulation, task-specific practice, massed practice and locomotor training which includes body weight supported treadmill walking and water treadmill training. The various components of ABRT have been shown to improve functional mobility, and reverse negative body composition changes after SCI leading to the reduction of cardiovascular and other metabolic disease risk factors. The consensus of those who received the ABRT training was that ABRT has much potential for enhancement of recovery of those with SCI. Although various institutions have their own strengths and challenges, each institution was able to initiate a modified ABRT program. PMID:26236547

  12. Activating Photodynamic Therapy in vitro with Cerenkov Radiation Generated from Yttrium-90.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Brad A; Hirschberg, Henry; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    The translation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to the clinical setting has primarily been limited to easily accessible and/or superficial diseases, for which traditional light delivery can be performed noninvasively. Cerenkov radiation, as generated from medically relevant radionuclides, has been suggested as a means to deliver light to deeper tissues noninvasively to overcome this depth limitation. This article investigates the utility of Cerenkov radiation, as generated from the radionuclide yttrium-90, for activating the PDT process using clinically approved aminolevulinic acid at 1.0 mm and also the more efficient porphyrin-based photosensitizer mesotetraphenylporphine with two sulfonate groups on adjacent phenyl rings (TPPS2a) at 1.2 µm. Experiments were conducted with monolayer cultured glioma and breast tumor cell lines. Although aminolevulinic acid proved to be ineffective for generating a therapeutic effect at all but the highest activity levels, TPPS2a produced at least a 20% therapeutic effect at activities ranging from 6 to 60 µCi/well for the C6 glioma cell line. Importantly, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Cerenkov radiation generated from a radionuclide can be used to activate PDT using clinically relevant photosensitizers. These results therefore provide evidence that it may be possible to generate a phototherapeutic effect in vivo using Cerenkov radiation and clinically relevant photosensitizers. PMID:27481495

  13. SU-E-J-49: Distal Edge Activity Fall Off Of Proton Therapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L; Butuceanu, C; Zhu, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify the distal edge activity fall off, created in a phantom by a proton therapy beam Method and Materials: A 30x30x10cm polymethylmethacrylate phantom was irradiated with a proton therapy beam using different ranges and beams. The irradiation volume is approximated by a right circular cylinder of diameter 7.6cm and varying lengths. After irradiation, the phantom was scanned via a Philips Gemini Big Bore™ PET-CT for isotope activation. Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system as well as ImageJ™ were used to analyze the resulting PET and CT scans. The region of activity within the phantom was longitudinally measured as a function of PET slice number. Dose estimations were made via Monte Carlo (GATE) simulation. Results: For both the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and the mono-energetic pristine Bragg peak proton beams, the proximal activation rise was steep: average slope −0.735 (average intensity/slice number) ± 0.091 (standard deviation) for the pristine beams and −1.149 ± 0.117 for the SOBP beams. In contrast, the distal fall offs were dissimilar. The distal fall off in activity for the pristine beams was fit well by a linear curve: R{sup 2} (Pierson Product) was 0.9968, 0.9955 and 0.9909 for the 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm range beams respectively. The good fit allows for a slope comparison between the different ranges. The slope varied as a function of range from 1.021 for the 13.5cm beam to 0.8407 (average intensity/slice number) for the 21.0cm beam. This dependence can be characterized: −0.0234(average intensity/slice number/cm range). For the SOBP beams, the slopes were significantly less and were also less linear: average slope 0.2628 ± 0.0474, average R{sup 2}=0.9236. Conclusion: The distal activation fall off edge for pristine proton beams was linear and steep. The corresponding quantities for SOBP beams were shallower and less linear. Philips has provided support for this work.

  14. Sympathetic Activation in Chronic Heart Failure: Potential Benefits of Interventional Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lachowska, Kamila; Gruchała, Marcin; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Hering, Dagmara

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major and growing public health problem. This condition is associated with poor prognosis, a high rate of mortality, frequent hospitalization and increasing costs to health care systems. Pharmacological approaches aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality in HF have primarily focused on inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), both of which have been associated with disease development, progression and adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. The increasing number of hospitalizations for HF decompensation suggests the failure of available treatment options, indicating the necessity for alternative therapeutic approaches. Alongside pharmacological and cardiac resynchronization therapies in selected patients with arrhythmia, recent advancements in the management of HF have been directed at inhibiting relevant neurogenic pathways underlying disease development and progression. Initial evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of interventional procedures suggests that HF patients may benefit from novel adjunctive therapies. Here we review the critical role of sympathetic activation in HF and the rationale for therapeutic interventions including device-based and interventional approaches aimed at restoring autonomic neural balance in this condition. PMID:27193773

  15. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy. PMID:26513754

  16. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi) is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis) is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection. PMID:22168333

  17. VR PTSD exposure therapy results with active duty OIF/OEF combatants.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Albert A; Difede, Joann; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Johnston, Scott; McLay, Robert N; Reger, Greg; Gahm, Greg; Parsons, Thomas; Graap, Ken; Pair, Jarrell

    2009-01-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is reported to be caused by traumatic events that are outside the range of usual human experience including military combat, violent personal assault, being kidnapped or taken hostage and terrorist attacks. Reports indicate that at least 1 out of 6 Iraq War veterans are exhibiting symptoms of depression, anxiety and PTSD. Virtual Reality exposure therapy has been previously used for PTSD with reports of positive outcomes. This paper will present a brief description of the USC/ICT Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan PTSD therapy application and present clinical outcome data from active duty patients treated at the Naval Medical Center-San Diego (NMCSD) as of October 2009. Initial outcomes from the first twenty patients to complete treatment indicate that 16 no longer meet diagnostic criteria for PTSD at post treatment. Research and clinical tests using the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan software are also currently underway at Weill Cornell Medical College, Emory University, Fort Lewis and WRAMC along with 20 other test sites. PMID:19377167

  18. Brief Report: Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Mitigates Liver Disease in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seaberg, Eric C.; Phair, John P.; Witt, Mallory D.; Koletar, Susan L.; Thio, Chloe L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: To determine the impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on liver disease, we analyzed changes in the aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) pre- and post-HAART initiation among 441 HIV-monoinfected and 53 HIV-viral hepatitis–coinfected men. Before HAART, APRI increased 17% and 34% among the HIV-monoinfected and coinfected men, respectively. With HAART initiation, APRI decreased significantly in men who achieved HIV RNA of <500 copies per milliliter: 16% for HIV-monoinfected and 22% for coinfected men. Decreases in APRI were dependent on HIV suppression. This protective effect of HAART decreased after 2 years, particularly in the HIV-monoinfected men. PMID:26945179

  19. Assessing disease activity in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: impact on management and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Vinod; Maharaj, Ajesh B

    2016-05-01

    The management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis has undergone major advancements over the last decade. This has been made possible, in part, due to the introduction of new therapies for their management, as well as global collaboration in the development of outcome measures and "treat- to- target" paradigms. In this review article, we discuss how disease activity is measured and the outcome measures that have been recently developed for the management of PsA. The importance of assessing the individual domains as well as global assessments both from the physician and patient perspective, and the development of composite measures are discussed. The newer PsA specific measures are expected to be more commonly used in clinical trials as well as clinical practice. PMID:26807494

  20. A case of atypical progressive outer retinal necrosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Se Joon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chung, Hum

    2004-06-01

    This is a report of an atypical case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) and the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical course of viral retinitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. A 22-year-old male patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with unilaterally reduced visual acuity and a dense cataract. After cataract extraction, retinal lesions involving the peripheral and macular areas were found with perivascular sparing and the mud-cracked, characteristic appearance of PORN. He was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and was given combined antiviral treatment. With concurrent HAART, the retinal lesions regressed, with the regression being accelerated by further treatment with intravenous acyclovir and ganciclovir. This case suggests that HAART may change the clinical course of PORN in AIDS patients by improving host immunity. PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute unilateral cataract in AIDS patients. PMID:15255240

  1. Maggot debridement therapy promotes diabetic foot wound healing by up-regulating endothelial cell activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinjuan; Chen, Jin'an; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Wei; Sun, Jinshan; Wang, Aiping

    2016-03-01

    To determine the role of maggot debridement therapy (MDT) on diabetic foot wound healing, we compared growth related factors in wounds before and after treatment. Furthermore, we utilized human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to explore responses to maggot excretions/secretions on markers of angiogenesis and proliferation. The results showed that there was neo-granulation and angiogenesis in diabetic foot wounds after MDT. Moreover, significant elevation in CD34 and CD68 levels was also observed in treated wounds. In vitro, ES increased HUVEC proliferation, improved tube formation, and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 in a dose dependent manner. These results demonstrate that MDT and maggot ES can promote diabetic foot wound healing by up-regulating endothelial cell activity. PMID:26782021

  2. Perceptions of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies by Parents and Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Danielle; Rothwell, Erin; Newcomb, Tara M.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify the physical and psychosocial effects of equine assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) on children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) from the perspective of the child and their parents. Methods The families of all eligible children with SMA, who reported participation in EAAT, from a western metropolitan academic center were contacted and invited to participate. This study implemented qualitative, semi-structured interviews of children with SMA and their parents. Results Three themes emerged from the qualitative content analysis: physical/psychosocial benefits; relationship development with the horses, instructors, and children; and barriers to continued EAAT engagement. Conclusions The data suggest the overall EAAT experience was a source of enjoyment, self-confidence, and normalcy for the children with SMA. The results of this study provide preliminary support for the use of EAAT among children with SMA. PMID:24675128

  3. Brief Report: Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Mitigates Liver Disease in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Price, Jennifer C; Seaberg, Eric C; Phair, John P; Witt, Mallory D; Koletar, Susan L; Thio, Chloe L

    2016-07-01

    To determine the impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on liver disease, we analyzed changes in the aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) pre- and post-HAART initiation among 441 HIV-monoinfected and 53 HIV-viral hepatitis-coinfected men. Before HAART, APRI increased 17% and 34% among the HIV-monoinfected and coinfected men, respectively. With HAART initiation, APRI decreased significantly in men who achieved HIV RNA of <500 copies per milliliter: 16% for HIV-monoinfected and 22% for coinfected men. Decreases in APRI were dependent on HIV suppression. This protective effect of HAART decreased after 2 years, particularly in the HIV-monoinfected men. PMID:26945179

  4. Complement activation and choriocapillaris loss in early AMD: Implications for pathophysiology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, S.Scott; Sohn, Elliott H.; Chirco, Kathleen R.; Drack, Arlene V.; Stone, Edwin M.; Tucker, Budd A.; Mullins, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common and devastating disease that can result in severe visual dysfunction. Over the last decade, great progress has been made in identifying genetic variants that contribute to AMD, many of which lie in genes involved in the complement cascade. In this review we discuss the significance of complement activation in AMD, particularly with respect to the formation of the membrane attack complex in the aging choriocapillaris. We review the clinical, histological and biochemical data that indicate that vascular loss in the choroid occurs very early in the pathogenesis of AMD, and discuss the potential impact of vascular dropout on the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane and the photoreceptor cells. Finally, we present a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of early AMD and consider the implications of this model on the development of new therapies. PMID:25486088

  5. Highly active antiretroviral therapy-related mechanisms of endothelial and platelet function alterations.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Momi, Stefania; Francisci, Daniela; Baldelli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic condition, which has allowed the infected population to age and become prone to chronic degenerative diseases common to the general population, including atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Possible causative mechanisms of HIV-associated CAD are related to classic cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and fat redistribution, which may be due to either HIV infection or to HAART-associated toxicity. However, other mechanisms are emerging as crucial for the cardiovascular complication of HIV and HAART. This article analyzes the effects of HIV and HAART on endothelial function, endothelium-leukocyte interactions, and platelets as possible mechanisms of enhanced cardiovascular risk. PMID:24987863

  6. Hybrid data capture for monitoring patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in urban Botswana.

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Hermann; Wester, C. William; Ndwapi, Ndwapi; Vanderwarker, Chris; Gaolathe, Tendani; Tirelo, Geoffrey; Avalos, Ava; Moffat, Howard; Marlink, Richard G.

    2006-01-01

    Individual patient care and programme evaluation are pivotal for the success of antiretroviral treatment programmes in resource-limited countries. While computer-aided documentation and data storage are indispensable for any large programme, several important issues need to be addressed including which data are to be collected, who collects it and how it is entered into an electronic database. We describe a patient-monitoring approach, which uses patient encounter forms (in hybrid paper + electronic format) based on optical character recognition, piloted at Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone, Botswana's first public highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) outpatient clinic. Our novel data capture approach collects "key" data for tracking patient and programme outcomes. It saves physician time and does not detract from clinical care. PMID:16501730

  7. Exploring Sudden Gains in Behavioral Activation Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hunnicutt-Ferguson, Kallio; Hoxha, Denada; Gollan, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the onset and course of sudden gains in treatment provides clinical information to the patient and clinician, and encourages clinicians to strive for these sudden clinical gains with their patients. This study characterizes the occurrence of sudden gains with Behavioral Activation (BA; Martell, Addis, & Jacobson, 2001), and the extent to which pre-treatment dysfunctional depressive thinking predicts sudden gains during treatment. We enrolled a sample of adults (n = 42) between ages 18–65 diagnosed with primary Major Depressive Disorder. All participants completed a 16-week course of BA, with clinical and self-report assessments at pre-, mid- and post-treatment. Results indicated that sudden gain and non-sudden gain participants showed differential improvement across treatment. No significant effects emerged for the dysfunctional cognitive style as a predictor of sudden gain status. Sudden gains may result from interaction of non-specific factors with the BA techniques implemented during early phases of therapy. PMID:22336434

  8. Impediments to Enhancement of CPT-11 Anticancer Activity by E. coli Directed Beta-Glucuronidase Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Tao, Mi-Hua; Roffler, Steve R.

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is a camptothecin analog used for the clinical treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma. CPT-11 is converted into the therapeutic anti-cancer agent SN-38 by liver enzymes and can be further metabolized to a non-toxic glucuronide SN-38G, resulting in low SN-38 but high SN-38G concentrations in the circulation. We previously demonstrated that adenoviral expression of membrane-anchored beta-glucuronidase could promote conversion of SN-38G to SN-38 in tumors and increase the anticancer activity of CPT-11. Here, we identified impediments to effective tumor therapy with E. coli that were engineered to constitutively express highly active E. coli beta-glucuronidase intracellularly to enhance the anticancer activity of CPT-11. The engineered bacteria, E. coli (lux/βG), could hydrolyze SN-38G to SN-38, increased the sensitivity of cultured tumor cells to SN-38G by about 100 fold and selectively accumulated in tumors. However, E. coli (lux/βG) did not more effectively increase CPT-11 anticancer activity in human tumor xenografts as compared to non-engineered E. coli. SN-38G conversion to SN-38 by E. coli (lux/βG) appeared to be limited by slow uptake into bacteria as well as by segregation of E. coli in necrotic regions of tumors that may be relatively inaccessible to systemically-administered drug molecules. Studies using a fluorescent glucuronide probe showed that significantly greater glucuronide hydrolysis could be achieved in mice pretreated with E. coli (lux/βG) by direct intratumoral injection of the glucuronide probe or by intratumoral lysis of bacteria to release intracellular beta-glucuronidase. Our study suggests that the distribution of beta-glucuronidase, and possibly other therapeutic proteins, in the tumor microenvironment might be an important barrier for effective bacterial-based tumor therapy. Expression of secreted therapeutic proteins or induction of therapeutic protein release from bacteria might therefore be a promising strategy to enhance anti

  9. Impediments to enhancement of CPT-11 anticancer activity by E. coli directed beta-glucuronidase therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Tao, Mi-Hua; Roffler, Steve R

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is a camptothecin analog used for the clinical treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma. CPT-11 is converted into the therapeutic anti-cancer agent SN-38 by liver enzymes and can be further metabolized to a non-toxic glucuronide SN-38G, resulting in low SN-38 but high SN-38G concentrations in the circulation. We previously demonstrated that adenoviral expression of membrane-anchored beta-glucuronidase could promote conversion of SN-38G to SN-38 in tumors and increase the anticancer activity of CPT-11. Here, we identified impediments to effective tumor therapy with E. coli that were engineered to constitutively express highly active E. coli beta-glucuronidase intracellularly to enhance the anticancer activity of CPT-11. The engineered bacteria, E. coli (lux/βG), could hydrolyze SN-38G to SN-38, increased the sensitivity of cultured tumor cells to SN-38G by about 100 fold and selectively accumulated in tumors. However, E. coli (lux/βG) did not more effectively increase CPT-11 anticancer activity in human tumor xenografts as compared to non-engineered E. coli. SN-38G conversion to SN-38 by E. coli (lux/βG) appeared to be limited by slow uptake into bacteria as well as by segregation of E. coli in necrotic regions of tumors that may be relatively inaccessible to systemically-administered drug molecules. Studies using a fluorescent glucuronide probe showed that significantly greater glucuronide hydrolysis could be achieved in mice pretreated with E. coli (lux/βG) by direct intratumoral injection of the glucuronide probe or by intratumoral lysis of bacteria to release intracellular beta-glucuronidase. Our study suggests that the distribution of beta-glucuronidase, and possibly other therapeutic proteins, in the tumor microenvironment might be an important barrier for effective bacterial-based tumor therapy. Expression of secreted therapeutic proteins or induction of therapeutic protein release from bacteria might therefore be a promising strategy to enhance anti

  10. Antitumor activity of photodynamic therapy performed with nanospheres containing zinc-phthalocyanine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing incidence of cancer and the search for more effective therapies with minimal collateral effects have prompted studies to find alternative new treatments. Among these, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been proposed as a very promising new modality in cancer treatment with the lowest rates of side effects, revealing itself to be particularly successful when the photosensitizer is associated with nanoscaled carriers. This study aimed to design and develop a new formulation based on albumin nanospheres containing zinc-phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (ZnPcS4-AN) for use in the PDT protocol and to investigate its antitumor activity in Swiss albino mice using the Ehrlich solid tumor as an experimental model for breast cancer. Methods Ehrlich tumor’s volume, histopathology and morphometry were used to assess the efficacy of intratumoral injection of ZnPcS4-AN in containing tumor aggressiveness and promoting its regression, while the toxicity of possible treatments was assessed by animal weight, morphological analysis of the liver and kidneys, hemogram, and serum levels of total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, indirect bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase, creatinine and urea. In order to evaluate the efficacy of PDT, groups of animals treated with intratumoral injection of doxorubicin (Dox) were also investigated. Results Intratumoral injection of ZnPcS4-AN was found to be efficient in mediating PDT to refrain tumor aggressiveness and to induce its regression. Although tumor volume reduction was not significant, PDT induced a remarkable increase in the necrosis area seen in the tumor’s central region, as in other experimental groups, including tumor and Dox treated groups, but also in the tumor’s peripheral region. Further, PDT showed minimal adverse effects. Indeed, the use of ZnPcS4-AN in mediating PDT revealed anti-neoplastic activity similar to that

  11. Real-time active MR-tracking of metallic stylets in MR-guided radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Tse, Zion T. H.; Mehrtash, Alireza; Loew, Wolfgang; Norton, Isaiah; Tokuda, Junichi; Seethamraju, Ravi T.; Kapur, Tina; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Schmidt, Ehud J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop an active MR-tracking system to guide placement of metallic devices for radiation therapy. Methods An actively tracked metallic stylet for brachytherapy was constructed by adding printed-circuit micro-coils to a commercial stylet. The coil design was optimized by electromagnetic simulation, and has a radio-frequency lobe pattern extending ~5 mm beyond the strong B0 inhomogeneity region near the metal surface. An MR-tracking sequence with phase-field dithering was used to overcome residual effects of B0 and B1 inhomogeneities caused by the metal, as well as from inductive coupling to surrounding metallic stylets. The tracking system was integrated with a graphical workstation for real-time visualization. 3T MRI catheter-insertion procedures were tested in phantoms and ex-vivo animal tissue, and then performed in three patients during interstitial brachytherapy. Results The tracking system provided high-resolution (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6 mm3) and rapid (16 to 40 frames per second, with three to one phase-field dithering directions) catheter localization in phantoms, animals, and three gynecologic cancer patients. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of active tracking of the shaft of metallic stylet in MR-guided brachytherapy. It holds the promise of assisting physicians to achieve better targeting and improving outcomes in interstitial brachytherapy. PMID:24903165

  12. Targeting Microglial Activation in Stroke Therapy: Pharmacological Tools and Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Won, S.J.; Xu, Y.; Swanson, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused by critical reductions in blood flow to brain or spinal cord. Microglia are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, and they respond to stroke by assuming an activated phenotype that releases cytotoxic cytokines, reactive oxygen species, proteases, and other factors. This acute, innate immune response may be teleologically adapted to limit infection, but in stroke this response can exacerbate injury by further damaging or killing nearby neurons and other cell types, and by recruiting infiltration of circulating cytotoxic immune cells. The microglial response requires hours to days to fully develop, and this time interval presents a clinically accessible time window for initiating therapy. Because of redundancy in cytotoxic microglial responses, the most effective therapeutic approach may be to target the global gene expression changes involved in microglial activation. Several classes of drugs can do this, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, minocycline and other PARP inhibitors, corticosteroids, and inhibitors of TNFα and scavenger receptor signaling. Here we review the pre-clinical studies in which these drugs have been used to suppress microglial activation after stroke. We also review recent advances in the understanding of sex differences in the CNS inflammatory response, as these differences are likely to influence the efficacy of drugs targeting post-stroke brain inflammation. PMID:24372213

  13. Activation of mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 normalizes tumor vasculature and improves cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Adapala, R K; Thoppil, R J; Ghosh, K; Cappelli, H C; Dudley, A C; Paruchuri, S; Keshamouni, V; Klagsbrun, M; Meszaros, J G; Chilian, W M; Ingber, D E; Thodeti, C K

    2016-01-21

    Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormal morphology and hyperpermeability that together cause inefficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Although vascular endothelial growth factor has been established as a critical regulator of tumor angiogenesis, the role of mechanical signaling in the regulation of tumor vasculature or tumor endothelial cell (TEC) function is not known. Here we show that the mechanosensitive ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) regulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor vessel maturation via modulation of TEC mechanosensitivity. We found that TECs exhibit reduced TRPV4 expression and function, which is correlated with aberrant mechanosensitivity towards extracellular matrix stiffness, increased migration and abnormal angiogenesis by TEC. Further, syngeneic tumor experiments revealed that the absence of TRPV4 induced increased vascular density, vessel diameter and reduced pericyte coverage resulting in enhanced tumor growth in TRPV4 knockout mice. Importantly, overexpression or pharmacological activation of TRPV4 restored aberrant TEC mechanosensitivity, migration and normalized abnormal angiogenesis in vitro by modulating Rho activity. Finally, a small molecule activator of TRPV4, GSK1016790A, in combination with anticancer drug cisplatin, significantly reduced tumor growth in wild-type mice by inducing vessel maturation. Our findings demonstrate TRPV4 channels to be critical regulators of tumor angiogenesis and represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic and vascular normalization therapies. PMID:25867067

  14. Activation of mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 normalizes tumor vasculature and improves cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adapala, Ravi K.; Thoppil, Roslin J.; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Cappelli, Holly; Dudley, Andrew C.; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar; Klagsbrun, Michael; Meszaros, J. Gary; Chilian, William M.; Ingber, Donald E.; Thodeti, Charles K.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormal morphology and hyper-permeability that together cause inefficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Although VEGF has been established as a critical regulator of tumor angiogenesis, the role of mechanical signaling in the regulation of tumor vasculature or tumor endothelial cell (TEC) function is not known. Here, we show that the mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 regulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor vessel maturation via modulation of TEC mechanosensitivity. We found that TEC exhibit reduced TRPV4 expression and function, which is correlated with aberrant mechanosensitivity towards ECM stiffness, increased migration and abnormal angiogenesis by TEC. Further, syngeneic tumor experiments revealed that the absence of TRPV4 induced increased vascular density, vessel diameter and reduced pericyte coverage resulting in enhanced tumor growth in TRPV4 KO mice. Importantly, overexpression or pharmacological activation of TRPV4 restored aberrant TEC mechanosensitivity, migration and normalized abnormal angiogenesis in vitro by modulating Rho activity. Finally, a small molecule activator of TRPV4, GSK1016790A, in combination with anti-cancer drug Cisplatin, significantly reduced tumor growth in WT mice by inducing vessel maturation. Our findings demonstrate TRPV4 channels to be critical regulators of tumor angiogenesis and represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic and vascular normalization therapies. PMID:25867067

  15. Activity dependent therapies modulate the spinal changes that motoneurons suffer after a peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Torres-Espín, Abel; Navarro, Xavier; Udina, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Injury of a peripheral nerve not only leads to target denervation, but also induces massive stripping of spinal synapses on axotomized motoneurons, with disruption of spinal circuits. Even when regeneration is successful, unspecific reinnervation and the limited reconnection of the spinal circuits impair functional recovery. The aim of this study was to describe the changes that axotomized motoneurons suffer after peripheral nerve injury and how activity-dependent therapies and neurotrophic factors can modulate these events. We observed a marked decrease in glutamatergic synapses, with a maximum peak at two weeks post-axotomy, which was only partially reversed with time. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in gephyrin immunoreactivity and a disintegration of perineuronal nets (PNNs) surrounding the motoneurons. Direct application of neurotrophins at the proximal stump was not able to reverse these effects. In contrast, activity-dependent treatment, in the form of treadmill running, reduced the observed destructuring of perineuronal nets and the loss of glutamatergic synapses two weeks after injury. These changes were proportional to the intensity of the exercise protocol. Blockade of sensory inputs from the homolateral hindlimb also reduced PNN immunoreactivity around intact motoneurons, and in that case treadmill running did not reverse that loss, suggesting that the effects of exercise on motoneuron PNN depend on increased sensory activity. Preservation of motoneuron PNN and reduction of synaptic stripping by exercise could facilitate the maintenance of the spinal circuitry and benefit functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25448160

  16. Effects of active music therapy on the normal brain: fMRI based evidence.

    PubMed

    Raglio, Alfredo; Galandra, Caterina; Sibilla, Luisella; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gaeta, Francesca; Di Salle, Francesco; Moro, Luca; Carne, Irene; Bastianello, Stefano; Baldi, Maurizia; Imbriani, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological bases of Active Music Therapy (AMT) and its effects on the normal brain. Twelve right-handed, healthy, non-musician volunteers were recruited. The subjects underwent 2 AMT sessions based on the free sonorous-music improvisation using rhythmic and melodic instruments. After these sessions, each subject underwent 2 fMRI scan acquisitions while listening to a Syntonic (SP) and an A-Syntonic (AP) Production from the AMT sessions. A 3 T Discovery MR750 scanner with a 16-channel phased array head coil was used, and the image analysis was performed with Brain Voyager QX 2.8. The listening to SP vs AP excerpts mainly activated: (1) the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal sulcus, (2) the right middle frontal gyrus and in particular the right precentral gyrus, (3) the bilateral precuneus, (4) the left superior temporal sulcus and (5) the left middle temporal gyrus. These results are consistent with the psychological bases of the AMT approach and with the activation of brain areas involved in memory and autobiographical processes, and also in personal or interpersonal significant experiences. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and to explain possible effects of AMT in clinical settings. PMID:25847861

  17. Allopurinol enhances the activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in inflammatory bowel disease patients during low-dose thiopurine therapy: preliminary data of an ongoing series.

    PubMed

    Seinen, Margien L; de Boer, Nanne K H; Smid, Kees; van Asseldonk, Dirk P; Bouma, Gerd; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A; Peters, Godefridus J

    2011-12-01

    Thiopurines are crucial in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The phenotype of pivotal metabolic enzymes determines whether thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) are generated in clinically sufficiently high levels. The first step in activation of thiopurine prodrugs to 6-TGN is catalysis by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Often, patients exhibit a clinically unfavorable metabolism, leading to discontinuation of conventional thiopurine therapy. The combination of allopurinol and low-dose thiopurine therapy may optimize this variant metabolism, presumably by affecting enzyme activities. We performed a prospective pharmacodynamic study to determine the effect of combination therapy on the activity of HGPRT. The activity of HGPRT and 6-TGN concentrations was measured in red blood cells during thiopurine monotherapy and after 4 weeks of combination therapy. The activity of HGPRT was also measured after 12 weeks of combination therapy. From the results, we conclude that combination therapy increases the activity of HGPRT and subsequently 6-TGN concentrations. PMID:22132961

  18. Effect of Antiviral Therapy on Serum Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Husic-Selimovic, Azra; Sofic, Amela; Huskic, Jasminko; Bulja, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renin-angiotenzin system (RAS) is frequently activated in patients with chronic liver disease. Angiotenzin - II (AT-II), produced by angiotenzin converting enzyme (ACE), has many physiological effects, including an important role in liver fibrogenesis. Combined antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN and ribavirin besides its antiviral effect also leads to a reduction in liver parenchyma fibrosis. Aim of the study: Determining the value of ACE in serum of patients with chronic hepatitis C before and after combined antiviral therapy, as well as the value of ACE activities in sera of the control group. Materials and methods: We studied 50 patients treated at Gastroenterohepatology Department, in the time-period of four years. Value of ACE in serum was determined by Olympus AU 400 device, with application of kit “Infinity TN ACE Liquid Stable Reagent”. HCV RNA levels in sera were measured by real time PCR. HCV RNA test was performed with modular analysis of AMPLICOR and COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test v2.0, which has proved infection and was used for quantification of the viruses and monitoring of the patients’ response to therapy. Liver histology was evaluated in accordance with the level of necroinflammation activity and stage of fibrosis. Results: Serum activities of ACE in chronic hepatitis C patients is statistically higher than the values in the control group (p=0.02). Antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients statistically decreases serum activities of ACE (p= 0.02) and indirectly affects fibrogenesis of the liver parenchyma. Correlation between ACE and ALT activity after the therapy was proved (0.3934). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the activity of ACE in serum is a good indirect parameter of the liver damage, and could be used as an indirect prognostic factor of the level of liver parenchyma damage. Serum activity of ACE can be used as a parameter for non-invasive assessment of intensity of liver damage. PMID:27147779

  19. Seasonal migration and environmental conditions of Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis, elucidated from pop-up archival transmitting (PAT) tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loher, T.; Seitz, A.

    2006-01-01

    Pop-up archival transmitting (PAT) tags were used to study the fall migration of halibut in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). We tagged 6 Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis on summer feeding grounds in the eastern GOA and another 6 in the western GOA from June 13 to August 6, 2002. The tags were programed to be released from the fish on January 15, 2003, at the height of the winter spawning season: 10 tags successfully detached, transmitted archived environmental data (depth and temperature), and generated accurate latitude-longitude coordinates shortly after pop-up; 2 tags deployed off SE Alaska were lost. The tags revealed that 6 fish had moved a considerable distance (>200 km) between tagging and pop-up, and all of these had moved northward to some extent. The longest of the observed migrations was from the southern Alaska Peninsula to Yakutat Bay, a linear displacement of 1153 km; 4 fish showed little evidence of geographic displacement, exhibiting migrations that ranged only from 30 to 69 km. Although 2 fish had moved inshore by the end of the tagging period, all other fish had moved offshore regardless of their overall migration distance. The precise timing of offshore movements varied, beginning as early as August and as late as January. These observations generally corroborate conventional tagging, indicating migration of halibut toward winter spawning grounds in the northern GOA, and movement of fish to deep water in fall. However, no single stereotypic migration behavior was apparent, and a variety of vertical movement patterns and temperature profiles were observed. Halibut spent most time in waters of 5 to 7??C, but experienced temperatures ranging from 2.6 to 11.6??C. Depth observations ranged from 0 to 736 m, with summertime activity concentrated in depths from 0 to 400 m, and halibut that exhibited offshore movement were typically observed at 300 to 700 m by mid-winter. Vertical movement (short-period changes in depth) varied among fish and over time

  20. Dog-assisted therapies and activities in rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Elmacı, Dilek Tunçay; Cevizci, Sibel

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate dog-assisted therapies and activities in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities who have difficulties in benefiting from well-being and health-improving services. This descriptive-explanatory study was conducted in disabled children of various ages between 2008 and 2011 by an experienced team in a private training and rehabilitation center in Antalya (Turkey). In this study, five study groups were formed among the children with physical and mental disabilities. During the therapy studies, three dogs were used. For each therapy group, the goals for the children and therapist were defined, and the activities were determined according to these goals. The entire study process was followed using audio-records and photographs of patients. The expected targets were reached in all study groups. The children who experienced fear, anxiety and difficulties due to their disabilities in daily life learned to cope with their anxieties and fears, set goals and make plans to achieve their aims. During this study, the children improved their abilities to use their bodies according to their capabilities. Accordingly, they improved their ability to develop empathy between themselves and a therapy dog, to receive and present help, and to communicate. The results of the present study revealed that dog-assisted therapies and activities can be a supportive method for routine treatment procedures in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities. PMID:25985307

  1. Dog-Assisted Therapies and Activities in Rehabilitation of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Physical and Mental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Tunçay Elmacı, Dilek; Cevizci, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate dog-assisted therapies and activities in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities who have difficulties in benefiting from well-being and health-improving services. This descriptive-explanatory study was conducted in disabled children of various ages between 2008 and 2011 by an experienced team in a private training and rehabilitation center in Antalya (Turkey). In this study, five study groups were formed among the children with physical and mental disabilities. During the therapy studies, three dogs were used. For each therapy group, the goals for the children and therapist were defined, and the activities were determined according to these goals. The entire study process was followed using audio-records and photographs of patients. The expected targets were reached in all study groups. The children who experienced fear, anxiety and difficulties due to their disabilities in daily life learned to cope with their anxieties and fears, set goals and make plans to achieve their aims. During this study, the children improved their abilities to use their bodies according to their capabilities. Accordingly, they improved their ability to develop empathy between themselves and a therapy dog, to receive and present help, and to communicate. The results of the present study revealed that dog-assisted therapies and activities can be a supportive method for routine treatment procedures in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities. PMID:25985307

  2. Retinal complications with elevated circulating plasma C5a associated with interferon-alpha therapy for chronic active hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Sugano, S; Yanagimoto, M; Suzuki, T; Sato, M; Onmura, H; Aizawa, H; Makino, H

    1994-11-01

    Retinal hemorrhage is a complication of interferon therapy of unknown pathogenesis. We report two chronic active hepatitis C patients who developed retinal hemorrhage and/or cotton wool patches during interferon-alpha therapy 4 and 12 wk after beginning treatment. At the time of the hemorrhage, plasma-activated complement 5, a known potent intravascular aggregator of granulocytes, increased to 54 ng/ml in one patient and to 29 ng/ml in the other patient. When the hemorrhage resolved, it decreased to under 5 ng/ml. Our cases suggest that complement activation occurs in patients treated with interferon-alpha and that activation of complement 5 can lead to retinal capillary infarction and retinal hemorrhage. High levels of activated complement 5 may predict retinal artery infarction or perhaps microvascular emboli in the other organs. PMID:7942735

  3. Anticancer Therapy: Light-Activated Hypoxia-Responsive Nanocarriers for Enhanced Anticancer Therapy (Adv. Mater. 17/2016).

