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Sample records for activation thermodynamic parameters

  1. Partial solvation parameters and mixture thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-06-21

    The recently introduced partial solvation parameters (PSPs) are molecular descriptors that combine elements from quantum mechanics with the QSPR/LSER/solvatochromic and solubility parameter approaches. Basic regularities and universalities exhibited by PSPs are examined in this work and the concepts of homosolvation, heterosolvation and solvation energy density are quantified. A simple consistent thermodynamic framework is developed, through which the validity of the PSP approach is tested. The predictions are compared with experimental phase equilibrium data that span the full composition range from the pure fluid state to infinite dilution. They include vapor-liquid equilibria of fluids interacting with strong specific forces, dissolution of solids/liquids in various solvents and probe/oligomer or probe/polymer interactions as typically determined by inverse gas-chromatography. These applications show the potential of the PSP approach not only to reasonably predict a variety of properties of classes of complex systems but, also, to shed light to challenging aspects of intermolecular interactions. The perspectives of this unified approach to solution thermodynamics are discussed. PMID:22642662

  2. Integrated 3-parameter diagram for determining thermodynamic properties of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guochang; Deng, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Mingshan

    1987-04-01

    The importance of thermodynamic properties of fluids has motivated recent studies in developing methods of calculating thermodynamic properties. Among the various methods, the use of computational diagrams is a commonly used engineering method. Conventional diagrams do not take into consideration the internal relationships among the various thermodynamic properties. The internal relationships of various thermodynamic properties are considered. The Lee-Kessler three-parameter equations were used to construct an integrated three-parameter diagram for determining the thermodynamic properties of fluids; the curves were generated using an ai-M/6 microcomputer with an attached Sr 6602 plotter. The diagram is considered sufficiently accurate for engineering calculations.

  3. Diagnostics of gas turbines based on changes in thermodynamics parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocko, Marián; Klimko, Marek

    2016-03-01

    This article is focused on solving the problems of determining the true state of gas turbine based on measured changes in thermodynamic parameters. Dependence between the real individual parts for gas turbines and changing the thermodynamic parameters were experimentally verified and confirmed on a small jet engine MPM-20 in the laboratory of the Department of Aviation Engineering at Technical University in Košice. The results of experiments confirm that the wear and tear of basic parts for gas turbines (turbo-compressor engines) to effect the change of thermodynamic parameters of the engine.

  4. Stochastic thermodynamics for active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The theoretical understanding of active matter, which is driven out of equilibrium by directed motion, is still fragmental and model oriented. Stochastic thermodynamics, on the other hand, is a comprehensive theoretical framework for driven systems that allows to define fluctuating work and heat. We apply these definitions to active matter, assuming that dissipation can be modelled by effective non-conservative forces. We show that, through the work, conjugate extensive and intensive observables can be defined even in non-equilibrium steady states lacking a free energy. As an illustration, we derive the expressions for the pressure and interfacial tension of active Brownian particles. The latter becomes negative despite the observed stable phase separation. We discuss this apparent contradiction, highlighting the role of fluctuations, and we offer a tentative explanation.

  5. He-Ne laser-induced changes in germination, thermodynamic parameters, internal energy, enzyme activities and physiological attributes of wheat during germination and early growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Yasir; Perveen, Rashida; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ali, Qasim; Iqbal, Munawar; Ahmad, Muhammad Raza

    2013-04-01

    Using low power continuous wave He-Ne laser irradiation of seeds, the germination characteristics, thermodynamic changes and enzyme activities as well as changes in morphological attributes were explored for wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. S-24) cultivar. The changes in thermodynamic properties such as change in enthalpy (ΔH), entropy generation [(ΔSe)], entropy flux [(ΔSc)], entropy generation ratio [(ΔS)e/Δt], and entropy flux ratio [(ΔS)c/Δt] showed significant (P < 0.05) changes at an energy level of 500 mJ. The germination energy (GE), germination percentage (G%), germination index (GI) as well as α-amylase and protease activities was also found to be higher at 500 mJ, while the mean emergence time (MET) and time for 50% germination (E50) decreased for 300 mJ irradiance. The internal energy of the seeds increased significantly at all laser energy levels, but was highest for 500 mJ 72 h after sowing. The enzyme activities increased up to 24 h after sowing and then declined. The activities of α-amylase and protease were found to be positively correlated with the plant physiological attributes. These results indicate that low power continuous wave He-Ne laser (632 nm) treatment has considerable biological effects on seed metabolism during germination as well as on later vegetative growth.

  6. Global parameter estimation for thermodynamic models of transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Suleimenov, Yerzhan; Ay, Ahmet; Samee, Md Abul Hassan; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Sinha, Saurabh; Arnosti, David N

    2013-07-15

    Deciphering the mechanisms involved in gene regulation holds the key to understanding the control of central biological processes, including human disease, population variation, and the evolution of morphological innovations. New experimental techniques including whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis have enabled comprehensive modeling approaches to study gene regulation. In many cases, it is useful to be able to assign biological significance to the inferred model parameters, but such interpretation should take into account features that affect these parameters, including model construction and sensitivity, the type of fitness calculation, and the effectiveness of parameter estimation. This last point is often neglected, as estimation methods are often selected for historical reasons or for computational ease. Here, we compare the performance of two parameter estimation techniques broadly representative of local and global approaches, namely, a quasi-Newton/Nelder-Mead simplex (QN/NMS) method and a covariance matrix adaptation-evolutionary strategy (CMA-ES) method. The estimation methods were applied to a set of thermodynamic models of gene transcription applied to regulatory elements active in the Drosophila embryo. Measuring overall fit, the global CMA-ES method performed significantly better than the local QN/NMS method on high quality data sets, but this difference was negligible on lower quality data sets with increased noise or on data sets simplified by stringent thresholding. Our results suggest that the choice of parameter estimation technique for evaluation of gene expression models depends both on quality of data, the nature of the models [again, remains to be established] and the aims of the modeling effort. PMID:23726942

  7. Assessment of thermodynamic parameters of plasma shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileva, O. V.; Isaev, Yu N.; Budko, A. A.; Filkov, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    The work is devoted to the solution of the one-dimensional equation of hydraulic gas dynamics for the coaxial magneto plasma accelerator by means of Lax-Wendroff modified algorithm with optimum choice of the regularization parameter artificial viscosity. Replacement of the differential equations containing private derivatives is made by finite difference method. Optimum parameter of regularization artificial viscosity is added using the exact known decision of Soda problem. The developed algorithm of thermodynamic parameter calculation in a braking point is proved. Thermodynamic parameters of a shock wave in front of the plasma piston of the coaxial magneto plasma accelerator are calculated on the basis of the offered algorithm. Unstable high-frequency fluctuations are smoothed using modeling and that allows narrowing the ambiguity area. Results of calculation of gas dynamic parameters in a point of braking coincide with literary data. The chart 3 shows the dynamics of change of speed and thermodynamic parameters of a shock wave such as pressure, density and temperature just before the plasma piston.

  8. Microcomputer Calculation of Thermodynamic Properties from Molecular Parameters of Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1990-01-01

    Described in this article is a problem-solving activity which integrates the application of microcomputers with the learning of physical chemistry. Students use the program with spectroscopic data to calculate the thermodynamic properties and compare them with the values from the thermochemical tables. (Author/KR)

  9. Towards a thermodynamics of active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatori, S. C.; Brady, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Self-propulsion allows living systems to display self-organization and unusual phase behavior. Unlike passive systems in thermal equilibrium, active matter systems are not constrained by conventional thermodynamic laws. A question arises, however, as to what extent, if any, can concepts from classical thermodynamics be applied to nonequilibrium systems like active matter. Here we use the new swim pressure perspective to develop a simple theory for predicting phase separation in active matter. Using purely mechanical arguments we generate a phase diagram with a spinodal and critical point, and define a nonequilibrium chemical potential to interpret the "binodal." We provide a generalization of thermodynamic concepts like the free energy and temperature for nonequilibrium active systems. Our theory agrees with existing simulation data both qualitatively and quantitatively and may provide a framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of nonequilibrium active systems.

  10. Towards a thermodynamics of active matter.

    PubMed

    Takatori, S C; Brady, J F

    2015-03-01

    Self-propulsion allows living systems to display self-organization and unusual phase behavior. Unlike passive systems in thermal equilibrium, active matter systems are not constrained by conventional thermodynamic laws. A question arises, however, as to what extent, if any, can concepts from classical thermodynamics be applied to nonequilibrium systems like active matter. Here we use the new swim pressure perspective to develop a simple theory for predicting phase separation in active matter. Using purely mechanical arguments we generate a phase diagram with a spinodal and critical point, and define a nonequilibrium chemical potential to interpret the "binodal." We provide a generalization of thermodynamic concepts like the free energy and temperature for nonequilibrium active systems. Our theory agrees with existing simulation data both qualitatively and quantitatively and may provide a framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of nonequilibrium active systems. PMID:25871064

  11. Cloud and Thermodynamic Parameters Retrieved from Satellite Ultraspectral Infrared Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Schluessel, Peter; Strow, L. Larrabee; Mango, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric-thermodynamic parameters and surface properties are basic meteorological parameters for weather forecasting. A physical geophysical parameter retrieval scheme dealing with cloudy and cloud-free radiance observed with satellite ultraspectral infrared sounders has been developed and applied to the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS). The retrieved parameters presented herein are from radiance data gathered during the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx). JAIVEx provided intensive aircraft observations obtained from airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) systems, in-situ measurements, and dedicated dropsonde and radiosonde measurements for the validation of the IASI products. Here, IASI atmospheric profile retrievals are compared with those obtained from dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and the airborne FTS system. The IASI examples presented here demonstrate the ability to retrieve fine-scale horizontal features with high vertical resolution from satellite ultraspectral sounder radiance spectra.

  12. Flavonoid-DNA binding studies and thermodynamic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Shaheen, Amber; Yaqub, Azra; Perveen, Fouzia; Sabahat, Sana; Mumtaz, Misbah; Jacob, Claus; Ba, Lalla Aicha; Mohammed, Hamdoon A.

    2011-09-01

    Interactional studies of new flavonoid derivatives (Fl) with chicken blood ds.DNA were investigated spectrophotometrically in DMSO-H 2O (9:1 v/v) at various temperatures. Spectral parameters suggest considerable binding between the flavonoid derivatives studied and ds.DNA. The binding constant values lie in the enhanced-binding range. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from UV studies also point to strong spontaneous binding of Fl with ds.DNA. Viscometric studies complimented the UV results where a small linear increase in relative viscosity of the DNA solution was observed with added optimal flavonoid concentration. An overall mixed mode of interaction (intercalative plus groove binding) is proposed between DNA and flavonoids. Conclusively, investigated flavonoid derivatives are found to be strong DNA binders and seem to be promising drug candidates like their natural analogues.

  13. A Thermodynamic Description of Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjelstrup, S.; Rubi, J. M.; Bedeaux, D.

    We present a solution to problems that were raised in the 1960s: How can the vectorial ion flux couple to the scalar energy of the reaction of ATP to ADP and P, to give active transport of the ion; i.e. transport against its chemical potential? And, is it possible, on thermodynamic grounds to obtain non-linear flux force relations for this transport? Using non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) on the stochastic (mesoscopic) level, we explain how the second law of thermodynamics gives a basis for the description of active transport of Ca2+ by the Ca-ATPase. Coupling takes place at the surface, because the symmetry of the fluxes changes here. The theory gives the energy dissipated as heat during transport and reaction. Experiments are defined to determine coupling coefficients. We propose that the coefficients for coupling between chemical reaction, ion flux and heat flux are named thermogenesis coefficients. They are all probably significant. We discuss that the complete set of coefficients can explain slippage in molecular pumps as well as thermogenesis that is triggered by a temperature jump.

  14. Determination of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that describe isothermal seed germination: A student research project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hageseth, Gaylord T.

    1982-02-01

    Students under the supervision of a faculty member can collect data and fit the data to the theoretical mathematical model that describes the rate of isothermal seed germination. The best-fit parameters are interpreted as an initial substrate concentration, product concentration, and the autocatalytic reaction rate. The thermodynamic model enables one to calculate the activation energy for the substrate and product, the activation energy for the autocatalytic reaction, and changes in enthalpy, entropy, and the Gibb's free energy. Turnip, lettuce, soybean, and radish seeds have been investigated. All data fit the proposed model.

  15. Towards elucidation of the drug release mechanism from compressed hydrophilic matrices made of cellulose ethers. III. Critical use of thermodynamic parameters of activation for modeling the water penetration and drug release processes.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Carmen; Massuelle, Danielle; Jeannerat, Damien; Doelker, Eric

    2013-09-10

    The two main purposes of this work were: (i) to critically consider the use of thermodynamic parameters of activation for elucidating the drug release mechanism from hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) matrices, and (ii) to examine the effect of neutral (pH 6) and acidic (pH 2) media on the release mechanism. For this, caffeine was chosen as model drug and various processes were investigated for the effect of temperature and pH: caffeine diffusion in solution and HPMC gels, and drug release from and water penetration into the HPMC tablets. Generally, the kinetics of the processes was not significantly affected by pH. As for the temperature dependence, the activation energy (E(a)) values calculated from caffeine diffusivities were in the range of Fickian transport (20-40 kJ mol⁻¹). Regarding caffeine release from HPMC matrices, fitting the profiles using the Korsmeyer-Peppas model would indicate anomalous transport. However, the low apparent E(a) values obtained were not compatible with a swelling-controlled mechanism and can be assigned to the dimensional change of the system during drug release. Unexpectedly, negative apparent E(a) values were calculated for the water uptake process, which can be ascribed to the exothermic dissolution of water into the initially dry HPMC, the expansion of the matrix and the polymer dissolution. Taking these contributions into account, the true E(a) would fall into the range valid for Fickian diffusion. Consequently, a relaxation-controlled release mechanism can be dismissed. The apparent anomalous drug release from HPMC matrices results from a coupled Fickian diffusion-erosion mechanism, both at pH 6 and 2. PMID:23727289

  16. Thermodynamic and activation parameters for dissociation of [CpCr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and [Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} into paramagnetic monomers from {sup 1}H NMR shift and line width measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woska, D.C.; Ni, Y.; Wayland, B.B.

    1999-09-06

    Substitution of pentamethyl cyclopentadienide (Cp*) for cyclopentadienide (Cp) is commonly used as an approach for increasing ligand steric requirements that can enhance dissociation of M-M bonded complexes. {sup 1}H NMR spectra for solutions prepared by dissolution of [CpCr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and [Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in toluene in the temperature range 190--390 K are interpreted in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for dissociation of the diamagnetic dimers into the paramagnetic monomers CpCr(CO){sub 3} and Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}. There is no evidence in this temperature range for thermally populated excited states or non-Curie magnetic behavior of the monomers making a significant contribution to the NMR. An expression for the temperature dependence of the NMR chemical shift at limiting fast interchange of monomer and dimer in terms of the {Delta}H{degree} and {Delta}S{degree} for dimer dissociation is applied in determining the thermodynamic parameters for Cr-Cr bond homolysis of [CpCr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} ({Delta}H{sub 1}{degree} = 15.3 {+-} 0.6 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}S{sub 1}{degree} = 39 {+-} 2 cal K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1}) and [Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} ({Delta}H{sub 2}{degree} = 14.2 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}S{sub 2}{degree} = 47 {+-} 2 cal K{sup {minus}1}mol{sup {minus}1}). Rate constants and activation parameters have been evaluated from {sup 1}H NMR line broadening in the region of slow dimer-monomer interchange for dissociation of [CpCr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} ({kappa}{sub 1} (240 K) {approx} 59 s{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}H{sub 1}{double{underscore}dagger} = 17 {+-} 2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}S{sub 1}{double{underscore}dagger} = 21 {+-} 6 cal K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1}) and [Cp*Cr(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} ({kappa}{sub 2} (240 K) {approx} 1.4 x 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}H{sub 2}{double{underscore}dagger} = 16 {+-} 1 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}S{sub 2}{double{underscore}dagger} = 30 {+-} 6 cal K

  17. Exploring the role of model parameters and regularization procedures in the thermodynamics of the PNJL model

    SciTech Connect

    Ruivo, M. C.; Costa, P.; Sousa, C. A. de; Hansen, H.

    2010-08-05

    The equation of state and the critical behavior around the critical end point are studied in the framework of the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We prove that a convenient choice of the model parameters is crucial to get the correct description of isentropic trajectories. The physical relevance of the effects of the regularization procedure is insured by the agreement with general thermodynamic requirements. The results are compared with simple thermodynamic expectations and lattice data.

  18. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamic properties of liquid crystals: Verifying the scaling parameters using a molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2013-08-01

    The thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamic properties of rotation and thermodynamic parameters in a nematic phase was investigated by a molecular dynamic simulation using the Gay-Berne potential. A master curve for the relaxation time of flip-flop motion was obtained using thermodynamic scaling, and the dynamic property could be solely expressed as a function of TV^{γ _τ }, where T and V are the temperature and volume, respectively. The scaling parameter γτ was in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic parameter Γ, which is the logarithm of the slope of a line plotted for the temperature and volume at constant P2. This line was fairly linear, and as good as the line for p-azoxyanisole or using the highly ordered small cluster model. The equivalence relation between Γ and γτ was compared with results obtained from the highly ordered small cluster model. The possibility of adapting the molecular model for the thermodynamic scaling of other dynamic rotational properties was also explored. The rotational diffusion constant and rotational viscosity coefficients, which were calculated using established theoretical and experimental expressions, were rescaled onto master curves with the same scaling parameters. The simulation illustrates the universal nature of the equivalence relation for liquid crystals.

  19. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamic properties of liquid crystals: verifying the scaling parameters using a molecular model.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2013-08-28

    The thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamic properties of rotation and thermodynamic parameters in a nematic phase was investigated by a molecular dynamic simulation using the Gay-Berne potential. A master curve for the relaxation time of flip-flop motion was obtained using thermodynamic scaling, and the dynamic property could be solely expressed as a function of TV(γτ) , where T and V are the temperature and volume, respectively. The scaling parameter γτ was in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic parameter Γ, which is the logarithm of the slope of a line plotted for the temperature and volume at constant P2. This line was fairly linear, and as good as the line for p-azoxyanisole or using the highly ordered small cluster model. The equivalence relation between Γ and γ(τ) was compared with results obtained from the highly ordered small cluster model. The possibility of adapting the molecular model for the thermodynamic scaling of other dynamic rotational properties was also explored. The rotational diffusion constant and rotational viscosity coefficients, which were calculated using established theoretical and experimental expressions, were rescaled onto master curves with the same scaling parameters. The simulation illustrates the universal nature of the equivalence relation for liquid crystals. PMID:24007031

  20. Thermodynamic and cloud parameter retrieval using infrared spectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.; Huang, Hung-Lung A.; Li, Jun; McGill, Matthew J.; Mango, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution infrared radiance spectra obtained from near nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud property information. A fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. The retrieval algorithm is presented along with its application to recent field experiment data from the NPOESS Airborne Sounding Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I). The retrieval accuracy dependence on cloud properties is discussed. It is shown that relatively accurate temperature and moisture retrievals can be achieved below optically thin clouds. For optically thick clouds, accurate temperature and moisture profiles down to cloud top level are obtained. For both optically thin and thick cloud situations, the cloud top height can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 1.0 km. Preliminary NAST-I retrieval results from the recent Atlantic-THORPEX Regional Campaign (ATReC) are presented and compared with coincident observations obtained from dropsondes and the nadir-pointing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL).

  1. Active Chemical Thermodynamics promoted by activity of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    The spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of the nanoclusters of cell surface proteins is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we have proposed a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. We study the consequences of such active actin-based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that the active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in efficiency and extent of conformational spread, even at low levels of expression at the cell surface. We define a activity temperature (τa) arising due to actin activities which can be used to describe chemical thermodynamics of the system. We plot TTT (time-temparature-transformation) curves and compute the Arrhenius factors which depend on τa . With this, the active asters can be treated as enzymes whose enzymatic reaction rate can be related to the activity.

  2. Stochastic thermodynamics of active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Chandrima; Chaudhuri, Debasish

    2013-09-01

    Examples of self-propulsion in strongly fluctuating environments are abundant in nature, e.g., molecular motors and pumps operating in living cells. Starting from the Langevin equation of motion, we develop a stochastic thermodynamic description of noninteracting self-propelled particles using simple models of velocity-dependent forces. We derive fluctuation theorems for entropy production and a modified fluctuation-dissipation relation, characterizing the linear response in nonequilibrium steady states. We study these notions in a simple model of molecular motors, and in the Rayleigh-Helmholtz and energy-depot models of self-propelled particles.

  3. Thermodynamic Derivation of the Activation Energy for Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play a key role in the radiative and hydrological balance of the upper troposphere. Their correct representation in atmospheric models requires an understanding of the microscopic processes leading to ice nucleation. A key parameter in the theoretical description of ice nucleation is the activation energy, which controls the flux of water molecules from the bulk of the liquid to the solid during the early stages of ice formation. In most studies it is estimated by direct association with the bulk properties of water, typically viscosity and self-diffusivity. As the environment in the ice-liquid interface may differ from that of the bulk, this approach may introduce bias in calculated nucleation rates. In this work a theoretical model is proposed to describe the transfer of water molecules across the ice-liquid interface. Within this framework the activation energy naturally emerges from the combination of the energy required to break hydrogen bonds in the liquid, i.e., the bulk diffusion process, and the work dissipated from the molecular rearrangement of water molecules within the ice-liquid interface. The new expression is introduced into a generalized form of classical nucleation theory. Even though no nucleation rate measurements are used to fit any of the parameters of the theory the predicted nucleation rate is in good agreement with experimental results, even at temperature as low as 190 K, where it tends to be underestimated by most models. It is shown that the activation energy has a strong dependency on temperature and a weak dependency on water activity. Such dependencies are masked by thermodynamic effects at temperatures typical of homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets; however, they may affect the formation of ice in haze aerosol particles. The new model provides an independent estimation of the activation energy and the homogeneous ice nucleation rate, and it may help to improve the interpretation of experimental results and the

  4. Computational study of frontier orbitals, moments, chemical reactivity and thermodynamic parameters of sildenafil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, Ritika; Kaur, Prabhjot; Singh, V. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of frontier orbitals of sildenafil has been carried using Density Functional Theory. On the basis of HOMO-LUMO energy, values of global chemical reactivity descriptors such as electronegativity, chemical hardness, softness, chemical potential, electrophilicity index have been calculated. Calculated values of dipole moment, polarizability, hyperpolarizability have also been reported for sildenafil along with its thermodynamic parameters.

  5. Thermodynamic parameters for adsorption equilibrium of heavy metals and dyes from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2014-05-01

    This meta-analysis evaluates adsorption studies that report thermodynamic parameters for heavy metals and dyes from wastewaters. The adsorbents were derived from agricultural waste, industrial wastes, inorganic particulates, or some natural products. The adsorption mechanisms, derivation of thermodynamic relationships, and possible flaws made in such evaluation are discussed. This analysis shows that conclusions from the examined standard enthalpy and entropy changes are highly contestable. The reason for this flaw may be the poor physical structure of adsorbents tested, such that pore transport controlled the solute flux, leaving a surface reaction process near equilibrium. PMID:24461254

  6. Thermodynamic parameters and counterion binding to the micelle in binary anionic surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Maneedaeng, Atthaphon; Haller, Kenneth J; Grady, Brian P; Flood, Adrian E

    2011-04-15

    Competitive counterion binding of sodium and calcium to micelles, and mixed micellization have been investigated in the systems sodium dodecylsulfate (NaDS)/sodium decylsulfate (NaDeS) and NaDS/sodium 4-octylbenzenesulfonate (NaOBS) in order to accurately model the activity of the relevant species in solution. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and equilibrium micelle compositions of mixtures of these anionic surfactants, which is necessary for determining fractional counterion binding measurements, is thermodynamically modeled by regular solution theory. The mixed micelle is ideal (the regular solution parameter β(M)=0) for the NaDS/NaOBS system, while the mixed micelle for NaDS/NaDeS has β(M)=-1.05 indicating a slight synergistic interaction. Counterion binding of sodium to the micelle is influenced by the calcium ion concentration, and vice versa. However, the total degree of counterion binding is essentially constant at approximately 0.65 charge negation at the micelle's surface. The counterion binding coefficients can be quantitatively modeled using a simple equilibrium model relating concentrations of bound and unbound counterions. PMID:21292278

  7. Thermodynamic parameters of CdTe crystals in the cubic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freik, Dmytro; Parashchuk, Taras; Volochanska, Bohdana

    2014-09-01

    Based on the analysis of the crystal and electronic structures of CdTe crystals in the cubic phase cluster models have been built for calculation of the geometric and thermodynamic parameters. According to density functional theory (DFT) and by using the hybrid B3LYP functional the temperature dependences of formation energy ∆E, formation enthalpy ∆H, Gibbs free energy ∆G, entropy ∆S, specific heat capacity at constant volume CV and pressure CP have been defined. Also, in the work analytical expressions of temperature dependences of the presented thermodynamic parameters have been derived, which have been approximated by quantum-chemical calculation data using the mathematical package Maple 14. The results of ab initio calculations are compared with experimental data.

  8. The role of test parameters on the kinetics and thermodynamics of glass leaching. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1988-01-01

    The relative durabilities of nuclear waste, natural, and ancient glasses have been assessed by standard laboratory leach tests. Different test conditions result in different glass surface areas (SA), leachant volumes (V), and test durations (t). Leachate concentrations are known to be a parabolic function of the kinetic test parameter SAV/center dot/t. Based on durability experiments of glass monoliths at low (SAV)/center dot/ glass durability has been shown to be a logarithmic function of the thermodynamic hydration free energy, ..delta..G/sub hyd/. The thermodynamic hydration free energy, ..delta..G/sub hyd/, can be calculated from glass composition and solution pH. In the repository environment high effective glass surface areas to solution volume ratios may occur as a result of slow groundwater flow rates. The application of hydration thermodynamics to crushed glass, high (SAV)/center dot/t, durability tests has been demonstrated. The relative contributions of the kinetic test parameters, (SAV)/center dot/t, and the thermodynamic parameter, ..delta..G/sub hyd/, have been shown to define a plane in ..delta..G/sub hyd/-concentration-(SAV)/center dot/t space. At constant test conditions, e.g. constant (SAV/center dot/t, the intersection with this surface indicates that all /delta G//sub hyd/-concentration plots should have similar slopes and predict the same relative durabilities for various glasses as a function of glass composition. Using this approach, the durability of nuclear waste glasses has been interpolated to be -- 10/sup 6/ years and no less than 10/sup 3/ years. 28 refs., 24 figs.

  9. Computer simulation for prediction of performance and thermodynamic parameters of high energy materials.

    PubMed

    Muthurajan, H; Sivabalan, R; Talawar, M B; Asthana, S N

    2004-08-01

    A new code viz., Linear Output Thermodynamic User-friendly Software for Energetic Systems (LOTUSES) developed during this work predicts the theoretical performance parameters such as density, detonation factor, velocity of detonation, detonation pressure and thermodynamic properties such as heat of detonation, heat of explosion, volume of explosion gaseous products. The same code also assists in the prediction of possible explosive decomposition products after explosion and power index. The developed code has been validated by calculating the parameters of standard explosives such as TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX. Theoretically predicated parameters are accurate to the order of +/-5% deviation. To the best of our knowledge, no such code is reported in literature which can predict a wide range of characteristics of known/unknown explosives with minimum input parameters. The code can be used to obtain thermochemical and performance parameters of high energy materials (HEMs) with reasonable accuracy. The code has been developed in Visual Basic having enhanced windows environment, and thereby advantages over the conventional codes, written in Fortran. The theoretically predicted HEMs performance can be directly printed as well as stored in text (.txt) or HTML (.htm) or Microsoft Word (.doc) or Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format in the hard disk. The output can also be copied into the Random Access Memory as clipboard text which can be imported/pasted in other software as in the case of other codes. PMID:15225927

  10. Determination of thermodynamic gas parameters in branched pipes in internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents theoretical and experimental results of calculation of basic gas parameters in the branched pipes. These parameters are required in one-dimensional computer models for prediction of non-steady gas flow in complicated multi-cylinder engine ducts. The gas flow near the junction is described with assumption of compressed and unsteady flow. Mathematical equations describing the gas flow are given in the paper on basis of mass, energy balance in the junction, pressure drop between pipes and conservation of energy in the section of supplied pipe. Equation systems enable to solve values of pressure, gas velocity, sound speed, density and concentration of gas components in every pipe connected to the joint. The different cases of the flow area are considered. The obtained parameters at the junction outflow are needed as initial values for calculation of unsteady gas flow in the outflow pipes. Verification of the method was conducted experimentally and pressure loss coefficients are given in the paper. Additionally by using Fluent program with high mesh density of the T-pipe junction the thermodynamic parameters (pressure, velocity, temperature) are compared with those obtained from 0D model. The model enables calculation the thermodynamic parameters of inflow and outflow systems in multi-cylinder IC engines in computer program.

  11. Rapid Computation of Thermodynamic Properties over Multidimensional Nonbonded Parameter Spaces Using Adaptive Multistate Reweighting.

    PubMed

    Naden, Levi N; Shirts, Michael R

    2016-04-12

    We show how thermodynamic properties of molecular models can be computed over a large, multidimensional parameter space by combining multistate reweighting analysis with a linear basis function approach. This approach reduces the computational cost to estimate thermodynamic properties from molecular simulations for over 130,000 tested parameter combinations from over 1000 CPU years to tens of CPU days. This speed increase is achieved primarily by computing the potential energy as a linear combination of basis functions, computed from either modified simulation code or as the difference of energy between two reference states, which can be done without any simulation code modification. The thermodynamic properties are then estimated with the Multistate Bennett Acceptance Ratio (MBAR) as a function of multiple model parameters without the need to define a priori how the states are connected by a pathway. Instead, we adaptively sample a set of points in parameter space to create mutual configuration space overlap. The existence of regions of poor configuration space overlap are detected by analyzing the eigenvalues of the sampled states' overlap matrix. The configuration space overlap to sampled states is monitored alongside the mean and maximum uncertainty to determine convergence, as neither the uncertainty or the configuration space overlap alone is a sufficient metric of convergence. This adaptive sampling scheme is demonstrated by estimating with high precision the solvation free energies of charged particles of Lennard-Jones plus Coulomb functional form with charges between -2 and +2 and generally physical values of σij and ϵij in TIP3P water. We also compute entropy, enthalpy, and radial distribution functions of arbitrary unsampled parameter combinations using only the data from these sampled states and use the estimates of free energies over the entire space to examine the deviation of atomistic simulations from the Born approximation to the solvation free

  12. Order parameter, correlation functions, and fidelity susceptibility for the BCS model in the thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Araby, Omar; Baeriswyl, Dionys

    2014-04-01

    The exact ground state of the reduced BCS Hamiltonian is investigated numerically for large system sizes and compared with the BCS ansatz. A "canonical" order parameter is found to be equal to the largest eigenvalue of Yang's reduced density matrix in the thermodynamic limit. Moreover, the limiting values of the exact analysis agree with those obtained for the BCS ground state. Exact results for the ground-state energy, level occupations, and a pseudospin-pseudospin correlation function are also found to converge to the BCS values already for relatively small system sizes. However, discrepancies persist for a pair-pair correlation function, for interlevel correlations of occupancies and for the fidelity susceptibility, even for large system sizes where these quantities have visibly converged to well-defined limits. Our results indicate that there exist nonperturbative corrections to the BCS predictions in the thermodynamic limit.

  13. An electromagnetic and thermodynamic lumped parameter model of an explosively driven regenerative magnetohydrodynamic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a simple, yet accurate, lumped parameter mathematical model for an explosively driven magnetohydrodynamic generator that can predict the pulse power variables of voltage and current from startup through regenerative operation. The inputs to the model will be the plasma properties entering the generator as predicted by the explosive shock model of Reference [1]. The strategy used was to simplify electromagnetic and thermodynamic three dimensional effects into a zero dimensional model. The model will provide a convenient tool for researchers to optimize designs to be used in pulse power applications. The model is validated using experimental data of Reference [1]. An overview of the operation of the explosively driven generator is first presented. Then a simplified electrical circuit model that describes basic performance of the device is developed. Then a lumped parameter model that incorporates the coupled electromagnetic and thermodynamic effects that govern generator performance is described and developed. The model is based on fundamental physical principles and parameters that were either obtained directly from design data or estimated from experimental data. The model was used to obtain parameter sensitivities and predict beyond the limits observed in the experiments to the levels desired by the potential Department of Defense sponsors. The model identifies process limitations that provide direction for future research.

  14. Redefinition of the mode Grüneisen parameter for polyatomic substances and thermodynamic implications

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeister, Anne M.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2002-01-01

    Although the value of the thermal Grüneisen parameter (γth) should be obtained by averaging spectroscopic measurements of mode Grüneisen parameters [γi ≡ (KT/νi)∂νi/∂P, where KT is isothermal bulk modulus, ν is frequency, and P is pressure], in practice, the average 〈γi〉 is up to 25% lower than γth. This discrepancy limits the accuracy of inferring physical properties from spectroscopic data and their application to geophysics. The problem arises because the above formula is physically meaningful only for monatomic or diatomic solids. We redefine γi to allow for the presence of functional groups in polyatomic crystal structures, and test the formula against spinel- and olivine-group minerals that have well-constrained spectra at pressure, band assignments, thermodynamic properties, and elastic moduli, and represent two types of functional groups. Our revised formula [γi ≡ (KX/νi)∂νi/∂P] uses polyhedral bulk moduli (KX) appropriate to the particular atomic motion associated with each vibrational mode, which results in equal values for 〈γi〉, γth, and γLA (the Grüneisen parameter of the longitudinal acoustic mode). Similar revisions lead to the pressure derivatives of these parameters being equal. Accounting for differential compression intrinsic to structures with functional groups improves the accuracy with which spectroscopic models predict thermodynamic properties and link to elastic properties. PMID:11805314

  15. Thermodynamic integration to monitor parameter convergence in molecular dynamics: application to liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Jose M.; Fritz, Michelle; Fernandez-Serra, Marivi

    Checking the convergence of accuracy parameters (e.g. basis set), in ab initio molecular dynamics, is complicated and computationally expensive. This is because entire simulations are required for each new parameter set, and comparing two simulations is subject to large statistical errors in structural (pair correlation functions) and thermodynamic (pressure, compressibility) properties. In this work we propose a method to evaluate parameter convergence without these costly simulations. In the spirit of thermodynamic integration approaches, the average change of a given property is computed with different parameters in the same geometries, extracted from a given MD trajectory or set of trajectories. This same approach can be used to explore tendencies for new exchange-correlation functionals, so that only the most promising ones need to be thoroughly evaluated with entire simulations. This work is supported by DOE Grants No. DE-FG02-09ER16052, No. DE-SC0003871 and the Grant FIS2012-37549-C05 from the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness.

  16. Sensitivity of predicted scaling and permeability in Enhanced Geothermal Systems to Thermodynamic Data and Activity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingerl, Ferdinand F.; Wagner, Thomas; Kulik, Dmitrii A.; Kosakowski, Georg; Driesner, Thomas; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-05-01

    A consortium of research groups from ETH Zurich, EPF Lausanne, the Paul Scherrer Institut and the University of Bonn collaborates in a comprehensive program of basic research on key aspects of the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGSs). As part of this GEOTHERM project (www.geotherm.ethz.ch), we concentrate on the fundamental investigation of thermodynamic models suitable for describing fluid-rock interactions at geothermal conditions. Predictions of the fluid-rock interaction in EGS still face several major challenges. Slight variations in the input thermodynamic and kinetic parameters may result in significant differences in the predicted mineral solubilities and stable assemblage. Realistic modeling of mineral precipitation in turn has implications onto our understanding of the permeability evolution of the geothermal reservoir, as well as the scaling in technical installations. In order to reasonably model an EGS, thermodynamic databases and activity models must be tailored to geothermal conditions. We therefore implemented in GEMS code the Pitzer formalism, which is the standard model used for computing thermodynamic excess properties of brines at elevated temperatures and pressures. This model, however, depends on a vast amount of interaction parameters, which are to a substantial extend unknown. Furthermore, a high order polynomial temperature interpolation makes extrapolation unreliable if not impossible. As an alternative we additionally implemented the EUNIQUAC activity model. EUNIQUAC requires fewer empirical fit parameters (only binary interaction parameters needed) and uses simpler and more stable temperature and pressure extrapolations. This results in an increase in computation speed, which is of crucial importance when performing coupled long term simulations of geothermal reservoirs. To achieve better performance under geothermal conditions, we are currently partly reformulating EUNIQUAC and refitting the existing parameter set. First results of the

  17. Thermodynamic Activity Measurements with Knudsen Cell Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    Coupling the Knudsen effusion method with mass spectrometry has proven to be one of the most useful experimental techniques for studying the equilibrium between condensed phases and complex vapors. The Knudsen effusion method involves placing a condensed sample in a Knudsen cell, a small "enclosure", that is uniformly heated and held until equilibrium is attained between the condensed and vapor phases. The vapor is continuously sampled by effusion through a small orifice in the cell. A molecular beam is formed from the effusing vapor and directed into a mass spectrometer for identification and pressure measurement of the species in the vapor phase. Knudsen cell mass spectrometry (KCMS) has been used for nearly fifty years now and continues to be a leading technique for obtaining thermodynamic data. Indeed, much of the well-established vapor specie data in the JANAF tables has been obtained from this technique. This is due to the extreme versatility of the technique. All classes of materials can be studied and all constituents of the vapor phase can be measured over a wide range of pressures (approximately 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -11) bar) and temperatures (500-2800 K). The ability to selectively measure different vapor species makes KCMS a very powerful tool for the measurement of component activities in metallic and ceramic solutions. Today several groups are applying KCMS to measure thermodynamic functions in multicomponent metallic and ceramic systems. Thermodynamic functions, especially component activities, are extremely important in the development of CALPHAD (Calculation of Phase Diagrams) type thermodynamic descriptions. These descriptions, in turn, are useful for modeling materials processing and predicting reactions such as oxide formation and fiber/matrix interactions. The leading experimental methods for measuring activities are the Galvanic cell or electro-motive force (EMF) technique and the KCMS technique. Each has specific advantages, depending on

  18. Influence of precipitating agents on thermodynamic parameters of protein crystallization solutions.

    PubMed

    Stavros, Philemon; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Nounesis, George

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is the most powerful method for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins to (near-)atomic resolution, but protein crystallization is a poorly explained and often intractable phenomenon. Differential Scanning Calorimetry was used to measure the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) of temperature-driven unfolding of two globular proteins, lysozyme, and ribonuclease A, in various salt solutions. The mixtures were categorized into those that were conducive to crystallization of the protein and those that were not. It was found that even fairly low salt concentrations had very large effects on thermodynamic parameters. High concentrations of salts conducive to crystallization stabilized the native folded forms of proteins, whereas high concentrations of salts that did not crystallize them tended to destabilize them. Considering the ΔH and TΔS contributions to the ΔG of unfolding separately, high concentrations of crystallizing salts were found to enthalpically stabilize and entropically destabilize the protein, and vice-versa for the noncrystallizing salts. These observations suggest an explanation, in terms of protein stability and entropy of hydration, of why some salts are good crystallization agents for a given protein and others are not. This in turn provides theoretical insight into the process of protein crystallization, suggesting ways of predicting and controlling it. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 642-652, 2016. PMID:27114109

  19. Redefinition of the mode Grüneisen parameter for polyatomic substances and thermodynamic implications.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Anne M; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2002-01-22

    Although the value of the thermal Grüneisen parameter (gamma(th)) should be obtained by averaging spectroscopic measurements of mode Grüneisen parameters [gamma(i) identical with (K(T)/nu(i)) delta nu(i)/ delta P, where K(T) is isothermal bulk modulus, nu is frequency, and P is pressure], in practice, the average is up to 25% lower than gamma(th). This discrepancy limits the accuracy of inferring physical properties from spectroscopic data and their application to geophysics. The problem arises because the above formula is physically meaningful only for monatomic or diatomic solids. We redefine gamma(i) to allow for the presence of functional groups in polyatomic crystal structures, and test the formula against spinel- and olivine-group minerals that have well-constrained spectra at pressure, band assignments, thermodynamic properties, and elastic moduli, and represent two types of functional groups. Our revised formula [gamma(i) identical with (K(X)/nu(i)) delta nu(i)/ delta P] uses polyhedral bulk moduli (K(X)) appropriate to the particular atomic motion associated with each vibrational mode, which results in equal values for , gamma(th), and gamma(LA) (the Grüneisen parameter of the longitudinal acoustic mode). Similar revisions lead to the pressure derivatives of these parameters being equal. Accounting for differential compression intrinsic to structures with functional groups improves the accuracy with which spectroscopic models predict thermodynamic properties and link to elastic properties. PMID:11805314

  20. Additivity, density fluctuations, and nonequilibrium thermodynamics for active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Subhadip; Mishra, Shradha; Pradhan, Punyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Using an additivity property, we study particle-number fluctuations in a system of interacting self-propelled particles, called active Brownian particles (ABPs), which consists of repulsive disks with random self-propulsion velocities. From a fluctuation-response relation, a direct consequence of additivity, we formulate a thermodynamic theory which captures the previously observed features of nonequilibrium phase transition in the ABPs from a homogeneous fluid phase to an inhomogeneous phase of coexisting gas and liquid. We substantiate the predictions of additivity by analytically calculating the subsystem particle-number distributions in the homogeneous fluid phase away from criticality where analytically obtained distributions are compatible with simulations in the ABPs.

  1. Surface tension and related thermodynamic parameters of alcohols using the Traube stalagmometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilmohamud, B. A.; Seeneevassen, J.; Rughooputh, S. D. D. V.; Ramasami, P.

    2005-11-01

    An apparatus was devised using the Traube Stalagmometer for the determination of the surface tension of the alcohols methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol. Measurements were made under atmospheric pressure at temperatures between 288.15 K and 313.15 K. The surface tension values were correlated with temperature and surface thermodynamic parameters, namely surface entropy and surface enthalpy, were also calculated. The results obtained are in agreement with the literature and they are promising for the use of this low cost arrangement for accurate measurement of surface tension. Surface tension values were obtained with a maximum error of 0.5 mN m-1 and a maximum standard deviation of 0.8 mN m-1. We recommend this arrangement for students in advanced university courses and it can also be used for research work.

  2. Thermal equation of state and thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter of beryllium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianzhong Zhu, Jinlong; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng

    2013-11-07

    We conducted in-situ high-pressure synchrotron x-ray experiments on beryllium metal at pressures up to 7.9 GPa and temperatures up to 1373 K. A complete pressure (P)–volume (V)–temperature (T) equation of state (EOS) is determined based on the experiment, which includes temperature derivatives of elastic bulk modulus (at both constant pressure and constant volume) and pressure dependence of thermal expansivity. From this EOS, we calculate thermal pressure, heat capacity at constant volume, and thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter as a function of temperature. Above ∼600 K, our results show notable deviation from theoretical predictions using the quasiharmonic and local-density approximations, indicating that the free energy calculations need to be further improved within the current scheme of approximations.

  3. The optical method for determining the thermodynamic parameters of hot gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, O. V.; Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Kashirskii, D. E.; Tsvyk, R. Sh.; Sazanovich, V. M.; Sherstobitov, M. V.

    2014-11-01

    The research conducted on the thermodynamic parameters of a flame was based on its experimental transmission spectra in the 2.7 μm and 4.3 μm ranges. To produce the flame, alcohol was burned under atmospheric conditions. The hot gases resulting from the burning of ethanol (H2O, CO, and CO2) were accelerated and spun by the rotation of an impeller. The optical method developed by the authors was employed for predicting the temperature and partial pressure of the hot gases. The results demonstrate the practical significance of the method suggested. The spectroscopic database HITEMP 2010 was used for all line-by-line calculations presented in the article.

  4. Electrochemistry of mammalian cytochrome P450 2B4 indicates tunable thermodynamic parameters in surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Katharine D; Gillan, James M; Im, Sang-Choul; Landefeld, Sally; Mead, Griffin; Hiley, Megan; Waskell, Lucy A; Hill, Michael G; Udit, Andrew K

    2013-12-01

    Electrochemical methods continue to present an attractive means for achieving in vitro biocatalysis with cytochromes P450; however understanding fully the nature of electrode-bound P450 remains elusive. Herein we report thermodynamic parameters using electrochemical analysis of full-length mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 2B4 (CYP 2B4) in didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) surfactant films. Electronic absorption spectra of CYP 2B4-DDAB films on silica slides reveal an absorption maximum at 418nm, characteristic of low-spin, six-coordinate, water-ligated Fe(III) heme in P450. The Fe(III/II) and Fe(II/I) redox couples (E1/2) of substrate-free CYP 2B4 measured by cyclic voltammetry are -0.23V and -1.02V (vs. SCE, or 14mV and -776mV vs. NHE) at 21°C. The standard heterogeneous rate constant for electron transfer from the electrode to the heme for the Fe(III/II) couple was estimated at 170s(-1). Experiments indicate that the system is capable of catalytic reduction of dioxygen, however substrate oxidation was not observed. From the variation of E1/2 with temperature (18-40°C), we have measured entropy and enthalpy changes that accompany heme reduction, -151Jmol(-1)K(-1) and -46kJmol(-1), respectfully. The corresponding entropy and enthalpy values are less for the six-coordinate low-spin, imidazole-ligated enzyme (-59Jmol(-1)K(-1) and -18kJmol(-1)), consistent with limited conformational changes upon reduction. These thermodynamic parameters are comparable to those measured for bacterial P450 from Bacillus megaterium (CYP BM3), confirming our prior reports that the surfactant environment exerts a strong influence on the redox properties of the heme. PMID:24013063

  5. Thermodynamically weighted ART (THWART): a finite-temperature activated algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkema, Gerard; Mousseau, Normand

    2004-03-01

    Much effort has been invested in the last decade to develop accelerated algorithms. Many of these methods are limited either by having to work effectively at T=0 (ART, eigenvector-following or dimer method) or by the complexity level of the system under study (hyper-MD, TAD, etc.). The thermodynamically weighted activation-relaxation technique (THWART) overcomes some of these limitations. Coupling molecular dynamics with ART, this algorithm can be shown to sample the configurational space with the correct ensemble, while generating a trajectory that can go over large activation barriers. Preliminary simulations show that the method is many orders of magnitude faster than MD for sampling the configurational space of amorphous silicon at T=800 K and small peptides at 300 K. This work is supported in part by NSERC (Canada) and FRQNT (Québec). The simulations were performed on the supercomputers of the RQCHP. NM is a Cottrell Scholar of the Research Corporation.

  6. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectroscopic analysis, thermodynamic parameters and molecular modeling studies of (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Zarife Sibel; Kantar, Günay Kaya; Şaşmaz, Selami; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the molecular characteristic and structural parameters that govern the chemical behavior of a new (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate compound and to compare predictions made from theory with experimental observations. The title compound, (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate, (I), (C16H14O6), has been synthesized. The compound has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopies and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Optimized molecular structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts have been investigated by B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method using density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results show that the predicted geometry can well reproduce structural parameters. In addition, global chemical reactivity descriptors, molecular electrostatic potential map (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), Mulliken population method and natural population analysis (NPA) and thermodynamic properties have also been studied. The energetic behavior of title compound has been examined in solvent media using polarizable continuum model (PCM).

  7. Vibrational and electronic investigations, thermodynamic parameters, HOMO and LUMO analysis on Lornoxicam by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhasini, M.; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of Lornoxicam were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameters, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the Vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator's strength calculated by TD-DFT and Lornoxicam is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like Entropy, Enthalpy, Specific heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was investigated using theoretical calculations.

  8. Physically-Retrieving Cloud and Thermodynamic Parameters from Ultraspectral IR Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.; Mango, Stephen A.; Huang, Hung-Lung

    2007-01-01

    A physical inversion scheme has been developed, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiance observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, to simultaneously retrieve surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A fast radiative transfer model, which applies to the clouded atmosphere, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. A one-dimensional (1-d) variational multi-variable inversion solution is used to improve an iterative background state defined by an eigenvector-regression-retrieval. The solution is iterated in order to account for non-linearity in the 1-d variational solution. It is shown that relatively accurate temperature and moisture retrievals can be achieved below optically thin clouds. For optically thick clouds, accurate temperature and moisture profiles down to cloud top level are obtained. For both optically thin and thick cloud situations, the cloud top height can be retrieved with relatively high accuracy (i.e., error < 1 km). NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST-I) retrievals from the Atlantic-THORPEX Regional Campaign are compared with coincident observations obtained from dropsondes and the nadir-pointing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). This work was motivated by the need to obtain solutions for atmospheric soundings from infrared radiances observed for every individual field of view, regardless of cloud cover, from future ultraspectral geostationary satellite sounding instruments, such as the Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) and the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES). However, this retrieval approach can also be applied to the ultraspectral sounding instruments to fly on Polar satellites, such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the European MetOp satellite, the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the NPOESS Preparatory Project and the following NPOESS series of satellites.

  9. Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Determine Thermodynamic Parameters of Protein–Glycosaminoglycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Amit K.; Rösgen, Jörg; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    It has now become increasingly clear that a complete atomic description of how biomacromolecules recognize each other requires knowledge not only of the structures of the complexes but also of how kinetics and thermodynamics drive the binding process. In particular, such knowledge is lacking for protein–glycosaminoglycan (GAG) complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique that can provide various thermodynamic parameters—enthalpy, entropy, free energy (binding constant), and stoichiometry—from a single experiment. Here we describe different factors that must be taken into consideration in carrying out ITC titrations to obtain meaningful thermodynamic data of protein–GAG interactions. PMID:25325962

  10. Thermodynamic and chemical parameters of the exhaust effluents from the HARPOON booster motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Goldford, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    The exhaust products from the Harpoon booster motors were analyzed using both thermodynamic analysis and finite-rate chemistry. The resulting constituents are presented together with a discussion of the techniques employed.

  11. Thermodynamic parameters of scandium trifluoride and triiodide in the condensed state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristova, N. M.; Belov, G. V.

    2015-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties of new classes of compounds, particularly scandium trihalides ScF3, ScCl3, ScBr3, and ScI3, are added to the IVTANTHERMO software package. A critical analysis and processing of the entire array of primary data available in the literature is performed. An equation approximating the temperature dependence of heat capacity in the temperature range 298.15- T m (K) is derived for each crystalline scandium trihalide. The resulting equations C {/p po}( T) for the solid state and the data for the liquid phase are used to calculate the thermodynamic functions of entropy, the reduced Gibbs free energies, and the enthalpy increments. Both the experimental data available in literature and the missing estimated thermodynamic data are used in calculations. The error of the recommended values is estimated in all cases. In the first part of this work, we describe the thermodynamic properties of ScF3 and ScI3 used as the reference data for calculating the thermodynamic functions of ScCl3 and ScBr3, for which experimental data are either very scarce or missing altogether. The resulting data are added to the database of the IVTANTHERMO software package.

  12. Superposition-additive approach: thermodynamic parameters of clusterization of monosubstituted alkanes at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Belyaeva, E A; Fomina, E S; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2011-12-21

    The applicability of the superposition-additive approach for the calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and atomization of conjugate systems, their dipole electric polarisabilities, molecular diamagnetic susceptibilities, π-electron circular currents, as well as for the estimation of the thermodynamic parameters of substituted alkanes, was demonstrated earlier. Now the applicability of the superposition-additive approach for the description of clusterization of fatty alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, carboxylic acids at the air/water interface is studied. Two superposition-additive schemes are used that ensure the maximum superimposition of the graphs of the considered molecular structures including the intermolecular CH-HC interactions within the clusters. The thermodynamic parameters of clusterization are calculated for dimers, trimers and tetramers. The calculations are based on the values of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of clusterization calculated earlier using the semiempirical quantum chemical PM3 method. It is shown that the proposed approach is capable of the reproduction with sufficiently enough accuracy of the values calculated previously. PMID:22042000

  13. Thermodynamic assessment of solubility and activity of iron, chromium, and nickel in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossé, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) is a heavy liquid alloy used as a coolant for the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors and spallation target for Accelerator Driven Systems. LBE is also considered in sodium fast reactor designs as coolant in secondary circuit to avoid any occurrence of the reaction between sodium and water in steam generators. Even if this coolant presents many advantages due to its thermophysical properties, corrosion towards structural materials remains one of the major issues of LBE. Because corrosion in LBE is partly driven by dissolution processes, the solubility and chemical activity of the main elements of the alloy are the key parameters to model the related corrosion processes. Using the Calphad method and the Thermo-Calc software, a thermodynamic database was developed to assess the interaction between Cr-Ni-Fe alloys and LBE. The current thermodynamic data on the Cr-Fe-Ni + Bi-Pb quinary system was reviewed and the Bi-Cr and Cr-Pb binary phase diagrams were assessed. Fe, Cr and Ni solubilities (in at. fraction, T in K) at LBE composition were calculated: Fe solubility at LBE composition: log10 (SFe)=0.5719-4398.6T (399-1173 K) Cr solubility at LBE composition: log10 (SCr)=-0.2757-3056.1T (399-1173 K) Ni solubility at LBE composition: log10 (SNi)=2.8717-2932.9T (528-742 K) log10 (SNi)=0.2871-1006.3T (742-1173 K) Then, the thermodynamic assessment performed in this study was used to predict more accurately the Fe, Cr and Ni activities and solubilities in the case of four austenitic model alloys also studied in the framework of corrosion tests [1]. The calculated activities and solubilities provide thermodynamic data to better understand dissolution or precipitation phenomena observed during LBE corrosion processes.

  14. Assessment of physical activity of the human body considering the thermodynamic system.

    PubMed

    Hochstein, Stefan; Rauschenberger, Philipp; Weigand, Bernhard; Siebert, Tobias; Schmitt, Syn; Schlicht, Wolfgang; Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    2016-01-01

    Correctly dosed physical activity is the basis of a vital and healthy life, but the measurement of physical activity is certainly rather empirical resulting in limited individual and custom activity recommendations. Certainly, very accurate three-dimensional models of the cardiovascular system exist, however, requiring the numeric solution of the Navier-Stokes equations of the flow in blood vessels. These models are suitable for the research of cardiac diseases, but computationally very expensive. Direct measurements are expensive and often not applicable outside laboratories. This paper offers a new approach to assess physical activity using thermodynamical systems and its leading quantity of entropy production which is a compromise between computation time and precise prediction of pressure, volume, and flow variables in blood vessels. Based on a simplified (one-dimensional) model of the cardiovascular system of the human body, we develop and evaluate a setup calculating entropy production of the heart to determine the intensity of human physical activity in a more precise way than previous parameters, e.g. frequently used energy considerations. The knowledge resulting from the precise real-time physical activity provides the basis for an intelligent human-technology interaction allowing to steadily adjust the degree of physical activity according to the actual individual performance level and thus to improve training and activity recommendations. PMID:26296149

  15. On equivalence of high temperature series expansion and coupling parameter series expansion in thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sai Venkata Ramana, A.

    2014-04-21

    The coupling parameter series expansion and the high temperature series expansion in the thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids are shown to be equivalent if the interaction potential is pairwise additive. As a consequence, for the class of fluids with the potential having a hardcore repulsion, if the hard-sphere fluid is chosen as reference system, the terms of coupling parameter series expansion for radial distribution function, direct correlation function, and Helmholtz free energy follow a scaling law with temperature. The scaling law is confirmed by application to square-well fluids.

  16. Internal ballistics of small arms: Particular problems. Part 2: Thermodynamic model, powder parameters, initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celens, E.

    1986-01-01

    The applicability of the thermodynamic model was studied in small caliber weapons. The use of appropriate computer algorithms for optimal exploitation of closed vessel trials was examined. To better understand the initiation phase, the working of primary high explosive compounds was studied by visualizing the ignition phenomenon in a transparent chamber. The results obtained in these studies are summarized.

  17. Applying thermodynamic and kinetic parameters to predict the physical stability of two differently prepared amorphous forms of simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Graeser, Kirsten A; Patterson, James E; Rades, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    Converting drugs from the crystalline to the amorphous state has gained increasing interest in the past decades as a potential method to overcome solubility issues of poorly water soluble drugs. A variety of techniques exist to convert the crystalline state of a drug to its amorphous form, including solution based, heat based and solid - solid conversion based methods. Inherent to the amorphous state, regardless of its preparation technique, is its physical instability and tendency to recrystallize. In this study, quench-cooled and cryo-milled simvastatin were compared with regards to their configurational thermodynamic parameters (entropy, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy) and mobility (relaxation times calculated using the Adam-Gibbs and Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts method). Stability studies showed quench-cooled simvastatin to be more stable than cryo-milled simvastatin. This was reflected in the calculated parameters although their absolute values did not agree with the stability behaviour. Relaxation time parameters of tau = 6.9 x 10(4) s for quench-cooled and tau = 1.7 x 10(4) s for cryo-milled simvastatin were calculated. The results from this study suggested that differences in the physical stability of amorphous forms prepared by different techniques are reflected in their mobility and thermodynamic parameters. Even though the predictive capabilities of these parameters for a set of different drugs may be limited, they can serve as a predictive tool for physical stability assessment if differently prepared amorphous forms of the same drug are investigated. PMID:19534709

  18. Determination of Arrhenius and Thermodynamic Parameters for the Aqueous Reaction of the Hydroxyl Radical with Lactic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Stephen P. Mezyk; Bruce J. Mincher

    2009-01-01

    Lactic acid is a major component of the TALSPEAK process planned for use in the separation of trivalent lanthanide and actinide elements. This acid acts both as a buffer, and also to protect the actinide complexant from radiolytic damage. However, there is little kinetic information on the reaction of water radiolysis species with lactic acid, particularly under the anticipated process conditions of aerated aqueous solution at pH~3, where oxidizing reactions are expected to dominate. Here we have determined temperature-dependent reaction rate constants for the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with lactic acid and the lactate ion. For lactic acid this rate constant is given by the equation: ln k1 = (23.85 ± 0.19) – (1120 ± 54) / T, corresponding to an activation energy of 9.31 ± 0.45 kJ mol-1 and a room temperature reaction rate constant of (5.24 ± 0.09) x 108 M-1 s-1 (24.0oC). For the lactate ion, the temperature-dependent rate constant is given by: ln k2 = (24.83 ± 0.14) – (1295 ± 42) / T, for an activation energy of 10.76 ± 0.35 kJ mol-1 and a room temperature value of (7.77 ± 0.11) x 108 M-1 s-1 (22.2oC). These kinetic data have been combined with autotitration measurements to determine the temperature-dependent behavior of the lactic acid pKa value, allowing thermodynamic parameters for the acid dissociation to be calculated as ?Hº = -10.75 ± 1.77 kJ mol-1, ?Sº = -103.9 ± 6.0 J K-1 mol-1 and ?Gº = 20.24 ± 2.52 kJ mol-1 at low ionic strength.