    PubMed

    Qian, Chenggen; Yu, Jicheng; Chen, Yulei; Hu, Quanyin; Xiao, Xuanzhong; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Feng, Peijian; Shen, Qun-Dong; Gu, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    A light-activated hypoxia-responsive drug-delivery vehicle is described by Q.-D. Shen, Z. Gu, and co-workers on page 3313. This conjugated-polymer-based nanocarrier can be activated by photoirradiation, producing singlet oxygen ((1) O2 ) and inducing hypoxia to promote release of its cargo inside tumor cells for enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27122110

  4. Regorafenib: Antitumor Activity upon Mono and Combination Therapy in Preclinical Pediatric Malignancy Models

    PubMed Central

    Daudigeos-Dubus, Estelle; Le Dret, Ludivine; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Bawa, Olivia; Opolon, Paule; Vievard, Albane; Villa, Irène; Pagès, Mélanie; Bosq, Jacques; Vassal, Gilles; Zopf, Dieter; Geoerger, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib (BAY 73–4506) exerts both anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activity in adult solid malignancies mainly advanced colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We intended to explore preclinically the potential of regorafenib against solid pediatric malignancies alone and in combination with anticancer agents to guide the pediatric development plan. In vitro effects on cell proliferation were screened against 33 solid tumor cell lines of the Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer (ITCC) panel covering five pediatric solid malignancies. Regorafenib inhibited cell proliferation with a mean half maximal growth inhibition of 12.5 μmol/L (range 0.7 μmol/L to 28 μmol/L). In vivo, regorafenib was evaluated alone at 10 or 30 mg/kg/d or in combination with radiation, irinotecan or the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor refametinib against various tumor types, including patient-derived brain tumor models with an amplified platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) gene. Regorafenib alone significantly inhibited tumor growth in all xenografts derived from nervous system and connective tissue tumors. Enhanced effects were observed when regorafenib was combined with irradiation and irinotecan against PDGFRA amplified IGRG93 glioma and IGRM57 medulloblastoma respectively, resulting in 100% tumor regressions. Antitumor activity was associated with decreased tumor vascularization, inhibition of PDGFR signaling, and induction of apoptotic cell death. Our work demonstrates that regorafenib exhibits significant antitumor activity in a wide spectrum of preclinical pediatric models through inhibition of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, radio- and chemosensitizing effects were observed with DNA damaging agents in PDGFR amplified tumors. PMID:26599335

  5. Hypertension among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Nazisa; MSL, Huang; Lin, Khor Geok; Choong, Lee Christopher Kwok

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing researches about non-communicable disease such as elevated blood pressure among people living with HIV before and after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors among 340 HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy at a Malaysian public hospital providing HIV-related treatment. Data on socioeconomic background, anthropometry, medical history and dietary intake of the patients were collected. Hypertension is defined as blood pressure ≥130/85 (mm Hg). Prevalence of hypertension was 45.60% (n=155) of which 86.5% of the hypertensive group were male (n=134). The results showed that increase in age (OR 1.051, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.024-1.078), higher body mass index (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.106-2.71), bigger waist circumference (OR 1.18, 95%CI 1.106-2.71), higher waist-hip ratio (OR 1.070, 95%CI 1.034-1.106), higher fasting plasma glucose (OR 1.332, 95% CI 0.845-2.100) and percentage energy intake from protein >15 (OR 2.519, 95%CI 1.391-4.561) were significant risk factors for hypertension (p<0.001). After adjusting for other variables, increasing age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.069 95%CI 1.016-1.124, p=0.010), being male (aOR 3.026, 95%CI 1.175-7.794, p=0.022) and higher body mass index (aOR 1.26, 95%CI 1.032-1.551, p=0.024) were independently associated with hypertension. None of the antiretroviral therapy and immunologic factors was linked to hypertension. In conclusion hypertension among PLHIV was linked to the well-known risk factors such as age, gender and body mass index. With HAART, people can live longer by making monitoring and control of some reversible factors, especially excessive weight gain for maintaining quality of life. PMID:24576366

  6. HIV-Associated Lung Cancer in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)

    PubMed Central

    Pakkala, Suchita; Chen, Zhengjia; Rimland, David; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Gunthel, Clifford; Brandes, Johann R.; Saba, Nabil R.; Shin, Dong M.; Curran, Walter J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) defining malignancies. Since highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has improved survival for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients, we evaluated lung cancer outcomes in the HAART era. Methods HIV-positive patients diagnosed with lung cancer in our institution during the HAART era (1995-2008) were analyzed. Patient charts were reviewed for clinical and laboratory data. CD4 count at diagnosis was treated as a continuous variable and subcategorized into distinct variables with 3 cut-off points (50, 200, & 500 μl). Pearson’s correlation coefficients were estimated for each covariate studied. Survival was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Out of 80 patients, 73 had non-small cell lung cancer. Baseline characteristics were: median age-52 yrs; male-80%; African American-84%; injection drug use-25%; smokers-100%; and prior exposure to antiretroviral agents-55%. Mean CD4 count and viral load were 304 μL and 82,420 copies/ml, respectively at cancer diagnosis. The latency between diagnosis of HIV and lung cancer was significantly shorter in women (4.1 yrs vs. 7.7 yrs, P=0.02) and 71% of the patients received anti-cancer therapy. The 1- and 3-year survival rates were 31% and 4% overall. Grade 3/4 toxicities occurred in 60% with chemo-radiation vs. 36% with chemotherapy. Cancer-related survival was better for patients with CD4 count >200 (P=0.0298) and >500 (P=0.0076). Conclusions The latency from diagnosis of HIV to lung cancer was significantly shorter for women. Although outcomes for lung cancer patients with HIV remain poor, high CD4 count is associated with an improved lung cancer-related survival. PMID:21713759

  7. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Adverse Birth Outcomes Among HIV-Infected Women in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jennifer Y.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Souda, Sajini; Parekh, Natasha; Ogwu, Anthony; Lockman, Shahin; Powis, Kathleen; Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Creek, Tracy; Jimbo, William; Madidimalo, Tebogo; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Shapiro, Roger L

    2012-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether adverse birth outcomes are associated with maternal highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in pregnancy, particularly in resource-limited settings. Methods. We abstracted obstetrical records at 6 sites in Botswana for 24 months. Outcomes included stillbirths (SBs), preterm delivery (PTD), small for gestational age (SGA), and neonatal death (NND). Among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected women, comparisons were limited to HAART exposure status at conception, and those with similar opportunities for outcomes. Comparisons were adjusted for CD4+ lymphocyte cell count. Results. Of 33 148 women, 32 113 (97%) were tested for HIV, of whom 9504 (30%) were HIV infected. Maternal HIV was significantly associated with SB, PTD, SGA, and NND. Compared with all other HIV-infected women, those continuing HAART from before pregnancy had higher odds of PTD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1, 1.4), SGA (AOR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.6, 2.1) and SB (AOR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2, 1.8). Among women initiating antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy, HAART use (vs zidovudine) was associated with higher odds of PTD (AOR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2, 1.8), SGA (AOR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2, 1.9), and SB (AOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.6, 3.9). Low CD4+ was independently associated with SB and SGA, and maternal hypertension during pregnancy with PTD, SGA, and SB. Conclusions. HAART receipt during pregnancy was associated with increased PTD, SGA, and SB. PMID:23066160

  8. BioPatRec: A modular research platform for the control of artificial limbs based on pattern recognition algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Processing and pattern recognition of myoelectric signals have been at the core of prosthetic control research in the last decade. Although most studies agree on reporting the accuracy of predicting predefined movements, there is a significant amount of study-dependent variables that make high-resolution inter-study comparison practically impossible. As an effort to provide a common research platform for the development and evaluation of algorithms in prosthetic control, we introduce BioPatRec as open source software. BioPatRec allows a seamless implementation of a variety of algorithms in the fields of (1) Signal processing; (2) Feature selection and extraction; (3) Pattern recognition; and, (4) Real-time control. Furthermore, since the platform is highly modular and customizable, researchers from different fields can seamlessly benchmark their algorithms by applying them in prosthetic control, without necessarily knowing how to obtain and process bioelectric signals, or how to produce and evaluate physically meaningful outputs. Results BioPatRec is demonstrated in this study by the implementation of a relatively new pattern recognition algorithm, namely Regulatory Feedback Networks (RFN). RFN produced comparable results to those of more sophisticated classifiers such as Linear Discriminant Analysis and Multi-Layer Perceptron. BioPatRec is released with these 3 fundamentally different classifiers, as well as all the necessary routines for the myoelectric control of a virtual hand; from data acquisition to real-time evaluations. All the required instructions for use and development are provided in the online project hosting platform, which includes issue tracking and an extensive “wiki”. This transparent implementation aims to facilitate collaboration and speed up utilization. Moreover, BioPatRec provides a publicly available repository of myoelectric signals that allow algorithms benchmarking on common data sets. This is particularly useful for

  9. A novel cationic lipid with intrinsic antitumor activity to facilitate gene therapy of TRAIL DNA.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; Miao, Lei; Zhao, Yi; Musetti, Sara; Wang, Yuhua; Shi, Kai; Huang, Leaf

    2016-09-01

    Metformin (dimethylbiguanide) has been found to be effective for the treatment of a wide range of cancer. Herein, a novel lipid (1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-biguanide-propane (DOBP)) was elaborately designed by utilizing biguanide as the cationic head group. This novel cationic lipid was intended to act as a gene carrier with intrinsic antitumor activity. When compared with 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), a commercially available cationic lipid with a similar structure, the blank liposomes consisting of DOBP showed much more potent antitumor effects than DOTAP in human lung tumor xenografts, following an antitumor mechanism similar to metformin. Given its cationic head group, biguanide, DOBP could encapsulate TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) plasmids into Lipid-Protamine-DNA (LPD) nanoparticles (NPs) for systemic gene delivery. DOBP-LPD-TRAIL NPs demonstrated distinct superiority in delaying tumor progression over DOTAP-LPD-TRAIL NPs, due to the intrinsic antitumor activity combined with TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumor. These results indicate that DOBP could be used as a versatile and promising cationic lipid for improving the therapeutic index of gene therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:27344367

  10. Activatable Ferritin Nanocomplex for Real-Time Monitoring of Caspase-3 Activation during Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Liwen; Chen, Minglong; Gao, Shi; Zhu, Lei

    2015-10-21

    One mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the ablation of tumors is to induce apoptosis. Visualization of apoptosis during PDT in real-time is of great benefit for predicting and evaluating therapeutic outcomes. Herein, we engineered a highly stable and sensitive caspase-3 ferritin activatable probe (FABP/ZnPc) for simultaneous delivery of a photosensitizer (ZnPc) and real-time visualization of apoptosis during PDT. Upon near-infrared (NIR) light irradiation, ZnPc becomes active and initiates apoptosis, upon which the outer layer of the FABP/ZnPc is degraded by the apoptotic marker, caspase-3, to boost strong fluorescent signals, ultimately allowing real-time imaging of apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the utility of FABP/ZnPc as a tool for PDT and simultaneous imaging of caspase-3 activation in vitro and in vivo. Overall, the ability of FABP/ZnPc to image apoptosis during PDT will not only facilitate optimizing and personalizing the PDT strategy but is also important for understanding the mechanisms of PDT. PMID:26388178

  11. Mindfulness-based therapy and behavioral activation: A randomized controlled trial with depressed college students.

    PubMed

    McIndoo, C C; File, A A; Preddy, T; Clark, C G; Hopko, D R

    2016-02-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) manifests in 20-30% of college students, with increased incidence in recent decades. Very limited research has assessed the efficacy of evidence-based interventions for MDD in college students. Mindfulness-Based Therapy (MBT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are two interventions with significant potential to meet demands of college counseling clinics and effectively treat college students with MDD. This study utilized a randomized controlled research design (n = 50) to examine the efficacy of four-sessions of abbreviated MBT and BA relative to a wait-list control condition with depressed college students. Intent-to-treat data analyses on depression outcome measures suggested both treatments were superior to the control group. There were significant pre-post treatment improvements across measures of depression, rumination, stress, and mindfulness, gains largely maintained at 1-month follow-up. Neither active treatment effectively reduced somatic anxiety. Both treatments generally had moderate-strong effect sizes relative to the control group, and based on depression response and remission criteria, 56-79% of patients exhibited clinically significant improvement. Based on reliable change indices, 75-85% experienced clinically significant reductions in depression. There was strong therapist competence and adherence to treatment protocols and high patient satisfaction with both interventions. Study limitations and implications for the assessment and treatment of depressed college students are discussed. PMID:26745622

  12. Silent left ventricular dysfunction during routine activity after thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Kayden, D.S.; Wackers, F.J.; Zaret, B.L. )

    1990-06-01

    To investigate prospectively the occurrence and significance of postinfarction transient left ventricular dysfunction, 33 ambulatory patients who underwent thrombolytic therapy after myocardial infarction were monitored continuously for 187 +/- 56 min during normal activity with a radionuclide left ventricular function detector at the time of hospital discharge. Twelve patients demonstrated 19 episodes of transient left ventricular dysfunction (greater than 0.05 decrease in ejection fraction, lasting greater than or equal to 1 min), with no change in heart rate. Only two episodes in one patient were associated with chest pain and electrocardiographic changes. The baseline ejection fraction was 0.52 +/- 0.12 in patients with transient left ventricular dysfunction and 0.51 +/- 0.13 in patients without dysfunction (p = NS). At follow-up study (19.2 +/- 5.4 months), cardiac events (unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death) occurred in 8 of 12 patients with but in only 3 of 21 patients without transient left ventricular dysfunction (p less than 0.01). During submaximal supine bicycle exercise, only two patients demonstrated a decrease in ejection fraction greater than or equal to 0.05 at peak exercise; neither had a subsequent cardiac event. These data suggest that transient episodes of silent left ventricular dysfunction at hospital discharge in patients treated with thrombolysis after myocardial infarction are common and associated with a poor outcome. Continuous left ventricular function monitoring during normal activity may provide prognostic information not available from submaximal exercise test results.

  13. Efficacy of physical activity counseling plus sleep restriction therapy on the patients with chronic insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihui; Yin, Guangxia; Li, Guanying; Liang, Wenjing; Wei, Qinling

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lack of physical activity (PA) is common in patients with chronic insomnia. Studies to increase PA and decrease sedentary behavior in those patients are limited. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of “PA counseling combined with sleep restriction (SR) therapy (PASR)” vs only SR in the patients with chronic insomnia. Methods Seventy-one outpatients were assigned to either PASR (n=35), consisting of four weekly PA counseling sessions based on 5A model (assess, advise, agree, assist, and arrange) + SR, or SR (n=36), consisting of four weekly SR. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (Chinese version) and pedometer-based daily steps were evaluated as the primary endpoints. Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Scale-14, and Sleep Diary were evaluated as the secondary endpoints. Results The results showed that the patients in the PASR group gained more benefits than the SR group in terms of PA level and pedometer-based daily steps (all P<0.05). Better improvements of the study group were also shown in Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Scale-14, and Sleep efficiency (all P<0.05). Conclusion We conclude that PA counseling based on 5A model combined with SR cannot only effectively increase the PA levels but also improve the sleep quality for patients with chronic insomnia. PMID:26566369

  14. Smart hyaluronidase-actived theranostic micelles for dual-modal imaging guided photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjun; Zheng, Cuifang; Pan, Zhengyin; Chen, Chi; Hu, Dehong; Gao, Guanhui; Kang, Shendong; Cui, Haodong; Gong, Ping; Cai, Lintao

    2016-09-01

    We here report smart hyaluronidase-actived theranostic nanoparticles based on hyaluronic acid (HA) coupled with chlorin e6 (Ce6) via adipic dihydrazide (ADH) forming HA-ADH-Ce6 conjugates and self-assembling into HACE NPs. The resulting nanoparticles showed stable nano-structure in aqueous condition with uniform size distribution and can be actively disassembled in the presence of hyaluronidase (over-expressed in tumor cells), exhibiting hyaluronidase-responsive "OFF/ON" behavior of fluorescence signal. The HACE NPs were rapidly taken up to human lung cancer cells A549 via CD44 (the HA receptor on the surface of tumor cells) receptor mediated endocytosis. Upon laser irradiation, the HACE NPs realized good near-infrared fluorescence imaging and photoacoustic imaging in the tumor bearing mice, which showed 5-fold higher fluorescence intensity and 3-fold higher photoacoustic (PA) intensity than free Ce6, respectively. In addition, under low dose of laser power, the HACE NPs presented more effective photodynamic therapy to suppression of tumor growth than free Ce6 in vitro and in vivo. Overall, these results suggest that the well-defined HACE NPs is a biocompatible theranostic nanoplatform for in vivo dual-modal tumor imaging and phototherapy simultaneously. PMID:27262027

  15. Natural Xanthones from Garcinia mangostana with Multifunctional Activities for the Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Nan; Li, Qian; Jing, Ming-Hua; Alba, Espargaró; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Sabaté, Raimon; Han, Yi-Fan; Pi, Rong-Biao; Lan, Wen-Jian; Yang, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Jing-Kao

    2016-07-01

    Natural xanthones have diversity pharmacological activities. Here, a series of xanthones isolated from the pericarps of Garcinia mangostana Linn, named α-Mangostin, 8-Deoxygartanin, Gartanin, Garciniafuran, Garcinone C, Garcinone D, and γ-Mangostin were investigated. Biological screening performed in vitro and in Escherichia coli cells indicated that most of the xanthones exhibited significant inhibition of self-induced β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation and also β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1, acted as potential antioxidants and biometal chelators. Among these compounds, α-Mangostin, Gartanin, Garcinone C and γ-Mangostin showed better antioxidant properties to scavenge Diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical than Trolox, and potent neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death partly by up-regulating HO-1 protein level and then scavenging reactive oxygen species. Moreover, Gartanin, Garcinone C and γ-Mangostin could be able to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro. These findings suggest that the natural xanthones have multifunctional activities against Alzheimer's disease (AD) and could be promising compounds for the therapy of AD. PMID:27038926

  16. Targeting histone methylation for cancer therapy: enzymes, inhibitors, biological activity and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongcheng; Wu, Fangrui; Wu, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational methylation of histone lysine or arginine residues plays important roles in gene regulation and other physiological processes. Aberrant histone methylation caused by a gene mutation, translocation, or overexpression can often lead to initiation of a disease such as cancer. Small molecule inhibitors of such histone modifying enzymes that correct the abnormal methylation could be used as novel therapeutics for these diseases, or as chemical probes for investigation of epigenetics. Discovery and development of histone methylation modulators are in an early stage and undergo a rapid expansion in the past few years. A number of highly potent and selective compounds have been reported, together with extensive preclinical studies of their biological activity. Several compounds have been in clinical trials for safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy, targeting several types of cancer. This review summarizes the biochemistry, structures, and biology of cancer-relevant histone methylation modifying enzymes, small molecule inhibitors and their preclinical and clinical antitumor activities. Perspectives for targeting histone methylation for cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:27316347

  17. p53 activated by AND gate genetic circuit under radiation and hypoxia for targeted cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Miao; Li, Rong; He, Rong; Wang, Xingyong; Yi, Qijian; Wang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Radio-activated gene therapy has been developed as a novel therapeutic strategy against cancer; however, expression of therapeutic gene in peritumoral tissues will result in unacceptable toxicity to normal cells. To restrict gene expression in targeted tumor mass, we used hypoxia and radiation tolerance features of tumor cells to develop a synthetic AND gate genetic circuit through connecting radiation sensitivity promoter cArG6, heat shock response elements SNF1, HSF1 and HSE4 with retroviral vector plxsn. Their construction and dynamic activity process were identified through downstream enhanced green fluorescent protein and wtp53 expression in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells and in a nude mice model. The result showed that AND gate genetic circuit could be activated by lower required radiation dose (6 Gy) and after activated, AND gate could induce significant apoptosis effects and growth inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The radiation- and hypoxia-activated AND gate genetic circuit, which could lead to more powerful target tumoricidal activity represented a promising strategy for both targeted and effective gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma and low dose activation character of the AND gate genetic circuit implied that this model could be further exploited to decrease side-effects of clinical radiation therapy. PMID:26177264

  18. Cytokine release syndrome after blinatumomab treatment related to abnormal macrophage activation and ameliorated with cytokine-directed therapy.

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Rheingold, Susan R; Maude, Shannon L; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Barrett, David M; Seif, Alix E; Nichols, Kim E; Suppa, Erica K; Kalos, Michael; Berg, Robert A; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Aplenc, Richard; Gore, Lia; Grupp, Stephan A

    2013-06-27

    Blinatumomab is a CD19/CD3-bispecific T-cell receptor-engaging (BiTE) antibody with efficacy in refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Some patients treated with blinatumomab and other T cell-activating therapies develop cytokine release syndrome (CRS). We hypothesized that patients with more severe toxicity may experience abnormal macrophage activation triggered by the release of cytokines by T-cell receptor-activated cytotoxic T cells engaged by BiTE antibodies and leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We prospectively monitored a patient during blinatumomab treatment and observed that he developed HLH. He became ill 36 hours into the infusion with fever, respiratory failure, and circulatory collapse. He developed hyperferritinemia, cytopenias, hypofibrinogenemia, and a cytokine profile diagnostic for HLH. The HLH continued to progress after discontinuation of blinatumomab; however, he had rapid improvement after IL-6 receptor-directed therapy with tocilizumab. Patients treated with T cell-activating therapies, including blinatumomab, should be monitored for HLH, and cytokine-directed therapy may be considered in cases of life-threatening CRS. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00103285. PMID:23678006

  19. Successful use of oral linezolid as a single active agent in endocarditis unresponsive to conventional antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, V; John, J; Kaye, G C; Meigh, R E

    2003-08-01

    Treatment of resistant gram-positive endocarditis is difficult. We report a case of resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis that failed to respond to conventional antibiotic therapy but was treated successfully with an oral regimen of a new antibiotic, linezolid as a single active agent. This case report demonstrates the use of linezolid as an effective alternative to conventional antibiotics in such cases. PMID:12860152

  20. Effectiveness of Group Activity Play Therapy on Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior Problems of Preadolescent Orphans in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojiambo, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the impact of group activity play therapy (GAPT) on displaced orphans aged 10 to 12 years living in a large children's village in Uganda. Teachers and housemothers identified 60 preadolescents exhibiting clinical levels of internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. The participants' ethnicity was…

  1. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Keith S.; Hollon, Steven D.; Dimidjian, Sona; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert J.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2008-01-01

    This study followed treatment responders from a randomized controlled trial of adults with major depression. Patients treated with medication but withdrawn onto pill-placebo had more relapse through 1 year of follow-up compared to patients who received prior behavioral activation, prior cognitive therapy, or continued medication. Prior…

  2. Photodynamic-therapy Activates Immune Response by disrupting Immunity Homeostasis of Tumor Cells, which Generates Vaccine for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Zhang, Anle; Chen, Siyu; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a regulatory approved cancer treatment, is reported to be capable of causing immunogenic apoptosis. The current data reveal PDT can cause the dysregulation of “eat me” and “don't eat me” signal by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) -mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This dysregulation probably contribute to the increased uptake of PDT-killed Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells by homologous dendritic cells (DCs), accompanied by phenotypic maturation (CD80high, CD86high, and CD40high) and functional stimulation (NOhigh, IL-10absent) of dendritic cells as well as subsequent T-cell responses. Morevover, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with PDT-treated LLCs (PDT-DCs) or PDT-treated LLCs alone (PDT-LLCs) exhibited potent immunity against LLC tumors. In the current study, the PDT-induced immune response was characterized as a process related with the dysregulation of “eat me” signal and “don't eat me” signal, revealing the possibility for developing PDT into an antitumor vaccination strategy for personalized cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26722223

  3. Photodynamic-therapy Activates Immune Response by disrupting Immunity Homeostasis of Tumor Cells, which Generates Vaccine for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Zhang, Anle; Chen, Siyu; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a regulatory approved cancer treatment, is reported to be capable of causing immunogenic apoptosis. The current data reveal PDT can cause the dysregulation of "eat me" and "don't eat me" signal by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) -mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This dysregulation probably contribute to the increased uptake of PDT-killed Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells by homologous dendritic cells (DCs), accompanied by phenotypic maturation (CD80(high), CD86(high), and CD40(high)) and functional stimulation (NO(high), IL-10(absent)) of dendritic cells as well as subsequent T-cell responses. Morevover, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with PDT-treated LLCs (PDT-DCs) or PDT-treated LLCs alone (PDT-LLCs) exhibited potent immunity against LLC tumors. In the current study, the PDT-induced immune response was characterized as a process related with the dysregulation of "eat me" signal and "don't eat me" signal, revealing the possibility for developing PDT into an antitumor vaccination strategy for personalized cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26722223

  4. Dialectical behavior therapy alters emotion regulation and amygdala activity in patients with borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Marianne; Carpenter, David; Tang, Cheuk Y.; Goldstein, Kim E.; Avedon, Jennifer; Fernandez, Nicolas; Mascitelli, Kathryn A.; Blair, Nicholas J.; New, Antonia S.; Triebwasser, Joseph; Siever, Larry J.; Hazlett, Erin A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Siever and Davis’ (1991) psychobiological framework of borderline personality disorder (BPD) identifies affective instability (AI) as a core dimension characterized by prolonged and intense emotional reactivity. Recently, deficient amygdala habituation, defined as a change in response to repeated relative to novel unpleasant pictures within a session, has emerged as a biological correlate of AI in BPD. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an evidence-based treatment, targets AI by teaching emotion-regulation skills. This study tested the hypothesis that BPD patients would exhibit decreased amygdala activation and improved habituation, as well as improved emotion regulation with standard 12-month DBT. Methods Event-related fMRI was obtained pre- and post-12-months of standard-DBT in unmedicated BPD patients. Healthy controls (HCs) were studied as a benchmark for normal amygdala activity and change over time (n = 11 per diagnostic-group). During each scan, participants viewed an intermixed series of unpleasant, neutral and pleasant pictures presented twice (novel, repeat). Change in emotion regulation was measured with the Difficulty in Emotion Regulation (DERS) scale. Results fMRI results showed the predicted Group × Time interaction: compared with HCs, BPD patients exhibited decreased amygdala activation with treatment. This post-treatment amygdala reduction in BPD was observed for all three pictures types, but particularly marked in the left hemisphere and during repeated-emotional pictures. Emotion regulation measured with the DERS significantly improved with DBT in BPD patients. Improved amygdala habituation to repeated-unpleasant pictures in patients was associated with improved overall emotional regulation measured by the DERS (total score and emotion regulation strategy use subscale). Conclusion These findings have promising treatment implications and support the notion that DBT targets amygdala hyperactivity—part of the disturbed neural

  5. Relapse Prevention in Major Depressive Disorder: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus an Active Control Condition

    PubMed Central

    Shallcross, Amanda J.; Gross, James J.; Visvanathan, Pallavi D.; Kumar, Niketa; Palfrey, Amy; Ford, Brett Q.; Dimidjian, Sona; Shirk, Stephen; Holm-Denoma, Jill; Goode, Kari M.; Cox, Erica; Chaplin, William; Mauss, Iris B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the comparative effectiveness of Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus an active control condition (ACC) for depression relapse prevention, depressive symptom reduction, and improvement in life satisfaction. Method Ninety-two participants in remission from Major Depressive Disorder with residual depressive symptoms were randomized to either an 8-week MBCT or a validated ACC that is structurally equivalent to MBCT and controls for non-specific effects (e.g., interaction with a facilitator, perceived social support, treatment outcome expectations). Both interventions were delivered according to their published manuals. Results Intention-to-treat analyses indicated no differences between MBCT and ACC in depression relapse rates or time to relapse over a 60-week follow-up. Both groups experienced significant and equal reductions in depressive symptoms and improvements in life satisfaction. A significant quadratic interaction (group x time) indicated that the pattern of depressive symptom reduction differed between groups. The ACC experienced immediate symptom reduction post-intervention and then a gradual increase over the 60-week follow-up. The MBCT group experienced a gradual linear symptom reduction. The pattern for life satisfaction was identical but only marginally significant. Conclusions MBCT did not differ from an ACC on rates of depression relapse, symptom reduction, or life satisfaction, suggesting that MBCT is no more effective for preventing depression relapse and reducing depressive symptoms than the active components of the ACC. Differences in trajectory of depressive symptom improvement suggest that the intervention-specific skills acquired may be associated with differential rates of therapeutic benefit. This study demonstrates the importance of comparing psychotherapeutic interventions to active control conditions. PMID:26371618

  6. A critical analysis of mini peer assessment tool (mini-PAT).

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Aza

    2008-01-01

    The structured evaluation of doctors' performance through peer review is a relatively new phenomenon brought about by public demand for accountability to patients. Medical knowledge (as assessed by examination score) is no longer a good predictor of individual performance, humanistic qualities and communication skills. The process of peer review (or multi-source assessment) was developed over the last two decades in the USA and has started to pick up momentum in the UK through the introduction of Modernizing Medical Careers. However the concept is not new. Driven by market forces, it was initially developed by industrial organizations to improve leadership qualities with a view to increasing productivity through positive behaviour change and self-awareness. Multi-source feedback is not without its problems and may not always produce its desired outcomes. In this article we review the evidence for peer review and critically discuss the current process of mini peer assessment tool (mini-PAT) as the assessment tool for peer review employed in UK. PMID:18263910

  7. Network and user interface for PAT DOME virtual motion environment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthington, J. W.; Duncan, K. M.; Crosier, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The Device for Orientation and Motion Environments Preflight Adaptation Trainer (DOME PAT) provides astronauts a virtual microgravity sensory environment designed to help alleviate tye symptoms of space motion sickness (SMS). The system consists of four microcomputers networked to provide real time control, and an image generator (IG) driving a wide angle video display inside a dome structure. The spherical display demands distortion correction. The system is currently being modified with a new graphical user interface (GUI) and a new Silicon Graphics IG. This paper will concentrate on the new GUI and the networking scheme. The new GUI eliminates proprietary graphics hardware and software, and instead makes use of standard and low cost PC video (CGA) and off the shelf software (Microsoft's Quick C). Mouse selection for user input is supported. The new Silicon Graphics IG requires an Ethernet interface. The microcomputer known as the Real Time Controller (RTC), which has overall control of the system and is written in Ada, was modified to use the free public domain NCSA Telnet software for Ethernet communications with the Silicon Graphics IG. The RTC also maintains the original ARCNET communications through Novell Netware IPX with the rest of the system. The Telnet TCP/IP protocol was first used for real-time communication, but because of buffering problems the Telnet datagram (UDP) protocol needed to be implemented. Since the Telnet modules are written in C, the Adap pragma 'Interface' was used to interface with the network calls.

  8. Ion Storage with the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Lewis, Raymond; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise

    2002-01-01

    The matter antimatter reaction represents the densest form of energy storage/release known to modern physics: as such it offers one of the most compact sources of power for future deep space exploration. To take the first steps along this path, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a goal of maintaining 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. Experiments have been performed with this hardware using normal matter (positive hydrogen ions) to assess the device's ability to hold charged particles. These ions are currently created using an electron gun method to ionize background gas; however, this technique is limited by the quantity that can be captured. To circumvent this issue, an ion source is currently being commissioned which will greatly increase the number of ions captured and more closely simulate actual operations expected at an antiproton production facility. Ions have been produced, stored for various time intervals, and then extracted against detectors to measure species, quantity and energy. Radio frequency stabilization has been tested as a method to prolong ion lifetime: results show an increase in the baseline 1/e lifetime of trapped particles from hours to days. Impurities in the residual background gas (typically carbon-containing species CH4, CO, CO2, etc.) present a continuing problem by reducing the trapped hydrogen population through the mechanism of ion charge exchange.

  9. Implementation of transmission NIR as a PAT tool for monitoring drug transformation during HME processing.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhammad T; Scoutaris, Nikolaos; Maniruzzaman, Mohammed; Moradiya, Hiren G; Halsey, Sheelagh A; Bradley, Michael S A; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Snowden, Martin J; Douroumis, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the work reported herein was to implement process analytical technology (PAT) tools during hot melt extrusion (HME) in order to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between HME processing parameters and the extruded formulations. For the first time two in-line NIR probes (transmission and reflectance) have been coupled with HME to monitor the extrusion of the water insoluble drug indomethacin (IND) in the presence of Soluplus (SOL) or Kollidon VA64 hydrophilic polymers. In-line extrusion monitoring of sheets, produced via a specially designed die, was conducted at various drug/polymer ratios and processing parameters. Characterisation of the extruded transparent sheets was also undertaken by using DSC, XRPD and Raman mapping. Analysis of the experimental findings revealed the production of molecular solutions where IND is homogeneously blended (ascertained by Raman mapping) in the polymer matrices, as it acts as a plasticizer for both hydrophilic polymers. PCA analysis of the recorded NIR signals showed that the screw speed used in HME affects the recorded spectra but not the homogeneity of the embedded drug in the polymer sheets. The IND/VA64 and IND/SOL extruded sheets displayed rapid dissolution rates with 80% and 30% of the IND being released, respectively within the first 20min. PMID:26209124

  10. Activation of HER3 Interferes with Antitumor Effects of Axl Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: Suggestion of Combination Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Torka, Robert; Pénzes, Kinga; Gusenbauer, Simone; Baumann, Christine; Szabadkai, István; Őrfi, Lászlȯ; Kéri, György; Ullrich, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) has been established as a strong candidate for targeted therapy of cancer. However, the benefits of targeted therapies are limited due to acquired resistance and activation of alternative RTKs. Therefore, we asked if cancer cells are able to overcome targeted Axl therapies. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of Axl by short interfering RNA or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) BMS777607 induces the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) and the neuregulin 1(NRG1)–dependent phosphorylation of HER3 in MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Moreover, analysis of 20 Axl-expressing cancer cell lines of different tissue origin indicates a low basal phosphorylation of RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT) as a general requirement for HER3 activation on Axl inhibition. Consequently, phosphorylation of AKT arises as an independent biomarker for Axl treatment. Additionally, we introduce phosphorylation of HER3 as an independent pharmacodynamic biomarker for monitoring of anti-Axl therapy response. Inhibition of cell viability by BMS777607 could be rescued by NRG1-dependent activation of HER3, suggesting an escape mechanism by tumor microenvironment. The Axl-TKI MPCD84111 simultaneously blocked Axl and HER2/3 signaling and thereby prohibited HER3 feedback activation. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 using BMS777607 and lapatinib led to a significant inhibition of cell viability in Axl-expressing MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Therefore, we conclude that, in patient cohorts with expression of Axl and low basal activity of AKT, a combined inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 kinase would be beneficial to overcome acquired resistance to Axl-targeted therapies. PMID:24862757

  11. Anti-TNFα therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases is associated with Epstein-Barr virus lytic activation.

    PubMed

    Lapsia, Sameer; Koganti, Siva; Spadaro, Salvatore; Rajapakse, Ramona; Chawla, Anupama; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita

    2016-02-01

    Anti-TNFα therapy, known to suppress T-cell immunity, is increasingly gaining popularity for treatment of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). T-cell suppression increases the risk of B-cell EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas. Since EBV-lytic activation is essential for development of EBV-lymphomas and there have been reports of EBV-lymphomas in patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy, we investigated if patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies demonstrate greater EBV-lytic activity in blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 10 IBD patients solely on anti-TNFα therapy compared to 3 control groups (10 IBD patients not on immunosuppressive therapy, 10 patients with abdominal pain but without IBD, and 10 healthy subjects) were examined for the percentage of T-cells, EBV load and EBV-lytic transcripts. Patients on anti-TNFα therapy had significantly fewer T-cells, greater EBV load, and increased levels of transcripts from EBV-lytic genes of all kinetic classes compared to controls. Furthermore, exposure of EBV-infected B-cell lines to anti-TNFα antibodies resulted in increased levels of BZLF1 mRNA; BZLF1 encodes for ZEBRA, the viral latency-to-lytic cycle switch. Thus, IBD patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies have greater EBV loads likely due to enhanced EBV-lytic gene expression and anti-TNFα antibodies may be sufficient to activate the EBV lytic cycle. Findings from this pilot study lay the groundwork for additional scientific and clinical investigation into the effects of anti-TNFα therapy on the life cycle of EBV, a ubiquitous oncovirus that causes lymphomas in the setting of immunocompromise. PMID:26307954

  12. New compounds for neutron capture therapy (NCT) and their significance

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Clearly the most effective tumor therapy would be obtained by the selective targeting of cytotoxic agents to tumor cells. Although many biomolecules are known to be taken up in tumors, the targeting of cytotoxic agents to tumors is limited by the fact that other essential cell pools compete with equal or even greater effectiveness. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, with activation by means of an external radiation beam, is advantageous for two reasons: (1) it obviates problems associated with high uptake of isotopes in normal tissues, as these cell pools can be excluded from the radiation field, and (2) the general tumor area can be included in the activating beam field; thus, the possibility exists that all microscopic tumor extensions can be irradiated. As long as range of reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to the tumor, with a resultant high therapeutic ratio. This method can be accomplished with either photon activation therapy (PAT) or Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), the latter will be emphasized here. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10 ..mu..m, or one cell diameter; hence this reaction is optimal for cell killing. A number of biomolecules have been investigated as possible vehicles for transport of boron to tumors, including phenothiazines, thiouracils, porphyrins, nucleosides, and amino acids. Biodistributions of these compounds show selective concentration in tumor adequate for therapy. The biological halflives are in the order of days, allowing the possibility of fractionated or protracted irradiations. The radiobiological and physical implication of these parameters on NCT are discussed. The possibility of using an approximately-monoenergetic, scandium-filtered beam of about 2 keV, to reduce the dose from background radiations by about 85%, is also discussed. (ERB)

  13. [The Patient Rights Act (PatRG)--Part 3: Burden of proof in liability questions and critical resumé].

    PubMed

    Parzeller, Markus; Zedler, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the new regulations in the German Civil Code (Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch - BGB), which came into effect in Germany as the Patient Rights Act (PatRG) on the 2/26/2013. In the third part, the burden of proof in liability questions (and 630h BGB) are discussed and critically analysed. In the discussion and a final resume points of criticism of the new law are pointed out. PMID:24683869

  14. Comprehensive clinical studies in 34 patients with molecularly defined UPD(14)pat and related conditions (Kagami–Ogata syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Kagami, Masayo; Kurosawa, Kenji; Miyazaki, Osamu; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Paternal uniparental disomy 14 (UPD(14)pat) and epimutations and microdeletions affecting the maternally derived 14q32.2 imprinted region lead to a unique constellation of clinical features such as facial abnormalities, small bell-shaped thorax with a coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly, and polyhydramnios. In this study, we performed comprehensive clinical studies in patients with UPD(14)pat (n=23), epimutations (n=5), and microdeletions (n=6), and revealed several notable findings. First, a unique facial appearance with full cheeks and a protruding philtrum and distinctive chest roentgenograms with increased coat-hanger angles to the ribs constituted the pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood. Second, birth size was well preserved, with a median birth length of ±0 SD (range, −1.7 to +3.0 SD) and a median birth weight of +2.3 SD (range, +0.1 to +8.8 SD). Third, developmental delay and/or intellectual disability was invariably present, with a median developmental/intellectual quotient of 55 (range, 29–70). Fourth, hepatoblastoma was identified in three infantile patients (8.8%), and histological examination in two patients showed a poorly differentiated embryonal hepatoblastoma with focal macrotrabecular lesions and well-differentiated hepatoblastoma, respectively. These findings suggest the necessity of an adequate support for developmental delay and periodical screening for hepatoblastoma in the affected patients, and some phenotypic overlap between UPD(14)pat and related conditions and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome. On the basis of our previous and present studies that have made a significant contribution to the clarification of underlying (epi)genetic factors and the definition of clinical findings, we propose the name ‘Kagami–Ogata syndrome' for UPD(14)pat and related conditions. PMID:25689926

  15. Comprehensive clinical studies in 34 patients with molecularly defined UPD(14)pat and related conditions (Kagami-Ogata syndrome).

    PubMed

    Kagami, Masayo; Kurosawa, Kenji; Miyazaki, Osamu; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-11-01

    Paternal uniparental disomy 14 (UPD(14)pat) and epimutations and microdeletions affecting the maternally derived 14q32.2 imprinted region lead to a unique constellation of clinical features such as facial abnormalities, small bell-shaped thorax with a coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly, and polyhydramnios. In this study, we performed comprehensive clinical studies in patients with UPD(14)pat (n=23), epimutations (n=5), and microdeletions (n=6), and revealed several notable findings. First, a unique facial appearance with full cheeks and a protruding philtrum and distinctive chest roentgenograms with increased coat-hanger angles to the ribs constituted the pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood. Second, birth size was well preserved, with a median birth length of ±0 SD (range, -1.7 to +3.0 SD) and a median birth weight of +2.3 SD (range, +0.1 to +8.8 SD). Third, developmental delay and/or intellectual disability was invariably present, with a median developmental/intellectual quotient of 55 (range, 29-70). Fourth, hepatoblastoma was identified in three infantile patients (8.8%), and histological examination in two patients showed a poorly differentiated embryonal hepatoblastoma with focal macrotrabecular lesions and well-differentiated hepatoblastoma, respectively. These findings suggest the necessity of an adequate support for developmental delay and periodical screening for hepatoblastoma in the affected patients, and some phenotypic overlap between UPD(14)pat and related conditions and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. On the basis of our previous and present studies that have made a significant contribution to the clarification of underlying (epi)genetic factors and the definition of clinical findings, we propose the name 'Kagami-Ogata syndrome' for UPD(14)pat and related conditions. PMID:25689926

  16. PAT-seq: a method to study the integration of 3'-UTR dynamics with gene expression in the eukaryotic transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Paul F; Powell, David R; Clancy, Jennifer L; Preiss, Thomas; Boag, Peter R; Traven, Ana; Seemann, Torsten; Beilharz, Traude H

    2015-08-01

    A major objective of systems biology is to quantitatively integrate multiple parameters from genome-wide measurements. To integrate gene expression with dynamics in poly(A) tail length and adenylation site, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach, Poly(A)-Test RNA-sequencing. PAT-seq returns (i) digital gene expression, (ii) polyadenylation site/s, and (iii) the polyadenylation-state within and between eukaryotic transcriptomes. PAT-seq differs from previous 3' focused RNA-seq methods in that it depends strictly on 3' adenylation within total RNA samples and that the full-native poly(A) tail is included in the sequencing libraries. Here, total RNA samples from budding yeast cells were analyzed to identify the intersect between adenylation state and gene expression in response to loss of the major cytoplasmic deadenylase Ccr4. Furthermore, concordant changes to gene expression and adenylation-state were demonstrated in the classic Crabtree-Warburg metabolic shift. Because all polyadenylated RNA is interrogated by the approach, alternative adenylation sites, noncoding RNA and RNA-decay intermediates were also identified. Most important, the PAT-seq approach uses standard sequencing procedures, supports significant multiplexing, and thus replication and rigorous statistical analyses can for the first time be brought to the measure of 3'-UTR dynamics genome wide. PMID:26092945

  17. High-speed pre-clinical brain imaging using pulsed laser diode based photoacoustic tomography (PLD-PAT) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a promising biomedical imaging modality for small animal imaging, breast cancer imaging, monitoring of vascularisation, tumor angiogenesis, blood oxygenation, total haemoglobin concentration etc. The existing PAT systems that uses Q-switched Nd:YAG and OPO nanosecond lasers have limitations in clinical applications because they are expensive, non-potable and not suitable for real-time imaging due to their low pulse repetition rate. Low-energy pulsed near-infrared diode laser which are low-cost, compact, and light-weight (<200 grams), can be used as an alternate. In this work, we present a photoacoustic tomography system with a pulsed laser diode (PLD) that can nanosecond pulses with pulse energy 1.3 mJ/pulse at ~803 nm wavelength and 7000 Hz repetition rate. The PLD is integrated inside a single-detector circular scanning geometric system. To verify the high speed imaging capabilities of the PLD-PAT system, we performed in vivo experimental results on small animal brain imaging using this system. The proposed system is portable, low-cost and can provide real-time imaging.

  18. A Systematic Review of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Behavioral Activation Apps for Depression

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Patrick J.; Wozney, Lori; Wheaton, Mike; Conrod, Jill; Rozario, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common mental health condition for which many mobile apps aim to provide support. This review aims to identify self-help apps available exclusively for people with depression and evaluate those that offer cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or behavioural activation (BA). One hundred and seventeen apps have been identified after searching both the scientific literature and the commercial market. 10.26% (n = 12) of these apps identified through our search offer support that seems to be consistent with evidence-based principles of CBT or BA. Taking into account the non existence of effectiveness/efficacy studies, and the low level of adherence to the core ingredients of the CBT/BA models, the utility of these CBT/BA apps are questionable. The usability of reviewed apps is highly variable and they rarely are accompanied by explicit privacy or safety policies. Despite the growing public demand, there is a concerning lack of appropiate CBT or BA apps, especially from a clinical and legal point of view. The application of superior scientific, technological, and legal knowledge is needed to improve the development, testing, and accessibility of apps for people with depression. PMID:27135410

  19. The lived experience of physically active older prostate cancer survivors on androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wright-St Clair, Valerie A; Malcolm, Wanda; Keogh, Justin W L

    2014-03-01

    This study sought to explore the lived experiences of physically active prostate cancer survivors on androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), who exercise individually. Three older men (74-88 years old) with prostate cancer, using ADT continuously for at least 12 months and regularly exercising for at least 6 months, participated in this qualitative pilot study, informed by interpretive phenomenology. Data were gathered using individual semi-structured interviews, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Coherent stories were drawn from each transcript and analyzed using iterative and interpretive methods. van Manen's lifeworld existentials provided a framework for interpreting across the research text. Three notions emerged: Getting started, Having a routine and Being with music. Together they reveal what drew the participants to exercising regularly despite the challenges associated with their cancer and treatments. This study provides insights into the benefits of, and what it means for, older men with prostate cancer to regularly exercise individually. These findings may assist cancer clinicians and other allied health professionals to be more attuned to prostate cancer survivors' lived experiences when undergoing ADT, allowing clinicians to better promote regular exercise to their patients as a foundational component of living well. PMID:23862577

  20. A Systematic Review of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Behavioral Activation Apps for Depression.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Anna; Rao, Sanjay; McGrath, Patrick J; Wozney, Lori; Wheaton, Mike; Conrod, Jill; Rozario, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common mental health condition for which many mobile apps aim to provide support. This review aims to identify self-help apps available exclusively for people with depression and evaluate those that offer cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or behavioural activation (BA). One hundred and seventeen apps have been identified after searching both the scientific literature and the commercial market. 10.26% (n = 12) of these apps identified through our search offer support that seems to be consistent with evidence-based principles of CBT or BA. Taking into account the non existence of effectiveness/efficacy studies, and the low level of adherence to the core ingredients of the CBT/BA models, the utility of these CBT/BA apps are questionable. The usability of reviewed apps is highly variable and they rarely are accompanied by explicit privacy or safety policies. Despite the growing public demand, there is a concerning lack of appropiate CBT or BA apps, especially from a clinical and legal point of view. The application of superior scientific, technological, and legal knowledge is needed to improve the development, testing, and accessibility of apps for people with depression. PMID:27135410

  1. Vitamin E Concentrations in Adults with HIV/AIDS on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaio, Daniella J. Itinoseki; Rondó, Patricia Helen C.; Luzia, Liania Alves; Souza, José Maria P.; Firmino, Aline Vale; Santos, Sigrid Sousa

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients are probably more predisposed to vitamin E deficiency, considering that they are more exposed to oxidative stress. Additionally, there are an extensive number of drugs in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens that may interfere with vitamin E concentrations. The objective of this study was to compare serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol in 182 HIV/AIDS patients receiving different HAART regimens. The patients were divided into three groups according to regimen: nucleoside analog reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) + non-nucleoside analog reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs); NRTIs + protease inhibitors + ritonavir; NRTIs + other classes. Alpha-tocopherol was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of HAART regimen, time of use, and compliance with the regimen on alpha-tocopherol concentrations. Alpha-tocopherol concentrations were on average 4.12 μmol/L lower for the NRTIs + other classes regimen when compared to the NRTIs + NNRTIs regimen (p = 0.037). A positive association (p < 0.001) was observed between alpha-tocopherol and cholesterol concentrations, a finding due, in part, to the relationship between liposoluble vitamins and lipid profile. This study demonstrated differences in alpha-tocopherol concentrations between patients using different HAART regimens, especially regimens involving the use of new drugs. Long-term prospective cohort studies are needed to monitor vitamin E status in HIV/AIDS patients since the beginning of treatment. PMID:25225815

  2. Prolonged Exposure Therapy With Veterans and Active Duty Personnel Diagnosed With PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gregory K; Kretzmer, Tracy; Crawford, Eric; Thors, Christina; Wagner, H Ryan; Strom, Thad Q; Eftekhari, Afsoon; Klenk, Megan; Hayward, Laura; Vanderploeg, Rodney D

    2015-08-01

    The present study used archival clinical data to analyze the delivery and effectiveness of prolonged exposure (PE) and ancillary services for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veterans (N = 69) with histories of mild to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data from standard clinical assessments of veterans and active duty personnel treated in both inpatient and outpatient programs at 2 Department of Veteran Affairs medical centers were examined. Symptoms were assessed with self-report measures of PTSD (PTSD Checklist) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II) before and throughout therapy. Mixed linear models were utilized to determine the slope of reported symptoms throughout treatment, and the effects associated with fixed factors such as site, treatment setting (residential vs. outpatient), and TBI severity were examined. Results demonstrated significant decreases in PTSD, B = -3.00, 95% CI [-3.22, -2.78]; t(210) = -13.5; p < .001, and in depressive symptoms, B = -1.46, 95% CI [-1.64, -1.28]; t(192) = -8.32; p < .001. The effects of PE treatment did not differ by clinical setting and participants with moderate to severe injuries reported more rapid gains than those with a history of mild TBI. The results provide evidence that PE may well be effective for veterans with PTSD and TBI. PMID:26201688

  3. Effect of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on Incident AIDS Using Calendar Period as an Instrumental Variable

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Stephen R.; Greenland, Sander; Brown, Todd T.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Kingsley, Lawrence; Detels, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) researchers often use calendar periods as an imperfect proxy for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) when estimating the effect of HAART on HIV disease progression. The authors report on 614 HIV-positive homosexual men followed from 1984 to 2007 in 4 US cities. During 5,321 person-years, 268 of 614 men incurred acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, 49 died, and 90 were lost to follow-up. Comparing the pre-HAART calendar period (<1996) with the HAART calendar period (≥1996) resulted in a naive rate ratio of 3.62 (95% confidence limits: 2.67, 4.92). However, this estimate is likely biased because of misclassification of HAART use by calendar period. Simple calendar period approaches may circumvent confounding by indication at the cost of inducing exposure misclassification. To correct this misclassification, the authors propose an instrumental-variable estimator analogous to ones previously used for noncompliance corrections in randomized clinical trials. When the pre-HAART calendar period was compared with the HAART calendar period, the instrumental-variable rate ratio was 5.02 (95% confidence limits: 3.45, 7.31), 39% higher than the naive result. Weighting by the inverse probability of calendar period given age at seroconversion, race/ethnicity, and time since seroconversion did not appreciably alter the results. These methods may help resolve discrepancies between observational and randomized evidence. PMID:19318615

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups influence lipoatrophy after Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Sher L.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Poole, Jason C.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Palella, Frank J.; Bream, Jay H.; Wallace, Douglas C.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Although highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) has been extremely effective in lowering AIDS incidence among patients infected with HIV, certain drugs included in HAART can cause serious mitochondrial toxicities. One of the most frequent adverse events is lipoatrophy, which is the loss of subcutaneous fat in the face, arms, buttocks and/or legs as an adverse reaction to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). The clinical symptoms of lipoatrophy resemble those of inherited mitochondrial diseases, which suggests that host mitochondrial genotype may play a role in susceptibility. We analyzed the association between mitochondrial haplogroup and severity of lipoatrophy in HIV-infected European American patients on HAART in the Multicenter AIDS cohort Study (MACS) and found that mitochondrial haplogroup H was strongly associated with increased atrophy (arms: p = 0.007, OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.17–2.69 legs: p = 0.037, OR = 1.54 95% CI = 1.03–2.31, and buttocks: p = 0.10, OR = 1.41 95% CI = 0.94–2.12). We also saw borderline significance for haplogroup T as protective against lipoatrophy (p = 0.05, OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.20–1.00). These data suggest that mitochondrial DNA haplogroup may influence the propensity for lipoatrophy in patients receiving NRTIs. PMID:19339895

  5. Enhancing Team-Based Active Learning Through Hands-On Experience With Nicotine Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To enhance tobacco cessation active-learning in an ambulatory care elective course by adding hands-on experience with nicotine replacement therapy to a team-based learning (TBL) session. Design. A hands-on experience that included students chewing a piece of nicotine gum was added to a TBL class session. Student pairs used a skills checklist to evaluate and give peer feedback on appropriate counseling and gum use. Assessment. Students’ scores on a tobacco cessation examination were higher than those of students enrolled in the previous course in which TBL alone had been used. Based on pre- and post-experience survey responses, students’ perceptions regarding their abilities to provide tobacco cessation counseling improved. Subjective student comments regarding the experience were positive. Conclusion. Participating in a TBL session that incorporated hands-on experience with nicotine gum in an ambulatory care elective course increased students’ confidence in their ability to provide tobacco cessation counseling and provided a unique perspective on the product’s characteristics. PMID:23966731

  6. VEGF neutralizing aerosol therapy in primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Virginie; Rabbe, Nathalie; Guilleminault, Laurent; Paul, Flora; Schlick, Laurène; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Duruisseaux, Michael; Fouquenet, Delphine; Montharu, Jérôme; Redini, Françoise; Paintaud, Gilles; Lemarié, Etienne; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    K-ras mutations promote angiogenesis in lung cancer and contribute to the drug resistance of cancer cells. It is not clear whether K-ras mutated adenocarcinomas are sensitive to anti-angiogenic therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-angiogenic mAbs are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion reaches the lung after intravenous injection. We investigated the relevance of a non-invasive pulmonary route for the delivery of anti-VEGF mAbs in the mouse K-ras(LA1) model. We found that pulmonary delivery of these mAbs significantly reduced the number of tumor lesions and inhibited malignant progression. The antitumor effect involves the VEGFR2-dependent inhibition of blood vessel growth, which impairs tumor proliferation. Pharmacokinetic analysis of aerosolized anti-VEGF showed its low rate of passage into the bloodstream, suggesting that this delivery route is associated with reduced systemic side effects. Our findings highlight the value of the aerosol route for administration of anti-angiogenic mAbs in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations. PMID:25484066

  7. The immune pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuhuang; Zhou, Huaying; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo; He, Mei

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the immunological pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A total of 238 patients with AIDS who received initial HAART were included in this prospective cohort study. Blood samples were collected immediately, at baseline, at week 12, and at week 24 after initial HAART and at the onset of IRIS. Lymphocyte subsets, Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and interleukin (IL)-7 levels were measured by flow cytometry or ELISA. Among the 238 patients with AIDS who received HAART, 47 patients developed IRIS. The percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naive, memory, and activated cells exhibited no significant differences between AIDS patients with and without IRIS 24 weeks after initial HAART. The percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was lower in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients before HAART, 12 weeks after HAART, 24 weeks after HAART, and at the onset of IRIS. IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly higher at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were significantly lower at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. Plasma IL-7 decreased gradually with the progression of HAART. The level of IL-7 was higher in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients at all follow-up time points. An imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines, a consistently low CD(+)CD25(+)Fox3(+) percentage, and a high IL-7 level may be crucial in the pathogenesis of IRIS in AIDS patients who had received HAART. PMID:25131160

  8. Clinical evidence on high flow oxygen therapy and active humidification in adults.

    PubMed

    Gotera, C; Díaz Lobato, S; Pinto, T; Winck, J C

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been growing interest in an alternative to conventional oxygen therapy: the heated, humidified high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC). A number of physiological effects have been described with HFNC: pharyngeal dead space washout, reduction of nasopharyngeal resistance, a positive expiratory pressure effect, an alveolar recruitment, greater humidification, more comfort and better tolerance by the patient, better control of FiO2 and mucociliary clearance. There is limited experience of HFNC in adults. There are no established guidelines or decision-making pathways to guide use of the HFNC therapy for adults. In this article we review the existing evidence of HFNC oxygen therapy in adult patients, its advantages, limitations and the current literature on clinical applications. Further research is required to determine the long-term effect of this therapy and identify the adult patient population to whom it is most beneficial. PMID:23845744

  9. Enteric parasitic infections in HIV/AIDS patients before and after the highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Bachur, Tatiana Paschoalette Rodrigues; Vale, Josias Martins; Coêlho, Ivo Castelo Branco; Queiroz, Telma Régia Bezerra Sales de; Chaves, Cristina de Souza

    2008-04-01

    Enteroparasites are related to gastrointestinal alterations among patients with HIV/AIDS, some causing severe manifestations in the period before the institution of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The prevalence of enteroparasitoses in patients with HIV/AIDS seen at two hospitals in Ceará , Brazil, was compared in the pre-HAART (Group 1; n = 482) and HAART (Group 2; n = 100) eras. Fecal parasitologic examinations (FPE) were performed using the direct, Lutz, Baermann-Moraes and modified Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The following parasites were detected in Groups 1 and 2, respectively: Strongyloides stercoralis--30.1% and 11% (p<0.0001), Ascaris lumbricoides--15.6% and 2% (p<0.0001), hookworms--3.7% and 2% (p<0.0001), Trichuris trichiura--13.1% and 1% (p<0.0001), Hymenolepis nana--0 and 1% (p = 0.1718), Giardia duodenalis--7.9% and 1% (p = 0.0076), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar--3.3% and 1% (p = 0.3301), Isospora belli--4.8% and 1% (p = 0.0993), Cryptosporidium sp.--8.1% and 0 (p = 0.0007), and non-pathogenic protozoans as well. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence of enteroparasites between the eras (63.9% to 24%; p<0.0001). In the HAART era, the following observations were made: greater frequency of enteroparasites in patients without antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.0575), as in those with AIDS (p = 0.08), and diarrhea (36% of the patients); lack of association with positive FPE (p = 0.626); and non-detection of Cryptosporidium sp. Strongyloides stercoralis showed an elevated prevalence in the two eras and was more frequent in men (32.41%) than women (19.04%) of Group 1 (p = 0.018), a finding suggesting the transmission of the helminth through sodomy. The advent of the HAART modified the profile of opportunistic infections, including parasites, probably due to the reconstitution of cellular immunity and the direct action of HAART on the parasites. PMID:18641847

  10. [Media use and physical activity patterns of adolescent participants in obesity therapy: Analysis of the impact of selected sociodemographic factors].

    PubMed

    Wulff, Hagen; Wagner, Petra

    2016-02-01

    To meet the challenge of obesity, effective therapeutic concepts for adolescents focusing on lifestyle changes are necessary. Particularly relevant are nutrition and physical activity patterns associated with media use, which can be influenced by sociodemographic factors. For the optimization of obesity therapy approaches, it is essential to analyze these sociodemographic factors to adjust the aims, content, and methods of interventions, and to use the potential of media in treatment concepts. Thus, the research question is: what are the media and physical activity patterns of 11- to 17-year-old participants in obesity therapy, depending on sociodemographic factors? The national multicenter study was conducted from 2012 to 2013. A questionnaire was administered to 564 participants aged 13.4 ± 1.6 (mean ± standard deviation) years. Standardized instruments were used to assess the variables physical activity, media use, and sociodemographic factors. Participants were physically active for 1 h on 3.3 ± 1.8 days per week, 8.5 % daily. Televisions, mobile phones, and computers were available in all sociodemographic groups and were used for 2 h per day. Sociodemographic differences can be seen in the extent of media usage (h/day). These differences can be found between girls and boys concerning their usage of mobile phones (2.49 vs. 1.90; p  < 0.001), between 11- to 13- and 14- to 17-year-old children concerning their usage of game consoles (0.55 vs. 1.65; p  = 0.007), and in the correlation analysis of media usage and physical activity. Compared with existing literature, the survey results reveal reduced activity and increased media use, which vary among the groups. Thus, differentiated therapy approaches appear to be reasonable. Future research needs to evaluate to what extent media, despite the risks, can contribute to the methodological support of therapy, training, and aftercare concepts. PMID:26689417

  11. patGPCR: A Multitemplate Approach for Improving 3D Structure Prediction of Transmembrane Helices of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongjie; Lü, Qiang; Quan, Lijun; Qian, Peide; Xia, Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    The structures of the seven transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors are critically involved in many aspects of these receptors, such as receptor stability, ligand docking, and molecular function. Most of the previous multitemplate approaches have built a “super” template with very little merging of aligned fragments from different templates. Here, we present a parallelized multitemplate approach, patGPCR, to predict the 3D structures of transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors. patGPCR, which employs a bundle-packing related energy function that extends on the RosettaMem energy, parallelizes eight pipelines for transmembrane helix refinement and exchanges the optimized helix structures from multiple templates. We have investigated the performance of patGPCR on a test set containing eight determined G-protein-coupled receptors. The results indicate that patGPCR improves the TM RMSD of the predicted models by 33.64% on average against a single-template method. Compared with other homology approaches, the best models for five of the eight targets built by patGPCR had a lower TM RMSD than that obtained from SWISS-MODEL; patGPCR also showed lower average TM RMSD than single-template and multiple-template MODELLER. PMID:23554839

  12. Pharmacotherapy of the Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS) Children Growing Up

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Benedetto; Lazzaretto, Deborah; Yershova, Kseniya; Abikoff, Howard; Paykina, Natalya; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Kollins, Scott H.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Wigal, Sharon; Wigal, Tim; Riddle, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the long-term psychopharmacological treatment of children first diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as preschoolers. Method In a systematic, prospective, naturalistic follow-up, 206 (68.0%) of the 303 children who participated in the Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS) were reassessed 3 years (mean age 7.4 years), and 179 (59.1%), 6 years (mean age 10.4 years), after completion of the controlled study. Pharmacotherapy and clinical data were obtained from the parents. Pharmacotherapy was defined as use of a specific class of medication for at least 50% of the days in the previous 6 months. Results At year 3, 34.0% were on no pharmacotherapy, 41.3% were on stimulant monotherapy, 9.2% on atomoxetine, alone or with a stimulant, 8.3% on an antipsychotic, usually together with a stimulant, and the remaining 7.2% on other pharmacotherapy; overall, 65.0% were on an indicated ADHD medication. At year 6, 26.8% were on no pharmacotherapy, 40.2% were on stimulant monotherapy, 4.5% on atomoxetine, alone or with a stimulant, 13.4% on an antipsychotic, and 15.1% on other pharmacotherapy; overall, 70.9% were on an indicated ADHD medication. Antipsychotic treatment was associated with more comorbidity, in particular disruptive behavior disorders and pervasive development disorders, and a lower level of functioning. Conclusion The long-term pharmacotherapy of preschoolers with ADHD was heterogeneous. While stimulant medication continued to be used by most children, about 1 child in 4 was off medication, and about 1 in 10 was on an antipsychotic. PMID:26088659

  13. Effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase activator and stimulator therapy on nitroglycerin-induced nitrate tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jabs, A; Oelze, M; Mikhed, Y; Stamm, P; Kröller-Schön, S; Welschof, P; Jansen, T; Hausding, M; Kopp, M; Steven, S; Schulz, E; Stasch, J-P; Münzel, T; Daiber, A

    2015-08-01

    Chronic nitroglycerin (GTN) anti-ischemic therapy induces side effects such as nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Both phenomena could be based on a desensitization/oxidation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Therefore, the present study aims at investigating the effects of the therapy with the sGC activator BAY 60-2770 and the sGC stimulator BAY 41-8543 on side effects induced by chronic nitroglycerin treatment. Male Wistar rats were treated with nitroglycerin (100mg/kg/d for 3.5days, s.c. in ethanol) and BAY 60-2770 (0.5 or 2.5mg/kg/d) or BAY 41-8543 (1 and 5mg/kg/d) for 6days. Therapy with BAY 60-2770 but not with BAY 41-8543 improved nitroglycerin-triggered endothelial dysfunction and nitrate tolerance, corrected the decrease in aortic nitric oxide levels, improved the cGMP dependent activation of protein kinase I in aortic tissue and reduced vascular, cardiac and whole blood oxidative stress (fluorescence and chemiluminescence assays; 3-nitrotyrosine staining). In contrast to BAY 41-8543, the vasodilator potency of BAY 60-2770 was not impaired in isolated aortic ring segments from nitrate tolerant rats. sGC activator therapy improves partially the adverse effects of nitroglycerin therapy whereas sGC stimulation has only minor beneficial effects pointing to a nitroglycerin-dependent sGC oxidation/inactivation mechanism contributing to nitrate tolerance. PMID:25869522

  14. Chaperone therapy for GM2 gangliosidosis: effects of pyrimethamine on β-hexosaminidase activity in Sandhoff fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chiricozzi, Elena; Niemir, Natalia; Aureli, Massimo; Magini, Alessandro; Loberto, Nicoletta; Prinetti, Alessandro; Bassi, Rosaria; Polchi, Alice; Emiliani, Carla; Caillaud, Catherine; Sonnino, Sandro

    2014-08-01

    Sphingolipidoses are inherited genetic diseases due to mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in the lysosomal catabolism of sphingolipids. Despite a low incidence of each individual disease, altogether, the number of patients involved is relatively high and resolutive approaches for treatment are still lacking. The chaperone therapy is one of the latest pharmacological approaches to these storage diseases. This therapy allows the mutated protein to escape its natural removal and to increase its quantity in lysosomes, thus partially restoring the metabolic functions. Sandhoff disease is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder resulting from β-hexosaminidase deficiency and characterized by large accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in brain. No enzymatic replacement therapy is currently available, and the use of inhibitors of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis for substrate reduction therapy, although very promising, is associated with serious side effects. The chaperone pyrimethamine has been proposed as a very promising drug in those cases characterized by a residual enzyme activity. In this review, we report the effect of pyrimethamine on the recovery of β-hexosaminidase activity in cultured fibroblasts from Sandhoff patients. PMID:24356898