  19. Identifying Crucial Parameter Correlations Maintaining Bursting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons) allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO) model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron) and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency) similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, Leak; a persistent K current, K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, P) that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of Leak, K2, and P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained. PMID:24945358

  20. Structure-thermodynamics-antioxidant activity relationships of selected natural phenolic acids and derivatives: an experimental and theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuzhen; Xiao, Huizhi; Zheng, Jie; Liang, Guizhao

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic acids and derivatives have potential biological functions, however, little is known about the structure-activity relationships and the underlying action mechanisms of these phenolic acids to date. Herein we investigate the structure-thermodynamics-antioxidant relationships of 20 natural phenolic acids and derivatives using DPPH• scavenging assay, density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. Three main working mechanisms (HAT, SETPT and SPLET) are explored in four micro-environments (gas-phase, benzene, water and ethanol). Computed thermodynamics parameters (BDE, IP, PDE, PA and ETE) are compared with the experimental radical scavenging activities against DPPH•. Available theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated that the extended delocalization and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds are the two main contributions to the stability of the radicals. The C = O or C = C in COOH, COOR, C = CCOOH and C = CCOOR groups, and orthodiphenolic functionalities are shown to favorably stabilize the specific radical species to enhance the radical scavenging activities, while the presence of the single OH in the ortho position of the COOH group disfavors the activities. HAT is the thermodynamically preferred mechanism in the gas phase and benzene, whereas SPLET in water and ethanol. Furthermore, our QSAR models robustly represent the structure-activity relationships of these explored compounds in polar media. PMID:25803685

  1. Structure-Thermodynamics-Antioxidant Activity Relationships of Selected Natural Phenolic Acids and Derivatives: An Experimental and Theoretical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Liang, Guizhao

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic acids and derivatives have potential biological functions, however, little is known about the structure-activity relationships and the underlying action mechanisms of these phenolic acids to date. Herein we investigate the structure-thermodynamics-antioxidant relationships of 20 natural phenolic acids and derivatives using DPPH• scavenging assay, density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. Three main working mechanisms (HAT, SETPT and SPLET) are explored in four micro-environments (gas-phase, benzene, water and ethanol). Computed thermodynamics parameters (BDE, IP, PDE, PA and ETE) are compared with the experimental radical scavenging activities against DPPH•. Available theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated that the extended delocalization and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds are the two main contributions to the stability of the radicals. The C = O or C = C in COOH, COOR, C = CCOOH and C = CCOOR groups, and orthodiphenolic functionalities are shown to favorably stabilize the specific radical species to enhance the radical scavenging activities, while the presence of the single OH in the ortho position of the COOH group disfavors the activities. HAT is the thermodynamically preferred mechanism in the gas phase and benzene, whereas SPLET in water and ethanol. Furthermore, our QSAR models robustly represent the structure-activity relationships of these explored compounds in polar media. PMID:25803685

  2. The thermodynamic parameters of the step dissociation of L-phenylalanyl in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochergina, L. A.; Emel'Yanov, A. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Gorboletova, G. G.

    2007-10-01

    The heats of interaction of L-phenylalanine with solutions of nitric acid and potassium and lithium hydroxides were determined calorimetrically at 288.15, 298.15, and 308.15 K and solution ionic strengths of 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 in the presence of LiNO3 and KNO3. The standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δr H°, Δr G°, Δr S°, and Δ C {/p °} of acid-base interactions in aqueous solutions of L-phenylalanine were calculated. The influence of the concentration of background electrolytes and temperature on the heats of dissociation of L-phenylalanine was considered. A comparative analysis of the standard thermodynamic characteristics of step dissociation of L-phenylalanine and alanine was performed in terms of the modern concepts of the structure and physicochemical properties of these compounds and their solutions.

  3. Thermodynamic parameters for mixtures of quartz under shock wave loading in views of the equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Maevskii, K. K. Kinelovskii, S. A.

    2015-10-27

    The numerical results of modeling of shock wave loading of mixtures with the SiO{sub 2} component are presented. The TEC (thermodynamic equilibrium component) model is employed to describe the behavior of solid and porous multicomponent mixtures and alloys under shock wave loading. State equations of a Mie–Grüneisen type are used to describe the behavior of condensed phases, taking into account the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen coefficient, gas in pores is one of the components of the environment. The model is based on the assumption that all components of the mixture under shock-wave loading are in thermodynamic equilibrium. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data derived by various authors. The behavior of the mixture containing components with a phase transition under high dynamic loads is described.

  4. Rapid determination of thermodynamic parameters from one-dimensional programmed-temperature gas chromatography for use in retention time prediction in comprehensive multidimensional chromatography.

    PubMed

    McGinitie, Teague M; Ebrahimi-Najafabadi, Heshmatollah; Harynuk, James J

    2014-01-17

    A new method for estimating the thermodynamic parameters of ΔH(T0), ΔS(T0), and ΔCP for use in thermodynamic modeling of GC×GC separations has been developed. The method is an alternative to the traditional isothermal separations required to fit a three-parameter thermodynamic model to retention data. Herein, a non-linear optimization technique is used to estimate the parameters from a series of temperature-programmed separations using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. With this method, the time required to obtain estimates of thermodynamic parameters a series of analytes is significantly reduced. This new method allows for precise predictions of retention time with the average error being only 0.2s for 1D separations. Predictions for GC×GC separations were also in agreement with experimental measurements; having an average relative error of 0.37% for (1)tr and 2.1% for (2)tr. PMID:24377740

  5. Linking subsurface to surface degassing at active volcanoes: A thermodynamic model with applications to Erebus volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovino, Kayla

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic plumbing systems are the pathways through which volatiles are exchanged between the deep Earth and the atmosphere. The interplay of a multitude of processes occurring at various depths in the system dictates the composition and quantity of gas eventually erupted through volcanic vents. Here, a model is presented as a framework for interpreting surface volcanic gas measurements in terms of subsurface degassing processes occurring throughout a volcanic plumbing system. The model considers all possible sources of fluid from multiple depths, including degassing of dissolved volatiles during crystallization and/or decompression as recorded in melt inclusions plus any co-existing fluid phase present in a magma reservoir. The former is achieved by differencing melt inclusion volatile contents between groups of melt inclusions saturated at discrete depths. The latter is calculated using a thermodynamic model, which computes the composition of a C-O-H-S fluid in equilibrium with a melt given a minimum of five thermodynamic parameters commonly known for natural systems (T, P, fO2, either fH2 or one parameter for H2O, and either fS2 or one parameter for CO2). The calculated fluids are thermodynamically decompressed and run through a mixing model, which finds all possible mixtures of subsurface fluid that match the chemistry of surface gas within ±2.0 mol%. The method is applied to Mount Erebus (Antarctica), an active, intraplate volcano whose gas emissions, which emanate from an active phonolitic lava lake, have been well quantified by FTIR, UV spectroscopy, and multi-gas sensors over the last several decades. In addition, a well-characterized suite of lavas and melt inclusions, and petrological interpretations thereof, represent a wealth of knowledge about the shallow, intermediate, and deep parts of the Erebus plumbing system. The model has been used to calculate the compositions of seven C-O-H-S fluids that originate from four distinct regions within the Erebus

  6. TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance determination of the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monovalent cations to gramicidins A and C.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, J F; Fernandez, J Q; Shungu, D C; Whaley, W L; Koeppe, R E; Millett, F S

    1988-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for the binding of the monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, NH4+, TI+, and Ag+, to gramicidin A and for the binding of TI+ to gramicidin C, incorporated into lysophosphatidylcholine, have been determined using a combination of TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and competition binding. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy and entropy, are discussed in terms of a process involving the transfer of cations from an aqueous to amide environment. PMID:2462930

  7. Brain activity and cognition: a connection from thermodynamics and information theory

    PubMed Central

    Collell, Guillem; Fauquet, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The connection between brain and mind is an important scientific and philosophical question that we are still far from completely understanding. A crucial point to our work is noticing that thermodynamics provides a convenient framework to model brain activity, whereas cognition can be modeled in information-theoretical terms. In fact, several models have been proposed so far from both approaches. A second critical remark is the existence of deep theoretical connections between thermodynamics and information theory. In fact, some well-known authors claim that the laws of thermodynamics are nothing but principles in information theory. Unlike in physics or chemistry, a formalization of the relationship between information and energy is currently lacking in neuroscience. In this paper we propose a framework to connect physical brain and cognitive models by means of the theoretical connections between information theory and thermodynamics. Ultimately, this article aims at providing further insight on the formal relationship between cognition and neural activity. PMID:26136709

  8. Brain activity and cognition: a connection from thermodynamics and information theory.

    PubMed

    Collell, Guillem; Fauquet, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The connection between brain and mind is an important scientific and philosophical question that we are still far from completely understanding. A crucial point to our work is noticing that thermodynamics provides a convenient framework to model brain activity, whereas cognition can be modeled in information-theoretical terms. In fact, several models have been proposed so far from both approaches. A second critical remark is the existence of deep theoretical connections between thermodynamics and information theory. In fact, some well-known authors claim that the laws of thermodynamics are nothing but principles in information theory. Unlike in physics or chemistry, a formalization of the relationship between information and energy is currently lacking in neuroscience. In this paper we propose a framework to connect physical brain and cognitive models by means of the theoretical connections between information theory and thermodynamics. Ultimately, this article aims at providing further insight on the formal relationship between cognition and neural activity. PMID:26136709

  9. Thermodynamic, Kinetic, and Equilibrium Parameters for the Removal of Lead and Cadmium from Aqueous Solutions with Calcium Alginate Beads

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Cuevas-Villanueva, Ruth; Hidalgo-Vázquez, Aura Roxana; Cortés Penagos, Consuelo de Jesús; Cortés-Martínez, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    The sorption of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) by calcium alginate beads (CAB) from aqueous solutions in batch systems was investigated. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, as well as the sorption capacities of CAB in each system at different temperatures, were evaluated. The rate of sorption for both metals was rapid in the first 10 minutes and reached a maximum in 50 minutes. Sorption kinetic data were fitted to Lagergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models and it was found that the second-order kinetic model describes these data for the two metals; comparing kinetic parameters for Cd and Pb sorption a higher kinetic rate (K2) for Pb was observed, indicating that the interaction between lead cations and alginate beads was faster than for cadmium. Similarly, isotherm data were fitted to different models reported in literature and it was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich (L-F) and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models describe the isotherms in all cases. CAB sorption capacity for cadmium was 27.4 mg/g and 150.4 mg/g for lead, at 25°C. Sorption capacities of Cd and Pb increase as temperature rises. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the cadmium and lead adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. It was also found that pH has an important effect on the adsorption of these metals by CAB, as more were removed at pH values between 6 and 7. PMID:24587740

  10. Thermodynamic order parameters and statistical-mechanical measures for characterization of the burst and spike synchronizations of bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2015-11-01

    We are interested in characterization of population synchronization of bursting neurons which exhibit both the slow bursting and the fast spiking timescales, in contrast to spiking neurons. Population synchronization may be well visualized in the raster plot of neural spikes which can be obtained in experiments. The instantaneous population firing rate (IPFR) R(t) , which may be directly obtained from the raster plot of spikes, is often used as a realistic collective quantity describing population behaviors in both the computational and the experimental neuroscience. For the case of spiking neurons, realistic thermodynamic order parameter and statistical-mechanical spiking measure, based on R(t) , were introduced in our recent work to make practical characterization of spike synchronization. Here, we separate the slow bursting and the fast spiking timescales via frequency filtering, and extend the thermodynamic order parameter and the statistical-mechanical measure to the case of bursting neurons. Consequently, it is shown in explicit examples that both the order parameters and the statistical-mechanical measures may be effectively used to characterize the burst and spike synchronizations of bursting neurons.

  11. Control of phase boundary evolution in metal solidification for new thermodynamic parameters of the metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albu, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    The problem of controlling the phase boundary evolution in the course of solidification of metals with different thermodynamic properties is studied. The underlying mathematical model of the process is based on a three-dimensional nonstationary two-phase initial-boundary value problem of the Stefan type. The control functions are determined by optimal control problems, which are solved numerically with the help of gradient optimization methods. The gradient of the cost function is exactly computed by applying the fast automatic differentiation technique. The research results are described and analyzed. Some of them are illustrated.

  12. Simultaneous determination of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters from fast-reaction kinetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Trimm, H H; Ushio, H; Patel, R C

    1981-10-01

    A combined stopped-flow temperature-jump apparatus interfaced with a dedicated microcomputer has been used to study the complexation reaction of iron(III) with thiocyanate in aqueous solution. Kinetic rate-constants (k(f) = 143 l.mole(-1) .sec(-1) from T-jump, k(f) = 150 l.mole(-1) .sec(-1) from stopped flow), equilibrium constants (K = 143 from T-jump, K = 150 from stopped flow) and the thermodynamic enthalpy change (DeltaH(c) = -6.7 kJ/mole) could be independently determined from the simultaneous application of the two techniques. PMID:18962997

  13. Performance of DFT+U method for prediction of structural and thermodynamic parameters of monazite-type ceramics.

    PubMed

    Blanca Romero, Ariadna; Kowalski, Piotr M; Beridze, George; Schlenz, Hartmut; Bosbach, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    We performed a density functional theory (DFT) study of the monazite-type ceramics using DFT+U method, where the Hubbard U parameters are derived ab initio, with the main goal in testing the predictive power of this computational method for modeling of f-electron materials that are of interest in nuclear waste management. We show that DFT+U approach with PBEsol as the exchange-correlation functional significantly improves description of structures and thermodynamic parameters of lanthanide-bearing oxides and monazites over commonly used standard DFT (PBE) approach. We found that it is essential to use the Hubbard U parameter derived for a given element and a given structure to reproduce the structural parameters of the measured materials. We obtained exceptionally good description of the structural parameters with U parameter derived using the linear response approach of Cococcioni and de Gironcoli (Phys. Rev. B 2005, 71, 035105). This shows that affordable methods, such as DFT+U with a clever choice of exchange-correlation functional and the Hubbard U parameter can lead to a good description of f-electron materials. PMID:24760757

  14. Transfer of antioxidants at the interfaces of model food emulsions: distributions and thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Sánchez-Paz, Verónica; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos

    2015-01-21

    Knowledge on the driving force for the hydrophobic effect that partitions antioxidants (AOs) between the oil (O), aqueous (W) and interfacial (I) regions of food emulsions is crucial to predict their efficiency in inhibiting lipid oxidation and to preserve the organoleptic properties of lipid-based foods. Here, we have investigated the effects of temperature and surfactant volume fraction (ΦI) on the distribution of two representative AOs, the water insoluble α-tocopherol (TOC) and the oil insoluble caffeic acid (CA), in a model food emulsion composed of stripped corn oil, acidic water and the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. The distribution of the AOs is assessed in the intact emulsions by employing a well-established kinetic method based on the reaction between a hydrophobic arenediazonium ion and the AOs. The variations of the observed rate constant, kobs, with ΦI are interpreted on the grounds of the pseudophase kinetic model, which provides values for the interfacial rate constant kI and the partition constants between the aqueous-interfacial (P) and oil-interfacial (P) regions of the emulsions. From the variations of P, P and kI at a series of temperatures, we determined the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy values for the transfer of CA from the water to the interfacial (W → I) region and of TOC from the oil to the interfacial (O → I) regions of the emulsions, and the activation parameters for the reaction in the interfacial region. Activation energy values are in line with those expected for a bimolecular reaction. Results show that the W → I and O → I transfer processes are spontaneous and entropy driven. PMID:25408193

  15. In search of the best match: probing a multi-dimensional cloud microphysical parameter space to better understand what controls cloud thermodynamic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ivy; Storelvmo, Trude

    2015-04-01

    Substantial improvements have been made to the cloud microphysical schemes used in the latest generation of global climate models (GCMs), however, an outstanding weakness of these schemes lies in the arbitrariness of their tuning parameters, which are also notoriously fraught with uncertainties. Despite the growing effort in improving the cloud microphysical schemes in GCMs, most of this effort has neglected to focus on improving the ability of GCMs to accurately simulate the present-day global distribution of thermodynamic phase partitioning in mixed-phase clouds. Liquid droplets and ice crystals not only influence the Earth's radiative budget and hence climate sensitivity via their contrasting optical properties, but also through the effects of their lifetimes in the atmosphere. The current study employs NCAR's CAM5.1, and uses observations of cloud phase obtained by NASA's CALIOP lidar over a 79-month period (November 2007 to June 2014) guide the accurate simulation of the global distribution of mixed-phase clouds in 20∘ latitudinal bands at the -10∘ C, -20∘C and -30∘C isotherms, by adjusting six relevant cloud microphysical tuning parameters in the CAM5.1 via Quasi-Monte Carlo sampling. Among the parameters include those that control the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) timescale for the conversion of supercooled liquid droplets to ice and snow in mixed-phase clouds, the fraction of ice nuclei that nucleate ice in the atmosphere, ice crystal sedimentation speed, and wet scavenging in stratiform and convective clouds. Using a Generalized Linear Model as a variance-based sensitivity analysis, the relative contributions of each of the six parameters are quantified to gain a better understanding of the importance of their individual and two-way interaction effects on the liquid to ice proportion in mixed-phase clouds. Thus, the methodology implemented in the current study aims to search for the combination of cloud microphysical parameters in a GCM that

  16. Discovering the Thermodynamics of Simultaneous Equilibria: An Entropy Analysis Activity Involving Consecutive Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    An activity is presented in which the thermodynamics of simultaneous, consecutive equilibria are explored. The activity is appropriate for second-year high school or AP chemistry. Students discover that a reactant-favored (entropy-diminishing or endergonic) reaction can be caused to happen if it is coupled with a product-favored reaction of…

  17. Non-equilibrium thermodynamical description of rhythmic motion patterns of active systems: a canonical-dissipative approach.

    PubMed

    Dotov, D G; Kim, S; Frank, T D

    2015-02-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the non-equilibrium thermodynamical variables of a canonical-dissipative limit cycle oscillator describing rhythmic motion patterns of active systems. These variables are statistical entropy, non-equilibrium internal energy, and non-equilibrium free energy. In particular, the expression for the non-equilibrium free energy is derived as a function of a suitable control parameter. The control parameter determines the Hopf bifurcation point of the deterministic active system and describes the effective pumping of the oscillator. In analogy to the equilibrium free energy of the Landau theory, it is shown that the non-equilibrium free energy decays as a function of the control parameter. In doing so, a similarity between certain equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase transitions is pointed out. Data from an experiment on human rhythmic movements is presented. Estimates for pumping intensity as well as the thermodynamical variables are reported. It is shown that in the experiment the non-equilibrium free energy decayed when pumping intensity was increased, which is consistent with the theory. Moreover, pumping intensities close to zero could be observed at relatively slow intended rhythmic movements. In view of the Hopf bifurcation underlying the limit cycle oscillator model, this observation suggests that the intended limit cycle movements were actually more similar to trajectories of a randomly perturbed stable focus. PMID:25619737

  18. Study of thermodynamic parameters for solubilization of plant sterol and stanol in bile salt micelles.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Tomomi; Nakamura, Ai; Honda, Chikako; Endo, Kazutoyo; Tsukada, Masamichi

    2008-08-01

    We investigated the difference between the molecular structures of plant sterols and stanols that affect the solubilization of cholesterol in bile salt micelles (in vitro study). First, the aqueous solubility of beta-sitosterol, beta-sitostanol, and campesterol was determined by considering the specific radioactivity by using a fairly small quantity of each radiolabeled compound. The order of their aqueous solubilities was as follows: cholesterol > campesterol > beta-sitostanol > beta-sitosterol. The maximum solubility of cholesterol and the above mentioned sterol/stanol in sodium taurodeoxycholate and sodium taurocholate solutions (single solubilizate system) was measured. Moreover, the preferential solubilization of cholesterol in bile salt solutions was systematically studied by using different types of plant sterols/stanols. The solubilization results showed that the cholesterol-lowering effect was similar for sterols and stanol. Thermodynamic analysis was applied to these experimental results. The Gibbs energy change (Delta G degrees ) for the solubilization of plant sterols/stanols showed a negative value larger than that for cholesterol. PMID:18544343

  19. Heat Activation of Phycomyces blakesleeanus Spores: Thermodynamics and Effect of Alcohols, Furfural, and High Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Thevelein, Johan M.; Van Assche, Jozef A.; Carlier, Albert R.; Heremans, Karel

    1979-01-01

    The thermodynamic parameters for the heat activation of the sporangiospores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus were determined. For the apparent activation enthalpy (ΔH#) a value of 1,151 kJ/mol was found, whereas a value of 3,644 J./°K·mol was calculated for the apparent activation entropy (ΔS#). n-Alcohols (from methanol to octanol), phenethyl alcohol, and furfural lowered the activation temperature of P. blakesleeanus spores. The heat resistance of the spores was lowered concomitantly. The effect of the alcohols was a linear function of the concentration in the range that could be applied. When the log of the concentration needed to produce an equal shift of the activation temperature was plotted for each alochol against the log of the octanol/water partition coefficient, a straight line was obtained. The free energy of adsorption of the n-alcohols to their active sites was calculated to be −2,487 J/mol of CH2 groups. Although still inconclusive, this points toward an involvement of protein in the activation process. The effect of phenethyl alcohol was similar to the effect of n-alcohols, but furfural produced a greater shift than would be expected from the value of its partition coefficient. When the heat activation of the spores was performed under high pressure, the activation temperature was raised by 2 to 4°K/1,000 atm. However, with pressures higher than 1,000 atm (1.013 × 105 kPa) the activation temperature was lowered until the pressure became lethal (more than 2,500 atm). It is known that membrane phase transition temperatures are shifted upward by about 20°K/1,000 atm and that protein conformational changes are shifted upward by 2 to 6°K/1,000 atm. Consequently, heat activation of fungal spores seems to be triggered by a protein conformational change and not by a membrane phase transition. Activation volumes of −54.1 cm3/mol at 38°C and −79.3 cm2/mol at 40°C were found for the lowering effect of high pressure on the heat activation temperature

  20. Isotherm-Based Thermodynamic Models for Solute Activities of Organic Acids with Consideration of Partial Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Lucy; Ohm, Peter B; Dutcher, Cari S

    2016-06-23

    Organic acids make up a significant fraction of the organic mass in atmospheric aerosol particles. The calculation of gas-liquid-solid equilibrium partitioning of the organic acid is therefore critical for accurate determination of atmospheric aerosol physicochemical properties and processes such as new particle formation and activation to cloud condensation nuclei. Previously, an adsorption isotherm-based statistical thermodynamic model was developed for capturing solute concentration-activity relationships for multicomponent aqueous solutions over the entire concentration range (Dutcher et al. J. Phys. Chem. C/A 2011, 2012, 2013), with model parameters for energies of adsorption successfully related to dipole-dipole electrostatic forces in solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions for both electrolytes and organics (Ohm et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015). However, careful attention is needed for weakly dissociating semivolatile organic acids. Dicarboxylic acids, such as malonic acid and glutaric acid are treated here as a mixture of nondissociated organic solute (HA) and dissociated solute (H(+) + A(-)). It was found that the apparent dissociation was greater than that predicted by known dissociation constants alone, emphasizing the effect of dissociation on osmotic and activity coefficient predictions. To avoid additional parametrization from the mixture approach, an expression was used to relate the Debye-Hückel hard-core collision diameter to the adjustable solute-solvent intermolecular distance. An improved reference state treatment for electrolyte-organic aqueous mixtures, such as that observed here with partial dissociation, has also been proposed. This work results in predictive correlations for estimation of organic acid and water activities for which there is little or no activity data. PMID:27222917

  1. Effects of different doses of low power continuous wave he-ne laser radiation on some seed thermodynamic and germination parameters, and potential enzymes involved in seed germination of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Perveen, Rashida; Ali, Qasim; Ashraf, Muhammad; Al-Qurainy, Fahad; Jamil, Yasir; Raza Ahmad, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    In this study, water-soaked seeds of sunflower were exposed to He-Ne laser irradiation of different energies to determine whether or not He-Ne laser irradiation caused changes to seed thermodynamic and germination parameters as well as effects on the activities of germination enzymes. The experiment comprised four energy levels: 0 (control), 100, 300 and 500mJ of laser energy and each treatment replicated four times arranged in a completely randomized design. The experimentation was performed under the greenhouse conditions in the net-house of the Department of Botany, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. The seed thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to seed germination thermograms determined with a calorimeter at 25.8°C for 72h. Various thermodynamic parameters of seed (ΔH, (ΔS)(e), (ΔS)(c), (ΔS)(e) /Δt and (ΔS)(c) /Δt) were affected significantly due to presowing laser treatment. Significant changes in seed germination parameters and enzyme activities were observed in seeds treated with He-Ne laser. The He-Ne laser seed treatment resulted in increased activities of amylase and protease. These results indicate that the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser light seed treatment has considerable biological effects on seed metabolism. This seed treatment technique can be potentially employed to enhance agricultural productivity. PMID:20670360

  2. Thermodynamics and kinetics parameters of co-combustion between sewage sludge and water hyacinth in CO2/O2 atmosphere as biomass to solid biofuel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Limao; Liu, Jingyong; He, Yao; Sun, Shuiyu; Chen, Jiacong; Sun, Jian; Chang, KenLin; Kuo, Jiahong; Ning, Xun'an

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of sewage sludge (SS) and water hyacinth (WH) co-combustion as a blend fuel (SW) for bioenergy production were studied through thermogravimetric analysis. In CO2/O2 atmosphere, the combustion performance of SS added with 10-40wt.% WH was improved 1-1.97 times as revealed by the comprehensive combustion characteristic index (CCI). The conversion of SW in different atmospheres was identified and their thermodynamic parameters (ΔH,ΔS,ΔG) were obtained. As the oxygen concentration increased from 20% to 70%, the ignition temperature of SW decreased from 243.1°C to 240.3°C, and the maximum weight loss rate and CCI increased from 5.70%·min(-1) to 7.26%·min(-1) and from 4.913%(2)·K(-3)·min(-2) to 6.327%(2)·K(-3)·min(-2), respectively, which corresponded to the variation in ΔS and ΔG. The lowest activation energy (Ea) of SW was obtained in CO2/O2=7/3 atmosphere. PMID:27416513

  3. Joint interaction of ethidium bromide and methylene blue with DNA. The effect of ionic strength on binding thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Vardevanyan, Poghos O; Antonyan, Ara P; Parsadanyan, Marine A; Torosyan, Margarita A; Karapetian, Armen T

    2016-07-01

    Large amount of data of experimental and theoretical studies have shown that ethidium bromide (EtBr) and methylene blue (MB) may bind to nucleic acids via three modes: intercalation between two adjacent base pairs, insertion into the plane between neighboring bases in the same strand (semi-intercalation), and outside binding with negatively charged backbone phosphate groups. The aim of the given research is to examine the behavior of these two ligands at both separate and joint DNA binding. The obtained experimental data show that the effect of simultaneous binding of EtBr and MB on double-stranded DNA has a non-additive effect of separate binding. The analyses of the melting thermodynamic parameters of DNA complexes with two bound ligands suggest competitive mechanism of interaction. PMID:26239502

  4. Multi-criteria assessment of energy conversion systems by means of thermodynamic, economic and environmental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra Lopez, Humberto Ruben

    2007-12-01

    High expansion of power demand is expected in the Upper Rio Grande region (El Paso, Hudspeth, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio and Brewster counties) as a result of both electrical demand growth and decommissioning of installed capacity. On the supply side a notable deployment of renewable power technologies can be projected owing to the recent introduction of a new energy policy in Texas, which attempts to reach 10,000 installed-MWe of renewable capacity for 2025. Power generation fueled by natural-gas might consistently expand due to the encouraged use of this fuel. In this context the array of participating technologies can be optimized, which, within a sustainability framework, translates into a multidimensional problem. The solution to the problem is presented through this dissertation in two main parts. The first part solves the thermodynamic-environmental problem through developing a dynamic model to project maximum allowable expansion of technologies. Predetermined alternatives include diverse renewable energy technologies (wind turbine, photovoltaic conversion, hybrid solar thermal parabolic trough, and solid oxide fuel cells), a conventional fossil-fuel technology (natural gas combined-cycle), and a breakthrough fossil-fuel technology (solid oxide fuel cells). The analysis is based on the concept of cumulative exergy consumption, expanded to include abatement of emissions. A Gompertz sigmoid growth is assumed and constrained by both exergetic self-sustenance and regional energy resource availability. This part of the analysis assumes that power demand expansion is met by full deployment of alternative technologies backed up by conventional technology. Results show that through a proper allowance for exergy reinvestment the power demand expansion may be met largely by alternative technologies minimizing the primary resource depletion. The second part of the study makes use of the dynamic model to support a multi-objective optimization routine, where the

  5. Arsenic (III) adsorption on iron acetate coated activated alumina: thermodynamic, kinetics and equilibrium approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption potential of iron acetate coated activated alumina (IACAA) for removal of arsenic [As (III)] as arsenite by batch sorption technique is described. IACAA was characterized by XRD, FTIR, EDAX and SEM instruments. Percentage adsorption on IACAA was determined as a function of pH, contact time and adsorbent dose. The study revealed that the removal of As (III) was best achieved at pH =7.4. The initial As (III) concentration (0.45 mg/L) came down to less than 0.01 mg/L at contact time 90 min with adsorbent dose of 1 g/100 mL. The sorption was reasonably explained with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and E a were calculated in order to understand the nature of sorption process. The sorption process was found to be controlled by pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. PMID:24359995

  6. Investigations on thermodynamic phenomena of the active-pressurization process of a cryogenic propellant tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, C.; Dreyer, M. E.

    2014-09-01

    In optimizing the design and operation of a launcher’s cryogenic upper stage, the required pressurant gas mass must be accurately predicted. In order to do so, the appearing thermodynamic phenomena of the initial active-pressurization process of a cryogenic propellant tank need to be understood and assessed. On that account, ground experiments with liquid nitrogen as model propellant, pressurized with either gaseous nitrogen or gaseous helium, as well as numerical simulations were performed, and analytical approaches were applied. It was found that the thermal stratification in the liquid propellant is mostly driven by the increase in saturation temperature at the free surface during pressurization. The mode of phase change during pressurization was found to be mainly dependent on the pressurant gas type. The main mode of heat transfer appears from pressurant gas to the tank wall, through which the heat is then partly conducted into the uppermost liquid layers. After tank pressurization end, a pressure drop is observed and the decrease in vapor temperature is identified as its main driver. Moreover, a correlation is derived for the prediction of the required pressurant gas mass, based on the Jakob number and the thermal expansion Froude number, identifying pressurant gas temperature, phase change, and tank aspect ratio as the most important parameters, determining the required pressurant gas mass for cryogenic propellant tanks.

  7. Determination of Kinetic and Thermodynamic Parameters that Describe Isothermal Seed Germination: A Student Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hageseth, Gaylord T.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a project for students to collect and fit data to a theoretical mathematical model that describes the rate of isothermal seed germination, including activation energy for substrate and produce and the autocatalytic reaction, and changes in enthalpy, entropy, and the Gibb's free energy. (Author/SK)

  8. Determination of thermodynamic and transport parameters of naphthenic acids and organic process chemicals in oil sand tailings pond water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Robinson, Lisa; Wen, Qing; Kasperski, Kim L

    2013-07-01

    Oil sand tailings pond water contains naphthenic acids and process chemicals (e.g., alkyl sulphates, quaternary ammonium compounds, and alkylphenol ethoxylates). These chemicals are toxic and can seep through the foundation of the tailings pond to the subsurface, potentially affecting the quality of groundwater. As a result, it is important to measure the thermodynamic and transport parameters of these chemicals in order to study the transport behavior of contaminants through the foundation as well as underground. In this study, batch adsorption studies and column experiments were performed. It was found that the transport parameters of these chemicals are related to their molecular structures and other properties. The computer program (CXTFIT) was used to further evaluate the transport process in the column experiments. The results from this study show that the transport of naphthenic acids in a glass column is an equilibrium process while the transport of process chemicals seems to be a non-equilibrium process. At the end of this paper we present a real-world case study in which the transport of the contaminants through the foundation of an external tailings pond is calculated using the lab-measured data. The results show that long-term groundwater monitoring of contaminant transport at the oil sand mining site may be necessary to avoid chemicals from reaching any nearby receptors. PMID:23736740

  9. The effect of quaternary element on the thermodynamic parameters and structure of CuAlMn shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksu Canbay, C.; Karagoz, Z.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the Cu-based shape memory alloys were produced by arc melting. We have investigated the effects of the alloying elements on the characteristic transformation temperatures, enthalpy, entropy values, and the structure of Cu-Al-Mn ternary system. The evolution of the transformation temperatures was studied by the differential scanning calorimetry. The characteristic transformation temperatures can be controlled by the variations in the aluminum and manganese content. Additionally, the effect of magnesium and iron on the transformation temperatures and thermodynamic parameters was investigated in the Cu-Al-Mn ternary system. The addition of the magnesium decreases the characteristic transformation temperatures of the Cu-Al-Mn system, but that of the iron increases. The structural changes of the samples were studied by X-ray diffraction measurements and optical microscope observations. Due to the low solubility of the magnesium, the magnesium addition into the Cu-Al-Mn system forms precipitates in the matrix. It is evaluated that the transformation parameters of the CuAlMn shape memory alloys can be controlled by the change of the alloying elements and the weight percentages of alloying elements.

  10. Active vibration and balance system for closed cycle thermodynamic machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass. A method is also provided.

  11. Thermodynamic parameters for binding of some halogenated inhibitors of human protein kinase CK2

    SciTech Connect

    Winiewska, Maria; Makowska, Małgorzata; Maj, Piotr; Wielechowska, Monika; Bretner, Maria; Poznański, Jarosław; Shugar, David

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Two new compounds being potential human CK2a inhibitors are studied. • Their IC50 values were determined in vitro. • The heats of binding and kbind were estimated using DSC. • The increased stability of protein–ligand complexes was followed by fluorescence. • Methylated TBBt derivative (MeBr3Br) is almost as active as TBBt. - Abstract: The interaction of human CK2α with a series of tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBBt) and tetrabromobenzimidazole (TBBz) analogs, in which one of the bromine atoms proximal to the triazole/imidazole ring is replaced by a methyl group, was studied by biochemical (IC{sub 50}) and biophysical methods (thermal stability of protein–ligand complex monitored by DSC and fluorescence). Two newly synthesized tri-bromo derivatives display inhibitory activity comparable to that of the reference compounds, TBBt and TBBz, respectively. DSC analysis of the stability of protein–ligand complexes shows that the heat of ligand binding (H{sub bind}) is driven by intermolecular electrostatic interactions involving the triazole/imidazole ring, as indicated by a strong correlation between H{sub bind} and ligand pK{sub a}. Screening, based on fluorescence-monitored thermal unfolding of protein–ligand complexes, gave comparable results, clearly identifying ligands that most strongly bind to the protein. Overall results, additionally supported by molecular modeling, confirm that a balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contribute predominantly, relative to possible intermolecular halogen bonding, in binding of the ligands to the CK2α ATP-binding site.

  12. Relevance of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of chemical vapor deposition precursors.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, J; Nagaraja, K S; Sathiyamoorthy, D

    2011-09-01

    We have studied various metallorganic and organometallic compounds by simultaneous nonisothermal thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analyses to confirm their volatility and thermal stability. The equilibrium vapor pressures of the metallorganic and organometallic compounds were determined by horizontal dual arm single furnace thermoanalyzer as transpiration apparatus. Antoine coefficients were calculated from the temperature dependence equilibrium vapor pressure data. The model-fitting solid-state kinetic analyses of Al(acac)3, (acac = acetylacetonato), Cr(CO)6, Fe(Cp)2, (Cp-cyclopentadienyl), Ga(acac)3, Mn(tmhd)3, and Y(tmhd)3 (tmhd = 2,2,6,6,-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) revealed that the processes follow diffusion controlled, contracting area and zero order model sublimation or evaporation kinetics. The activation energy for the sublimation/evaporation processes were calculated by model-free kinetic methods. Thin films of nickel and lanthanum-strontium-manganite (LSM) are grown on silicon substrate at 573 K using selected metallorganic complexes of Ni[(acac)2en], La(tmhd)3, Sr(tmhd)2 and Mn(tmhd)3 as precursors by plasma assisted liquid injection chemical vapor deposition (PA-LICVD). The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis for their composition and morphology. PMID:22097553

  13. Nanoporous activated carbon fluidized bed catalytic oxidations of aqueous o, p and m-cresols: kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Sekaran, G; Gupta, V K

    2013-07-01

    Nanoporous activated carbon prepared from rice husk through precarbonisation at 400 °C and phosphoric acid activation at 800 °C was used as fluidized bed in Fenton oxidation of the o, p and m-cresols in aqueous solution. The efficiencies of homogeneous Fenton oxidation, fluidized Fenton oxidation and aerobic biological oxidation systems for the removal of o, p and m-cresols in aqueous solution have been compared. The kinetic constants and the thermodynamic parameters for the homogeneous Fenton, heterogeneous Fenton and aerobic biological oxidations of o, p and m-cresols in synthetic wastewater were determined. The degradation of cresols in synthetic wastewater was confirmed using FT-IR, (1)H-NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy. PMID:23292221

  14. Activation parameters of flow through battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokhra, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the hydrodynamic flow of water and 45 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution through a microporous and an ion exchange separator are described. The permeability values are interpreted in terms of a pseudoactivation process. The enthalpy of activation deltaH* and the entropy of activation deltaS* were estimated from Eyring's rate equation.

  15. Removal of Anionic Dyes from Water by Potash Alum Doped Polyaniline: Investigation of Kinetics and Thermodynamic Parameters of Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Patra, Braja N; Majhi, Deola

    2015-06-25

    Polyaniline was synthesized by the oxidative polymerization method by using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The positive charge in the backbone of the polymer was generated by using Potash alum as a dopant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used for characterization of doped polyaniline. The doped polyaniline can be used for selective adsorption of various dyes (selectively sulfonated dyes) from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies regarding the effect of contact time, initial dye concentration, pH, doses of adsorbent, and temperature on adsorption kinetics were investigated. The influence of other anions like Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) on the adsorption density of dyes onto doped polyaniline was also explored. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics were found to be the most appropriate models to describe the removal of anionic dyes from water through adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)), and entropy (ΔS(0)) changes were also evaluated. The interaction of dyes with doped polyaniline was also investigated by FTIR and UV spectroscopy. PMID:26079693

  16. Thermodynamic activity measurements of U-Zr alloys by knudsen effusion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Masayoshi; Yamawaki, Michio; Koyama, Tadafumi; Morioka, Nobuo

    1988-06-01

    Vaporization of a series of U-Zr alloys, a fundamental subsystem of the promising metallic fuel U-Pu-Zr, was studied by using a tantalum Knudsen cell coupled with a mass spectrometer in the temperature range 1700-2060 K. Thermodynamic activities, partial molar Gibbs free energies and integral molar Gibbs free energies of mixing were calculated from the partial vapor pressures of uranium over these alloys. The activities of uranium exhibit negative deviations from ideality, especially in the uranium-rich composition region. Both the solidus and liquidus lines for this system estimated from the activities show negative deviations from the tentative phase diagram previously reported.

  17. Thermodynamic holography

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  18. Thermodynamic holography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  19. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts. PMID:26178185

  20. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts.

  1. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2008-08-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH+4, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO-3, HSO-4, and SO2-4 as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol+water+salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  2. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, Th.

    2008-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42- as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol + water + salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  3. Equation of state and thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter of monoclinic 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Liping

    2016-10-01

    In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were conducted on 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7) at pressures up to 6.8 GPa and temperatures up to 485 K. Within the resolution of the present diffraction data, our results do not reveal evidence for a pressure-induced structural phase transition near 2 GPa, previously observed in several vibrational spectroscopy experiments. Based on unit-cell volume measurements, the least-squares fit using the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EOS) yields K 0  =  12.6  ±  1.4 GPa and [Formula: see text]  =  11.3  ±  2.1 for the α-phase of FOX-7, which are in good agreement with recently reported values for the deuterated sample, indicating that the effect of hydrogen-deuterium substitution on the compressibility of FOX-7 is negligibly small. A thermal EOS is also obtained for the α-phase of FOX-7, including pressure dependence of thermal expansivity, (∂α/∂P)T  =  -7.0  ±  2.0  ×  10(-5) K(-1) GPa(-1), and temperature derivative of the bulk modulus, (∂K T/∂T)P  =  -1.1  ×  10(-2) GPa K(-1). From these EOS parameters, we calculate heat capacity at constant volume (C V) and thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter (γ TH) as a function of temperature. At ambient conditions, the calculated γ TH is 1.055, which is in good agreement with the value (1.09) previously obtained from density functional theory (DFT). The obtained C V, however, is 13% larger than that calculated from the first-principles calculations, indicating that the dispersion correction in the DFT calculations may need to be further improved for describing intermolecular interactions of molecular crystals. PMID:27494384

  4. [Heat resistance of "Bacillus subtilis" and "Bacillus stearothermophilus" spores in ethylene glycol, propylene glycol and butylene glycol solutions. Criticism of the use of thermodynamic parameters (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cerf, O; L'Haridon, R; Hermier, J

    1975-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of ethylene glycol (EG), 1,2-propylene glycol (PG) or 2,3-butylene glycol (BG) lower the heat resistance of B. subtilis SJ2 and B. stearothermophilus 1518 spores, and there is a linear relationship between logarithm of decimal reduction time (D) and glycol concentration. D120 degreesc values of B. subtilis spores in 0.02M, pH 7.0 phosphate buffer containing 20 per cent (w/w) EG, PG and BG are respectively 1, 0.7 and 1.1 min compared to 1.5 min in buffer alone. Corresponding values for B. stearothermophilus spores are 2, 2.4 and 3 min compared to 3.2 min. The type of glycol has little effect upon temperature coefficient z for destruction of the B. subtilis spores (average 6.9 degrees C). On the contrary, in the case of B. stearothermophilus, z increases when the number of carbons increases in the glycol molecule (from 7 to 15 degrees). The thermodynamic parameters which characterize the activation of the spore destruction reaction cannot lead to a general conclusion about a possible mechanism of destruction in the presence of chemical compounds belonging to an homologous series: the two behave diversely, and there is no "isokinetic temperature". PMID:811145

  5. Adsorption behavior of activated carbon derived from pyrolusite-modified sewage sludge: equilibrium modeling, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Jiang, Li; Ji, Xiujuan

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was developed from sewage sludge using pyrolusite as an additive. It was demonstrated that the removal efficiency of two synthetic dyes (Tracid orange GS and Direct fast turquoise blue GL) by the produced adsorbent was up to 97.6%. The activated carbon with pyrolusite addition had 38.2% higher surface area, 43.8% larger micropore and 54.4% larger mesopore production than ordinary sludge-based activated carbons. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on dyes adsorption tests. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, and the results fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equation. The experimental data fitted very well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Activation energies for the adsorption processes ranged between 8.7 and 19.1 kJ mol 1. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (deltaG0), standard enthalpy (deltaH0) and standard entropy (deltaS0) were evaluated. The adsorption of these two dyes on the activated carbon was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. PMID:22097045

  6. Distributed activation energy model parameters of some Turkish coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gunes, M.; Gunes, S.K.

    2008-07-01

    A multi-reaction model based on distributed activation energy has been applied to some Turkish coals. The kinetic parameters of distributed activation energy model were calculated via computer program developed for this purpose. It was observed that the values of mean of activation energy distribution vary between 218 and 248 kJ/mol, and the values of standard deviation of activation energy distribution vary between 32 and 70 kJ/mol. The correlations between kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model and certain properties of coal have been investigated.

  7. Thermodynamic considerations and prediction of the primary coolant activity of 99Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.; Akbari, F.; Morrison, C.; Husain, A.

    2005-04-01

    A physical model has been developed to describe the coolant activity behaviour of 99Tc, during constant and reactor shutdown operations. This analysis accounts for the fission production of technetium and molybdenum, in which their chemical form and volatility is determined by a thermodynamic treatment using Gibbs-energy minimization. The release kinetics are calculated according to the rate-controlling step of diffusional transport in the fuel matrix and vaporization from the fuel-grain surface. Based on several in-reactor tests with defective fuel elements, and as supported by the thermodynamic analysis, the model accounts for the washout of molybdenum from the defective fuel on reactor shutdown. The model also considers the recoil release of both 99Mo and 99Tc from uranium contamination, as well as a corrosion source due to activation of 98Mo. The model has provided an estimate of the activity ratio 99Tc/ 137Cs in the ion-exchange columns of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, i.e., 6 × 10 -6 (following ˜200 days of steady reactor operation) and 4 × 10 -6 (with reactor shutdown). These results are consistent with that measured by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories with a mixed-bed resin-sampling device installed in a number of Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor plants.

  8. POP-ART: thermodynamically correct activated event sampling in complex materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubynsky, M. V.; Vocks, Henk; Mousseau, Normand; Barkema, G. T.

    2006-03-01

    Dynamics of complex systems with a rugged energy landscape can be represented as a sequence of rare activated events during which the system jumps between different potential energy minima. The activation-relaxation technique (ART) [1] is an efficient method of sampling such events; however, because of an unknown bias in selecting these events it cannot easily provide thermodynamical information. We present a modification of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART) [2]. POP-ART combines short molecular dynamics runs with ART-like activated moves, with an additional accept/reject step designed to satisfy detailed balance and thus reproduce correct thermodynamics. Both correctness and efficiency of the method have been tested using a variety of systems. We mention briefly some ways of extending the approach to obtain correct dynamics as well.[1] G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4358 (1996)[2] H. Vocks, M.V. Chubynsky, G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, J. Chem. Phys., accepted

  9. Human ECG signal parameters estimation during controlled physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Marcin; Surtel, Wojciech; Dzida, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    ECG signal parameters are commonly used indicators of human health condition. In most cases the patient should remain stationary during the examination to decrease the influence of muscle artifacts. During physical activity, the noise level increases significantly. The ECG signals were acquired during controlled physical activity on a stationary bicycle and during rest. Afterwards, the signals were processed using a method based on Pan-Tompkins algorithms to estimate their parameters and to test the method.

  10. Release and Skin Permeation of Scopolamine From Thin Polymer Films in Relation to Thermodynamic Activity.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Anders; Lee, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    The object was to demonstrate if the diffusional flux of the drug out of a drug-in-adhesive-type matrix and its subsequent permeation through an excised skin membrane is a linear function of the drug's thermodynamic activity in the thin polymer film. The thermodynamic activity, ap(*), is defined here as the degree of saturation of the drug in the polymer. Both release and release/permeation of scopolamine base from 3 different poylacrylate pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) were measured. The values for ap(*) were calculated using previous published saturation solubilities, wp(s), of the drug in the PSAs. Different rates of release and release/permeation were determined between the 3 PSAs. These differences could be accounted for quantitatively by correlating with ap(*) rather than the concentration of the drug in the polymer films. At similar values for ap(*) the same release or release/permeation rates from the different polymers were measured. The differences could not be related to cross-linking or presence of ionizable groups of the polymers that should influence diffusivity. PMID:27019963

  11. Polymerase/DNA interactions and enzymatic activity: multi-parameter analysis with electro-switchable biosurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Andreas; Schräml, Michael; Strasser, Ralf; Daub, Herwin; Myers, Thomas; Heindl, Dieter; Rant, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The engineering of high-performance enzymes for future sequencing and PCR technologies as well as the development of many anticancer drugs requires a detailed analysis of DNA/RNA synthesis processes. However, due to the complex molecular interplay involved, real-time methodologies have not been available to obtain comprehensive information on both binding parameters and enzymatic activities. Here we introduce a chip-based method to investigate polymerases and their interactions with nucleic acids, which employs an electrical actuation of DNA templates on microelectrodes. Two measurement modes track both the dynamics of the induced switching process and the DNA extension simultaneously to quantitate binding kinetics, dissociation constants and thermodynamic energies. The high sensitivity of the method reveals previously unidentified tight binding states for Taq and Pol I (KF) DNA polymerases. Furthermore, the incorporation of label-free nucleotides can be followed in real-time and changes in the DNA polymerase conformation (finger closing) during enzymatic activity are observable.

  12. Does using active learning in thermodynamics lectures improve students’ conceptual understanding and learning experiences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, H.; Sharma, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Encouraging ‘active learning’ in the large lecture theatre emerges as a credible recommendation for improving university courses, with reports often showing significant improvements in learning outcomes. However, the recommendations are based predominantly on studies undertaken in mechanics. We set out to examine those claims in the thermodynamics module of a large first year physics course with an established technique, called interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs). The study took place at The University of Sydney, where four parallel streams of the thermodynamics module were divided into two streams that experienced the ILDs and two streams that did not. The programme was first implemented in 2011 to gain experience and refine logistical matters and repeated in 2012 with approximately 500 students. A validated survey, the thermal concepts survey, was used as pre-test and post-test to measure learning gains while surveys and interviews provided insights into what the ‘active learning’ meant from student experiences. We analysed lecture recordings to capture the time devoted to different activities in a lecture, including interactivity. The learning gains were in the ‘high gain’ range for the ILD streams and ‘medium gain’ for the other streams. The analysis of the lecture recordings showed that the ILD streams devoted significantly more time to interactivity while surveys and interviews showed that students in the ILD streams were thinking in deep ways. Our study shows that ILDs can make a difference in students’ conceptual understanding as well as their experiences, demonstrating the potential value-add that can be provided by investing in active learning to enhance lectures.

  13. Calculation of the standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of KCl{sup 0} and activity coefficients of aqueous KCl at temperatures and pressures to 1000{degree}C and 5 kbar

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovskii, V.A.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1997-06-01

    Regression of experimental activity coefficient and dissociation constant data reported in the literature with the Hueckel and Setchenow equations and the revised HKF equations of state generated parameters and thermodynamic properties of dissociated KCl and KCl{sup 0} at 25{degrees}C and bar that can be used to calculate the standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of KCl{sup 0} and the activity coefficients of KCl at temperatures and pressures to 1000{degrees}C and 5 kbar. 46 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. A procedure to find thermodynamic equilibrium constants for CO2 and CH4 adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Trinh, T T; van Erp, T S; Bedeaux, D; Kjelstrup, S; Grande, C A

    2015-03-28

    Thermodynamic equilibrium for adsorption means that the chemical potential of gas and adsorbed phase are equal. A precise knowledge of the chemical potential is, however, often lacking, because the activity coefficient of the adsorbate is not known. Adsorption isotherms are therefore commonly fitted to ideal models such as the Langmuir, Sips or Henry models. We propose here a new procedure to find the activity coefficient and the equilibrium constant for adsorption which uses the thermodynamic factor. Instead of fitting the data to a model, we calculate the thermodynamic factor and use this to find first the activity coefficient. We show, using published molecular simulation data, how this procedure gives the thermodynamic equilibrium constant and enthalpies of adsorption for CO2(g) on graphite. We also use published experimental data to find similar thermodynamic properties of CO2(g) and of CH4(g) adsorbed on activated carbon. The procedure gives a higher accuracy in the determination of enthalpies of adsorption than ideal models do. PMID:25732332

  15. SteamTablesGrid: An ActiveX control for thermodynamic properties of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra P.

    2011-04-01

    An ActiveX control, steam tables grid ( StmTblGrd) to speed up the calculation of the thermodynamic properties of pure water is developed. First, it creates a grid (matrix) for a specified range of temperature (e.g. 400-600 K with 40 segments) and pressure (e.g. 100,000-20,000,000 Pa with 40 segments). Using the ActiveX component SteamTables, the values of selected properties of water for each element (nodal point) of the 41×41 matrix are calculated. The created grid can be saved in a file for its reuse. A linear interpolation within an individual phase, vapor or liquid is implemented to calculate the properties at a given value of temperature and pressure. A demonstration program to illustrate the functionality of StmTblGrd is written in Visual Basic 6.0. Similarly, a methodology is presented to explain the use of StmTblGrd in MS-Excel 2007. In an Excel worksheet, the enthalpy of 1000 random datasets for temperature and pressure is calculated using StmTblGrd and SteamTables. The uncertainty in the enthalpy calculated with StmTblGrd is within ±0.03%. The calculations were performed on a personal computer that has a "Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.2 GHz, RAM 1.0 GB" processor and Windows XP. The total execution time for the calculation with StmTblGrd was 0.3 s, while it was 60.0 s for SteamTables. Thus, the ActiveX control approach is reliable, accurate and efficient for the numerical simulation of complex systems that demand the thermodynamic properties of water at several values of temperature and pressure like steam flow in a geothermal pipeline network.

  16. Thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of trinitrotoluene adsorption on powdered activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.W.; Hwang, K.J.; Shim, W.G.; Moon, I.S.

    2006-07-01

    Regulations on the removal of trinitrotoluene (TNT) from wastewater have become increasingly more stringent, demanding faster, less expensive, and more efficient treatment. This study focuses on the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of TNT on powered activated carbons (PAC). Three types of PACs (i.e., wood based, coal based, and coconut-shell based) were studied as functions of temperature and pH. Thermodynamic properties including Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy, were evaluated by applying the Van't Hoff equation. In addition, the adsorption energy distribution functions which describe heterogeneous characteristics of porous solid sorbents were calculated by using the generalized nonlinear regularization method. Adsorption kinetic studies were carried out in batch adsorber under important conditions such as PAC types, temperature, pH, and concentration. We found that fast and efficient removal of TNT dissolved in water can be successfully achieved by PAC adsorption.

  17. Combinatorial influence of environmental parameters on transcription factor activity

    PubMed Central

    Knijnenburg, T.A.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Reinders, M.J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Cells receive a wide variety of environmental signals, which are often processed combinatorially to generate specific genetic responses. Changes in transcript levels, as observed across different environmental conditions, can, to a large extent, be attributed to changes in the activity of transcription factors (TFs). However, in unraveling these transcription regulation networks, the actual environmental signals are often not incorporated into the model, simply because they have not been measured. The unquantified heterogeneity of the environmental parameters across microarray experiments frustrates regulatory network inference. Results: We propose an inference algorithm that models the influence of environmental parameters on gene expression. The approach is based on a yeast microarray compendium of chemostat steady-state experiments. Chemostat cultivation enables the accurate control and measurement of many of the key cultivation parameters, such as nutrient concentrations, growth rate and temperature. The observed transcript levels are explained by inferring the activity of TFs in response to combinations of cultivation parameters. The interplay between activated enhancers and repressors that bind a gene promoter determine the possible up- or downregulation of the gene. The model is translated into a linear integer optimization problem. The resulting regulatory network identifies the combinatorial effects of environmental parameters on TF activity and gene expression. Availability: The Matlab code is available from the authors upon request. Contact: t.a.knijnenburg@tudelft.nl Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18586711

  18. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  19. Superposition-additive approach in the description of thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization of substituted alkanes at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Belyaeva, E A; Fomina, E S; Vasylyev, A O; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R

    2012-12-01

    The superposition-additive approach developed previously was shown to be applicable for the calculations of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and atomization of conjugate systems, their dipole polarizability, molecular diamagnetic susceptibility, π-electronic ring currents, etc. In the present work, the applicability of this approach for the calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization at the water/air interface of alkanes, fatty alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, nitriles, fatty acids (C(n)H(2n+1)X, X is the functional group) and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids (C(n)H(2n-1)COOH) is studied. Using the proposed approach the thermodynamic quantities determined agree well with the available data, either calculated using the semiempirical (PM3) quantum chemical method, or obtained in experiments. In particular, for enthalpy and Gibbs' energy of the formation of substituted alkane monomers from the elementary substances, and their absolute entropy, the standard deviations of the values calculated according to the superposition-additive scheme with the mutual superimposition domain C(n-2)H(2n-4) (n is the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain) from the results of PM3 calculations for alkanes, alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, fatty acids, nitriles and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids are respectively: 0.05, 0.004, 2.87, 0.02, 0.01, 0.77, and 0.01 kJ/mol for enthalpy; 2.32, 5.26, 4.49, 0.53, 1.22, 1.02, 5.30 J/(molK) for absolute entropy; 0.69, 1.56, 3.82, 0.15, 0.37, 0.69, 1.58 kJ/mol for Gibbs' energy, whereas the deviations from the experimental data are: 0.52, 5.75, 1.40, 1.00, 4.86 kJ/mol; 0.52, 0.63, 1.40, 6.11, 2.21 J/(molK); 2.52, 5.76, 1.58, 1.78, 4.86 kJ/mol, respectively (for nitriles and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids experimental data are not available). The proposed approach provides also quite accurate estimates of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of boiling and melting, critical temperatures and standard heat

  20. Thermodynamics of Metal Composites Based on Polyvinylchloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolupaev, B. B.; Lyashuk, T. G.; Kolupaev, B. S.

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of experimental investigations of the thermodynamic properties of composites based on polyvinylchloride and copper nanoparticles obtained by electrical explosion of the conductor. It has been established that the thermodynamic potentials H and G in determining the system parameters (s, T, p, V) depend nonlinearly on the temperature and content of the filler. β- and α-relaxation transitions as a general phenomenon characteristic of the fluctuation structure of polyvinylchloride are observed thereby. The introduction of a nanodispersed metal filler into polyvinylchloride increases the amount of activation energy and the time of "settled" life of the structural elements, changing the thermodynamic stability of the composite.

  1. Entanglement thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliemann, John

    2014-09-01

    We investigate further the relationship between the entanglement spectrum of a composite many-body system and the energy spectrum of a subsystem making use of concepts of canonical thermodynamics. In many important cases the entanglement Hamiltonian is, in the limit of strong coupling between subsystems, proportional to the energy Hamiltonian of the subsystem. The proportionality factor is an appropriately defined coupling parameter, suggesting to interpret the latter as a inverse temperature. We identify a condition on the entanglement Hamiltonian which rigorously guarantees this interpretation to hold and removes any ambiguity in the definition of the entanglement Hamiltonian regarding contributions proportional to the unit operator. Illustrations of our findings are provided by spin ladders of arbitrary spin length, and by bilayer quantum Hall systems at total filling factor ν = 2. Within mean-field description, the latter system realizes an entanglement spectrum of free fermions with just two levels of equal modulus where the analogies to canonical thermodynamics are particularly close.

  2. Thermodynamic compatibility of actives encapsulated into PEG-PLA nanoparticles: In Silico predictions and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Erlebach, Andreas; Ott, Timm; Otzen, Christoph; Schubert, Stephanie; Czaplewska, Justyna; Schubert, Ulrich S; Sierka, Marek

    2016-09-15

    Achieving optimal solubility of active substances in polymeric carriers is of fundamental importance for a number of industrial applications, including targeted drug delivery within the growing field of nanomedicine. However, its experimental optimization using a trial-and-error approach is cumbersome and time-consuming. Here, an approach based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the Flory-Huggins theory is proposed for rapid prediction of thermodynamic compatibility between active species and copolymers comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments. In contrast to similar methods, our approach offers high computational efficiency by employing MD simulations that avoid explicit consideration of the actual copolymer chains. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated for compatibility predictions between pyrene and nile red as model dyes as well as indomethacin as model drug and copolymers containing blocks of poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(lactic acid) in different ratios. The results of the simulations are directly verified by comparison with the observed encapsulation efficiency of nanoparticles prepared by nanoprecipitation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27425625

  3. Chlorination pattern effect on thermodynamic parameters and environmental degradability for C10-SCCPs: Quantum chemical calculation based on virtual combinational library.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuzhen; Pan, Wenxiao; Lin, Yuan; Fu, Jianjie; Zhang, Aiqian

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are still controversial candidates for inclusion in the Stockholm Convention. The inherent mixture nature of SCCPs makes it rather difficult to explore their environmental behaviors. A virtual molecule library of 42,720 C10-SCCP congeners covering the full structure spectrum was constructed. We explored the structural effects on the thermodynamic parameters and environmental degradability of C10-SCCPs through semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations. The thermodynamic properties were acquired using the AM1 method, and frontier molecular orbital analysis was carried out to obtain the EHOMO, ELUMO and ELUMO-EHOMO for degradability exploration at the same level. The influence of the chlorination degree (NCl) on the relative stability and environmental degradation was elucidated. A novel structural descriptor, μ, was proposed to measure the dispersion of the chlorine atoms within a molecule. There were significant correlations between thermodynamic values and NCl, while the reported NCl-dependent pollution profile of C10-SCCPs in environmental samples was basically consistent with the predicted order of formation stability of C10-SCCP congeners. In addition, isomers with large μ showed higher relative stability than those with small μ. This could be further verified by the relationship between μ and the reactivity of nucleophilic substitution and OH attack respectively. The C10-SCCP congeners with less Cl substitution and lower dispersion degree are susceptible to environmental degradation via nucleophilic substitution and hydroxyl radical attack, while direct photolysis of C10-SCCP congeners cannot readily occur due to the large ELUMO-EHOMO values. The chlorination effect and the conclusions were further checked with appropriate density functional theory (DFT) calculations. PMID:26899657

  4. Sensor Data Acquisition and Processing Parameters for Human Activity Classification

    PubMed Central

    Bersch, Sebastian D.; Azzi, Djamel; Khusainov, Rinat; Achumba, Ifeyinwa E.; Ries, Jana

    2014-01-01

    It is known that parameter selection for data sampling frequency and segmentation techniques (including different methods and window sizes) has an impact on the classification accuracy. For Ambient Assisted Living (AAL), no clear information to select these parameters exists, hence a wide variety and inconsistency across today's literature is observed. This paper presents the empirical investigation of different data sampling rates, segmentation techniques and segmentation window sizes and their effect on the accuracy of Activity of Daily Living (ADL) event classification and computational load for two different accelerometer sensor datasets. The study is conducted using an ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) based on 32 different window sizes, three different segmentation algorithm (with and without overlap, totaling in six different parameters) and six sampling frequencies for nine common classification algorithms. The classification accuracy is based on a feature vector consisting of Root Mean Square (RMS), Mean, Signal Magnitude Area (SMA), Signal Vector Magnitude (here SMV), Energy, Entropy, FFTPeak, Standard Deviation (STD). The results are presented alongside recommendations for the parameter selection on the basis of the best performing parameter combinations that are identified by means of the corresponding Pareto curve. PMID:24599189

  5. Meaning and Measurability of Single-Ion Activities, the Thermodynamic Foundations of pH, and the Gibbs Free Energy for the Transfer of Ions between Dissimilar Materials

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Alan L

    2015-01-01

    Considering the relationship between concentration and vapor pressure (or the relationship between concentration and fugacity) single-ion activity coefficients are definable in purely thermodynamic terms. The measurement process involves measuring a contact potential between a solution and an external electrode. Contact potentials are measurable by using thermodynamically reversible processes. Extrapolation of an equation to zero concentration and ionic strength enables determination of single-ion activity coefficients. Single-ion activities can be defined and measured without using any extra-thermodynamic assumptions, concepts, or measurements. This method could serve as a gold standard for the validation of extra-thermodynamic methods for determining single-ion activities. Furthermore, it places the concept of pH on a thermodynamically solid foundation. Contact potential measurements can also be used to determine the Gibbs free energy for the transfer of ions between dissimilar materials. PMID:25919971

  6. Meaning and Measurability of Single-Ion Activities, the Thermodynamic Foundations of pH, and the Gibbs Free Energy for the Transfer of Ions between Dissimilar Materials.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Alan L

    2015-06-22

    Considering the relationship between concentration and vapor pressure (or the relationship between concentration and fugacity) single-ion activity coefficients are definable in purely thermodynamic terms. The measurement process involves measuring a contact potential between a solution and an external electrode. Contact potentials are measurable by using thermodynamically reversible processes. Extrapolation of an equation to zero concentration and ionic strength enables determination of single-ion activity coefficients. Single-ion activities can be defined and measured without using any extra-thermodynamic assumptions, concepts, or measurements. This method could serve as a gold standard for the validation of extra-thermodynamic methods for determining single-ion activities. Furthermore, it places the concept of pH on a thermodynamically solid foundation. Contact potential measurements can also be used to determine the Gibbs free energy for the transfer of ions between dissimilar materials. PMID:25919971

  7. Comparing the removal of perchlorate when using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon: adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie C; Hsu, Yung S; Hsu, Kai L; Chou, Ming S; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to remove perchlorate using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon (GAC). Dynamic and equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed to evaluate the thermodynamic behavior of perchlorate on SWCNTs and GAC. Key parameters affecting the adsorption, such as pH, ionic strength, and temperature were studied. The experimental results showed that the dynamic adsorption experiment achieved equilibrium in approximately eight hours. The adsorption capacity increased as the concentration of perchlorate increased or as the ionic strength decreased. The selected adsorption models were the modified Freundlich, the pseudo-1st-order, and the pseudo-2nd-order equations. The results showed that the modified Freundlich equation best described the kinetic adsorption processes. The maximal adsorption capacities of GAC and SWCNTs were 33.87-28.21 mg/g and 13.64 - 10.03 mg/g, respectively, at a constant temperature between 5°C and 45°C. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the equilibrium constant (K0 ), the standard free energy changes (ΔG°), the standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and the standard entropy change (ΔS°), were obtained. The results of the isothermal equilibrium adsorption experiment showed that low pH levels, low ionic strength, and low-temperature conditions facilitated the perchlorate adsorption, indicating that GAC and SWCNTs are potential absorbents for water treatment. PMID:24410681

  8. Measurement of physiological parameters during brain activation usingfMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ching-Mei Janet

    The changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO 2), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) are correlated with the changes in blood deoxyhemoglobin content that determine the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Both CBF and CBV have been widely measured and well understood by previous studies, while CMRO2 measurement is still in development. The central hypothesis of the proposed study is that those physiological parameters can be simulated by biophysical models with fixed parameters and measured directly. The goal of this proposal is to test the central hypothesis. In summary, this dissertation focused on measurements of physiological parameters in two image modalities. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) were studied in chapters II to IV. It is going to help to understand human brain metabolism during neuronal activity. Chapter V compared two image modalities---MR and PET and furthermore determine beta* in existing MR model for clinic use. This dissertation shows that the characteristics of BOLD signal can be examined by balloon model in both block-designed and event-related designed paradigm. The dynamic change of CMRO2 and OER using event-related fMRI can be measured using existing biophysical model proposed by Kim and his coworker in 1999. Furthermore, PET experiment was used to determine the parameters contained in Kim's model. This dissertation verify the central hypothesis that we made early on and we expect CMRO2 model with fixed parameters will bring a big impact in research and clinical use.

  9. Influence of selected physicochemical parameters on microbiological activity of mucks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Całka, A.; Sokołowska, Z.; Warchulska, P.; Dąbek-Szreniawska, M.

    2009-04-01

    One of the basic factor decided about soil fertility are microorganisms that together with flora, determine trend and character of biochemical processes as well totality of fundamental transformations connected with biogeochemistry and physicochemical properties of soil. Determination of general bacteria number, quantity of selected groups of microorganisms and investigation of respiration intensity let estimate microbiological activity of soil. Intensity of microbiological processes is directly connected with physicochemical soil parameters. In that case, such structural parameters as bulk density, porosity, surface or carbon content play significant role. Microbiological activity also changes within the bounds of mucks with different stage of humification and secondary transformation. Knowledge of relations between structural properties, microorganism activity and degree of transformation and humification can lead to better understanding microbiological processes as well enable to estimate microbiological activity at given physicochemical conditions and at progressing process of soil transformation. The study was carried out on two peaty-moorsh (muck) soils at different state of secondary transformation and humification degree. Soil samples were collected from Polesie Lubelskie (layer depth: 5 - 25 cm). Investigated mucks originated from soils formed from low peatbogs. Soil sample marked as I belonged to muck group weakly secondary transformed. Second sample (II) represented soil group with middle stage of secondary transformation. The main purpose of the research was to examine the relations between some physicochemical and surface properties and their biological activity. Total number and respiration activity of microorganisms were determined. The effectiveness of utilizing the carbon substances from the soil by the bacteria increased simultaneously with the transformation state of the peat-muck soils. Quantity of organic carbon decreased distinctly in the soil

  10. The significant role of the rare earth ions on the elastic and thermodynamic parameters of LiCoDy- and ZnCoCe-ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishay, Samiha T.

    2006-06-01

    Two types of rare earth ferrites [Li 0.6Co 0.1Dy xFe 2.3-xO 4; 0.0⩽ x⩽0.2] and [Zn 0.5Co 0.5Ce yFe 2-yO 4; 0.0⩽ y⩽0.2] were prepared by standard ceramic technique with a view to investigate their elastic behavior and some essential thermodynamic parameters. The elastic properties were studied by measuring the ultrasonic velocities by adopting the pulse transmission technique. Longitudinal ( V) and shear ( V) velocities, Young's modulus ( E), Debye temperature ( θ) and specific heat capacity ( C) have been evaluated for all the investigated samples. The rare earth content as well as its ionic radius plays a significant role in the evaluated parameters. According to the experimental results, the two investigated types of rare earth ferrite are considered as insulator magnetic solids. It was found that for each composition there exists a characteristic temperature, down to which the resonance frequency of the investigated samples drops smoothly, but above this temperature the resonance frequency stays constant. Accordingly, these samples seem to be of importance in industrial applications especially in the field of electronics.

  11. Theoretical study on stability, mechanical properties and thermodynamic parameters of the orthorhombic-A2N2O (A=C, Si and Ge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yingchun

    2012-06-01

    The structural stability, mechanical properties and thermodynamic parameters such as Debye temperature, minimum thermal conductivities of orthorhombic-A2N2O (A=C, Si and Ge) are calculated by first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The calculated lattice parameters, elastic constants of Si2N2O and Ge2N2O using PBEsol function are consisted with the experimental data and other calculated values. The full set elastic constants of the orthorhombic-A2N2O (A=C, Si and Ge) are calculated by stress-strain method. The mechanical moduli (bulk modulus, shear modulus and Young's modulus) are evaluated by the Voigt-Reuss-Hill approach. The orthorhombic-C2N2O exhibits larger mechanical moduli than the other two structures. The hardness of orthorhombic-A2N2O (A=C, Si and Ge) is evaluated according to the intrinsic hardness calculation theory of covalent crystal relying on Mulliken overlap population. The results indicate that the orthorhombic-C2N2O is a super hard material. Furthermore, the mechanical anisotropy, Debye temperature and minimum thermal conductivity of the orthorhombic-A2N2O (A=C, Si and Ge) have been estimated by empirical methods. The orthorhombic-Ge2N2O shows the lowest thermal conductivity, which may have useful applications as gas turbine engines and diesel engines.

  12. Thermodynamic properties and cloud droplet activation of a series of oxo-acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, Mia; Platt, Stephen; Zardini, Alessandro; Bilde, Merete

    2010-05-01

    Submicron sized aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere influence visibility, human health, and global climate (IPCC, 2007). The organic mass fraction of the atmospheric aerosol has been estimated at 20-90% of the total aerosol mass mass (Kanakidou et al., 2005). Many of the organic species found in the particle phase in the atmosphere are produced via the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions such as terpenes and sesquiterpenes (Hallquist et al. 2009). We have investigated the thermodynamic properties of four aliphatic oxo-dicarboyxlic acids identified or thought to be present in atmospheric particulate matter: oxosuccinic acid, 2-oxoglutaric acid, 3-oxoglutaric acid, and 4-oxopimelic acid. The compounds were characterized in terms of their cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, vapor pressure, density, and tendency to decarboxylate in aqueous solution. We deployed a variety of experimental techniques and instruments: a CCN counter, a Tandem Differential Mobililty Analyzer (TDMA) coupled with a laminar flow tube (Bilde, 2003), and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Generally, the presence of the oxo functional group causes the vapor pressure of the compounds to diminish by an order of magnitude with respect to the parent dicarboxylic acid, and it tends to increase the CCN activity. Dicarboxylic acids with an oxo-group in the β-position were found to decarboxylate in aqueous solution. IPCC: Climate Change (2007): The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. Kanakidou, M., Seinfeld, J. H., Pandis, S. N., Barnes, I., Dentener, F. J., Facchini, M. C., Van Dingenen, R., Ervens, B., Nenes, A., Nielsen, C. J., Swietlicki, E., Putaud, J. P., Balkanski, Y., Fuzzi, S., Horth, J., Moortgat, G. K., Winterhalter, R., Myhre, C. E. L., Tsigaridis, K., Vignati, E., Stephanou, E. G., and Wilson, J (2005). Atmos

  13. Statistical Thermodynamics of Chain Molecular Fluids: Equation of State Parameters for PVT Scaling and Their Group Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahsi, Ugur

    Extensive experimental studies of fluid hydrocarbons in the lubricating range of molar mass have been undertaken sometime ago by American Petroleum Institute Project 42, located in the Departments of Chemistry and Physics at Pennsylvania State University. In these studies systematic structural changes were introduced, so that the equation of state (e.o.s.) as well as the viscosities of linear paraffins, branched hydrocarbons, and various rings attached to n-alkanes tails are known. Hence this material became the basis for various semi-empirical or empirical structural correlations. We proceed here with the hole theory of Simha-Somcynsky (SS) which has proven quantitatively successful for low as well as high molar mass system and examine e.o.s. data. We demonstrate the success of the theory and obtain the characteristic volume (nu^*), energy ( varepsilon^*) and flexibility (c) parameters as functions of chain length for the different structures. For the short chains in question these represent averages over the terminal and internal units. By suitable generalization of the SS theory developed for physical mixtures we decompose these averages into the individual group contributions. The accuracy of the numerical procedures employed is tested by back computations. Sometime ago A. Bondi developed structural rules for the computation of Van der Waals excluded group volumes. Interesting correlations between these and the above nu ^* values, defined for a 6-12 potential, are obtained. In the same way we examine correlations between D. W. Van Krevelen's and P. J. Hoftyzer's cohesive group energies and varepsilon^* values.

  14. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  15. Solvent Stability Study with Thermodynamic Analysis and Superior Biocatalytic Activity of Burkholderia cepacia Lipase Immobilized on Biocompatible Hybrid Matrix of Poly(vinyl alcohol) and Hypromellose.

    PubMed

    Badgujar, Kirtikumar C; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2014-12-26

    In the present study, we have synthesized a biocompatible hybrid carrier of hypromellose (HY) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) for immobilization of Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL). The immobilized biocatalyst HY:PVA:BCL was subjected to determination of half-life time (τ) and deactivation rate constant (K(D)) in various organic solvents. Biocatalyst showed higher τ-value in a nonpolar solvent like cyclohexane (822 h) as compared to that of a polar solvent such as acetone (347 h), which signifies better compatibility of biocatalyst in the nonpolar solvents. Furthermore, the K(D)-value was found to be less in cyclohexane (0.843 × 10(-3)) as compared to acetone (1.997 × 10(-3)), indicating better stability in the nonpolar solvents. Immobilized-BCL (35 mg) was sufficient to achieve 99% conversion of phenethyl butyrate (natural constituent of essential oils and has wide industrial applications) using phenethyl alcohol (2 mmol) and vinyl butyrate (6 mmol) at 44 °C in 3 h. The activation energy (E(a)) was found to be lower for immobilized-BCL than crude-BCL, indicating better catalytic efficiency of immobilized lipase BCL. The immobilized-BCL reported 6-fold superior biocatalytic activity and 8 times recyclability as compared to crude-BCL. Improved catalytic activity of immobilized enzyme in nonpolar media was also supported by thermodynamic activation parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH(⧧)), entropy (ΔS(⧧)) and Gibb's free energy (ΔG(⧧)) study, which showed that phenethyl butyrate synthesis catalyzed by immobilized-BCL was feasible as compared to crude-BCL. The present work explains a thermodynamic investigation and superior biocatalytic activity for phenethyl butyrate synthesis using biocompatible immobilized HY:PVA:BCL in nonaqueous media for the first time. PMID:25474503

  16. Effects of solutes on thermodynamic activity of tritium in liquid lithium blanket of fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lyublinski, I.E.; Evtikhin, V.A.; Krassine, V.P.

    1995-10-01

    The study of tritium dissolved in liquid lithium systems containing metallic impurities is of technological interest for tritium removal processes and suppression of the tritium leakages from the blanket in a fusion reactor. The interaction parameter formalism and coordination cluster theory have been used to calculate the tritium activity coefficients in Li-T-Al, Li-T-Mg, Li-T-Si, Li-T-Y and Li-T-La systems. Calculations performed demonstrated that silicon, aluminum and magnesium have no influence on the tritium activity coefficients in dilute lithium solutions within the temperature range 400-800{degree}C, but yttrium and lanthanum may be used to effectively decrease this coefficient in lithium melts. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. [Value of electrogastrographic parameters in evaluation of gastric myoelectrical activity].

    PubMed

    Tabor, S; Thor, P J; Pitala, A; Laskiewicz, J

    1999-01-01

    Electrogastrography (EGG) is presently the only non-invasive method for the evaluation of gastric myoelectrical activity. In relation to the more and more described disturbances of the basic electrical rhythm in different pathological units EGG has been applied on a still larger scale. However, the data obtained from the EGG record do not reflect directly the gastric motility. This method allows only to make an indirect evaluation of the gastric motor disturbances. It still entails a great number of investigations so as to attain a better precisions of the evaluations of its clinical usefulness in gastroenterological diagnostics. This thesis presents the basic information on the methodology, the parameters under evaluation and the clinical application of the EGG method. PMID:10909472

  18. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner’99 and Turner’04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  19. Synthesis and properties of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles for removal of aniline from aqueous solution: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, powder activated carbon (PAC) and magnetic nanoparticles of iron (III) oxide were used for synthesis of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles (AC-Fe3O4 MNPs) as an adsorbent for the removal of aniline. The characteristics of adsorbent were evaluated by SEM, TEM, XRD and BET. Also, the impact of different parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, aniline initials concentration and solution temperature were studied. The experimental data investigated by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and two models kinetically of pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order. The results indicated that the adsorption followed Langmuir and pseudo second-order models with correlation r2 > 0.98 and r2 > 0.99, respectively. The equilibrium time was obtained after 5 h. According to Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity was 90.91 mg/g at pH = 6, and 20°C. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that adsorption of aniline on magnetic activated carbon was exothermic and spontaneous. This synthesized AC-Fe3O4 MNPs due to have advantages such as easy and rapid separation from solution could be applied as an adsorbent effective for removal of pollutants such as aniline from water and wastewater. PMID:23414171

  20. Molecular structure, spectroscopy (FT-IR, FT-Raman), thermodynamic parameters, molecular electrostatic potential and HOMO-LUMO analysis of 2, 6-dichlorobenzamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yaping; Han, Ligang; Li, Xiaofeng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Zhaojun

    2016-03-01

    2, 6-dichlorobenzamide is the degradation product of 2, 6-dichlorobenzonitrile, which is often used as herbicide and can cause groundwater pollution. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2, 6-dichlorobenzamide at room temperature were recorded and analyzed in the range 4000-400 and 3700-100 cm-1, respectively. In order to obtain the most stable structure, a potential energy surface (PES) scan for internal rotations was carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The optimized geometry, structural parameters energies, theoretical IR and Raman spectra for the title compound have been obtained by employing B3LYP exchange-correlation functional with high-quality aug-cc-pVTZ basis-set. Detailed vibrational assignments of vibrational spectra have been made on the basis of the potential energy distributions (PED) analysis. In addition, the HOMO-LUMO gap and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were studied theoretically. Finally, the thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, entropy, enthalpy, and Gibbs free energy) of 2, 6-dichlorobenzamide were obtained in the range of 100-1000 K.

  1. New general pore size distribution model by classical thermodynamics application: Activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A model is developed using classical thermodynamics to characterize pore size distributions (PSDs) of materials containing micropores and mesopores. The thermal equation of equilibrium adsorption (TEEA) is used to provide thermodynamic properties and relate the relative pore filling pressure of vapors to the characteristic pore energies of the adsorbent/adsorbate system for micropore sizes. Pore characteristic energies are calculated by averaging of interaction energies between adsorbate molecules and adsorbent pore walls as well as considering adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. A modified Kelvin equation is used to characterize mesopore sizes by considering variation of the adsorbate surface tension and by excluding the adsorbed film layer for the pore size. The modified-Kelvin equation provides similar pore filling pressures as predicted by density functional theory. Combination of these models provides a complete PSD of the adsorbent for the micropores and mesopores. The resulting PSD is compared with the PSDs from Jaroniec and Choma and Horvath and Kawazoe models as well as a first-order approximation model using Polanyi theory. The major importance of this model is its basis on classical thermodynamic properties, less simplifying assumptions in its derivation compared to other methods, and ease of use.

  2. Thermodynamics of geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1981-03-01

    A model to predict the thermodynamic properties of geothermal brines, based on a minimum amount of experimental data on a few key systems, is tested. Volumetric properties of aqueous sodium chloride, taken from the literature, are represented by a parametric equation over the range 0 to 300{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 1 kbar. Density measurements at 20 bar needed to complete the volumetric description also are presented. The pressure dependence of activity and thermal properties, derived from the volumetric equation, can be used to complete an equation of state for sodium chloride solutions. A flow calorimeter, used to obtain heat capacity data at high temperatures and pressures, is described. Heat capacity measurements, from 30 to 200{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 200 bar, are used to derive values for the activity coefficient and other thermodynamic properties of sodium sulfate solutions as a function of temperature. Literature data on the solubility of gypsum in mixed electrolyte solutions have been used to evaluate model parameters for calculating gypsum solubility in seawater and natural brines. Predictions of strontium and barium sulfate solubility in seawater also are given.

  3. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, Leslie

    2013-10-15

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy

  4. Errors in Sounding of the Atmosphere Using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Kinetic Temperature Caused by Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Comas, Maya; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Bermejo-Pantaleon, D.; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Gordley, L. L.; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The vast set of near global and continuous atmospheric measurements made by the SABER instrument since 2002, including daytime and nighttime kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) from 20 to 105 km, is available to the scientific community. The temperature is retrieved from SABER measurements of the atmospheric 15 micron CO2 limb emission. This emission separates from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions in the rarefied mesosphere and thermosphere, making it necessary to consider the CO2 vibrational state non-LTE populations in the retrieval algorithm above 70 km. Those populations depend on kinetic parameters describing the rate at which energy exchange between atmospheric molecules take place, but some of these collisional rates are not well known. We consider current uncertainties in the rates of quenching of CO2 (v2 ) by N2 , O2 and O, and the CO2 (v2 ) vibrational-vibrational exchange to estimate their impact on SABER T(sub k) for different atmospheric conditions. The T(sub k) is more sensitive to the uncertainty in the latter two and their effects depend on altitude. The T(sub k) combined systematic error due to non-LTE kinetic parameters does not exceed +/- 1.5 K below 95 km and +/- 4-5 K at 100 km for most latitudes and seasons (except for polar summer) if the Tk profile does not have pronounced vertical structure. The error is +/- 3 K at 80 km, +/- 6 K at 84 km and +/- 18 K at 100 km under the less favourable polar summer conditions. For strong temperature inversion layers, the errors reach +/- 3 K at 82 km and +/- 8 K at 90 km. This particularly affects tide amplitude estimates, with errors of up to +/- 3 K.

  5. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Reynier, Yvan; Yazami, Rachid; Fultz, Brent T.

    2009-09-29

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  6. The Combined Strength of Thermodynamics and Comparative Planetology: Application of Activity Models to Core Formation in Terrestrial Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent models for accretion of terrestrial bodies involve metal-silicate equilibrium as the metallic core formed during growth. Most elements considered are either refractory or well studied elements for which effects of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, and metallic liquid composition are well known. There are a large number of elements that are both siderophile and volatile, whose fate in such models is unknown, largely due to a lack of data at comparable conditions and com-positions (FeNi core with light elements such as S, C, Si, and O). We have focused on Ge, In, As, Sb and determined the effect of Si and C on metal-silicate partitioning, and developed a thermo-dynamic model that allows application of these new data to a wide range of planetary bodies. New experiments: We have previously carried out experiments with FeSi metallic liquid at C-saturated conditions at 1600 and 1800 C [4]. In a new series of experiments we investigate the effect of Si in carbon-free systems at 1600 C for comparison. Experiments were carried out at 1 GPa in MgO capsules using the same basaltic starting composition as in previous studies. The MgO capsule reacts with the silicate melt to form more MgO-rich liquids that have 22-26 wt% MgO. Experimental met-als and silicates were analyzed using a combination of electron microprobe analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS. Results: The new results can be interpreted by considering Ge as an example, in the simple exchange equilibrium Fe + GeO = FeO + Ge, where the equilibrium constant Kd can be examined as a function of Si content of the metal. The slope of lnKd vs. (1-XSi) for this new series allows derivation of the epsilon interaction parameter for each of these four elements and Si (both C-saturated and C-free).All four elements have positive epsilon values, indicating that Si causes a decrease in the partition coefficients; values are 6.6, 6.5, 27.8 and 25.2 for In, Ge, As, and Sb, respectively, at 1 GPa and 1600 C. As an example of

  7. A Practical Integrated Approach to Supramolecular Chemistry III. Thermodynamics of Inclusion Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Benito, Jesus; Garcia-Santos, M. Pilar; O'Brein, Emma; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2004-01-01

    A practical approach for familiarizing students with the thermodynamics of the inclusion phenomena is described. The experiment facilitates calculation of the activation parameters corresponding to the reactions involved in the inclusion mechanism.

  8. Thermodynamic Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaston, Scot

    1999-02-01

    Thermodynamic data such as equilibrium constants, standard cell potentials, molar enthalpies of formation, and standard entropies of substances can be a very useful basis for an organized presentation of knowledge in diverse areas of applied chemistry. Thermodynamic data can become particularly useful when incorporated into thermodynamic diagrams that are designed to be easy to recall, to serve as a basis for reconstructing previous knowledge, and to determine whether reactions can occur exergonically or only with the help of an external energy source. Few students in our chemistry-based courses would want to acquire the depth of knowledge or rigor of professional thermodynamicists. But they should nevertheless learn how to make good use of thermodynamic data in their professional occupations that span the chemical, biological, environmental, and medical laboratory fields. This article discusses examples of three thermodynamic diagrams that have been developed for this purpose. They are the thermodynamic energy account (TEA), the total entropy scale, and the thermodynamic scale diagrams. These diagrams help in the teaching and learning of thermodynamics by bringing the imagination into the process of developing a better understanding of abstract thermodynamic functions, and by allowing the reader to keep track of specialist thermodynamic discourses in the literature.

  9. Thermodynamics of tryptophan-mediated activation of the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Craig A; Manfredo, Amanda; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2006-06-27

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) functions in many bacilli to control the expression of the tryptophan biosynthesis genes. Transcription of the trp operon is controlled by TRAP through an attenuation mechanism, in which competition between two alternative secondary-structural elements in the 5' leader sequence of the nascent mRNA is influenced by tryptophan-dependent binding of TRAP to the RNA. Previously, NMR studies of the undecamer (11-mer) suggested that tryptophan-dependent control of RNA binding by TRAP is accomplished through ligand-induced changes in protein dynamics. We now present further insights into this ligand-coupled event from hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Scanning calorimetry showed tryptophan dissociation to be independent of global protein unfolding, while analysis of the temperature dependence of the binding enthalpy by ITC revealed a negative heat capacity change larger than expected from surface burial, a hallmark of binding-coupled processes. Analysis of this excess heat capacity change using parameters derived from protein folding studies corresponds to the ordering of 17-24 residues per monomer of TRAP upon tryptophan binding. This result is in agreement with qualitative analysis of residue-specific broadening observed in TROSY NMR spectra of the 91 kDa oligomer. Implications for the mechanism of ligand-mediated TRAP activation through a shift in a preexisting conformational equilibrium and an induced-fit conformational change are discussed. PMID:16784236

  10. A Time-Frequency Analysis of the Effects of Solar Activities on Tropospheric Thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard K.; Kyle, H. Lee; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Whether the Sun has significantly influenced the climate during the last century has been under extensive debates for almost two decades. Since the solar irradiance varies very little in a solar cycle, it is puzzling that some geophysical parameters show proportionally large variations which appear to be responding to the solar cycles. For example, variation in low altitude clouds is shown correlated with solar cycle, and the onset of Forbush decrease is shown correlated with the reduction of the vorticity area index. A possible sun-climate connection is that galactic cosmic rays modulated by solar activities influence cloud formation. In this paper, we apply wavelet transform to satellite and surface data to examine this hypothesis. Data analyzed include the time series for solar irradiance, sunspots, UV index, temperature, cloud coverage, and neutron counter measurements. The interactions among the elements in the Earth System under the external and internal forcings give out very complex signals.The periodicity of the forcings or signals could range widely. Since wavelet transforms can analyze multi-scale phenomena that are both localized in frequency and time, it is a very useful technique for detecting, understanding and monitoring climate changes.

  11. Free energy calculation using molecular dynamics simulation combined with the three dimensional reference interaction site model theory. I. Free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration along a coupling parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Tatsuhiko; Ikuta, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Fumio

    2010-07-01

    This article proposes a free energy calculation method based on the molecular dynamics simulation combined with the three dimensional reference interaction site model theory. This study employs the free energy perturbation (FEP) and the thermodynamic integration (TDI) along the coupling parameters to control the interaction potential. To illustrate the method, we applied it to a complex formation process in aqueous solutions between a crown ether molecule 18-Crown-6 (18C6) and a potassium ion as one of the simplest model systems. Two coupling parameters were introduced to switch the Lennard-Jones potential and the Coulomb potential separately. We tested two coupling procedures: one is a "sequential-coupling" to couple the Lennard-Jones interaction followed by the Coulomb coupling, and the other is a "mixed-coupling" to couple both the Lennard-Jones and the Coulomb interactions together as much as possible. The sequential-coupling both for FEP and TDI turned out to be accurate and easily handled since it was numerically well-behaved. Furthermore, it was found that the sequential-coupling had relatively small statistical errors. TDI along the mixed-coupling integral path was to be carried out carefully, paying attention to a numerical behavior of the integrand. The present model system exhibited a nonmonotonic behavior in the integrands for TDI along the mixed-coupling integral path and also showed a relatively large statistical error. A coincidence within a statistical error was obtained among the results of the free energy differences evaluated by FEP, TDI with the sequential-coupling, and TDI with the mixed-coupling. The last one is most attractive in terms of the computer power and is accurate enough if one uses a proper set of windows, taking the numerical behavior of the integrands into account. TDI along the sequential-coupling integral path would be the most convenient among the methods we tested, since it seemed to be well-balanced between the computational

  12. High-temperature thermodynamic activities of zirconium in platinum alloys determined by nitrogen-nitride equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.A.

    1980-05-01

    A high-temperature nitrogen-nitride equilibrium apparatus is constructed for the study of alloy thermodynamics to 2300/sup 0/C. Zirconium-platinum alloys are studied by means of the reaction 9ZrN + 11Pt ..-->.. Zr/sub 9/Pt/sub 11/ + 9/2 N/sub 2/. Carful attention is paid to the problems of diffusion-limited reaction and ternary phase formation. The results of this study are and a/sub Zr//sup 1985/sup 0/C/ = 2.4 x 10/sup -4/ in Zr/sub 9/Pt/sub 11/ ..delta..G/sub f 1985/sup 0/C//sup 0/ Zr/sub 9/Pt/sub 11/ less than or equal to -16.6 kcal/g atom. These results are in full accord with the valence bond theory developed by Engel and Brewer; this confirms their prediction of an unusual interaction of these alloys.

  13. Poisson Parameters of Antimicrobial Activity: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sestraş, Radu E.; Jäntschi, Lorentz; Bolboacă, Sorana D.

    2012-01-01

    A contingency of observed antimicrobial activities measured for several compounds vs. a series of bacteria was analyzed. A factor analysis revealed the existence of a certain probability distribution function of the antimicrobial activity. A quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis for the overall antimicrobial ability was conducted using the population statistics associated with identified probability distribution function. The antimicrobial activity proved to follow the Poisson distribution if just one factor varies (such as chemical compound or bacteria). The Poisson parameter estimating antimicrobial effect, giving both mean and variance of the antimicrobial activity, was used to develop structure-activity models describing the effect of compounds on bacteria and fungi species. Two approaches were employed to obtain the models, and for every approach, a model was selected, further investigated and found to be statistically significant. The best predictive model for antimicrobial effect on bacteria and fungi species was identified using graphical representation of observed vs. calculated values as well as several predictive power parameters. PMID:22606039

  14. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  15. Surface valence transformation during thermal activation and hydrogenation thermodynamics of Mg-Ni-Y melt-spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiebang; Song, Wenjie; Kou, Hongchao; Li, Jinshan

    2016-05-01

    In this work, phase compositions and chemical valence states on the surface and subsurface of Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) ribbons during thermal activation have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that the surface contaminants of melt-spun ribbons are mainly MgO, NiO, Y2O3 and organics. The oxides/hydroxides of Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) melt-spun ribbons are removed from the surface during thermal activation. Surface chemical valence firstly transforms from oxidized state to the metallic one during thermal activation, which accounts for hydrogenation of Mg67Ni33-xYx melt-spun ribbons. Hydrogen absorption capacities of Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) melt-spun ribbons are enhanced with the increase of cycle numbers during thermal activation. Hydrogenation thermodynamics of activated Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) melt-spun ribbons have been also compared and correlated with the surface valence transformation. The obtained enthalpy of hydride formation is -55.5, -50.5, -46.9 and -48.6 kJ/mol for Mg67Ni33-xYx melt-spun ribbons with x = 0, 1, 3 and 6, respectively.

  16. Kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of a novel low-temperature-active xylanase from Arthrobacter sp. GN16 isolated from the feces of Grus nigricollis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junpei; Liu, Yu; Shen, Jidong; Zhang, Rui; Tang, Xianghua; Li, Junjun; Wang, Yiyan; Huang, Zunxi

    2015-01-01

    We previously presented the cloning, heterologous expression, and characterization of a novel multidomain endoxylanase from Arthrobacter sp. GN16 isolated from the feces of Grus nigricollis. Molecular and biochemical characterization studies indicate that the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 domain at the N-terminus of the multidomain xylanase (rXynAGN16L) is a low-temperature-active endoxylanase. Many low-temperature-active enzymes contain regions of high local flexibility related to their kinetic and thermodynamic properties compared with mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. However, the thermodynamic property of low-temperature-active xylanases, including rXynAGN16L, has rarely been reported. In this study, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of rXynAGN16L were determined using different substrates and temperature conditions to completely characterize its activity properties. The kinetic property of rXynAGN16L is similar to some low-temperature-active GH 10 endoxylanases. Moreover, the thermodynamic property indicates that rXynAGN16L is typically characterized as a low-temperature-active enzyme. PMID:25587940

  17. Semiannual variation of the geomagnetic activity and solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, M.; Moreno, G.; Parisi, M.; Storini, M.

    1993-10-01

    The semiannual variation of the geomagnetic activity is investigated in connection with a large set of solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data (4494 daily averages from 1965 to 1987). Our analysis confirms that the geomagnetic activity (described by the aa index), is mainly modulated by the southward component of the magnetic field (BS), as suggested by Russell and McPherron. On the other hand, it is also found that the solar wind velocity (V) has a relevant role in this phenomenon. In fact, the amplitude of the aa modulation is best correlated with the function BSV2. We also explore the linkage between the annual trend of aa and the sunspot activity (1868-1989), showing that the modulation of the geomagnetic activity follows a more regular pattern during the descending phase of the solar cycle than during the rising and maximum parts.

  18. Simple thermodynamic model of unassisted proton shuttle uncoupling and prediction of activity from calculated speciation, lipophilicity, and molecular geometry.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Louis C

    2012-06-21

    A mechanistic model of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by lipophilic weak acids (i.e. proton shuttles) was developed for the purposes of predicting the relative activity of xenobiotics of widely varying structure and of guiding the design of optimized derivatives. The model is based on thermodynamic premises not formulated elsewhere that allow for the calculation of steady-state conditions and of rate of energy dissipation on the basis of acid-dissociation and permeability behavior, the later estimated from partitioning behavior and geometric considerations. Moreover, permeability of either the neutral or of the ionized species is proposed to be effectively enhanced under conditions of asymmetrical molecular distribution. Finally, special considerations were developed to accommodate multi-protic compounds. The comparison of predicted to measured activity for a diverse testset of 48 compounds of natural origin spanning a wide range of activity yielded a Spearman's rho of 0.90. The model was used to tentatively identify several novel proton shuttles, as well as to elucidate core structures particularly conducive to proton shuttle activity from which optimized derivatives can be designed. Principles of design were formulated and examples of derivatives projected to be active at concentrations on the order of 10(-7)M are proposed. Among these are di-protic compounds predicted to shuttle two protons per cycle iteration and proposed to maximally exploit the proton shuttle mechanism. This work promotes the design of highly active, yet easily-metabolized uncouplers for therapeutic applications, namely the indirect activation of AMP-kinase, as well as for various industrial applications where low persistence is desirable. PMID:22425608

  19. Quantifying planetary limits of Earth system processes relevant to human activity using a thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Food, water, and energy play, obviously, a central role in maintaining human activity. In this contribution, I derive estimates for the fundamental limits on the rates by which these resources are provided by Earth system processes and the levels at which these can be used sustainably. The key idea here is that these resources are, directly or indirectly, generated out of the energy associated with the absorption of sunlight, and that the energy conversions from sunlight to other forms ultimately limit the generation of these resources. In order to derive these conversion limits, we need to trace the links between the processes that generate food, water and energy to the absorption of sunlight. The resource "food" results from biomass production by photosynthesis, which requires light and a sufficient magnitude of gas exchange of carbon dioxide at the surface, which is maintained by atmospheric motion which in turn is generated out of differential radiative heating and cooling. The resource "water" is linked to hydrologic cycling, with its magnitude being linked to the latent heat flux of the surface energy balance and water vapor transport in the atmosphere which is also driven by differential radiative heating and cooling. The availability of (renewable) energy is directly related to the generation of different forms of energy of climate system processes, such as the kinetic energy of atmospheric motion, which, again, relates to radiative heating differences. I use thermodynamics and its limits as a basis to establish the planetary limits of these processes and use a simple model to derive first-order estimates. These estimates compare quite well with observations, suggesting that this thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system provides an objective, physical basis to define and quantify planetary boundaries as well as the factors that shape these boundaries.

  20. Conformational and Thermodynamic Landscape of GPCR Activation from Theory and Computation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sijia S; Goddard, William A; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-06-21

    We present a hybrid computational methodology to predict multiple energetically accessible conformations for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that might play a role in binding to ligands and different signaling partners. To our knowledge, this method, termed ActiveGEnSeMBLE, enables the first quantitative energy profile for GPCR activation that is consistent with the qualitative profile deduced from experiments. ActiveGEnSeMBLE starts with a systematic coarse grid sampling of helix tilts/rotations (∼13 trillion transmembrane-domain conformations) and selects the conformational landscape based on energy. This profile identifies multiple potential active-state energy wells, with the TM3-TM6 intracellular distance as an approximate activation coordinate. These energy wells are then sampled locally using a finer grid to find locally minimized conformation in each energy well. We validate this strategy using the inactive and active experimental structures of β2 adrenergic receptor (hβ2AR) and M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Structures of membrane-embedded hβ2AR along its activation coordinate are subjected to molecular-dynamics simulations for relaxation and interaction energy analysis to generate a quantitative energy landscape for hβ2AR activation. This landscape reveals several metastable states along this coordinate, indicating that for hβ2AR, the agonist alone is not enough to stabilize the active state and that the G protein is necessary, consistent with experimental observations. The method's application to somatostatin receptor SSTR5 (no experimental structure available) shows that to predict an active conformation it is better to start from an inactive structure template based on a close homolog than to start from an active template based on a distant homolog. The energy landscape for hSSTR5 activation is consistent with hβ2AR in the role of the G protein. These results demonstrate the utility of the ActiveGEnSeMBLE method for predicting

  1. Plasma parameters of an active cathode during relativistic magnetron operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Y.; Kweller, T.; Sayapin, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2009-09-01

    The results of time- and space-resolved spectroscopic studies of the plasma produced at the surface of the ferroelectric cathode during the operation of an S-band relativistic magnetron generating ˜50 MW microwave power at f =3005 MHz and powered by a linear induction accelerator (LIA) (150 kV, 1.5 kA, 250 ns) are presented. The surface plasma was produced by a driving pulse (3 kV, 150 ns) prior to the application of the LIA accelerating high-voltage pulse. The cathode plasma electron density and temperature were obtained by analyzing hydrogen Hα and Hβ, and carbon ions CII and CIII spectral lines, and using the results of nonstationary collision radiative modeling. It was shown that the microwave generation causes an increase in plasma ion and electron temperature up to ˜4 and ˜7 eV, respectively, and the plasma density increases up to ˜7×1014 cm-3. Estimates of the plasma transport parameters and its interaction with microwave radiation are also discussed.

  2. Investigation of metal binding and activation of Escherichia coli glyoxalase I: kinetic, thermodynamic and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed Central

    Clugston, Susan L; Yajima, Rieko; Honek, John F

    2004-01-01

    GlxI (glyoxalase I) isomerizes the hemithioacetal formed between glutathione and methylglyoxal. Unlike other GlxI enzymes, Escherichia coli GlxI exhibits no activity with Zn(2+) but maximal activation with Ni(2+). To elucidate further the metal site in E. coli GlxI, several approaches were undertaken. Kinetic studies indicate that the catalytic metal ion affects the k (cat) without significantly affecting the K (m) for the substrate. Inductively coupled plasma analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed one metal ion bound to the enzyme, including Zn(2+), which produces an inactive enzyme. Isothermal titration calorimetry was utilized to determine the relative binding affinity of GlxI for various bivalent metals. Each metal ion examined bound very tightly to GlxI with an association constant ( K (a))>10(7) M(-1), with the exception of Mn(2+) ( K (a) of the order of 10(6) M(-1)). One of the ligands to the catalytic metal, His(5), was altered to glutamine, a side chain found in the Zn(2+)-active Homo sapiens GlxI. The affinity of the mutant protein for all bivalent metals was drastically decreased. However, low levels of activity were now observed for Zn(2+)-bound GlxI. Although this residue has a marked effect on metal binding and activation, it is not the sole factor determining the differential metal activation between the human and E. coli GlxI enzymes. PMID:14556652

  3. Stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Aurell, Erik

    2014-04-01

    'Stochastic thermodynamics as a conceptual framework combines the stochastic energetics approach introduced a decade ago by Sekimoto [1] with the idea that entropy can consistently be assigned to a single fluctuating trajectory [2]'. This quote, taken from Udo Seifert's [3] 2008 review, nicely summarizes the basic ideas behind stochastic thermodynamics: for small systems, driven by external forces and in contact with a heat bath at a well-defined temperature, stochastic energetics [4] defines the exchanged work and heat along a single fluctuating trajectory and connects them to changes in the internal (system) energy by an energy balance analogous to the first law of thermodynamics. Additionally, providing a consistent definition of trajectory-wise entropy production gives rise to second-law-like relations and forms the basis for a 'stochastic thermodynamics' along individual fluctuating trajectories. In order to construct meaningful concepts of work, heat and entropy production for single trajectories, their definitions are based on the stochastic equations of motion modeling the physical system of interest. Because of this, they are valid even for systems that are prevented from equilibrating with the thermal environment by external driving forces (or other sources of non-equilibrium). In that way, the central notions of equilibrium thermodynamics, such as heat, work and entropy, are consistently extended to the non-equilibrium realm. In the (non-equilibrium) ensemble, the trajectory-wise quantities acquire distributions. General statements derived within stochastic thermodynamics typically refer to properties of these distributions, and are valid in the non-equilibrium regime even beyond the linear response. The extension of statistical mechanics and of exact thermodynamic statements to the non-equilibrium realm has been discussed from the early days of statistical mechanics more than 100 years ago. This debate culminated in the development of linear response

  4. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-jie; Qin, Ye-bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-fei

    2013-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1 530.67 mg2/g and 0.782 6 cm3/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue. PMID:23825151

  5. Probabilistic parameter estimation of activated sludge processes using Markov Chain Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Soroosh; Murthy, Sudhir; Takács, Imre; Massoudieh, Arash

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important challenges in making activated sludge models (ASMs) applicable to design problems is identifying the values of its many stoichiometric and kinetic parameters. When wastewater characteristics data from full-scale biological treatment systems are used for parameter estimation, several sources of uncertainty, including uncertainty in measured data, external forcing (e.g. influent characteristics), and model structural errors influence the value of the estimated parameters. This paper presents a Bayesian hierarchical modeling framework for the probabilistic estimation of activated sludge process parameters. The method provides the joint probability density functions (JPDFs) of stoichiometric and kinetic parameters by updating prior information regarding the parameters obtained from expert knowledge and literature. The method also provides the posterior correlations between the parameters, as well as a measure of sensitivity of the different constituents with respect to the parameters. This information can be used to design experiments to provide higher information content regarding certain parameters. The method is illustrated using the ASM1 model to describe synthetically generated data from a hypothetical biological treatment system. The results indicate that data from full-scale systems can narrow down the ranges of some parameters substantially whereas the amount of information they provide regarding other parameters is small, due to either large correlations between some of the parameters or a lack of sensitivity with respect to the parameters. PMID:24384542

  6. Application of zeolite-activated carbon macrocomposite for the adsorption of Acid Orange 7: isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chi Kim; Bay, Hui Han; Neoh, Chin Hong; Aris, Azmi; Abdul Majid, Zaiton; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the adsorption behavior of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) from aqueous solution onto macrocomposite (MC) was investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorbent, MC, which consists of a mixture of zeolite and activated carbon, was found to be effective in removing AO7. The MC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray, point of zero charge, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. A series of experiments were performed via batch adsorption technique to examine the effect of the process variables, namely, contact time, initial dye concentration, and solution pH. The dye equilibrium adsorption was investigated, and the equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Tempkin isotherm models. The Langmuir isotherm model fits the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm model. For the kinetic study, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion model were used to fit the experimental data. The adsorption kinetic was found to be well described by the pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption process is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectral and high performance liquid chromatography analysis were carried out before and after the adsorption process. For the phytotoxicity test, treated AO7 was found to be less toxic. Thus, the study indicated that MC has good potential use as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solution. PMID:23653315

  7. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-09-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with

  8. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with

  9. Towards an integrated determination of thermodynamic density and gravity parameters using accelerometer measurements on board of low-orbit satellite missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, Jürgen; Forootan, Ehsan; Löcher, Anno; Henze, Christina; Börger, Klaus; Schall, Judith

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop an integrated approach, which allows a) to measure the neutral density of the thermosphere using orbit and accelerometer information from various satellite missions and b) to relate them to operational atmospheric models. The satellite missions to be considered will include low-orbit satellites CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE and SWARM; laser-ranging satellites such as LAGEOS; as well as altimetry satellites such as Topex/Poseidon and Jason 1-2. On the other hand different atmospheric models, including Jacchia-Bowman, MSIS 86, MSISE 90, and NRLMSISE-00 models, will be investigated with respect to their sensitivity to geomagnetic activity and sunspot cycle etc. and they will be used to determine a theoretical acceleration due to air drag. Subsequently, we will compare the "computed" atmospheric density with the total mass density ("observed" atmospheric density) retrieved from accelerometer measurements made on board the satellites during their operational period. Based on these results we finally will develop a method - a so called "integrated approach" - that allows the joint determination of thermospherical, instrumental, and gravitational parameters, as well as their respective errors and correlations.

  10. Sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro; Manepally, Chandrika; Fedors, Randall; Wyrick, Danielle Y.

    2009-09-01

    Active fractures refer to the portions of unsaturated, connected fractures that actively conduct water. The active fracture model parameter accounts for the reduction in the number of fractures carrying water and in the fracture-matrix interface area in field-scale simulations of flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rocks. One example includes the numerical analyses of the fault test results at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada (USA). In such applications, the active fracture model parameter is commonly used as a calibration parameter without relating it to fracture network orientations and infiltration rates. A two-dimensional, multiphase lattice-Boltzmann model was used in this study to investigate the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios for an unsaturated, variable dipping, and geometrically simple fracture network. The active fracture model parameter differed by as much as 0.11-0.44 when the effects of fracture network orientation, injection rate, and injection mode were included in the simulations. Hence, the numerical results suggest that the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation, injection rates, and injection modes should be explored at the field-scale to strengthen the technical basis and range of applicability of the active fracture model.

  11. Focus on stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Broeck, Christian; Sasa, Shin-ichi; Seifert, Udo

    2016-02-01

    We introduce the thirty papers collected in this ‘focus on’ issue. The contributions explore conceptual issues within and around stochastic thermodynamics, use this framework for the theoretical modeling and experimental investigation of specific systems, and provide further perspectives on and for this active field.

  12. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  13. Thermodynamic Metrics and Optimal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2012-05-08

    A fundamental problem in modern thermodynamics is how a molecular-scale machine performs useful work, while operating away from thermal equilibrium without excessive dissipation. To this end, we derive a friction tensor that induces a Riemannian manifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within the linear-response regime, this metric structure controls the dissipation of finite-time transformations, and bestows optimal protocols with many useful properties. We discuss the connection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism, and demonstrate the utility of this metric by solving for optimal control parameter protocols in a simple nonequilibrium model.

  14. Descriptive thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, David; Huntsman, Steven

    2006-06-01

    Thermodynamics (in concert with its sister discipline, statistical physics) can be regarded as a data reduction scheme based on partitioning a total system into a subsystem and a bath that weakly interact with each other. Whereas conventionally, the systems investigated require this form of data reduction in order to facilitate prediction, a different problem also occurs, in the context of communication networks, markets, etc. Such “empirically accessible” systems typically overwhelm observers with the sort of information that in the case of (say) a gas is effectively unobtainable. What is required for such complex interacting systems is not prediction (this may be impossible when humans besides the observer are responsible for the interactions) but rather, description as a route to understanding. Still, the need for a thermodynamical data reduction scheme remains. In this paper, we show how an empirical temperature can be computed for finite, empirically accessible systems, and further outline how this construction allows the age-old science of thermodynamics to be fruitfully applied to them.

  15. Thermodynamic Properties of HCFC-124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Masato; Watanabe, Naohiro

    Thermodynamic properties of HCFC-124, such as saturated densities, vapor pressures and PVT properties, were measured and the critical parameters were determined through those experimental results. The correlations for vapor pressure, saturated liquid density and PVT properties deduced from those experimental results were compared with the measured data and also with the estimates of the other correlations published in literatures. The thermodynamic functions, such as enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, etc., can reasonably be calculated from the correlation equations in this paper.

  16. Adaptability and Prediction of Anticipatory Muscular Activity Parameters to Different Movements in the Sitting Position.

    PubMed

    Chikh, Soufien; Watelain, Eric; Faupin, Arnaud; Pinti, Antonio; Jarraya, Mohamed; Garnier, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Voluntary movement often causes postural perturbation that requires an anticipatory postural adjustment to minimize perturbation and increase the efficiency and coordination during execution. This systematic review focuses specifically on the relationship between the parameters of anticipatory muscular activities and movement finality in sitting position among adults, to study the adaptability and predictability of anticipatory muscular activities parameters to different movements and conditions in sitting position in adults. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Springer-Link, Engineering Village, and EbscoHost. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to retain the most rigorous and specific studies, yielding 76 articles, Seventeen articles were excluded at first reading, and after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 23 were retained. In a sitting position, central nervous system activity precedes movement by diverse anticipatory muscular activities and shows the ability to adapt anticipatory muscular activity parameters to the movement direction, postural stability, or charge weight. In addition, these parameters could be adapted to the speed of execution, as found for the standing position. Parameters of anticipatory muscular activities (duration, order, and amplitude of muscle contractions constituting the anticipatory muscular activity) could be used as a predictive indicator of forthcoming movement. In addition, this systematic review may improve methodology in empirical studies and assistive technology for people with disabilities. PMID:27440765

  17. The effect of dependence between vapor heat capacity, specific heat of evaporation-condensation of irrigating liquid and temperature on thermodynamic parameters of processes gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khromova, Helen; Oparina, Irene

    2014-08-01

    The results of parameters calculations of the vapor-gas flow and droplets of irrigating liquid in application to the conditions of flue gas cooling in the reactors of the soda ash workshop at "Azot" limited company, Kemerovo, are compared.

  18. Thymidylate synthase expression and activity: relation to S-phase parameters and 5-fluorouracil sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Mirjolet, J. F.; Barberi-Heyob, M.; Merlin, J. L.; Marchal, S.; Etienne, M. C.; Milano, G.; Bey, P.

    1998-01-01

    Six human cancer cell lines exhibiting a large range of sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were evaluated for thymidylate synthase (TS) and p53 gene expression, TS and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity, as well as cell cycle parameters, S-phase fraction (SPF), bromodeoxyuridine labelling index (LI) and S-phase duration (SPD). All these parameters were investigated for 7 days in asynchronously growing cell populations and compared with the cell sensitivity to 5-FU. No significant correlation was found between S-phase parameters and TS gene expression and/or activity. TS activity was higher in proliferating cells; however, it was not significantly higher in rapidly growing cell lines with short SPD. Neither TS gene expression nor activity was found to correlate with 5-FU sensitivity. On the another hand, a statistically significant correlation (P < 0.0001) was observed between LI and SPD and 5-FU sensitivity. The present results suggest that cell cycle parameters such as SPD and/or LI could be better parameters for 5-FU sensitivity prediction than TS gene expression and/or activity. This could be especially informative in cases of concomitant radio-chemotherapy as S-phase parameters are already proposed for hyperfractionated radiotherapy planning. PMID:9662252

  19. Exact solution of the thermodynamics and size parameters of a polymer confined to a lattice of finite size: Large chain limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Chad R.; Guttman, Charles M.; Di Marzio, Edmund A.

    2014-01-01

    We extend the exact solutions of the Di Marzio-Rubin matrix method for the thermodynamic properties, including chain density, of a linear polymer molecule confined to walk on a lattice of finite size. Our extensions enable (a) the use of higher dimensions (explicit 2D and 3D lattices), (b) lattice boundaries of arbitrary shape, and (c) the flexibility to allow each monomer to have its own energy of attraction for each lattice site. In the case of the large chain limit, we demonstrate how periodic boundary conditions can also be employed to reduce computation time. Advantages to this method include easy definition of chemical and physical structure (or surface roughness) of the lattice and site-specific monomer-specific energetics, and straightforward relatively fast computations. We show the usefulness and ease of implementation of this extension by examining the effect of energy variation along the lattice walls of an infinite rectangular cylinder with the idea of studying the changes in properties caused by chemical inhomogeneities on the surface of the box. Herein, we look particularly at the polymer density profile as a function of temperature in the confined region for very long polymers. One particularly striking result is the shift in the critical condition for adsorption due to surface energy inhomogeneities and the length scale of the inhomogeneities; an observation that could have important implications for polymer chromatography. Our method should have applications to both copolymers and biopolymers of arbitrary molar mass.