  15. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6–8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p < 0.001), with no difference between interventions. No amelioration of psychiatric symptoms was observed. The dropout rate was lower with cognitive behavioural therapy than with recreational activity, and participants in cognitive behavioural therapy rated themselves as more generally improved, as well as more improved regarding expression of needs and understanding of difficulties. Both interventions appear to be promising treatment options for adults with autism spectrum disorder. The interventions’ similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout. PMID:24089423

  16. Immune reconstitution but persistent activation after 48 weeks of antiretroviral therapy in youth with pre-therapy CD4 >350 in ATN 061

    PubMed Central

    Rudy, Bret J.; Kapogiannis, Bill G.; Worrell, Carol; Squires, Kathleen; Bethel, James; Li, Su; Wilson, Craig M.; Agwu, Allison; Emmanuel, Patricia; Price, Georgine; Hudey, Stephanie; Goodenow, Maureen M.; Sleasman, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Measures of immune outcomes in youth who initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) early in HIV infection are limited. Design Adolescent Trials Network 061 examined changes over 48 weeks of cART in T cell subsets and markers of T cell and macrophage activation in subjects with pre-therapy CD4>350. All subjects had optimal viral suppression from weeks 24 through 48. Methods Subjects (n=48) initiated cART with tenofovir/emtricitabine plus ritonavir-boosted atazanavir. Data were collected at baseline and weeks 12, 24, and 48. Trends were compared to uninfected controls. Results Significant increases over 48 weeks were noted in all CD4 populations including total, naïve, central memory (CM), and effector memory RO (EM RO) and effector memory RA (EM RA) while numbers of CM and EMRO CD8 cells declined significantly. By week 48, CD4 naïve cells were similar to controls while CM CD4 cells remained significantly lower and EM RO and EM RA subsets were significantly higher. CD38 and HLA DR expression, both individually and when co-expressed, decreased over 48 weeks of cART on CD8 cells but remained significantly higher than controls at week 48. In contrast, markers of macrophage activation measured by sCD14 and sCD163 in plasma did not change with cART and were significantly higher than controls. Conclusion In youth initiating early cART, CD4 cell reconstitution is robust with decreases in CD8 cells. However CD8 T cell and macrophage activation persists at higher levels than uninfected controls. PMID:25942459

  17. Repurposing the NRF2 Activator Dimethyl Fumarate as Therapy Against Synucleinopathy in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    García-Yagüe, Angel J.; Scannevin, Robert H.; Casarejos, María J.; Kügler, Sebastian; Rábano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: This preclinical study was aimed at determining whether pharmacological targeting of transcription factor NRF2, a master controller of many homeostatic genes, might provide a disease-modifying therapy in the animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD) that best reproduces the main hallmark of this pathology, that is, α-synucleinopathy, and associated events, including nigral dopaminergic cell death, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation. Results: Pharmacological activation of NRF2 was achieved at the basal ganglia by repurposing dimethyl fumarate (DMF), a drug already in use for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Daily oral gavage of DMF protected nigral dopaminergic neurons against α-SYN toxicity and decreased astrocytosis and microgliosis after 1, 3, and 8 weeks from stereotaxic delivery to the ventral midbrain of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector expressing human α-synuclein. This protective effect was not observed in Nrf2-knockout mice. In vitro studies indicated that this neuroprotective effect was correlated with altered regulation of autophagy markers SQTSM1/p62 and LC3 in MN9D, BV2, and IMA 2.1 and with a shift in microglial dynamics toward a less pro-inflammatory and a more wound-healing phenotype. In postmortem samples of PD patients, the cytoprotective proteins associated with NRF2 expression, NQO1 and p62, were partly sequestered in Lewy bodies, suggesting impaired neuroprotective capacity of the NRF2 signature. Innovation: These experiments provide a compelling rationale for targeting NRF2 with DMF as a therapeutic strategy to reinforce endogenous brain defense mechanisms against PD-associated synucleinopathy. Conclusion: DMF is ready for clinical validation in PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 61–77. PMID:27009601

  18. Sex Differences in HIV Outcomes in the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Era: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Melekhin, Vlada V.; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To assess sex disparities in AIDS clinical and laboratory outcomes in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era we conducted a systematic review of the published literature on mortality, disease progression, and laboratory outcomes among persons living with HIV and starting HAART. We performed systematic PubMed and targeted bibliographic searches of observational studies published between January, 1998, and November, 2013, that included persons starting HAART and reported analyses of mortality, progression to AIDS, or virologic or immunologic treatment outcomes by sex. Risk ratios (relative risks, odd ratios, and hazard ratios) and 95% confidence intervals were obtained. Sixty-five articles were included in this review. Thirty-nine studies were from North America and Europe and 26 were from Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Forty-four studies (68%) showed no statistically significant difference in risk of mortality, progression to AIDS, or virologic or immunologic treatment outcomes by sex. Decreased risk of death among females compared to males was observed in 24 of the 25 articles that included mortality analyses [pooled risk ratio 0.72 (95% confidence interval=0.69–0.75)], and decreased risk of death or AIDS was observed in 9 of the 13 articles that examined the composite outcome [pooled risk ratio=0.91 (0.84–0.98)]. There was no significant effect of sex on the risk of progression to AIDS [pooled risk ratio=1.15 (0.99–1.31)]. In this systematic review, females starting HAART appeared to have improved survival compared to males. However, this benefit was not associated with decreased progression to either AIDS or to differences in virologic or immunologic treatment outcomes. PMID:24401107

  19. IFN-α subtypes: distinct biological activities in anti-viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbert, K; Schlaak, JF; Yang, D; Dittmer, U

    2013-01-01

    During most viral infections, the immediate host response is characterized by an induction of type I IFN. These cytokines have various biological activities, including anti-viral, anti-proliferative and immunomodulatory effects. After induction, they bind to their IFN-α/β receptor, which leads to downstream signalling resulting in the expression of numerous different IFN-stimulated genes. These genes encode anti-viral proteins that directly inhibit viral replication as well as modulate immune function. Thus, the induction of type I IFN is a very powerful tool for the host to fight virus infections. Many viruses evade this response by various strategies like the direct suppression of IFN induction or inhibition of the IFN signalling pathway. Therefore, the therapeutic application of exogenous type I IFN or molecules that induce strong IFN responses should be of great potential for future immunotherapies against viral infections. Type I IFN is currently used as a treatment in chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection, but as yet is not widely utilized for other viral infections. One reason for this restricted clinical use is that type I IFN belongs to a multigene family that includes 13 different IFN-α subtypes and IFN-β, whose individual anti-viral and immunomodulatory properties have so far not been investigated in detail to improve IFN therapy against viral infections in humans. In this review, we summarize the recent achievements in defining the distinct biological functions of type I IFN subtypes in cell culture and in animal models of viral infection as well as their clinical usage in chronic hepatitis virus infections. PMID:23072338

  20. Erectile Dysfunction Among HIV Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: Dyslipidemia as a Main Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Velez, Gustavo; Lisker-Cervantes, Andrés; Villeda-Sandoval, Christian I; Sotomayor de Zavaleta, Mariano; Olvera-Posada, Daniel; Sierra-Madero, Juan Gerardo; Arreguin-Camacho, Lucrecia O; Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence and risk factors of erectile dysfunction (ED) in HIV patients from the HIV clinic of a tertiary referral center in Mexico City. Design Prevalence was obtained from cross-sectional studies, and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), a standardized method, was used to assess ED. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in the HIV clinic. Participants completed the IIEF to allow ED assessment. Information on demographics, clinical and HIV-related variables was retrieved from their medical records. Results One hundred and nine patients were included, with a mean age of 39.9 ± 8.8 years. ED was present in 65.1% of the individuals. Patients had been diagnosed with HIV for a mean of 92.7 ± 70.3 months and had undergone a mean 56.4 ± 45.5 months of HAART. The only variable associated with ED in the univariate analysis was dyslipidemia, and this association was also found in the multivariate analysis (P = 0.01). Conclusions ED is highly prevalent in HIV patients. Dyslipidemia should be considered as a risk factor for ED in HIV patients. Romero-Velez G, Lisker-Cervantes A, Villeda-Sandoval CI, Sotomayor de Zavaleta M, Olvera-Posada D, Sierra-Madero JG, Arreguin-Camacho LO, and Castillejos-Molina RA. Erectile dysfunction among HIV patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy: Dyslipidemia as a main risk factor. Sex Med 2014;2:24–30. PMID:25356298

  1. Neural activity based biofeedback therapy for Autism spectrum disorder through wearable wireless textile EEG monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahi, Ahna; Rai, Pratyush; Oh, Sechang; Ramasamy, Mouli; Harbaugh, Robert E.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    Mu waves, also known as mu rhythms, comb or wicket rhythms are synchronized patterns of electrical activity involving large numbers of neurons, in the part of the brain that controls voluntary functions. Controlling, manipulating, or gaining greater awareness of these functions can be done through the process of Biofeedback. Biofeedback is a process that enables an individual to learn how to change voluntary movements for purposes of improving health and performance through the means of instruments such as EEG which rapidly and accurately 'feedback' information to the user. Biofeedback is used for therapeutic purpose for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) by focusing on Mu waves for detecting anomalies in brain wave patterns of mirror neurons. Conventional EEG measurement systems use gel based gold cup electrodes, attached to the scalp with adhesive. It is obtrusive and wires sticking out of the electrodes to signal acquisition system make them impractical for use in sensitive subjects like infants and children with ASD. To remedy this, sensors can be incorporated with skull cap and baseball cap that are commonly used for infants and children. Feasibility of Textile based Sensor system has been investigated here. Textile based multi-electrode EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system with embedded electronics for data acquisition and wireless transmission has been seamlessly integrated into fabric of these items for continuous detection of Mu waves. Textile electrodes were placed on positions C3, CZ, C4 according to 10-20 international system and their capability to detect Mu waves was tested. The system is ergonomic and can potentially be used for early diagnosis in infants and planning therapy for ASD patients.

  2. CLEFT PALATE IN HIV-EXPOSED NEWBORNS OF MOTHERS ON HIGHLY ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    James, Ayotunde; Oluwatosin, Babatunde; Njideka, Georgina; Babafemi; Benjamin, Onyekwere George; Olufemi, David; Leo, Robert; Folorunso, Isaac; Phylis; Olusina, Olusegun

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cleft lip/palate, though rare, is the commonest head and neck congenital malformation. Both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis but the role of in-utero exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is still being investigated. This short communication reports the occurrence of cleft palate in three newborns exposed in-utero to HIV and HAART. Material and methods This is a case series of HIV-exposed newborns observed to have cleft palate among a larger cohort of HIV-exposed and unexposed newborns in a study evaluating the effect of HIV infection and HAART on newborn hearing. The Risk Ratio (RR) was calculated to detect a potential association between in-utero exposure to Efavirenz containing ART and cleft palate. Results Three HIV-exposed newborns with cleft palate were identified during hearing screening performed on 126 HIV-exposed and 121 HIV unexposed newborns. Two had exposure to tenofovir+lamivudine+efavirenz (TDF+3TC+EFV) while the third had exposure to zidovudine+lamivudine+nevirapine (ZDV+3TC+NVP) during the first trimester. There was no statistically significant association between presence of cleft palate and exposure to an EFV containing HAART regimen (p=0.07, RR=10.95 [0.94-126.84]). Conclusions This communication highlights the possible aetiologic role of HAART in cleft palate, the need for further prospective follow-up studies and establishment of antiretroviral pregnancy, birth and neonatal registries. PMID:25653715

  3. Glycaemic profile changes by highly active antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Duro, M; Rebelo, I; Barreira, S; Sarmento-Castro, R; Medeiros, R; Almeida, C

    2015-10-01

    To study dysglycaemia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients we conducted a retrospective cohort study of the glucose profile in HIV-infected patients. The fasting blood glucose was analysed taking into consideration conventional risk factors as well as HIV infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). One hundred seventy-three cases were selected for this study. Five risk factors had significant effects (p < 0.05) on glucose levels: age, body mass index (BMI), hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus (HCV/HBV) co-infection, viral load (VL), and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count. Fasting blood glucose levels increased with age (0.59 mg/dL/year), decreased with the VL (-4.1 × 10(-6 )mg/dL/number of viral RNA copies) and the CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count (-0.016 mg/dL/cell count). Furthermore, obese patients and those co-infected with HCV/HBV were more prone to develop dysglycaemia having, on average, 15.4 mg/dL and 13.8 mg/dL higher levels, respectively, of fasting blood glucose. Despite an increase of 1.0% and 8.4% in the glucose levels noticed among HIV patients treated with non-nucleotide inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors, respectively, HAART did not prove to be a significant predictor of fasting glucose levels as well as lipodystrophy and male gender. Age, BMI, HCV/HBV co-infection and HIV-related (VL and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count) factors seem to be the most influential on fasting blood glucose levels in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:25281540

  4. Importance of Baseline Prognostic Factors With Increasing Time Since Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extent to which the prognosis for AIDS and death of patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) continues to be affected by their characteristics at the time of initiation (baseline) is unclear. Methods We analyzed data on 20,379 treatment-naive HIV-1–infected adults who started HAART in 1 of 12 cohort studies in Europe and North America (61,798 person-years of follow-up, 1844 AIDS events, and 1005 deaths). Results Although baseline CD4 cell count became less prognostic with time, individuals with a baseline CD4 count <25 cells/µL had persistently higher progression rates than individuals with a baseline CD4 count >350 cells/µL (hazard ratio for AIDS = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0 to 2.3; mortality hazard ratio = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2 to 5.5, 4 to 6 years after starting HAART). Rates of AIDS were persistently higher in individuals who had experienced an AIDS event before starting HAART. Individuals with presumed transmission by means of injection drug use experienced substantially higher rates of AIDS and death than other individuals throughout follow-up (AIDS hazard ratio = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.8 to 3.0; mortality hazard ratio = 3.5, 95% CI: 2.2 to 5.5, 4 to 6 years after starting HAART). Conclusions Compared with other patient groups, injection drug users and patients with advanced immunodeficiency at baseline experience substantially increased rates of AIDS and death up to 6 years after starting HAART. PMID:18043315

  5. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  6. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  7. Long-term warfarin therapy and biomarkers for osteoporosis and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Sayaka; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Hashikata, Takehiro; Ikeda, Yuki; Kitasato, Lisa; Hashimoto, Takuya; Shimohama, Takao; Tojo, Taiki; Takahira, Naonobu; Masuda, Takashi; Ako, Junya

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke prevention by warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, has been an integral part in the management of atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla protein (MGP) has been known as a potent inhibitor of arterial calcification and osteoporosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that warfarin therapy affects bone mineral metabolism, vascular calcification, and vascular endothelial dysfunction. Methods We studied 42 atrial fibrillation patients at high-risk for atherosclerosis having one or more coronary risk factors. Twenty-four patients had been treated with warfarin for at least 12 months (WF group), and 18 patients without warfarin (non-WF group). Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and under carboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) were measured as bone metabolism markers. Reactive hyperemia-peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) index measured by Endo-PAT2000 was used as an indicator of vascular endothelial function. Results There were no significant differences in patient background characteristics and other clinical indicators between the two groups. In WF group, the ucOC levels were significantly higher than those in the non-WF group (10.3 ± 0.8 vs. 3.4 ± 0.9 ng/mL; P < 0.01), similarly, the RANKL levels in the WF group were higher than those in the non-WF group (0.60 ± 0.06 vs. 0.37 ± 0.05 ng/mL; P = 0.007). Moreover, RH-PAT index was significantly lower in the WF group compared to those in the non-WF group (1.48 ± 0.11 vs. 1.88 ± 0.12; P = 0.017). Conclusions Long-term warfarin therapy may be associated with bone mineral loss and vascular calcification in 60–80 year old hypertensive patients. PMID:26674156

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Using Watch-PAT 200 Is Independently Associated With an Increase in Morning Blood Pressure Surge in Never-Treated Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sun; Ihm, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Chan Joon; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung-Ho; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Tae-Seok

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and morning blood pressure surge in never-treated patients with essential hypertension. This prospective study included a total of 58 patients (mean age, 51.7 years; 55.2% men) with never-treated essential hypertension. The patients were divided into non-OSA (n=23, 49.3±12.7 years) and OSA (n=35, 53.2±9.8 years) groups. The OSA group was defined as having an apnea-hypopnea index level >5 as measured by the Watch-PAT 200. The authors collected 24-hour ambulatory BP, plasma aldosterone concentration, and plasma renin activity data from all of the patients. The measured sleep-trough morning systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases were higher in the OSA group than in the non-OSA group (28.7±11.8 mm Hg vs 19.6±12.8 mm Hg, P=.008). The sleep-trough morning SBP increase was inversely correlated with the lowest oxygen saturation (r=-0.272, P=.039). OSA known to be associated with increased daytime and nocturnal sympathetic activity was associated with significantly higher sleep-trough morning SBP levels in this study. PMID:26033308

  9. Identifying risk factors of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in AIDS patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Zheng, Yuhuang; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Guoqiang; Chen, Xia; Mamadou, Diallo; He, Yan; Zhou, Huaying; Chen, Zi

    2013-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome typically occurs within days after patients undergo highly active anti-retroviral therapy and is a big hurdle for effective treatment of AIDS patients. In this study, we monitored immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in 238 AIDS patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among them, immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurred in 47 cases (19.7%). Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients had significantly higher rate of opportunistic infection (p<0.001) and persistently lower CD4(+) cell count (p<0.001) compared to the non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients. In contrast, no significant differences in HIV RNA loads were observed between the immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group and non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group. These data suggest that a history of opportunistic infection and CD4(+) cell counts at baseline may function as risk factors for immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in AIDS patients as well as potential prognostic markers. These findings will improve the management of AIDS with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23434049

  10. Closing the gap between ethics knowledge and practice through active engagement: an applied model of physical therapy ethics.

    PubMed

    Delany, Clare M; Edwards, Ian; Jensen, Gail M; Skinner, Elizabeth

    2010-07-01

    Physical therapist practice has a distinct focus that is holistic (ie, patient centered) and at the same time connected to a range of other providers within health care systems. Although there is a growing body of literature in physical therapy ethics knowledge, including clinical obligations and underlying philosophical principles, less is known about the unique ethical issues that physical therapists encounter, and how and why they make ethical decisions. As moral agents, physical therapists are required to make autonomous clinical and ethical decisions based on connections and relationships with their patients, other health care team members, and health institutions and policies. This article identifies specific ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and highlights the development and focus of ethics knowledge in physical therapy over the last several decades. An applied ethics model, called the "active engagement model," is proposed to integrate clinical and ethical dimensions of practice with the theoretical knowledge and literature about ethics. The active engagement model has 3 practical steps: to listen actively, to think reflexively, and to reason critically. The model focuses on the underlying skills, attitudes, and actions that are required to build a sense of moral agency and purpose within physical therapist practice and to decrease gaps between the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and physical therapy ethics knowledge and scholarship. A clinical case study is provided to illustrate how the ethics engagement model might be used to analyze and provide insight into the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice. PMID:20448105

  11. The Study of External Dose Rate and Retained Body Activity of Patients Receiving 131I Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiying; Jiao, Ling; Cui, Songye; Wang, Liang; Tan, Jian; Zhang, Guizhi; He, Yajing; Ruan, Shuzhou; Fan, Saijun; Zhang, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    Radiation safety is an integral part of targeted radionuclide therapy. The aim of this work was to study the external dose rate and retained body activity as functions of time in differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients receiving 131I therapy. Seventy patients were stratified into two groups: the ablation group (A) and the follow-up group (FU). The patients’ external dose rate was measured, and simultaneously, their retained body radiation activity was monitored at various time points. The equations of the external dose rate and the retained body activity, described as a function of hours post administration, were fitted. Additionally, the release time for patients was calculated. The reduction in activity in the group receiving a second or subsequent treatment was more rapid than the group receiving only the initial treatment. Most important, an expeditious method was established to indirectly evaluate the retained body activity of patients by measuring the external dose rate with a portable radiation survey meter. By this method, the calculated external dose rate limits are 19.2, 8.85, 5.08 and 2.32 μSv·h−1 at 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 m, respectively, according to a patient’s released threshold level of retained body activity <400 MBq. This study is beneficial for radiation safety decision-making. PMID:25337944

  12. Electroconvulsive therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression and some other mental illnesses. ... During ECT, the electric current triggers a seizure in the brain. Doctors believe that the seizure activity may help the brain "rewire" itself, which ...

  13. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of combined therapy of silver nanoparticles and visible blue light against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Nour El Din, Suzanne; El-Tayeb, Tarek A; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; El-Azizi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as potential antimicrobial agents against resistant pathogens. We investigated the possible therapeutic use of AgNPs in combination with visible blue light against a multidrug resistant clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa (1×10(5) colony forming unit/mL) was investigated at its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and sub-MIC, alone and in combination with blue light at 460 nm and 250 mW for 2 hours. The effect of this combined therapy on the treated bacteria was then visualized using transmission electron microscope. The therapy was also assessed in the prevention of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa on AgNP-impregnated gelatin biopolymer discs. Further, in vivo investigations were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the combined therapy to prevent burn-wound colonization and sepsis in mice and, finally, to treat a real infected horse with antibiotic-unresponsive chronic wound. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs and visible blue light was significantly enhanced (P<0.001) when both agents were combined compared to each agent alone when AgNPs were tested at MIC, 1/2, or 1/4 MIC. Transmission electron microscope showed significant damage to the cells that were treated with the combined therapy compared to other cells that received either the AgNPs or blue light. In addition, the combined treatment significantly (P<0.001) inhibited biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa on gelatin discs compared to each agent individually. Finally, the combined therapy effectively treated a horse suffering from a chronic wound caused by mixed infection, where signs of improvement were observed after 1 week, and the wound completely healed after 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this combinatorial therapy has not been investigated before. It was proved efficient and promising in managing infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria and could be used as an

  14. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of combined therapy of silver nanoparticles and visible blue light against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nour El Din, Suzanne; El-Tayeb, Tarek A; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; El-Azizi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as potential antimicrobial agents against resistant pathogens. We investigated the possible therapeutic use of AgNPs in combination with visible blue light against a multidrug resistant clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa (1×105 colony forming unit/mL) was investigated at its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and sub-MIC, alone and in combination with blue light at 460 nm and 250 mW for 2 hours. The effect of this combined therapy on the treated bacteria was then visualized using transmission electron microscope. The therapy was also assessed in the prevention of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa on AgNP-impregnated gelatin biopolymer discs. Further, in vivo investigations were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the combined therapy to prevent burn-wound colonization and sepsis in mice and, finally, to treat a real infected horse with antibiotic-unresponsive chronic wound. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs and visible blue light was significantly enhanced (P<0.001) when both agents were combined compared to each agent alone when AgNPs were tested at MIC, 1/2, or 1/4 MIC. Transmission electron microscope showed significant damage to the cells that were treated with the combined therapy compared to other cells that received either the AgNPs or blue light. In addition, the combined treatment significantly (P<0.001) inhibited biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa on gelatin discs compared to each agent individually. Finally, the combined therapy effectively treated a horse suffering from a chronic wound caused by mixed infection, where signs of improvement were observed after 1 week, and the wound completely healed after 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this combinatorial therapy has not been investigated before. It was proved efficient and promising in managing infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria and could be used as an

  15. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types.

  16. A novel molecule integrating therapeutic and diagnostic activities reveals multiple aspects of stem cell-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Hingtgen, Shawn D; Kasmieh, Randa; van de Water, Jeroen; Weissleder, Ralph; Shah, Khalid

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutic delivery vehicles; however pre-clinical and clinical applications of stem cell-based therapy would benefit significantly from the ability to simultaneously determine therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics of therapies delivered by engineered stem cells. In this study, we engineered and screened numerous fusion variants that contained therapeutic (TRAIL) and diagnostic (luciferase) domains designed to allow simultaneous investigation of multiple events in stem cell-based therapy in vivo. When various stem cell lines were engineered with the optimized molecule, SRL(O)L(2)TR, diagnostic imaging showed marked differences in the levels and duration of secretion between stem cell lines, while the therapeutic activity of the molecule showed the different secretion levels translated to significant variability in tumor cell killing. In vivo, simultaneous diagnostic and therapeutic monitoring revealed that stem cell-based delivery significantly improved pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor effectiveness of the therapy compared to intravenous or intratumoral delivery. As treatment for highly malignant brain tumor xenografts, tracking SRL(O)L(2)TR showed stable stem cell-mediated delivery significantly regressed peripheral and intracranial tumors. Together, the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic properties of SRL(O)L(2)TR answer critical questions necessary for successful utilization of stem cells as novel therapeutic vehicles. PMID:20127797

  17. [Foetal therapy for Down syndrome: a pro-active ethical reflection].

    PubMed

    de Wert, G M W R; Dondorp, W J

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal screening for Down syndrome has to date focused on facilitating the informed choice to continue or not with a pregnancy. The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) for Down syndrome does potentially offer the option to apply foetal neurocognitive therapy for Down syndrome (FTDS). Current research in animal models looks promising and therefore a proactive ethical reflection in relation to clinical trials is urgently needed. This discussion includes an exploration of the ethical aspects of FTDS. There seem to be no convincing a priori objections on the basis of the social model of disability. Arguments in terms of (respect for) autonomy, wellbeing and justice seem to in principle support such therapy. Still, both the conditions for sound clinical trials and the implications of possible effective therapy for current prenatal screening need further scrutiny. PMID:27334087

  18. Lipodystrophy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Sunil; Shashibhushan, J.; Venugopal, K.; Vishwanatha, Huggi; Menon, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, abnormal lipid deposition (both lipoatrophy and fat redistribution) and its related complications have changed from an anecdotal issue into a major problem for HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infected patients on HAART (Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy). Lipoatrophy and fat redistribution are potentially stigmatizing complications of HAART and leads to poor adherence among patients. Hence we conducted this study to determine the pattern and to assess various risk factors for maldeposition of lipids in HIV patients. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional case series study was conducted in ART PLUS centre, Bellary over a period of 8 months from January to August 2014 in HIV patients on ART to determine risk factors associated with and epidemiological pattern of fat redistribution or atrophy. Results A total of 50 patients with LD {lipodystrophy} (26 with fat redestribution and 24 with lipoatrophy {LA} were diagnosed in this period. Most of them belonged to younger age and was commonly seen in females (76%). Patients with LA had a significantly lower BMI (18.73 ± 7.4), {the p-value being 0.19} compared to LH group (21.54 ± 7.62). The duration of disease was comparable among both groups (6.96 years in LH and 5.79 years in LA group) {p-value is 0.29}. There was a relatively good immunity among these patients with mean CD4 count was 509.23 in LH and 545.91 in LA group {single CD4 count was taken and the p-value was 0.001}. Most of the patients were in TLN (Tenofovir, Lamivudine, Nevirapine) regimen (58%).The duration that patient was on ART before commencement of study varied from patient to patient, but the mean duration was approximately five years in fat redistribution group and 4.5 years in LA group. There were no derangements in lipid and sugar levels among them. Conclusion This study shows the need to identify and impact of LD with respect to treatment adherence in young patients especially female patients. Early community

  19. Birth outcomes in South African women receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a triple-drug combination, in HIV-infected pregnant women markedly reduces mother to child transmission of HIV and decreases maternal morbidity. However, there remains uncertainty about the effects of in utero exposure to HAART on foetal development. Methods Our objectives were to investigate whether in utero exposure to HAART is associated with low birth weight and/or preterm birth in a population of South African women with advanced HIV disease. A retrospective observational study was performed on women with CD4 counts ≤250 cells/mm3 attending antenatal antiretroviral clinics in Johannesburg between October 2004 and March 2007. Low birth weight (<2.5 kg) and preterm birth rates (<37 weeks) were compared between those exposed and unexposed to HAART during pregnancy. Effects of different HAART regimen and duration were assessed. Results Among HAART-unexposed infants, 27% (60/224) were low birth weight compared with 23% (90/388) of early HAART-exposed (exposed <28 weeks gestation) and 19% (76/407) of late HAART-exposed (exposed ≥28 weeks) infants (p = 0.05). In the early HAART group, a higher CD4 cell count was protective against low birth weight (AOR 0.57 per 50 cells/mm3 increase, 95% CI 0.45-0.71, p < 0.001) and preterm birth (AOR 0.68 per 50 cells/mm3 increase, 95% CI 0.55-0.85, p = 0.001). HAART exposure was associated with an increased preterm birth rate (15%, or 138 of 946, versus 5%, or seven of 147, in unexposed infants, p = 0.001), with early nevirapine and efavirenz-based regimens having the strongest associations with preterm birth (AOR 5.4, 95% CI 2.1-13.7, p < 0.001, and AOR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1-15.2, p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions In this immunocompromised cohort, in utero HAART exposure was not associated with low birth weight. An association between NNRTI-based HAART and preterm birth was detected, but residual confounding is plausible. More advanced immunosuppression was a risk

  20. Role of mitogen activated protein kinases in skin tumorigenicity of Patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Neha; Ansari, Kausar M.; Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhari, Bhushan P.; Dwivedi, Premendra D.; Das, Mukul

    2011-12-15

    WHO has highlighted the need to evaluate dermal toxicity of mycotoxins including Patulin (PAT), detected in several fruits. In this study the skin carcinogenic potential of topically applied PAT was investigated. Single topical application of PAT (400 nmol) showed enhanced cell proliferation ({approx} 2 fold), along with increased generation of ROS and activation of ERK, p38 and JNK MAPKs, in mouse skin. PAT exposure also showed activation of downstream target proteins, c-fos, c-Jun and NF-{kappa}B transcription factors. Further, single topical application of PAT (400 nmol) followed by twice weekly application of TPA resulted in tumor formation after 14 weeks, indicating the tumor initiating activity of PAT. However no tumors were observed when PAT was used either as a complete carcinogen (80 nmol) or as a tumor promoter (20 nmol and 40 nmol) for 25 weeks. Histopathological findings of tumors found in PAT/TPA treated mice showed that these tumors were of squamous cell carcinoma type and similar to those found in the positive control group (DMBA/TPA) along with significant increase of lipid peroxidation and decrease in free sulfydryls, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase activities. The results suggest the possible role of free radicals in PAT mediated dermal tumorigenicity involving MAPKs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single topical application of Patulin showed enhanced cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patulin activate MAPKs, c-fos, c-Jun and NF-{kappa}B transcription factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patulin showed skin tumor initiating potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We could not detect skin tumor promoting potential of Patulin at the tested dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer However prolonged exposure of Patulin at a higher dose may promote tumor.

  1. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. B.; Sims, Herb; Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace

    2003-01-01

    The significant energy density of matter-antimatter annihilation is attractive to the designers of future space propulsion systems, with the potential to offer a highly compact source of power. Many propulsion concepts exist that could take advantage of matter-antimatter reactions, and current antiproton production rates are sufficient to support basic proof-of-principle evaluation of technology associated with antimatter- derived propulsion. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, allowing antiprotons to be trapped, stored, and transported for use at an experimental facility. To address this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. The HiPAT makes use of an electromagnetic system (Penning- Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Telsa superconductor, high voltage electrode structure, radio frequency (RF) network, and ultra high vacuum system. To evaluate the system normal matter sources (both electron guns and ion sources) are used to generate charged particles. The electron beams ionize gas within the trapping region producing ions in situ, whereas the ion sources produce the particles external to the trapping region and required dynamic capture. A wide range of experiments has been performed examining factors such as ion storage lifetimes, effect of RF energy on storage lifetime, and ability to routinely perform dynamic ion capture. Current efforts have been focused on improving the FW rotating wall system to permit longer storage times and non-destructive diagnostics of stored ions. Typical particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and destructively colliding them with a micro-channel plate detector (providing number and energy information). This improved RF system has been used to detect various

  2. A Scintillation Counter System Design To Detect Antiproton Annihilation using the High Performance Antiproton Trap(HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Stanojev, Boris

    2003-01-01

    The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT), a system designed to hold up to l0(exp 12) charge particles with a storage half-life of approximately 18 days, is a tool to support basic antimatter research. NASA's interest stems from the energy density represented by the annihilation of matter with antimatter, 10(exp 2)MJ/g. The HiPAT is configured with a Penning-Malmberg style electromagnetic confinement region with field strengths up to 4 Tesla, and 20kV. To date a series of normal matter experiments, using positive and negative ions, have been performed evaluating the designs performance prior to operations with antiprotons. The primary methods of detecting and monitoring stored normal matter ions and antiprotons within the trap includes a destructive extraction technique that makes use of a micro channel plate (MCP) device and a non-destractive radio frequency scheme tuned to key particle frequencies. However, an independent means of detecting stored antiprotons is possible by making use of the actual annihilation products as a unique indicator. The immediate yield of the annihilation event includes photons and pie mesons, emanating spherically from the point of annihilation. To "count" these events, a hardware system of scintillators, discriminators, coincident meters and multi channel scalars (MCS) have been configured to surround much of the HiPAT. Signal coincidence with voting logic is an essential part of this system, necessary to weed out the single cosmic ray events from the multi-particle annihilation shower. This system can be operated in a variety of modes accommodating various conditions. The first is a low-speed sampling interval that monitors the background loss or "evaporation" rate of antiprotons held in the trap during long storage periods; provides an independent method of validating particle lifetimes. The second is a high-speed sample rate accumulating information on a microseconds time-scale; useful when trapped antiparticles are extracted

  3. Hematopoietic gene therapy restores thymidine phosphorylase activity in a cell culture and a murine model of MNGIE.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torronteras, J; Gómez, A; Eixarch, H; Palenzuela, L; Pizzorno, G; Hirano, M; Andreu, A L; Barquinero, J; Martí, R

    2011-08-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase (TP). TP dysfunction results in systemic thymidine (dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) overload, which selectively impair mitochondrial DNA replication. Allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation has been used to treat MNGIE patients; however, this approach has serious adverse effects, including the toxicity of myeloablative conditioning, graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease. With the aim of testing the feasibility of gene therapy for MNGIE, we transduced TP-deficient B-lymphoblastoid cells from two MNGIE patients, with lentiviral vectors carrying a functional copy of the human TYMP DNA coding sequence. This restored TP activity in the cells, which reduced the excretion of dThd and dUrd and their concentrations when added in excess. Additionally, lentiviral-mediated hematopoietic gene therapy was used in partially myeloablated double Tymp/Upp1 knockout mice. In spite of the relatively low levels of molecular chimerism achieved, high levels of TP activity were observed in the peripheral blood of the transplanted mice, with a concomitant reduction of nucleoside concentrations. Our results suggest that hematopoietic gene therapy could be an alternative treatment for this devastating disorder in the future. PMID:21451581

  4. The use of craft activities as an occupational therapy treatment modality in Norway during 1952-1960.

    PubMed

    Horghagen, Sissel; Josephsson, Staffan; Alsaker, Sissel

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the use of craft activities as occupational therapy treatment modalities in Norway during the period 1952-1960. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews with six retired occupational therapists on their experiences in using crafts. Data were analysed through textual analysis and this resulted in four themes: craft activities identified as a therapeutic tool; ambivalence in how to frame the intervention; practice relative to power relationships; and occupational therapists and patients as equals. A limitation of the present study was that participants drew on their screened memories in the context of contemporary practice, which may omit or distort the historical truth. Further research is needed to document the effect of contemporary therapeutic use of craft activities, and to bring forward how occupational therapists and clients value the craft activities of today in the context of their lives. PMID:17623378

  5. Clinical Supervision in Adventure Therapy: Enhancing the Field through an Active Experiential Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Michael A.; Gillis, H. L.

    2010-01-01

    Supervision of therapeutic practice is one of the central professional elements of mental health practitioners. Supervision provides growth for therapists in their respective professional fields, more effective therapy for clients, and some measure of ethical protection for the welfare of clients and the public at large. However, therapists who…

  6. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Relatively Active and for Passive Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazelmans, Ellen; Prins, Judith; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2006-01-01

    In chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), facilitating, initiating, and perpetuating factors are distinguished. Although somatic factors might have initiated symptoms in CFS, they do not explain the persistence of fatigue. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for CFS focuses on factors that perpetuate and prolong symptoms. Recently it has been shown that,…

  7. Brief Behavioral Activation and Problem-Solving Therapy for Depressed Breast Cancer Patients: Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopko, Derek R.; Armento, Maria E. A.; Robertson, Sarah M. C.; Ryba, Marlena M.; Carvalho, John P.; Colman, Lindsey K.; Mullane, Christen; Gawrysiak, Michael; Bell, John L.; McNulty, James K.; Lejuez, Carl W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Major depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial impairment. Although some research has explored the utility of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients, only 2 small trials have investigated the potential benefits of behavior therapy among patients with…

  8. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Behavioral Activation for the Treatment of Depression: Description and Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Baruch, David E.; Gaynor, Scott T.

    2006-01-01

    The field of clinical behavior analysis is growing rapidly and has the potential to affect and transform mainstream cognitive behavior therapy. To have such an impact, the field must provide a formulation of and intervention strategies for clinical depression, the "common cold" of outpatient populations. Two treatments for depression have emerged:…

  9. Effects of Drawing on Alpha Activity: A Quantitative EEG Study with Implications for Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence exists as to how materials used in art therapy affect the brain and its neurobiological functioning. This pre/post within-groups study utilized the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) to measure residual effects in the brain after 20 minutes of drawing. EEG recordings were conducted before and after participants (N =…

  10. Activation of endogenous human stem cell-associated retroviruses (SCARs) and therapy-resistant phenotypes of malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-07-01

    Recent reports revealed consistent activation of specific endogenous retroviral elements in human preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cells. Activity of stem cell associated retroviruses (SCARs) has been implicated in seeding thousands of human-specific regulatory sequences in the hESC genome. Activation of specific SCARs has been demonstrated in patients diagnosed with multiple types of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders, and appears associated with clinically lethal therapy resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes in a sub-set of cancer patients diagnosed with different types of malignant tumors. A hallmark feature of human-specific SCAR integration sites is deletions of ancestral DNA. Analysis of human-specific genetic loci of SCARs' stemness networks in tumor samples of TCGA cohorts representing 29 cancer types suggests that this approach may facilitate identification of pan-cancer genomic signatures of clinically-lethal disease defined by the presence of somatic non-silent mutations, gene-level copy number changes, and transcripts and proteins' expression of SCAR-regulated host genes. Present analyses indicate that multiple lines of strong circumstantial evidence support the hypothesis that activation of SCARs' networks may play an important role in cancer progression and metastasis, perhaps contributing to the emergence of clinically-lethal therapy-resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes. PMID:27084523

  11. The association of body mass index with disease activity and clinical response to combination therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mirpourian, Maryam; Salesi, Mansour; Abdolahi, Hadi; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Karimzadeh, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of obesity in clinical curse of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is not clear. We investigated the association of obesity and adiposity with disease activity and clinical response to combination therapy in RA patients. Materials and Methods: Active RA patients with the disease activity score using 28 joint counts (DAS28) > 2.6 were studied. Height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences were measured and body mass index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio were calculated. Patients were treated with methotrexate (7.5 to 10 mg/week) plus hydroxychloroquine (200 to 400 mg/day) and prednisolone (2.5 to 10 mg/day) and were followed by DAS28 for up to 24 weeks. Results: One hundred and six patients were studied; age = 48.5 ± 13.8 years, 87.7% female, disease duration = 4.4 years [SE = 0.48]. DAS28 was decreased from 4.5 ± 1.6 to 2.9 ± 1.4 (P < 0.001) after 24 weeks of treatment. Only in patients with disease duration of ≤2 years, BMI (r = –0.415, P = 0.005) and waist circumference (r = –0.296, P = 0.05) were correlated with baseline DAS28. Although BMI (r = –0.337, P = 0.025) and waist circumference (r = –0.315, P = 0.038) were correlated with change in DAS28 after therapy, these correlations were disappeared after controlling for baseline DAS28. Conclusion: Obesity and adiposity are associated with less severe disease activity in early stage of RA, but are not associated with response to combination therapy with methotrexate plus hydroxychloroquine in RA patients. PMID:25197291

  12. Mass-spectrometry analysis of histone post-translational modifications in pathology tissue using the PAT-H-MS approach.

    PubMed

    Noberini, Roberta; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) have been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer, and may represent useful epigenetic biomarkers. The data described here provide a mass spectrometry-based quantitative analysis of hPTMs from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, from which histones were extracted through the recently developed PAT-H-MS method. First, we analyzed FFPE samples from mouse spleen and liver or human breast cancer up to six years old, together with their corresponding fresh frozen tissue. We then combined the PAT-H-MS approach with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC strategy-using a mix of histones from four breast cancer cell lines as a spike-in standard- to accurately quantify hPTMs from breast cancer specimens belonging to different subtypes. The data, which are associated with a recent publication (Pathology tissue-quantitative mass spectrometry analysis to profile histone post-translational modification patterns in patient samples (Noberini, 2015) [1]), are deposited at the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002669. PMID:27408908

  13. Small GTPase CDC-42 promotes apoptotic cell corpse clearance in response to PAT-2 and CED-1 in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Neukomm, L J; Zeng, S; Frei, A P; Huegli, P A; Hengartner, M O

    2014-01-01

    The rapid clearance of dying cells is important for the well-being of multicellular organisms. In C. elegans, cell corpse removal is mainly mediated by three parallel engulfment signaling cascades. These pathways include two small GTPases, MIG-2/RhoG and CED-10/Rac1. Here we present the identification and characterization of CDC-42 as a third GTPase involved in the regulation of cell corpse clearance. Genetic analyses performed by both loss of cdc-42 function and cdc-42 overexpression place cdc-42 in parallel to the ced-2/5/12 signaling module, in parallel to or upstream of the ced-10 module, and downstream of the ced-1/6/7 module. CDC-42 accumulates in engulfing cells at membranes surrounding apoptotic corpses. The formation of such halos depends on the integrins PAT-2/PAT-3, UNC-112 and the GEF protein UIG-1, but not on the canonical ced-1/6/7 or ced-2/5/12 signaling modules. Together, our results suggest that the small GTPase CDC-42 regulates apoptotic cell engulfment possibly upstream of the canonical Rac GTPase CED-10, by polarizing the engulfing cell toward the apoptotic corpse in response to integrin signaling and ced-1/6/7 signaling in C. elegans. PMID:24632947

  14. Asc-1, PAT2 and P2RX5 are novel cell surface markers for white, beige and brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ussar, Siegfried; Lee, Kevin Y.; Dankel, Simon N.; Boucher, Jeremie; Haering, Max-Felix; Kleinridders, Andre; Thomou, Thomas; Xue, Ruidan; Macotela, Yazmin; Cypess, Aaron M.; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Mellgren, Gunnar; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    White, beige and brown adipocytes are developmentally and functionally distinct but often occur mixed together within individual depots. To target white, beige and brown adipocytes for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, a better understanding of the cell surface properties of these cell types is essential. Using a combination of in silico, in vitro and in vivo methods, we have identified three new cell surface markers of adipose cell types. The amino acid transporter Asc-1 is a white adipocyte-specific cell surface protein, with little or no expression in brown adipocytes, whereas the amino acid transporter PAT2 and the purinergic receptor P2RX5 are cell surface markers expressed in classical brown and beige adipocytes in mice. These markers also selectively mark brown/beige and white adipocytes in human tissue. Thus, Asc-1, PAT2 and P2RX5 are membrane surface proteins that may serve as tools to identify and target white and brown/beige adipocytes for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25080478

  15. Development of departmental standard for traceability of measured activity for I-131 therapy capsules used in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, Jp

    2011-01-01

    International Basic Safety Standards (International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA) provide guidance levels for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine indicating the maximum usual activity for various diagnostic tests in terms of activities of injected radioactive formulations. An accuracy of ± 10% in the activities of administered radio-pharmaceuticals is being recommended, for expected outcome in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures. It is recommended that the long-term stability of isotope calibrators used in nuclear medicine is to be checked periodically for their performance using a long-lived check source, such as Cs-137, of suitable activity. In view of the un-availability of such a radioactive source, we tried to develop methods to maintain traceability of these instruments, for certifying measured activities for human use. Two re-entrant chambers [(HDR 1000 and Selectron Source Dosimetry System (SSDS)] with I-125 and Ir-192 calibration factors in the Department of Radiotherapy were used to measure Iodine-131 (I-131) therapy capsules to establish traceability to Mark V isotope calibrator of the Department of Nuclear Medicine. Special nylon jigs were fabricated to keep I-131 capsule holder in position. Measured activities in all the chambers showed good agreement. The accuracy of SSDS chamber in measuring Ir-192 activities in the last 5 years was within 0.5%, validating its role as departmental standard for measuring activity. The above method is adopted because mean energies of I-131 and Ir-192 are comparable. PMID:21430859

  16. Photo-activated Cancer Therapy: Potential for Treatment of Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry

    The diffuse and infiltrative nature of high grade gliomas, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), makes complete surgical resection virtually impossible. The propensity of glioma cells to migrate along white matter tracts suggests that a cure is possible only if these migratory cells can be eradicated. Approximately 80% of GBMs recur within 2 cm of the resection margin, suggesting that a reasonable approach for improving the prognosis of GBM patients would be the development of improved local therapies capable of eradicating glioma cells in the brain-adjacent-to-tumor (BAT). An additional complicating factor for the development of successful therapies is the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which is highly variable throughout the BAT—it is intact in some regions, while leaky in others. This variance in BBB patency has significant implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents. The results of a number of studies have shown that experimental light-based therapeutic modalities such as photochemical internalization (PCI) and photothermal therapy (PTT) may be useful in the treatment of gliomas. This chapter summarizes recent findings illustrating the potential of: (1) PCI for the delivery of therapeutic macromolecules such as chemotherapeutic agents and tumor suppressor genes, and (2) nanoshell-mediated PTT, including nanoparticle delivery approaches via macrophages.

  17. Use of preferred music to reduce emotional distress and symptom activity during radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Michael; Isaacks-Downton, Gloria; Wells, Nancy; Redlin-Frazier, Sheryl; Eck, Carol; Hepworth, Joseph T; Chakravarthy, Bapsi

    2006-01-01

    Music therapy has decreased anxiety levels in many medical settings. This randomized clinical trial examined the effectiveness of a music listening intervention, delivered by a board-certified music therapist, in patients undergoing curative radiation therapy (RT). Emotional distress (anxiety, depression, and treatment-related distress) and symptoms (fatigue and pain) were measured at baseline, mid-treatment, and end of treatment in 63 patients undergoing RT. Although patients who listened to self-selected music reported lower anxiety and treatment-related distress, there was a decline in these outcomes for patients in both groups over the course of RT. Depression, fatigue, and pain were not appreciably affected by music therapy. Within the music group, there was a significant correlation between number of times music was used/week and the change in treatment-related distress, suggesting that higher doses of music produced greater declines in distress. While these findings provided some support for the use of music in reducing distress during RT, further research demonstrating clear differences between intervention and control conditions is needed. Physical symptoms were not affected by the use of music over the course of RT. PMID:17037953

  18. Improving therapeutic activity of anti-CD20 antibody therapy through immunomodulation in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lipowska-Bhalla, Grazyna; Fagnano, Ester; Illidge, Timothy M; Cheadle, Eleanor J

    2016-06-01

    Nearly two decades ago rituximab heralded a new era in management of B cell malignancies significantly increasing response rates and survival. However, despite clear therapeutic advantage, significant numbers of patients become refractory to anti-CD20 mAb therapy, suggesting urgent improvements are required. It is now well recognized that the suppressive tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the outcome of anti-CD20 mAb therapy and that manipulation of this environment may improve the efficacy and produce long-term tumor control. The past few years have seen a surge of interest in immunomodulatory agents capable of overwriting immune suppressive networks into favorable clinical outcome. Currently, a number of such combinations with anti-CD20 mAb is under evaluation and some have produced encouraging outcomes in rituximab refractory disease. In this review, we give an outline of anti-CD20 mAbs and explore the combinations with immunomodulatory agents that enhance antitumor immunity through targeting stimulatory or inhibitory pathways and have proven potential to synergize with anti-CD20 mAb therapy. These agents, primarily mAbs, target CTLA-4, PD-1/PD-L1, and CD40. PMID:27050042

  19. In vivo neutron activation analysis of sodium and chlorine in tumor tissue after fast neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Auberger, T; Koester, L; Knopf, K; Weissfloch, L

    1996-01-01

    In 12 patients with recurrences and metastases of different primaries (head and neck cancer, breast cancer, malignant melanoma, and osteosarcoma) who were treated with reactor fission neutrons the photon emission of irradiated tissue was measured after each radiotherapy fraction. Spectral analyses of the decay rates resulted in data for the exchange of sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl) between the irradiated tissue and the body. About 60% of Na and Cl exchanged rapidly with a turnover half-life of 13 +/- 2 min. New defined mass exchange rates for Na and Cl amount to an average of 0.8 mval/min/kg of soft tissue. At the beginning of radiotherapy the turnover of the electrolytes in tissues with large tumor volumes was about twice that in tissues with small tumor volumes. Depending on the dose, neutron therapy led in all cases to variation in the metabolism. A maximum of Cl exchange and a minimum of Na exchange occurred after 10 Gy of neutrons (group of six previously untreated patients) or after 85 Gy (photon equivalent dose) of combined photon-neutron therapy. A significant increase in non-exchangeable fraction of Na from about 40 to 80% was observed in three tumors after a neutron dose of 10 Gy administered in five fractions correlated with a rapid reduction of tissue within 4 weeks after end of therapy. These results demonstrate for the first time the local response of the electrolyte metabolism to radiotherapy. PMID:8949749

  20. Plasmonic Vesicles of Amphiphilic Nanocrystals: Optically Active Multifunctional Platform for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Jibin; Huang, Peng; Duan, Hongwei; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-15

    Vesicular structures with compartmentalized, water-filled cavities, such as liposomes of natural and synthetic amphiphiles, have tremendous potential applications in nanomedicine. When block copolymers self-assemble, the result is polymersomes with tailored structural properties and built-in releasing mechanisms, controlled by stimuli-responsive polymer building blocks. More recently, chemists are becoming interested in multifunctional hybrid vesicles containing inorganic nanocrystals with unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. In this Account, we review our recent progress in assembling amphiphilic plasmonic nanostructures to create a new class of multifunctional hybrid vesicles and applying them towards cancer diagnosis and therapy. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) gives plasmonic nanomaterials a unique set of optical properties that are potentially useful for both biosensing and nanomedicine. For instance, the strong light scattering at their LSPR wavelength opens up the applications of plasmonic nanostructures in single particle plasmonic imaging. Their superior photothermal conversion properties, on the other hand, make them excellent transducers for photothermal ablation and contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Of particular note for ultrasensitive detection is that the confined electromagnetic field resulting from excitation of LSPR can give rise to highly efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for molecules in close proximity. We have explored several ways to combine well-defined plasmonic nanocrystals with amphiphilic polymer brushes of diverse chemical functionalities. In multiple systems, we have shown that the polymer grafts impart amphiphilicity-driven self-assembly to the hybrid nanoparticles. This has allowed us to synthesize well-defined vesicles in which we have embedded plasmonic nanocrystals in the shell of collapsed hydrophobic polymers. The hydrophilic brushes extend into external and interior aqueous

  1. A dual function theranostic agent for near-infrared photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Huang, Shuo; Wang, Mingfeng; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Theranostic, defined as combining diagnostic and therapeutic agents, has attracted more attention in biomedical application. It is essential to monitor diseased tissue before treatment. Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising treatment of cancer tissue due to minimal invasion, unharmful to normal tissue and high efficiency. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid nonionizing biomedical imaging modality that combines rich optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality. The near infra-red (NIR) wavelengths, usually used in PAT, can provide deep penetration at the expense of reduced contrast, as the blood absorption drops in the NIR range. Exogenous contrast agents with strong absorption in the NIR wavelength range can enhance the photoacoustic imaging contrast as well as imaging depth. Most theranostic agents incorporating PAT and PTT are inorganic nanomaterials that suffer from poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we present an benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c'] bis[1,2,5] thiadiazole (BBT), based theranostic agent which not only acts as photoacoustic contrast agent but also a photothermal therapy agent. Experiments were performed on animal blood and organic nanoparticles embedded in a chicken breast tissue using PAT imaging system at ~803 nm wavelengths. Almost ten time contrast enhancement was observed from the nanoparticle in suspension. More than 6.5 time PA signal enhancement was observed in tissue at 3 cm depth. HeLa cell lines was used to test photothermal effect showing 90% cells were killed after 10 min laser irradiation. Our results indicate that the BBT - based naoparticles are promising theranostic agents for PAT imaging and cancer treatment by photothermal therapy.

  2. [Open questions in the drug therapy of tumors with new active substances].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Schott, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    At the time of market authorization and/or the expansion of indication of new oncology drugs, it is often not possible to reliably measure the relevant benefit for the patient. The conception of the clinical studies, on which the market authorization and/or expansion of indication is based, orients itself primarily at the regulatory requirements of the regulatory authorities. In addition, their results are frequently published only incompletely or some time after the end of the clinical study. To clarify these outstanding questions regarding the individual treatment of patients, independent,science-initiated clinical studies after the market authorization are required. However, the execution of these studies is obstructed due to insufficient financial means as well as by regulations and the low evaluation of such studies by the academia. Further challenges result from the high costs of innovative oncologic therapies, which burden the resources of the statutory and private health insurance providers(GKV, PKV) who are confronted with an aging population and a rising prevalence of tumor cases. Independent post-market authorization clinical studies need to be completed in order to ensure a need-oriented and efficient treatment with new oncologic substances. New perspectives result by connecting the reimbursement of the costs of innovative therapies by the GKV and PKV to the generation of evidence in the context of clinical studies, thus improving the medical care of tumor patients as well as the efficient handling of limited health resources. PMID:20926907

  3. Antitumor activity of photodynamic therapy, adoptive immunotherapy, and chemotherapy in experimental tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canti, Gianfranco L.; Calastretti, Angela; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola; Valentini, Gianluca; Reddi, Elena; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2004-07-01

    Since Photodynamic therapy(PDT) is able to increase the antitumor immunity, in our laboratory we examine the antitumor effect of combination of PDT,with photoactivated Aluminium disulfonated Phthalocianine(ALS2Pc),adoptive immunotherapy, with immune lymphocytes, and chemotherapy on aggressive murine tumor. Mice bearing L1210 tumor were treated at day +4 with PDT ( 5mg/Kg of AlS2Pc and 100mW/cm2 x 10" of exposure of laser light 24hrs. later),at day +6 with Adriamycin(ADR 2mg/Kg) and at day + 7 with immune lymphocytes(IL),collected from L1210 bearing mice pretreated with PDT(2x107 cells).The results show that the combination ADR + PDT + IL demonstrates a significant synergistic antitumor effect while the chemotherapy treatment with low dose of the drug and the adotive immunotherapy treatment are slightly effective. The same positive results were obtained with the combination of PDT,Cisplatin(CDDP 2mg/Kg) and IL,while the CDDP treatment alone and the Il treatment alone are slightly effective. In conclusion these results suggest that it is possible to completely cure animals bearing advanced tumors, with a combined therapy, PDT + adoptive immunotherapy + low dose chemotherapy.

  4. Inhibition of NF-κB in Tumor Cells Exacerbates Immune Cell Activation Following Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Broekgaarden, Mans; Kos, Milan; Jurg, Freek A; van Beek, Adriaan A; van Gulik, Thomas M; Heger, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) yields very good outcomes in numerous types of superficial solid cancers, some tumors respond suboptimally to PDT. Novel treatment strategies are therefore needed to enhance the efficacy in these therapy-resistant tumors. One of these strategies is to combine PDT with inhibitors of PDT-induced survival pathways. In this respect, the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been identified as a potential pharmacological target, albeit inhibition of NF-κB may concurrently dampen the subsequent anti-tumor immune response required for complete tumor eradication and abscopal effects. In contrast to these postulations, this study demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of NF-κB in murine breast carcinoma (EMT-6) cells increased survival signaling in these cells and exacerbated the inflammatory response in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. These results suggest a pro-death and immunosuppressive role of NF-κB in PDT-treated cells that concurs with a hyperstimulated immune response in innate immune cells. PMID:26307977

  5. Inhibition of NF-κB in Tumor Cells Exacerbates Immune Cell Activation Following Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Broekgaarden, Mans; Kos, Milan; Jurg, Freek A.; van Beek, Adriaan A.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Heger, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) yields very good outcomes in numerous types of superficial solid cancers, some tumors respond suboptimally to PDT. Novel treatment strategies are therefore needed to enhance the efficacy in these therapy-resistant tumors. One of these strategies is to combine PDT with inhibitors of PDT-induced survival pathways. In this respect, the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been identified as a potential pharmacological target, albeit inhibition of NF-κB may concurrently dampen the subsequent anti-tumor immune response required for complete tumor eradication and abscopal effects. In contrast to these postulations, this study demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of NF-κB in murine breast carcinoma (EMT-6) cells increased survival signaling in these cells and exacerbated the inflammatory response in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. These results suggest a pro-death and immunosuppressive role of NF-κB in PDT-treated cells that concurs with a hyperstimulated immune response in innate immune cells. PMID:26307977

  6. Potential utility of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and propolis in enhancing the leishmanicidal activity of glucantime.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Diana Copi; Fedele, Thiago Antonio; Marcucci, Maria Cristina; Giorgio, Selma

    2011-01-01

    In this study we investigated the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy, alone or combined with the pentavalent antimonial glucantime on Leishmania amazonensis infection. In parallel, the effect of Brazilian red propolis gel (propain) alone or combined with glucantime on L. amazonensis infection was evaluated. The inhibition of the infection in macrophages treated with glucantime in combination with HBO exposition was greater than that of macrophages treated with glucantime alone or HBO alone. The susceptible mouse strain BALB/c infected in the shaved rump with L. amazonensis treated with glucantime and exposed to HBO showed: time points in the course of the disease in which lesions were smaller than those of mice treated with glucantime alone and revascularization of the skin in the lesion site; interferon-gamma (IFN-g) levels were not elevated in lymph node cells from these animals. Propain alone was not efficient against lesions, although less exudative lesions were observed in animals treated with propain alone or combined with glucantime. These results reveal the potential value of HBO and red propolis in combination with glucantime for treating cutaneous leishmaniasis and encourage further studies on the effect of more aggressive HBO, propolis and glucantime therapies on different mouse models of leishmaniasis. PMID:22183457

  7. A new bifunctional hybrid nanostructure as an active platform for photothermal therapy and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Khafaji, Mona; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Börrnert, Felix; Irajizad, Azam

    2016-01-01

    As a bi-functional cancer treatment agent, a new hybrid nanostructure is presented which can be used for photothermal therapy by exposure to one order of magnitude lower laser powers compared to similar nanostructures in addition to substantial enhancment in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. This gold-iron oxide hybrid nanostructure (GIHN) is synthesized by a cost-effective and high yield water-based approach. The GIHN is sheilded by PEG. Therefore, it shows high hemo and biocompatibility and more than six month stability. Alongside earlier nanostructures, the heat generation rate of GIHN is compareable with surfactnat-capped gold nanorods (GNRs). Two reasons are behind this enhancement: Firstly the distance between GNRs and SPIONs is adjusted in a way that the surface plasmon resonance of the new nanostructure is similar to bare GNRs and secondly the fraction of GNRs is raised in the hybrid nanostructure. GIHN is then applied as a photothermal agent using laser irradiation with power as low as 0.5 W.cm(-2) and only 32% of human breast adenocarcinoma cells could survive. The GIHN also acts as a dose-dependent transvers relaxation time (T2) MRI contrast agent. The results show that the GINH can be considered as a good candidate for multimodal photothermal therapy and MRI. PMID:27297588

  8. A new bifunctional hybrid nanostructure as an active platform for photothermal therapy and MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khafaji, Mona; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Hormozi-Nezhad, M. Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Börrnert, Felix; Irajizad, Azam

    2016-01-01

    As a bi-functional cancer treatment agent, a new hybrid nanostructure is presented which can be used for photothermal therapy by exposure to one order of magnitude lower laser powers compared to similar nanostructures in addition to substantial enhancment in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. This gold-iron oxide hybrid nanostructure (GIHN) is synthesized by a cost-effective and high yield water-based approach. The GIHN is sheilded by PEG. Therefore, it shows high hemo and biocompatibility and more than six month stability. Alongside earlier nanostructures, the heat generation rate of GIHN is compareable with surfactnat-capped gold nanorods (GNRs). Two reasons are behind this enhancement: Firstly the distance between GNRs and SPIONs is adjusted in a way that the surface plasmon resonance of the new nanostructure is similar to bare GNRs and secondly the fraction of GNRs is raised in the hybrid nanostructure. GIHN is then applied as a photothermal agent using laser irradiation with power as low as 0.5 W.cm−2 and only 32% of human breast adenocarcinoma cells could survive. The GIHN also acts as a dose-dependent transvers relaxation time (T2) MRI contrast agent. The results show that the GINH can be considered as a good candidate for multimodal photothermal therapy and MRI. PMID:27297588

  9. Myosin7a Deficiency Results in Reduced Retinal Activity Which Is Improved by Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Colella, Pasqualina; Sommella, Andrea; Marrocco, Elena; Di Vicino, Umberto; Polishchuk, Elena; Garrido, Marina Garcia; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Polishchuk, Roman; Auricchio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in MYO7A cause autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B), one of the most frequent conditions that combine severe congenital hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. A promising therapeutic strategy for retinitis pigmentosa is gene therapy, however its pre-clinical development is limited by the mild retinal phenotype of the shaker1 (sh1−/−) murine model of USH1B which lacks both retinal functional abnormalities and degeneration. Here we report a significant, early-onset delay of sh1−/− photoreceptor ability to recover from light desensitization as well as a progressive reduction of both b-wave electroretinogram amplitude and light sensitivity, in the absence of significant loss of photoreceptors up to 12 months of age. We additionally show that subretinal delivery to the sh1−/− retina of AAV vectors encoding the large MYO7A protein results in significant improvement of sh1−/− photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium ultrastructural anomalies which is associated with improvement of recovery from light desensitization. These findings provide new tools to evaluate the efficacy of experimental therapies for USH1B. In addition, although AAV vectors expressing large genes might have limited clinical applications due to their genome heterogeneity, our data show that AAV-mediated MYO7A gene transfer to the sh1−/− retina is effective. PMID:23991031

  10. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of an interleukin-2 agonist among HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Davey, Richard T; Pertel, Peter E; Benson, Alice; Cassell, Delanie J; Gazzard, Brian G; Holodniy, Mark; Lalezari, Jacob P; Levy, Yves; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Palella, Frank J; Pollard, Richard B; Rajagopalan, Prabhu; Saag, Michael S; Salata, Robert A; Sha, Beverly E; Choudhri, Shurjeel

    2008-02-01

    We sought to determine the safety, maximum tolerated dose, optimal dose, and preliminary dose efficacy of intermittent subcutaneously (s.c.) administered BAY 50-4798 among patients with HIV infection receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) compared with patients receiving HAART alone. A phase I/II randomized, double-blind, dose-escalation study was conducted of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of s.c. BAY 50-4798 administered to HIV-infected patients already receiving stable HAART. There were no unexpected safety findings in a population of HIV-infected patients receiving HAART plus SC BAY 50-4798 as adjunctive therapy. BAY 50-4798 exhibited nearly dose-proportional pharmacokinetics, and accumulation was minimal during multiple-dose treatment. Limited efficacy data indicated that treatment with BAY 50-4798 caused at least a transient increase in CD4(+) T cell counts in some recipients, particularly at the early time points. In general, this effect appeared to increase with increasing dose. Bay 50-4798 was generally well tolerated across the dose range tested, but a lack of potent, sustained immunologic activity suggests that further optimization of dose and schedule will be necessary. PMID:18279104

  11. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  12. Activating Na+-K+ ATPase: a potential cardioprotective therapy during early hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Li, Weijing; Wang, Xuanlin; He, Min; Wang, Chunyan; Qiao, Zhixin; Wang, Qingjun; Ren, Suping; Yu, Qun

    2014-12-01

    Cell volume and resting potential are heavily affected by the activity of Na+-K+ ATPase (NKA, Na+-K+ pump), an essential membrane protein that regulates plasma K+ and Na+ levels. It is generally accepted that the ineffective perfusion of body tissues inhibits NKA activity and that NKA activity and heart failure are closely related. Recently, research has proven that the activation of NKA provides significant cardioprotection against ischemic injury. Based on these data, we propose that NKA stimulation could attenuate the development of heart arrhythmia during the early phase of hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25459134

  13. Impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) timing on chronic immune activation/inflammation and end-organ damage

    PubMed Central

    Rajasuriar, Reena; Wright, Edwina; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review was to summarize recent studies on the effect of early antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients on markers of immune activation/inflammation, viral persistence and serious non-AIDS events. Recent findings Early ART, initiated within days to months of HIV infection, was associated with marked reduction in T-cell activation often reaching levels observed in HIV-uninfected individuals. However, the impact of early ART on markers of innate immune activation, microbial translocation and inflammation/coagulation was less clear. Early ART has also been associated with a significant reduction in the frequency of latently infected cells, which was greater if ART was initiated within days to weeks rather than months following infection. However, few studies have evaluated the relationship between immune activation and viral reservoirs, specifically following early ART. Early ART may potentially reduce serious non-AIDS events and associated mortality, but most of these studies have extrapolated from changes in surrogate markers, such as CD4 : CD8 ratio. Summary Early ART was associated with beneficial effects on multiple markers of immune activation, inflammation and viral persistence. Longer term prospective studies are still needed to determine whether early ART translates to a significant reduction in serious non-AIDS events and mortality. PMID:25415420

  14. Low-Level Laser Therapy Activates NF-kB via Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kharkwal, Gitika B.; Saleem, Taimur; Mooney, David; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation at a cellular level remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810 nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NF-kB was observed at fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2 and was confirmed by Western blot analysis. NF-kB was activated earlier (1 hour) by LLLT compared to conventional lipopolysaccharide treatment. We also observed that LLLT induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production similar to mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat. Furthermore, we observed similar NF-kB activation with these mitochondrial inhibitors. These results, together with inhibition of laser induced NF-kB activation by antioxidants, suggests that ROS play an important role in the laser induced NF-kB signaling pathways. However, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that LLLT also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. Conclusion We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive NFkB signaling via generation of ROS. Expression of anti-apoptosis and pro-survival genes responsive to NFkB could explain many clinical effects of LLLT. PMID:21814580

  15. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D.; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  16. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Carin I M; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  17. Immune activation and IL-12 production during acute/early HIV infection in the absence and presence of highly active, antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Adriana A; Harris, David M; Atabani, Sowsan F; Sabundayo, Beulah P; Langan, Susan J; Margolick, Joseph B; Karp, Christopher L

    2008-12-01

    Suppressed IL-12 production and maladaptive immune activation, both of which are ameliorated by successful highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), are thought to play important roles in the immunopathogenesis of chronic HIV infection. Despite the important effects of the immunological and virological events of early HIV infection on subsequent disease progression, IL-12 production and immune activation in early infection remain under-defined. To quantify IL-12 production and immune activation during acute/early HIV infection, in the presence and absence of HAART, we performed a prospective, longitudinal study of participants in the Baltimore site of the Acute Infection and Early Disease Research Program, with cross-sectional comparison to healthy control subjects. PBMC cytokine productive capacity and plasma immune activation markers [soluble CD8 (sCD8), sCD4, granzyme B, neopterin, beta2-microglobulin, sIL-2R, sTNFRI, sTNFRII, and IL-12p70] were quantified by ELISA. Notably, PBMC from patients with acute/early HIV infection exhibited in vivo IL-12p70 production along with increased, maximal in vitro IL-12 production. Further, despite evidence from plasma markers of generalized immune activation, no elevation in plasma levels of sCD4 was observed, suggesting relative blunting of in vivo CD4+ T cell activation from the beginning of HIV infection. Finally, despite successful virological responses to HAART, heightened in vivo CD8+ T cell activation, IL-12 production, and IFN activity were sustained for at least 6 months during primary HIV infection. These data underscore the need for comparative mechanistic analysis of the immunobiology of early and chronic HIV infection. PMID:18806124

  18. Developing a Manualized Occupational Therapy Diabetes Management Intervention: Resilient, Empowered, Active Living With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Carandang, Kristine; Davis, Shain

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on the development of a manualized occupational therapy intervention for diabetes management. An initial theoretical framework and core content areas for a Stage I intervention manual were developed based on an in-depth needs assessment and review of existing literature. After evaluation by a panel of experts and completion of a feasibility study, the intervention was revised into a Stage 2 manual in preparation for a randomized study evaluating the intervention's efficacy. In developing the initial manual, we delineated core theoretical principles to allow for flexible application and tailoring of the intervention's content areas. Expert panel feedback and feasibility study results led to changes to the intervention structure and content as we developed the Stage 2 manual. Through describing this process, we illustrate the dynamic evolution of intervention manuals, which undergo revisions due to both theoretical and practical considerations at each stage of the research-to-clinical practice pipeline. PMID:26594741

  19. Engineering a Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen–Activated Tumor Endothelial Cell Prodrug for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Denmeade, Samuel R.; Mhaka, Annastasiah M.; Rosen, D. Marc; Brennen, W. Nathaniel; Dalrymple, Susan; Dach, Ingrid; Olesen, Claus; Gurel, Bora; DeMarzo, Angelo M.; Wilding, George; Carducci, Michael A.; Dionne, Craig A.; Møller, Jesper V.; Nissen, Poul; Christensen, S. Brøgger; Isaacs, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of drug target proteins within tumor sites is a major mechanism of resistance to anticancer therapies. We describe a strategy to selectively inhibit, within tumor sites, the function of a critical intracellular protein, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump, whose proper function is required by all cell types for viability. To achieve targeted inhibition, we took advantage of the unique expression of the carboxypeptidase prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) by tumor endothelial cells within the microenvironment of solid tumors. We generated a prodrug, G202, consisting of a PSMA-specific peptide coupled to an analog of the potent SERCA pump inhibitor thapsigargin. G202 produced substantial tumor regression against a panel of human cancer xenografts in vivo at doses that were minimally toxic to the host. On the basis of these data, a phase 1 dose-escalation clinical trial has been initiated with G202 in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:22745436

  20. Effects of combined fine motor skill and cognitive therapy to cognition, degree of dementia, depression, and activities of daily living in the elderly with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin; Lee, ByoungHee; Park, YuHyung; Kim, Yumi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of combined fine motor skill and cognitive therapies on cognition, depression, and activities of daily living in elderly patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six participants comprised 2 groups. The experimental group (n=13) received combined fine motor skill and cognitive therapy, and the control group (n=13) received only general medical care. [Results] The experimental group showed improvements in cognition, degree of dementia, depression, and activities of daily living compared to the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that combined fine motor skill and cognitive therapy improves cognition, degree of dementia, depression, and daily living in elderly patients with AD. These therapies would therefore be effective as general medical care strategies. PMID:26644663

  1. Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao; Arany, Praveen R.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Saleem, Taimur; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810-nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NFkB was observed for fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2. NF-kB activation by laser was detectable at 1-hour time point. Moreover, we demonstrated that laser phosphorylated both IKK α/β and NF-kB 15 minutes after irradiation, which implied that laser activates NF-kB via phosphorylation of IKK α/β. Suspecting mitochondria as the source of NF-kB activation signaling pathway, we demonstrated that laser increased both intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescence microscopy with dichlorodihydrofluorescein and ATP synthesis by luciferase assay. Mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat increased ROS and NF-kB activation but had no effect on ATP. The ROS quenchers N-acetyl-L-cysteine and ascorbic acid abrogated laser-induced NF-kB and ROS but not ATP. These results suggested that ROS might play an important role in the signaling pathway of laser induced NF-kB activation. However, the western blot showed that antimycin A, a mitochondrial inhibitor, did not activate NF-kB via serine phosphorylation of IKK α/β as the laser did. On the other hand, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that light also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. ATP upregulation reached a maximum at 0.3 J/cm2 or higher. We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kB by generating ROS as signaling molecules.