  20. Exact solution of the thermodynamics and size parameters of a polymer confined to a lattice of finite size: Large chain limit

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Chad R. Guttman, Charles M.; Di Marzio, Edmund A.

    2014-01-21

    We extend the exact solutions of the Di Marzio-Rubin matrix method for the thermodynamic properties, including chain density, of a linear polymer molecule confined to walk on a lattice of finite size. Our extensions enable (a) the use of higher dimensions (explicit 2D and 3D lattices), (b) lattice boundaries of arbitrary shape, and (c) the flexibility to allow each monomer to have its own energy of attraction for each lattice site. In the case of the large chain limit, we demonstrate how periodic boundary conditions can also be employed to reduce computation time. Advantages to this method include easy definition of chemical and physical structure (or surface roughness) of the lattice and site-specific monomer-specific energetics, and straightforward relatively fast computations. We show the usefulness and ease of implementation of this extension by examining the effect of energy variation along the lattice walls of an infinite rectangular cylinder with the idea of studying the changes in properties caused by chemical inhomogeneities on the surface of the box. Herein, we look particularly at the polymer density profile as a function of temperature in the confined region for very long polymers. One particularly striking result is the shift in the critical condition for adsorption due to surface energy inhomogeneities and the length scale of the inhomogeneities; an observation that could have important implications for polymer chromatography. Our method should have applications to both copolymers and biopolymers of arbitrary molar mass.

  1. [The motor activity as an age parameter of the rat (authors transl)].

    PubMed

    Hofecker, G; Kment, A; Niedermüller, H

    1978-05-01

    The motor activity as an behavioural parameter provides information about the functional state of the organism as a whole. Therefore it is an important age parameter. The results of activity measurements, however, depend strongly on the method of registration. Using 3 groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 9, 15 and 29 months two methods have been tested: 1) An electronic recording: the rats were registrated in their normal cages on the Animex-Activity-Meter during the dark-phase in complete darkness. The activity measured by this method has been regarded as spontaneous activity. 2) A kinematographic method: the rats were registrated in a changed environment at constant light during the dark-phase. The activity assessed by this method has been regarded as reactive activity. Spontaneous and reactive activity show a different age dependence. For the use of the motor activity as an age parameter, both, spontaneous and reactive activity, should be assessed to get a better information about the ageing of the different functional levels of the systems governing the animal's behaviour. PMID:26274

  2. Stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure is studied. The stochastic deformation is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables such as deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). Gauge symmetries of thermodynamics and corresponding stochastic mechanics, which describes fluctuations of a thermodynamic system, are revealed and gauge fields are introduced. A physical interpretation to the gauge transformations and gauge fields is given. An application of the formalism to a description of systems with distributed parameters in a local thermodynamic equilibrium is considered.

  3. Stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure.

    PubMed

    Kazinski, P O

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure is studied. The stochastic deformation is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables such as deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). Gauge symmetries of thermodynamics and corresponding stochastic mechanics, which describes fluctuations of a thermodynamic system, are revealed and gauge fields are introduced. A physical interpretation to the gauge transformations and gauge fields is given. An application of the formalism to a description of systems with distributed parameters in a local thermodynamic equilibrium is considered. PMID:19256999

  4. Thermodynamic modeling for organic solid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.H.

    1992-12-01

    A generalized predictive model which is based on thermodynamic principle for solid-liquid phase equilibrium has been developed for organic solid precipitation. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, composition, and activity coefficient on the solubility of wax and asphaltenes in organic solutions. The solid-liquid equilibrium K-value is expressed as a function of the heat of melting, melting point temperature, solubility parameter, and the molar volume of each component in the solution. All these parameters have been correlated with molecular weight. Thus, the model can be applied to crude oil systems. The model has been tested with experimental data for wax formation and asphaltene precipitation. The predicted wax appearance temperature is very close to the measured temperature. The model not only can match the measured asphaltene solubility data but also can be used to predict the solubility of asphaltene in organic solvents or crude oils. The model assumes that asphaltenes are dissolved in oil in a true liquid state, not in colloidal suspension, and the precipitation-dissolution process is reversible by changing thermodynamic conditions. The model is thermodynamically consistent and has no ambiguous assumptions.

  5. A Thermodynamic and Kenetic Study of the Heterolytic Activation of Hydrogen by Frustrated Borane-Amine Lewis Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Parab, Kshitij; Camaioni, Donald M.; Neiner, Doinita; Cho, Herman M.; Nielsen, Thomas K.; Autrey, Thomas

    2013-01-21

    Calorimetry is used to measure the reaction enthalpies of hydrogen activation by 2,6-lutidine (Lut), 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (TMP), N-methyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (MeTMP) and tri-tert-butylphosphine (TBP) with tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane (BCF). At 6.6 bar H2 the conversion of the Lewis acid Lewis base pair to the corresponding ionic pair in bromobenzene at 294 K was quantitative in under 60 minutes. Integration of the heat release from the reaction of the Frustrated Lewis Pair (FLP) with hydrogen as a function of time yields a relative rate of hydrogenation in addition to the enthalpy of hydrogenation. The half-lives of hydrogenation range from 230 seconds with TMP, ΔHH2 = -31.5(0.2) kcal/mol, to 1400 seconds with Lut, ΔHH2 = -23.4(0.4) kcal/mol. The 11B NMR spectrum of B(C6F5)3 in bromobenzene exhibits three distinct traits depending on the sterics of the Lewis base; (i) in the presence of pyridine, only the dative bond adduct pyridine--B(C6F5)3 is observed, (ii) in the presence of TMP and MeTMP only the free B(C6F5)3 is observed, and (iii) in the presence of Lut both the free B(C6F5)3 and the Lut--B(C6F5)3 adduct appear in equilibrium. A measure of the change in Keq of Lut + B(C6F5)3 <->Lut--B(C6F5)3 as a function of temperature provides thermodynamic properties of the Lewis acid Lewis base adduct, ΔH = -17.9(1.0) kcal/mol and a ΔS = -49.2(2.5) cal/mol K, suggesting the Lut--B(C6F5)3 adduct is more stable in bromobenzene than in toluene. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. D.M.C. and A.K. acknowledges support by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform kinetic analyses of the calorimetry data. The work was performed in part at EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research. EMSL is located at

  6. Statistical Thermodynamics of Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Devireddy, Ram V.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of the major issues involved in the statistical thermodynamic treatment of phospholipid membranes at the atomistic level is summarized: thermodynamic ensembles, initial configuration (or the physical system being modeled), force field representation as well as the representation of long-range interactions. This is followed by a description of the various ways that the simulated ensembles can be analyzed: area of the lipid, mass density profiles, radial distribution functions (RDFs), water orientation profile, Deuteurium order parameter, free energy profiles and void (pore) formation; with particular focus on the results obtained from our recent molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of phospholipids interacting with dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO), a commonly used cryoprotective agent (CPA). PMID:19460363

  7. Quantifying the Sensitivity of Energy Fluxes to Land Surface Parameter Selection Using the Active Subspace Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, J.; Gilbert, J. M.; Maxwell, R. M.; Constantine, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Complex hydrologic models are commonly used as computational tools to assess and quantify fluxes at the land surface and for forecasting and prediction purposes. When estimating water and energy fluxes from vegetated surfaces, the equations solved within these models require that multiple input parameters be specified. Some parameters characterize land cover properties while others are constants used to model physical processes like transpiration. As a result, it becomes important to understand the sensitivity of output flux estimates to uncertain input parameters. The active subspace method identifies the most important direction in the high-dimensional space of model inputs. Perturbations of input parameters in this direction influence output quantities more, on average, than perturbations in other directions. The components of the vector defining this direction quantify the sensitivity of the model output to the corresponding inputs. Discovering whether or not an active subspace exists is computationally efficient compared to several other sensitivity analysis methods. Here, we apply this method to evaluate the sensitivity of latent, sensible and ground heat fluxes from the ParFlow-Common Land Model (PF-CLM). Of the 19 input parameters used to specify properties of a grass covered surface, between three and six parameters are identified as important for heat flux estimates. Furthermore, the 19-dimenision input parameter space is reduced to one active variable and the relationship between the inputs and output fluxes for this case is described by a quadratic polynomial. The input parameter weights and the input-output relationship provide a powerful combination of information that can be used to understand land surface dynamics. Given the success of this proof-of-concept example, extension of this method to identify important parameters within the transpiration computation will be explored.

  8. Prediction of Geomagnetic Activity and Key Parameters in High-Latitude Ionosphere-Basic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    Prediction of geomagnetic activity and related events in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere is an important task of the Space Weather program. Prediction reliability is dependent on the prediction method and elements included in the prediction scheme. Two main elements are a suitable geomagnetic activity index and coupling function -- the combination of solar wind parameters providing the best correlation between upstream solar wind data and geomagnetic activity. The appropriate choice of these two elements is imperative for any reliable prediction model. The purpose of this work was to elaborate on these two elements -- the appropriate geomagnetic activity index and the coupling function -- and investigate the opportunity to improve the reliability of the prediction of geomagnetic activity and other events in the Earth's magnetosphere. The new polar magnetic index of geomagnetic activity and the new version of the coupling function lead to a significant increase in the reliability of predicting the geomagnetic activity and some key parameters, such as cross-polar cap voltage and total Joule heating in high-latitude ionosphere, which play a very important role in the development of geomagnetic and other activity in the Earth s magnetosphere, and are widely used as key input parameters in modeling magnetospheric, ionospheric, and thermospheric processes.

  9. Forecasting of electronic devices lifetime on the basis of activation models of functional parameters drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, I. N.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a model of functional parameters drift for electronic devices, allowing predicting their lifetime. The method of model parameters estimation is developed. The developed model allows optimizing the accelerated tests modes, taking into account the complex impact of stress factors. The results are applicable for modern electronic devices with a failure rate less than 1 FIT. The results are applicable if the physical and chemical processes leading to electronic devices degradation have an activation mechanism; the activation process is due to the temperature.

  10. Correlation of alkaline phosphatase activity to clinical parameters of inflammation in smokers suffering from chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Vishakha; Malhotra, Ranjan; Kapoor, Anoop; Bither, Rupika; Sachdeva, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Context: Current clinical periodontal diagnostic techniques emphasize the assessment of clinical and radiographic signs of periodontal diseases which can provide a measure of history of disease. Hence, new methodologies for early identification and determination of periodontal disease activity need to be explored which will eventually result in expedited treatment. Aim: To evaluate the correlation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) to clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation in smokers with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Study population included 15 smoker male patients in the age group of 35–55 years suffering from moderate generalized chronic periodontitis with history of smoking present. Following parameters were evaluated at baseline, 1 month and 3 months after scaling and root planing: plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth (PD), relative attachment level (RAL), and GCF ALP activity. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent variables for measurements over time were analyzed by using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: A statistically significant reduction in all the clinical parameters and GCF ALP activity was observed from baseline to 1 month and 3 months. A correlation was observed between change in GCF ALP activity and PD reduction as well as gain in RAL at 3 months. Conclusion: The present study emphasizes that total ALP activity could be used as a marker for periodontal disease activity in smokers. Estimation of changes in the levels of this enzyme has a potential to aid in the detection of progression of periodontal disease and monitoring the response to periodontal therapy. PMID:27563197

  11. Natural thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annila, Arto

    2016-02-01

    The principle of increasing entropy is derived from statistical physics of open systems assuming that quanta of actions, as undividable basic build blocks, embody everything. According to this tenet, all systems evolve from one state to another either by acquiring quanta from their surroundings or by discarding quanta to the surroundings in order to attain energetic balance in least time. These natural processes result in ubiquitous scale-free patterns: skewed distributions that accumulate in a sigmoid manner and hence span log-log scales mostly as straight lines. Moreover, the equation for least-time motions reveals that evolution is by nature a non-deterministic process. Although the obtained insight in thermodynamics from the notion of quanta in motion yields nothing new, it accentuates that contemporary comprehension is impaired when modeling evolution as a computable process by imposing conservation of energy and thereby ignoring that quantum of actions are the carriers of energy from the system to its surroundings.

  12. Effect of acute exercise on some haematological parameters and neutrophil functions in active and inactive subjects.

    PubMed

    Benoni, G; Bellavite, P; Adami, A; Chirumbolo, S; Lippi, G; Brocco, G; Cuzzolin, L

    1995-01-01

    In this work we studied the possible effects of acute exercise on some haematological parameters and on some functions of neutrophils in seven active and six inactive subjects. Physical exercise (10 min on a cycle ergometer at a heart rate of 150 beats.min-1) induced a significant increase in total leucocyte, lymphocyte and neutrophil concentrations in active subjects; serum iron and ferritin concentrations were lower in active compared to inactive subjects. Cellular adhesion, bactericidal activity and superoxide anion production did not change after exercise, while we also observed some differences between active and inactive subjects before exercise. In particular, the neutrophils from active subjects showed a significantly higher percentage of adhesion, higher bactericidal activity and lower superoxide anion production. In conclusion, the training induced changes in some neutrophil functions, while acute exercise influenced, overall, leucocyte concentrations. PMID:7768243

  13. Advances in thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sieniutycz, S. ); Salamon, P. )

    1990-01-01

    This book covers: nonequilibrium thermodynamics for solar energy applications; finite-time thermodynamics as applied to solar power conversion; thermodynamics and economics; exergy analysis; and an analysis of cumulative exergy consumption and exergy losses.

  14. On the role of thermodynamics and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions over thunderstorm activity during GoAmazon and ACRIDICON-CHUVA field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Morales, C. A.; Hoeller, H.; Braga, R. C.; Machado, L.; Wendisch, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Rosenfeld, D.; Poeschl, U.; Biscaro, T.; Lima, W.; Eichholz, C.; Oliveira, R. A. J.; Sperling, V.; Carvalho, I.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Amaral, L. F.; Cecchin, M.; Saraiva, J.; Saraiva, I.; Schumacher, C.; Funk, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Based on satellite data, total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning activity climatological annual cycle over the GoAmazon area of interest (from T0 to T3 sites) shows that lightning activity is moderate (up to 10 flashes per day - fl day-1) throughout the wet (December-March) and dry (April-August) seasons, with T3 always being a little greater than T1 and T0 sites, respectively. During the dry-to-wet transition season (September-October), however, lightning activity peaks up to 25 fl day-1 at T1, followed by T3 (20 fl day-1) and T0 (15 fl day-1). The diurnal cycle reveals that the onset of deep convection during this same season starts one hour and peaks two hours earlier than the wet season. In the Amazon, cloud updrafts are primarily controlled by the local environment thermodynamics. During the dry-to-wet transition season, thermodynamics is significantly changed by land cover land cover where cloud base heights are elevated over deforested areas potentially increasing the strength of updrafts due to a better processing of the convective available potential energy, and therefore also increasing cloud electrification. The total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) LIghtning NET(LINET - Nowcast) installed in September-October 2014 for GoAmazon IOP2 and ACRIDICON-CHUVA field experiments and the set of weather radars revealed that the thunderstorm enhancement over T1 (Manaus) during the dry-to-wet season is driven by the interaction between river breeze and the main easterly winds over Amazon basin, resulting in a locally forced convergent flow on the east side of Rio Negro which drives deep afternoon convection. In terms of atmospheric pollution, the dry-to-wet season is also marked by increased biomass burning, and the city of Manaus (T1) is a local polluted heat island. We will also present quantified thermodynamical and microphysical differences between the thunderstorms that developed over T0, T1 and T2. Our hypothesis is that cloud charge centers, total

  15. Important Physiological Parameters and Physical Activity Data for Evaluating Exposure Modeling Performance: a Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to develop a database of physiological parameters needed for understanding and evaluating performance of the APEX and SHEDS exposure/intake dose rate model used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of its regulatory activities. The A...

  16. Estimates of genetic parameters among scale activity scores, growth, and fatness in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic parameters for scale activity score were estimated from generations 5, 6, and 7 of a randomly selected, composite population composed of Duroc, Large White, and two sources of Landrace (n = 2,186). At approximately 156 d of age, pigs were weighed (WT) and ultrasound backfat measurements (BF1...

  17. Effect of spray drying processing parameters on the insecticidal activity of two encapsulated formulations of baculovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of spray dryer processing parameters on the process yield and insecticidal activity of baculovirus to support the development of this beneficial group of microbes as biopesticides. For each of two baculoviruses [granulovirus (GV) from Pieris rapae (L....

  18. Correlation between Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Anthropometrical Parameters in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, F. J.; Rosety-Rodriguez, M.

    2007-01-01

    Since we have recently found that regular exercise increased erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in adolescents with Down syndrome, these programs may be recommended. This study was designed to assess the role of anthropometrical parameters as easy, economic and non-invasive biomarkers of GPX. Thirty-one…

  19. Fluorescent intercalator displacement replacement (FIDR) assay: determination of relative thermodynamic and kinetic parameters in triplex formation—a case study using triplex-forming LNAs

    PubMed Central

    Sau, Sujay P.; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K.; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are the most commonly used approach for site-specific targeting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA). Important parameters describing triplex formation include equilibrium binding constants (Keq) and association/dissociation rate constants (kon and koff). The ‘fluorescent intercalator displacement replacement’ (FIDR) assay is introduced herein as an operationally simple approach toward determination of these parameters for triplexes involving TC-motif TFOs. Briefly described, relative rate constants are determined from fluorescence intensity changes upon: (i) TFO-mediated displacement of pre-intercalated and fluorescent ethidium from dsDNA targets (triplex association) and (ii) Watson–Crick complement-mediated displacement of the TFO and replacement with ethidium (triplex dissociation). The assay is used to characterize triplexes between purine-rich dsDNA targets and TC-motif TFOs modified with six different locked nucleic acid (LNA) monomers, i.e. conventional and C5-alkynyl-functionalized LNA and α-L-LNA pyrimidine monomers. All of the studied monomers increase triplex stability by decreasing the triplex dissociation rate. LNA-modified TFOs form more stable triplexes than α-L-LNA-modified counterparts owing to slower triplex dissociation. Triplexes modified with C5-(3-aminopropyn-1-yl)-LNA-U monomer Z are particularly stable. The study demonstrates that three affinity-enhancing features can be combined into one high-affinity TFO monomer: conformational restriction of the sugar ring, expansion of the pyrimidine π-stacking surface and introduction of an exocyclic amine. PMID:22855561

  20. Fluorescent intercalator displacement replacement (FIDR) assay: determination of relative thermodynamic and kinetic parameters in triplex formation--a case study using triplex-forming LNAs.

    PubMed

    Sau, Sujay P; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2012-11-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are the most commonly used approach for site-specific targeting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA). Important parameters describing triplex formation include equilibrium binding constants (K(eq)) and association/dissociation rate constants (k(on) and k(off)). The 'fluorescent intercalator displacement replacement' (FIDR) assay is introduced herein as an operationally simple approach toward determination of these parameters for triplexes involving TC-motif TFOs. Briefly described, relative rate constants are determined from fluorescence intensity changes upon: (i) TFO-mediated displacement of pre-intercalated and fluorescent ethidium from dsDNA targets (triplex association) and (ii) Watson-Crick complement-mediated displacement of the TFO and replacement with ethidium (triplex dissociation). The assay is used to characterize triplexes between purine-rich dsDNA targets and TC-motif TFOs modified with six different locked nucleic acid (LNA) monomers, i.e. conventional and C5-alkynyl-functionalized LNA and α-L-LNA pyrimidine monomers. All of the studied monomers increase triplex stability by decreasing the triplex dissociation rate. LNA-modified TFOs form more stable triplexes than α-L-LNA-modified counterparts owing to slower triplex dissociation. Triplexes modified with C5-(3-aminopropyn-1-yl)-LNA-U monomer Z are particularly stable. The study demonstrates that three affinity-enhancing features can be combined into one high-affinity TFO monomer: conformational restriction of the sugar ring, expansion of the pyrimidine π-stacking surface and introduction of an exocyclic amine. PMID:22855561

  1. Thermodynamic Modeling of Savannah River Evaporators

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.

    2001-08-02

    A thermodynamic model based on the code SOLGASMIX is developed to calculate phase equilibrium in evaporators and related tank wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This model uses the Pitzer method to calculate activity coefficients, and many of the required Pitzer parameters have been determined in the course of this work. Principal chemical species in standard SRS simulant solutions are included, and the temperature range for most parameters has been extended above 100 C. The SOLGASMIX model and calculations using the code Geochemists Workbench are compared to actual solubility data including silicate, aluminate, and aluminosilicate solutions. In addition, SOLGASMIX model calculations are also compared to transient solubility data involving SRS simulant solutions. These comparisons indicate that the SOLGASMIX predictions closely match reliable data over the range of temperature and solution composition expected in the SRS evaporator and related tanks. Predictions using the Geochemists Workbench may be unreliable, due primarily to the use of an inaccurate activity coefficient model.

  2. Prediction of Geomagnetic Activity and Key Parameters in High-latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Tan, Arjun; Ridley, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Prediction of geomagnetic activity and related events in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere are important tasks of US Space Weather Program. Prediction reliability is dependent on the prediction method, and elements included in the prediction scheme. Two of the main elements of such prediction scheme are: an appropriate geomagnetic activity index, and an appropriate coupling function (the combination of solar wind parameters providing the best correlation between upstream solar wind data and geomagnetic activity). We have developed a new index of geomagnetic activity, the Polar Magnetic (PM) index and an improved version of solar wind coupling function. PM index is similar to the existing polar cap PC index but it shows much better correlation with upstream solar wind/IMF data and other events in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. We investigate the correlation of PM index with upstream solar wind/IMF data for 10 years (1995-2004) that include both low and high solar activity. We also have introduced a new prediction function for the predicting of cross-polar-cap voltage and Joule heating based on using both PM index and upstream solar wind/IMF data. As we show such prediction function significantly increase the reliability of prediction of these important parameters. The correlation coefficients between the actual and predicted values of these parameters are approx. 0.9 and higher.

  3. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  4. Simulating Metabolism with Statistical Thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.

    2014-08-04

    Kinetic probabilities of state are usually based on empirical measurements, while thermodynamic state probabilities are based on the assumption that chemical species are distributed to according to a multinomial Boltzmann distribution. While the use of kinetic simulations is desirable, obtaining all the mass action rate constants necessary to carry out kinetic simulations is an overwhelming challenge. Here, the kinetic probability of a state is compared in depth to the thermodynamic probability of a state for sets of coupled reactions. The entropic and energetic contributions to thermodynamic stable states are described and compared to entropic and energetic contributions of kinetic steady states. It is shown that many kinetic steady states are possible for a system of coupled reactions depending on the relative values of the mass action rate constants, but only one of these corresponds to a thermodynamically stable state. Furthermore, the thermodynamic stable state corresponds to a minimum free energy state. The use of thermodynamic simulations of state to model metabolic processes is attractive, since metabolite levels and energy requirements of pathways can be evaluated using only standard free energies of formation as parameters in the probability distribution. In chemical physics, the assumption of a Boltzmann distribution is the basis of transition state theory for modeling transitory species. Application to stable species, such as those found in metabolic processes, is a less severe assumption that would enable the use of simulations of state.

  5. Cellular electrical micro-impedance parameter artifacts produced by passive and active current regulation.

    PubMed

    English, Anthony E; Squire, James C; Moy, Alan B

    2008-03-01

    This study analyzes the cellular microelectrode voltage measurement errors produced by active and passive current regulation, and the propagation of these errors into cellular barrier function parameter estimates. The propagation of random and systematic errors into these parameters is accounted for within a Riemannian manifold framework consistent with information geometry. As a result, the full non-linearity of the model parameter state dependence, the instrumental noise distribution, and the systematic errors associated with the voltage to impedance conversion, are accounted for. Specifically, cellular model parameters are treated as the coordinates of a model space manifold that inherits a Riemannian metric from the data space. The model space metric is defined in terms of the pull back of an instrumental noise-dependent Fisher information metric. Additional noise sources produced by the evaluation of the cell-covered electrode model that is a function of a naked electrode random variable are also included in the analysis. Based on a circular cellular micro-impedance model in widespread use, this study shows that cellular barrier function parameter estimates are highly model state dependent. Systematic errors produced by coaxial lead capacitances and circuit loading can also lead to significant and model state-dependent parameter errors and should, therefore, be either reduced or corrected for analytically. PMID:18202917

  6. Data set of optimal parameters for colorimetric red assay of epoxide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Stephani; Adriani, Patricia Pereira; Borges, Flavia Garcia; Lopes, Adriana Rios; Campana, Patricia T; Chambergo, Felipe S

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Epoxide hydrolase of Trichoderma reesei: Biochemical properties and conformational characterization" [1]. Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides to the corresponding vicinal diols. This article describes the optimal parameters for the colorimetric red assay to determine the enzymatic activity, with an emphasis on the characterization of the kinetic parameters, pH optimum and thermal stability of this enzyme. The effects of reagents that are not resistant to oxidation by sodium periodate on the reactions can generate false positives and interfere with the final results of the red assay. PMID:27366781

  7. Thermodynamic interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Maiden, D E

    1998-10-01

    A method for constructing bicubic interpolation polynomials for the pressure P and internal energy E that are thermodynamically consistent at the mesh ponts and continuous across mesh boundaries is presented. The slope boundary conditions for the pressure and energy are derived from finite differences of the data and from Maxwell's consistency relation. Monotonicity of the sound speed and the specific heat is obtained by a bilinear interpolation of the slopes of the tabulated data. Monotonicity of the functions near steep gradients may be achieved by mesh refinement or by using a non-consistent bilinear to the data. Mesh refinement is very efficient for uniform-linear or uniform-logarithmic spaced data because a direct table lookup can be used. The direct method was compared to binary search and was 37 percent faster for logarithmic-spaced data and 106 percent faster for linear-spaced data. This improvement in speed is very important in the radiation-transport opacity-lookup part of the calculation. Interpolation in P-E space, with mesh refinement, can be made simple, robust, and conserve energy. In the final analysis the interpolation of the free energy and entropy (Maiden and Cook) remains a competitor.

  8. Correlation of fungostatic activity with log P and sigma parameters in the group of thiobenzanilides.

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak, K; Szumiło, H

    2000-11-01

    2,4-Dihydroxythiobenzanilide and its analogues were recently found to show strong biological activity. Earlier works exhibited that their biological activity depends strongly on their lipophilicity determined by means of RP-HPLC. Among others, fungostatic activity against tested yeast and mould strains appeared to be comparatively poorer modelled by chromatographic lipophilicity parameters. Very high correlation (r approximately 0.85-0.9) with these activities was obtained by means of multiparameter regression analysis where calculated log P and Hammet sigma values were involved as the independent variables. Analysed data show that activity against yeast and mould fungi is a superposition of two basic properties of thiobenzanilides: their lipophilicity and electronic properties. PMID:11293275

  9. Electro-optical parameters in excited states of some spectrally active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchea, Andreea Celia; Closca, Valentina; Rusu, Cristina Marcela; Morosanu, Cezarina; Dorohoi, Dana Ortansa

    2014-08-01

    The spectral shifts measured in different solvents are expressed as functions of the solvent macroscopic parameters. The value of the correlation coefficient multiplying the functions of electric permittivity was determined by statistical means. The correlation coefficient depends on the electric dipole moment of the spectrally active molecules. The electro-optical parameters in the ground state of the solute molecules can be approximated by molecular modeling. The excited state parameters are usually estimated using the results obtained both by HyperChem Programme and solvatochromic study. The importance of this approximate method is that it offers information about of the excited state of solute molecule for which our measuring possibilities are very restrictive. The information about the excited electronic state is affected by the limits in which the theories of liquid solutions are developed. Our results refer to two molecules of vitamins from B class, namely B3 and B6.

  10. Quantum-classical transition and quantum activation of ratchet currents in the parameter space.

    PubMed

    Beims, M W; Schlesinger, M; Manchein, C; Celestino, A; Pernice, A; Strunz, W T

    2015-05-01

    The quantum ratchet current is studied in the parameter space of the dissipative kicked rotor model coupled to a zero-temperature quantum environment. We show that vacuum fluctuations blur the generic isoperiodic stable structures found in the classical case. Such structures tend to survive when a measure of statistical dependence between the quantum and classical currents are displayed in the parameter space. In addition, we show that quantum fluctuations can be used to overcome transport barriers in the phase space. Related quantum ratchet current activation regions are spotted in the parameter space. Results are discussed based on quantum, semiclassical, and classical calculations. While the semiclassical dynamics involves vacuum fluctuations, the classical map is driven by thermal noise. PMID:26066230

  11. Thermodynamic Studies for Drug Design and Screening

    PubMed Central

    Garbett, Nichola C.; Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A key part of drug design and development is the optimization of molecular interactions between an engineered drug candidate and its binding target. Thermodynamic characterization provides information about the balance of energetic forces driving binding interactions and is essential for understanding and optimizing molecular interactions. Areas covered This review discusses the information that can be obtained from thermodynamic measurements and how this can be applied to the drug development process. Current approaches for the measurement and optimization of thermodynamic parameters are presented, specifically higher throughput and calorimetric methods. Relevant literature for this review was identified in part by bibliographic searches for the period 2004 – 2011 using the Science Citation Index and PUBMED and the keywords listed below. Expert opinion The most effective drug design and development platform comes from an integrated process utilizing all available information from structural, thermodynamic and biological studies. Continuing evolution in our understanding of the energetic basis of molecular interactions and advances in thermodynamic methods for widespread application are essential to realize the goal of thermodynamically-driven drug design. Comprehensive thermodynamic evaluation is vital early in the drug development process to speed drug development towards an optimal energetic interaction profile while retaining good pharmacological properties. Practical thermodynamic approaches, such as enthalpic optimization, thermodynamic optimization plots and the enthalpic efficiency index, have now matured to provide proven utility in design process. Improved throughput in calorimetric methods remains essential for even greater integration of thermodynamics into drug design. PMID:22458502

  12. Conformational stability, spectroscopic and computational studies, HOMO-LUMO, NBO, ESP analysis, thermodynamic parameters of natural bioactive compound with anticancer potential of 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, V; Karpagam, V; Revathi, B; Kavimani, M; Ilango, G

    2015-11-01

    Natural product drugs play a dominant role in pharmaceutical care. Nature is an attractive source of new therapeutic candidate compounds as a tremendous chemical diversity is found in millions of species of plants, animals, marine organism and micro-organism. A antifungal activity against important opportunist micro-organism and against those involved in superficial mycosis, all from nosocomial origin. The acute in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of each anthraquinone (AQ) isolated from these bioactive extracts, on a mammalian eukaryotic cell line (Vero cells), allowed us to establish the non-cytotoxic concentration range, which was used to evaluate the anti-microbial effect. A comprehensive ab initio calculation using the DFT/6-31+G(d) level theory showed that 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone can exist in four possible conformations, which can interchange through the OH group on the five-membered ring. Density functional theory calculations were used to predict the vibrational frequencies and to help in normal mode, assignments. Furthermore, a natural bond orbital analysis was performed describing each hydrogen bond as donor accepter interaction. The Fourier transform infrared spectra (4000-400 cm(-1)) and the Fourier transform Raman spectra (3500-100 cm(-1)) of the HMA in the solid space have been recorded. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The calculated ESP contour map shows the electrophilic and nucleophilic region of the molecule. PMID:26093112

  13. Thermodynamics of Radiation Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, Eduardo; de la Selva, Sara Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of the electromagnetic radiation in a cavity of a given volume and temperature. We found three levels of description, the thermodynamics of one mode, the thermodynamics of the distribution of frequencies in a band by summing over the frequencies in it and the global thermodynamics by summing over all the…

  14. Identifying hazard parameter to develop quantitative and dynamic hazard map of an active volcano in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suminar, Wulan; Saepuloh, Asep; Meilano, Irwan

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of hazard assessment to active volcanoes is crucial for risk management. The hazard map of volcano provides information to decision makers and communities before, during, and after volcanic crisis. The rapid and accurate hazard assessment, especially to an active volcano is necessary to be developed for better mitigation on the time of volcanic crises in Indonesia. In this paper, we identified the hazard parameters to develop quantitative and dynamic hazard map of an active volcano. The Guntur volcano in Garut Region, West Java, Indonesia was selected as study area due population are resided adjacent to active volcanoes. The development of infrastructures, especially related to tourism at the eastern flank from the Summit, are growing rapidly. The remote sensing and field investigation approaches were used to obtain hazard parameters spatially. We developed a quantitative and dynamic algorithm to map spatially hazard potential of volcano based on index overlay technique. There were identified five volcano hazard parameters based on Landsat 8 and ASTER imageries: volcanic products including pyroclastic fallout, pyroclastic flows, lava and lahar, slope topography, surface brightness temperature, and vegetation density. Following this proposed technique, the hazard parameters were extracted, indexed, and calculated to produce spatial hazard values at and around Guntur Volcano. Based on this method, the hazard potential of low vegetation density is higher than high vegetation density. Furthermore, the slope topography, surface brightness temperature, and fragmental volcanic product such as pyroclastics influenced to the spatial hazard value significantly. Further study to this proposed approach will be aimed for effective and efficient analyses of volcano risk assessment.

  15. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, M. S.; Majumder, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0 revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions.

  16. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe₂O₄ composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-01-15

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions. PMID:26322840

  17. Isopeptidase activity of human transglutaminase 2: disconnection from transamidation and characterization by kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Király, Róbert; Thangaraju, Kiruphagaran; Nagy, Zsófia; Collighan, Russell; Nemes, Zoltán; Griffin, Martin; Fésüs, László

    2016-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a multifunctional protein with diverse catalytic activities and biological roles. Its best studied function is the Ca(2+)-dependent transamidase activity leading to formation of γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine isopeptide crosslinks between proteins and γ-glutamyl-amine derivatives. TG2 has a poorly studied isopeptidase activity cleaving these bonds. We have developed and characterised TG2 mutants which are significantly deficient in transamidase activity while have normal or increased isopeptidase activity (W332F) and vice versa (W278F). The W332F mutation led to significant changes of both the K m and the V max kinetic parameters of the isopeptidase reaction of TG2 while its calcium and GTP sensitivity was similar to the wild-type enzyme. The W278F mutation resulted in six times elevated amine incorporating transamidase activity demonstrating the regulatory significance of W278 and W332 in TG2 and that mutations can change opposed activities located at the same active site. The further application of our results in cellular systems may help to understand TG2-driven physiological and pathological processes better and lead to novel therapeutic approaches where an increased amount of crosslinked proteins correlates with the manifestation of degenerative disorders. PMID:26250429

  18. Thermodynamics. II - The extended thermodynamic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The algebraic theory of thermodynamics developed in a previous paper is extended to include the algebraic structure that arises from the introduction of a physical body into the theory. The extension is based on very general definitions of both the thermodynamic states of a body and subsystems of that body. The algebraic analysis, which includes bodies in nonuniform states, shows that the set of all thermodynamic states of a body has the same algebraic structure as the set of thermodynamic states and that composite systems are induced by the algebraic structure of thermodynamic states. The analysis also justifies a variational treatment of thermodynamic bodies in uniform as well as nonuniform states. The variational calculation includes all conventional methods of calculation as special cases and helps to illuminate the origin and interpretation of the electrochemical potential.

  19. [Physiologic parameters and locomotor activity in Fleckvieh and Schwarzbund cattle during an alpine summer].

    PubMed

    Koch, K; Pirchner, F; Graf, F

    1995-01-01

    The investigation on an alpine pasture was performed on 15 heifers of the breeds Fleckvieh and Friesians from different farms. Some physiological parameters and locomotor activities in dependence of breed, farm of origin and weather conditions were studied. Animals of one farm were pastured in spring, the animals of the other farm were brought directly from the barn to the mountain area. Physiological parameters were influenced by farm, but not by breed. The activities of GOT and CK increased in unprepared heifers only (due to the release from skeletal muscles) as did levels of free fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate obviously due to adaptation-difficulties linked with energy-deficiency. Pre-pastured animals showed higher blood-urea concentrations, due to their ability to locate always fresh grass with high protein content. The breed influence on the daily number of steps and on the distance covered was statistically not significant. Animals already pastured in spring showed more movement than unprepared ones. Among weather conditions thunderstorm showed a striking increase in activity which resulted from the search for shelter. On rainy days without wind the animals showed least movement. Cloudy, dry weather as well as sunshine was associated with average activity. These reactions to meteorological conditions were manifested more clearly in prepared heifers. The other animals obviously had to learn first how to minimize untoward effects by suitable behaviour. PMID:7779069

  20. Movement-related parameters modulate cortical activity during imaginary isometric plantar-flexions.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Omar Feix; Nielsen, Kim Dremstrup; Voigt, Michael

    2006-05-01

    A multitude of studies have demonstrated a clear activation of the motor cortex during imagination of various motor tasks; however, it is still unclear if movement-related parameters (movement direction, range of motion, speed, force level and rate of force development) specifically modulate cortical activation as they do during the execution of actual motor tasks. Accordingly, this study examined whether the rate of torque development (RTD) and/or the torque amplitude modulates cortical potentials generated during imaginary motor tasks. Fifteen subjects imagined four different left-sided isometric plantar-flexion tasks, while EEG and EMG recordings were being performed. The averaged EEG activity was analyzed in terms of movement-related potentials (MRPs), consisting of readiness potential (RP), motor potential (MP) and movement-monitoring potential (MMP). It was demonstrated that RTD and torque amplitude indeed modulate cortical activity during imaginary motor tasks. Information concerning movement-related parameters for imaginary plantar-flexion tasks seems to be encoded in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and the primary motor cortex (M1). A comparison between MRPs of imaginary and actual motor tasks revealed that early MRPs were morphologically similar, but differed significantly in amplitude. One of the possible suggestions to explain such a difference may be an "abortion" of ongoing motor programs. PMID:16320044

  1. Effects of Intense Physical Activity with Free Water Replacement on Bioimpedance Parameters and Body Fluid Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, E. B.; Ulbricht, L.; Krueger, E.; Romaneli, E. F. R.; Souza, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Authors have emphasized the need for previous care in order to perform reliable bioimpedance acquisition. Despite of this need some authors have reported that intense physical training has little effect on Bioimpedance Analysis (BIA), while other ones have observed significant effects on bioimpedance parameters in the same condition, leading to body composition estimates considered incompatible with human physiology. The aim of this work was to quantify the changes in bioimpedance parameters, as well as in body fluids estimates by BIA, after four hours of intense physical activity with free water replacement in young males. Xitron Hydra 4200 equipment was used to acquire bioimpedance data before and immediately after the physical training. After data acquisition body fluids were estimates from bioimpedance parameters. Height and weight of all subjects were also acquired to the nearest 0.1 cm and 0.1 kg, respectively. Results point that among the bioimpedance parameter, extracellular resistance presented the most coherent behavior, leading to reliable estimates of the extracellular fluid and part of the total body water. Results also show decreases in height and weight of the participants, which were associated to the decrease in body hydration and in intervertebral discs.

  2. Effect of lateral structure parameters of SiGe HBTs on synthesized active inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Xiao, Zhao; Wan-Rong, Zhang; Huang, Xin; Hong-Yun, Xie; Dong-Yue, Jin; Qiang, Fu

    2016-03-01

    The effect of lateral structure parameters of transistors including emitter width, emitter length, and emitter stripe number on the performance parameters of the active inductor (AI), such as the effective inductance Ls, quality factor Q, and self-resonant frequency ω0 is analyzed based on 0.35-μm SiGe BiCMOS process. The simulation results show that for AI operated under fixed current density JC, the HBT lateral structure parameters have significant effect on Ls but little influence on Q and ω0, and the larger Ls can be realized by the narrow, short emitter stripe and few emitter stripes of SiGe HBTs. On the other hand, for AI with fixed HBT size, smaller JC is beneficial for AI to obtain larger Ls, but with a cost of smaller Q and ω0. In addition, under the fixed collector current IC, the larger the size of HBT is, the larger Ls becomes, but the smaller Q and ω0 become. The obtained results provide a reference for selecting geometry of transistors and operational condition in the design of active inductors. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Beijing, China (Grant Nos. 4142007 and 4122014), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61574010), and the Higher Educational Science and Technology Program of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. J13LN09).

  3. Kinetics of Bacterial Phospholipase C Activity at Micellar Interfaces: Effect of Substrate Aggregate Microstructure and a Model for the Kinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasmeet; Ranganathan, Radha; Hajdu, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Activity at micellar interfaces of bacterial phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on phospholipids solubilized in micelles was investigated with the goal of elucidating the role of the interface microstructure and developing further an existing kinetic model. Enzyme kinetics and physicochemical characterization of model substrate aggregates were combined; thus enabling the interpretation of kinetics in the context of the interface. Substrates were diacylphosphatidylcholine of different acyl chain lengths in the form of mixed micelles with dodecyldimethylammoniopropanesulfonate. An early kinetic model, reformulated to reflect the interfacial nature of the kinetics, was applied to the kinetic data. A better method of data treatment is proposed, use of which makes the presence of microstructure effects quite transparent. Models for enzyme-micelle binding and enzyme-lipid binding are developed and expressions incorporating the microstructural properties are derived for the enzyme-micelle dissociation constant KS and the interface Michaelis-Menten constant, KM. Use of these expressions in the interface kinetic model brings excellent agreement between the kinetic data and the model. Numerical values for the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are determined. Enzyme-lipid binding is found to be an activated process with an acyl chain length dependent free energy of activation that decreases with micelle lipid molar fraction with a coefficient of about −15 RT and correlates with the tightness of molecular packing in the substrate aggregate. Thus the physical insight obtained includes a model for the kinetic parameters that shows that these parameters depend on the substrate concentration and acyl chain length of the lipid. Enzyme-micelle binding is indicated to be hydrophobic and solvent mediated with a dissociation constant of 1.2 mM. PMID:19367944

  4. Effects of Space Weather on Biomedical Parameters during the Solar Activity Cycles 23-24.

    PubMed

    Ragul'skaya, M V; Rudenchik, E A; Chibisov, S M; Gromozova, E N

    2015-06-01

    The results of long-term (1998-2012) biomedical monitoring of the biotropic effects of space weather are discussed. A drastic change in statistical distribution parameters in the middle of 2005 was revealed that did not conform to usual sinusoidal distribution of the biomedical data reflecting changes in the number of solar spots over a solar activity cycle. The dynamics of space weather of 2001-2012 is analyzed. The authors hypothesize that the actual change in statistical distributions corresponds to the adaptation reaction of the biosphere to nonstandard geophysical characteristics of the 24th solar activity cycle and the probable long-term decrease in solar activity up to 2067. PMID:26085362

  5. Thermodynamic activities and phase boundaries for the alloys of the solid solution of Co in Ni{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, M.; Kath, D.; Hilpert, K. |

    1997-11-01

    The vaporization of the alloy samples of the compositions (Ni{sub 3}Al){sub 1{minus}x}Co{sub x}(x = 0, 0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12, or 0.15) was investigated at temperatures between 1326 to 1581 K by the use of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry in order to obtain thermodynamic data for the solid solution {gamma}{prime} phase of the type Ni{sub 3}Al. The partial pressures of Al, Co, and Ni were determined over the samples investigated. Excess chemical potentials at a temperature of 1,473 K resulted for the components in the {gamma}{prime} solubility range. New results on the phase boundaries of the {gamma}{prime} solubility lobe were obtained by the analysis of quenched alloy samples and from the mass spectrometric studies. The results obtained are discussed with respect to the solubility behavior of Co in the {gamma}{prime} phase.

  6. A New Polar Magnetic Index of Geomagnetic Activity and its Application to Monitoring Ionospheric Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.

    2008-01-01

    For improving the reliability of Space Weather prediction, we developed a new, Polar Magnetic (PM) index of geomagnetic activity, which shows high correlation with both upstream solar wind data and related events in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Similarly to the existing polar cap PC index, the new, PM index was computed from data from two near-pole geomagnetic observatories; however, the method for computing the PM index is different. The high correlation of the PM index with both solar wind data and events in Geospace environment makes possible to improve significantly forecasting geomagnetic disturbances and such important parameters as the cross-polar-cap voltage and global Joule heating in high latitude ionosphere, which play an important role in the development of geomagnetic, ionospheric and thermospheric disturbances. We tested the PM index for 10-year period (1995-2004). The correlation between PM index and upstream solar wind data for these years is very high (the average correlation coefficient R approximately equal to 0.86). The PM index also shows the high correlation with the cross-polar-cap voltage and hemispheric Joule heating (the correlation coefficient between the actual and predicted values of these parameters is approximately 0.9), which results in significant increasing the prediction reliability of these parameters. Using the PM index of geomagnetic activity provides a significant increase in the forecasting reliability of geomagnetic disturbances and related events in Geospace environment. The PM index may be also used as an important input parameter in modeling ionospheric, magnetospheric, and thermospheric processes.

  7. [Estimation of Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation for Winter Wheat Based on Hyperspectral Characteristic Parameters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Cai, Huan-jie; Li, Zhi-jun

    2015-09-01

    Estimating fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) precisely has great importance for detecting vegetation water content, energy and carbon cycle balance. Based on this, ASD FieldSpec 3 and SunScan canopy analyzer were applied to measure the canopy spectral reflectance and photosynthetically active radiation over whole growth stage of winter wheat. Canopy reflectance spectral data was used to build up 24 hyperspectral characteristic parameters and the correlation between FPAR and different spectral characteristic parameters were analyzed to establish the estimation model of FPAR for winter wheat. The results indicated that there were extremely significant correlations (p<0.01) between FPAR and hyperspectral characteristic parameters except the slope of blue edge (Db). The correlation coefficient between FPAR and the ratio of red edge area to blue edge area (VI4) was the highest, reaching at 0.836. Seven spectral parameters with higher correlation coefficient were selected to establish optimal linear and nonlinear estimation models of FPAR, and the best estimating models of FPAR were obtained by accuracy analysis. For the linear model, the inversin model between green edge and FPAR was the best, with R2, RMSE and RRMSE of predicted model reaching 0.679, 0.111 and 20.82% respectively. For the nonlinear model, the inversion model between VI2 (normalized ratio of green peak to red valley of reflectivity) and FPAR was the best, with R2, RMSE and RRMSE of predicted model reaching 0.724, 0.088 and 21.84% for. In order to further improve the precision of the model, the multiple linear regression and BP neural network methods were used to establish models with multiple high spectral parameters BP neural network model (R2=0.906, RMSE=0.08, RRMSE=16.57%) could significantly improve the inversion precision compared with the single variable model. The results show that using hyperspectral characteristic parameters to estimate FPAR of winter wheat is

  8. Measuring Thermodynamic Length

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2007-09-07

    Thermodynamic length is a metric distance between equilibrium thermodynamic states. Among other interesting properties, this metric asymptotically bounds the dissipation induced by a finite time transformation of a thermodynamic system. It is also connected to the Jensen-Shannon divergence, Fisher information, and Rao's entropy differential metric. Therefore, thermodynamic length is of central interestin understanding matter out of equilibrium. In this Letter, we will consider how to denethermodynamic length for a small system described by equilibrium statistical mechanics and how to measure thermodynamic length within a computer simulation. Surprisingly, Bennett's classic acceptance ratio method for measuring free energy differences also measures thermodynamic length.

  9. Wild-Type and Mutant Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptides Alter Bilayer Structure as Well as Kinetics and Activation Thermodynamics of Stalk and Pore Formation Differently: Mechanistic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Hirak; Tarafdar, Pradip K.; Klapper, David G.; Lentz, Barry R.

    2013-01-01

    Viral fusion peptides are short N-terminal regions of type-1 viral fusion proteins that are critical for virus entry. Although the importance of viral fusion peptides in virus-cell membrane fusion is established, little is known about how they function. We report the effects of wild-type (WT) hemagglutinin (HA) fusion peptide and its G1S, G1V, and W14A mutants on the kinetics of poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-mediated fusion of small unilamellar vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol (molar ratio of 35:30:15:20). Time courses of lipid mixing, content mixing, and content leakage were obtained using fluorescence assays at multiple temperatures and analyzed globally using either a two-step or three-step sequential ensemble model of the fusion process to obtain the rate constant and activation thermodynamics of each step. We also monitored the influence of peptides on bilayer interfacial order, acyl chain order, bilayer free volume, and water penetration. All these data were considered in terms of a recently published mechanistic model for the thermodynamic transition states for each step of the fusion process. We propose that WT peptide catalyzes Step 1 by occupying bilayer regions vacated by acyl chains that protrude into interbilayer space to form the Step 1 transition state. It also uniquely contributes a positive intrinsic curvature to hemi-fused leaflets to eliminate Step 2 and catalyzes Step 3 by destabilizing the highly stressed edges of the hemi-fused microstructures that dominate the ensemble of the intermediate state directly preceding fusion pore formation. Similar arguments explain the catalytic and inhibitory properties of the mutant peptides and support the hypothesis that the membrane-contacting fusion peptide of HA fusion protein is key to its catalytic activity. PMID:24314080

  10. Physical activity, and not fat mass is a primary predictor of circadian parameters in young men.

    PubMed

    Tranel, Hannah R; Schroder, Elizabeth A; England, Jonathan; Black, W Scott; Bush, Heather; Hughes, Michael E; Esser, Karyn A; Clasey, Jody L

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are ≈24 h oscillations in physiology and behavior, and disruptions have been shown to have negative effects on health. Wrist skin temperature has been used by several groups as a valid method of assessing circadian rhythms in humans. We tested the hypothesis that circadian temperature amplitude (TempAmp) and stability (TempStab) would significantly differ among groups of healthy young men of varying adiposities, and that we could identify physiological and behavioral measures that were significantly associated with these temperature parameters. Wrist skin temperatures taken at 10 min intervals for 7 consecutive days were determined in 18 optimal (OGroup), 20 fair (FGroup) and 21 poor (PGroup) %Fat grouped young men and subsequently analyzed using available validated software. Body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, actigraphy, daily nutritional and sleep data, and fasting lipid, insulin and glucose concentration measures were also determined. Significant changes in TempAmp and TempStab parameters in subjects with a single metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factor compared to those with no MetS factors was observed. In addition, stepwise multivariate regression analyses showed that 50% of the variance in TempAmp was explained by actigraphy (mean steps taken per day; MSTPD), cardiorespiratory fitness, and late night eating per week (#LNE); and 57% in TempStab by MSTPD, time spent in moderate-to-vigorous activity per day, fat mass, and #LNE. Overwhelmingly, physical activity was the most important measure associated with the differences in circadian rhythm parameters. Further research is warranted to determine the effects of increasing the amount and timing of physical activity on the status of the circadian system in a variety of populations. PMID:26101893

  11. The Influence of Different Physicochemical Parameters of the Solvent On The Activity and Selectivity of Lipase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Cao, Shu-Gui; Zhang, Ke-Chang

    1997-01-01

    The asymmetric esterification of octanoic acid with racemic 2-octanol catalyzed by a lipase from Pseudomonas sp. was investigated in several typical solvents. It was found that the catalytic activity and the enantioselectivity of the enzyme were governed by different physicochemical parameters of the solvent employed. While the former depended on the hydrophobicity (lgP) of the solvent, by contrast the latter was a function of the dielectric constant and the dipole moment. A mechanistic model for the binding site of the enzyme was postulated to rationalize this phenomenon based on the results of the kinetic studies of the reaction in some representative solvents. PMID:12215797

  12. Solubility parameter and activity coefficient of HDEHP dimer in select organic diluents by vapor pressure osmometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.; Nilsson, M.; Zalupski, P.

    2013-07-01

    A thorough understanding of the non-ideal behavior of the chemical components utilized in solvent extraction contributes to the success of any large-scale spent nuclear fuel treatment. To address this, our current work uses vapor pressure osmometry to characterize the non-ideal behavior of the solvent extraction agent di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), a common extractant in proposed separation schemes. Solubility parameters were fit to data on HDEHP at four temperatures using models based on Scatchard Hildebrand regular solution theory with Flory Huggins entropic corrections. The results are comparable but not identical to the activity coefficients from prior slope analysis in the literature. (authors)

  13. An ISEE 3 high time resolution study of interplanetary parameter correlations with magnetospheric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Bame, S. J.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1983-01-01

    The coupling between the solar wind and the geomagnetic disturbances was examined using data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft at an earth-sun libration point and ground-based data. One minute data were used to avoid aliasing in determining the internal magnetospheric response to solar wind conditions. Attention was given to the cross-correlations between the geomagnetic index (AE), the total energy dissipation rate (UT), and the solar wind parameters, as well as the spatial and temporal scales on which the magnetosphere reacts to the solar wind conditions. It was considered necessary to characterize the physics of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling in order to define the requirements for a spacecraft like the ISEE-3 that could be used as a real time monitoring system for predicting storms and substorms. The correlations among all but one parameter were lower during disturbance intervals; UT was highly correlated with all parameters during the disturbed times. An intrinsic 25-40 min delay was detected between interplanetary activity and magnetospheric response in quite times, diminishing to no more than 15 min during disturbed times.

  14. Parameter identification and modeling of the biochemical methane potential of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Appels, Lise; Lauwers, Joost; Gins, Geert; Degrève, Jan; Van Impe, Jan; Dewil, Raf

    2011-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion is widely used in waste activated sludge treatment. In this paper, partial least-squares (PLS) is employed to identify the parameters that are determining the biochemical methane potential (BMP) of waste activated sludge. Moreover, a model is developed for the prediction of the BMP. A strong positive correlation is observed between the BMP and volatile fatty acids and carbohydrate concentrations in the sludge. A somewhat weaker correlation with COD is also present. Soluble organics (sCOD, soluble carbohydrates and soluble proteins) were shown not to influence the BMP in the observed region. This finding could be most-valuable in the context of application of sludge pretreatment methods. The obtained model was able to satisfactory predict the BMP. PMID:21476497

  15. New Insights into Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Assay: Serum Dilution Factor as a Crucial Parameter

    PubMed Central

    Jońca, Joanna; Żuk, Monika; Wasąg, Bartosz; Janaszak-Jasiecka, Anna; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Waleron, Krzysztof; Jasiecki, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity assay and inhibitor phenotyping can help to identify patients at risk of prolonged paralysis following the administration of neuromuscular blocking agents. The assay plays an important role in clinical chemistry as a good diagnostic marker for intoxication with pesticides and nerve agents. Furthermore, the assay is also commonly used for in vitro characterization of cholinesterases, their toxins and drugs. There is still lack of standardized procedure for measurement of BChE activity and many laboratories use different substrates at various concentrations. The purpose of this study was to validate the BChE activity assay to determine the best dilution of human serum and the most optimal concentration of substrates and inhibitors. Serum BChE activity was measured using modified Ellman’s method applicable for a microplate reader. We present our experience and new insights into the protocol for high-throughput routine assays of human plasma cholinesterase activities adapted to a microplate reader. During our routine assays used for the determination of BChE activity, we have observed that serum dilution factor influences the results obtained. We show that a 400-fold dilution of serum and 5mM S-butyrylthiocholine iodide can be successfully used for the accurate measurement of BChE activity in human serum. We also discuss usage of various concentrations of dibucaine and fluoride in BChE phenotyping. This study indicates that some factors of such a multicomponent clinical material like serum can influence kinetic parameters of the BChE. The observed inhibitory effect is dependent on serum dilution factor used in the assay. PMID:26444431

  16. New Insights into Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Assay: Serum Dilution Factor as a Crucial Parameter.

    PubMed

    Jońca, Joanna; Żuk, Monika; Wasąg, Bartosz; Janaszak-Jasiecka, Anna; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Waleron, Krzysztof; Jasiecki, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity assay and inhibitor phenotyping can help to identify patients at risk of prolonged paralysis following the administration of neuromuscular blocking agents. The assay plays an important role in clinical chemistry as a good diagnostic marker for intoxication with pesticides and nerve agents. Furthermore, the assay is also commonly used for in vitro characterization of cholinesterases, their toxins and drugs. There is still lack of standardized procedure for measurement of BChE activity and many laboratories use different substrates at various concentrations. The purpose of this study was to validate the BChE activity assay to determine the best dilution of human serum and the most optimal concentration of substrates and inhibitors. Serum BChE activity was measured using modified Ellman's method applicable for a microplate reader. We present our experience and new insights into the protocol for high-throughput routine assays of human plasma cholinesterase activities adapted to a microplate reader. During our routine assays used for the determination of BChE activity, we have observed that serum dilution factor influences the results obtained. We show that a 400-fold dilution of serum and 5mM S-butyrylthiocholine iodide can be successfully used for the accurate measurement of BChE activity in human serum. We also discuss usage of various concentrations of dibucaine and fluoride in BChE phenotyping. This study indicates that some factors of such a multicomponent clinical material like serum can influence kinetic parameters of the BChE. The observed inhibitory effect is dependent on serum dilution factor used in the assay. PMID:26444431

  17. Thermodynamics of an accelerated expanding universe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Bin; Gong Yungui; Abdalla, Elcio

    2006-10-15

    We investigate the laws of thermodynamics in an accelerating universe driven by dark energy with a time-dependent equation of state. In the case we consider that the physically relevant part of the Universe is that enveloped by the dynamical apparent horizon, we have shown that both the first law and second law of thermodynamics are satisfied. On the other hand, if the boundary of the Universe is considered to be the cosmological event horizon the thermodynamical description based on the definitions of boundary entropy and temperature breaks down. No parameter redefinition can rescue the thermodynamics laws from such a fate, rendering the cosmological event horizon unphysical from the point of view of the laws of thermodynamics.

  18. Parameters Influencing the Photocatalytic Activity of Suspension-Sprayed TiO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Berger, Lutz-Michael; Shakhverdova, Irina; Leupolt, Beate; Potthoff, Annegret; Oelschlägel, Kathrin; Meissner, Tobias; Gomez, José Antonio Ibáñez; de Miguel, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Photocatalytic properties of titania have been studied very intensively for a variety of applications, including air and water purification. In order to clarify the influence of the phase composition and other parameters, thermal spraying with suspensions was applied to produce photocatalytically active titania coatings starting from two commercially available anatase and rutile submicron powders. Aqueous suspensions containing 40% solids by weight were sprayed with an HVOF process using ethylene as the fuel gas. The spray parameters were chosen in order to produce mechanically stable coatings and to preserve a high content of the initial crystalline phases of the powders. The coating microstructures, phase compositions, and surface properties were characterized. The photocatalytic performance was evaluated by degradation of the pink dye Rhodamine B (RB) using two techniques: degradation of an aqueous solution of RB and discoloration of impregnated RB. All the coatings exhibited photocatalytic activity to varying degrees, depending on the phase composition as well as other factors, namely, the coating microstructure, surface morphology, surface hydroxylation, light absorption, and interaction with the pollutant.