  2. Strategic framework for education and training in Quality by Design (QbD) and process analytical technology (PAT).

    PubMed

    de Matas, Marcel; De Beer, Thomas; Folestad, Staffan; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Lindén, Hans; Lopes, João Almeida; Oostra, Wim; Weimer, Marco; Öhrngren, Per; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-07-30

    The regulatory and technical landscape of the pharmaceutical field is rapidly evolving from one focused predominantly on development of small molecules, using well established manufacturing technologies towards an environment in which biologicals and complex modalities are being developed using advanced science and technology coupled with the application of modern Quality by Design (QbD) principles. In order that Europe keeps pace with these changes and sustains its position as major player in the development and commercialization of medicines, it is essential that measures are put in place to maintain a highly skilled workforce. A number of challenges however exist to equipping academic, industrial and health agency staff with the requisite knowledge, skills and experience to develop the next generation of medicines. In this regard, the EUFEPS QbD and PAT Sciences Network has proposed a structured framework for education, training and continued professional development, which comprises a number of pillars covering the fundamental principles of modern pharmaceutical development including the underpinning aspects of science, engineering and technology innovation. The framework is not prescriptive and is not aimed at describing specific course content in detail. It should however be used as a point of reference for those institutions delivering pharmaceutical based educational courses, to ensure that the necessary skills, knowledge and experience for successful pharmaceutical development are maintained. A positive start has been made and a number of examples of formal higher education courses and short training programs containing elements of this framework have been described. The ultimate vision for this framework however, is to see widespread adoption and proliferation of this curriculum with it forming the backbone of QbD and PAT science based skills development. PMID:27112991

  3. A double-focus collimator system for full PAT performance testing of inter-satellite laser communication terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijuan; Luan, Zhu; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhou, Yu; Liu, De'an; Liu, Liren

    2006-08-01

    A laser collimator is necessary for the testing and verification of the PAT performance of inter-satellite laser communication terminals. However, the terminals mostly have a large field of view for the acquisition and a high angular accuracy for the fine tracking needed to be examined. A single collimator has the conflict to reach at both a large field of view and a fine resolution. To compromise, a double-focus laser collimator is proposed. The collimator is mainly composed of a primary lens, a beam splitter, a secondary lens and some reflectors. The primary lens with a 9.9m focal length directly forms the long focal length arm of the collimator. The combination of the primary lens and the secondary lens has a new focal length of 1.3m and constructs the short focal length arm of the collimator. With two CMOS imaging sensors, the collimator can realize a 1.1mrad field of view with a <1μrad resolution in the focal plane of the long focal length arm and a 8.3mrad field of view with a 8.2μrad resolution in the focal plane of the short focal length arm. In combination with a coarse beam scanner (+/-15°) and a fine beam scanner (1mrad) to simulate the mutual angular movement between two satellites, the united system is capable to test the full PAT performance of inter-satellite laser communication terminals. The optical layouts of the collimator and two detecting units are illustrated. The optical design of the collimator is detailed. The mechanical design of the collimator is given.

  4. Integration of Structured Expressive Activities within a Humanistic Group Play Therapy Format for Preadolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratton, Sue C.; Ceballos, Peggy L.; Ferebee, Kelly Webb

    2009-01-01

    The integration of expressive activities in play groups with preadolescents encourages them to reach more deeply into their own resources, enabling them to handle future challenges more effectively. Developmental and therapeutic rationale, along with research support, is given for the integration of creative activities into a humanistic play group…

  5. Synthesis, Structure-Activity Relationship, and Mechanistic Investigation of Lithocholic Acid Amphiphiles for Colon Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Ashima; Motiani, Rajender K.; Shyam, Radhey; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Sengupta, Sagar; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    We report a structure-activity relationship of lithocholic acid amphiphiles for their anticancer activities against colon cancer. We synthesized ten cationic amphiphiles differing in nature of cationic charged head groups using lithocholic acid. We observed that anticancer activities of these amphiphiles against colon cancer cell lines are contingent on nature of charged head group. Lithocholic acid based amphiphile possessing piperidine head group (LCA-PIP1) is ~10 times more cytotoxic as compared to its precursor. Biochemical studies revealed that enhanced activity of LCA-PIP1 as compared to lithocholic acid is due to greater activation of apoptosis.LCA-PIP1 induces sub G0 arrest and causes cleavage of caspases. A single dose of lithocholic acid-piperidine derivative is enough to reduce the tumor burden by 75% in tumor xenograft model. PMID:25685308

  6. Adjuvant oestrogen therapy does not improve disease activity in postmenopausal patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink, H R; van Everdingen, A A; van Wijk, M J; Jacobs, J W; Bijlsma, J W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate whether oestrogens can be used as treatment to diminish disease activity in women with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS--Forty postmenopausal female patients with active rheumatoid arthritis participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind study on the possible beneficial effect of adjuvant treatment of oestradiol on disease activity. RESULTS--Thirty three patients completed 52 weeks of treatment with 2 mg oestradiol-valerate or placebo. No statistically significant difference was found in and between both treatment groups with regard to articular indices, pain score by visual analogue scale, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and health questionnaire on daily activities before, during and at the end of the study. CONCLUSION--This first randomised prospective placebo-controlled study shows no beneficial effect of oestrogens on disease activity in postmenopausal female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8311536

  7. The Natural Human IgM Antibody PAT-SM6 Induces Apoptosis in Primary Human Multiple Myeloma Cells by Targeting Heat Shock Protein GRP78

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Leo; Duell, Johannes; Morgner, Charlotte; Chatterjee, Manik; Hensel, Frank; Rosenwald, Andreas; Einsele, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other haematological malignancies, targeted immunotherapy has not entered standard treatment regimens for de novo or relapsed multiple myeloma (MM) yet. While a number of IgG-formatted monoclonal antibodies are currently being evaluated in clinical trials in MM, our study aimed to investigate whether the fully human IgM monoclonal antibody PAT-SM6 that targets a tumour-specific variant of the heat shock protein GRP78 might be an attractive candidate for future immunotherapeutic approaches. We here show that GRP78 is stably and consistently expressed on the surface on tumour cells from patients with de novo, but also relapsed MM and that binding of PAT-SM6 to MM cells can specifically exert cytotoxic effects on malignant plasma cells, whereas non-malignant cells are not targeted. We demonstrate that the induction of apoptosis and, to a lesser extent, complement dependent cytotoxicity is the main mode of action of PAT-SM6, whereas antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity does not appear to contribute to the cytotoxic properties of this antibody. Given the favourable safety profile of PAT-SM6 in monkeys, but also in a recent phase I trial in patients with malignant melanoma, our results form the basis for a planned phase I study in patients with relapsed MM. PMID:23667612

  8. The natural human IgM antibody PAT-SM6 induces apoptosis in primary human multiple myeloma cells by targeting heat shock protein GRP78.

    PubMed

    Rasche, Leo; Duell, Johannes; Morgner, Charlotte; Chatterjee, Manik; Hensel, Frank; Rosenwald, Andreas; Einsele, Hermann; Topp, Max S; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other haematological malignancies, targeted immunotherapy has not entered standard treatment regimens for de novo or relapsed multiple myeloma (MM) yet. While a number of IgG-formatted monoclonal antibodies are currently being evaluated in clinical trials in MM, our study aimed to investigate whether the fully human IgM monoclonal antibody PAT-SM6 that targets a tumour-specific variant of the heat shock protein GRP78 might be an attractive candidate for future immunotherapeutic approaches. We here show that GRP78 is stably and consistently expressed on the surface on tumour cells from patients with de novo, but also relapsed MM and that binding of PAT-SM6 to MM cells can specifically exert cytotoxic effects on malignant plasma cells, whereas non-malignant cells are not targeted. We demonstrate that the induction of apoptosis and, to a lesser extent, complement dependent cytotoxicity is the main mode of action of PAT-SM6, whereas antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity does not appear to contribute to the cytotoxic properties of this antibody. Given the favourable safety profile of PAT-SM6 in monkeys, but also in a recent phase I trial in patients with malignant melanoma, our results form the basis for a planned phase I study in patients with relapsed MM. PMID:23667612

  9. Rehabilitation Program for the Quality of Life for Individuals on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: A Short Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maharaj, Sonill S.; Chetty, Verusia

    2011-01-01

    Patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) spend less time on vigorous activities due to lower aerobic capacity with functional limitations that can be attributed to a detraining effect, resulting in a poor quality of life (QoL). The overall aims of rehabilitation are to restore, to maintain, and to enhance the QoL and this…

  10. Response to suxamethonium during propofol-fentanyl-N2O/O2 anaesthesia in a patient with active myasthenia gravis receiving long-term anticholinesterase therapy.

    PubMed

    Vanlinthout, L E; Robertson, E N; Booij, L H

    1994-06-01

    We describe the effect of repeated suxamethonium doses during propofol-fentanyl-N2O/O2 anaesthesia in a 29-year-old woman with active myasthenia gravis receiving chronic pyridostigmine therapy. Despite adequate pre-operative pseudocholinesterase activity, suxamethonium resistance occurred. Neither bradycardia nor residual neuromuscular block were seen after repeated doses of suxamethonium. PMID:8017595

  11. Immunoglobulin G kappa [IgG kappa] and IgG lambda paraproteinemia in a child with AIDS and response to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Seeborg, Filiz Odabasi; Gay, Hannah; Schmiege, Lorenz M; Bernard, David; Shearer, William T

    2005-11-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy with AIDS, extremely elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration and IgG kappa [IgG(kappa)] and IgG lambda [IgG(lambda)] paraproteinemia. This paraproteinemia partially responded to highly active antiretroviral therapy. This case emphasizes the importance of controlling B-cell activation. PMID:16275950

  12. Effect of antiangiogenic therapy on luciferase activity in a cytomegalovirus- or HSP70-promoter-transfected M21 tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundt, Walter; Schink, Christian; Steinbach, Silke; O'Connell-Rodwell, Caitlin E.; Kiessling, Andreas; Librizzi, Damiano; Burbelko, Mykhaylo; Guccione, Samira

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy on heat shock protein 70 expression (Hsp70) and protein production (HSP70) in a melanoma tumor model (M21; M21-L). M21 and M21-L cells transfected with a plasmid containing the Hsp70 (Hspa1b) or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter and the luciferase reporter gene were injected into mice; the resulting tumors grew to a size of 650 mm3. Mice (five per group) were intravenously treated with an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide-nanoparticle/Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein complex [RGD-NP/RAF(-)] or with a nanoparticle control. Bioluminescence imaging (IVIS®, Xenogen, USA) was performed at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after the treatment cycle. Western blot analysis of HSP70 protein was performed to monitor protein expression. The size of the treated M21 tumors remained fairly constant (647.8+/-103.4 mm2 at the beginning versus 704.8+/-94.4 mm3 at the end of the experiment). The size of the M21-L tumors increased, similar to the untreated control tumors. Bioluminescent imaging demonstrated that when transcription was controlled by the CMV promoter, luciferase activity decreased to 17.9%+/-4.3% of baseline values in the treated M21 tumors. When transcription was controlled by the Hsp70 promoter, the highest luciferase activity (4.5+/-0.7-fold increase over base-line values) was seen 24 h after injection in the M21 tumors; however, no luciferase activity was seen in the M21-L tumors. In accordance with bioluminescent imaging, western blot analysis showed a peak in HSP70 production at 24 h after the injection of the RGD-NP/RAF(-) complex in the M21 tumors; however, no HSP70 protein induction was seen in the M21-L tumors. Thus, targeted antiangiogenic therapy can induce Hsp70 expression and HSP70 protein in melanoma tumors.

  13. Prospects of medium specific activity (177) Lu in targeted therapy of prostate cancer using (177) Lu-labeled PSMA inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Chakravarty, Rubel; Shetty, Priyalata; Vimalnath, K V; Sen, Ishita B; Dash, Ashutosh

    2016-07-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy using (177) Lu-labeled peptidomimetic inhibitor of prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) viz. PSMA-617 is emerging as one the most effective strategies for management of metastatic prostate cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer related death. The aim of the present study is to develop a robust and easily adaptable protocol for formulation of therapeutic dose of (177) Lu-PSMA-617 at hospital radiopharmacy using moderate specific activity (177) Lu available at an affordable cost. Extensive radiochemical studies were performed to optimize the required [PSMA-617] / [Lu] ratio and other parameters to formulate 7.4 GBq dose of (177) Lu-PSMA-617. Based on these, 7.4 GBq therapeutic dose of (177) Lu-PSMA-617 was formulated by incubating 160 µg of PSMA-617 with indigenously produced (177) LuCl3 (555 GBq/µg specific activity of (177) Lu) at 90 °C for 30 min. The radiochemical purity of the formulation was 98.3 ± 0.6% (n = 7) which was retained to the extent of >95% after 7 d in normal saline at room temperature and >96% after 2 d in human serum at 37 °C. Preliminary clinical studies showed specific targeting of the agent in the lesion sites and similar physiological distribution as in diagnostic (68) Ga-PSMA-11 PET scans performed earlier. The developed optimized protocol for formulating therapeutic dose of (177) Lu-PSMA-617 could be useful for large number of nuclear medicine therapy clinics across the world having access to moderate specific activity (177) Lu at an affordable cost. PMID:27264278

  14. Impact of DCS-facilitated cue exposure therapy on brain activation to cocaine cues in cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, James J.; Myrick, Hugh; Henderson, Scott; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Ana, Elizabeth J. Santa; Saladin, Michael E.; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of addiction is marked by a pathological associative learning process that imbues incentive salience to stimuli associated with drug use. Recent efforts to treat addiction have targeted this learning process using cue exposure therapy augmented with D-cycloserine (DCS), a glutamatergic agent hypothesized to enhance extinction learning. To better understand the impact of DCS-facilitated extinction on neural reactivity to drug cues, the present study reports fMRI findings from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of DCS-facilitated cue exposure for cocaine dependence. Methods Twenty-five participants completed two MRI sessions (before and after intervention), with a cocaine-cue reactivity fMRI task. The intervention consisted of 50mg of DCS or placebo, combined with two sessions of cocaine cue exposure and skills training. Results Participants demonstrated cocaine cue activation in a variety of brain regions at baseline. From the pre- to post-study scan, participants experienced decreased activation to cues in a number of regions (e.g., accumbens, caudate, frontal poles). Unexpectedly, placebo participants experienced decreases in activation to cues in the left angular and middle temporal gyri and the lateral occipital cortex, while DCS participants did not. Conclusions Three trials of DCS-facilitated cue exposure therapy for cocaine dependence have found that DCS either increases or does not significantly impact response to cocaine cues. The present study adds to this literature by demonstrating that DCS may prevent extinction to cocaine cues in temporal and occipital brain regions. Although consistent with past research, results from the present study should be considered preliminary until replicated in larger samples. PMID:23497788

  15. Correlation Between Brain Activation Changes and Cognitive Improvement Following Cognitive Remediation Therapy in Schizophrenia: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yan-Yan; Wang, Ji-Jun; Yan, Chao; Li, Zi-Qiang; Pan, Xiao; Cui, Yi; Su, Tong; Liu, Tao-Sheng; Tang, Yun-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have indicated that cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) might improve cognitive function by changing brain activations in patients with schizophrenia. However, the results were not consistent in these changed brain areas in different studies. The present activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis was conducted to investigate whether cognitive function change was accompanied by the brain activation changes, and where the main areas most related to these changes were in schizophrenia patients after CRT. Analyses of whole-brain studies and whole-brain + region of interest (ROI) studies were compared to explore the effect of the different methodologies on the results. Methods: A computerized systematic search was conducted to collect fMRI and PET studies on brain activation changes in schizophrenia patients from pre- to post-CRT. Nine studies using fMRI techniques were included in the meta-analysis. Ginger ALE 2.3.1 was used to perform meta-analysis across these imaging studies. Results: The main areas with increased brain activation were in frontal and parietal lobe, including left medial frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, and inferior parietal lobule in patients after CRT, yet no decreased brain activation was found. Although similar increased activation brain areas were identified in ALE with or without ROI studies, analysis including ROI studies had a higher ALE value. Conclusions: The current findings suggest that CRT might improve the cognition of schizophrenia patients by increasing activations of the frontal and parietal lobe. In addition, it might provide more evidence to confirm results by including ROI studies in ALE meta-analysis. PMID:26904993

  16. The Alfred Hospital experience of resumption of cardiac activity after withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy.

    PubMed

    Sa, Yong; S, D'Souza; S, Philpot; Dv, Pilcher

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of donation after circulatory death programs in Australia and New Zealand, greater knowledge is needed about physiologic variation in haemodynamic activity following withdrawal of cardiorespiratory support. The ANZICS Statement on Death and Organ Donation allows provision for variation in the observation times between two and five minutes after cessation of the circulation prior to declaration of death. We report our experience of two cases, the first where electrical activity and pulse returned after a 102 second pause and the second where electrical activity returned after a three minute pause; both longer than previously reported cases. PMID:27608344

  17. A Tale of Two Melt Rocks: Equilibration and Metal/Sulfide-Silicate Segregation in the L7 Chondrites PAT 91501 and LEW 88663

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. P.

    1993-07-01

    Type 7 ordinary chondrites have experienced temperatures near or beyond those necessary for partial melting. Two recently collected Antarctic specimens, PAT91501 (PAT) and LEW88663 (LEW), have been tentatively identified as L7 chondrites based on mineral and oxygen isotope compositions [1,2]. The petrology and mineralogy of these meteorites suggests that they have undergone significant metal/sulfide-silicate segregation, with implications for meteorite parent bodies. PAT consists of an equigranular contact-framework of nearly euhedral olivine grains, with interstitial spaces filled by plagioclase, pyroxenes, and several minor phases. Ortho- and clinopyroxene occur in an exsolution relationship. Olivine and pyroxene are highly equilibrated, varying <<1% in Fe-endmember content. Pyroxene equilibration temperatures calculated for PAT using the methods of [3] are self-consistent at about 1180 degrees C. In thin section, PAT contains only traces of metal, as tiny isolated blebs in sulfide grains; large (>1 cm) globular sulfide inclusions are seen in hand-sample [1], but are not present in the section examined. LEW was originally classified as an achondrite with olivine and pyroxene compositions similar to those in L chondrites [2]. Metal is absent in LEW, although the specimen is small and heavily rusted, making it impossible to gauge the original metal content. Olivine grains are commonly rounded in shape and seldom in contact with more than a few other grains. LEW olivine and pyroxene are also highly equilibrated. Veins of Ni-bearing metal oxides and sulfides are common. Both low- and high-Ca pyroxene occur as discrete grains, orthopyroxene often poikilitically enclosing olivine. Pyroxene equilibration temperatures for LEW are more variable than those for PAT and consistently lower, with an average around 900 degrees C. The various textural and compositional characteristics of PAT and LEW suggest they have experienced partial melting to varying degrees. Both visually

  18. Opiate-Induced Suppression of Rat Hypoglossal Motoneuron Activity and Its Reversal by Ampakine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lorier, Amanda R.; Funk, Gregory D.; Greer, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons innervate tongue muscles and are vital for maintaining upper-airway patency during inspiration. Depression of XII nerve activity by opioid analgesics is a significant clinical problem, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Currently there are no suitable pharmacological approaches to counter opiate-induced suppression of XII nerve activity while maintaining analgesia. Ampakines accentuate α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor responses. The AMPA family of glutamate receptors mediate excitatory transmission to XII motoneurons. Therefore the objectives were to determine whether the depressant actions of μ-opioid receptor activation on inspiratory activity includes a direct inhibitory action at the inspiratory premotoneuron to XII motoneuron synapse, and to identify underlying mechanism(s). We then examined whether ampakines counteract opioid-induced depression of XII motoneuron activity. Methodology/Principal Findings A medullary slice preparation from neonatal rat that produces inspiratory-related output in vitro was used. Measurements of inspiratory burst amplitude and frequency were made from XII nerve roots. Whole-cell patch recordings from XII motoneurons were used to measure membrane currents and synaptic events. Application of the μ-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, to the XII nucleus depressed the output of inspiratory XII motoneurons via presynaptic inhibition of excitatory glutamatergic transmission. Ampakines (CX614 and CX717) alleviated DAMGO-induced depression of XII MN activity through postsynaptic actions on XII motoneurons. Conclusions/Significance The inspiratory-depressant actions of opioid analgesics include presynaptic inhibition of XII motoneuron output. Ampakines counteract μ-opioid receptor-mediated depression of XII motoneuron inspiratory activity. These results suggest that ampakines may be beneficial in countering opiate-induced suppression of XII motoneuron

  19. Hemothorax under thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue: plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in a 16-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Varnholt, V; Ringe, H; Nietsch, L; Gaedicke, G

    1999-12-01

    We present the case of a 16-year-old girl with an extended thrombosis of the femoral and iliac vein and the inferior vena cava during pleuropneumonia; predisposing risk factors for thrombophilia were: use of contraceptives, nicotine abuse and congenital deficiency of antithrombin III (not previously diagnosed). Thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA; initial dose: 0.08 mg/kg/h) was started. 2 days later--after diagnosis of an extended hemothorax: 1500 ml blood were obtained after thoracocentesis, transfusion of packed red blood cells was necessary--rt-PA was stopped, with only heparin (400 U/kg/d) being administered. 36 h later--the thrombosis had not yet changed--the thrombolytic therapy with rt-PA was continued in a markedly reduced dose (0.015 mg/kg/d) with no further bleeding complications. 8 days later--after successful thrombolysis--t-PA was stopped, heparin was given for another 10 days, then cumarin was administered orally. PMID:10650854

  20. Factors associated with adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in homeless or unstably housed adults living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Royal, Scott W; Kidder, Daniel P; Patrabansh, Satyendra; Wolitski, Richard J; Holtgrave, David R; Aidala, Angela; Pals, Sherri; Stall, Ron

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are homeless or unstably housed. We evaluated homeless or unstably housed PLWHA (n=644) in three US cities were enrolled in the Housing and Health Study. Using baseline data and controlling for gender, race, age, and education, we examined associations between self-reported two- and Seven-day adherence and access to healthcare, mental health, substance use, and attitudes toward HIV medical therapy. Of the 644 participants, 358 (55%) were currently on HAART. For two-day adherence, 280 (78%) reported missing no prescribed doses (100% adherence), and for seven-day adherence, 291 (81%) reported > or =90% adherence. Logistic regression analyses indicated being younger, not having health insurance, and drug use were associated with missing > or =1 dose over the past two days. Scoring lower on SF-36 mental component summary scale and having greater risk of depression (CES-D) and stress (Perceived Stress Scale) were associated with poorer adherence for both two- and seven-day outcomes. Negative attitudes toward HIV treatment were also associated with lower adherence. Adherence to HIV medications in this population is similar to other groups. Coexisting problems of access to healthcare, higher risk of mental health problems, along with poorer attitudes toward treatment are associated with increased likelihood of missing doses. Comprehensive models of HIV care that include a continuum of medical and social services are essential for treating this population. PMID:19401865

  1. Nitric oxide release combined with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory activity prevents muscular dystrophy pathology and enhances stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Silvia; Sciorati, Clara; D'Antona, Giuseppe; Innocenzi, Anna; Covarello, Diego; Galvez, Beatriz G.; Perrotta, Cristiana; Monopoli, Angela; Sanvito, Francesca; Bottinelli, Roberto; Ongini, Ennio; Cossu, Giulio; Clementi, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a relatively common disease that affects skeletal muscle, leading to progressive paralysis and death. There is currently no resolutive therapy. We have developed a treatment in which we combined the effects of nitric oxide with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory activity by using HCT 1026, a nitric oxide-releasing derivative of flurbiprofen. Here, we report the results of long-term (1-year) oral treatment with HCT 1026 of two murine models for limb girdle and Duchenne muscular dystrophies (α-sarcoglycan-null and mdx mice). In both models, HCT 1026 significantly ameliorated the morphological, biochemical, and functional phenotype in the absence of secondary effects, efficiently slowing down disease progression. HCT 1026 acted by reducing inflammation, preventing muscle damage, and preserving the number and function of satellite cells. HCT 1026 was significantly more effective than the corticosteroid prednisolone, which was analyzed in parallel. As an additional beneficial effect, HCT 1026 enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of arterially delivered donor stem cells, by increasing 4-fold their ability to migrate and reconstitute muscle fibers. The therapeutic strategy we propose is not selective for a subset of mutations; it provides ground for immediate clinical experimentation with HCT 1026 alone, which is approved for use in humans; and it sets the stage for combined therapies with donor or autologous, genetically corrected stem cells. PMID:17182743

  2. Tailored Synthesis of Octopus-type Janus Nanoparticles for Synergistic Actively-Targeted and Chemo-Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingyu; Chen, Yinyin; Li, Zilu; Li, Lu; Saint-Cricq, Philippe; Li, Chunxia; Lin, Jun; Wang, Chungang; Su, Zhongmin; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2016-02-01

    A facile, reproducible, and scalable method was explored to construct uniform Au@poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) Janus nanoparticles (JNPs). The as-prepared JNPs were used as templates to preferentially grow a mesoporous silica (mSiO2 ) shell and Au branches separately modified with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-thiol (PEG) to improve their stability, and lactobionic acid (LA) for tumor-specific targeting. The obtained octopus-type PEG-Au-PAA/mSiO2 -LA Janus NPs (PEG-OJNP-LA) possess pH and NIR dual-responsive release properties. Moreover, DOX-loaded PEG-OJNP-LA, upon 808 nm NIR light irradiation, exhibit obviously higher toxicity at the cellular and animal levels compared with chemotherapy or photothermal therapy alone, indicating the PEG-OJNP-LA could be utilized as a multifunctional nanoplatform for in vitro and in vivo actively-targeted and chemo-photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:26732130

  3. [Myeloperoxidase activity in blood plasma as a criterion of therapy for patients with cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Kostevich, V A; Sokolov, A V; Buko, I V; Vasilyev, V B; Polonetsky, L Z; Panasenko, O M; Cherenkevich, S N

    2016-03-01

    A significant increase in the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity has been found in plasma of patients with stable angina and with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in comparison with the control group. MPO concentration was significantly increased in plasma of ACS patients. Reduced MPO activity in the treated ACS patients correlated with a favorable outcome of the disease. Generally, changes in plasma MPO concentration coincided with changes in lactoferrin concentration thus confirming the role of neutrophil degranulation in the increase of plasma concentrations of these proteins. The increase in MPO activity was obviously determined by modification of the MPO protein caused by reactive oxygen species and halogen in the molar ratio of 1 : 25 and 1 : 50. The decrease in plasma MPO activity may be associated with increased plasma concentrations of the physiological inhibitor of its activity, ceruloplasmin, and also with modification of the MPO protein with reactive oxygen species and halogen at their molar ratio of 1 : 100 and higher. Thus, MPO activity may be used for evaluation of effectiveness of the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27420626

  4. Intensive Atorvastatin Therapy Attenuates the Inflammatory Responses in Monocytes of Patients with Unstable Angina Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention via Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Liu, Changqing; Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Yanhui; Guo, Aihua; Shi, Huiwu; Liu, Xiaoxia; Cheng, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Periprocedural myocardial injury is a prognostically important complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, it still remains unclear whether and how intensive atorvastatin therapy attenuates the unfavorable inflammatory responses of monocytes associated with PCI. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of intensive atorvastatin therapy on inflammatory responses of monocytes in Chinese patients with unstable angina who received PCI in order to explore the potential anti-inflammatory mechanism. Ninety-six patients with unstable angina were randomly assigned to atorvastatin 80 mg (intensive) or atorvastatin 20 mg (conventional) treatment at a 1:1 ratio. Creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), cTnI, hs-CRP, and IL-6 were assessed, and circulating CD14(+) monocytes were simultaneously obtained using CD14 MicroBeads 2 h before and 24 h after PCI. Plasma levels of CK-MB, cTnI, hs-CRP, and IL-6 were higher in the conventional dose group versus those in the intensive dose group following PCI. Furthermore, intensive atorvastatin treatment markedly reduced the expressions and responses of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, and CCR2 of CD14(+) monocytes versus the conventional dose group and significantly increased the activated peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ in the CD14(+) monocytes post-PCI. Notably, the changes in responses of TLR2, TLR4, and CCR2 of CD14(+) monocytes between the two groups were all reversed by PPARγ antagonist and augmented by PPARγ agonist. In conclusion, a single high (80 mg) loading dose of atorvastatin reduced the inflammatory response in Chinese patients with unstable angina following PCI. The anti-inflammatory role of intensive atorvastatin was possibly due to attenuation of inflammatory response in monocytes via PPARγ activation. PMID:25604313

  5. Activation of Macrophages: Establishing a Role for Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Strategies Envisaging Antibacterial Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Susana; Grenha, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are an important health concern, as several pathogens have developed the ability to survive inside phagocytic cells (mostly macrophages), encountered at early infection stages, using these cells as trojan horses. In fact, in several cases macrophages have become a nutrient reservoir that helps pathogens to grow in number and spread. It is frequent that conventional therapeutic schedules include long periods of drug intake, at high doses, in some cases leading to severe side effects and clinical relapses due to prolonged intake, along with an increased risk for the development of antibiotic resistances. Therefore, there is a compelling need to develop new therapeutic strategies providing a targeted drug delivery to macrophages. These cells have unique surface receptors that might recognise preferentially several polysaccharide moieties present on the surface of infecting organisms, including in the bacterial cell wall. Benefiting from a similar composition regarding the referred moieties, polysaccharides might be good candidates to compose the matrix of drug carriers aimed at macrophage targeting, as they can use the same recognition pathways of the infecting organisms. This review describes the features and the role of macrophages in infectious conditions, while addressing their potential as therapeutic targets and unravelling the prominent role of polysaccharides as matrix materials of drug delivery systems developed for the therapy of infectious diseases. PMID:26290207

  6. Synergistic activity of combination therapy with PEGylated pemetrexed and gemcitabine for an effective cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Vandana, Mallaredy; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2015-08-01

    Combination therapy in cancer is now opted as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. However, effective delivery of drugs in combination at the tumor site is marred by low bioavailability and systemic toxicity of individual drugs. Polymer therapeutics is indeed an upcoming approach for the combinational drug delivery in favor of better cancer management. Hence, the objective of our investigation was to develop a dual drug PEGylated system that carries two chemotherapeutic drugs simultaneously for effective treatment of cancer. In this regard, we have synthesized Pem-PEG-Gem, wherein pemetrexed (Pem) and gemcitabine (Gem) are conjugated to a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymer for the effective treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Our results demonstrate enhanced bioavailability of the individual drugs in Pem-PEG-Gem in comparison with the drugs in their native form. The developed Pem-PEG-Gem showed enhanced cell death with respect to their native counterparts when treated singly or in combination against NSCLC cells. This might be attributed to better cellular internalization through the process of macropinocytosis and synergistic cytotoxic action of Pem-PEG-Gem in NSCLC cells. Hence, we propose the above dual drug based polymer therapeutic approach suitable for better clinical application in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:25968494

  7. Folate-vinca alkaloid conjugates for cancer therapy: a structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Leamon, Christopher P; Vlahov, Iontcho R; Reddy, Joseph A; Vetzel, Marilynn; Santhapuram, Hari Krishna R; You, Fei; Bloomfield, Alicia; Dorton, Ryan; Nelson, Melissa; Kleindl, Paul; Vaughn, Jeremy F; Westrick, Elaine

    2014-03-19

    Vintafolide is a potent folate-targeted vinca alkaloid small molecule drug conjugate (SMDC) that has shown promising results in multiple clinical oncology studies. Structurally, vintafolide consists of 4 essential modules: (1) folic acid, (2) a hydrophilic peptide spacer, (3) a disulfide-containing, self-immolative linker, and (4) the cytotoxic drug, desacetylvinblastine hydrazide (DAVLBH). Here, we report a structure-activity study evaluating the biological impact of (i) substituting DAVLBH within the vintafolide molecule with other vinca alkaloid analogues such as vincristine, vindesine, vinflunine, or vinorelbine; (ii) substituting the naturally (S)-configured Asp-Arg-Asp-Asp-Cys peptide with alternative hydrophilic spacers of varied composition; and (iii) varying the composition of the linker module. A series of vinca alkaloid-containing SMDCs were synthesized and purified by HPLC and LCMS. The SMDCs were screened in vitro against folate receptor (FR)-positive cells, and anti-tumor activity was tested against well-established subcutaneous FR-positive tumor xenografts. The cytotoxic and anti-tumor activity was directly compared to that produced by vintafolide. Among all the folate vinca alkaloid SMDCs tested, DAVLBH-containing SMDCs were active, while those constructed with vincristine, vindesine, or vinorelbine analogues failed to produce meaningful biological activity. Within the DAVLBH series, having a bioreleasable, self-immolative linker system was found to be critical for activity since multiple analogues constructed with thioether-based linkers all failed to produce meaningful activity both in vitro and in vivo. Substitutions of some or all of the natural amino acids within vintafolide's hydrophilic spacer module did not significantly change the in vitro or in vivo potency of the SMDCs. Vintafolide remains one of the most potent folate-vinca alkaloid SMDCs produced to date, and continued clinical development is warranted. PMID:24564229

  8. Modulation of monocyte activation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis by leukapheresis therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, G; Stuhlmüller, B; Hain, N; Kalden, J R; Pfizenmaier, K; Burmester, G R

    1993-01-01

    One of the hallmarks in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the intense activation of the monocyte-macrophage system. In the present investigation, the modulation of blood monocyte activation was studied with regard to the secretion of cytokines and inflammatory mediators, and to the expression of cytokine receptors. Patients with severe active RA underwent repeated leukapheresis procedures that removed all circulating monocytes. Highly enriched monocyte preparations from the first and third leukapheresis were studied. There were striking differences between the two monocyte populations. Cells obtained from the first leukapheresis constitutively released large amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), neopterin, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). In particular, IL-1 beta and neopterin production were further enhanced by stimulation with either interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or TNF-alpha without a synergistic effect. In contrast, cells derived from the third leukapheresis procedure showed a close to normal activation status with only low levels of cytokine and mediator production as well as a reduced response to cytokine stimulation. The number of the receptors for IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha was not changed between first and third leukapheresis. However, TNF-binding capacity was only detectable upon acid treatment of freshly isolated monocytes. A further upregulation was noted upon 24 h in vitro culture, suggesting occupation of membrane receptors and receptor down-regulation by endogenously produced TNF-alpha. Northern blot analysis of cytokine gene expression was in good correlation with the amount of mediators determined on the protein level. These data indicate that cells of the monocyte-macrophage system are already highly activated in the peripheral blood in RA patients with active disease. These cells can be efficiently removed by repeated leukapheresis and are replenished by monocytes that have, with respect to cytokine and mediator

  9. Cytochrome P450 2D6 Activity Predicts Discontinuation of Tamoxifen Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rae, James M.; Sikora, Matthew J.; Henry, N. Lynn; Li, Lang; Kim, Seongho; Oesterreich, Steffi; Skaar, Todd; Nguyen, Anne T.; Desta, Zeruesenay; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Flockhart, David A.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Stearns, Vered

    2009-01-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen is routinely used for treatment and prevention of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Studies of tamoxifen adherence suggest that over half of patients discontinue treatment before the recommended 5 years. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in CYP2D6, the enzyme responsible for tamoxifen activation, predict for tamoxifen discontinuation. Tamoxifen-treated women (n = 297) were genotyped for CYP2D6 variants and assigned a “score” based on predicted allele activities from 0 (no activity) to 2 (high activity). Correlation between CYP2D6 score and discontinuation rates at 4 months were tested. We observed a strong non-linear correlation between higher CYP2D6 score and increased rates of discontinuation (r2 = 0.935, p = 0.018). These data suggest that presence of active CYP2D6 alleles may predict for higher likelihood of tamoxifen discontinuation. Therefore, patients who may be most likely to benefit from tamoxifen may paradoxically be most likely to discontinue treatment prematurely. PMID:19421167

  10. Multifunctional activity of polyphenolic compounds associated with a potential for Alzheimer's disease therapy from Ecklonia cava.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byoung Wook; Lee, Hye Sook; Shin, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Bong Ho

    2015-04-01

    Five polyphenols were isolated and purified from a brown alga Ecklonia cava. These compounds showed diverse biological activities such as antioxidative, antiinflammatory, and enzyme inhibitory activities. This led us to investigate the potential of these compounds as Alzheimer's disease drugs. All of the compounds showed moderate acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity in a micromolar range (IC50 from 16.0 to 96.3 μM). For butyrylcholinesterase, a new target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, phlorofucofuroeckol-A (PFF-A), showed a particularly potent inhibitory activity (IC50 0.95 μM), which is over 100-fold greater than for acetylcholinesterase. These compounds inhibited glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta, which is related to the formation of hyperphosphorylated tau and generation Aβ. Bieckol and PFF-A inhibited amyloid precursor protein biosynthesis. PFF-A also showed very strong β-secretase inhibitory activity with IC50 of submicromole. These results render these compounds as interesting potential drug candidates for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25640212

  11. Stress-activated signaling responses leading to apoptosis following photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; He, Jin; Xue, Liang-yan; Separovic, Duska

    1998-05-01

    Photodynamic treatment with the phthalocyanine Pc 4, a mitochondrially localizing photosensitizer, is an efficient inducer of cell death by apoptosis, a cell suicide pathway that can be triggered by physiological stimuli as well as by various types of cellular damage. Upon exposure of the dye- loaded cells to red light, several stress signalling pathways are rapidly activated. In murine L5178Y-R lymphoblasts, caspase activation and other hallmarks of the final phase of apoptosis are observed within a few minutes post-PDT. In Chinese hamster CHO-K1 cells, the first signs of apoptosis are not observed for 1 - 2 hours. The possible involvement of three parallel mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways has been investigated. The extracellular- regulated kinases (ERK-1 and ERK-2), that are thought to promote cell growth, are not appreciably altered by PDT. However, PDT causes marked activation of the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) cascade in both cell types and of the p38/HOG-type kinase in CHO cells. Both of these latter pathways have been demonstrated to be associated with apoptosis. A specific inhibitor of the ERK pathway did not alter PDT-induced apoptosis; however, an inhibitor of the p38 pathway partially blocked PDT-induced apoptosis. Blockage of the SAPK pathway is being pursued by a genetic approach. It appears that the SAPK and p38 pathways may participate in signaling apoptosis in response to PDT with Pc 4.

  12. Evolution of Surface Motor Activation Zones in Hemiplegic Patients During 20 Sessions of FES Therapy with Multi-pad Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Malešević, Jovana; Štrbac, Matija; Isaković, Milica; Kojić, Vladimir; Konstantinović, Ljubica; Vidaković, Aleksandra; Dedijer, Suzana; Kostić, Miloš; Keller, Thierry

    2016-06-13

    The purpose of this study was to examine surface motor activation zones for wrist, fingers and thumb extension movements and their temporal change during 20 therapy sessions using advanced multi-pad functional electrical stimulation system. Results from four hemiplegic patients indicate that certain zones have higher probability of eliciting each of the target movements. However, mutual overlap and variations of the zones are present not just between the subjects, but also on the intrasubject level, reflected through these session to session transformations of the selected virtual electrodes. The obtained results could be used as a priori knowledge for semi-automated optimization algorithm and could shorten the time required for calibration of the multi-pad electrode. PMID:27478575

  13. Transformable Peptide Nanocarriers for Expeditious Drug Release and Effective Cancer Therapy via Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Tianjiao; Zhao, Ying; Ding, Yanping; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Ruifang; Lang, Jiayan; Qin, Hao; Liu, Xiaoman; Shi, Jian; Tao, Ning; Qin, Zhihai; Nie, Guangjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2016-01-18

    A novel cleavable amphiphilic peptide (CAP) was designed to be specifically responsive to fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α), a protease specifically expressed on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts. The CAP self-assembled into fiber-like nanostructures in solution, while the presence of hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drugs readily transformed the assemblies into drug-loaded spherical nanoparticles. The disassembly of these nanoparticles (CAP-NPs) upon FAP-α cleavage resulted in rapid and efficient release of the encapsulated drugs specifically at tumor sites. This Transformers-like drug delivery strategy could allow them to disrupt the stromal barrier and enhance local drug accumulation. Therapeutic results suggested that drug-loaded CAP-NPs hold promising tumor specificity and therapeutic efficacy for various solid tumor models, confirming its potential utility and versatility in antitumor therapy. PMID:26283097

  14. Evolution of Surface Motor Activation Zones in Hemiplegic Patients During 20 Sessions of FES Therapy with Multi-pad Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Malešević, Jovana; Štrbac, Matija; Isaković, Milica; Kojić, Vladimir; Konstantinović, Ljubica; Vidaković, Aleksandra; Dedijer, Suzana; Kostić, Miloš; Keller, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine surface motor activation zones for wrist, fingers and thumb extension movements and their temporal change during 20 therapy sessions using advanced multi-pad functional electrical stimulation system. Results from four hemiplegic patients indicate that certain zones have higher probability of eliciting each of the target movements. However, mutual overlap and variations of the zones are present not just between the subjects, but also on the intrasubject level, reflected through these session to session transformations of the selected virtual electrodes. The obtained results could be used as a priori knowledge for semi-automated optimization algorithm and could shorten the time required for calibration of the multi-pad electrode. PMID:27478575

  15. Clinical utility of the liposteroid therapy: Potential effects on the macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Wakiguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

      Liposteroid, a lipid emulsion containing dexamethasone, was developed in Japan. This drug is effective against rheumatoid arthritis, and has fewer side effects than dexamethasone. Moreover, at high dosage, liposteroid has been effectively used for the treatment of macrophage activation syndrome, because the lipid emulsions are easily taken up by phagocytes, and are retained in macrophages. Its anti-inflammatory effect was found to be 2-5 times higher than that of dexamethasone in arthritis and granuloma rat models. Japanese researchers have reported the clinical efficacy and utility of liposteroid in the treatment of diseases with macrophage activation. These include hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, graft-versus-host disease, and pulmonary hemosiderosis. Here, we describe the clinical effects of liposteroid on macrophage activation syndrome and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients. PMID:27320934

  16. [Physical activity and exercise training in the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Claudia; Lackinger, Christian; Weitgasser, Raimund; Haber, Paul; Niebauer, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Lifestyle in general (nutrition, exercise, smoking habits), besides the genetic predisposition, is known to be a strong predictor for the development of diabetes. Exercise in particular is not only useful in improving glycaemia by lowering insulin resistance and positively affect insulin secretion, but to reduce cardiovascular risk.To gain substantial health benefits a minimum of 150 min of moderate or vigorous intense aerobic physical activity and muscle strengthening activities per week are needed. The positive effect of training correlates directly with the amount of fitness gained and lasts only as long as the fitness level is sustained. The effect of exercise is independent of age and gender. It is reversible and reproducible.Based on the large evidence of exercise referral and prescription the Austrian Diabetes Associations aims to implement the position of a "physical activity adviser" in multi-professional diabetes care. PMID:27052239

  17. HyperCare: a prototype of an active database for compliance with essential hypertension therapy guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Caironi, P. V.; Portoni, L.; Combi, C.; Pinciroli, F.; Ceri, S.

    1997-01-01

    HyperCare is a prototype of a decision support system for essential hypertension care management. The medical knowledge implemented in HyperCare derives from the guidelines for the management of mild hypertension of the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension, and from the recommendations of the United States Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. HyperCare has been implemented using Chimera, an active database language developed at the Politecnico di Milano. HyperCare proves the possibility to use active database systems in developing a medical data-intensive application where inferential elaboration of moderate complexity is required. PMID:9357634

  18. Effect of chronic activity-based therapy on bone mineral density and bone turnover in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Harness, Eric T.; Witzke, Kara A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporosis is a severe complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Many exercise modalities are used to slow bone loss, yet their efficacy is equivocal. This study examined the effect of activity-based therapy (ABT) targeting the lower extremities on bone health in individuals with SCI. Methods Thirteen men and women with SCI (age and injury duration = 29.7 ± 7.8 and 1.9 ± 2.7 years) underwent 6 months of ABT. At baseline and after 3 and 6 months of training, blood samples were obtained to assess bone formation (serum procollagen type 1 N propeptide (PINP) and bone resorption (serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), and participants underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans to obtain total body and regional estimates of bone mineral density (BMD). Results Results demonstrated significant increases (p < 0.05) in spine BMD (+4.8 %; 1.27 ± 0.22–1.33 ± 0.24 g/cm2) and decreases (p < 0.01) in total hip BMD (−6.1 %; 0.98 ± 0.18–0.91 ± 0.16 g/cm2) from 0 to 6 months of training. BMD at the bilateral distal femur (−7.5 to −11.0 %) and proximal tibia (− 8.0 to −11.2 %) declined but was not different (p > 0.05) versus baseline. Neither PINP nor CTX was altered (p> 0.05) with training. Conclusions Chronic activity-based therapy did not reverse bone loss typically observed soon after injury, yet reductions in BMD were less than the expected magnitude of decline in lower extremity BMD in persons with recent SCI. PMID:24097172

  19. Adverse Drug Reaction Profile in Patients on Anti-tubercular Treatment Alone and in Combination with Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Shamiya; Khajuria, Vijay; Mahajan, Annil; Singh, Jang B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adverse drug reactions are very common among patients on anti-tubercular treatment alone or in combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy but comparatively studied very less. Hence, the current study was done to evalaute the adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile in patients receiving anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) and ATT with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Materials and Methods A one year prospective, cross-sectional observational study was undertaken using suspected adverse drug data collection form available under Pharmacovigilance Programme of India. Results Seventy four patients receiving ATT & 32 patients on both ATT & HAART presented with 74 and 45 adverse drug events (ADE) respectively. Males were more affected than females in both the groups. DOTS category- 1 regimen was mostly responsible for ADE in both the groups. Epigastric pain was the most common ADE in TB patients, while anaemia was the most common presentation in TB with HIV group. On comparison, ADE rate of TB with HIV co-morbid patients was more (55.8%) than TB patients (0.36%) (p < 0.001). Urban population presented more with ADR in TB/HIV group unlike rural population in TB group (p<0.0001). Whereas, illiterate were more involved in TB group unlike literate in TB/HIV group (p<0.05). Type A reactions were more common in TB group (p < 0.001). Addition of drugs for the management of ADR events was more in TB/HIV group (p < 0.001) as compared to TB group. Rest all the parameters were comparable. Conclusion The study underscores that concomitant HAART and ATT, result in more ADRs in comparison to ATT alone demanding collaboration & integration of National AIDS Control programme and PvPI to enhance drug safety in this field. PMID:26557538

  20. 808-nm laser therapy with a flat-top handpiece photobiomodulates mitochondria activities of Paramecium primaurelia (Protozoa).

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Photobiomodulation is proposed as a non-linear process, and only low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is assumed to stimulate exposed cells, whereas high powered laser and fluences can cause negative effects, exhausting the cell's energy reserve as a consequence of excessive photon-based stimulation. In our work, we investigated and compared the effects of 808-nm diode laser (CW) with a new flat-top handpiece. To this purpose, we tested the photobiomodulation effects of 1 and 3 J/cm(2) fluence, both generated by 100 mW or 1 W of laser power and of 64 J/cm(2) of fluence generated by 100 mW, 1 W, 1.5 W or 2 W, as expressed through oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of Paramecium. Data collected indicates the incremental consumption of oxygen through irradiation with 3 J/cm(2)-100 mW or 64 J/cm(2)-1 W correlates with an increase in Paramecium ATP synthesis. The Paramecium respiration was inhibited by fluences 64 J/cm(2)-100 mW or 64 J/cm(2)-2 W and was followed by a decrease in the endogenous ATP concentration. The 1 J/cm(2)-100 mW or 1 W and 3 J/cm(2)-1 W did not affect mitochondrial activity. The results show that the fluence of 64 J/cm(2)-1 W more than the 3 J/cm(2)-100 mW causes greater efficiency in Paramecium mitochondria respiratory chain activity. Our results suggest that thanks to flat-top handpiece we used, high fluences by high-powered laser have to be reconsidered as an effective and non-invasive therapy. Possible associated benefits of deeper tissue penetration would increase treatment effectiveness and reduced irradiation time. PMID:26984347

  1. Use of Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy vs. Anticoagulation Therapy to Treat Acute Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis: 1-year Follow-up Results of a Randomised, Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Volkan; Gulcu, Aytac; Akay, Emrah; Capar, Ahmet E.; Gencpinar, Tugra; Kucuk, Banu; Karabay, Ozalp; Goktay, A. Yigit

    2014-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) followed by standard anticoagulant therapy, with anticoagulation therapy alone, for the treatment of acute proximal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis.MethodsIn this randomised, prospective study, 42 patients with acute proximal iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis documented via Doppler ultrasound examination, were separated into an interventional treatment group (16 males, 5 females, average age 51 years) and a medical treatment group (13 males, 8 females, average age 59 years). In the interventional group, PAT with large-lumen 9-F diameter catheterisation was applied, after initiation of standard anticoagulant therapy. Balloon angioplasty (n 19) and stent implementation (n: 14) were used to treat patients with residual stenosis (>50 %) after PAT. Prophylactic IVC filters were placed in two patients. The thrombus clearance status of the venous system was evaluated by venography. In both the medical and interventional groups, venous patency rates and clinical symptom scores were evaluated at months 1, 3, and 12 after treatment.ResultsDeep venous systems became totally cleared of thrombi in 12 patients treated with PAT. The venous patency rates in month 12 were 57.1 and 4.76 % in the interventional and medical treatment groups, respectively. A statistically significant improvement was observed in clinical symptom scores of the interventional group (PAT) with or without stenting (4.23 ± 0.51 before treatment; 0.81 ± 0.92 at month 12) compared with the medical treatment group (4.00 ± 0.63 before treatment; 2.43 ± 0.67 at month 12). During follow-up, four patients in the medical treatment and one in the interventional group developed pulmonary embolisms.ConclusionsFor treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis, PAT with or without stenting is superior to anticoagulant therapy alone in terms of both ensuring venous patency and improving clinical

  2. Inflammatory activation following interruption of long-term cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Rubaj, Andrzej; Ruciński, Piotr; Oleszczak, Krzysztof; Trojnar, Michał K; Wójcik, Maciej; Wysokiński, Andrzej; Kutarski, Andrzej

    2013-09-01

    Previous observations suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) may exert an anti-inflammatory effect. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of temporary interruption of long-term CRT on plasma concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). The study group consisted of 54 patients (32 male and 22 female, mean age 64 years) with chronic heart failure (HF) treated with CRT. BNP, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and neopterin were measured three times: after 26-28 weeks of continuous CRT (CRT-on), 48 h after its cessation (CRT-off), and 48 h after switching the CRT-on again. CRT interruption resulted in a significant worsening of left ventricular systolic function: reduction of cardiac output (CO), dP/dt, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as deterioration of mitral regurgitation in the CRT responder group. A significant increase in serum concentrations of hs-CRP, neopterin, IL-6, and BNP was noted in this subpopulation. In CRT nonresponders, no significant changes were observed. In responders the changes in serum concentrations of hs-CRP, IL-6, neopterin, and BNP, following CRT interruption, significantly correlated with the respective changes in thoracic fluid content (TFC) and inversely correlated with LVEF changes. Even short (48 h) interruption of long-term CRT led to a significant increase of proinflammatory cytokines and BNP concentrations in responders. The changes in hs-CRP, IL-6, neopterin, and BNP concentrations correlated with the change in TFC-marker of pulmonary congestion and inversely correlated with the change in LVEF. PMID:23242167

  3. Exercise-Induced Release of Pharmacologically Active Substances and Their Relevance for Therapy of Hepatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) features constant parenchymal injury and repair together with an increasing hepatic impairment, finally leading to fibrosis and cirrhosis and a heightened risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Closely related to the rise in obesity, the worldwide prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common form of CLD, has reached an epidemic dimension and is estimated to afflict up to 46% of the general population, including more than one out of three U.S. citizens. Up to now there is no effective drug treatment available, which is why recommendations encompass both exercise programs and changes in dietary habits. Exercise is well-known for unleashing potent anti-inflammatory effects, which can principally counteract liver inflammation and chronic low-grade inflammation. This review article summarizes the underlying mechanisms responsible for the exercise-mediated anti-inflammatory effects, illustrates the application in animal models as well as in humans, and highlights the therapeutic value when possible. Based on the available results there is no doubt that exercise can even be beneficial in an advanced stage of liver disease and it is the goal of this review article to provide evidence for the therapeutic impact on fibrosis, cirrhosis, and HCC and to assess whether exercise might be of value as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of CLD. In principle, all exercise programs carried out in these high-risk patients should be guided and observed by qualified healthcare professionals to guarantee the patients’ safety. Nevertheless, it is also necessary to additionally determine the optimal amount and intensity of exercise to maximize its value, which is why further studies are essential. PMID:27625607

  4. Exercise-Induced Release of Pharmacologically Active Substances and Their Relevance for Therapy of Hepatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) features constant parenchymal injury and repair together with an increasing hepatic impairment, finally leading to fibrosis and cirrhosis and a heightened risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Closely related to the rise in obesity, the worldwide prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common form of CLD, has reached an epidemic dimension and is estimated to afflict up to 46% of the general population, including more than one out of three U.S. citizens. Up to now there is no effective drug treatment available, which is why recommendations encompass both exercise programs and changes in dietary habits. Exercise is well-known for unleashing potent anti-inflammatory effects, which can principally counteract liver inflammation and chronic low-grade inflammation. This review article summarizes the underlying mechanisms responsible for the exercise-mediated anti-inflammatory effects, illustrates the application in animal models as well as in humans, and highlights the therapeutic value when possible. Based on the available results there is no doubt that exercise can even be beneficial in an advanced stage of liver disease and it is the goal of this review article to provide evidence for the therapeutic impact on fibrosis, cirrhosis, and HCC and to assess whether exercise might be of value as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of CLD. In principle, all exercise programs carried out in these high-risk patients should be guided and observed by qualified healthcare professionals to guarantee the patients' safety. Nevertheless, it is also necessary to additionally determine the optimal amount and intensity of exercise to maximize its value, which is why further studies are essential. PMID:27625607

  5. Association between Therapy Outcome and Right-Hemispheric Activation in Chronic Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Maria; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Straube, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The role of the right hemisphere for language processing and successful therapeutic interventions in aphasic patients is a matter of debate. This study explored brain activation in right-hemispheric areas and left-hemispheric perilesional areas in response to language tasks in chronic non-fluent aphasic patients before and after constraint-induced…

  6. The production of VEGF involving MAP kinase activation by low level laser therapy in human granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya-Kai, Yufuko; Kai, Kentaro; Miyakawa, Isao; Ohshiro, Toshio; Narahara, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The function of granulosa cells is regulated by various hormones and growth factors. Our aim is to clarify the regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced by low level laser therapy (LLLT) in human granulosa cells. Methods: A human granulosa cell line, KGN cells, were cultured and incubated after LLLT (60mW, GaAlAs 830nm). The levels of VEGF in the culture media were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The activation of MAP kinase in KGN cells was detected by western blot analysis. Results: VEGF production was significantly increased by LLLT in a time-dependent manner. MAP kinase activity was increased by LLLT. In addition it was enhanced by LLLT and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulation. Conclusions: The results suggested that VEGF is induced by LLLT through mechanisms involving MAPK. The increase in VEGF may contribute to neovascularization, which in turn would promote various ovulation phenomena as well as follicular growth. PMID:24511196

  7. Targeting mechanisms at sites of complement activation for imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Holers, V Michael

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in many acute injury states as well as chronic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Localized complement activation and alternative pathway-mediated amplification on diverse target surfaces promote local recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells and elaboration of other mediators. Despite a general understanding of the architecture of the system, though, many of the mechanisms that underlie site-specific complement activation and amplification in vivo are incompletely understood. In addition, there is no capability yet to measure the level of local tissue site-specific complement activation in patients without performing biopsies to detect products using immunohistochemical techniques. Herein is reviewed emerging evidence obtained through clinical research studies of human rheumatoid arthritis along with translational studies of its disease models which demonstrate that several parallel mechanisms are involved in site-specific amplification of activation of the complement system in vivo. Among these processes are de-regulation of the alternative pathway, effector pathway-catalyzed amplification of proximal complement activation, recognition of injury-associated ligands by components of the lectin pathway, and engagement of pathogenic natural antibodies that recognize a limited set of injury-associated neoepitopes. Studies suggest that each of these inter-related processes can play key roles in amplification of complement-dependent injury on self-tissues in vivo. These findings, in addition to development of an imaging strategy described herein designed to quantitatively measure local complement C3 fixation, have relevance to therapeutic and diagnostic strategies targeting the complement system. PMID:25979851

  8. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should be able to resume your normal activities. You will likely see your doctor every 3 to 4 months for a follow-up exam.

  9. Relationships between Inflammation, Immune Activation and Bone Health among HIV-Infected Adults on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Kristine M.; O’Riordan, MaryAnn; Labbato, Danielle; McComsey, Grace A.

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the association between bone health and inflammation, T-cell activation and monocyte activation among HIV-infected persons on stable antiretroviral therapy. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of all subjects enrolling in the Stopping Atherosclerosis and Treating Unhealthy bone with RosuvastatiN in HIV (SATURN-HIV) trial with available skeletal assessments by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, inflammation, and immune activation markers. Analyses used Wilcoxon rank sum tests, Spearman correlation coefficients and linear regression. Results 142 subjects were included: 78% male, 69% African-American, median age 46.3 years, CD4+ count 604 cells/μL, and 77% with undetectable HIV-1 RNA. 23% had osteopenia/osteoporosis at the hip; 21% at the lumbar spine. sVCAM-1 was correlated with hip (r=−0.22) and spine (r=−0.23 ) BMD, and bone turnover markers (r=0.20–0.33; all p <0.05). No significant correlations were observed between BMD and T-cell activation (%CD38HLA-DR on CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells), monocyte activation (CD14CD16, sCD14, sCD163), or inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNF-α, hs-CRP, d-dimer, RANKL, OPG, sTNF-RI and II). In regression models including traditional bone risk factors, hip BMD was associated with age, race, and body mass index; spine BMD was associated with race, family history of hip fracture, trunk fat, tenofovir, and HIV RNA; bone resorption (CTX) was associated with sICAM-1 and trunk fat; bone formation (P1NP) was associated with sVCAM-1, trunk and limb fat (p≤0.05). Conclusions Future studies should evaluate the longitudinal association of the adhesion molecules to further elucidate potential contributory mechanisms of bone loss among HIV-infected persons on stable ART. PMID:24525466

  10. Gene therapy by proteasome activator, PA28γ, improves motor coordination and proteasome function in Huntington's disease YAC128 mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, J; Kim, W; Jang, J; Isacson, O; Seo, H

    2016-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is neurologically characterized by involuntary movements, associated with degeneration of the medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) and ubiquitin-positive neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs). It has been reported that the proteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) are generally inhibited in HD patient's brain. We previously discovered that a proteasome activator (PA), PA28γ enhances proteasome activities and cell survival in in vitro HD model. In this study, we aimed to find whether PA28γ gene transfer improves the proteasome activities and pathological symptoms in in vivo HD model. We stereotaxically injected lenti-PA28γ virus into the striatum of mutant (MT) YAC128 HD mice and littermate (LM) controls at 14-18months of age, and validated their behavioral and biochemical changes at 12weeks after the injection. YAC128 mice showed a significant increase in their peptidyl-glutamyl preferring hydrolytic (PGPH) proteasome activity and the mRNA or protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pro-BDNF after lenti-PA28γ injection. The number of ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies was reduced in the striatum of YAC128 mice after lenti-PA28γ injection. YAC128 mice showed significant improvement of latency to fall on the rota-rod test after lenti-PA28γ injection. These data demonstrate that the gene therapy with PA, PA28γ can improve UPS function as well as behavioral abnormalities in HD model mice. PMID:26944602

  11. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  12. Activation of the Met kinase confers acquired drug resistance in FGFR-targeted lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-M; Kim, H; Yun, M R; Kang, H N; Pyo, K-H; Park, H J; Lee, J M; Choi, H M; Ellinghaus, P; Ocker, M; Paik, S; Kim, H R; Cho, B C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation/expression is a common feature in lung cancer (LC). In this study, we evaluated the antitumor activity of and the mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to two potent selective FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547 and BAY116387, in LC cell lines. The antitumor activity of AZD4547 and BAY1163877 was screened in 24 LC cell lines, including 5 with FGFR1 amplification. Two cell lines containing FGFR1 amplifications, H1581 and DMS114, were sensitive to FGFR inhibitors (IC50<250 nm). Clones of FGFR1-amplified H1581 cells resistant to AZD4547 or BAY116387 (H1581AR and H1581BR cells, respectively) were established. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) array and immunoblotting analyses showed strong overexpression and activation of Met in H1581AR/BR cells, compared with that in the parental cells. Gene set enrichment analysis against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database showed that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways were significantly enriched in H1581AR/BR cells, with Met contributing significantly to the core enrichment. Genomic DNA quantitative PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses showed MET amplification in H1581AR, but not in H1581BR, cells. Met amplification drives acquired resistance to AZD4547 in H1581AR cells by activating ErbB3. Combination treatment with FGFR inhibitors and an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)/Met inhibitor, crizotinib, or Met-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in both H1581AR and H1581BR cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of Met in H1581 cells conferred resistance to AZD4547 and BAY1163877. Acquired resistance to FGFR inhibitors not only altered cellular morphology, but also promoted migration and invasion of resistant clones, in part by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Taken together, our data suggest that Met activation is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR signaling. Concurrent

  13. Alternative (Complementary) Therapies for HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... For example, some people combine yoga with meditation. Physical (body) therapies Physical, or body, therapies include such activities as ... with specific health problems. Complementary therapies can include physical therapies (such as yoga and acupuncture), relaxation techniques (such ...