  19. Activated carbon derived from carbon residue from biomass gasification and its application for dye adsorption: Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Maneerung, Thawatchai; Liew, Johan; Dai, Yanjun; Kawi, Sibudjing; Chong, Clive; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC) as an effective and low-cost adsorbent was successfully prepared from carbon residue (or char, one of the by-products from woody biomass gasification) via physical activation. The surface area of char was significantly increased from 172.24 to 776.46m(2)/g after steam activation at 900°C. The obtained activated carbons were then employed for the adsorption of dye (Rhodamine B) and it was found that activated carbon obtained from steam activation exhibited the highest adsorption capability, which is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and the abundance of hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups on the activated carbon surface. Moreover, it was also found that the adsorption capability significantly increased under the basic condition, which can be attributed to the increased electrostatic interaction between the deprotonated (negatively charged) activated carbon and dye molecules. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted into different adsorption isotherms and found to fit well with Langmuir model (indicating that dye molecules form monolayer coverage on activated carbon) with a maximum monolayer adsorption capability of 189.83mg/g, whereas the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. PMID:26512858

  20. The relationship between enthesitis indices and disease activity parameters in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Sivas, Filiz; Mermerci Başkan, Bedriye; Erkol Inal, Esra; Akbulut Aktekin, Lale; Barça, Nurdan; Ozoran, Kürşat; Bodur, Hatice

    2009-03-01

    In this study, patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were assessed both by patient and physician using two enthesitis indices and the relationship between these indices and disease activity parameters was investigated. The study involved 100 AS patients. The patients were evaluated with 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) for spinal pain (VAS-S), peripheral joint pain (VAS-P), global assessment of patient, and global assessment of doctor. In the laboratory evaluations, the erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR) and serum C-reactive protein levels of the patients were determined. Bath AS disease activity index (BASDAI), Bath AS functional index (BASFI), Bath AS metrology index, and Bath AS radiology index were calculated. The severity of enthesitis was evaluated according to Mander enthesitis index (MEI) and Maastricht ankylosing spondylitis enthesitis score applied by both the patient (MASES-P) him/herself and the physician (MASES-D). There was a correlation between BASDAI and BASFI as well as MEI, MASES-D, and MASES-P indices (r = 0.447, r = 0.342, r = 0.663, r = 0.530, r = 0.464, and r = 0.435, respectively). No correlation between the laboratory parameters and enthesitis indices were detected. In multiple linear regression analysis, BASFI, VAS-S, and female gender (41.3%) were the best predictors of MEI-D, whereas BASFI, VAS-S, female gender, and ESR (32.5%) were the best predictors for MASES-D and BASFI (18.9%) was the best predictor of MASES-P. The assessment of simple and easily applicable MASES score by a patient may be expected to help the physician in clinical practice. When the disease activity of the patients with AS are evaluated, both BASDAI, the clinical importance of which has been confirmed in numerous studies and which is recommended by ASAS, and BASFI, which is valued by patients, should be considered. PMID:18953622

  1. Diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through China reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Lingbo; Xiang, Xin; Rao, Yongchu; Ye, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Chang An

    2016-03-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels have been considered as the most promising candidate structure materials for a fusion reactor. In the recent decades, two new types of RAFM steels, called China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel and China Low-activation Ferritic (CLF-1) steel, have been developed. The gas evolution permeation technique has been used to investigate diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through CLAM and CLF-1 over the temperature range 623 ∼ 873 K at deuterium pressure of 105 Pa. The resultant transport parameters are: Φ (mol. m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 5.40 × 10-8 exp (-46.8 (kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2 s-1) = 3.81 × 10-7 exp(-24.0(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S (mol. m-3 Pa-1/2) = 1.42 × 10-1 exp(-22.8(kJ. mol-1)/RT) for CLAM; while Φ(mol m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.76 × 10-8 exp(-43.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2. s-1) = 1.02 × 10-7 exp(-16.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S(mol. m-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.73 × 10-1 exp(-27.0(kJ. mol-1) /RT) for CLF-1. The results show that CLAM is more permeable than CLF-1, thus it is easier for hydrogen isotopes to transport and be removed.

  2. Chemical and process thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, B.G.

    1984-01-01

    The book is intended mainly to be used as a text for undergraduate chemical engineering studies. Presented is a unified and up-to-date treatment of the major chemical and engineering applications of thermodynamics. Special features include a four chapter sequence on phase equilibrium which begins with simple concepts discussions. More difficult concepts are introduced gradually. Partial molar properties and infinite dilution activity coefficients appear toward the end of the sequence. Solution behavior, including activity coefficients via UNIVAC, is covered. Chapter 14 discusses heat exchange, separation processes, and second law analysis of chemical processes. Chapter 12 provides a firm foundation for chemical equilibrium, and Chapter 13 includes complex chemical equilibrium and free energy minimization. A selection of end-of-chapter problems is included to help the student apply principles and concepts in practical situations.

  3. Thermodynamics: Frontiers and Foundations.

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following new book for free distribution: Thermodynamics: Frontiers and Foundations, Preface by Sir Alan Cottrell Introduction 1. Four-Square Foundations: The Laws of Thermodynamics 2. Maximum Entropy and Minimum Energy: The Master Functions and Equations 3. Ideal Gases and their Applications 4. Real Fluids and Some Applications 5. Van der Waals: A Model for Real Fluids 6. Surface Tension: Bubbles and Drops 7. Inert and Reactive Mixtures;more » An introduction to Chemical Thermodynamics 8. Radiation Thermodynamics: Solar Power Potential 9. Outposts of the Empire 10. A Glimpse into Statistical Thermodynamics Envoi« less

  4. Thermodynamics: Frontiers and Foundations.

    SciTech Connect

    JEFFERY,; LEWINS, D.

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following new book for free distribution: Thermodynamics: Frontiers and Foundations, Preface by Sir Alan Cottrell Introduction 1. Four-Square Foundations: The Laws of Thermodynamics 2. Maximum Entropy and Minimum Energy: The Master Functions and Equations 3. Ideal Gases and their Applications 4. Real Fluids and Some Applications 5. Van der Waals: A Model for Real Fluids 6. Surface Tension: Bubbles and Drops 7. Inert and Reactive Mixtures; An introduction to Chemical Thermodynamics 8. Radiation Thermodynamics: Solar Power Potential 9. Outposts of the Empire 10. A Glimpse into Statistical Thermodynamics Envoi

  5. A Compositional Look at the Human Gastrointestinal Microbiome and Immune Activation Parameters in HIV Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Ece A.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Losurdo, John; Swanson, Garth; Siewe, Basile; Forsyth, Christopher; French, Audrey; DeMarais, Patricia; Sun, Yan; Koenig, Lars; Cox, Stephen; Engen, Phillip; Chakradeo, Prachi; Abbasi, Rawan; Gorenz, Annika; Burns, Charles; Landay, Alan

    2014-01-01

    HIV progression is characterized by immune activation and microbial translocation. One factor that may be contributing to HIV progression could be a dysbiotic microbiome. We therefore hypothesized that the GI mucosal microbiome is altered in HIV patients and this alteration correlates with immune activation in HIV. 121 specimens were collected from 21 HIV positive and 22 control human subjects during colonoscopy. The composition of the lower gastrointestinal tract mucosal and luminal bacterial microbiome was characterized using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was correlated to clinical parameters as well as immune activation and circulating bacterial products in HIV patients on ART. The composition of the HIV microbiome was significantly different than that of controls; it was less diverse in the right colon and terminal ileum, and was characterized by loss of bacterial taxa that are typically considered commensals. In HIV samples, there was a gain of some pathogenic bacterial taxa. This is the first report characterizing the terminal ileal and colonic mucosal microbiome in HIV patients with next generation sequencing. Limitations include use of HIV-infected subjects on HAART therapy. PMID:24586144

  6. Investigation of relationships between parameters of solar nano-flares and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen; Kaki, Bardia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares are one of the important coronal events which are originated in solar magnetic activity. They release lots of energy during the interstellar medium, right after the trigger. Flare prediction can play main role in avoiding eventual damages on the Earth. Here, to interpret solar large-scale events (e.g., flares), we investigate relationships between small-scale events (nano-flares) and large-scale events (e.g., flares). In our method, by using simulations of nano-flares based on Monte Carlo method, the intensity time series of nano-flares are simulated. Then, the solar full disk images taken at 171 angstrom recorded by SDO/AIA are employed. Some parts of the solar disk (quiet Sun (QS), coronal holes (CHs), and active regions (ARs)) are cropped and the time series of these regions are extracted. To compare the simulated intensity time series of nano-flares with the intensity time series of real data extracted from different parts of the Sun, the artificial neural networks is employed. Therefore, we are able to extract physical parameters of nano-flares like both kick and decay rate lifetime, and the power of their power-law distributions. The procedure of variations in the power value of power-law distributions within QS, CH is similar to AR. Thus, by observing the small part of the Sun, we can follow the procedure of solar activity.

  7. Impact of extraction parameters on the recovery of lipolytic activity from fermented babassu cake.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jaqueline N; Godoy, Mateus G; Gutarra, Melissa L E; Freire, Denise M G

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme extraction from solid matrix is as important step in solid-state fermentation to obtain soluble enzymes for further immobilization and application in biocatalysis. A method for the recovery of a pool of lipases from Penicillium simplicissimum produced by solid-state fermentation was developed. For lipase recovery different extraction solution was used and phosphate buffer containing Tween 80 and NaCl showed the best results, yielding lipase activity of 85.7 U/g and 65.7 U/g, respectively. The parameters with great impacts on enzyme extraction detected by the Plackett-Burman analysis were studied by Central Composite Rotatable experimental designs where a quadratic model was built showing maximum predicted lipase activity (160 U/g) at 25°C, Tween 80 0.5% (w/v), pH 8.0 and extraction solution 7 mL/g, maintaining constant buffer molarity of 0.1 M and 200 rpm. After the optimization process a 2.5 fold increase in lipase activity in the crude extract was obtained, comparing the intial value (64 U/g) with the experimental design (160 U/g), thus improving the overall productivity of the process. PMID:25090644

  8. Impact of Extraction Parameters on the Recovery of Lipolytic Activity from Fermented Babassu Cake

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jaqueline N.; Godoy, Mateus G.; Gutarra, Melissa L. E.; Freire, Denise M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme extraction from solid matrix is as important step in solid-state fermentation to obtain soluble enzymes for further immobilization and application in biocatalysis. A method for the recovery of a pool of lipases from Penicillium simplicissimum produced by solid-state fermentation was developed. For lipase recovery different extraction solution was used and phosphate buffer containing Tween 80 and NaCl showed the best results, yielding lipase activity of 85.7 U/g and 65.7 U/g, respectively. The parameters with great impacts on enzyme extraction detected by the Plackett-Burman analysis were studied by Central Composite Rotatable experimental designs where a quadratic model was built showing maximum predicted lipase activity (160 U/g) at 25°C, Tween 80 0.5% (w/v), pH 8.0 and extraction solution 7 mL/g, maintaining constant buffer molarity of 0.1 M and 200 rpm. After the optimization process a 2.5 fold increase in lipase activity in the crude extract was obtained, comparing the intial value (64 U/g) with the experimental design (160 U/g), thus improving the overall productivity of the process. PMID:25090644

  9. Assessment of Circadian and Light-Entrainable Parameters in Mice Using Wheel-Running Activity.

    PubMed

    Banks, Gareth T; Nolan, Patrick M

    2011-01-01

    In most organisms, physiological variables are regulated by an internal clock. This endogenous circadian (∼24-hr) clock enables organisms to anticipate daily environmental changes and modify behavioral and physiological functions appropriately. Processes regulated by the circadian clock include sleep-wake and locomotor activity, core body temperature, metabolism, water/food intake, and available hormone levels. At the core of the mammalian circadian system are molecular oscillations within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. These oscillations are modifiable by signals from the environment (so called zeitgebers or time-givers) and, once integrated within the suprachiasmatic nucleus, are conveyed to remote neural circuits where output rhythms are regulated. Disrupting any of a number of neural processes can affect how rhythms are generated and relayed to the periphery and disturbances in circadian/entrainment parameters are associated with numerous human conditions. These non-invasive protocols can be used to determine whether circadian/entrainment parameters are affected in mouse mutants or treatment groups. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 1:369-381 © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26068996

  10. Thermodynamic Entropy as a Noether Invariant.

    PubMed

    Sasa, Shin-Ichi; Yokokura, Yuki

    2016-04-01

    We study a classical many-particle system with an external control represented by a time-dependent extensive parameter in a Lagrangian. We show that thermodynamic entropy of the system is uniquely characterized as the Noether invariant associated with a symmetry for an infinitesimal nonuniform time translation t→t+ηℏβ, where η is a small parameter, ℏ is the Planck constant, β is the inverse temperature that depends on the energy and control parameter, and trajectories in the phase space are restricted to those consistent with quasistatic processes in thermodynamics. PMID:27104690

  11. Thermodynamic Entropy as a Noether Invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasa, Shin-ichi; Yokokura, Yuki

    2016-04-01

    We study a classical many-particle system with an external control represented by a time-dependent extensive parameter in a Lagrangian. We show that thermodynamic entropy of the system is uniquely characterized as the Noether invariant associated with a symmetry for an infinitesimal nonuniform time translation t →t +η ℏβ , where η is a small parameter, ℏ is the Planck constant, β is the inverse temperature that depends on the energy and control parameter, and trajectories in the phase space are restricted to those consistent with quasistatic processes in thermodynamics.

  12. Biosorptive uptake of Fe(2+), Cu(2+) and As(5+) by activated biochar derived from Colocasia esculenta: Isotherm, kinetics, thermodynamics, and cost estimation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumya; Mukherjee, Shraboni; LaminKa-Ot, Augustine; Joshi, S R; Mandal, Tamal; Halder, Gopinath

    2016-09-01

    The adsorptive capability of superheated steam activated biochar (SSAB) produced from Colocasia esculenta was investigated for removal of Cu(2+), Fe(2+) and As(5+) from simulated coal mine wastewater. SSAB was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analyser. Adsorption isotherm indicated monolayer adsorption which fitted best in Langmuir isotherm model. Thermodynamic study suggested the removal process to be exothermic, feasible and spontaneous in nature. Adsorption of Fe(2+), Cu(2+) and As(5+) on to SSAB was found to be governed by pseudo-second order kinetic model. Efficacy of SSAB in terms of metal desorption, regeneration and reusability for multiple cycles was studied. Regeneration of metal desorbed SSAB with 1 N sodium hydroxide maintained its effectiveness towards multiple metal adsorption cycles. Cost estimation of SSAB production substantiated its cost effectiveness as compared to commercially available activated carbon. Hence, SSAB could be a promising adsorbent for metal ions removal from aqueous solution. PMID:27408763

  13. Sensor-derived physical activity parameters can predict future falls in people with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Michael; Hauer, Klaus; Zieschang, Tania; Englert, Stefan; Mohler, Jane; Najafi, Bijan

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need for simple clinical tools that can objectively assess fall risk in people with dementia. Wearable sensors seem to have potential for fall prediction, however, there has been limited work performed in this important area. Objective To explore the validity of sensor-derived physical activity (PA) parameters for predicting future falls in people with dementia. To compare sensor-based fall risk assessment with conventional fall risk measures. Methods A cohort study of people with confirmed dementia discharged from a geriatric rehabilitation ward. PA was quantified using 24-hour motion-sensor monitoring at the beginning of the study. PA parameters (percentage of walking, standing, sitting, lying; duration of single walking, standing, and sitting bouts) were extracted using specific algorithms. Conventional assessment included performance-based tests (Timed-up-and-go test, Performance-Oriented-Mobility-Assessment, 5-chair stand) and questionnaires (cognition, ADL-status, fear of falling, depression, previous faller). Outcome measures were fallers (at least one fall in the 3-month follow-up period) versus non-fallers. Results Seventy-seven people were included in the study (age 81.8 ± 6.3; community dwelling 88%, institutionalized 12%). Surprisingly, fallers and non-fallers did not differ on any conventional assessment (p= 0.069–0.991), except for ‘previous faller’ (p= 0.006). Interestingly, several PA parameters discriminated between groups. The ‘walking bouts average duration’, ‘longest walking bout duration’ and ‘walking bouts duration variability’ were lower in fallers, compared to non-fallers (p= 0.008–0.027). The ‘standing bouts average duration’ was higher in fallers (p= 0.050). Two variables, ‘walking bouts average duration’ [odds ratio (OR) 0.79, p= 0.012] and ‘previous faller’ [OR 4.44, p= 0.007] were identified as independent predictors for falls. The OR for a ‘walking bouts average duration’ of

  14. The Relationship between Telomerase Activity and Clinicopathological Parameters in Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xue-Cheng; Ge, Lian-Ying; Lai, Hao; Qiu, Hai; Tang, Fan; Qin, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, accumulated research has found that the expression of telomerase activity (TA) was associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) advancement, whereas the TA prognostic effect in CRC patients is still controversial. Aims: To investigate relationships between TA and CRC clinicopathological parameters. Study Design: Meta-analysis study. Methods: We searched published studies in databases, such as EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Ovid databases (last search updated to October 2014) by meeting specified search criteria. The quality of the included studies was usually evaluated and a meta-analysis was implemented by Stata 12.0 software. We used an odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) to evaluate relationship strengths between TA and CRC clinicopathological parameters. Results: In total, 11 studies (715 patients) were included to assess the relation between TA and metastasis-related parameters in CRC patients. The results indicate that a senior TA expression was connected with the existence of lymph node metastasis (180 patients; OR=2.85, 95% CI=1.40–5.81, p=0.004), and tumor site (522 patients; OR=2.93, 95% CI=1.29–6.67, p=0.010). However, a senior TA expression was not connected with tumor size (137 patients; OR=1.57, 95% CI=0.71–3.47, p=0.267), histological differentiation (570 patients; OR=1.28, 95% CI=0.78–2.09, p=0.332), depth of invasion (57 patients; OR=3.76, 95% CI=0.61–23.04, p=0.152), distant metastasis (123 patients; OR=1.76, 95% CI=0.54–5.74, p=0.346), and clinical stage of the cancer (543 patients; OR=1.59, 95% CI=0.74–3.38, p=0.232). Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that a positive TA was correlated with lymph node metastasis progression and tumor site of the CRC but did not correlate with other important clinicopathological parameters. TA can play a useful part in the prognosis and treatment of CRC patients, but further studies are required to confirm this. PMID:26966620

  15. The active RS Canum Venaticorum binary II Pegasi. I. Stellar and orbital parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Jankov, S.; Ilyin, I.; Tuominen, I.; Fekel, F. C.

    1998-06-01

    A detailed model atmosphere analysis of high-resolution and high S/N CCD spectra of II Peg has yielded for the first time a self-consistent set of fundamental parameters of the primary component: {T_eff}=4600 K, {log g=3.2, [M/H]=-0.4, {xi_t }=2.0 {km s(-1) }. In addition, 121 new high quality radial velocity measurements allowed us to determine improved orbital parameters, resulting in a new orbital ephemeris of T_conj=2449582.9268+6.724333E. The position of the primary of II Peg in the HR diagram with the new parameters corresponds to a K2 IV star with mass ~0.8 M_⊙. The evolved character of the star is confirmed by the C/N ratio, which is reduced significantly relative to the solar value. The unspotted V magnitude of the star of 6fm 9 is estimated from the observed variations of the TiO bands and quasi-simultaneous photometry. The blend of Li{ i 6707 Angstroms is suspected to vary in equivalent width due to spot modulation. The lithium abundance for the unspotted star, Li/H=1.0±m0.1, is found to be consistent with other post-main sequence chromospherically active stars. Combining all parameters, the radius R ~ 3.4 R_⊙ and the inclination i ~ 60° of the primary are estimated with the assumption that its rotational axis is perpendicular to the orbital plane. The secondary is probably a M0-M3 V star with a mass of about 0.4 M_⊙. Based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), La Palma, Spain; the 2.6 m telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Ukraine; the 2.7 m and 2.1 m telescopes of the McDonald Observatory, USA; the coudé feed telescope of the Kitt Peak National Observatory, USA Table 2 is also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html.

  16. The spectroscopic binary system Gl 375. I. Orbital parameters and chromospheric activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, R. F.; González, J. F.; Cincunegui, C.; Mauas, P. J. D.

    2007-11-01

    Aims:We study the spectroscopic binary system Gl 375 to characterise its orbit and the spectral types and chromospheric activity levels of the components. Methods: We employed medium-resolution echelle spectra obtained at the 2.15 m telescope at the Argentinian observatory CASLEO and photometric observations obtained from the ASAS database. Results: We have separated the composite spectra into those corresponding to both components. The separated spectra allow us to confirm that the spectral types of both components are similar (dMe3.5) and to obtain precise measurements of the orbital period (P = 1.87844 days), minimum masses (M_1 sin3 i = 0.35 {M}_⊙ and M_2 sin3 i =0.33 {M}_⊙), and other orbital parameters. The photometric observations exhibit a sinusoidal variation with the same period as the orbital period. We interpreted this as signs of active regions carried along with rotation in a tidally synchronised system, and studied the evolution of the amplitude of the modulation on longer timescales. Together with the mean magnitude, the modulation exhibits a roughly cyclic variation with a period of around 800 days. This periodicity is also found in the flux of the Ca II K lines of both components, which seem to be in phase. Conclusions: The periodic changes in the three observables are interpreted as a sign of a stellar activity cycle. Both components appear to be in phase, which implies that they are magnetically connected. The measured cycle of ≈2.2 years (≈800 days) is consistent with previous determinations of activity cycles in similar stars. The authors are visiting astronomers of the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under an agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  17. Thermodynamics of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, Frank D.

    2010-04-01

    Applications of elementary thermodynamic principles to the dynamics of the Earth lead to robust, quantitative conclusions about the tectonic effects that arise from convection. The grand pattern of motion conveys deep heat to the surface, generating mechanical energy with a thermodynamic efficiency corresponding to that of a Carnot engine operating over the adiabatic temperature gradient between the heat source and sink. Referred to the total heat flux derived from the Earth's silicate mantle, the efficiency is 24% and the power generated, 7.7 × 1012 W, causes all the material deformation apparent as plate tectonics and the consequent geological processes. About 3.5% of this is released in seismic zones but little more than 0.2% as seismic waves. Even major earthquakes are only localized hiccups in this motion. Complications that arise from mineral phase transitions can be used to illuminate details of the motion. There are two superimposed patterns of convection, plate subduction and deep mantle plumes, driven by sources of buoyancy, negative and positive respectively, at the top and bottom of the mantle. The patterns of motion are controlled by the viscosity contrasts (>104 : 1) at these boundaries and are self-selected as the least dissipative mechanisms of heat transfer for convection in a body with very strong viscosity variation. Both are subjects of the thermodynamic efficiency argument. Convection also drives the motion in the fluid outer core that generates the geomagnetic field, although in that case there is an important energy contribution by compositional separation, as light solute is rejected by the solidifying inner core and mixed into the outer core, a process referred to as compositional convection. Uncertainty persists over the core energy balance because thermal conduction is a drain on core energy that has been a subject of diverse estimates, with attendant debate over the need for radiogenic heat in the core. The geophysical approach to

  18. Insight into both coverage and surface structure dependent CO adsorption and activation on different Ni surfaces from DFT and atomistic thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaobin; Wang, Baojun; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Riguang; Li, Debao

    2016-06-29

    CO adsorption and activation on Ni(100), (110) and (111) surfaces have been systematically investigated to probe the effect of coverage and surface structure on CO adsorption and activation. Herein, dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations (DFT-D) were employed, and the related thermodynamic energies at 523 K were calculated by including the zero-point energy, thermal energy and entropic corrections; the results show that the saturated coverage of CO on the Ni(111), (100) and (110) surfaces correspond to 8/9, 9/12 and 9/9 ML, respectively. As the coverage increases, the stepwise adsorption free energies decrease on the flat (111) and (100) surfaces, whereas small changes occur on the corrugated (110) surface. CO migrates from the three-fold hollow site to the top site on the (111) surface, and from the four-fold hollow to the two-fold bridge site on the (100) surface, while all the CO molecules remain at the short-bridge site on the (110) surface. As a result, the obtained intermolecular CO-CO repulsive interactions on the flat surface are stronger than the interactions on the corrugated surface. Furthermore, the computed CO vibrational frequencies at different levels of coverage over the Ni surfaces agree well with the experimental results. On the other hand, kinetic analyses were utilized to compare the stepwise CO desorption with the dissociation at different degrees of coverage on the three Ni surfaces. CO desorption is more favorable than its dissociation at all coverage levels on the most exposed Ni(111) surface. Analogously, CO desorption becomes more favorable than its dissociation on the Ni(110) surface at higher coverage, except for coverage of 1/9 ML, in which CO desorption competes with its dissociation. However, on the Ni(100) surface, CO dissociation is more favorable than its desorption at 1/12 ML; when the coverage increases from 2/12 to 3/12 ML, equilibrium states exist between dissociation and desorption over the surface; when

  19. Effects of nanosized titanium dioxide on the physicochemical stability of activated sludge flocs using the thermodynamic approach and Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaonan; Cui, Fuyi; Guo, Xiaochun; Li, Dapeng

    2013-08-01

    The wide application of nanosized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) will result in high concentrations of the molecule in the aquatic environment, especially in the influent of wastewater treatment plants. The present study focuses on the potential effect of nano-TiO2 on the physicochemical stability of activated sludge flocs after long-term exposure, on which limited information is currently available. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was innovatively applied to assess the surface potential of the activated sludge in situ. The physicochemical characteristics of the bioflocs with and without long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 were well elucidated by the thermodynamic approach. The results showed that the repulsive force predominated the bioflocs system as the concentration of nano-TiO2 increased, owing to the corresponding increase in the density of the negative charge. The bioflocs exposed to 100 ppm nano-TiO2 presented the strongest stability compared to the other two samples with low concentrations of nano-TiO2, which also indicated that the bioflocs with long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 had a low settlement efficiency of the corresponding activated sludge. Further, the extended Derjaugin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (XDLVO) theory was used to explore the flocculation stability of the bioflocs system. As the concentration of nano-TiO2 increased, the ΔGiwi(LW)attraction (the van der Waals interaction) and the effective Hamaker constant decreased, the ΔGiwi(EL)(the electrostatic double-layers interaction) increasingly contributed to the interfacial repulsion, the ΔGiwi(AB)(the Lewis acid-base interaction) also exhibited a repulsive contribution to the total interaction energy and the ΔGiwi(TOT) (the total free energy of interaction) exhibited a repulsive contribution. These results are the keys for interpreting the adverse effects of nano-TiO2 on the activated sludge flocs of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). PMID:23706860

  20. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the liquid-phase etherification of isoamylenes with methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Piccoli, R.L. ); Lovisi, H.R. )

    1995-02-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of liquid-phase etherification of isoamylenes with methanol on ion exchange catalyst (Amberlyst 15) were studied. Thermodynamic properties and rate data were obtained in a batch reactor operating under 1,013 kPa and 323--353 K. The kinetic equation was modeled following the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson formalism according to a proposed surface mechanism where the rate-controlling step is the surface reaction. According to the experimental results, methanol adsorbs very strongly on the active sites, covering them completely, and thus the reaction follows an apparent first-order behavior. The isoamylenes, according to the proposed mechanism, adsorb simultaneously on the same single active center already occupied by methanol, migrating through the liquid layer formed by the alcohol around the catalyst to react in the acidic site. From the proposed mechanism a model was suggested and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were obtained using nonlinear estimation methods.

  1. Estimation of thermodynamic acidity constants of some penicillinase-resistant penicillins.

    PubMed

    Demiralay, Ebru Çubuk; Üstün, Zehra; Daldal, Y Doğan

    2014-03-01

    In this work, thermodynamic acidity constants (pssKa) of methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, cloxacilin, dicloxacillin were determined with reverse phase liquid chromatographic method (RPLC) by taking into account the effect of the activity coefficients in hydro-organic water-acetonitrile binary mixtures. From these values, thermodynamic aqueous acidity constants of these drugs were calculated by different approaches. The linear relationships established between retention factors of the species and the polarity parameter of the mobile phase (ET(N)) was proved to predict accurately retention in LC as a function of the acetonitrile content (38%, 40% and 42%, v/v). PMID:24412696

  2. Application of thermodynamics to silicate crystalline solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    A review of thermodynamic relations is presented, describing Guggenheim's regular solution models, the simple mixture, the zeroth approximation, and the quasi-chemical model. The possibilities of retrieving useful thermodynamic quantities from phase equilibrium studies are discussed. Such quantities include the activity-composition relations and the free energy of mixing in crystalline solutions. Theory and results of the study of partitioning of elements in coexisting minerals are briefly reviewed. A thermodynamic study of the intercrystalline and intracrystalline ion exchange relations gives useful information on the thermodynamic behavior of the crystalline solutions involved. Such information is necessary for the solution of most petrogenic problems and for geothermometry. Thermodynamic quantities for tungstates (CaWO4-SrWO4) are calculated.

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus activity and climate parameters during a 12-year period.

    PubMed

    Sirimi, Natalia; Miligkos, Michael; Koutouzi, Foteini; Petridou, Evi; Siahanidou, Tania; Michos, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    The epidemic pattern of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection during long periods and the factors that determine seasonality are not well studied. In order to correlate the RSV epidemic activity with climate parameters, we conducted a retrospective study of children (0-14 year) who were hospitalized because of respiratory tract infection and had an RSV test performed in the major tertiary pediatric hospital of Greece during a 12-year period (2002-2013). Daily data regarding temperature and humidity were obtained from the Hellenic National Meteorological Service. A total of 2030/7516 (27%) children were tested positive for RSV infection. Among RSV positive children 1945/2030 (95.8%) were infants <1 year. A peak of RSV activity was measured in years 2002, 2003, and 2006 (>35% positive). The RSV season in our area spanned from December to April, with higher incidence during January through March. The peak monthly RSV incidence was observed during February with mean temperature 10.34 °C and mean relative humidity 69.16%. Regarding climate conditions, a statistically significant positive correlation was found between monthly RSV activity and mean monthly relative humidity (rho = 0.66, P-value = 0.02), whereas a negative correlation was found with mean monthly temperature (rho = -0.81, P-value = 0.002). However, in the multivariable analysis, only the effect of mean monthly temperature remained statistically significant (IRR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.80). Further understanding of RSV seasonality in different geographic areas would be important in order to timely implement preventing strategies with immunoprophylaxis or future RSV vaccines. PMID:26575521

  4. Thermodynamic limitations on microbially catalyzed reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, Douglas E.; Dale, Andrew W.; Amend, Jan P.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Quantification of global biogeochemical cycles requires knowledge of the rates at which microorganisms catalyze chemical reactions. In order for models that describe these processes to capture global patterns of change, the underlying formulations in them must account for biogeochemical transformations over seasonal and millennial time scales in environments characterized by different energy levels. Building on existing models, a new thermodynamic limiting function is introduced. With only one adjustable parameter, this function that can be used to model microbial metabolism throughout the range of conditions in which organisms are known to be active. The formulation is based on a comparison of the amount of energy available from any redox reaction to the energy required to maintain a membrane potential, a proxy for the minimum amount of energy required by an active microorganism. This function does not require species- or metabolism-specific parameters, and can be used to model metabolisms that capture any amount of energy. The utility of this new thermodynamic rate limiting term is illustrated by applying it to three low-energy processes: fermentation, methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. The model predicts that the rate of fermentation will be reduced by half once the Gibbs energy of the catalyzed reaction reaches -12 kJ (mol e-)-1, and then slowing exponentially until the energy yield approaches zero. Similarly, the new model predicts that the low energy yield of methanogenesis, -4 to -0.5 kJ (mol e-)-1, for a partial pressure of H2 between 11 and 0.6 Pa decreases the reaction rate by 95-99%. Finally, the new function's utility is illustrated through its ability to accurately model sulfate concentration data in an anoxic marine sediment.

  5. Predicting RNA pseudoknot folding thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experimentally determined atomic coordinates for RNA helices and the self-avoiding walks of the P (phosphate) and C4 (carbon) atoms in the diamond lattice for the polynucleotide loop conformations, we derive a set of conformational entropy parameters for RNA pseudoknots. Based on the entropy parameters, we develop a folding thermodynamics model that enables us to compute the sequence-specific RNA pseudoknot folding free energy landscape and thermodynamics. The model is validated through extensive experimental tests both for the native structures and for the folding thermodynamics. The model predicts strong sequence-dependent helix-loop competitions in the pseudoknot stability and the resultant conformational switches between different hairpin and pseudoknot structures. For instance, for the pseudoknot domain of human telomerase RNA, a native-like and a misfolded hairpin intermediates are found to coexist on the (equilibrium) folding pathways, and the interplay between the stabilities of these intermediates causes the conformational switch that may underlie a human telomerase disease. PMID:16709732

  6. Time Evolution of Force-Free Parameter and Free Magnetic Energy in Active Region NOAA 10365

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valori, G.; Romano, P.; Malanushenko, A.; Ermolli, I.; Giorgi, F.; Steed, K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Zuccarello, F.; Malherbe, J.-M.

    2015-02-01

    We describe the variation of the accumulated coronal helicity derived from the magnetic helicity flux through the photosphere in active region (AR) NOAA 10365, where several large flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occurred. We used SOHO/MDI full-disk line-of-sight magnetograms to measure the helicity flux, and the integral of GOES X-ray flux as a proxy of the coronal energy variations due to flares or CMEs. Using the linear force-free field model, we transformed the accumulated helicity flux into a time sequence of the force-free parameter α accounting for flares or CMEs via the proxy derived from GOES observations. This method can be used to derive the value of α at different times during the AR evolution, and is a partial alternative to the commonly used match of field lines with EUV loops. By combining the accumulated helicity obtained from the observations with the linear force-free theory, we describe the main phases of the emergence process of the AR, and relate them temporally with the occurrence of flares or CMEs. Additionally, a comparison with the loop-matching method of fixing alpha at each time independently shows that the proposed method may be helpful in avoiding unrealistic or undetermined values of alpha that may originate from an insufficient quality of the image used to identify coronal loops at a given time. For the relative intensity of the considered events, the linear force-free field theory implies that there is a direct correlation between the released energy on the one hand and the product of the coronal helicity with the variation of α due to the event on the other. Therefore, the higher the value of the accumulated coronal helicity, the smaller the force-free parameter variation required to produce the same decrease in the free energy during the CMEs.

  7. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  8. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Stability of Organic and Inorganic Nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yefimova, S. L.; Tkacheva, T. N.; Klochkov, V. K.; Sorokin, A. V.; Malyukin, Yu. V.

    2015-05-01

    The kinetic and thermodynamic stability of organic (sodium dodecylsulfate micelles and egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine zwitterionic liposomes) and inorganic (based on GdYVO0034:Eu3+ nanoparticles) nanocarriers (NCs) was studied by the λ-ratiometric method (analysis of fluorescence intensity at two wavelengths) using non-radiative transfer of electronic excitation energy. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the redistribution of dyes DiO and DiI between NCs that was associated with the destruction of NC/DiO and NC/DiI complexes and the formation of new NC/(DiO + DiI) complexes were evaluated. Rate constants for the destruction of the complexes (K), lifetimes of the complexes (τ1/2), the activation energy for the destruction ( E a), the equilibrium constant ( K eq), and the change of free energy (Δ G 0), enthalpy (Δ H 0), and entropy (Δ S 0) of the process were calculated. The obtained kinetic parameters pointed to high kinetic stability for all investigated complexes whereas the thermodynamic ones indicated that dye redistribution required high temperatures.

  9. Thermodynamic Constraints in Using AuM (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Mo) Alloys as N₂ Dissociation Catalysts: Functionalizing a Plasmon-Active Metal.

    PubMed

    Martirez, John Mark P; Carter, Emily A

    2016-02-23

    The Haber-Bosch process for NH3 synthesis is arguably one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century, with a massive footprint in agriculture and, historically, warfare. Current catalysts for this reaction use Fe for N2 activation, conducted at high temperatures and pressures to improve conversion rate and efficiency. A recent finding shows that plasmonic metal nanoparticles can either generate highly reactive electrons and holes or induce resonant surface excitations through plasmonic decay, which catalyze dissociation and redox reactions under mild conditions. It is therefore appealing to consider AuM (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Mo) alloys to combine the strongly plasmonic nature of Au and the catalytic nature of M metals toward N2 dissociation, which together might facilitate ammonia production. To this end, through density functional theory, we (i) explore the feasibility of forming these surface alloys, (ii) find a pathway that may stabilize/deactivate surface M substituents during fabrication, and (iii) define a complementary route to reactivate them under operational conditions. Finally, we evaluate their reactivity toward N2, as well as their ability to support a pathway for N2 dissociation with a low thermodynamic barrier. We find that AuFe possesses similar appealing qualities, including relative stability with respect to phase separation, reversibility of Fe oxidation and reduction, and reactivity toward N2. While AuMo achieves the best affinity toward N2, its strong propensity toward oxidation could greatly limit its use. PMID:26831377

  10. Dissipation Bound for Thermodynamic Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-12-01

    Biological and engineered systems operate by coupling function to the transfer of heat and/or particles down a thermal or chemical gradient. In idealized deterministically driven systems, thermodynamic control can be exerted reversibly, with no entropy production, as long as the rate of the protocol is made slow compared to the equilibration time of the system. Here we consider fully realizable, entropically driven systems where the control parameters themselves obey rules that are reversible and that acquire directionality in time solely through dissipation. We show that when such a system moves in a directed way through thermodynamic space, it must produce entropy that is on average larger than its generalized displacement as measured by the Fisher information metric. This distance measure is subextensive but cannot be made small by slowing the rate of the protocol.

  11. Dissipation Bound for Thermodynamic Control.

    PubMed

    Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-12-31

    Biological and engineered systems operate by coupling function to the transfer of heat and/or particles down a thermal or chemical gradient. In idealized deterministically driven systems, thermodynamic control can be exerted reversibly, with no entropy production, as long as the rate of the protocol is made slow compared to the equilibration time of the system. Here we consider fully realizable, entropically driven systems where the control parameters themselves obey rules that are reversible and that acquire directionality in time solely through dissipation. We show that when such a system moves in a directed way through thermodynamic space, it must produce entropy that is on average larger than its generalized displacement as measured by the Fisher information metric. This distance measure is subextensive but cannot be made small by slowing the rate of the protocol. PMID:26764981

  12. Predicting trace organic compound attenuation with spectroscopic parameters in powdered activated carbon processes.

    PubMed

    Ziska, Austin D; Park, Minkyu; Anumol, Tarun; Snyder, Shane A

    2016-08-01

    The removal of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) is of growing interest in water research and society. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has been proven to be an effective method of removal for TOrCs in water, with the degree of effectiveness depending on dosage, contact time, and activated carbon type. In this study, the attenuation of TOrCs in three different secondary wastewater effluents using four PAC materials was studied in order to elucidate the effectiveness and efficacy of PAC for TOrC removal. With the notable exception of hydrochlorothiazide, all 14 TOrC indicators tested in this study exhibited a positive correlation of removal rate with their log Dow values, demonstrating that the main adsorption mechanism was hydrophobic interaction. As a predictive model, the modified Chick-Watson model, often used for the prediction of microorganism inactivation by disinfectants, was applied. The applied model exhibited good predictive power for TOrC attenuation by PAC in wastewater. In addition, surrogate models based upon spectroscopic measurements including UV absorbance at 254 nm and total fluorescence were applied to predict TOrC removal by PAC. The surrogate model was found to provide an excellent prediction of TOrC attenuation for all combinations of water quality and PAC type included in this study. The success of spectrometric parameters as surrogates in predicting TOrC attenuation by PAC are particularly useful because of their potential application in real-time on-line sensor monitoring and process control at full-scale water treatment plants, which could lead to significantly reduced operator response times and PAC operational optimization. PMID:27174829

  13. Modeling the parameters for plasmodesmal sugar filtering in active symplasmic phloem loaders

    PubMed Central

    Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) play a key role in loading of sugars into the phloem. In plant species that employ the so-called active symplasmic loading strategy, sucrose that diffuses into their unique intermediary cells (ICs) is converted into sugar oligomers. According to the prevalent hypothesis, the oligomers are too large to pass back through PD on the bundle sheath side, but can pass on into the sieve element to be transported in the phloem. Here, we investigate if the PD at the bundle sheath-IC interface can indeed fulfill the function of blocking transport of sugar oligomers while still enabling efficient diffusion of sucrose. Hindrance factors are derived via theoretical modeling for different PD substructure configurations: sub-nano channels, slit, and hydrogel. The results suggest that a strong discrimination could only be realized when the PD opening is almost as small as the sugar oligomers. In order to find model parameters that match the in vivo situation, we measured the effective diffusion coefficient across the interface in question in Cucurbita pepo with 3D-photoactivation microscopy. Calculations indicate that a PD substructure of several sub-nano channels with a radius around 7 Å, a 10.4 Å-wide slit or a hydrogel with 49% polymer fraction would be compatible with the effective diffusion coefficient. If these configurations can accommodate sufficient flux of sucrose into the IC, while blocking raffinose and stachyose movement was assessed using literature data. While the slit-configuration would efficiently prevent the sugar oligomers from “leaking” from the IC, none of the configurations could enable a diffusion-driven sucrose flux that matches the reported rates at a physiologically relevant concentration potential. The presented data provides a first insight on how the substructure of PD could enable selective transport, but indicates that additional factors are involved in efficient phloem loading in active symplasmic loading species. PMID

  14. Thermodynamic calculation of self-diffusion in sodium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baohua; Li, Chengbo; Shan, Shuangming

    2016-05-01

    Using the available pressure-volume-temperature equation of state of sodium chloride, we show that the self-diffusion coefficients of sodium and chloride in sodium chloride as a function of temperature and pressure can be successfully reproduced in terms of bulk elastic and expansivity data. We use a thermodynamic model that interconnects point-defect parameters with bulk properties. Our calculated diffusion coefficients and point-defect parameters, including activation enthalpy, activation entropy, and activation volume, well agree with reported experimental results when uncertainties are considered. Furthermore, the ionic conductivity of sodium chloride inferred from our predicted diffusivities of sodium through the Nernst-Einstein equation is compared with previous experimental data.

  15. Poromechanics Parameters of Fluid-Saturated Chemically Active Fibrous Media Derived from a Micromechanical Approach.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    The authors have derived macroscale poromechanics parameters for chemically active saturated fibrous media by combining microstructure-based homogenization with Hill's volume averaging. The stress-strain relationship of the dry fibrous media is first obtained by considering the fiber behavior. The constitutive relationships applicable to saturated media are then derived in the poromechanics framework using Hill's Lemmas. The advantage of this approach is that the resultant continuum model assumes a form suited to study porous materials, while retaining the effect of discrete fiber deformation. As a result, the model is able to predict the influence of microscale phenomena such as fiber buckling on the overall behavior, and in particular, on the poromechanics constants. The significance of the approach is demonstrated using the effect of drainage and fiber nonlinearity on monotonic compressive stress-strain behavior. The model predictions conform to the experimental observations for articular cartilage. The method can potentially be extended to other porous materials such as bone, clays, foams, and concrete. PMID:25419475

  16. X-ray spectral parameters for a sample of 95 active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasylenko, A. A.; Zhdanov, V. I.; Fedorova, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a broadband X-ray analysis of a new homogeneous sample of 95 active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the 22-month Swift/BAT all-sky survey. For this sample we treated jointly the X-ray spectra observed by XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL missions for the total spectral range of 0.5-250 keV. Photon index \\varGamma, relative reflection R, equivalent width of Fe K_{α} line EW_{FeK}, hydrogen column density NH, exponential cut-off energy Ec and intrinsic luminosity L_{corr} are determined for all objects of the sample. We investigated correlations \\varGamma-R, EW_{FeK}-L_{corr}, \\varGamma-Ec, EW_{FeK}-NH. Dependence "\\varGamma-R" for Seyfert 1/2 galaxies has been investigated separately. We found that the relative reflection parameter at low power-law indexes for Seyfert 2 galaxies is systematically higher than for Seyfert 1 ones. This can be related to an increasing contribution of the reflected radiation from the gas-dust torus. Our data show that there exists some anticorrelation between EW_{FeK} and L_{corr}, but it is not strong. We have not found statistically significant deviations from the AGN Unified Model.

  17. Parameters characterization and optimization of activated carbon (AC) cathodes for microbial fuel cell application.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Babanova, Sofia; Atanassov, Plamen; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Grattieri, Matteo; Cristiani, Pierangela; Trasatti, Stefano; Li, Baikun; Schuler, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed as a cost-effective catalyst for cathodic oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFC). The fabrication protocols of AC-based cathodes are conducted at different applied pressures (175-3500 psi) and treatment temperatures (25-343°C). The effects of those parameters along with changes in the surface morphology and chemistry on the cathode performances are comprehensively examined. The cathodes are tested in a three-electrode setup and explored in single chamber membraneless MFCs (SCMFCs). The results show that the best performance of the AC-based cathode is achieved when a pressure of 1400 psi is applied followed by heat treatment of 150-200°C for 1h. The influence of the applied pressure and the temperature of the heat treatment on the electrodes and SCMFCs is demonstrated as the result of the variation in the transfer resistance, the surface morphology and surface chemistry of the AC-based cathodes tested. PMID:24787317

  18. Poromechanics Parameters of Fluid-Saturated Chemically Active Fibrous Media Derived from a Micromechanical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    The authors have derived macroscale poromechanics parameters for chemically active saturated fibrous media by combining microstructure-based homogenization with Hill's volume averaging. The stress-strain relationship of the dry fibrous media is first obtained by considering the fiber behavior. The constitutive relationships applicable to saturated media are then derived in the poromechanics framework using Hill's Lemmas. The advantage of this approach is that the resultant continuum model assumes a form suited to study porous materials, while retaining the effect of discrete fiber deformation. As a result, the model is able to predict the influence of microscale phenomena such as fiber buckling on the overall behavior, and in particular, on the poromechanics constants. The significance of the approach is demonstrated using the effect of drainage and fiber nonlinearity on monotonic compressive stress-strain behavior. The model predictions conform to the experimental observations for articular cartilage. The method can potentially be extended to other porous materials such as bone, clays, foams, and concrete. PMID:25419475

  19. Active correction of aperture discontinuities (ACAD) for space telescope pupils: a parametic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall; Choquet, Élodie; Carlotti, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    As the performance of coronagraphs improves, the achievable contrast is more and more dependent of the shape of the pupil. The future generation of space and ground based coronagraphic instruments will have to achieve high contrast levels on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes. To correct for the high amplitude aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror, we explore a two deformable mirror (DM) method. The major difficulty of several DM methods is the non-linear relation linking actuator strokes to the point spread function in the coronagraph focal plane. The Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) method is achieving this minimization by solving a non linear differential Monge Ampere equation. Once this open loop method have reached the minimum, a close-loop stroke minimization method can be applied to correct for phase and amplitude aberrations to achieve the ultimate contrast. In this paper, I describe the results of the parametric analysis that that I have undertaken on this method. After recalling the principle of the method, I will described the explored parameter space (deformable mirror set-up, shape of the pupil, bandwidth, coronagraph designs). I will precisely described the way I simulated the Vortex coronagraph for this numerical simulation. Finally I will present the preliminary results of this parametric analysis for space telescope pupils only.

  20. Total individual ion activity coefficients of calcium and carbonate in seawater at 25°C and 35%. salinity, and implications to the agreement between apparent and thermodynamic constants of calcite and aragonite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L. Neil; Sundquist, Eric T.

    1982-01-01

    We have calculated the total individual ion activity coefficients of carbonate and calcium,  and , in seawater. Using the ratios of stoichiometric and thermodynamic constants of carbonic acid dissociation and total mean activity coefficient data measured in seawater, we have obtained values which differ significantly from those widely accepted in the literature. In seawater at 25°C and 35%. salinity the (molal) values of  and  are 0.038 ± 0.002 and 0.173 ± 0.010, respectively. These values of  and  are independent of liquid junction errors and internally consistent with the value . By defining  and  on a common scale (), the product  is independent of the assigned value of  and may be determined directly from thermodynamic measurements in seawater. Using the value  and new thermodynamic equilibrium constants for calcite and aragonite, we show that the apparent constants of calcite and aragonite are consistent with the thermodynamic equilibrium constants at 25°C and 35%. salinity. The demonstrated consistency between thermodynamic and apparent constants of calcite and aragonite does not support a hypothesis of stable Mg-calcite coatings on calcite or aragonite surfaces in seawater, and suggests that the calcite critical carbonate ion curve of Broecker and Takahashi (1978,Deep-Sea Research25, 65–95) defines the calcite equilibrium boundary in the oceans, within the uncertainty of the data.

  1. A Computational Framework for Mineralogical Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chust, Thomas Christian; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2013-04-01

    Determining the compositional, thermodynamic and mechanical properties of the polycrystalline aggregates in the mantle is an essential tool for geodynamic and seismological applications. We have developed an efficient, object-oriented, extensible software framework to facilitate such computations: Taking a database of thermodynamic model parameters for different minerals, a stable phase assemblage can be determined using Gibbs energy minimization at any given pressure and temperature. The program also computes densities, elastic moduli, heat capacities and thermal expansivities to name a few possibilities. These outputs can be transferred to control parameters of the mass and energy balance equations of a mantle convection model or of the propagation equation for seismic waves.

  2. Predictive thermodynamics for ionic solids and liquids.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Leslie; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2016-08-21

    The application of thermodynamics is simple, even if the theory may appear intimidating. We describe tools, developed over recent years, which make it easy to estimate often elusive thermodynamic parameter values, generally (but not exclusively) for ionic materials, both solid and liquid, as well as for their solid hydrates and solvates. The tools are termed volume-based thermodynamics (VBT) and thermodynamic difference rules (TDR), supplemented by the simple salt approximation (SSA) and single-ion values for volume, Vm, heat capacity, , entropy, , formation enthalpy, ΔfH°, and Gibbs formation energy, ΔfG°. These tools can be applied to provide values of thermodynamic and thermomechanical properties such as standard enthalpy of formation, ΔfH°, standard entropy, , heat capacity, Cp, Gibbs function of formation, ΔfG°, lattice potential energy, UPOT, isothermal expansion coefficient, α, and isothermal compressibility, β, and used to suggest the thermodynamic feasibility of reactions among condensed ionic phases. Because many of these methods yield results largely independent of crystal structure, they have been successfully extended to the important and developing class of ionic liquids as well as to new and hypothesised materials. Finally, these predictive methods are illustrated by application to K2SnCl6, for which known experimental results are available for comparison. A selection of applications of VBT and TDR is presented which have enabled input, usually in the form of thermodynamics, to be brought to bear on a range of topical problems. Perhaps the most significant advantage of VBT and TDR methods is their inherent simplicity in that they do not require a high level of computational expertise nor expensive high-performance computation tools - a spreadsheet will usually suffice - yet the techniques are extremely powerful and accessible to non-experts. The connection between formula unit volume, Vm, and standard thermodynamic parameters represents a

  3. Thermodynamic Reassessment of the Nd-Fe-B Ternary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G. J.; Luo, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Nd-B binary system and Nd-Fe-B ternary system were thermodynamically reassessed with the aim of obtaining more reasonable thermodynamic parameters and more accurate phase relations. Based on the metastable experimental information, a reasonable, self-consistent, and comprehensive thermodynamic description of the Nd-Fe-B ternary system considering the metastable phases Fe3B, Fe23Nd2B3, and Fe17Nd2B has been developed.

  4. Study of the kinetic parameters for synthesis and hydrolysis of pharmacologically active salicin isomer catalyzed by baker's yeast maltase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veličković, D. V.; Dimitrijević, A. S.; Bihelović, F. J.; Jankov, R. M.; Milosavić, N.

    2011-12-01

    One of the key elements for understanding enzyme reactions is determination of its kinetic parameters. Since transglucosylation is kinetically controlled reaction, besides the reaction of synthesis, very important is the reaction of enzymatic hydrolysis of created product. Therefore, in this study, kinetic parameters for synthesis and secondary hydrolysis of pharmacologically active α isosalicin by baker's yeast maltase were calculated, and it was shown that specifity of maltase for hydrolysis is approximately 150 times higher then for synthesis.

  5. Thermodynamics and combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    Modeling fluid phase phenomena blends the conservation equations of continuum mechanics with the property equations of thermodynamics. The thermodynamic contribution becomes especially important when the phenomena involve chemical reactions as they do in combustion systems. The successful study of combustion processes requires (1) the availability of accurate thermodynamic properties for both the reactants and the products of reaction and (2) the computational capabilities to use the properties. A discussion is given of some aspects of the problem of estimating accurate thermodynamic properties both for reactants and products of reaction. Also, some examples of the use of thermodynamic properties for modeling chemically reacting systems are presented. These examples include one-dimensional flow systems and the internal combustion engine.

  6. Changes of biochemical parameters and enzyme activities in broiler chickens with cold-induced ascites.

    PubMed

    Daneshyar, M; Kermanshahi, H; Golian, A

    2009-01-01

    An experiment with 250 one-day-old male broilers (Ross 308) was conducted to investigate the differences of some blood parameters of cold-induced ascitic and healthy broiler chicks in a 6-wk period. The chickens were divided into 2 groups of 5 replicates each. One group of these chickens was raised in normal temperature (NT) treatment and the other in cold temperature (CT) treatment to induce ascites. Mortality was necropsied daily to determine cause of death. At the end of the experiment (wk 6), 5 chickens from each replicate were randomly selected and slaughtered. The heart was removed; the right ventricle was dissected away from the left ventricle and septum. Weights of right and left ventricles were determined separately. Average BW gain and average feed intake were measured weekly, and weekly average feed conversion ratio was calculated. Serum glucose, total protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, activity of lactate dehydrogenase, as-partate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were determined. Throughout the study, the right ventricle-to-total ventricle ratio and total mortality percentage due to ascites of CT-treated birds at the end of experiment was greater (P < or = 0.05) than those of NT-treated ones. Fasting blood sugar of CT-treated birds in wk 4 and 6 was greater (P < or = 0.05) than NT-treated birds. Total blood protein of CT treatment was lower than NT-treated birds in every week and whole period, but this difference was only significant (P < or = 0.05) in wk 6. There was not a significant difference between 2 treatments for triglyceride and cholesterol, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase. It was concluded that cold-induced ascites could affect serum protein and fasting blood sugar of broiler chickens. PMID:19096064

  7. Thermodynamic and Biophysical Analysis of the Membrane-Association of a Histidine-Rich Peptide with Efficient Antimicrobial and Transfection Activities.

    PubMed

    Voievoda, Nataliia; Schulthess, Therese; Bechinger, Burkhard; Seelig, Joachim

    2015-07-30

    LAH4-L1 is a synthetic amphipathic peptide with antimicrobial activity. The sequence of the 23 amino acid peptide was inspired by naturally occurring frog peptides such as PGLa and magainin. LAH4-L1 also facilitates the transport of nucleic acids through the cell membrane. We have investigated the membrane binding properties and energetics of LAH4-L1 at pH 5.5 with physical-chemical methods. CD spectroscopy was employed to quantitate the membrane-induced random coil-to-helix transition of LAH4-L1. Binding isotherms were obtained with CD spectroscopy as a function of the lipid-to-protein ratio for neutral and negatively charged membranes and were analyzed with both the Langmuir multisite adsorption model and the surface partition/Gouy-Chapman model. According to the Langmuir adsorption model each molecule LAH4-L1 binds 4 POPS molecules, independent of the POPS concentration in the membrane. This is supported by the surface partition/Gouy-Chapman model which predicts an electric charge of LAH4-L1 of z = 4. Binding affinity is dominated by electrostatic attraction. The thermodynamics of the binding process was elucidated with isothermal titration calorimetry. The ITC data revealed that the binding process is composed of at least three different reactions, that is, a coil-to-helix transition with an exothermic enthalpy of about -11 kcal/mol and two endothermic processes with enthalpies of ∼4 and ∼8 kcal/mol, respectively, which partly compensate the exothermic enthalpy of the conformational change. The major endothermic reaction is interpreted as a deprotonation reaction following the insertion of a highly charged cationic peptide into a nonpolar environment. PMID:26134591

  8. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents. PMID:24080293

  9. Active vibration control of Flexible Joint Manipulator using Input Shaping and Adaptive Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. P.; Luo, B.; Huang, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a vibration control strategy for a two-link Flexible Joint Manipulator (FJM) with a Hexapod Active Manipulator (HAM). A dynamic model of the multi-body, rigid-flexible system composed of an FJM, a HAM and a spacecraft was built. A hybrid controller was proposed by combining the Input Shaping (IS) technique with an Adaptive-Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller (APADRC). The controller was used to suppress the vibration caused by external disturbances and input motions. Parameters of the APADRC were adaptively adjusted to ensure the characteristic of the closed loop system to be a given reference system, even if the configuration of the manipulator significantly changes during motion. Because precise parameters of the flexible manipulator are not required in the IS system, the operation of the controller was sufficiently robust to accommodate uncertainties in system parameters. Simulations results verified the effectiveness of the HAM scheme and controller in the vibration suppression of FJM during operation.

  10. A combined method to estimate parameters of neuron from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of active potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Wang, Jiang; Che, Yenqiu

    2009-03-01

    A method that combines the means of unscented Kalman filter (UKF) with the technique of synchronization-based parameter estimation is introduced for estimating unknown parameters of neuron when only a heavily noise-corrupted time series of active potential is given. Compared with other synchronization-based methods, this approach uses the state variables estimated by UKF instead of the measured data to drive the auxiliary system. The synchronization-based approach supplies a systematic and analytical procedure for estimating parameters from time series; however, it is only robust against weak noise of measurement, so the UKF is employed to estimate state variables which are used by the synchronization-based method to estimate all unknown parameters of neuron model. It is found out that the estimation accuracy of this combined method is much higher than only using UKF or synchronization-based method when the data of measurement were heavily noise corrupted.

  11. Determination of the thermodynamic activities of LiF and ThF4 in the Li(x)Th(1-x)F(4-3x) liquid solution by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Elisa; Beneš, Ondřej; Colle, Jean-Yves; Konings, Rudy J M

    2015-11-28

    Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) has been used to investigate the vapour pressure over the molten LiF-ThF4 salt and determine the thermodynamic activity of LiF and ThF4 in the liquid solution. As part of the study, the vaporization of pure LiF and pure ThF4 was examined and the results were compared with the literature values finding a good agreement. Next, the vapour pressure of the LixTh1-xF4-3x liquid solution was investigated by measuring four samples having different compositions (XLiF∼ 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 mol%). In order to determine the thermodynamic activities, the vapour pressure of LiF and ThF4 species over the liquid solution, as calculated from our results, were compared with the vapour pressure over the pure LiF(l) and pure ThF4(l) systems. A strong deviation from the Raoult's law was observed, more evident in case of LiF species, in agreement with the predictions by our thermodynamic model. PMID:26498704

  12. Development of a critically evaluated thermodynamic database for the systems containing alkaline-earth oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Adarsh

    In a thermodynamic system which contains several elements, the phase relationships among the components are usually very complex. Especially, systems containing oxides are generally very difficult to investigate owing to the very high experimental temperatures and corrosive action of slags. Due to such difficulties, large inconsistencies are often observed among the available experimental data. In order to investigate and understand the complex phase relationships effectively, it is very useful to develop thermodynamic databases containing optimized model parameters giving the thermodynamic properties of all phases as functions of temperature and composition. In a thermodynamic optimization, adjustable model parameters are calculated using, simultaneously, all available thermodynamic and phase-equilibrium data in order to obtain one set of model equations as functions of temperature and composition. Thermodynamic data, such as activities, can aid in the evaluation of the phase diagrams, and information on phase equilibria can be used to deduce thermodynamic properties. Thus, it is frequently possible to resolve discrepancies in the available data. From the model equations, all the thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams can be back-calculated, and interpolations and extrapolations can be made in a thermodynamically correct manner. The data are thereby rendered self-consistent and consistent with thermodynamic principles, and the available data are distilled into a small set of model parameters, ideal for computer storage. As part of a broader research project at the Centre de Recherche en Calcul Thermochimique (CRCT), Ecole Polytechnique to develop a thermodynamic database for multicomponent oxide systems, this thesis deals with the addition of components SrO and BaO to the existing multicomponent database of the SiO2-B2O3-Al2O 3-CaO-MgO system. Over the years, in collaboration with many industrial companies, a thermodynamic database for the SiO2-B2O 3-Al2O3-Ca

  13. Prediction of thermodynamic and surface properties of Pb-Hg liquid alloys at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, S. K.; Jha, L. N.; Jha, I. S.; Singh, B. P.; Koirala, R. P.; Adhikari, D.

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties, such as free energy of mixing, heat of mixing, activity and structural properties, such as concentration fluctuation in long wavelength limit, short-range order parameter of Pb-Hg liquid alloy at 600 K have been calculated using theoretical modelling. It has then been correlated with modified Butler model to compute the surface tension of the alloys at different temperatures. The Pb-Hg system at 600 K is found to be ordering at higher concentration of Pb.

  14. The Fourier analysis applied to the relationship between (7)Be activity in the Serbian atmosphere and meteorological parameters.

    PubMed

    Rajačić, M M; Todorović, D J; Krneta Nikolić, J D; Janković, M M; Djurdjević, V S

    2016-09-01

    Air sample monitoring in Serbia, Belgrade started in the 1960s, while (7)Be activity in air and total (dry and wet) deposition has been monitored for the last 22 years by the Environment and Radiation Protection Department of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences, Vinca. Using this data collection, the changes of the (7)Be activity in the air and the total (wet and dry) deposition samples, as well as their correlation with meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure, cloudiness, sunshine duration, precipitation and humidity) that affect (7)Be concentration in the atmosphere, were mathematically described using the Fourier analysis. Fourier analysis confirmed the expected; the frequency with the largest intensity in the harmonic spectra of the (7)Be activity corresponds to a period of 1 year, the same as the largest intensity frequency in Fourier series of meteorological parameters. To analyze the quality of the results produced by the Fourier analysis, we compared the measured values of the parameters with the values calculated according to the Fourier series. Absolute deviations between measured and predicted mean monthly values are in range from 0.02 mBq/m(3) to 0.7 mBq/m(3) for (7)Be activity in air, and 0.01 Bq/m(2) and 0.6 Bq/m(2) for (7)Be activity in deposition samples. Relatively good agreement of measured and predicted results offers the possibility of prediction of the (7)Be activity. PMID:27396670

  15. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

  16. Changes in growth, photosynthetic activities, biochemical parameters and amino acid profile of Thompson Seedless grapes (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Somkuwar, R G; Bahetwar, Anita; Khan, I; Satisha, J; Ramteke, S D; Itroutwar, Prerna; Bhongale, Aarti; Oulkar, Dashrath

    2014-11-01

    The study on photosynthetic activity and biochemical parameters in Thompson Seedless grapes grafted on Dog Ridge rootstock and its impact on growth, yield and amino acid profile at various stages of berry development was conducted during the year 2012-2013. Leaf and berry samples from ten year old vines of Thompson Seedless were collected at different growth and berry developmental stages. The analysis showed difference in photosynthetic activity, biochemical parameters and amino acid status with the changes in berry development stage. Higher photosynthetic rate of 17.39 umol cm(-2) s(-1) was recorded during 3-4mm berry size and the lowest (10.08 umol cm(-2) s(-1)) was recorded during the veraison stage. The photosynthetic activity showed gradual decrease with the onset of harvest while the different biochemical parameters showed increase and decrease from one stage to another in both berry and leaves. Changes in photosynthetic activity and biochemical parameters thereby affected the growth, yield and amino acid content of the berry. Positive correlation of leaf area and photosynthetic rate was recorded during the period of study. Reducing sugar (352.25 mg g(-1)) and total carbohydrate (132.52 mg g(-1)) was more in berries as compared to leaf. Amino acid profile showed variations in different stages of berry development. Marked variations in photosynthetic as well as biochemical and amino acid content at various berry development stages was recorded and thereby its cumulative effect on the development of fruit quality. PMID:25522520

  17. Thermodynamics: A Stirling effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Jordan M.; Parrondo, Juan M. R.

    2012-02-01

    The realization of a single-particle Stirling engine pushes thermodynamics into stochastic territory where fluctuations dominate, and points towards a better understanding of energy transduction at the microscale.

  18. The Thermodynamics of Portfolios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, E. W.; Sladkowski, J.

    2001-02-01

    We propose a new method of valuation of portfolios and their respective investing strategies. To this end we define a canonical ensemble of portfolios that allows to use the formalism of thermodynamics.

  19. Thermodynamics and Frozen Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, William L.; Reid, David S.

    1993-01-01

    The heat content of a food at a given temperature can be described by the thermodynamic property of enthalpy. Presents a method to construct a simple calorimeter for measuring the enthalpy changes of different foods during freezing. (MDH)

  20. Parameter Estimation in Hybrid Active-Passive Laminated Sandwich Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, A. L.; Mota Soares, C. M.; Mota Soares, C. A.

    2010-05-21

    In this article we present recent developments regarding parameter estimation in sandwich structures with viscoelastic frequency dependent core and elastic laminated skin layers, with piezoelectric patch sensors and actuators bonded to the exterior surfaces of the sandwich. The frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the core material are modelled using fractional derivative models, with unknown parameters that are to be estimated by an inverse technique, using experimentally measured natural frequencies and associated modal loss factors. The inverse problem is formulated as a constrained minimization problem, and gradient based optimization techniques are employed. An application case is presented and discussed, focused on identification of viscoelastic frequency dependent core material properties.

  1. Thermodynamics of Bioreactions.

    PubMed

    Held, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic principles have been applied to enzyme-catalyzed reactions since the beginning of the 1930s in an attempt to understand metabolic pathways. Currently, thermodynamics is also applied to the design and analysis of biotechnological processes. The key thermodynamic quantity is the Gibbs energy of reaction, which must be negative for a reaction to occur spontaneously. However, the application of thermodynamic feasibility studies sometimes yields positive Gibbs energies of reaction even for reactions that are known to occur spontaneously, such as glycolysis. This article reviews the application of thermodynamics in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It summarizes the basic thermodynamic relationships used for describing the Gibbs energy of reaction and also refers to the nonuniform application of these relationships in the literature. The review summarizes state-of-the-art approaches that describe the influence of temperature, pH, electrolytes, solvents, and concentrations of reacting agents on the Gibbs energy of reaction and, therefore, on the feasibility and yield of biological reactions. PMID:27276551

  2. Relative desirability of leisure activities and work parameters in a simulation of isolated work stations. [long term space flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, W. R., Jr.; Rogers, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    The kinds of activities that are attractive to man in long duration isolation are delineated considering meaningful work as major activity and a choice of leisure/living provisions. The dependent variables are the relative distribution between various work, leisure, and living activities where external constraints on the subject's freedom of choice are minimized. Results indicate that an average of at least five hours per day of significant meaningful work is required for satisfactory enjoyment of the situation; most other parameters of the situation have less effects on overall performance and satisfaction

  3. The thermodynamics and kinetics of phosphoester bond formation, use, and dissociation in biology, with the example of polyphosphate in platelet activation, trasience, and mineralization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelon, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria condense orthophosphates (Pi), forming phosphoester bonds for ATP production that is important to life. This represents an exchange of energy from dissociated carbohydrate bonds to phosophoester bonds. These bonds are available to phosphorylate organic compounds or hydrolyze to Pi, driving many biochemical processes. The benthic bacteria T. namibiensis 1 and Beggiatoa 2 condense Pi into phosphate polymers in oxygenated environments. These polyphosphates (polyPs) are stored until the environment becomes anoxic, when these bacteria retrieve the energy from polyP dissociation into Pi3. Dissociated Pi is released outside of the bacteria, where it precipitates as apatite.The Gibbs free energy of polyP phosphoester bond hydrolysis is negative, however, the kinetics are slow4. Diatoms contain a polyP pool that is stable until after death, after which the polyPs hydrolyze and form apatite5. The roles of polyP in eukaryotic organism biochemistry continue to be discovered. PolyPs have a range of biochemical roles, such as bioavailable P-storage, stress adaptation, and blood clotting6. PolyP-containing granules are released from anuclear platelets to activate factor V7 and factor XII in the blood clotting process due to their polyanionic charge8. Platelets have a lifespan of approximately 8 days, after which they undergo apoptosis9. Data will be presented that demonstrate the bioactive, thermodynamically unstable polyP pool within older platelets in vitro can spontaneously hydrolyze and form phosphate minerals. This process is likely avoided by platelet digestion in the spleen and liver, possibly recycling platelet polyPs with their phosphoester bond energy for other biochemical roles. 1 Schulz HN et al. Science (2005) 307: 416-4182 Brüchert V et al. Geochim Cosmochim Acta (2003) 67: 4505-45183 Goldhammer T et al. Nat Geosci (2010) 3: 557-5614 de Jager H-J et al. J Phys Chem A (1988) 102: 2838-28415 Diaz, J et al. Science (2008) 320: 652-6556 Mason KD et al

  4. Thermodynamics, Kinetics, and Activation energy Studies of the sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) to a Mn3O4 nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Yvette; Remes, Abril; Reyna, Alejandra; Martinez, Denise; Villarreal, Jahaziel; Ramos, Hilda; Trevino, Samantha; Tamez, C.; Martinez, A.; Eubanks, T.; Parsons, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a manganese oxide, Mn3O4 was used to remove chromium(III) and chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. The Mn3O4 nanomaterial was synthesized through a precipitation method, and was characterized using XRD, which confirmed the material had a crystal structure similar to hausmannite. In addition, using Scherrer’s equation it was determined that the nanomaterial had an average grain size of 19.5 ± 1.10 nm. A study of the effects of pH on the binding of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) showed that the optimum binding pH was 4 and 3 respectively. Batch isotherm studies were performed to determine the binding capacity of chromium(III), which was determined to be 18.7 mg/g, 41.7 mg/g, and 54.4 mg/g respectively for 4°C, 21°C, and 45°C. Chromium(VI) on the other hand had lower binding capacities of 2.5 mg/g, 4.3 mg/g, and 5.8 mg/g for 4°C, 21°C, 45°C, respectively. Thermodynamic studies performed indicated the sorption process was for the most part controlled by physisorption. The ΔG for the sorption of chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) ranged from −0.9 to −13 kJ/mol, indicating a spontaneous reaction was occurring. The enthalpy indicated a endothermic reaction was occurring during the binding and show ΔH values of 70.6 and 19.1 kJ.mol for chromium(III) and Chromium(VI), respectively. In addition, ΔS for the reaction had positive values of 267 and 73 J/mol for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) which indicate a spontaneous reaction. In addition, the sorption process was found to follow pseudo second order kinetic and the activation energy studies indicated the binding process occurred through chemisorption. PMID:25097453

  5. Unitary Thermodynamics from Thermodynamic Geometry II: Fit to a Local-Density Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppeiner, George

    2015-10-01

    Strongly interacting Fermi gasses at low density possess universal thermodynamic properties that have recently seen very precise PVT measurements by a group at MIT. This group determined local thermodynamic properties of a system of ultracold atoms tuned to Feshbach resonance. In this paper, I analyze the MIT data with a thermodynamic theory of unitary thermodynamics based on ideas from critical phenomena. This theory was introduced in the first paper of this sequence and characterizes the scaled thermodynamics by the entropy per particle and the energy per particle Y( z), in units of the Fermi energy. Y( z) is in two segments, separated by a second-order phase transition at : a "superfluid" segment for and a "normal" segment for . For small z, the theory obeys a series where is a constant exponent and () are constant series coefficients. For large z, the theory obeys a perturbation of the ideal gas , where is a constant exponent and () are constant series coefficients. This limiting form for large z differs from the series used in the first paper and was necessary to fit the MIT data. I fit the MIT data by adjusting four free independent theory parameters: . This fit process was augmented by trap integration and comparison with earlier thermal data taken at Duke University. The overall match to both the data sets was good and had , , , scaled critical temperature , where is the Fermi temperature, and Bertsch parameter . I also discuss the virial expansion in the context of this thermodynamic geometric theory.

  6. Correlations between IL-2 enhancing activity and clinical parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tomura, K; Kang, H; Mitamura, K; Takei, M; Yamagami, K; Karasaki, M; Nishinarita, S; Hayama, T; Sawada, S; Horie, T

    1991-04-01

    In a previous paper (Tomura, K. et al. Tohoku J. Exp. Med., 1989, 159, 171-183), we discovered IL-2 enhancing factor(s) designated B cell derived-growth enhancing factor-2 (BGEF-2), which enhanced IL-2 dependent cell proliferation, and reported that BGEF-2 was produced by B cells of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) only when they were in the active stage of the disease. In this paper, we studied relationship between each IL-2 enhancing activity from B cell supernatant of the patients with these diseases and clinical parameters. IL-2 enhancing activities did not correlate with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP), but correlated with plasma concentrations of gamma-globulin from the patients with RA and SLE in the active stages. IL-2 enhancing activities correlated with hypocomplementemia and leukocytopenia in the patients with SLE, and also correlated with RAHA titer in the patients with RA. Moreover, on several patients with RA or SLE in the active stages, diminution of IL-2 enhancing activity was found when they were in the remission stage after treatments. These findings suggested that IL-2 enhancing activity (i.e., BGEF-2 activity) correlated with activity of these diseases and supported the hypothesis that BGEF-2 played an important role in the polyclonal B cell activation and autoantibody production in patients with these diseases. PMID:1715616

  7. Updated activated sludge model number 1 parameter values for improved prediction of nitrogen removal in activated sludge processes: validation at 13 full-scale plants.

    PubMed

    Choubert, Jean-Marc; Stricker, Anne-Emmanuelle; Marquot, Aurélien; Racault, Yvan; Gillot, Sylvie; Héduit, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The Activated Sludge Model number 1 (ASM1) is the main model used in simulation projects focusing on nitrogen removal. Recent laboratory-scale studies have found that the default values given 20 years ago for the decay rate of nitrifiers and for the heterotrophic biomass yield in anoxic conditions were inadequate. To verify the relevance of the revised parameter values at full scale, a series of simulations were carried out with ASM1 using the original and updated set of parameters at 20 degrees C and 10 degrees C. The simulation results were compared with data collected at 13 full-scale nitrifying-denitrifying municipal treatment plants. This work shows that simulations using the original ASM1 default parameters tend to overpredict the nitrification rate and underpredict the denitrification rate. The updated set of parameters allows more realistic predictions over a wide range of operating conditions. PMID:19860142

  8. Thermodynamics and mechanics of photochemcially reacting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rong; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2013-11-01

    We develop a thermodynamics and mechanics theory for polymers that when irradiated with light, undergo photochemical reactions that alter their macromolecular structure, e.g., by bond breaking and/or reformation, and in turn affect their mechanical and physical behavior. This emerging class of highly-engineered active materials shows great promise for myriad applications and is a subset of a broader class of polymers with covalent bonds that can be dynamically tuned with various environmental stimuli. We formulate a general thermodynamic and kinetic framework to model the complex photochemical-thermal-mechanical coupling in these materials. Our theory considers the behavior of a polymer that is subjected to the combination of mechanical and thermal loading while simultaneously irradiated by light with multiple frequency components and directions. We introduce an approach to model the photochemical reactions that can change the network topology, resulting chemical species transport, heat conduction and finite deformation. We describe the interaction of the material with light via a radiometric description and show how it can be linked to a full electromagnetic treatment when appropriate and if desired. Our approach is sufficiently general to permit the modeling of various materials that operate via different photochemical reaction mechanisms. After formulating the general theory, we specialize it to a polymer that when irradiated with light undergoes a series of photochemical reactions that cause chain scission and reformation which continuously rearrange the polymer network into a stress-free configuration. Based on the operant physical mechanisms we develop a constitutive model using a polymer chain decomposition and evolution approach to track the molecular structure changes during simultaneous irradiation and mechanical loading. In the special case of isothermal conditions with monochromatic and unidirectional irradiation, we recover a previous model based on

  9. The effect of solar activity on the evolution of solar wind parameters during the rise of the 24th cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rod'kin, D. G.; Shugay, Yu. S.; Slemzin, V. A.; Veselovskii, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of parameters of the near-Earth solar wind (SW) and the effect of solar activity on the parameters of three SW components (fast SW from large-scale coronal holes (CHs); slow SW from active regions, streamers, and other sources; and transient flows related to sporadic solar activity) at the beginning of the 24th solar cycle (2009-2011) are analyzed. It is demonstrated that temperaturedependent parameters of ionic composition (C+6/C+5 and O+7/O+6) of the transient SW component in the profound minimum of solar activity in 2009 were correlated with the variation of the rate of weak (type C and weaker) flares. This verifies the presence of a hot component associated with these flares in the SW. The variations in the velocity and the kinetic temperature of fast SW from CHs with an increase in activity are more pronounced in the bulk of the high-speed stream, and the variations of O+7/O+6 and Fe/O ratios and the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field are the most prominent in the region of interaction between fast and slow SW streams. The analysis reveals that a value of O+7/O+6 = 0.1 serves as the criterion to distinguish between fast SW streams and interplanetary coronal mass ejections in the 2009 activity minimum. This value is lower than the one (0.145) determined earlier based on the data on the 23rd cycle (Zhao et al., 2009). Therefore, the distinguishing criterion is not an absolute one and depends on the solar activity level.

  10. Universal thermodynamics in different gravity theories: Conditions for generalized second law of thermodynamics and thermodynamical equilibrium on the horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Saugata; Saha, Subhajit; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2015-04-01

    The present work deals with a detailed study of universal thermodynamics in different modified gravity theories. The validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSLT) and thermodynamical equilibrium (TE) of the Universe bounded by a horizon (apparent/event) in f(R) -gravity, Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, RS-II brane scenario and DGP brane model has been investigated. In the perspective of recent observational evidences, the matter in the Universe is chosen as interacting holographic dark energy model. The entropy on the horizons is evaluated from the validity of the unified first law and as a result there is a correction (in integral form) to the usual Bekenstein entropy. The other thermodynamical parameter namely temperature on the horizon is chosen as the recently introduced corrected Hawking temperature. The above thermodynamical analysis is done for homogeneous and isotropic flat FLRW model of the Universe. The restrictions for the validity of GSLT and the TE are presented in tabular form for each gravity theory. Finally, due to complicated expressions, the validity of GSLT and TE are also examined from graphical representation, using three Planck data sets.

  11. Thermodynamic restrictions on mechanosynthesis of strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, J.F.; Ferreira, A.A.L.; Antunes, I.; Fagg, D.P.; Frade, J.R.

    2012-01-15

    Chemical potential phase stability diagrams were calculated from relevant thermodynamic properties and used to predict the thermodynamic driving force under prospective conditions of room temperature mechanosynthesis. One analysed the dependence of chemical potential diagrams on temperature and partial pressure of evolving gases such as oxygen or carbon dioxide, as expected on using strontium peroxide or strontium carbonate as precursor reactants for the alkali earth component. Thermodynamic calculations were also obtained for changes in titania precursor reactants, including thermodynamic predictions for reactivity of strontium carbonate with amorphous titania. Experimental evidence showed that strontium titanate can be obtained by mechanosynthesis of strontium carbonate+anatase mixtures, due to previous amorphization under high energy milling. Ability to perform mechanosynthesis with less energetic milling depends on the suitable choice of alternative precursor reactants, which meet the thermodynamic requirements without previous amorphization; this was demonstrated by mechanosynthesis from anatase+strontium peroxide mixtures. - Graphical abstract: X-Ray diffractograms of the starting TiO{sub 2} (anatase)+SrCO{sub 3} mixture and after mechanical activation at 650 rpm, for 1, 2, and 7 h. Different symbols are used to identify reflections ascribed to anatase (diamonds), SrCO{sub 3} (squares) and SrTiO{sub 3} (triangles). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prediction of thermodynamic driving force for room temperature mechanosynthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dependence of chemical potential diagrams on temperature and partial pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic calculations for changes in titania precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental support for thermodynamic predictions.

  12. Spectroscopic, thermodynamic, kinetic studies and oxidase/antioxidant biomimetic catalytic activities of tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate Cu(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Shaban Y; Ramadan, Abd El-Motaleb M; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Mohamed, Mahmoud A; van Eldik, Rudi

    2015-08-21

    A series of copper(ii) complexes, viz. [Tp(MeMe)Cu(Cl)(H2O)] (), [Tp(MeMe)Cu(OAc)(H2O)] (), [Tp(MeMe)Cu(NO3)] () and [Tp(MeMe)Cu(ClO4)] () containing tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate (KTp(MeMe)), have been synthesized and fully characterized. The substitution reaction of with thiourea was studied under pseudo-first-order conditions as a function of concentration, temperature and pressure in methanol and acetonitrile as solvents. Two reaction steps that both depended on the nucleophile concentration were observed for both solvents. Substitution of coordinated methanol is about 40 times faster than the substitution of chloride. In acetonitrile, the rate constant for the displacement of coordinated acetonitrile was more than 20 times faster than the substitution of chloride. The reported activation parameters indicate that both reaction steps follow a dissociative mechanism in both solvents. On going from methanol to acetonitrile, the rate constant for the displacement of the solvent becomes more than 200 times faster due to the more labile acetonitrile, but the substitution mechanism remained to have a dissociative character. The antioxidant activities of were evaluated for superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-s-transferase (GST0 and glutathione reduced (GSH-Rd) activity. and were found to show (p < 0.05) the highest antioxidant activity in comparison to and , which can be ascribed to the geometric configuration as well as the nature of the co-ligand. showed catechol oxidase activity with turnover numbers of 20 min(-1) and a coordination affinity for 3,5-DTBC of K1, = 31 mM(-1). K1 is rather large and seems to be typical for faster biomimetic models, and also for the enzyme itself (25 mM(-1)). The reaction rate depended linearly on the complex concentration, indicating a first-order dependence on the catalyst concentration. PMID:26172408

  13. Thermodynamic characterization of poly(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropyl methacrylate) by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Stella K; Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-03-16

    The thermodynamic characterization of a fluorinated methacrylic homopolymer was conducted by means of inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at infinite dilution. The polymer under study, poly(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropyl methacrylate) (PHFIMA) was synthesized via a free radical polymerization reaction and was properly characterized prior to IGC measurements. The IGC characterization encompassed the calculation of the thermodynamic sorption parameters, the parameters of mixing at infinite dilution, the weight fraction activity coefficients and the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters of 15 probes. Moreover, the total and partial solubility parameters of the polymer were determined. The impact of the temperature and the chemical nature of the probes on the aforementioned thermodynamic parameters are discussed. Results demonstrate that PHFIMA is insoluble in almost every tested solvent, with the exception of chloroform, due to its proton donor character which is favorable for the formation of hydrogen bonds with the fluorine groups and the oxygen atoms of the carbonyl groups (proton acceptors) of the polymer. Furthermore, the total and dispersive solubility parameters descend in a linear manner with the increase of temperature, whereas the polar and hydrogen bonding solubility parameters increase when temperature rises, probably due to the conformational changes of the polymer on the solid support. PMID:22336261

  14. Introducing thermodynamics through energy and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, Rodrigo; Guerra, Vasco

    2012-07-01

    We suggest a simple approach to introducing thermodynamics, beginning with the concept of internal energy of deformable bodies. From a series of thought experiments involving ideal gases, we show that the internal energy depends on the volume and on a second parameter, leading to the development of the concept of entropy. By introducing entropy before the notions of temperature and heat, the proposed approach avoids some of the major conceptual difficulties with the traditional presentation. The relationship between mechanics and thermodynamics naturally emerges, mechanics corresponding to isentropic thermodynamics. The questions of evolution to equilibrium and irreversibility are studied under the light of the action of the "dynamic force" and its dissipative character, evincing the benefits of keeping in mind the microscopic picture.

  15. Seasonal dynamics of prokaryotic abundance and activities in relation to environmental parameters in a transitional aquatic ecosystem (Cape Peloro, Italy).

    PubMed

    Zaccone, R; Azzaro, M; Azzaro, F; Bergamasco, A; Caruso, G; Leonardi, M; La Ferla, R; Maimone, G; Mancuso, M; Monticelli, L S; Raffa, F; Crisafi, E

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effects of temporal changes on microbial parameters in a brackish aquatic ecosystem. To this aim, the abundances of prokaryotes and vibrios together with the rates of enzymatic hydrolysis of proteins by leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), polysaccharides by β-glucosidase (GLU) and organic phosphates by alkaline phosphatase (AP), heterotrophic prokaryotic production (HPP), respiration (R), were seasonally investigated, during a 2-year period in the coastal area of Cape Peloro (Messina, Italy), constituted by two brackish lakes (Faro and Ganzirri). In addition, physical and chemical parameters (temperature, salinity, nutrients) and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (POC, PN) were measured. The influence of multiple factors on prokaryotic abundances and activities was analysed. The results showed that Cape Peloro area is characterised by high seasonal variability of the microbial parameters that is higher than the spatial one. Combined changes in particulate matter and temperature (T), could explain the variability in vibrios abundance, GLU and R activities in both lakes, indicating a direct stimulation of the warm season on the heterotrophic prokaryotic metabolism. Positive correlations between T (from 13.3 to 29.6 °C) and HPP, LAP, AP, POC, PN are also observed in Ganzirri Lake. Moreover, the trophic status index and most of the microbial parameters show significant seasonal differences. This study demonstrates that vibrios abundance and microbial activities are responsive to the spatial and seasonal changes of examined area. The combined effects of temperature and trophic conditions on the microbial parameters lead us to suggest their use as potential indicators of the prokaryotic response to climate changes in temperate brackish areas. PMID:24158689

  16. Rapid Rather than Gradual Weight Reduction Impairs Hemorheological Parameters of Taekwondo Athletes through Reduction in RBC-NOS Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Woo Hwi; Heine, Oliver; Pauly, Sebastian; Kim, Pilsang; Bloch, Wilhelm; Mester, Joachim; Grau, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rapid weight reduction is part of the pre-competition routine and has been shown to negatively affect psychological and physiological performance of Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. This is caused by a reduction of the body water and an electrolyte imbalance. So far, it is unknown whether weight reduction also affects hemorheological properties and hemorheology-influencing nitric oxide (NO) signaling, important for oxygen supply to the muscles and organs. Methods For this purpose, ten male TKD athletes reduced their body weight by 5% within four days (rapid weight reduction, RWR). After a recovery phase, athletes reduced body weight by 5% within four weeks (gradual weight reduction, GWR). Each intervention was preceded by two baseline measurements and followed by a simulated competition. Basal blood parameters (red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean cellular hemoglobin and mean cellular hemoglobin concentration), RBC-NO synthase activation, RBC nitrite as marker for NO synthesis, RBC deformability and aggregation parameters were determined on a total of eight investigation days. Results Basal blood parameters were not affected by the two interventions. In contrast to GWR, RWR decreased activation of RBC-NO synthase, RBC nitrite, respective NO concentration and RBC deformability. Additionally, RWR increased RBC aggregation and disaggregation threshold. Conclusion The results point out that a rapid weight reduction negatively affects hemorheological parameters and NO signaling in RBC which might limit performance capacity. Thus, GWR should be preferred to achieve the desired weight prior to a competition to avoid these negative effects. PMID:25875585

  17. Man-induced activities modify demographic parameters in a long-lived species: effects of poisoning and health policies.

    PubMed

    Margalida, Antoni; Colomer, Ma Angels; Oro, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Recent changes in sanitary policies within the European Union (EU) concerning disposal of carcasses of domestic animals and the increase of non-natural mortality factors, such as illegal poisoning, are threatening European vultures. However, the effects of anthropogenic activities on demographic parameters are poorly studied. Using a long-term study (1994-2011) of the threatened Pyrenean Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus population, we assess the variation in the proportion of breeding pairs, egg-laying dates, clutch size, breeding success, and survival following a sharp reduction in food availability in 2005 due to the application of restrictive sanitary policies decreasing livestock carcass availability. We found a delay in laying dates and a regressive trend in clutch size, breeding success, and survival following policy change. The maintenance of specific supplementary feeding stations for Bearded Vultures probably reduced the negative effects of illegal poisoning and food shortages, which mainly affected subadult survival. A drop in food availability may have produced changes in demographic parameters and an increase in mortality due to an increased exposure to contaminated food. As a result, supplementary feeding as a precautionary measure can be a useful tool to reduce illegal poisoning and declines in demographic parameters until previous food availability scenarios are achieved. This study shows how anthropogenic activities through human health regulations that affect habitat quality can suddenly modify demographic parameters in long-lived species, including those, such as survival, with high sensitivity to population growth rate. PMID:24834731

  18. Dependence of plasmaspheric hiss on solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity and modeling of its global distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Lee, Dae-Young; Shprits, Yuri

    2015-02-01

    Accurate knowledge of the global distribution of plasmaspheric hiss is essential for the radiation belt modeling because it provides a direct link to understanding the radiation belt loss in the slot region. In this paper, we study the dependence of hiss activity on solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity indices using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms hiss measurements made from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2012 based on a correlation analysis. We find that hiss amplitudes are well correlated with the preceding solar wind speed VSW, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) BZ, and interplanetary electric field (IEF) EY with delay times of 5-6 h for VSW and 3-4 h for IMF BZ and IEF EY, while the best correlation with the geomagnetic indices, AE, Kp, and SYM-H, occurs at a delay time of 2-3 h for AE and SYM-H and 3-4 h for Kp. Of the solar wind parameters, the dawn-to-dusk component of IEF EY yields the best correlation with the variation of hiss wave. More interestingly, the global distribution of hiss waves shows a significant dependence on the VSW and IMF BZ: the most intense hiss region tends to occur at prenoon sector for a more southward IMF BZ, while the tendency is opposite with increasing VSW. This implies different origins of hiss activity. Also, we employ an artificial neural network technique to develop models of the global distribution of hiss amplitudes based on the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. The solely solar wind parameter-based model generally results in a higher correlation between the measured and modeled hiss amplitudes than any other models based on the geomagnetic indices. Finally, we use the solar wind parameter-based model to investigate hiss activity during storm events by distinguishing between coronal mass ejection-driven storms and corotating interaction region-driven storms. The result shows that in spite of the differences in the behavior of solar wind parameters between the two storm

  19. Plasmin and coagulant activities in a minicurd model system: Study of technological parameters.

    PubMed

    Vélez, M A; Perotti, M C; Candioti, M C; Bergamini, C V; Hynes, E R

    2016-09-01

    The effect of scalding temperature of the curd, the inclusion of a washing step, and the pH at whey drainage on plasmin and coagulant activities were assessed in a minicurd model of young hard cooked cheese. The variables were tested as follows: draining pH was assayed at 3 levels (4.6, 5.6, and 6.4), curd scalding temperature was tested at 50 and 56°C, and washing of the curd was examined at 2 levels (no washing step, and the replacement of the whey by water). Increase in pH at whey drainage and washing of the curd had a positive effect on plasmin activity, which was also evidenced by compatible changes in soluble peptide profiles. No effect of increased cooking temperature was found on plasmin activity. Plasminogen activation was not verified in any treatment. As for coagulant, lower pH values at whey drainage and a decrease in curd cooking temperature increased its activity; washing of the curd showed no influence on coagulant residual activity. These results were consistent with proteolysis described by peptide profiles, electrophoresis, and soluble nitrogen fractions. PMID:27423946

  20. State, Parameter, and Unknown Input Estimation Problems in Active Automotive Safety Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanomchoeng, Gridsada

    A variety of driver assistance systems such as traction control, electronic stability control (ESC), rollover prevention and lane departure avoidance systems are being developed by automotive manufacturers to reduce driver burden, partially automate normal driving operations, and reduce accidents. The effectiveness of these driver assistance systems can be significant enhanced if the real-time values of several vehicle parameters and state variables, namely tire-road friction coefficient, slip angle, roll angle, and rollover index, can be known. Since there are no inexpensive sensors available to measure these variables, it is necessary to estimate them. However, due to the significant nonlinear dynamics in a vehicle, due to unknown and changing plant parameters, and due to the presence of unknown input disturbances, the design of estimation algorithms for this application is challenging. This dissertation develops a new approach to observer design for nonlinear systems in which the nonlinearity has a globally (or locally) bounded Jacobian. The developed approach utilizes a modified version of the mean value theorem to express the nonlinearity in the estimation error dynamics as a convex combination of known matrices with time varying coefficients. The observer gains are then obtained by solving linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A number of illustrative examples are presented to show that the developed approach is less conservative and more useful than the standard Lipschitz assumption based nonlinear observer. The developed nonlinear observer is utilized for estimation of slip angle, longitudinal vehicle velocity, and vehicle roll angle. In order to predict and prevent vehicle rollovers in tripped situations, it is necessary to estimate the vertical tire forces in the presence of unknown road disturbance inputs. An approach to estimate unknown disturbance inputs in nonlinear systems using dynamic model inversion and a modified version of the mean value theorem is

  1. A two-parameter model for the infrared/submillimeter/radio spectral energy distributions of galaxies and active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Daniel A.; Helou, George; Magdis, Georgios E.; Armus, Lee; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Shi, Yong

    2014-03-20

    A two-parameter semi-empirical model is presented for the spectral energy distributions of galaxies with contributions to their infrared-submillimeter-radio emission from both star formation and accretion disk-powered activity. This model builds upon a previous one-parameter family of models for star-forming galaxies, and includes an update to the mid-infrared emission using an average template obtained from Spitzer Space Telescope observations of normal galaxies. Star-forming/active galactic nucleus (AGN) diagnostics based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent widths and broadband infrared colors are presented, and example mid-infrared AGN fractional contributions are estimated from model fits to the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey sample of nearby U/LIRGS and the Five mJy Unbiased Spitzer Extragalactic Survey sample of 24 μm selected sources at redshifts 0 ≲ z ≲ 4.

  2. Thermodynamic Properties of Supported Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gorte, Raymond J.

    2014-03-26

    The goals of this work were to develop Coulometric Titration as a method for characterizing the thermodynamic redox properties of oxides and to apply this technique to the characterization of ceria- and vanadia-based catalysts. The redox properties of ceria and vanadia are a major part of what makes these materials catalytically active but their properties are also dependent on their structure and the presence of other oxides. Quantifying these properties through the measurement of oxidation energetics was the goal of this work.

  3. Mechanics and thermodynamics in lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A.; Gentle, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    The causes for breakdown in the lubricant film of mineral oils are discussed. It is stated that the critical point is caused by desorption of the naturally occurring surface active agent and can be described by thermodynamic analysis. The effect of different metals in lubrication is surveyed. The problem of breakdown in elastohydrodynamic lubrication is treated phenomenologically by studying traction. The topics considered are classical and non-Newtonian explanations, anomalous film thickness and viscosity effects, surface roughness contributions, and solidification of the lubricant. Reasons for the apparent granular traction characteristics are examined.

  4. Thermodynamics of firms' growth

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Eduardo; Hernando, Alberto; Hernando, Ricardo; Plastino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of firms' growth and firms' sizes is a topic under intense scrutiny. In this paper, we show that a thermodynamic model based on the maximum entropy principle, with dynamical prior information, can be constructed that adequately describes the dynamics and distribution of firms' growth. Our theoretical framework is tested against a comprehensive database of Spanish firms, which covers, to a very large extent, Spain's economic activity, with a total of 1 155 142 firms evolving along a full decade. We show that the empirical exponent of Pareto's law, a rule often observed in the rank distribution of large-size firms, is explained by the capacity of economic system for creating/destroying firms, and that can be used to measure the health of a capitalist-based economy. Indeed, our model predicts that when the exponent is larger than 1, creation of firms is favoured; when it is smaller than 1, destruction of firms is favoured instead; and when it equals 1 (matching Zipf's law), the system is in a full macroeconomic equilibrium, entailing ‘free’ creation and/or destruction of firms. For medium and smaller firm sizes, the dynamical regime changes, the whole distribution can no longer be fitted to a single simple analytical form and numerical prediction is required. Our model constitutes the basis for a full predictive framework regarding the economic evolution of an ensemble of firms. Such a structure can be potentially used to develop simulations and test hypothetical scenarios, such as economic crisis or the response to specific policy measures. PMID:26510828

  5. Thermodynamics of firms' growth.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Eduardo; Hernando, Alberto; Fernández Bariviera, Aurelio; Hernando, Ricardo; Plastino, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of firms' growth and firms' sizes is a topic under intense scrutiny. In this paper, we show that a thermodynamic model based on the maximum entropy principle, with dynamical prior information, can be constructed that adequately describes the dynamics and distribution of firms' growth. Our theoretical framework is tested against a comprehensive database of Spanish firms, which covers, to a very large extent, Spain's economic activity, with a total of 1,155,142 firms evolving along a full decade. We show that the empirical exponent of Pareto's law, a rule often observed in the rank distribution of large-size firms, is explained by the capacity of economic system for creating/destroying firms, and that can be used to measure the health of a capitalist-based economy. Indeed, our model predicts that when the exponent is larger than 1, creation of firms is favoured; when it is smaller than 1, destruction of firms is favoured instead; and when it equals 1 (matching Zipf's law), the system is in a full macroeconomic equilibrium, entailing 'free' creation and/or destruction of firms. For medium and smaller firm sizes, the dynamical regime changes, the whole distribution can no longer be fitted to a single simple analytical form and numerical prediction is required. Our model constitutes the basis for a full predictive framework regarding the economic evolution of an ensemble of firms. Such a structure can be potentially used to develop simulations and test hypothetical scenarios, such as economic crisis or the response to specific policy measures. PMID:26510828

  6. Thermodynamics of Quasi-One Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yung-Kang

    1995-11-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional materials are of interest because of the large variety of phase transitions they exhibit, such as charge-density-wave (CDW), spin-density -wave (SDW), spin-Peierls (SP) and superconducting transitions. Thermodynamic measurements are important to our understanding of the nature and magnitude of the phase transitions and the effect of fluctuations. Two quasi-one-dimensional inorganic oxides are comprehensively investigated in this thesis. First, CuGeO _3 undergoes a spin-Peierls transition at 14 K, and second, K_{0.3}MoO _3 shows a charge-density-wave ground state below the transition temperature of 180 K. We measured the heat capacity of CuGeO _3, using a high resolution ac calorimeter, both in the absence and presence of magnetic field. For the zero-field data, a sharp discontinuity at its spin -Peierls phase transition (~14 K) is observed. The magnitude of the jump is consistent with mean-field theory, indicating a nearest neighbor exchange interaction ~75 K, and that low-dimensional fluctuations have a small effect in depressing T_{c}. A temperature -dependent activation energy is observed at very low temperature. Between 5 and 10 K, we observed an activation energy Delta ~ 24K ~ 1.76 T_{c}, suggesting that the gap opens up more quickly below T_{c} than predicted by mean-field theory. The ratio of the specific heat anomaly and temperature derivative of the magnetic susceptibility at T _{c} equals the observed value of rm d^2T_{c}/dH ^2 at T_{c}, as expected in mean-field theory, but this ratio deviates from mean-field behavior below the transition. The depression of T_{c } in the presence of a magnetic field agrees well with mean-field theory, and there are no signs of suppression and broadening of the specific heat peaks due to external magnetic fields. The activation energy appears to be temperature dependent in all fields, but there is no clear evidence of reducing the activation energy in higher fields, suggesting that there is no

  7. APOSTLE OBSERVATIONS OF GJ 1214b: SYSTEM PARAMETERS AND EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kundurthy, P.; Agol, E.; Becker, A. C.; Williams, B.; Mukadam, A.; Barnes, R.

    2011-04-20

    We present three transits of GJ 1214b, observed as part of the Apache Point Observatory Survey of Transit Light Curves of Exoplanets. By applying Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to a multi-wavelength data set which included our r-band light curves and previously gathered data of GJ 1214b, we confirm earlier estimates of system parameters. Using spectral energy distribution fitting, mass-luminosity relations, and light curve data, we derived absolute parameters for the star and planet, improving uncertainties by a factor of two for the stellar mass (M{sub *} = 0.153{sup +0.010}{sub -0.009} M{sub sun}), stellar radius (R{sub *} = 0.210{sup +0.005}{sub -0.004} R{sub sun}), planetary radius (R{sub p} = 2.74{sup +0.06}{sub -0.05} R{sub +}), and planetary density ({rho}{sub p} = 1.68 {+-} 0.23 g cm{sup -3}). Transit times derived from our study show no evidence for strong transit timing variations. We also report the detection of two features in our light curves which we believe are evidence for a low-energy stellar flare and a spot-crossing event.

  8. Thermodynamics of the variable modified Chaplygin gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, D.; Chatterjee, S.

    2016-05-01

    A cosmological model with a new variant of Chaplygin gas obeying an equation of state(EoS), P = Aρ ‑ B/ρα where B= B0an is investigated in the context of its thermodynamical behaviour. Here B0 and n are constants and a is the scale factor. We show that the equation of state of this `Variable Modified Chaplygin gas' (VMCG) can describe the current accelerated expansion of the universe. Following standard thermodynamical criteria we mainly discuss the classical thermodynamical stability of the model and find that the new parameter, n introduced in VMCG plays a crucial role in determining the stability considerations and should always be negative. We further observe that although the earlier model of Lu explains many of the current observational findings of different probes it fails the desirable tests of thermodynamical stability. We also note that for 0n < our model points to a phantom type of expansion which, however, is found to be compatible with current SNe Ia observations and CMB anisotropy measurements. Further the third law of thermodynamics is obeyed in our case. Our model is very general in the sense that many of earlier works in this field may be obtained as a special case of our solution. An interesting point to note is that the model also apparently suggests a smooth transition from the big bang to the big rip in its whole evaluation process.

  9. The thermodynamics of simple biomembrane mimetic systems

    PubMed Central

    Raudino, Antonio; Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Pannuzzo, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Insight into the forces governing a system is essential for understanding its behavior and function. Thermodynamic investigations provide a wealth of information that is not, or is hardly, available from other methods. This article reviews thermodynamic approaches and assays to measure collective properties such as heat adsorption / emission and volume variations. These methods can be successfully applied to the study of lipid vesicles (liposomes) and biological membranes. With respect to instrumentation, differential scanning calorimetry, pressure perturbation calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry, dilatometry, and acoustic techniques aimed at measuring the isothermal and adiabatic processes, two- and three-dimensional compressibilities are considered. Applications of these techniques to lipid systems include the measurement of different thermodynamic parameters and a detailed characterization of thermotropic, barotropic, and lyotropic phase behavior. The membrane binding and / or partitioning of solutes (proteins, peptides, drugs, surfactants, ions, etc.) can also be quantified and modeled. Many thermodynamic assays are available for studying the effect of proteins and other additives on membranes, characterizing non-ideal mixing, domain formation, bilayer stability, curvature strain, permeability, solubilization, and fusion. Studies of membrane proteins in lipid environments elucidate lipid–protein interactions in membranes. Finally, a plethora of relaxation phenomena toward equilibrium thermodynamic structures can be also investigated. The systems are described in terms of enthalpic and entropic forces, equilibrium constants, heat capacities, partial volume changes, volume and area compressibility, and so on, also shedding light on the stability of the structures and the molecular origin and mechanism of the structural changes. PMID:21430953

  10. The distribution of temperature in an active region for a comet with known parameters of rotation and orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. V.; Shulman, L. M.

    2005-06-01

    We calculated the temperature regime of an active region considered as a conical hole in dust layer. All the calculations are carried out for the case when the season effects are distinctly expressed. The temperature is defined from the geometrical parameters of the active region separately for ice bottom and dust walls. It is shown that dust walls are cooled very slowly for the small vertex angles of the crater structure. The temperature of the ice bottom practically does not change over the whole period of rotation, because it is retained at an approximately constant level by concentration of reradiated energy from the dust walls heated by the Sun.

  11. Changes of serum cytokine activities and other parameters in dogs with experimentally induced endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, T; Fujinaga, T; Yamashita, K; Hagio, M

    1996-08-01

    To study the relationship of changes of cytokines in endotoxic shock, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 like activities, together with physiologic and hemodynamic responses, were examined in dogs before and after intravenous administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) purified from Escherichia coli in a dose of 500 micrograms/kg of body weight. The blood endotoxin concentration increased significantly at 30 min after LPS administration, and maintained high levels for 24 hr. Red blood cell counts; hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit values increased at 30 min, and these high values persisted for 24 hr. The platelet count decreased significantly at 30 min, then showed a tendency to recover, but decreased again at 24 hr. Cardiac output, cardiac index and mean arterial pressure showed transient, significant decreases at 15 min, and then returned to the baseline levels by 24 hr. TNF-like activities increased at 30 min, while IL-1-like activities did so between 30 and 60 min. The former reached the maximal levels at 2 hr and the latter at 1.5 hr. Both activities were then hardly detectable from 6 to 24 hr. IL-6-like activities elevated at 1 hr with the peak at 1.5 hr, and remained high until 24 hr. PMID:8870390

  12. [Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and lipid parameters in Tunisian smokers].

    PubMed

    Haj Mouhamed, Dhouha; Ezzaher, Asma; Araoud, Manel; Neffati, Fadoua; Douki, Wahiba; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at examine the effect of cigarettes smoking on paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and lipid profile. Our study included 102 smokers aged 35.5 +/- 16.0 years and 98 non-smokers aged 38.5 +/- 21.9 years. Total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerols (TG), HDL cholesterol (CHDL) and LDL-cholesterol (cLDL) were determined by enzymatic colorimetric methods. ApoA1 and ApoB and Lp(a) were analyzed by immunoturbidimetry on Konélab 30, PON1 activity was measured by a kinetic method. Plasma CT, TG, cLDL, Lp(a) and ApoB/ApoA1 ratio appeared significantly higher in the smokers when compared to nonsmokers, since cHDL levels were lower. In addition, TG values were significantly higher in subjects smoking more than 30 cigarettes/day as compared to those smoking 5-10 cigarettes/day. We noted a significant decrease of PON1 activity in smokers compared to non smokers (94 +/- 104 vs 158 +/- 133 IU/L), with regression of PON1 activity according number of cigarettes/day. In conclusion, hypertriglyceridemia, low levels of cHDL, high levels of ApoB/ApoA1 and significant decrease of PON1 activity confirm the high risk of cardiovascular diseases in smokers. PMID:20348046

  13. Thermodynamics of Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hernan G.; Kondev, Jane; Orme, Nigel; Theriot, Julie A.; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    There is a long and rich tradition of using ideas from both equilibrium thermodynamics and its microscopic partner theory of equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this chapter, we provide some background on the origins of the seemingly unreasonable effectiveness of ideas from both thermodynamics and statistical mechanics in biology. After making a description of these foundational issues, we turn to a series of case studies primarily focused on binding that are intended to illustrate the broad biological reach of equilibrium thinking in biology. These case studies include ligand-gated ion channels, thermodynamic models of transcription, and recent applications to the problem of bacterial chemotaxis. As part of the description of these case studies, we explore a number of different uses of the famed Monod–Wyman–Changeux (MWC) model as a generic tool for providing a mathematical characterization of two-state systems. These case studies should provide a template for tailoring equilibrium ideas to other problems of biological interest. PMID:21333788

  14. Thermodynamics of Nonadditive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latella, Ivan; Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Campa, Alessandro; Casetti, Lapo; Ruffo, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    The usual formulation of thermodynamics is based on the additivity of macroscopic systems. However, there are numerous examples of macroscopic systems that are not additive, due to the long-range character of the interaction among the constituents. We present here an approach in which nonadditive systems can be described within a purely thermodynamics formalism. The basic concept is to consider a large ensemble of replicas of the system where the standard formulation of thermodynamics can be naturally applied and the properties of a single system can be consequently inferred. After presenting the approach, we show its implementation in systems where the interaction decays as 1 /rα in the interparticle distance r , with α smaller than the embedding dimension d , and in the Thirring model for gravitational systems.

  15. Antiulcer activity of fluvoxamine in rats and its effect on oxidant and antioxidant parameters in stomach tissue

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although many drugs are available for the treatment of gastric ulcers, often these drugs are ineffective. Many antidepressant drugs have been shown to have antiulcer activity in various models of experimental ulcer. One such drug, the antidepressant mirtazapine, has been reported to have an antiulcer effect that involves an increase in antioxidant, and a decrease in oxidant, parameters. To date, however, there is no information available regarding the antiulcer activity for a similar antidepressant, fluvoxamine. This study aimed to investigate the antiulcer effects of fluvoxamine and to determine its relationship with antioxidants. Methods Groups of rats fasted for 24 h received fluvoxamine (25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg), ranitidine (50 mg/kg) or distilled water by oral gavage. Indomethacin (25 mg/kg) was orally administered to the rats as an ulcerative agent. Six hours after ulcer induction, the stomachs of the rats were excised and an ulcer index determined. Separate groups of rats were treated with the same doses of fluvoxamine and ranitidine, but not with indomethacin, to test effects of these drugs alone on biochemical parameters. The stomachs were evaluated biochemically to determine oxidant and antioxidant parameters. We used one-way ANOVA and least significant difference (LSD) options for data analysis. Results The 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of fluvoxamine exerted antiulcer effects of 48.5, 67.5, 82.1 and 96.1%, respectively, compared to the control rat group. Ranitidine showed an 86.5% antiulcer effect. No differences were observed in the absence of indomethacin treatment for any dose of fluvoxamine or for ranitidine. The levels of antioxidant parameters, total glutathione and nitric oxide, were increased in all fluvoxamine groups and in the ranitidine group when compared with the indomethacin-only group. In addition, fluvoxamine and ranitidine decreased the levels of the oxidant parameters, myeloperoxidase and malondialdeyhyde, in the stomach

  16. Thermodynamics of Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, J. L., Jr.; Cory, J. S.

    1987-02-01

    A self-consistent macroscopic thermodynamics is developed for the calculation of work, heat, and dissipation for thermodynamic paths of the shape memory alloy, Nitinol. The thermodynamic system analyzed is a Nitinol helix for which extensive force-length-temperature (FLT) equation of state measurements have been made. The Nitinol system exhibits significant hysteresis and is determined to be a nonequilibrium thermostatic system. A set of equations of state are provided which correlate all reversible and irreversible Nitinol thermodynamic paths to both the set of helix (FLT) thermodynamic state variables and to new ``history'' state variables. It is shown that these equations predict observed cyclic behaviors not previously interpreted. In the absence of calorimetric measurements for the Nitinol helix system, a physical assumption is made that reversible paths are of constant phase. This assumption is used to estimate the reversible path thermal and mechanical heat capacities for the Nitinol system. With the state equations and the estimated reversible path heat capacities, the nonequilibrium thermostatic formalism is employed to derive expressions for the heat flow for any Nitinol thermodynamic path. It is shown that predicted calorimetric quantities are in good qualitative agreement with measurements. It is also shown that the calorimetric quantities are sensitive to state equation coefficients, which in turn are sensitive to cold-working or ``conditioning'' of the material. The large heat of transformation, ˜2.4 cal/g, an estimated isentropic temperature change of 22 °C and the large dimensional changes associated with the shape memory effect, imply that Nitinol may be useful for many applications, including use as a working medium for low-grade thermal-energy conversion (i.e., heat engines).

  17. Thermodynamics of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    The 21st century has brought a lot of new results related to graphene. Apparently, graphene has been characterized from all points of view except surface science and, especially, surface thermodynamics. This report aims to close this gap. Since graphene is the first real two-dimensional solid, a general formulation of the thermodynamics of two-dimensional solid bodies is given. The two-dimensional chemical potential tensor coupled with stress tensor is introduced, and fundamental equations are derived for energy, free energy, grand thermodynamic potential (in the classical and hybrid forms), enthalpy, and Gibbs energy. The fundamentals of linear boundary phenomena are formulated with explaining the concept of a dividing line, the mechanical and thermodynamic line tensions, line energy and other linear properties with necessary thermodynamic equations. The one-dimensional analogs of the Gibbs adsorption equation and Shuttleworth-Herring relation are presented. The general thermodynamic relationships are illustrated with calculations based on molecular theory. To make the reader sensible of the harmony of chemical and van der Waals forces in graphene, the remake of the classical graphite theory is presented with additional variable combinations of graphene sheets. The calculation of the line energy of graphene is exhibited including contributions both from chemical bonds and van der Waals forces (expectedly, the latter are considerably smaller than the former). The problem of graphene holes originating from migrating vacancies is discussed on the basis of the Gibbs-Curie principle. An important aspect of line tension is the planar sheet/nanotube transition where line tension acts as a driving force. Using the bending stiffness of graphene, the possible radius range is estimated for achiral (zigzag and armchair) nanotubes.

  18. Viscoplasticity: A thermodynamic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Chaboche, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A thermodynamic foundation using the concept of internal state variables is given for a general theory of viscoplasticity, as it applies to initially isotropic materials. Three fundamental internal state variables are admitted. They are: a tensor valued back stress for kinematic effects, and the scalar valued drag and yield strengths for isotropic effects. All three are considered to phenomenologically evolve according to competitive processes between strain hardening, strain induced dynamic recovery, and time induced static recovery. Within this phenomenological framework, a thermodynamically admissible set of evolution equations is put forth. This theory allows each of the three fundamental internal variables to be composed as a sum of independently evolving constituents.

  19. Thermodynamics of lattice OCD

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic consequences of QCD are explored in the framework of lattice gauge theory. Attention is focused upon the nature of the chiral symmetry restoration transition at finite temperature and at finite baryon density, and possible strategies for identifying relevant thermodynamic phases are discussed. Some numerical results are presented on the chiral symmetry restoration in the SU(2) gauge theory at high baryon density. The results suggest that with T approx. = 110 MeV there is a second order restoration transition at the critical baryon density n/sub B//sup c/ approx. = 0.62 fm/sup -3/.

  20. Acute low-level microwave exposure and central cholinergic activity: studies on irradiation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake was measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus of rats after acute exposure (45 min) to pulsed (2 microseconds, 500 pps) or continuous-wave 2,450-MHz microwaves in cylindrical waveguides or miniature anechoic chambers. In all exposure conditions, the average whole-body specific absorption rate was at 0.6 W/kg. Decrease in choline uptake was observed in the frontal cortex after microwave exposure in all of the above irradiation conditions. Regardless of the exposure system used, hippocampal choline uptake was decreased after exposure to pulsed but not continuous-wave microwaves. Striatal choline uptake was decreased after exposure to either pulsed or continuous-wave microwaves in the miniature anechoic chamber. No significant change in hypothalamic choline uptake was observed under any of the exposure conditions studied. We conclude that depending on the parameters of the radiation, microwaves can elicit specific and generalized biological effects.

  1. EVALUATION OF PARAMETERS AFFECTING ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION OF A SOLVENT-LADEN AIR STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of EPA's continuing research on methods to control volatile organic compound emissions, a vapor-phase activated carbon pilot plant has been constructed. The automated, computer-controlled pilot plant has been designed to provide data not easily obtained from full-scale ad...

  2. Genetic Parameter Estimates Among Scale Activity Score and Farrowing Disposition with Reproductive Traits in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scale activity score (SA) at 5 months of age ranged from 1 to 5. Farrowing disposition score (FD) ranged from 1 to 3. Reproductive traits included age at puberty (AP), number born alive (NBA), number born dead (NBD), litter birth weight (LBW), average birth weight (ABW), number weaned adjusted for c...