  14. Serum Paraoxonase Activity and Malondialdehyde Serum Concentrations Remain Unaffected in Response to Hydroxyurea Therapy in β-Thalassemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Zohaib, Muhammad; Ansari, Saqib H; Hashim, Zehra; Shamsi, Tahir S; Zarina, Shamshad

    2016-07-01

    β-Thalassemia is the most common hereditary disorder characterized by reduced production of β-globin chains of hemoglobin A (HbA). In recent years, hydroxyurea (HU) has shown promising therapeutic benefits in patients with β-thalassemia by fetal hemoglobin augmentation. We have analyzed effects of hydroxyurea treatment on oxidative stress in β-thalassemia patients by assessing activities of paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase along with malondialdehyde (MDA) and total reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations. Blood samples from 159 individuals including 56 HU-treated and 58 untreated β-thalassemia patients and 45 healthy controls were analyzed. PON activity was found to be highest in healthy individuals (177.76 ± 4.44 U/mL) as compared to treated (52.67 ± 3.65 U/mL) and untreated (55.11 ± 3.26 U/mL) patients. A similar trend was observed in the case of arylesterase activity in normal, β-thalassemia-treated, and untreated (210.0 ± 11.25 U/mL, 163.03 ± 9.04 U/mL, 139.77 ± 10.10 U/mL) subjects. Serum MDA concentrations (2.59 ± 0.09 nmol/mL, 2.45 ± 0.08 nmol/mL, and 1.15 ± 0.05 nmol/mL) and total ROS concentrations (3.73 ± 0.20 nmol/mL, 3.54 ± 0.23 nmol/mL, and 2.45 ± 0.14 nmol/mL) were significantly elevated in both groups (untreated and treated) as compared to healthy individuals (P < .01). Oxidative stress was found to be markedly elevated in β-thalassemia patients as compared to healthy controls. Insignificant differences were, however, observed in mean concentrations of PON1 paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, serum MDA concentration and total ROS concentrations between HU-treated and untreated patients. We propose that HU therapy alone seems to be ineffective in managing oxidative stress and is likely to offer a better clinical outcome when supplemented with efficient iron chelation therapy and antioxidants. PMID:26608512

  15. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-01-01

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin®) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed. PMID:27019795

  16. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-03-26

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin(®)) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed. PMID:27019795

  17. Validation of computational methods for treatment planning of fast-neutron therapy using activation foil techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.; Hartwell, J.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Venhuizen, J.R.; Risler, R.

    1997-12-01

    A closed-form direct method for unfolding neutron spectra from foil activation data is presented. The method is applied to measurements of the free-field neutron spectrum produced by the proton-cyclotron-based fast-neutron radiotherapy facility at the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine. The results compare favorably with theoretical expectations based on an a-priori calculational model of the target and neutron beamline configuration of the UW facility.

  18. Light-Activated Hypoxia-Responsive Nanocarriers for Enhanced Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chenggen; Yu, Jicheng; Chen, Yulei; Hu, Quanyin; Xiao, Xuanzhong; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Feng, Peijian; Shen, Qun-Dong; Gu, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    A light-activated hypoxia-responsive conjugated polymer-based nanocarrier is developed for efficiently producing singlet oxygen ((1) O2 ) and inducing hypoxia to promote release of its cargoes in tumor cells, leading to enhanced antitumor efficacy. This dual-responsive nanocarrier provides an innovative design guideline for enhancing traditional photodynamic therapeutic efficacy integrated with a controlled drug-release modality. PMID:26948067

  19. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  20. Antitumoral Activity of Snake Venom Proteins: New Trends in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Leonardo A.; Sobrinho, Juliana C.; Zaqueo, Kayena D.; de Moura, Andrea A.; Grabner, Amy N.; Mazzi, Maurício V.; Marcussi, Silvana; Fernandes, Carla F. C.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Carvalho, Bruna M. A.; da Silva, Saulo L.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.; Soares, Andreimar M.

    2014-01-01

    For more than half a century, cytotoxic agents have been investigated as a possible treatment for cancer. Research on animal venoms has revealed their high toxicity on tissues and cell cultures, both normal and tumoral. Snake venoms show the highest cytotoxic potential, since ophidian accidents cause a large amount of tissue damage, suggesting a promising utilization of these venoms or their components as antitumoral agents. Over the last few years, we have studied the effects of snake venoms and their isolated enzymes on tumor cell cultures. Some in vivo assays showed antineoplastic activity against induced tumors in mice. In human beings, both the crude venom and isolated enzymes revealed antitumor activities in preliminary assays, with measurable clinical responses in the advanced treatment phase. These enzymes include metalloproteases (MP), disintegrins, L-amino acid oxidases (LAAOs), C-type lectins, and phospholipases A2 (PLA2s). Their mechanisms of action include direct toxic action (PLA2s), free radical generation (LAAOs), apoptosis induction (PLA2s, MP, and LAAOs), and antiangiogenesis (disintegrins and lectins). Higher cytotoxic and cytostatic activities upon tumor cells than normal cells suggest the possibility for clinical applications. Further studies should be conducted to ensure the efficacy and safety of different snake venom compounds for cancer drug development. PMID:24683541

  1. The effect of massage therapy on autonomic activity in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ling; Collet, Jean-Paul; Yuskiv, Nataliya; Skippen, Peter; Brant, Rollin; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Our main objective was to describe the effect of foot and hand (F&H) massage on the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity in children hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU); the secondary objectives were to assess the relationship between ANS function and the clinical severity and to explore the effects of repeated massage sessions on the ANS. Methods. Design was a descriptive experimental study. Intervention was single or six session(s) of F&H massage. ANS function was assessed through the frequency-domain analysis of heart rate variability. Main metrics included high and low frequency power (HF and LF), HF + LF, and LF/HF ratio. Results. Eighteen children participated in the study. A strong Spearman's correlation (ρ = -0.77) was observed between HF + LF and clinical severity. During massage, the parasympathetic activity (measured by HF) increased significantly from baseline (P = 0.04) with a mean percentage increase of 75% (95% CI: 20%∼130%). LF increased by 56% (95% CI: 20%∼92%) (P = 0.026). Repeated sessions were associated with a persistent effect on HF and LF which peaked at the second session and remained stable thereafter. Conclusions. HF + LF is positively correlated with clinical severity. F&H massage can improve the ANS activity and the effect persists when repeated sessions are offered. PMID:25587344

  2. Why do patients with stroke not receive the recommended amount of active therapy (ReAcT)? Study protocol for a multisite case study investigation

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, David J; Tyson, Sarah; Rodgers, Helen; Drummond, Avril; Palmer, Rebecca; Prescott, Matthew; Tyrrell, Pippa; Burton, Louisa; Grenfell, Katie; Brkic, Lianne; Forster, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Increased frequency and intensity of inpatient therapy contributes to improved outcomes for stroke survivors. Differences exist in the amount of therapy provided internationally. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland it is recommended that a minimum of 45 min of each active therapy should be provided at least 5 days a week provided the therapy is appropriate and that the patient can tolerate this. Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (2014) data demonstrate this standard is not being achieved for most patients. No research been undertaken to explore how therapists in England manage their practice to meet time-specific therapy recommendations. The ReAcT study aims to develop an in-depth understanding of stroke therapy provision, including how the guideline of 45 min a day of each relevant therapy, is interpreted and implemented by therapists, and how it is experienced by stroke-survivors and their families. Methods and analysis A multisite ethnographic case study design in a minimum of six stroke units will include modified process mapping, observations of service organisation, therapy delivery and documentary analysis. Semistructured interviews with therapists and service managers (n=90), and with patients and informal carers (n=60 pairs) will be conducted. Data will be analysed using the Framework approach. Ethics and dissemination The study received a favourable ethical opinion via the National Research Ethics Service (reference number: 14/NW/0266). Participants will provide written informed consent or, where stroke-survivors lack capacity, a consultee declaration will be sought. ReAcT is designed to generate insights into the organisational, professional, social, practical and patient-related factors acting as facilitators or barriers to providing the recommended amount of therapy. Provisional recommendations will be debated in consensus meetings with stakeholders who have not participated in ReAcT case studies or interviews. Final

  3. Deciphering the Role of Aspartate and Prephenate Aminotransferase Activities in Plastid Nitrogen Metabolism1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Fernando; El-Azaz, Jorge; Ávila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts and plastids of nonphotosynthetic plant cells contain two aspartate (Asp) aminotransferases: a eukaryotic type (Asp5) and a prokaryotic-type bifunctional enzyme displaying Asp and prephenate aminotransferase activities (PAT). We have identified the entire Asp aminotransferase gene family in Nicotiana benthamiana and isolated and cloned the genes encoding the isoenzymes with plastidic localization: NbAsp5 and NbPAT. Using a virus-induced gene silencing approach, we obtained N. benthamiana plants silenced for NbAsp5 and/or NbPAT. Phenotypic and metabolic analyses were conducted in silenced plants to investigate the specific roles of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of essential amino acids within the plastid. The NbAsp5 silenced plants had no changes in phenotype, exhibiting similar levels of free Asp and glutamate as control plants, but contained diminished levels of asparagine and much higher levels of lysine. In contrast, the suppression of NbPAT led to a severe reduction in growth and strong chlorosis symptoms. NbPAT silenced plants exhibited extremely reduced levels of asparagine and were greatly affected in their phenylalanine metabolism and lignin deposition. Furthermore, NbPAT suppression triggered a transcriptional reprogramming in plastid nitrogen metabolism. Taken together, our results indicate that NbPAT has an overlapping role with NbAsp5 in the biosynthesis of Asp and a key role in the production of phenylalanine for the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The analysis of NbAsp5/NbPAT cosilenced plants highlights the central role of both plastidic aminotransferases in nitrogen metabolism; however, only NbPAT is essential for plant growth and development. PMID:24296073

  4. Institutionalizing McCarthyism: An Exploration of Senator Pat McCarran's Anti-Communist Activities in Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarbrough, Charles G., Jr.

    Contending that Senator Patrick McCarran of Nevada was the real force behind the communist witch hunts of the lage 1940s and early 1950s, this essay explores McCarran's legislative legacy. The first section examines McCarran's background and the legislative bodies over which he held sway. The second section delineates his legislative "Grand…

  5. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors: March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFalpha therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn s complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk/benefit assessment. PMID:18344925

  6. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors - March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFα therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFα therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFα therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn's complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions, ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-α therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk / benefit assessment. Rev Port Pneumol 2007; XIV (2): 271-283. PMID:25966834

  7. N-Chlorotaurine Exhibits Fungicidal Activity against Therapy-Refractory Scedosporium Species and Lomentospora prolificans

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Michaela; Binder, Ulrike; Reindl, Martin; Gönül, Beyhan; Fankhauser, Hannes; Mair, Christian

    2015-01-01

    N-Chlorotaurine (NCT), a well-tolerated endogenous long-lived oxidant that can be applied topically as an antiseptic, was tested on its fungicidal activity against Scedosporium and Lomentospora, opportunistic fungi that cause severe infections with limited treatment options, mainly in immunocompromised patients. In quantitative killing assays, both hyphae and conidia of Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium boydii, and Lomentospora prolificans (formerly Scedosporium prolificans) were killed by 55 mM (1.0%) NCT at pH 7.1 and 37°C, with a 1- to 4-log10 reduction in CFU after 4 h and a 4- to >6-log10 reduction after 24 h. The addition of ammonium chloride to NCT markedly increased this activity. LIVE/DEAD staining of conidia treated with 1.0% NCT for 0.5 to 3 h increased the permeability of the cell wall and membrane. Preincubation of the test fungi in 1.0% NCT for 10 to 60 min delayed the time to germination of conidia by 2 h to >12 h and reduced their germination rate by 10.0 to 100.0%. Larvae of Galleria mellonella infected with 1.0 × 107 conidia of S. apiospermum and S. boydii died at a rate of 90.0 to 100% after 8 to 12 days. The mortality rate was reduced to 20 to 50.0% if conidia were preincubated in 1.0% NCT for 0.5 h or if heat-inactivated conidia were used. Our study demonstrates the fungicidal activity of NCT against different Scedosporium and Lomentospora species. A postantifungal effect connected with a loss of virulence occurs after sublethal incubation times. The augmenting effect of ammonium chloride can be explained by the formation of monochloramine. PMID:26239996

  8. Activation of inflammasome by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium in bacteria-mediated cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Phan, Thuy Xuan; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Duong, Mai Thi-Quynh; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2015-11-01

    Escherichia coli and attenuated Salmonella both naturally accumulate in a tumor mass, yet have distinct therapeutic efficacy: the E. coli K-12 strain (MG1655) cannot induce as significant a tumor suppression as attenuated Salmonella typhimurium, despite similar levels of accumulation in the tumor. To elucidate the mechanism of the robust antitumor effect of S. typhimurium, the cytokine profiles elicited by bacterial colonization in tumors were analyzed. C57BL/6 mice bearing MC38 tumors were injected with Salmonella or MG1655 in the tail vein. Tumors were collected 3 days post-infection and homogenized. Inflammasome-related signals were measured by real-time PCR, ELISA and western blot analysis. Only attenuated Salmonella triggered significant levels of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in the tumor, whereas tumor growth was significantly suppressed. In addition, transcript levels of the core molecules of inflammasome signaling, IPAF, NLRP3 and P2X7, were significantly elevated only in Salmonella-treated tumors. Upon direct interaction between Salmonella and BMDM, BMDM expressed inflammasome-related proteins such as NLRP3, IPAF and caspase-1 p10, and secreted a significant amount of IL-1β in supernatants. Coincubation assays with BMDM and Salmonella-treated MC38 cells (damaged cancer cells) revealed secretion of IL-1β only when TLR4 and inflammasome were activated by both LPS and damaged cancer cells. ATP released from damaged cancer cells was also identified as a mechanism of NLRP3 activation. In conclusion, Salmonella activate the inflammasome pathway using damage signals released from cancer cells and through direct interaction with macrophages. PMID:26500022

  9. N-Chlorotaurine Exhibits Fungicidal Activity against Therapy-Refractory Scedosporium Species and Lomentospora prolificans.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Michaela; Binder, Ulrike; Reindl, Martin; Gönül, Beyhan; Fankhauser, Hannes; Mair, Christian; Nagl, Markus

    2015-10-01

    N-Chlorotaurine (NCT), a well-tolerated endogenous long-lived oxidant that can be applied topically as an antiseptic, was tested on its fungicidal activity against Scedosporium and Lomentospora, opportunistic fungi that cause severe infections with limited treatment options, mainly in immunocompromised patients. In quantitative killing assays, both hyphae and conidia of Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium boydii, and Lomentospora prolificans (formerly Scedosporium prolificans) were killed by 55 mM (1.0%) NCT at pH 7.1 and 37°C, with a 1- to 4-log10 reduction in CFU after 4 h and a 4- to >6-log10 reduction after 24 h. The addition of ammonium chloride to NCT markedly increased this activity. LIVE/DEAD staining of conidia treated with 1.0% NCT for 0.5 to 3 h increased the permeability of the cell wall and membrane. Preincubation of the test fungi in 1.0% NCT for 10 to 60 min delayed the time to germination of conidia by 2 h to >12 h and reduced their germination rate by 10.0 to 100.0%. Larvae of Galleria mellonella infected with 1.0 × 10(7) conidia of S. apiospermum and S. boydii died at a rate of 90.0 to 100% after 8 to 12 days. The mortality rate was reduced to 20 to 50.0% if conidia were preincubated in 1.0% NCT for 0.5 h or if heat-inactivated conidia were used. Our study demonstrates the fungicidal activity of NCT against different Scedosporium and Lomentospora species. A postantifungal effect connected with a loss of virulence occurs after sublethal incubation times. The augmenting effect of ammonium chloride can be explained by the formation of monochloramine. PMID:26239996

  10. Lightening up Light Therapy: Activation of Retrograde Signaling Pathway by Photobiomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Photobiomodulation utilizes monochromatic (or quasimonochromatic) light in the electromagnetic region of 600∼1000 nm for the treatment of soft tissues in a nondestructive and nonthermal mode. It is conceivable that photobiomodulation is based upon the ability of the light to alter cell metabolism as it is absorbed by general hemoproteins and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in particular. Recently it has been suggested radiation of visible and infrared (IR) activates retrograde signaling pathway from mitochondria to nucleus. In this review, the role of COX in the photobiomodulation will be discussed. Further a possible role of water as a photoreceptor will be suggested. PMID:25489415

  11. Colloidal Oatmeal (Avena Sativa) Improves Skin Barrier Through Multi-Therapy Activity.

    PubMed

    Ilnytska, Olha; Kaur, Simarna; Chon, Suhyoun; Reynertson, Kurt A; Nebus, Judith; Garay, Michelle; Mahmood, Khalid; Southall, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Oats (Avena sativa) are a centuries-old topical treatment for a variety of skin barrier conditions, including dry skin, skin rashes, and eczema; however, few studies have investigated the actual mechanism of action for the skin barrier strengthening activity of colloidal oatmeal. Four extracts of colloidal oatmeal were prepared with various solvents and tested in vitro for skin barrier related gene expression and activity. Extracts of colloidal oatmeal were found to induce the expression of genes related to epidermal differentiation, tight junctions and lipid regulation in skin, and provide pH-buffering capacity. Colloidal oatmeal boosted the expression of multiple target genes related to skin barrier, and resulted in recovery of barrier damage in an in vitro model of atopic dermatitis. In addition, an investigator-blinded study was performed with 50 healthy female subjects who exhibited bilateral moderate to severe dry skin on their lower legs. Subjects were treated with a colloidal oatmeal skin protectant lotion. Clinically, the colloidal oatmeal lotion showed significant clinical improvements in skin dryness, moisturization, and barrier. Taken together, these results demonstrate that colloidal oatmeal can provide clinically effective benefits for dry and compromised skin by strengthening skin barrier.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(6):684-690. PMID:27272074

  12. Efficacy of RetroNectin-activated cytokine-induced killer cell therapy in the treatment of advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEI; WANG, YAOMEI; KELLNER, DANIEL B.; ZHAO, LINGDI; XU, LINPING; GAO, QUANLI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of RetroNectin-activated cytokine-induced killer cell (R-CIK) therapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients as compared with conventional chemotherapy, a comparison that has not yet been thoroughly studied. From January 2010 to October 2013, 74 patients with an initial diagnosis of advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma were enrolled in the study. Patients were assigned to one of two treatment arms: patients in arm 1 (n=37) received R-CIK treatment as the first line therapy, whereas those in arm 2 (n=37) received chemotherapy as the first line treatment. The primary end point measured in this study was median overall survival (mOS). Median progression-free survival time (mPFS) and 1- and 2-year survival rates were recorded as secondary end points. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed on all mOS and mPFS data, and treatment hazard ratios were established using the Cox proportional hazards model. The 1-year survival rate in treatment arm 1 was 42.47% vs. 24.89% in arm 2 (95% CI, 24.91–59.01% vs. 12.10–40.02%, P=0.066); the 2-year survival rates were 21.24 and 5.53% (95% CI, 4.60–45.86 vs. 0.46–21.06%, P=0.106) in arms 1 and 2, respectively; the mPFS in arm 1 was 4.37 vs. 3.90 (x2=0.182, P=0.670) in arm 2; and the mOS in arm 1 was 14.03 months vs. 9.46 months(x2=4.406, P=0.036) in arm 2. Calculations of univariate analyses of arm 1, R-CIK cycles ≥6, KPS >70, AFP ≤400 ng/ml, and findings of no vascular invasion and no extra-hepatic metastasis were potential predictive factors (P<0.05). Calculations from multivariate analyses similarly identified these factors as potentially having predictive value (P<0.05). The main adverse effects of R-CIK therapy included fever and headache pain. R-CIK treatment may prolong mOS in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients compared with conventional chemotherapy. Patients who underwent ≥6 cycles of R-CIK, had KPS scores >70, AFP ≤400 ng/ml, displayed no evidence of

  13. Targeting CD9 produces stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis: A novel antiangiogenic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamisasanuki, Taro; Tokushige, Saori; Terasaki, Hiroto; Khai, Ngin Cin; Wang, Yuqing; Sakamoto, Taiji; Kosai, Ken-ichiro

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} CD9 plays stimulus-independent roles in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression is effective in an angiogenic disease model. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression predominantly affects activated endothelial cells. {yields} CD9 is involved in endothelial cell proliferation, but not survival. {yields} CD9 is part of angiogenic machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. -- Abstract: The precise roles of tetraspanin CD9 are unclear. Here we show that CD9 plays a stimulus-independent role in angiogenesis and that inhibiting CD9 expression or function is a potential antiangiogenic therapy. Knocking down CD9 expression significantly inhibited in vitro endothelial cell migration and invasion induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Injecting CD9-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA-CD9) markedly inhibited HGF- or VEGF-induced subconjunctival angiogenesis in vivo. Both results revealed potent and stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects of targeting CD9. Furthermore, intravitreous injections of siRNA-CD9 or anti-CD9 antibodies were therapeutically effective for laser-induced retinal and choroidal neovascularization in mice, a representative ocular angiogenic disease model. In terms of the mechanism, growth factor receptor and downstream signaling activation were not affected, whereas abnormal localization of integrins and membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed during angiogenesis, by knocking down CD9 expression. Notably, knocking down CD9 expression did not induce death and mildly inhibited proliferation of quiescent endothelial cells under conditions without an angiogenic stimulus. Thus, CD9 does not directly affect growth factor-induced signal transduction, which is required in angiogenesis and normal vasculature, but is part of the angiogenesis machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In conclusion, targeting CD9 produced stimulus

  14. Enhanced Plasmonic Resonance Energy Transfer in Mesoporous Silica-Encased Gold Nanorod for Two-Photon-Activated Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Tzu; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chung, Ming-Fang; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Huang, Ching-Mao; Chu, Chia-Hui; Chou, Pi-Tai; Souris, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The unique optical properties of gold nanorods (GNRs) have recently drawn considerable interest from those working in in vivo biomolecular sensing and bioimaging. Especially appealing in these applications is the plasmon-enhanced photoluminescence of GNRs induced by two-photon excitation at infrared wavelengths, owing to the significant penetration depth of infrared light in tissue. Unfortunately, many studies have also shown that often the intensity of pulsed coherent irradiation of GNRs needed results in irreversible deformation of GNRs, greatly reducing their two-photon luminescence (TPL) emission intensity. In this work we report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of mesoporous silica-encased gold nanorods (MS-GNRs) that incorporate photosensitizers (PSs) for two-photon-activated photodynamic therapy (TPA-PDT). The PSs, doped into the nano-channels of the mesoporous silica shell, can be efficiently excited via intra-particle plasmonic resonance energy transfer from the encased two-photon excited gold nanorod and further generates cytotoxic singlet oxygen for cancer eradication. In addition, due to the mechanical support provided by encapsulating mesoporous silica matrix against thermal deformation, the two-photon luminescence stability of GNRs was significantly improved; after 100 seconds of 800 nm repetitive laser pulse with the 30 times higher than average power for imaging acquisition, MS-GNR luminescence intensity exhibited ~260% better resistance to deformation than that of the uncoated gold nanorods. These results strongly suggest that MS-GNRs with embedded PSs might provide a promising photodynamic therapy for the treatment of deeply situated cancers via plasmonic resonance energy transfer. PMID:24955141

  15. Predictors of impaired renal function among HIV infected patients commencing highly active antiretroviral therapy in Jos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Agbaji, Oche O.; Onu, Adamu; Agaba, Patricia E.; Muazu, Muhammad A.; Falang, Kakjing D.; Idoko, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Kidney disease is a common complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection even in the era of antiretroviral therapy, with kidney function being abnormal in up to 30% of HIV-infected patients. We determined the predictors of impaired renal function in HIV-infected adults initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study among HIV-1 infected patients attending the antiretroviral clinic at the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), between November 2005 and November 2007. Data were analysed for age, gender, weight, WHO clinical stage, CD4 count, HIV-1 RNA viral load, HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody status. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault equation. Statistical analysis was done using Epi Info 3.5.1. Results: Data for 491 (294 females and 197 males) eligible patients were abstracted. The mean age of this population was 38.8±8.87 years. One hundred and seventeen patients (23.8%; 95% CI, 20.2-27.9%) had a reduced eGFR (defined as <60 mL/min), with more females than males (28.6% vs. 16.8%; P=0.02) having reduced eGFR. Age and female sex were found to have significant associations with reduced eGFR. Adjusted odds ratios were 1.07 (95% CI, 1.04, 1.10) and 1.96 (95% CI, 1.23, 3.12) for age and female sex, respectively. Conclusions: Older age and female sex are independently associated with a higher likelihood of having lower eGFRs at initiation of HAART among our study population. We recommend assessment of renal function of HIV-infected patients prior to initiation of HAART to guide the choice and dosing of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:22083208

  16. Slimming and Appetite-Suppressing Effects of Caraway Aqueous Extract as a Natural Therapy in Physically Active Women.

    PubMed

    Kazemipoor, Mahnaz; Hamzah, Sareena; Hajifaraji, Majid; Radzi, Che Wan Jasimah Bt Wan Mohamed; Cordell, Geoffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Following the current 'Globesity' trend, there is an increasing demand for alternative natural therapies for weight management. Numerous phytoconstituents reduce body weight through suppressing appetite and reducing food intake. Caraway (Carum carvi L.) is one of the medicinal plants that is traditionally used for weight loss. In this study, the appetite-suppressing effects of caraway aqueous extract (CAE) on 70 aerobically trained, overweight, and obese women were examined in a triple-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study. Subjects were randomly allocated into placebo and experimental groups and consumed either 30 mL/day of CAE or placebo without changing their diet or physical activity over a period of 90 days. Calorie and macronutrient intake and anthropometric indices were measured before and after the intervention. In addition, appetite changes were assessed through a visual analog scale and an ad libitum pizza test. After the intervention, the results showed a significant reduction in appetite levels and carbohydrate intake of the experimental group compared with the placebo group. All of the anthropometric indices were reduced significantly in CAE compared with placebo group (p < 0.01). These preliminary outcomes suggest that a dietary CAE might be effective in weight management of physically active, adult females, reducing their body size and hunger level. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26988309

  17. Effect of Target Therapy on the Content of Transcription and Growth Factors, Protein Kinase TOR, and Activity of Intracellular Proteases in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Spirina, L V; Usynin, E A; Kondakova, I V; Yurmazov, Z A; Slonimskaya, E M

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the dynamics of the expression of transcription factors, VEGF and its receptor VEGFR2, serine-threonine protein kinase mTOR and activity of proteasome and calpain in patients with metastatic renal cancer during therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitor Votrient and mTOR blocker Afinitor. The expression of hypoxic nuclear factor HIF-1α in the tumor tissue decreased during therapy with the target preparations. The decrease of VEGF and its receptor VEGFR2 was observed only in patients treated with mTOR inhibitor. The increase in calpain activity in the tumor tissue was observed in both groups. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanism of action of target anticancer preparations as allow considering the studied markers as predictors in choosing optimal therapy. PMID:27165064

  18. Role of Calcium-activated Potassium Channels in Atrial Fibrillation Pathophysiology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Diness, Jonas G.; Bentzen, Bo H.; Sørensen, Ulrik S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (SK) channels are relative newcomers within the field of cardiac electrophysiology. In recent years, an increased focus has been given to these channels because they might constitute a relatively atrial-selective target. This review will give a general introduction to SK channels followed by their proposed function in the heart under normal and pathophysiological conditions. It is revealed how antiarrhythmic effects can be obtained by SK channel inhibition in a number of species in situations of atrial fibrillation. On the contrary, the beneficial effects of SK channel inhibition in situations of heart failure are questionable and still needs investigation. The understanding of cardiac SK channels is rapidly increasing these years, and it is hoped that this will clarify whether SK channel inhibition has potential as a new anti–atrial fibrillation principle. PMID:25830485

  19. Role of Calcium-activated Potassium Channels in Atrial Fibrillation Pathophysiology and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Diness, Jonas G; Bentzen, Bo H; Sørensen, Ulrik S; Grunnet, Morten

    2015-11-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (SK) channels are relative newcomers within the field of cardiac electrophysiology. In recent years, an increased focus has been given to these channels because they might constitute a relatively atrial-selective target. This review will give a general introduction to SK channels followed by their proposed function in the heart under normal and pathophysiological conditions. It is revealed how antiarrhythmic effects can be obtained by SK channel inhibition in a number of species in situations of atrial fibrillation. On the contrary, the beneficial effects of SK channel inhibition in situations of heart failure are questionable and still needs investigation. The understanding of cardiac SK channels is rapidly increasing these years, and it is hoped that this will clarify whether SK channel inhibition has potential as a new anti-atrial fibrillation principle. PMID:25830485

  20. Behavior Therapy of Impotence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dengrove, Edward

    1971-01-01

    Behavior therapy approaches to the treatment of male sexual impotence, specifically premature ejaculation and erective impotence, are discussed. Included in the behavioral therapies are systematic desensitization, active graded therapy, assertive techniques, sexual responses, operant approaches and others. Often marriage counseling is also…

  1. Stop Thinking and Start Doing: Switching from Cognitive Therapy to Behavioral Activation in a Case of Chronic Treatment-Resistant Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottonari, Kathryn A.; Roberts, John E.; Thomas, Sherilyn N.; Read, Jennifer P.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent investigations have demonstrated that Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are both efficacious treatments for depression (Butler, Chapman, Forman, & Beck, 2006; Dimidjian et al., 2006; Dobson, 1989; Gloaguen, Cottraux, Cucherat, & Blackburn, 1998; Hollon, Thase, & Markowitz, 2002; Jacobson et al., 1996). This…

  2. Circulating gamma delta T cells are activated and depleted during progression of high-grade gliomas: Implications for gamma delta T cell therapy of GBM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains frustratingly impervious to any existing therapy. We have previously shown that GBM is sensitive to recognition and lysis by ex vivo activated gamma delta T cells, a minor subset of lymphocytes that innately recognize autologous stress-associated target antigens...

  3. Multi-parameter flow cytometry as a process analytical technology (PAT) approach for the assessment of bacterial ghost production.

    PubMed

    Langemann, Timo; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Meitz, Andrea; Lubitz, Werner; Herwig, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a tool for the analysis of single-cell properties in a cell suspension. In this contribution, we present an improved FCM method for the assessment of E-lysis in Enterobacteriaceae. The result of the E-lysis process is empty bacterial envelopes-called bacterial ghosts (BGs)-that constitute potential products in the pharmaceutical field. BGs have reduced light scattering properties when compared with intact cells. In combination with viability information obtained from staining samples with the membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent dye bis-(1,3-dibutylarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (DiBAC4(3)), the presented method allows to differentiate between populations of viable cells, dead cells, and BGs. Using a second fluorescent dye RH414 as a membrane marker, non-cellular background was excluded from the data which greatly improved the quality of the results. Using true volumetric absolute counting, the FCM data correlated well with cell count data obtained from colony-forming units (CFU) for viable populations. Applicability of the method to several Enterobacteriaceae (different Escherichia coli strains, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri 2a) could be shown. The method was validated as a resilient process analytical technology (PAT) tool for the assessment of E-lysis and for particle counting during 20-l batch processes for the production of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 BGs. PMID:26521248

  4. 3D noninvasive, high-resolution imaging using a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and rapid wavelength-cycling lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Gross, Daniel; Klosner, Marc; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-05-01

    Globally, cancer is a major health issue as advances in modern medicine continue to extend the human life span. Breast cancer ranks second as a cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) provides high molecular contrast at greater depths in tissue without the use of ionizing radiation. In this work, we describe the development of a PA tomography (PAT) system and a rapid wavelength-cycling Alexandrite laser designed for clinical PAI applications. The laser produces 450 mJ/pulse at 25 Hz to illuminate the entire breast, which eliminates the need to scan the laser source. Wavelength cycling provides a pulse sequence in which the output wavelength repeatedly alternates between 755 nm and 797 nm rapidly within milliseconds. We present imaging results of breast phantoms with inclusions of different sizes at varying depths, obtained with this laser source, a 5-MHz 128-element transducer and a 128-channel Verasonics system. Results include PA images and 3D reconstruction of the breast phantom at 755 and 797 nm, delineating the inclusions that mimic tumors in the breast.

  5. Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Thomas J.; Gomer, Charles J.; Henderson, Barbara W.; Jori, Giulio; Kessel, David; Korbelik, Mladen; Moan, Johan; Peng, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy involves administration of a tumor-localizing photosensitizing agent, which may require metabolic synthesis (i.e., a prodrug), followed by activation of the agent by light of a specific wavelength. This therapy results in a sequence of photochemical and photobiologic processes that cause irreversible photodamage to tumor tissues. Results from preclinical and clinical studies conducted worldwide over a 25-year period have established photodynamic therapy as a useful treatment approach for some cancers. Since 1993, regulatory approval for photodynamic therapy involving use of a partially purified, commercially available hematoporphyrin derivative compound (Photofrin®) in patients with early and advanced stage cancer of the lung, digestive tract, and genitourinary tract has been obtained in Canada, The Netherlands, France, Germany, Japan, and the United States. We have attempted to conduct and present a comprehensive review of this rapidly expanding field. Mechanisms of subcellular and tumor localization of photosensitizing agents, as well as of molecular, cellular, and tumor responses associated with photodynamic therapy, are discussed. Technical issues regarding light dosimetry are also considered. PMID:9637138

  6. Application of a patient-derived xenograft model in cytolytic viral activation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Huang, Yenlin; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lui, Kar-Wai; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lin, Tung-Liang; Fan, Hsien-Chi; Lin, An-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Lee, Li-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Li, Hsin-Pai; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-related malignancy in which the tumor microenvironment plays a pivotal role in tumor progression. Here, we developed two patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse lines from engrafted NPC metastatic tumors. Positive staining for EBV-encoded small RNAs confirmed that these tumors harbored EBV, and gene expression profile analyses further showed that the PDX was highly similar to the primary parent tumor. In vivo drug screening using the PDX system demonstrated that gemcitabine had the best antitumor effect among the tested drugs. The donor of this PDX also showed excellent responsiveness to gemcitabine treatment. The combination of gemcitabine and valproic acid exerted synergistic antitumor effects. Further addition of ganciclovir to this two-drug combination regimen enhanced cytolytic viral activation, yielding the best antitumor response among tested regimens. Treatment with this three-drug combination regimen decreased plasma EBV-DNA load, tumor viral concentration, and the number of viable tumor cells to a greater extent than the two-drug gemcitabine and valproic acid combination. These results highlight the value of PDX models in the development of EBV-targeted strategies to treat NPC. PMID:26416517

  7. Pharmacological activation of wild-type p53 in the therapy of leu