  3. TOC, ATP AND RESPIRATION RATE AS CONTROL PARAMETERS FOR THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research was conducted to determine the feasibility of using TOC, ATP and respiration rates as tools for controlling a complete mix activated sludge plant handling a significant amount of industrial waste. Control methodology was centered on using F/M ratio which was determi...

  4. Technical Work Plan for: Thermodynamic Database for Chemical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    C.F. Jovecolon

    2006-09-07

    The objective of the work scope covered by this Technical Work Plan (TWP) is to correct and improve the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) thermodynamic databases, to update their documentation, and to ensure reasonable consistency among them. In addition, the work scope will continue to generate database revisions, which are organized and named so as to be transparent to internal and external users and reviewers. Regarding consistency among databases, it is noted that aqueous speciation and mineral solubility data for a given system may differ according to how solubility was determined, and the method used for subsequent retrieval of thermodynamic parameter values from measured data. Of particular concern are the details of the determination of ''infinite dilution'' constants, which involve the use of specific methods for activity coefficient corrections. That is, equilibrium constants developed for a given system for one set of conditions may not be consistent with constants developed for other conditions, depending on the species considered in the chemical reactions and the methods used in the reported studies. Hence, there will be some differences (for example in log K values) between the Pitzer and ''B-dot'' database parameters for the same reactions or species.

  5. Assaying Locomotor Activity to Study Circadian Rhythms and Sleep Parameters in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanna C.; Low, Kwang Huei; Pike, Douglas H.; Yildirim, Evrim; Edery, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    Most life forms exhibit daily rhythms in cellular, physiological and behavioral phenomena that are driven by endogenous circadian (≡24 hr) pacemakers or clocks. Malfunctions in the human circadian system are associated with numerous diseases or disorders. Much progress towards our understanding of the mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms has emerged from genetic screens whereby an easily measured behavioral rhythm is used as a read-out of clock function. Studies using Drosophila have made seminal contributions to our understanding of the cellular and biochemical bases underlying circadian rhythms. The standard circadian behavioral read-out measured in Drosophila is locomotor activity. In general, the monitoring system involves specially designed devices that can measure the locomotor movement of Drosophila. These devices are housed in environmentally controlled incubators located in a darkroom and are based on using the interruption of a beam of infrared light to record the locomotor activity of individual flies contained inside small tubes. When measured over many days, Drosophila exhibit daily cycles of activity and inactivity, a behavioral rhythm that is governed by the animal's endogenous circadian system. The overall procedure has been simplified with the advent of commercially available locomotor activity monitoring devices and the development of software programs for data analysis. We use the system from Trikinetics Inc., which is the procedure described here and is currently the most popular system used worldwide. More recently, the same monitoring devices have been used to study sleep behavior in Drosophila. Because the daily wake-sleep cycles of many flies can be measured simultaneously and only 1 to 2 weeks worth of continuous locomotor activity data is usually sufficient, this system is ideal for large-scale screens to identify Drosophila manifesting altered circadian or sleep properties. PMID:20972399

  6. Dynamics of microbiological parameters, enzymatic activities and worm biomass production during vermicomposting of effluent treatment plant sludge of bakery industry.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anoop; Suthar, S; Garg, V K

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the changes in microbial parameters and enzymatic activities during vermicomposting of effluent treatment plant sludge (ETPS) of bakery industry spiked with cow dung (CD) by Eisenia fetida. Six vermibins containing different ratios of ETPS and CD were maintained under controlled laboratory conditions for 15 weeks. Total bacterial and total fungal count increased upto 7th week and declined afterward in all the bins. Maximum bacterial and fungal count was 31.6 CFU × 10(6) g(-1) and 31 CFU × 10(4) g(-1) in 7th week. Maximum dehydrogenase activity was 1921 μg TPF g(-1) h(-1) in 9th week in 100 % CD containing vermibin, whereas maximum urease activity was 1208 μg NH4 (-)N g(-1) h(-1) in 3rd week in 100 % CD containing vermibin. The enzyme activity and microbial counts were lesser in ETPS containing vermibins than control (100 % CD). The growth and fecundity of the worms in different vermibins were also investigated. The results showed that initially biomass and fecundity of the worms increased but decreased at the later stages due to non-availability of the palatable feed. This showed that quality and palatability of food directly affect biological parameters of the system. PMID:25982984

  7. Determination of soluble CD21 as a parameter of B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Huemer, H P; Larcher, C; Prodinger, W M; Petzer, A L; Mitterer, M; Falser, N

    1993-08-01

    In this study we established a novel solid-phase immunoassay for CD21 using the time-resolved fluorescence of lanthanide chelates. The capture assay was able to detect concentrations of as low as 100 pg of CD21 antigen per millilitre of sample and was used for quantitative determination of CD21 in lysates of different cell lines as well as in patient serum specimens. CD21 was measured in lysates of tonsils and cell lines of B, T cell and myelomonocyte lineage, and appeared to consist of monomeric antigen under the detergent conditions used. Elevated levels of soluble CD21 were observed in serum of patients with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, a disease known to be associated with polyclonal B cell activation, and in infection with the lymphotropic rubella virus. Significantly increased levels were also found in malignancies which are associated with EBV. In patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a correlation with the titre of EBV-specific IgA was observed, thus supporting a possible role of soluble CD21 as a marker for disease activity in certain malignancies. Our data suggest that measurement of soluble CD21 could serve as a marker for activation of the immune system and diseases involving the B cell lymphoid system. Possible mechanisms and functions of soluble CD21 are discussed. PMID:8348744

  8. Neuronal activity topography parameters as a marker for differentiating vascular cognitive impairment in carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takashi; Musha, Toshimitu; Kubo, Michiya; Horie, Yukio; Asahi, Takashi; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi; Hayashi, Karin; Kobayashi, Yohei; Tanaka, Mieko; Matsuzaki, Haruyasu; Asada, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Previously, we reported on the differentiation between patients with Alzheimer disease and normal controls using a quantitative electroencephalographic technique called neuronal activity topography (NAT). In this technique, cerebral neuronal activities are characterized by the signal intensity and coherence (sNAT and vNAT, respectively). In the present study, we examined 47 patients with vascular cognitive impairment in carotid stenosis and 52 normal controls. All subjects underwent electroencephalography in a resting state with closed eyes for 5 minutes. Electroencephalographic markers of the differential likelihood, that is, the sensitivity-versus-specificity characteristics, sL(x:VCI-NLc) and vL(x:VCI-NLc), were assessed with neuronal activity topography and were compared between the 2 groups. sL(x:VCI-NLc) and vL(x:VCI-NLc) crossed each other at a cutoff value of the differential likelihood. Separation of the patients and controls was made with a sensitivity of 92% and 88%, as well as a false-positive rate of 8% and 12% for sL(x:VCI-NLc) and vL(x:VCI-NLc), respectively. Using sNAT, we accurately differentiated 92% patients with vascular cognitive impairment. We recommend that sNAT, rather than vNAT, should be used in detecting vascular cognitive impaired patients. PMID:25174560

  9. Preventive control of odor emissions through manipulation of operational parameters during the active phase of composting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenxiu; Lau, Anthony K; Wen, Zhiping S

    2009-06-01

    Better understanding of the effects of key operational parameters or environmental factors on odor emission is of critical importance for minimizing the generation of composting odors. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted to examine the effects of various operating conditions on odor emissions. The results revealed that airflow rates that were too high or too low could result in higher total odor emissions. An optimal flowrate for odor control would be approximately 0.6 L/min.kg dry matter with intermittent aeration and a duty cycle of 33%. Temperature setpoint at 60 degrees C appeared to be a turning point for odor emission. Below this point, odor emissions increased with increasing temperature setpoint; conversely, odor emissions decreased with increasing temperature setpoint above this point. With regard to the composting material properties, odor emissions were greatly affected by the initial moisture content of feedstock. Both peak odor concentration and emission rate generally increased with higher initial moisture content. Odor emission was significant only at moisture levels higher than 65%. An initial moisture level below 45% is not recommended due to concern with the resulting lower degree of biodegradation. Biodegradable volatile solids content (BVS) of feedstock had pronounced effect on odor emissions. Peak odor concentration and emission rate increased dramatically as BVS increased from 45% to 65%, thus, total odor emission increased exponentially with BVS. PMID:20183055

  10. Black Hole Thermodynamics in an Undergraduate Thermodynamics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Barry R.; McLeod, Robert J.

    1980-01-01

    An analogy, which has been drawn between black hole physics and thermodynamics, is mathematically broadened in this article. Equations similar to the standard partial differential relations of thermodynamics are found for black holes. The results can be used to supplement an undergraduate thermodynamics course. (Author/SK)

  11. Effect of age and chemical treatments on characteristic parameters for active and porous sublayers of polymeric composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Benavente, J; Vázquez, M I

    2004-05-15

    Changes in the transport parameters and the chemical nature of the surface of composite polyamide/polysulfone membranes due to both aging and treatment with chemical products (HCl, H(3)NO, and NaOH) have been considered. Hydraulic and salt permeability were obtained from water flow and salt diffusion measurements, respectively, and their values seem to indicate a modification in the structural parameters (porosity/thickness) of aging samples, while HCl and HNO(3) treatments will act in the opposite way. Chemical modifications in the membrane surfaces were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which mainly show the effect of H(3)NO and HCl on the polyamide active layer of the membranes (polyamide oxidation), but no chemical damage for that sublayer. Electrical characterization of both sublayers of the composite membranes were determined from impedance spectroscopy (IS) measurements using equivalent circuits as models, and these results indicate: (i) a strong increase of the membrane electrical resistance as a consequence of aging, mainly that associated with the active sublayer (30 times higher for an old sample than for a fresh one) and treatment with NaOH; (ii) the reduction of this effect when the samples were treated with HCl and HNO(3) solutions. Changes in the values of the electrical resistance of the composite membranes are in agreement with those obtained for permeabilities, but the electrical parameter also allows the determination of the contribution of each sublayer. PMID:15082393

  12. Thermodynamics of convective circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D. K.; Renno, N. O.

    2003-04-01

    The heat engine framework has proven successful for studies of atmospheric phenomena ranging from small to large scales. At large scales, the heat engine framework provides estimates of convective available potential energy, convective velocities, and fractional area covered by convection. At the smaller end of the spectrum, the framework provides estimates of the intensity of convective vortices such as dust devils and waterspouts. The heat engine framework sheds light on the basic physics of planetary atmospheres. In particular, it allows the calculation of their thermodynamic efficiency. Indeed, this is a fundamental number for atmospheric circulations because it quantifies the amount of heat that is converted into kinetic energy. As such, it is a valuable number not only for comparison of models with nature, but also for the intercomparison of models. In the present study, we generalize the heat engine framework to large-scale circulations, both open (e.g., the Hadley circulation) and closed (e.g., the general circulation) and apply it to an idealized global climate model to ascertain the thermodynamic efficiency of model circulations, both global and regional. Our results show that the thermodynamic efficiency is sensitive to model resolution and provides a baseline for minimum model resolution in climate studies. The value of the thermodynamic efficiency of convective circulations in nature is controversial. It has been suggested that both nature and numerical models are extremely irreversible. We show that both the global and the Hadley circulation of the idealized model are, to a first approximation, reversible.

  13. Program Computes Thermodynamic Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    PAC91 is latest in PAC (Properties and Coefficients) series. Two principal features are to provide means of (1) generating theoretical thermodynamic functions from molecular constants and (2) least-squares fitting of these functions to empirical equations. PAC91 written in FORTRAN 77 to be machine-independent.

  14. Thermodynamics of Resource Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauserman, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluates the overall economic efficiency of a closed resource cycle. Uses elementary thermodynamic definitions of overall thermal efficiency for determining an economically quantifiable basis. Selects aluminum for investigation and includes a value-entropy diagram for a closed aluminum cycle. (MVL)

  15. Thermodynamics of Dilute Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancso, Gabor; Fenby, David V.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses principles and definitions related to the thermodynamics of dilute solutions. Topics considered include dilute solution, Gibbs-Duhem equation, reference systems (pure gases and gaseous mixtures, liquid mixtures, dilute solutions), real dilute solutions (focusing on solute and solvent), terminology, standard states, and reference systems.…

  16. Thermodynamics with Design Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cilento, E. V.; Sears, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how basic thermodynamics concepts are integrated with design problems. Includes course goals, instructional strategies, and major advantages/disadvantages of the integrated design approach. Advantages include making subject more concrete, emphasizing interrelation of variables, and reinforcing concepts by use in design analysis; whereas…

  17. On Teaching Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debbasch, F.

    2011-01-01

    The logical structure of classical thermodynamics is presented in a modern, geometrical manner. The first and second law receive clear, operatively oriented statements and the Gibbs free energy extremum principle is fully discussed. Applications relevant to chemistry, such as phase transitions, dilute solutions theory and, in particular, the law…

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic investigation of enzymatic L-ascorbyl acetate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Hao; Li, Chao; Zhi, Gao-Ying

    2013-12-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of lipase-catalyzed esterification of l-ascorbic acid in acetone were investigated by using vinyl acetate as acyl donor. The results showed that l-ascorbic acid could generate inhibition effect on lipase activity. A suitable model, Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism having substrate inhibition, was thus introduced to describe the enzymatic kinetics. Furthermore, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated from a series of experimental data according to the kinetic model. The inhibition constant of L-ascorbic acid was also obtained, which seemed to imply that enhancing reaction temperature could depress the substrate inhibition. Besides, the activation energy values of the first-step and the second-step reaction were estimated to be 37.31 and 4.94 kJ/mol, respectively, demonstrating that the first-step reaction was the rate-limiting reaction and could be easily improved by enhancing temperature. PMID:24211407

  19. Salinity effects on growth, photosynthetic parameters, and nitrogenase activity in estuarine planktonic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Moisander, P H; McClinton, E; Paerl, H W

    2002-05-01

    Salinity has been suggested as being a controlling factor for blooms of N2-fixing cyanobacteria in estuaries. We tested the effect of salinity on the growth, N2 fixation, and photosynthetic activities of estuarine and freshwater isolates of heterocystous bloom-forming cyanobacteria. Anabaena aphanizomenoides and Anabaenopsis sp. were isolated from the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii from Lakes Dora and Griffin, central Florida. Salinity tolerance of these cyanobacteria was compared with that of two Nodularia strains from the Baltic Sea. We measured growth rates, N2 fixation (nitrogenase activity), and CO2 fixation at salinities between 0 and 20 g L(-1) NaCl. We also examined photosynthesis-irradiance relation-ships in response to salinity. Anabaenopsis maintained similar growth rates in the full range of salinities from 2 to 20 g L(-1) NaCl. Anabaena grew at up to 15 g L-', but the maximum salinity 20 g L(-1) NaCl was inhibitory. The upper limit for salinity tolerance of Cylindrospermopsis was 4 g L(-1) NaCl. Nodularia spp. maintained similar growth rates in the full range of salinities from 0 to 20 g L(-1) . Between 0 and 10 g L(-1), the growth rate of Nodularia spumigena was slower than that of the Neuse Estuary strains. In most strains, the sensitivity of nitrogenase activity and CO2 fixation to salinity appeared similar. Anabaenopsis, Anabaena, and the two Nodularia strains rapidly responded to NaCl by increasing their maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmn). Overall, both Neuse River Estuary and Baltic Sea strains showed an ability to acclimate to salt stress over short-(24 h) and long-term (several days to weeks) exposures. The study suggested that direct effect of salinity (as NaCl in these experiments) on cyanobacterial physiology does not alone explain the low frequency and magnitude of blooms of N2-fixing cyanobacteria in estuaries. PMID:12043002

  20. Thermodynamic derivatives of infrared absorptance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broersma, S.; Walls, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the concentration, pressure, and temperature dependence of the spectral absorptance of a vibrational absorption band. A smooth thermodynamic dependence was found for wavelength intervals where the average absorptance is less than 0.65. Individual rotational lines, whose parameters are often well known, were used as bases in the calculation of medium resolution spectra. Two modes of calculation were combined: well-separated rotational lines plus interaction terms, or strongly overlapping lines that were represented by a compound line of similar shape plus corrections. The 1.9- and 6.3-micron bands of H2O and the 4.3-micron band of CO2 were examined in detail and compared with experiment.

  1. Fluctuating Thermodynamics for Biological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Sihyun

    Because biomolecular processes are largely under thermodynamic control, dynamic extension of thermodynamics is necessary to uncover the mechanisms and driving factors of fluctuating processes. The fluctuating thermodynamics technology presented in this talk offers a practical means for the thermodynamic characterization of conformational dynamics in biomolecules. The use of fluctuating thermodynamics has the potential to provide a comprehensive picture of fluctuating phenomena in diverse biological processes. Through the application of fluctuating thermodynamics, we provide a thermodynamic perspective on the misfolding and aggregation of the various proteins associated with human diseases. In this talk, I will present the detailed concepts and applications of the fluctuating thermodynamics technology for elucidating biological processes. This work was supported by Samsung Science and Technology Foundation under Project Number SSTF-BA1401-13.

  2. Association of coliform bacteria with wastewater particles: impact of operational parameters of the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Loge, Frank J; Emerick, Robert W; Ginn, Tim R; Darby, Jeannie L

    2002-01-01

    The fraction of particles with associated coliform bacteria (PAC) in the activated sludge process was evaluated using a 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probe specific to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The PAC was found to decline exponentially with increasing mean cell residence times (MCRTs). The factors influencing the formation of PAC, identified with simplified mass balance relationships. are the concentration of particles, the concentration of dispersed (non-particle associated) coliform bacteria, and the MCRT. The concentration of dispersed coliform bacteria was found to decline with increasing MCRTs. The rate of decline was greater than the typical half-life attributed to endogenous decay, suggesting that other factors (e.g., predation by protozoa) influence the concentration of dispersed coliform bacteria, and subsequently the formation of PAC. Given that the association of targeted organisms with particles adversely impacts the performance of a disinfection system, studies targeted at the fate of organisms other than coliform bacteria in the activated sludge process are of paramount importance in assessing the health risks of post-disinfected effluents. PMID:11766816

  3. Active experiments in the ionosphere and variations of geophysical and meteorological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon, Vladimir; Cherneva, Nina; Shevtsov, Boris

    Energy distribution in ionospheric-magnetospheric relations, as one of the possible external climatological factors, may be traced on the basis of the analysis of natural geophysical phenomena such as ionosphere artificial radio radiation and magnetic storms. Development of magnetic disturbances is, to some extent, associated with current variations in electrojet. In its turn, some technologies are known which may affect electrojet and its characteristics. The method, developed by the authors, is based on a complex comparison of different geophysical fields and allows us to determine the degree of active experiment effect on energy change in ionospheric-magnetospheric relations and to evaluate on this basis the degree of active experiment effect on climate in the ionosphere. Within the framework of RAS Presidium Program Project “Determination of climate-forming characteristic changes on the basis of monitoring of geophysical field variations”, investigations have been carried out, which showed the possibility of ionosphere modification effect on the energy of magnetospheric-ionospheric relations. Evaluation of possible climate changes considering ionospheric-magnetospheric relations has not been previously discussed.

  4. A multi-parameter remote system to monitoring active landslides by using middle-low cost sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, J.; Vega, C. A.; Maya, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a remote system to monitoring active landslides, by using a multi-parameter device, middle-low cost sensors, and an expert system based on rules. The system consists of six (6) analogue sensors: geophone, hygrometer, rain gauge, thermocouple, tiltmeter, and piezometer. All the sensors are connected to a A/D converter board of our own design of variable rate sampling, which stores, packs and transmit digitally the information to a remote device (PC or computer server). At the remote device, an expert system based on rules, and developed in open source code, processes the data and analyses the information, given a state or activity level of the landslide continuously. The expert system based on rules, can be adapted according user needs. New rules and states or activity levels of landslide can be added as well. Information is stored in a data base. A processing module allows to analyze in a friendly way the results in both, online and offline modes. Averages, tendencies, moving averages, cumulative curves, and other basic time series processing are available. A technique of changes in slope of cumulative normalized curves of the data set for each sensor and a combination of them, is used as a one of the parameters to evaluate the level of activity of the landslide, as well as a scheme of decision based on weights and rules for each sensor. Alerts can be sent by email or SMS to a group of users. The system was installed in an active landslide at Manizales city (2100 masl), located in the central part of Colombia, at the Andean zone. The system collected data for 1 month. Preliminary results showed that the system is able to detect temporal changes in several parameters, allowing to have an idea of the level of activity of the monitored landslide. Calibration or adjusting of the detection levels for each sensor is necessary when the system is installed in different landslide. The system can be useful for monitoring zones with very active landslides at

  5. Influence of lasing parameters on the cleaning efficacy of laser-activated irrigation with pulsed erbium lasers.

    PubMed

    Meire, Maarten A; Havelaerts, Sophie; De Moor, Roeland J

    2016-05-01

    Laser-activated irrigation (LAI) using erbium lasers is an irrigant agitation technique with great potential for improved cleaning of the root canal system, as shown in many in vitro studies. However, lasing parameters for LAI vary considerably and their influence remains unclear. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the influence of pulse energy, pulse frequency, pulse length, irradiation time and fibre tip shape, position and diameter on the cleaning efficacy of LAI. Transparent resin blocks containing standardized root canals (apical diameter of 0.4 mm, 6 % taper, 15 mm long, with a coronal reservoir) were used as the test model. A standardized groove in the apical part of each canal wall was packed with stained dentin debris. The canals were filled with irrigant, which was activated by an erbium: yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser (2940 nm, AT Fidelis, Fotona, Ljubljana, Slovenia). In each experiment, one laser parameter was varied, while the others remained constant. In this way, the influence of pulse energy (10-40 mJ), pulse length (50-1000 μs), frequency (5-30 Hz), irradiation time (5-40 s) and fibre tip shape (flat or conical), position (pulp chamber, canal entrance, next to groove) and diameter (300-600 μm) was determined by treating 20 canals per parameter. The amount of debris remaining in the groove after each LAI procedure was scored and compared among the different treatments. The parameters significantly (P < 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis) affecting debris removal from the groove were fibre tip position, pulse length, pulse energy, irradiation time and frequency. Fibre tip shape and diameter had no significant influence on the cleaning efficacy. PMID:26861988

  6. Influence of microwave parameters and water activity on radical generation in rice starch.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daming; Liu, Yixiao; Hu, Bo; Lin, Lufen; Huang, Luelue; Wang, Liyun; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Radical generation in rice starch under microwave treatment as well as the related chemical bond changes were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Raman spectroscopy. Samples with water activity of 0.4 and 0.7 have been treated and analyzed. It was found that microwave power level and water content could influence the amount of radicals along with the radical components and their contribution. Raman spectra showed corresponding changes in vibrational features of chemical bonds. During storage the signal intensity started to drop after a short period of increase. Rice starch radicals were relatively stable and could exist a long time in room temperature. Through signal simulation, 3 main components were separated from the original spectra and the evolving process was investigated. The main component was the radical located on C1 position in the glucose ring. PMID:26593462

  7. Spörer's law and relationship between the latitude and amplitude parameters of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. G.; Miletsky, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The equatorward drift of average sunspot latitudes (Spörer's law) and its relationship with other characteristics of the 11-year solar cycle are analyzed. The notion of cycle latitude phase (CLP) is introduced, which is calculated from behavior of average sunspot latitudes. The latter are shown to be expressed, with known accuracy, as a universal monotonic decreasing function of the CLP and to be independent of the cycle strength. The same applies to the latitudinal drift velocity of the sunspot generating zone. The shifts in the CLP reference times relative to the cycle minima are, on the contrary, well correlated with the amplitudes of the corresponding cycles. Solar activity in the declining phase of the solar cycle is found to be tightly related to the average sunspot latitude and CLP. The relationships found in the study can be used to reconstruct average sunspot latitudes in the pre-Greenwich epoch based on the available information on cycle amplitudes.

  8. The fundamental parameters of the chromospherically active K2 dwarf Epsilon Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Smith, Geoffrey

    1993-01-01

    A silicon array detector was used to record regions exhibiting calcium and iron lines in the spectrum of the chromospherically active K2 dwarf Epsilon Eri at a resolution of 120,000 and with an SNR of not less than 200. The effective temperature, surface gravity, logarithmic iron and calcium abundances, and microturbulence are determined. Three high-excitation lines of Fe I were found to yield anomalously low iron abundances; it is postulated that the origin of the anomaly lies in the nonthermal excitation of the upper photosphere caused by chromospheric emission. It is shown that Epsilon Eri is in an evolutionary stage consistent with an M/solar mass of 0.85 theoretical zero-age main-sequence model. It is suggested that Epsilon Eri is almost certainly a young star of slightly less than one solar mass.

  9. Extracting Kinematic Parameters for Monkey Bipedal Walking from Cortical Neuronal Ensemble Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimmons, Nathan A.; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Peikon, Ian D.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to walk may be critically impacted as the result of neurological injury or disease. While recent advances in brain–machine interfaces (BMIs) have demonstrated the feasibility of upper-limb neuroprostheses, BMIs have not been evaluated as a means to restore walking. Here, we demonstrate that chronic recordings from ensembles of cortical neurons can be used to predict the kinematics of bipedal walking in rhesus macaques – both offline and in real time. Linear decoders extracted 3D coordinates of leg joints and leg muscle electromyograms from the activity of hundreds of cortical neurons. As more complex patterns of walking were produced by varying the gait speed and direction, larger neuronal populations were needed to accurately extract walking patterns. Extraction was further improved using a switching decoder which designated a submodel for each walking paradigm. We propose that BMIs may one day allow severely paralyzed patients to walk again. PMID:19404411

  10. Thermodynamic Laws Applied to Economic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González, José Villacís

    2009-01-01

    Economic activity in its different manifestations--production, exchange, consumption and, particularly, information on quantities and prices--generates and transfers energy. As a result, we can apply to it the basic laws of thermodynamics. These laws are applicable within a system, i.e., in a country or between systems and countries. To these…

  11. A Thermodynamics Course Package in Onenote

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Nicodemus, Garret D.; Medlin, J. Will; deGrazia, Janet; McDanel, Katherine P.

    2014-01-01

    A ready-to-use package of active-learning materials for a semester-long chemical engineering thermodynamics course was prepared for instructors, and similar materials are being prepared for a material and energy balance course. The course package includes ConcepTests, explanations of the ConcepTests for instructors, links to screencasts, chapter…

  12. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 1. Equilibrium parameters.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2009-10-30

    This study was carried out to investigate the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of a pesticide of the uracil group on powdered activated carbon (PAC). The experiments were conducted at a wide range of initial pesticide concentrations (approximately 5 microg L(-1) to approximately 500 microg L(-1) at pH 7.8), corresponding to equilibrium concentrations of less than 0.1 microg L(-1) for the weakest, which is compatible with the tolerance limits of drinking water. Such a very broad range of initial solute concentrations resulting powdered activated carbon (PAC) concentrations (0.1-5 mg L(-1)) is the main particularity of our study. The application of several monosolute equilibrium models (two, three or more parameters) has generally shown that Bromacil adsorption is probably effective on two types of sites. High reactivity sites (K(L) approximately 10(3) Lmg(-1)) which are 10-20 less present in a carbon surface than lower reactivity sites (K(L) approximately 10 Lmg(-1)), according to the q(m) values calculated by two- or three-parameter models. The maximum capacity of the studied powdered activated carbon (PAC), corresponding to monolayer adsorption, compared to the Bromacil molecule surface, would be between 170 mg g(-1) and 190 mg g(-1). This theoretical value is very close to the experimental q(m) values obtained when using linearized forms of Langmuir, Tóth and Fritz-Schluender models. PMID:19539425

  13. A self-centering active probing technique for kinematic parameter identification and verification of articulated arm coordinate measuring machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santolaria, J.; Brau, A.; Velázquez, J.; Aguilar, J. J.

    2010-05-01

    A crucial task in the procedure of identifying the parameters of a kinematic model of an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) or robot arm is the process of capturing data. In this paper a capturing data method is analyzed using a self-centering active probe, which drastically reduces the capture time and the required number of positions of the gauge as compared to the usual standard and manufacturer methods. The mathematical models of the self-centering active probe and AACMM are explained, as well as the mathematical model that links the AACMM global reference system to the probe reference system. We present a self-calibration method that will allow us to determine a homogeneous transformation matrix that relates the probe's reference system to the AACMM last reference system from the probing of a single sphere. In addition, a comparison between a self-centering passive probe and self-centering active probe is carried out to show the advantages of the latter in the procedures of kinematic parameter identification and verification of the AACMM.

  14. The thermodynamic cost of driving quantum systems by their boundaries.

    PubMed

    Barra, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics put limits to the efficiencies of thermal machines. Analogues of these laws are now established for quantum engines weakly and passively coupled to the environment providing a framework to find improvements to their performance. Systems whose interaction with the environment is actively controlled do not fall in that framework. Here we consider systems actively and locally coupled to the environment, evolving with a so-called boundary-driven Lindblad equation. Starting from a unitary description of the system plus the environment we simultaneously obtain the Lindblad equation and the appropriate expressions for heat, work and entropy-production of the system extending the framework for the analysis of new, and some already proposed, quantum heat engines. We illustrate our findings in spin 1/2 chains and explain why an XX chain coupled in this way to a single heat bath relaxes to thermodynamic-equilibrium while and XY chain does not. Additionally, we show that an XX chain coupled to a left and a right heat baths behaves as a quantum engine, a heater or refrigerator depending on the parameters, with efficiencies bounded by Carnot efficiencies. PMID:26445899

  15. The thermodynamic cost of driving quantum systems by their boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Barra, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics put limits to the efficiencies of thermal machines. Analogues of these laws are now established for quantum engines weakly and passively coupled to the environment providing a framework to find improvements to their performance. Systems whose interaction with the environment is actively controlled do not fall in that framework. Here we consider systems actively and locally coupled to the environment, evolving with a so-called boundary-driven Lindblad equation. Starting from a unitary description of the system plus the environment we simultaneously obtain the Lindblad equation and the appropriate expressions for heat, work and entropy-production of the system extending the framework for the analysis of new, and some already proposed, quantum heat engines. We illustrate our findings in spin 1/2 chains and explain why an XX chain coupled in this way to a single heat bath relaxes to thermodynamic-equilibrium while and XY chain does not. Additionally, we show that an XX chain coupled to a left and a right heat baths behaves as a quantum engine, a heater or refrigerator depending on the parameters, with efficiencies bounded by Carnot efficiencies. PMID:26445899

  16. The thermodynamic cost of driving quantum systems by their boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Felipe

    2015-10-01

    The laws of thermodynamics put limits to the efficiencies of thermal machines. Analogues of these laws are now established for quantum engines weakly and passively coupled to the environment providing a framework to find improvements to their performance. Systems whose interaction with the environment is actively controlled do not fall in that framework. Here we consider systems actively and locally coupled to the environment, evolving with a so-called boundary-driven Lindblad equation. Starting from a unitary description of the system plus the environment we simultaneously obtain the Lindblad equation and the appropriate expressions for heat, work and entropy-production of the system extending the framework for the analysis of new, and some already proposed, quantum heat engines. We illustrate our findings in spin 1/2 chains and explain why an XX chain coupled in this way to a single heat bath relaxes to thermodynamic-equilibrium while and XY chain does not. Additionally, we show that an XX chain coupled to a left and a right heat baths behaves as a quantum engine, a heater or refrigerator depending on the parameters, with efficiencies bounded by Carnot efficiencies.

  17. Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric determination of mixing thermodynamic data of liquid Ag-In-Sn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencze, L.; Popovic, A.

    2008-03-01

    The vaporisation of a liquid Ag-In-Sn system has been investigated at 1273-1473 K by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) and the data fitted to a Redlich-Kister-Muggianu (RKM) sub-regular solution model. Nineteen different compositions have been examined at six fixed indium mole fractions, XIn = 0.10, 0.117, 0.20, 0.30, 0.40 and 0.50. The ternary L-parameters, the thermodynamic activities and the thermodynamic properties of mixing have been evaluated using standard KEMS procedures and from the measured ion intensity ratios of Ag+ to In+ and Ag+ to Sn+, using a mathematical regression technique described by us for the first time. The intermediate data obtained directly from the regression technique are the RKM ternary L-parameters. From the obtained ternary L-parameters the integral molar excess Gibbs free energy, the excess chemical potentials, the activity coefficients and the activities have been evaluated. Using the temperature dependence of the activities, the integral and partial molar excess enthalpies and entropies were determined. In addition, for comparison, for some compositions, also the Knudsen effusion isothermal evaporation method (IEM) and the Gibbs-Duhem ion intensity ratio method (GD-IIR) were used to determine activities and good agreement was obtained with the data obtained from fitting to the RKM model.

  18. Thermodynamic modeling of atmospheric aerosols: 0-100% relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutcher, Cari S.; Ge, Xinlei; Asato, Caitlin; Wexler, Anthony S.; Clegg, Simon L.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate models of water and solute activities in aqueous atmospheric aerosols are central to predicting aerosol size, optical properties and cloud formation. A powerful method has been recently developed (Dutcher et al. JPC 2011, 2012, 2013) for representing the thermodynamic properties of multicomponent aerosols at low and intermediate levels of RH (< 90%RH) by applying the principles of multilayer sorption to ion hydration in solutions. In that work, statistical mechanics was used to model sorption of a solvent (water), onto each solute or ion in solution as n energetically distinct layers. This corresponds to n hydration layers surrounding each solute molecule. Here, we extend the model to the 100% RH limit and reduce the number of adjustable model parameters, allowing for a unified thermodynamic treatment for a wider range of atmospheric systems. The long-range interactions due to electrostatic screening of ions in solution are included as a mole fraction based Pitzer-Debye-Hückel (PDH) term. Equations for the Gibbs free energy, solvent and solute activity, and solute concentration are derived, yielding remarkable agreement between measured and fitted solute concentration and osmotic coefficients for solutions over the entire 0 to 100% RH range. By relating the values of the energy of sorption in each hydration layer to known short-range Coulombic electrostatic relationships governed by the size and dipole moment of the solute and solvent molecules, it may be possible to reduce the number of parameters for each solute. Modified equations for mixtures that take into account the long range PDH term will also be presented; these equations include no additional parameters.

  19. Distribution of Hydrothermal Activity at the Lau ISS: Possible Controlling Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, F.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Edwards, M. H.; Walker, S. L.; Buck, N.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic tomographic studies of intermediate to fast spreading rate mid-ocean ridges (MORs) interpret zones of rapid crustal cooling a few (3-4) km off axis surrounding the axial seismic low velocity zone (LVZ). These zones of rapid cooling also broadly correlate with the initiation and growth of large abyssal hill faults. The close association of both high thermal gradients and development of fault permeability at crustal scales suggests the hypothesis that these areas may be favorable locations for off-axis high temperature hydrothermal activity. In March-May 2008 on R/V Kilo Moana we conducted a near-bottom sidescan sonar and oceanographic survey along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Lau back-arc basin to map the distribution of hydrothermal activity within this region. The survey utilized the deep-towed DSL120A (IMI120) sonar, an array of miniature autonomous plume recorders (MAPRs) attached to the tow cable and tethered beneath the sonar's depressor weight, an in situ chemical scanner (VISA) and 23 CTD hydrocasts (see Baker et al., this session). At the ELSC the survey spanned ~100 x 10 km area encompassing the ABE, Tow Cam and Kilo Moana vent fields with ~ 1 km spaced lines overall and ~500 m spaced lines in the area of the ABE vent field. On the VFR the survey spanned a distance of ~100 km along axis by ~5 km across axis with 700 m spaced lines encompassing the Vai Lili, Mariner and Tui Malila vent sites. Initial results identified particle plumes, indicative of high temperature venting, only within about a km of the ridge axis at the ELSC and VFR with possible diffuse venting indicated by MAPR oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements at flank sites at VFR. The expanded sonar coverage better defines the volcano-tectonic context of the hydrothermal signals and previously mapped vent sites. Initial results suggest, however, no high-T venting more than about 1 km from the ridge axis, an apparently negative test of

  20. Effects of maternal low-protein diet on parameters of locomotor activity in a rat model of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kássia Oliveira Gomes da; Pereira, Sabrina da Conceição; Portovedo, Mariana; Milanski, Marciane; Galindo, Lígia Cristina Monteiro; Guzmán-Quevedo, Omar; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; Toscano, Ana Elisa

    2016-08-01

    Children with cerebral palsy have feeding difficulties that can contribute to undernutrition. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of early undernutrition on locomotor activity and the expression of the myofibrillar protein MuRF-1 in an experimental model of cerebral palsy (CP). In order to achieve this aim, pregnant rats were divided into two groups according to the diet provided: Normal Protein (NP, n=9) and Low Protein (LP, n=12) groups. After birth, the pups were divided into four groups: Normal Protein Sham (NPS, n=16), Normal Protein Cerebral Palsy (NPCP, n=21), Low Protein Sham (LPS, n=20) and Low Protein Cerebral Palsy (LPCP, n=18) groups. The experimental cerebral palsy protocol consisted of two episodes of anoxia at birth and during the first days of life. Each day, nitrogen flow was used (9l/min during 12min). After nitrogen exposure, sensorimotor restriction was performed 16h per day, from the 2nd to the 28th postnatal day (PND). Locomotor activity was evaluated at 8th, 14th, 17th, 21th and 28th PND. At PND 29, soleus muscles were collected to analyse myofibrillar protein MuRF-1. Our results show that CP animals decreased body weight (p<0.001), which were associated with alterations of various parameters of locomotor activity (p<0.05), compared to their control. Undernourished animals also showed a decrease (p<0.05) in body weight and locomotor activity parameters. Moreover, CP decreased MuRF-1 levels in nourished rats (p=0.015) but not in undernourished rats. In summary, perinatal undernutrition exacerbated the negative effects of cerebral palsy on locomotor activity and muscle atrophy, but it appears not be mediated by changes in MuRF-1 levels. PMID:27211347

  1. Path planning and parameter optimization of uniform removal in active feed polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Shaozhi; Zhang, Chunlei; Zhang, Linghua; Chen, Huanan

    2015-06-01

    A high-quality ultrasmooth surface is demanded in short-wave optical systems. However, the existing polishing methods have difficulties meeting the requirement on spherical or aspheric surfaces. As a new kind of small tool polishing method, active feed polishing (AFP) could attain a surface roughness of less than 0.3 nm (RMS) on spherical elements, although AFP may magnify the residual figure error or mid-frequency error. The purpose of this work is to propose an effective algorithm to realize uniform removal of the surface in the processing. At first, the principle of the AFP and the mechanism of the polishing machine are introduced. In order to maintain the processed figure error, a variable pitch spiral path planning algorithm and the dwell time-solving model are proposed. For suppressing the possible mid-frequency error, the uniformity of the synthesis tool path, which is generated by an arbitrary point at the polishing tool bottom, is analyzed and evaluated, and the angular velocity ratio of the tool spinning motion to the revolution motion is optimized. Finally, an experiment is conducted on a convex spherical surface and an ultrasmooth surface is finally acquired. In conclusion, a high-quality ultrasmooth surface can be successfully obtained with little degradation of the figure and mid-frequency errors by the algorithm.

  2. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept. PMID:25016978

  3. DAN Active Parameters and Mastcam Hydration Survey Imaging: Comparisons Across Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Rice, M. S.; Moersch, J.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M.; Wellington, D. F.; Behar, A.; Bell, J. F.; Boynton, W. V.; DeFlores, L.; Drake, D.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Jun, I.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Milliken, R.; Kuzmin, R.; Mischna, M. A.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Sanin, A.; Tate, C.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    is a buried layer of H-rich material more strongly influencing the DAN signal. Through modeling of a variety of layer geometries and H-rich layers, we investigate whether a one- or two-layer model more accurately fits the DAN data as well as the amount of H within each layer. As of sol 269, DAN has acquired over 30 active measurements while Curiosity made her way to the location of where the first and second drill holes would be made, including measurements at those sites. Over 100 Mastcam hydration survey observations within Yellowknife Bay have been acquired, primarily at the drill sites. We will present the results of detailed mapping of the veins and nodules within the Mastcam hydration surveys in Yellowknife Bay to determine if the DAN signal can be correlated or anti-correlated to the surficial spatial distribution of these features. Where data from other instruments like APXS or ChemCam are available to constrain the H or Cl abundance at the location of a given DAN active measurement, and if those compositions are assumed to be laterally homogeneous within the DAN footprint, they can be used to constrain the modeled surface compositions to determine how deep the surface composition extends.

  4. A New Radio Loudness Diagnostic for Active Galaxies: A Radio-to-Mid-Infrared Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, Marcio B.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between the nuclear (high-resolution) radio emission, at 8.4GHz (3.6cm) and 1.4GHz (20cm), the [O IV) (gamma)25.89 micron, [Ne III] (gamma)l5.56 micron and [Ne II] (gamma)l2.81 micron emission lines and the black hole mass accretion rate for a sample of Seyfert galaxies. In order to characterize the radio contribution for the Seyfert nuclei we used the 8.4 GHz/[O IV] ratio, assuming that [0 IV] scales with the luminosity of the active galactic nuclei (AGN). From this we find that Seyfert 1 s (i.e. Seyfert 1.0s, 1.2s and 1.5s) and Seyfert 2s (i.e. Seyfert 1.8s, 1.9s and 2.0s) have similar radio contributions, relative to the AGN. On the other hand, sources in which the [Ne u] emission is dominated either by the AGN or star formation have statistically different radio contributions, with star formation dominated sources more 'radio loud', by a factor of approx.2.8 on average, than AGN dominated sources. We show that star formation dominated sources with relatively larger radio contribution have smaller mass accretion rates. Overall, we suggest that 8.4 GHz/[O IV], or alternatively, 1.4 GHz/[O IV] ratios, can be used to characterize the radio contribution, relative to the AGN, without the limitation of previous methods that rely on optical observables. Key words: Galaxy: stellar content - galaxies: Seyfert - infrared: galaxies

  5. In vitro bioassays for anticancer drug screening: effects of cell concentration and other assay parameters on growth inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M M; Patterson, G M; Moore, R E

    2001-11-01

    In vitro growth inhibition assays were performed using human cancer cell lines at various concentrations with experimental anticancer drugs such as the cryptophycins and other cytotoxins. The effect of variations in assay parameters on the observed growth inhibition of these anticancer therapeutic agents was determined. The results demonstrated that the observed inhibitory activity of these compounds varied inversely with the cell concentrations used. The observed differences in activity between different cytotoxins were not necessarily proportionate. Thus, the relative activities of two toxins also varied with cell concentration. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these cell lines to the cytostatic purine analog, 6-mercaptopurine (used as a control), varied with cell concentration as well. The activity of this compound was dependent on the medium used for cell growth, yielding good activity in Eagle's minimum essential medium, but not in Ham's F-12 (Kaigin) medium. Moreover, growth inhibition by cryptophycin as well as 6-mercaptopurine was also dependent on the serum concentration in the medium. Finally, the sensitivity of the cancer cell lines to various organic solvents commonly used as drug vehicles for in vitro testing, such as ethanol, dimethylformamide, and dimethylsulfoxide, was likewise found to vary inversely with cell concentration. PMID:11578805

  6. Determination and modeling of the thermodynamic properties of liquid calcium-antimony alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Poizeau, S; Kim, H; Newhouse, JM; Spatocco, BL; Sadoway, DR

    2012-08-01

    The thermodynamic properties of Ca-Sb alloys were determined by emf measurements in a cell configured as Ca(s)vertical bar CaF2 vertical bar Ca-Sb over the temperature range 550-830 degrees C. Activity coefficients of Ca and Sb, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, and entropy of mixing of Ca-Sb alloys were calculated for xc(a) < 0.55. To explain the connection between short-range order of liquid Ca-Sb alloys and the strong deviation from ideality in the thermodynamic properties, two thermodynamic models were invoked and reconciled: the regular associated solution model, assuming the presence of a CaSb2 associate, and the molecular interaction volume model (MIVM). For the first time, the MIVM was used successfully to model the activity coefficients of a system with high-melting intermetallics, reducing the number of fitting parameters necessary from 5 (regular associated model) to 2 (MIVM). From the interaction parameters optimized by fitting at 800 degrees C, the with an average error of less than value. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved,

  7. Thermodynamic Losses in Multi-effect Distillation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, S.

    2015-09-01

    The multi-effect distillation (MED) is one of desalination technologies. It is also applied in chemical engineering and other industries for evaporation, distillation, crystallization, etc. In a large multi-effect distillation plant, some tiny thermodynamic losses might have a great influence to the performance and design parameters. For the detailed analysis and design of a MED desalination plant, a series of experiments were carried out. The thermodynamic losses in a MED desalination plant is analyzed as an example to show its effect on the performance and structure parameters. The thermodynamics losses have a cumulative effect. With the increase of effect number and the concentration ratio, the thermodynamic losses shall be a dominant factor for the operation performance of a MED plant.

  8. Microbial surface thermodynamics and applications.

    PubMed

    Strevett, Keith A; Chen, Gang

    2003-06-01

    Microbial surface thermodynamics is the reflection of microbial physicochemical and biological characteristics and it bridges micro-scale structures with macro-scale biological functions. Microbial surface thermodynamics is theoretically based on colloid surface thermodynamics using the classical theory of colloidal stability, Derjauin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. An extended DLVO theory is applied to for the hydration forces not considered in the classical DLVO theory. Herein, a review of current application of microbial surface thermodynamic theory is presented. Microbial surface thermodynamic theory is the fundamental theory in interpreting microbial hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity, microbial attachment, and microbial biofilm development. PMID:12837508

  9. Multi-Parameter Observation and Detection of Pre-Earthquake Signals in Seismically Active Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S.; Parrot, M.; Liu, J. Y.; Hattori, K.; Kafatos, M.; Taylor, P.

    2012-01-01

    The recent large earthquakes (M9.0 Tohoku, 03/2011; M7.0 Haiti, 01/2010; M6.7 L Aquila, 04/2008; and M7.9 Wenchuan 05/2008) have renewed interest in pre-anomalous seismic signals associated with them. Recent workshops (DEMETER 2006, 2011 and VESTO 2009 ) have shown that there were precursory atmospheric /ionospheric signals observed in space prior to these events. Our initial results indicate that no single pre-earthquake observation (seismic, magnetic field, electric field, thermal infrared [TIR], or GPS/TEC) can provide a consistent and successful global scale early warning. This is most likely due to complexity and chaotic nature of earthquakes and the limitation in existing ground (temporal/spatial) and global satellite observations. In this study we analyze preseismic temporal and spatial variations (gas/radon counting rate, atmospheric temperature and humidity change, long-wave radiation transitions and ionospheric electron density/plasma variations) which we propose occur before the onset of major earthquakes:. We propose an Integrated Space -- Terrestrial Framework (ISTF), as a different approach for revealing pre-earthquake phenomena in seismically active areas. ISTF is a sensor web of a coordinated observation infrastructure employing multiple sensors that are distributed on one or more platforms; data from satellite sensors (Terra, Aqua, POES, DEMETER and others) and ground observations, e.g., Global Positioning System, Total Electron Content (GPS/TEC). As a theoretical guide we use the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) model to explain the generation of multiple earthquake precursors. Using our methodology, we evaluated retrospectively the signals preceding the most devastated earthquakes during 2005-2011. We observed a correlation between both atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies preceding most of these earthquakes. The second phase of our validation include systematic retrospective analysis for more than 100 major earthquakes (M>5

  10. [Correlation between clinical parameters and quantitative analysis of inflammatory infiltrate. Importance in the diagnosis of active periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Mendieta Fiter, C

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the destruction in chronic periodontal disease occurs in relatively short periods of time which are followed of prolonged periods of inactivity. These bursts of activity are characterized by an increase in the inflammatory reaction. It has been the purpose of this paper to study the correlation between the clinical measurements of periodontal disease and the histomorphometric quantification of areas of dense inflammatory infiltrate. The results of this study show that the clinical parameters that measure gingival inflammation or loss of periodontal attachment are useful to distinguish pathology from normal (p less than 0.003), but lack sensitivity to detect burst of periodontal disease activity (p greater than 0.05). PMID:2489938

  11. Thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamics in supercooled liquid state of pharmaceuticals: Itraconazole and ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Tarnacka, M; Madejczyk, O; Adrjanowicz, K; Pionteck, J; Kaminska, E; Kamiński, K; Paluch, M

    2015-06-14

    Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) measurements and broadband dielectric spectroscopy were carried out to investigate molecular dynamics and to test the validity of thermodynamic scaling of two homologous compounds of pharmaceutical activity: itraconazole and ketoconazole in the wide range of thermodynamic conditions. The pressure coefficients of the glass transition temperature (dT(g)/dp) for itraconazole and ketoconazole were determined to be equal to 183 and 228 K/GPa, respectively. However, for itraconazole, the additional transition to the nematic phase was observed and characterized by the pressure coefficient dT(n)/dp = 258 K/GPa. From PVT and dielectric data, we obtained that the liquid-nematic phase transition is governed by the relaxation time since it occurred at constant τ(α) = 10(-5) s. Furthermore, we plotted the obtained relaxation times as a function of T(-1)v(-γ), which has revealed that the validity of thermodynamic scaling with the γ exponent equals to 3.69 ± 0.04 and 3.64 ± 0.03 for itraconazole and ketoconazole, respectively. Further analysis of the scaling parameter in itraconazole revealed that it unexpectedly decreases with increasing relaxation time, which resulted in dramatic change of the shape of the thermodynamic scaling master curve. While in the case of ketoconazole, it remained the same within entire range of data (within experimental uncertainty). We suppose that in case of itraconazole, this peculiar behavior is related to the liquid crystals' properties of itraconazole molecule. PMID:26071720

  12. Thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamics in supercooled liquid state of pharmaceuticals: Itraconazole and ketoconazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnacka, M.; Madejczyk, O.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Pionteck, J.; Kaminska, E.; Kamiński, K.; Paluch, M.

    2015-06-01

    Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) measurements and broadband dielectric spectroscopy were carried out to investigate molecular dynamics and to test the validity of thermodynamic scaling of two homologous compounds of pharmaceutical activity: itraconazole and ketoconazole in the wide range of thermodynamic conditions. The pressure coefficients of the glass transition temperature (dTg/dp) for itraconazole and ketoconazole were determined to be equal to 183 and 228 K/GPa, respectively. However, for itraconazole, the additional transition to the nematic phase was observed and characterized by the pressure coefficient dTn/dp = 258 K/GPa. From PVT and dielectric data, we obtained that the liquid-nematic phase transition is governed by the relaxation time since it occurred at constant τ α = 10-5 s. Furthermore, we plotted the obtained relaxation times as a function of T-1v-γ, which has revealed that the validity of thermodynamic scaling with the γ exponent equals to 3.69 ± 0.04 and 3.64 ± 0.03 for itraconazole and ketoconazole, respectively. Further analysis of the scaling parameter in itraconazole revealed that it unexpectedly decreases with increasing relaxation time, which resulted in dramatic change of the shape of the thermodynamic scaling master curve. While in the case of ketoconazole, it remained the same within entire range of data (within experimental uncertainty). We suppose that in case of itraconazole, this peculiar behavior is related to the liquid crystals' properties of itraconazole molecule.

  13. Thermodynamic indicators for environmental certification.

    PubMed

    Panzieri, Margherita; Porcelli, Marcello; Pulselli, Federico Maria

    2002-09-01

    The Earth is an open thermodynamic system, that remains in a steady state far from the equilibrium, through energy and matter exchanges with the surrounding environment. These natural constraints, which prevent the system from maximizing its entropy, are threatened by human action and our ecosystem needs urgent protection. In this viewpoint the environmental certification was born, according to international standards ISO 14001, ISO 14040, and European Regulation EMAS. These are voluntary adhesions to a program of environmental protection by companies, administrations and organizations which, starting from the respect of the existing environmental laws and regulations, decide to further improve their environmental performance. To obtain and maintain certification of a system is necessary to apply some indicators to evaluate its environmental performance and to demonstrate its progressive improvement. Here we propose to use for this purpose the thermodynamic indicators produced from energy analysis by Odum. The case study is Montalcino city (Italy) and energy indicators are used to evaluate environmental performance of this system where exist different activities, from agricultural productions, to tourism. Results show that energy analysis could become a valid standard monitoring method for environmental certification, especially in consideration of its wide application field. PMID:12407910

  14. Thermodynamical description of the ghost dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarvaryan, M.; Sheykhi, A.; Moradpour, H.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we point out thermodynamical description of ghost dark energy (GDE) and its generalization to the early universe. Thereinafter, we find expressions for the entropy changes of these dark energy (DE) candidates. In addition, considering thermal fluctuations, thermodynamics of the DE component interacting with a dark matter (DM) sector is addressed. We will also find the effects of considering the coincidence problem on the mutual interaction between the dark sectors, and thus the equation of state parameter of DE. Finally, we derive a relation between the mutual interaction of the dark components of the universe, accelerated with the either GDE or its generalization, and the thermodynamic fluctuations.

  15. Methods for thermodynamic evaluation of battery state of health

    DOEpatents

    Yazami, Rachid; McMenamin, Joseph; Reynier, Yvan; Fultz, Brent T

    2013-05-21

    Described are systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and battery systems and for characterizing the state of health of electrodes and battery systems. Measurement of physical attributes of electrodes and batteries corresponding to thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions permit determination of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and battery systems, such as energy, power density, current rate, cycle life and state of health. Also provided are systems and methods for charging a battery according to its state of health.

  16. Hessian matrix, specific heats, Nambu brackets, and thermodynamic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini; Mirza, Behrouz; Fazel, Mohamadreza

    2015-04-01

    As an extension to our earlier work [1], we employ the Nambu brackets to prove that the divergences of heat capacities correspond to their counterparts in thermodynamic geometry. We also obtain a simple representation for the conformal transformations that connect different thermodynamics metrics to each other. Using our bracket approach, we obtain interesting exact relations between the Hessian matrix with any number of parameters and specific heat capacities. Finally, we employ this approach to investigate some thermodynamic properties of the Meyers-Perry black holes with three spins.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  18. Perspective on quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millen, James; Xuereb, André

    2016-01-01

    Classical thermodynamics is unrivalled in its range of applications and relevance to everyday life. It enables a description of complex systems, made up of microscopic particles, in terms of a small number of macroscopic quantities, such as work and entropy. As systems get ever smaller, fluctuations of these quantities become increasingly relevant, prompting the development of stochastic thermodynamics. Recently we have seen a surge of interest in exploring the quantum regime, where the origin of fluctuations is quantum rather than thermal. Many questions, such as the role of entanglement and the emergence of thermalisation, lie wide open. Answering these questions may lead to the development of quantum heat engines and refrigerators, as well as to vitally needed simple descriptions of quantum many-body systems.

  19. Dynamically tunable transformation thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Meca, Carlos; Barceló, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the introduction of transformation thermodynamics has provided a way to design thermal media that alter the flow of heat according to any spatial deformation, enabling the construction of novel devices such as thermal cloaks or concentrators. However, in its current version, this technique only allows static deformations of space. Here, we develop a space–time theory of transformation thermodynamics that incorporates the possibility of performing time-varying deformations. This extra freedom greatly widens the range of achievable effects, providing an additional degree of control for heat management applications. As an example, we design a reconfigurable thermal cloak that can be opened and closed dynamically, therefore being able to gradually adjust the temperature distribution of a given region.

  20. Canonical fluid thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    The space-time integral of the thermodynamic pressure plays the role of the thermodynamic potential for compressible, adiabatic flow in the sense that the pressure integral for stable flow is less than for all slightly different flows. This stability criterion can be converted into a variational minimum principle by requiring the molar free-enthalpy and the temperature, which are the arguments of the pressure function, to be generalized velocities, that is, the proper-time derivatives of scalar spare-time functions which are generalized coordinates in the canonical formalism. In a fluid context, proper-time differentiation must be expressed in terms of three independent quantities that specify the fluid velocity. This can be done in several ways, all of which lead to different variants (canonical transformations) of the same constraint-free action integral whose Euler-Lagrange equations are just the well-known equations of motion for adiabatic compressible flow.

  1. Contact symmetries and Hamiltonian thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bravetti, A.; Lopez-Monsalvo, C.S.; Nettel, F.

    2015-10-15

    It has been shown that contact geometry is the proper framework underlying classical thermodynamics and that thermodynamic fluctuations are captured by an additional metric structure related to Fisher’s Information Matrix. In this work we analyse several unaddressed aspects about the application of contact and metric geometry to thermodynamics. We consider here the Thermodynamic Phase Space and start by investigating the role of gauge transformations and Legendre symmetries for metric contact manifolds and their significance in thermodynamics. Then we present a novel mathematical characterization of first order phase transitions as equilibrium processes on the Thermodynamic Phase Space for which the Legendre symmetry is broken. Moreover, we use contact Hamiltonian dynamics to represent thermodynamic processes in a way that resembles the classical Hamiltonian formulation of conservative mechanics and we show that the relevant Hamiltonian coincides with the irreversible entropy production along thermodynamic processes. Therefore, we use such property to give a geometric definition of thermodynamically admissible fluctuations according to the Second Law of thermodynamics. Finally, we show that the length of a curve describing a thermodynamic process measures its entropy production.

  2. Latitudinal Responses of F2 Peak Parameters to High-intensity Long-duration Continuous AE Activity (HILDCAA) Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spraggs, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The ionospheric responses to geomagnetic storms form an important part of the space weather study. The ionospheric perturbations may be described as enhancements and depletions compared to the quiet time variations, known as positive and negative phases of the ionospheric storms, respectively. In spite of a significant volume of studies on the ionospheric responses to the geomagnetic storms, understanding of ionospheric storm has not reached a level where it is possible to predict it. Geomagnetic activity may be divided into three categories: substorms, storms of different intensity, and high-intensity long-duration continuous AE activity (HILDCAA) events. This work presents specifically the latitudinal responses of the noontime F region peak parameters (hmF2 and foF2) to HILDCAA events. For this, digisonde data from 51 stations around the world was selected from the Digital Ionogram Data Base (DIDbase) from 2004 to 2012. For the same period 19 HILDCAA events were detected. Preliminary results show a positive effect in the peak parameters of the southern hemisphere and a negative effect in those of the northern hemisphere, suggesting that there is a predominantly northward component of the meridional winds. Additionally, it seems that the events occurring around the summer solstice have meridional wind components that are exclusively northward, while two of the six winter time events have southward components. Wintertime events are also the only ones with a very prominent eastward component of the zonal winds.

  3. A two-parameter kinetic model based on a time-dependent activity coefficient accurately describes enzymatic cellulose digestion

    PubMed Central

    Kostylev, Maxim; Wilson, David

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential source of renewable, low-carbon-footprint liquid fuels. Biomass recalcitrance and enzyme cost are key challenges associated with the large-scale production of cellulosic fuel. Kinetic modeling of enzymatic cellulose digestion has been complicated by the heterogeneous nature of the substrate and by the fact that a true steady state cannot be attained. We present a two-parameter kinetic model based on the Michaelis-Menten scheme (Michaelis L and Menten ML. (1913) Biochem Z 49:333–369), but with a time-dependent activity coefficient analogous to fractal-like kinetics formulated by Kopelman (Kopelman R. (1988) Science 241:1620–1626). We provide a mathematical derivation and experimental support to show that one of the parameters is a total activity coefficient and the other is an intrinsic constant that reflects the ability of the cellulases to overcome substrate recalcitrance. The model is applicable to individual cellulases and their mixtures at low-to-medium enzyme loads. Using biomass degrading enzymes from a cellulolytic bacterium Thermobifida fusca we show that the model can be used for mechanistic studies of enzymatic cellulose digestion. We also demonstrate that it applies to the crude supernatant of the widely studied cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei and can thus be used to compare cellulases from different organisms. The two parameters may serve a similar role to Vmax, KM, and kcat in classical kinetics. A similar approach may be applicable to other enzymes with heterogeneous substrates and where a steady state is not achievable. PMID:23837567

  4. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, M; Sagis, L M C

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects. PMID:25494727

  5. The discovery of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Based on the idea that a scientific journal is also an "agora" (Greek: market place) for the exchange of ideas and scientific concepts, the history of thermodynamics between 1800 and 1910 as documented in the Philosophical Magazine Archives is uncovered. Famous scientists such as Joule, Thomson (Lord Kelvin), Clausius, Maxwell or Boltzmann shared this forum. Not always in the most friendly manner. It is interesting to find out, how difficult it was to describe in a scientific (mathematical) language a phenomenon like "heat", to see, how long it took to arrive at one of the fundamental principles in physics: entropy. Scientific progress started from the simple rule of Boyle and Mariotte dating from the late eighteenth century and arrived in the twentieth century with the concept of probabilities. Thermodynamics was the driving intellectual force behind the industrial revolution, behind the enormous social changes caused by this revolution. The history of thermodynamics is a fascinating story, which also gives insights into the mechanism that seem to govern science.

  6. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  7. Thermodynamic products for Sen black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the properties of inner and outer horizon thermodynamics of Sen black hole (BH) both in Einstein frame (EF) and string frame (SF). We also compute area (or entropy) product, area (or entropy) sum of the said BH in EF as well as SF. In the EF, we observe that the area (or entropy) product is universal, whereas area (or entropy) sum is not universal. On the other hand, in the SF, area (or entropy) product and area (or entropy) sum don't have any universal behaviour because they all are depends on Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) mass parameter. We also verify that the first law is satisfied at the Cauchy horizon as well as event horizon (EH). In addition, we also compute other thermodynamic products and sums in the EF as well as in the SF. We further compute the Smarr mass formula and Christodoulou's irreducible mass formula for Sen BH. Moreover, we compute the area bound and entropy bound for both the horizons. The upper area bound for EH is actually the Penrose like inequality, which is the first geometric inequality in BHs. Furthermore, we compute the central charges of the left and right moving sectors of the dual CFT in Sen/CFT correspondence using thermodynamic relations. These thermodynamic relations on the multi-horizons give us further understanding the microscopic nature of BH entropy (both interior and exterior).

  8. A Hamilton Jacobi formalism for thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, S. G.

    2008-09-01

    We show that classical thermodynamics has a formulation in terms of Hamilton-Jacobi theory, analogous to mechanics. Even though the thermodynamic variables come in conjugate pairs such as pressure/volume or temperature/entropy, the phase space is odd-dimensional. For a system with n thermodynamic degrees of freedom it is 2n+1-dimensional. The equations of state of a substance pick out an n-dimensional submanifold. A family of substances whose equations of state depend on n parameters define a hypersurface of co-dimension one. This can be described by the vanishing of a function which plays the role of a Hamiltonian. The ordinary differential equations (characteristic equations) defined by this function describe a dynamical system on the hypersurface. Its orbits can be used to reconstruct the equations of state. The 'time' variable associated to this dynamics is related to, but is not identical to, entropy. After developing this formalism on well-grounded systems such as the van der Waals gases and the Curie-Weiss magnets, we derive a Hamilton-Jacobi equation for black hole thermodynamics in General Relativity. The cosmological constant appears as a constant of integration in this picture.

  9. 'Sum of activities' as dependent parameter: a new CoMFA-based approach for the design of pan PPAR agonists.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Sandeep; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2009-01-01

    A 'sum-model' (3D QSAR - CoMFA) has been developed to design PPAR(alpha/gamma/delta) (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor) pan agonists by using the sum of activities (EC(50)) of compounds against individual subtypes as a dependent parameter. In addition, the three subtype specific CoMFA models were also generated using the identical training set molecules (N=28). All four models were validated using the popular 'leave-one-out' (LOO) method and with a test set of 9 molecules. The generated models were found to be statistically significant with r(cv)(2)>0.5 and r(ncv)(2)>0.9 and the lower values of standard error of estimation (SEE) ranging from 0.097 to 0.160. From the contour map analyses the 'sum-model' was found to represent the three subtype specific models and also predicted the sum of activities of the training set molecules with reasonable accuracy. The new molecules were designed based on the 'sum-model' and were found to dock well in the PPARgamma active site. This approach may find wider applications in the research related to other classes of 'designed multiple ligands'. PMID:18448203

  10. The long-term future for civilian nuclear power generation in France: The case for breeder reactors. Breeder reactors: The physical and physical chemistry parameters, associate material thermodynamics and mechanical engineering: Novelties and issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dautray, Robert

    2011-06-01

    The author firstly gives a summary overview of the knowledge base acquired since the first breeder reactors became operational in the 1950s. "Neutronics", thermal phenomena, reactor core cooling, various coolants used and envisioned for this function, fuel fabrication from separated materials, main equipment (pumps, valves, taps, waste cock, safety circuits, heat exchange units, etc.) have now attained maturity, sufficient to implement sodium cooling circuits. Notwithstanding, the use of metallic sodium still raises certain severe questions in terms of safe handling (i.e. inflammability) and other important security considerations. The structural components, both inside the reactor core and outside (i.e. heat exchange devices) are undergoing in-depth research so as to last longer. The fuel cycle, notably the refabrication of fuel elements and fertile elements, the case of transuranic elements, etc., call for studies into radiation induced phenomena, chemistry separation, separate or otherwise treatments for materials that have different radioactive, physical, thermodynamical, chemical and biological properties. The concerns that surround the definitive disposal of certain radioactive wastes could be qualitatively improved with respect to the pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in service today. Lastly, the author notes that breeder reactors eliminate the need for an isotope separation facility, and this constitutes a significant contribution to contain nuclear proliferation. Among the priorities for a fully operational system (power station - the fuel cycle - operation-maintenance - the spent fuel pool and its cooling system-emergency cooling system-emergency electric power-transportation movements-equipment handling - final disposal of radioactive matter, independent safety barriers), the author includes materials (fabrication of targets, an irradiation and inspection instrument), the chemistry of all sorting processes, equipment "refabrication" or rehabilitation

  11. Increasing O-GlcNAcylation Level on Organ Culture of Soleus Modulates the Calcium Activation Parameters of Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Montel, Valerie; Berthoin, Serge; Bastide, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    O-N-acetylglucosaminylation is a reversible post-translational modification which presents a dynamic and highly regulated interplay with phosphorylation. New insights suggest that O-GlcNAcylation might be involved in striated muscle physiology, in particular in contractile properties such as the calcium activation parameters. By the inhibition of O-GlcNAcase, we investigated the effect of the increase of soleus O-GlcNAcylation level on the contractile properties by establishing T/pCa relationships. We increased the O-GlcNAcylation level on soleus biopsies performing an organ culture of soleus treated or not with PUGNAc or Thiamet-G, two O-GlcNAcase inhibitors. The enhancement of O-GlcNAcylation pattern was associated with an increase of calcium affinity on slow soleus skinned fibers. Analysis of the glycoproteins pattern showed that this effect is solely due to O-GlcNAcylation of proteins extracted from skinned biopsies. We also characterized the O-GlcNAcylated contractile proteins using a proteomic approach, and identified among others troponin T and I as being O-GlcNAc modified. We quantified the variation of O-GlcNAc level on all these identified proteins, and showed that several regulatory contractile proteins, predominantly fast isoforms, presented a drastic increase in their O-GlcNAc level. Since the only slow isoform of contractile protein presenting an increase of O-GlcNAc level was MLC2, the effect of enhanced O-GlcNAcylation pattern on calcium activation parameters could involve the O-GlcNAcylation of sMLC2, without excluding that an unidentified O-GlcNAc proteins, such as TnC, could be potentially involved in this mechanism. All these data strongly linked O-GlcNAcylation to the modulation of contractile activity of skeletal muscle. PMID:23110217

  12. Thermodynamic limits set relevant constraints to the soil-plant-atmosphere system and to optimality in terrestrial vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, Axel; Renner, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The soil-plant-atmosphere system is a complex system that is strongly shaped by interactions between the physical environment and vegetation. This complexity appears to demand equally as complex models to fully capture the dynamics of the coupled system. What we describe here is an alternative approach that is based on thermodynamics and which allows for comparatively simple formulations free of empirical parameters by assuming that the system is so complex that its emergent dynamics are only constrained by the thermodynamics of the system. This approach specifically makes use of the second law of thermodynamics, a fundamental physical law that is typically not being considered in Earth system science. Its relevance to land surface processes is that it fundamentally sets a direction as well as limits to energy conversions and associated rates of mass exchange, but it requires us to formulate land surface processes as thermodynamic processes that are driven by energy conversions. We describe an application of this approach to the surface energy balance partitioning at the diurnal scale. In this application the turbulent heat fluxes of sensible and latent heat are described as the result of a convective heat engine that is driven by solar radiative heating of the surface and that operates at its thermodynamic limit. The predicted fluxes from this approach compare very well to observations at several sites. This suggests that the turbulent exchange fluxes between the surface and the atmosphere operate at their thermodynamic limit, so that thermodynamics imposes a relevant constraint to the land surface-atmosphere system. Yet, thermodynamic limits do not entirely determine the soil-plant-atmosphere system because vegetation affects these limits, for instance by affecting the magnitude of surface heating by absorption of solar radiation in the canopy layer. These effects are likely to make the conditions at the land surface more favorable for photosynthetic activity

  13. Analysing petrophysical parameters of reservoir rock from the Ketzin pilot site (Germany) during long-term CO2-exposure experiments under thermodynamic conditions relevant for the geological storage of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemke, K.; Fischer, S.; Liebscher, A.; Ketzin Team

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, 7 reservoir core samples from observation well Ktzi 202 at the Ketzin pilot storage site (Germany) were experimentally exposed to pure CO2 and synthetic reservoir brine at simulated reservoir conditions of 5.5 MPa and 40°C. Reservoir rocks are immature arcosic to litharenitic sandstones of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation. After 15, 21, 24, and 40 months, respectively, autoclaves were opened and rock samples were taken for petrophysical characterisation and mineralogical and microbial analyses. Brine samples were analysed with respect to organic and inorganic components. Porosity and pore radii distribution have been investigated before and after the experiments by NMR relaxation and mercury injection. NMR measurements on brine-saturated rock core plugs potentially yield valuable information on the porous structure of the rock core. The distribution of NMR-T2 values (CPMG) reflects pore sizes within the rock core. NMR pore size is a derivative of the ratio pore surface to pore volume. The pore size derived by mercury injection is an area-equivalent diameter of throats connecting the pore system. Both methods produce petrophysical parameters required for calculating storage capacity and hydraulic properties (e.g. injectivity). Measured porosity data of the experimentally treated samples together with data from additional, untreated core samples from the Ketzin wells were also compared with results from wireline porosity determinations in the wells. Based on the NMR measurements, the permeability was calculated with standard parameters for sandstones after Timur-Coates. Mercury injection data was used to calculate sandstone permeabilities after Swanson (1981) and to furthermore determine the threshold pressure. NMR and mercury injection data generally indicate increased porosities and a shift to larger pore sizes during the first months. This suggests mineral dissolution during the experiments in agreement with the observed chemical

  14. Thermodynamics of nitrogen in Mn-Fe-C melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young E.

    2003-12-01

    The present study assesses the available experimental data in the Unified Interaction Parameter (UIP) formalism and proposes a thermodynamic model to describe the solubility of nitrogen over the entire composition range in Mn-Fe-C melts. The solubility of nitrogen was investigated from equilibrium between gaseous nitrogen and nitrogen dissolved in Mn-Fe-C melts. 1/2N_2 (g) + \\underset{raise0.3emsmashriptscriptstyle-}{N} (x,liq.Mn)K = x_N γ _N /P_{N_2^{1/2} } The equilibrium constant, K, and the activity coefficient of nitrogen, γ N, in the UIP formalism were determined taking a liquid Mn and infinite dilution of N in a Mn melt as the standard states for Mn and N, respectively. In K=-5.633+5770/T (1544 to 1841 K) ln K = - 5.633 + 5770/T (1544 to 1841 K)[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Metastable Solution Thermodynamic Properties and Crystal Growth Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soojin; Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The crystal growth rates of NH4H2PO4, KH2PO4, (NH4)2SO4, KAl(SO4)2 central dot 12H2O, NaCl, and glycine and the nucleation rates of KBr, KCl, NaBr central dot 2H2O, (NH4)2Cl, and (NH4)2SO4 were expressed in terms of the fundamental driving force of crystallization calculated from the activity of supersaturated solutions. The kinetic parameters were compared with those from the commonly used kinetic expression based on the concentration difference. From the viewpoint of thermodynamics, rate expressions based on the chemical potential difference provide accurate kinetic representation over a broad range of supersaturation. The rates estimated using the expression based on the concentration difference coincide with the true rates of crystallization only in the concentration range of low supersaturation and deviate from the true kinetics as the supersaturation increases.

  16. A combined experimental and computational thermodynamic investigation of the U-Th-O system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McMurray, Jake Wesley; Voit, Stewart L.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2016-03-21

    Here, the thermodynamics of the U–Th–O system have been assessed using the Calphad method. The compound energy formalism (CEF) and a partially ionic two-sublattice liquid model (TSLM) were used for the fluorite U1–yThyO2±x, γ-(U,Th)4O9, and the U–Th–O melt. The O2 activity of fluorite U1–yThyO2±x with temperature and composition was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Thermodynamic studies for the Th–O binary and U–Th–O ternary available in the open literature were critically reviewed. A self-consistent data set was selected and compiled with the equilibrium oxygen pressures determined by thermogravimetry in order to optimize the adjustable parameters of models selected to represent the phasesmore » in the Th–O and U–Th–O systems.« less

  17. Internal Thermodynamical Equilibrium And Consequences For Rate Law Expressions For Elementary Chemical And Physical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesudason, Christopher G.

    2009-07-01

    By viewing reactant species to be in a state of thermodynamical equilibrium with its various members which constitutes a set within a set of topological parameters various states of internal equilibrium within the same species would exist subject to the Gibbs thermodynamical criteria. Some examples from actual ab initio computer simulations show that there exists an empirical relationship between the activity coefficient ratio and the so-called reactivity coefficients, defined as a measure of departure of the rate constant with varying concentration of reactants in a system at equilibrium, where forward and backward rates can still be measured. These ideas are applied to charged reaction dynamics where a generalization of the Brönsted and Bjerrum rate expression is obtained.

  18. ProTherm: Thermodynamic Database for Proteins and Mutants.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M M; An, J; Kono, H; Oobatake, M; Uedaira, H; Sarai, A

    1999-01-01

    The first release of the Thermodynamic Database for Proteins and Mutants (ProTherm) contains more than 3300 data of several thermodynamic parameters for wild type and mutant proteins. Each entry includes numerical data for unfolding Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change, heat capacity change, transition temperature, activity etc., which are important for understanding the mechanism of protein stability. ProTherm also includes structural information such as secondary structure and solvent accessibility of wild type residues, and experimental methods and other conditions. A WWW interface enables users to search data based on various conditions with different sorting options for outputs. Further, ProTherm is cross-linked with NCBI PUBMED literature database, Protein Mutant Database, Enzyme Code and Protein Data Bank structural database. Moreover, all the mutation sites associated with each PDB structure are automatically mapped and can be directly viewed through 3DinSight developed in our laboratory. The database is available at the URL, http://www.rtc.riken.go.jp/protherm.htm l PMID:9847203

  19. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner. PMID:27317840

  20. Biosorptive uptake of ibuprofen by steam activated biochar derived from mung bean husk: Equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, modeling and eco-toxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sandip; Bobde, Kiran; Aikat, Kaustav; Halder, Gopinath

    2016-11-01

    The present study explores the use of steam activated mung bean husk biochar (SA-MBHB) as a potential sorbent for the removal of non-steroidal and anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen from aqueous solution. SA-MBHB was characterized by SEM, FTIR, BET, TGA, point of zero charge (pHPZC) and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The relation between removal percentages of ibuprofen and parameters such as adsorbent dose (0.05 g-250 g), contact time (5 min-210 min), pH (2-10), speed of agitation (40-280 rpm), temperature (293-308 K) and initial ibuprofen concentration (5-100 ppm) was investigated and optimized by a series of batch sorption experiments. The optimized conditions achieved were: adsorbent dose 0.1 g/L, agitation speed 200 rpm, pH 2, initial ibuprofen concentration 20 mg L(-1), equilibrium time 120 min and temperature 20 °C for more than 99% adsorptive removal of ibuprofen. The equilibrium adsorption data were well fitted into the Langmuir isotherm model while kinetic data suggested the removal process to follow pseudo second order reaction. The adsorption phenomena were optimized and simulated by using response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network (ANN). Effect of process variables viz. dose, agitation speed and pH on the sorbed amount of IBP was studied through a 2(3) full factorial central composite design (CCD). The comparative analysis was done for ibuprofen removal by constructing ANN model training using same experimental matrix of CCD. The growth of Scenedesmus abundans was also observed to be affected by the IBP solution whereas the biochar treated with IBP solution did not significantly affect the growth of the Scenedesmus abundans. The results revealed that SA-MBHB could be a cost-effective, efficient and non-hazardous adsorbent for the removal of ibuprofen from aqueous solution. PMID:27544645

  1. Sign-Problem-Free Quantum Monte Carlo Study on Thermodynamic Properties and Magnetic Phase Transitions in Orbital-Active Itinerant Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shenglong; Li, Yi; Wu, Congjun

    2015-04-01

    The microscopic mechanism of itinerant ferromagnetism is a long-standing problem due to the lack of nonperturbative methods to handle strong magnetic fluctuations of itinerant electrons. We nonpertubatively study thermodynamic properties and magnetic phase transitions of a two-dimensional multiorbital Hubbard model exhibiting ferromagnetic ground states. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations are employed, which are proved in a wide density region free of the sign problem usually suffered by simulations for fermions. Both Hund's coupling and electron itinerancy are essential for establishing the ferromagnetic coherence. No local magnetic moments exist in the system as a priori; nevertheless, the spin channel remains incoherent showing the Curie-Weiss-type spin magnetic susceptibility down to very low temperatures at which the charge channel is already coherent, exhibiting a weakly temperature-dependent compressibility. For the SU(2) invariant systems, the spin susceptibility further grows exponentially as approaching zero temperature in two dimensions. In the paramagnetic phase close to the Curie temperature, the momentum space Fermi distributions exhibit strong resemblance to those in the fully polarized state. The long-range ferromagnetic ordering appears when the symmetry is reduced to the Ising class, and the Curie temperature is accurately determined. These simulations provide helpful guidance to searching for novel ferromagnetic materials in both strongly correlated d -orbital transition-metal oxide layers and the p -orbital ultracold atom optical lattice systems.

  2. Thermodynamics of Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, Jeff W.

    One challenge facing society is the responsible use of our energy resources. Increasing the efficiency of energy generation provides one path to solving this challenge. One commonality among most current energy generation methods is that waste heat is generated during the generation process. Thermoelectrics can provide a solution to increasing the efficiency of power generation and automotive systems by converting waste heat directly to electricity. The current barrier to implementation of thermoelectric systems is the low efficiencies of underlying thermoelectric materials. The efficiency of a thermoelectric material depends on the electronic and thermal transport properties of the material; a good thermoelectric material should be an electronic conductor and a thermal insulator, traits which generally oppose one another. The thermal properties of a thermoelectric material can be improved by forming nanoscale precipitates with the material which scatter phonons, reducing the thermal conductivity. The electronic properties of a thermoelectric material can be improved by doping the material to increase the electronic conductivity or by alloying the material to favorably alter its band structure. The ability of these chemical modifications to affect the thermoelectric efficiency of material are ultimately governed by the chemical thermodynamics of the system. PbTe is a prototypical thermoelectric material: Alloying PbTe with PbS (or other materials) creates nanostructures which scatter phonons and reduce the lattice thermal conductivity. Doping PbTe with Na increases the hole concentration, increasing the electronic conductivity. In this work, we investigate the thermodynamics of PbTe and similar systems using first principles to understand the underlying mechanisms controlling the formation of nanostructures and the amount of doping allowed in these systems. In this work we: 1) investigate the thermodynamics of pseudo-binary alloys of IV--VI systems to identify the

  3. Experimental parameters optimization of instrumental neutron activation analysis in order to determine selected elements in some industrial soils in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haciyakupoglu, Sevilay; Nur Esen, Ayse; Erenturk, Sema

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is optimization of the experimental parameters for analysis of soil matrix by instrumental neutron activation analysis and quantitative determination of barium, cerium, lanthanum, rubidium, scandium and thorium in soil samples collected from industrialized urban areas near Istanbul. Samples were irradiated in TRIGA MARK II Research Reactor of Istanbul Technical University. Two types of reference materials were used to check the accuracy of the applied method. The achieved results were found to be in compliance with certified values of the reference materials. The calculated En numbers for mentioned elements were found to be less than 1. The presented data of element concentrations in soil samples will help to trace the pollution as an impact of urbanization and industrialization, as well as providing database for future studies.

  4. RACC Code System for Computing Radioactivity-Related Parameters for Fusion Reactor Systems Modified for Pulsed/Intermittent Activation Analysis.

    1996-04-30

    Version 00 CCC-388/RACC was specifically developed to compute the radioactivity and radioactivity-related parameters (e.g., afterheat, biological hazard potential, etc.) due to neutron activation within Inertial Fusion Energy and Magnetic Fusion Energy reactor systems. It can also be utilized to compute the radioactivity in fission, accelerator or any other neutron generating and neutron source system. This new version designated RACC-PULSE is based on CCC-388 and has the capability to model irradiation histories of varying flux levelsmore » having varying pulse widths (on times) and dwell periods (off times) and varying maintenance periods. This provides the user with the flexibility of modeling most any complexity of irradiation history beginning with simple steady state operating systems to complex multi-flux level pulse/intermittent operating systems.« less

  5. Non-hard sphere thermodynamic perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2011-08-01

    A non-hard sphere (HS) perturbation scheme, recently advanced by the present author, is elaborated for several technical matters, which are key mathematical details for implementation of the non-HS perturbation scheme in a coupling parameter expansion (CPE) thermodynamic perturbation framework. NVT-Monte Carlo simulation is carried out for a generalized Lennard-Jones (LJ) 2n-n potential to obtain routine thermodynamic quantities such as excess internal energy, pressure, excess chemical potential, excess Helmholtz free energy, and excess constant volume heat capacity. Then, these new simulation data, and available simulation data in literatures about a hard core attractive Yukawa fluid and a Sutherland fluid, are used to test the non-HS CPE 3rd-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) and give a comparison between the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT and other theoretical approaches. It is indicated that the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT is superior to other traditional TPT such as van der Waals/HS (vdW/HS), perturbation theory 2 (PT2)/HS, and vdW/Yukawa (vdW/Y) theory or analytical equation of state such as mean spherical approximation (MSA)-equation of state and is at least comparable to several currently the most accurate Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theories. It is discovered that three technical issues, i.e., opening up new bridge function approximation for the reference potential, choosing proper reference potential, and/or using proper thermodynamic route for calculation of fex - ref, chiefly decide the quality of the non-HS CPE TPT. Considering that the non-HS perturbation scheme applies for a wide variety of model fluids, and its implementation in the CPE thermodynamic perturbation framework is amenable to high-order truncation, the non-HS CPE 3rd-order or higher order TPT will be more promising once the above-mentioned three technological advances are established.

  6. Serum Dioxin-like Activity Is Associated with Reproductive Parameters in Young Men from the General Flemish Population

    PubMed Central

    Dhooge, Willem; van Larebeke, Nicolas; Koppen, Gudrun; Nelen, Vera; Schoeters, Greet; Vlietinck, Robert; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Comhaire, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and some related environmental contaminants are aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands that exert reproductive and developmental toxicity in laboratory animals. In humans, fertility-related effects are less documented. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between dioxin-like biological activity in serum and parameters of reproductive status in men from the general population 5 months after a polychlorinated biphenyl and dioxin food-contamination episode in Belgium. Design In the framework of the cross-sectional Flemish Environment and Health Study (FLEHS), we recruited 101 men 20–40 years of age and evaluated sperm parameters, measured sex hormones, and gathered information on a number of lifestyle factors. In addition, we determined the AhR-mediated enzymatic response elicited by individual serum samples and expressed it as TCDD equivalent concentrations (CALUX-TEQs) using an established transactivation assay. Results Age (p = 0.04) and the frequency of fish (p = 0.02) and egg (p = 0.001) consumption were independent positive determinants of serum dioxin-like activity. After correcting for possible confounders, we found that a 2-fold increase in CALUX-TEQ > 16 pg/L was associated with a 7.1% and 6.8% (both p = 0.04) decrease in total and free testosterone, respectively. We also observed a more pronounced drop in semen volume of 16.0% (p = 0.03), whereas sperm concentration rose by 25.2% (p = 0.07). No relationship was found with total sperm count or sperm morphology. Conclusions These data suggest an interaction of dioxin-like compounds with the secretory function of the seminal vesicles or prostate, possibly indirectly through an effect on testosterone secretion, at levels not affecting spermatogenesis as such. PMID:17107851

  7. Dynamics versus thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, V. L.

    1991-05-01

    An effort is made to characterize the ways in which the approaches of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics can be useful in the study of the dynamic behavior of structures. This meditation proceeds through consideration of such wide-ranging and deliberately provocative questions as: 'What are to be considered values in a stress-distribution function?' and 'How many degrees-of-freedom has a beam?'; it then gives attention to the hierarchy of vibrations, the interaction of the mechanism of dissipation with invisible degrees of freedom, and a plausible view of vibrations for the case of small dissipation.

  8. Stochastic thermodynamics of resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Jaco; Goldt, Sebastian; Seifert, Udo

    2016-03-01

    Stochastic dynamics with random resetting leads to a non-equilibrium steady state. Here, we consider the thermodynamics of resetting by deriving the first and second law for resetting processes far from equilibrium. We identify the contributions to the entropy production of the system which arise due to resetting and show that they correspond to the rate with which information is either erased or created. Using Landauer's principle, we derive a bound on the amount of work that is required to maintain a resetting process. We discuss different regimes of resetting, including a Maxwell demon scenario where heat is extracted from a bath at constant temperature.

  9. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-19

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. PMID:27545849

  10. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97<ΔH<7.44 kJ/mol, -15.29<ΔG<-11.87 kJ/mol and 41.97<ΔS<47.35 J/mol·K. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution. PMID:26422265

  11. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  12. The Impact of Ozone Treatment in Dynamic Bed Parameters on Changes in Biologically Active Substances of Juniper Berries.

    PubMed

    Brodowska, Agnieszka Joanna; Śmigielski, Krzysztof; Nowak, Agnieszka; Czyżowska, Agata; Otlewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The development of the parameters of ozone decontamination method assuring the least possible losses of biologically active substances (essential oils and polyphenols) and their activity in common juniper (Juniperus communis (L.)) berries was studied. Ozone treatment in dynamic bed was conducted 9 times. The process was conducted under different ozone concentrations (100.0; 130.0; 160.0 g O3/m3) and times (30, 60, 90 min). After each decontamination, the microbiological profile of the juniper berries was studied, and the contaminating microflora was identified. Next to the microbiological profile, the phenolic profile, as well as antioxidant activity of extracts and essential oils were determined. The total polyphenol content (TPC), composition of essential oils, free radical-scavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), beta-carotene bleaching test (BCB) and LC-MS polyphenol analysis were carried out. The study reveals that during short ozone contact times, higher amounts of TPC, 15.47 and 12.91 mg CE/g of extract, for samples 100/30 and 130/30, respectively, were demonstrated. Whereas samples 100/60, 130/60, 100/90, and 160/90 exhibited the lowest amount of phenolics. The highest antioxidant activity was found in the methanol extract obtained from ozonated berries which exhibited the lowest IC50 in all the antioxidant assays, such as DPPH, FRAP, and BCB assays. Ozone treatment showed noteworthy potential and its usage in food manufacturing and as an alternative decontamination method should be considered. PMID:26659905

  13. The Impact of Ozone Treatment in Dynamic Bed Parameters on Changes in Biologically Active Substances of Juniper Berries

    PubMed Central

    Brodowska, Agnieszka Joanna; Śmigielski, Krzysztof; Nowak, Agnieszka; Czyżowska, Agata; Otlewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The development of the parameters of ozone decontamination method assuring the least possible losses of biologically active substances (essential oils and polyphenols) and their activity in common juniper (Juniperus communis (L.)) berries was studied. Ozone treatment in dynamic bed was conducted 9 times. The process was conducted under different ozone concentrations (100.0; 130.0; 160.0 g O3/m3) and times (30, 60, 90 min). After each decontamination, the microbiological profile of the juniper berries was studied, and the contaminating microflora was identified. Next to the microbiological profile, the phenolic profile, as well as antioxidant activity of extracts and essential oils were determined. The total polyphenol content (TPC), composition of essential oils, free radical-scavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), beta-carotene bleaching test (BCB) and LC-MS polyphenol analysis were carried out. The study reveals that during short ozone contact times, higher amounts of TPC, 15.47 and 12.91 mg CE/g of extract, for samples 100/30 and 130/30, respectively, were demonstrated. Whereas samples 100/60, 130/60, 100/90, and 160/90 exhibited the lowest amount of phenolics. The highest antioxidant activity was found in the methanol extract obtained from ozonated berries which exhibited the lowest IC50 in all the antioxidant assays, such as DPPH, FRAP, and BCB assays. Ozone treatment showed noteworthy potential and its usage in food manufacturing and as an alternative decontamination method should be considered. PMID:26659905

  14. Thermodynamics of Lovelock-Lifshitz black branes

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M. H.; Mann, R. B.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the thermodynamics of Lovelock-Lifshitz black branes. We begin by introducing the finite action of third order Lovelock gravity in the presence of a massive vector field for a flat boundary, and use it to compute the energy density of these black branes. Using the field equations, we find a conserved quantity along the r coordinate that relates the metric parameters at the horizon and at infinity. Remarkably, though the subleading large-r behavior of Lovelock-Lifshitz black branes differs substantively from their Einsteinian Lifshitz counterparts, we find that the relationship between the energy density, temperature, and entropy density is unchanged from Einsteinian gravity. Using the first law of thermodynamics to obtain the relationship between entropy and temperature, we find that it too is the same as the Einsteinian case, apart from a constant of integration that depends on the Lovelock coefficients.

  15. Thermodynamic transient behavior of a geothermal fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Ascencio, F.; Samaniego, F.; Cinco-Ley, H.; Rivera, J.

    1995-01-26

    This paper presents a space integrated zero dimensional model that describes the thermodynamic behavior of a geothermal fracture undergoing exploitation. The main assumptions involved are: fluid and energy entering the fracture come from the surrounding matrix, fracture of infinite conductivity, and that the steam and water phases are gravitationally segregated and in thermodynamic equilibrium. The nonlinear equations of mass and energy conservation are numerically solved. A sensitivity analysis on the main parameters that affect this problem was carried out. Water recharge is described by a linear infinite aquifer, and heat flow from the matrix to the fluid was also considered by means of a linear infinite system. The behavior of the system is clearly described for conditions of exploitation in the steam, in the water, or mixed completion in both steam and water zones.

  16. A dissipation bound for thermodynamic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin

    Biological and engineered systems operate by coupling function to the transfer of heat and/or particles down a thermal or chemical gradient. In idealized deterministically driven systems, thermodynamic control can be exerted reversibly, with no entropy production, as long as the rate of the protocol is made slow compared to the equilibration time of the system. Here we consider fully realizable, entropically driven systems where the control parameters themselves obey rules that are reversible and that acquire directionality in time solely through dissipation. We show that when such a system moves in a directed way through thermodynamic space, it must produce entropy that is on average larger than its generalized displacement as measured by the Fisher information metric. This distance measure is sub-extensive but cannot be made small by slowing the rate of the protocol.

  17. Thermodynamics of Strecker synthesis in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell; Shock, Everett

    1995-01-01

    Submarine hydrothermal systems on the early Earth may have been the sites from which life emerged. The potential for Strecker synthesis to produce biomolecules (amino and hydroxy acids) from starting compounds (ketones, aldehydes, HCN and ammonia) in such environments is evaluated quantitatively using thermodynamic data and parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state. Although there is an overwhelming thermodynamic drive to form biomolecules by the Strecker synthesis at hydrothermal conditions, the availability and concentration of starting compounds limit the efficiency and productivity of Strecker reactions. Mechanisms for concentrating reactant compounds could help overcome this problem, but other mechanisms for production of biomolecules may have been required to produce the required compounds on the early Earth. Geochemical constraints imposed by hydrothermal systems provide important clues for determining the potential of these and other systems as sites for the emergence of life.

  18. Exploring the thermodynamics of noncommutative scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Francisco A.; Lima, Elisama E. M.

    2016-04-01

    We study the thermodynamic properties of the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the context of the quantum field theory with noncommutative target space. Our main goal is to investigate in which temperature and/or energy regimes the noncommutativity can characterize some influence on the BEC properties described by a relativistic massive noncommutative boson gas. The noncommutativity parameters play a key role in the modified dispersion relations of the noncommutative fields, leading to a new phenomenology. We have obtained the condensate fraction, internal energy, pressure and specific heat of the system and taken ultrarelativistic (UR) and nonrelativistic (NR) limits. The noncommutative effects on the thermodynamic properties of the system are discussed. We found that there appear interesting signatures around the critical temperature.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of cerium mononitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristova, N. M.; Belov, G. V.

    2014-09-01

    Data on the thermodynamic properties of cerium mononitride CeN in the solid state are analyzed. Relations approximating the temperature dependence of the thermodynamic functions of CeN(cr.) in the temperature range of 298.15-2900 K are obtained. Using the relations of thermodynamics known for this temperature range, the thermodynamic functions of cerium mononitride (entropy, Gibbs energy, and enthalpy variation) are calculated. The resulting data is entered into the database of the IVTANTHERMO software package and is used to analyze the thermal stability of CeN(cr.), and to estimate its boiling point at atmospheric pressure.

  20. Predictive thermodynamics for condensed phases.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Leslie; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2005-10-01

    Thermodynamic information is central to assessment of the stability and reactivity of materials. However, because of both the demanding nature of experimental thermodynamics and the virtually unlimited number of conceivable compounds, experimental data is often unavailable or, for hypothetical materials, necessarily impossible to obtain. We describe simple procedures for thermodynamic prediction for condensed phases, both ionic and organic covalent, principally via formula unit volumes (or density); our volume-based approach (VBT) provides a new thermodynamic tool for such assessment. These methods, being independent of detailed knowledge of crystal structures, are applicable to liquids and amorphous materials as well as to crystalline solids. Examples of their use are provided. PMID:16172676

  1. Dissipative work in thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mário G.; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This work explores the concept of dissipative work and shows that such a kind of work is an invariant non-negative quantity. This feature is then used to get a new insight into adiabatic irreversible processes; for instance, why the final temperature in any adiabatic irreversible process is always higher than that attained in a reversible process having the same initial state and equal final pressure or volume. Based on the concept of identical processes, numerical simulations of adiabatic irreversible compression and expansion were performed, enabling a better understanding of differences between configuration and dissipative work. The positive nature of the dissipative work was used to discuss the case where the dissipated energy ends up in the surroundings, while the invariance of such work under a system-surroundings interchange enabled the resulting modification in thermodynamical quantities to be determined. The ideas presented in this study are primarily intended for undergraduate students with a background in thermodynamics, but they may also be of interest to graduate students and teachers.

  2. Thermodynamics of Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and work dissipated by the system during wrong incorporations. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics; hence, its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  3. Thermodynamics of diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuszak, Daniel

    Diffusion is the migration of molecules in the reference frame of a system's center of mass and it is a physical process that occurs in all chemical and biological systems. Diffusion generally involves intermolecular interactions that lead to clustering, adsorption, and phase transitions; as such, it is difficult to describe theoretically on a molecular level in systems containing both intermolecular repulsions and attractions. This work describes a simple thermodynamic approach that accounts for intermolecular attractions and repulsions (much like how the van der Waals equation does) to model and help provide an understanding of diffusion. The approach is an extension of the equilibrium Lattice Density Functional Theory of Aranovich and Donohue; it was developed with Mason and Lonsdale's guidelines on how to construct and test a transport theory. In the framework of lattice fluids, this new approach gives (a) correct equilibrium limits, (b) Fickian behavior for non-interacting systems, (c) correct departures from Fickian behavior in non-ideal systems, (d) the correct Maxwell-Stefan formulation, (e) symmetry behavior upon re-labeling species, (f) reasonable non-equilibrium phase behavior, (g) agreement with Molecular Dynamics simulations, (h) agreement with the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, (i) a vanishing diffusive flux at the critical point, and (j) other qualitatively-correct behaviors when applied to problems in porous membranes and in packed beds.

  4. Thermodynamics. [algebraic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental structure of thermodynamics is purely algebraic, in the sense of atopological, and it is also independent of partitions, composite systems, the zeroth law, and entropy. The algebraic structure requires the notion of heat, but not the first law. It contains a precise definition of entropy and identifies it as a purely mathematical concept. It also permits the construction of an entropy function from heat measurements alone when appropriate conditions are satisfied. Topology is required only for a discussion of the continuity of thermodynamic properties, and then the weak topology is the relevant topology. The integrability of the differential form of the first law can be examined independently of Caratheodory's theorem and his inaccessibility axiom. Criteria are established by which one can determine when an integrating factor can be made intensive and the pseudopotential extensive and also an entropy. Finally, a realization of the first law is constructed which is suitable for all systems whether they are solids or fluids, whether they do or do not exhibit chemical reactions, and whether electromagnetic fields are or are not present.

  5. Ionosonde observations of F region parameters over Indian low latitude during different solar activity conditions and comparison with IRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddapati, PavanChaitanya; Patra, Amit

    2016-07-01

    In the equatorial region, the daytime F region exhibits three layers, namely F1, F2 and F3 layers. The detail characteristics of the F2 and F3 layers and their variabilities at different equatorial latitudes, however, have not been well defined. Given the fact that equatorial ionosphere is governed profoundly by dynamical and electro-dynamical forcing, electron density varies remarkably with latitude and altitude. A detailed characterization and study of the equatorial F region, thus, is necessary for improving ionospheric model, such as International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), applicable to the equatorial region. For this purpose, we have analyzed ionosonde observations from the dip equator and low magnetic latitude in the Indian sector to characterize the F2 and F3 layers in different seasons and solar activity conditions. In this paper, we present a detailed comparative analysis on the variabilities of the F2 and F3 layers as a function of local time, season and solar activity conditions. Finally, these results are compared with the IRI model parameters in an effort to evaluate the suitability of the IRI model representing the equatorial ionosphere in the Indian sector.

  6. Temperature dependence of the rate and activation parameters for tert-butyl chloride solvolysis: Monte Carlo simulation of confidence intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Dae Dong; Kim, Jong-Youl; Lee, Ikchoon; Chung, Sung Sik; Park, Kwon Ha

    2004-07-01

    The solvolysis rate constants ( kobs) of tert-butyl chloride are measured in 20%(v/v) 2-PrOH-H 2O mixture at 15 temperatures ranging from 0 to 39 °C. Examination of the temperature dependence of the rate constants by the weighted least squares fitting to two to four terms equations has led to the three-term form, ln kobs= a1+ a2T-1+ a3ln T, as the best expression. The activation parameters, ΔH ‡ and ΔS ‡, calculated by using three constants a1, a2 and a3 revealed the steady decrease of ≈1 kJ mol -1 per degree and 3.5 J K -1 mol -1 per degree, respectively, as the temperature rises. The sign change of ΔS ‡ at ≈20.0 °C and the large negative heat capacity of activation, ΔC p‡=-1020 J K -1 mol -1, derived are interpreted to indicate an S N1 mechanism and a net change from water structure breaking to electrostrictive solvation due to the partially ionic transition state. Confidence intervals estimated by the Monte Carlo method are far more precise than those by the conventional method.

  7. Persistent inflation at Aira caldera accompanying explosive activity at Sakurajima volcano: Constraining deformation source parameters from Finite Element inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Iguchi, Masato; Nakamichi, Haruhisa

    2015-04-01

    Aira caldera is located within Kagoshima Bay at the southern end of Kyushu, Japan. Sakurajima is an active post-caldera andesitic stratovolcano that sits on the caldera's southern rim. Despite frequent Vulcanian-type explosive activity, the area is experiencing continued uplift at a maximum rate of approximately 1.5 cm/yr with a footprint of 40 km, indicating that magma is being supplied faster than it is erupted. This is of particular concern as the amplitude of deformation is approaching the level inferred prior to the 1914 VEI 4 eruption. Using GPS data from 1996 - 2007 we explore causes for the uplift. To solve for the optimum deformation source parameters we use an inverse Finite Element method accounting for three-dimensional material heterogeneity (inferred from seismic tomography) and the surrounding topography of the region. The same inversions are also carried out using Finite Element models that incorporate simplified homogeneous or one-dimensional subsurface material properties, with and without topography. Results from the comparison of the six different models show statistically significant differences in the inferred deformation sources. This indicates that both subsurface heterogeneity and surface topography are essential in geodetic modelling to extract the most realistic deformation source parameters. The current best-fit source sits within a seismic low-velocity zone in the north-east of the caldera at a depth of approximately 14 km with a volume increase of 1.2 x 108 m3. The source location underlies a region of active underwater fumaroles within the Wakamiko crater and differs significantly from previous analytical modelling results. Seismic data further highlights areas of high seismic attenuation as well as large aseismic zones, both of which could allude to inelastic behaviour and a significant heat source at depth. To integrate these observations, subsequent forward Finite Element models will quantify the importance of rheology and

  8. Thermodynamics of Impurity Removal in Solvent Refining of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafaghodikhajavi, Leili

    In a new approach to metallurgical refining of silicon by solvent refining, iron has been successfully utilized as the getter element. Unlike most metallic impurities, phosphorus and boron have relatively large distribution coefficients that render them unresponsive to solidification refining processes. Consequently it is crucial to study the efficiency of phosphorus and boron removal through solvent refining with iron. This research focuses on thermodynamics of phosphorus and boron distribution between silicon crystals and the iron-silicon melt. Aiming to establish the thermodynamic fundamentals of the process, the present study was performed to investigate the distribution coefficient of phosphorus and boron between silicon and the alloy melt. Based on the values obtained for distribution coefficient of phosphorus and boron at different temperatures, impurity removal is 2-3 times more effective compared with conventional directional solidification process. The values of interaction parameter of phosphorus on iron were obtained as -5297+/-359 (1310 °C), -4324+/-292 (1260 °C) and -2893+/-268 (1210 °C). The values of interaction parameter of boron on iron were: -813+/-53 (1310 °C), -830+/-92 (1260 °C), -863+/-91 (1210 °C). Large negative values obtained for both interaction parameters, indicate strong affinity between iron and either phosphorus or boron. Self interaction parameter of phosphorus were as follows: 243+/-38 (1310 °C), 137+/-22 (1260 °C) and 18+/-2 (1210 °C), indicating the repulsion between phosphorus atoms. Self interaction parameter of boron were as follow: -96+/-12 (1310 °C), -111+/-28 (1260 °C) and -159+/-45 (1210 °C) implying an attraction between boron atoms in silicon. The distribution coefficient of phosphorus at infinite dilution were obtained as: 0.34+/-0.01 (1310 °C), 0.28+/-0.01 (1260 °C) and 0.24+/-0.00 (1210 °C). The same parameter for boron were: 0.49+/-0.01 (1310 °C), 0.41+/-0.03 (1260 °C) and 0.33+/-0.04 (1210

  9. Biochemical Thermodynamics under near Physiological Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for nomenclature and tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics approved by IUBMB and IUPAC in 1994 can be easily introduced after the chemical thermodynamic formalism. Substitution of the usual standard thermodynamic properties by the transformed ones in the thermodynamic equations, and the use of appropriate thermodynamic tables…

  10. Comparison of hemodynamic and nutritional parameters between older persons practicing regular physical activity, nonsmokers and ex-smokers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sedentary lifestyle combined with smoking, contributes to the development of a set of chronic diseases and to accelerating the course of aging. The aim of the study was to compare the hemodynamic and nutritional parameters between elderly persons practicing regular physical activity, nonsmokers and ex-smokers. Methods The sample was comprised of 40 elderly people practicing regular physical activity for 12 months, divided into a Nonsmoker Group and an Ex-smoker Group. During a year four trimestrial evaluations were performed, in which the hemodynamic (blood pressure, heart rate- HR and VO2) and nutritional status (measured by body mass index) data were collected. The paired t-test and t-test for independent samples were applied in the intragroup and intergroup analysis, respectively. Results The mean age of the groups was 68.35 years, with the majority of individuals in the Nonsmoker Group being women (n = 15) and the Ex-smoker Group composed of men (n = 11). In both groups the variables studied were within the limits of normality for the age. HR was diminished in the Nonsmoker Group in comparison with the Ex-smoker Group (p = 0.045) between the first and last evaluation. In the intragroup analysis it was verified that after one year of exercise, there was significant reduction in the HR in the Nonsmoker Group (p = 0.002) and a significant increase in VO2 for the Ex-smoker Group (p = 0.010). There are no significant differences between the hemodynamic and nutritional conditions in both groups. Conclusion In elderly persons practicing regular physical activity, it was observed that the studied variables were maintained over the course of a year, and there was no association with the history of smoking, except for HR and VO2. PMID:21040562

  11. Calculating the thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions of alkali metal carboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakov, A. M.; Sergievskii, V. V.; Zhukova, T. V.

    2014-06-01

    A modified Robinson-Stokes equation with terms that consider the formation of ionic hydrates and associates is used to describe thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions of electrolytes. The model is used to describe data on the osmotic coefficients of aqueous solutions of alkali metal carboxylates, and to calculate the mean ionic activity coefficients of salts and excess Gibbs energies. The key contributions from ionic hydration and association to the nonideality of solutions is determined by analyzing the contributions of various factors. Relations that connect the hydration numbers of electrolytes with the parameters of the Pitzer-Mayorga equation and a modified Hückel equation are developed.

  12. Thermodynamics from Car to Kitchen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The historical background to the laws of thermodynamics is explained using examples we can all observe in the world around us, focusing on motorised transport, refrigeration and solar heating. This is not to be considered as an academic article. The purpose is to improve understanding of thermodynamics rather than impart new knowledge, and for…

  13. Thermodynamics--A Practical Subject.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Hugh G.

    1984-01-01

    Provides a simplified, synoptic overview of the area of thermodynamics, enumerating and explaining the four basic laws, and introducing the mathematics involved in a stepwise fashion. Discusses such basic tools of thermodynamics as enthalpy, entropy, Helmholtz free energy, and Gibbs free energy, and their uses in problem solving. (JM)

  14. Ch. 33 Modeling: Computational Thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2012-01-01

    This chapter considers methods and techniques for computational modeling for nuclear materials with a focus on fuels. The basic concepts for chemical thermodynamics are described and various current models for complex crystalline and liquid phases are illustrated. Also included are descriptions of available databases for use in chemical thermodynamic studies and commercial codes for performing complex equilibrium calculations.

  15. Comments to Irreversibility in Thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1995-01-01

    The problem of irreversibility in thermodynamics was revisited and analyzed on the microscopic, stochastic, and macroscopic levels of description. It was demonstrated that Newtonian dynamics can be represented in the Reynolds form, a new phenomenological force with non-Lipschitz properties was introduced, and additional non- Lipschitz thermodynamical forces were incorporated into macroscopic models of transport phenomena.

  16. Eu(2+)-Activated Phase-Pure Oxonitridosilicate Phosphor in a Ba-Si-O-N System via Facile Silicate-Assisted Routes Designed by First-Principles Thermodynamic Simulation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Young Jun; Kim, Jin Kyu; Ju, Ji Young; Choi, Seul Ki; Park, Woon Ik; Jung, Ha-Kyun; Kim, Yongseon; Choi, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Eu(2+)-activated single phase Ba(2+)-oxonitridosilicate phosphors were prepared under a mild synthetic condition via silicate precursors, and their luminescent properties were investigated. Both the preferred oxonitridosilicate formation as for the available host compounds and thermodynamic stability within the Ba-Si-O-N system were elucidated in detail by the theoretical simulation based on the first-principles density functional theory. Those results can visualize the optimum synthetic conditions for Eu(2+)-activated highly luminescent Ba(2+)-oxonitridosilicates, especially Ba3Si6O12N2, as promising conversion phosphors for white LEDs, including Ba3Si6O9N4 and BaSi2O2N2 phases. To prove the simulated design rule, we synthesized the Ba3Si6O12N2:Eu(2+) phosphor using various silicate precursors, Ba2Si4O10, Ba2Si3O8, and BaSiO3, in a carbothermal reduction ambient and finally succeeded in obtaining a phase of pure highly luminescent oxonitridosilicate phosphor without using any solid-state nitride addition and/or high pressure synthetic procedures. Our study provides useful guidelines for robust synthetic procedures for developing thermally stable rare-earth-ion activated oxonitridosilicate phosphors and an established simulation method that can be effectively applied to other multigas systems. PMID:27518370

  17. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  18. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  19. Modern problems of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, I. I.

    2012-12-01

    The role of energy and methods of its saving for the development of human society and life are analyzed. The importance of future use of space energy flows and energy of water and air oceans is emphasized. The authors consider the idea of the unit for production of electric energy and pure substances using sodium chloride which reserves are limitless on the planet. Looking retrospectively at the development of power engineering from the elementary fire to modern electric power station, we see that the used method of heat production, namely by direct interaction of fuel and oxidizer, is the simplest. However, it may be possible to combust coal, i.e., carbon in salt melt, for instance, sodium chloride that would be more rational and efficient. If the stated problems are solved positively, we would master all energy properties of the substance; and this is the main problem of thermodynamics being one of the sciences on energy.

  20. Extensive quantities in thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannaerts, Sebastiaan H.

    2014-05-01

    A literature survey shows little consistency in the definitions of the term ‘extensive quantity’ (a.k.a. extensive property) as used in thermodynamics. A majority assumes that extensive quantities are those that are proportional to mass. Taking the mathematical meaning of proportional and taking the ‘mass’ to be that of the system or subsystem, it is shown that the proportionality assumption is only correct for a few extensive quantities under condition of constant composition. A large subset of extensive quantities are completely independent of mass; for most systems extensive quantities are not proportional to mass, but mass is the (extensive) constant of proportionality. The definition by IUPAC, based on the additivity of extensive quantities, is the preferred baseline for discussing this subject. It is noted however, that two types of additivity need to be distinguished and that a few intensive quantities are also additive. This paper leaves several interesting questions open to further scrutiny.

  1. Thermodynamics of Glass Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradt, Reinhard

    First, a model based on linear algebra is described by which the thermodynamic properties of industrial multi-component glasses and glass melts can be accurately predicted from their chemical composition. The model is applied to calculate the heat content of glass melts at high temperatures, the standard heat of formation of glasses from the elements, and the vapor pressures of individual oxides above the melt. An E-fiber glass composition is depicted as an example. Second, the role of individual raw materials in the melting process of E-glass is addressed, with a special focus on the decomposition kinetics and energetic situation of alkaline earth carriers. Finally, the heat of the batch-to-melt conversion is calculated. A simplified reaction path model comprising heat turnover, content of residual solid matter, and an approach to batch viscosity is outlined.

  2. Thermodynamics of feldspathoid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Richard O.; Ghiorso, Mark S.

    We have developed models for the thermody-namic properties of nephelines, kalsilites, and leucites in the simple system NaAlSiO4-KAlSiO4-Ca0.5AlSiO4-SiO2-H2O that are consistent with all known constraints on subsolidus equilibria and thermodynamic properties, and have integrated them into the existing MELTS software package. The model for nepheline is formulated for the simplifying assumptions that (1) a molecular mixing-type approximation describes changes in the configurational entropy associated with the coupled exchange substitutions □Si?NaAl and □Ca? Na2 and that (2) Na+ and K+ display long-range non-convergent ordering between a large cation and the three small cation sites in the Na4Al4Si4O16 formula unit. Notable features of the model include the prediction that the mineral tetrakalsilite (``panunzite'', sensu stricto) results from anti-ordering of Na and K between the large cation and the three small cation sites in the nepheline structure at high temperatures, an average dT/dP slope of about 55°/kbar for the reaction over the temperature and pressure ranges 800-1050 °C and 500-5000 bars, roughly symmetric (i.e. quadratic) solution behavior of the K-Na substitution along joins between fully ordered components in nepheline, and large positive Gibbs energies for the nepheline reciprocal reactions and and for the leucite reciprocal reaction

  3. Thermodynamic similarity of physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccariello, Salvino

    2016-02-01

    Two different physical systems A and B are said to be thermodynamically similar if one of the thermodynamic potentials of system A is proportional to the corresponding potential of B after expressing the state variables of system A in terms of those of B by a transformation reversible throughout the state variables' domain. The thermodynamic similarity has a transitive nature so that physical systems divide into classes of thermodynamically similar systems that have similar phase diagrams. Considering the simplest physical systems, one finds that a class of thermodynamically similar systems is formed by the ideal classical gas, the Fermi and the Bose ideal quantum gases, whatever the dimensions of the confining spaces, and the one dimensional hard rod gas. Another class is formed by the physical systems characterized by interactions that coincide by a scaling of the distance and the coupling constant.

  4. High-rate activated sludge system for carbon management--Evaluation of crucial process mechanisms and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jose; Miller, Mark; Bott, Charles; Murthy, Sudhir; De Clippeleir, Haydee; Wett, Bernhard

    2015-12-15

    The high-rate activated sludge (HRAS) process is a technology suitable for the removal and redirection of organics from wastewater to energy generating processes in an efficient manner. A HRAS pilot plant was operated under controlled conditions resulting in concentrating the influent particulate, colloidal, and soluble COD to a waste solids stream with minimal energy input by maximizing sludge production, bacterial storage, and bioflocculation. The impact of important process parameters such as solids retention time (SRT), hydraulic residence time (HRT) and dissolved oxygen (DO) levels on the performance of a HRAS system was demonstrated in a pilot study. The results showed that maximum removal efficiencies of soluble COD were reached at a DO > 0.3 mg O2/L, SRT > 0.5 days and HRT > 15 min which indicates that minimizing the oxidation of the soluble COD in the high-rate activated sludge process is difficult. The study of DO, SRT and HRT exhibited high degree of impact on the colloidal and particulate COD removal. Thus, more attention should be focused on controlling the removal of these COD fractions. Colloidal COD removal plateaued at a DO > 0.7 mg O2/L, SRT > 1.5 days and HRT > 30 min, similar to particulate COD removal. Concurrent increase in extracellular polymers (EPS) production in the reactor and the association of particulate and colloidal material into sludge flocs (bioflocculation) indicated carbon capture by biomass. The SRT impacted the overall mass and energy balance of the high-rate process indicating that at low SRT conditions, lower COD mineralization or loss of COD content occurred. In addition, the lower SRT conditions resulted in higher sludge yields and higher COD content in the WAS. PMID:26260539

  5. Contribution of Social Isolation, Restraint, and Hindlimb Unloading to Changes in Hemodynamic Parameters and Motion Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tsvirkun, Darya; Bourreau, Jennifer; Mieuset, Aurélie; Garo, Florian; Vinogradova, Olga; Larina, Irina; Navasiolava, Nastassia; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Gharib, Claude; Custaud, Marc-Antoine

    2012-01-01

    The most accepted animal model for simulation of the physiological and morphological consequences of microgravity on the cardiovascular system is one of head-down hindlimb unloading. Experimental conditions surrounding this model include not only head-down tilting of rats, but also social and restraint stresses that have their own influences on cardiovascular system function. Here, we studied levels of spontaneous locomotor activity, blood pressure, and heart rate during 14 days under the following experimental conditions: cage control, social isolation in standard rat housing, social isolation in special cages for hindlimb unloading, horizontal attachment (restraint), and head-down hindlimb unloading. General activity and hemodynamic parameters were continuously monitored in conscious rats by telemetry. Heart rate and blood pressure were both evaluated during treadmill running to reveal cardiovascular deconditioning development as a result of unloading. The main findings of our work are that: social isolation and restraint induced persistent physical inactivity, while unloading in rats resulted in initial inactivity followed by normalization and increased locomotion after one week. Moreover, 14 days of hindlimb unloading showed significant elevation of blood pressure and slight elevation of heart rate. Hemodynamic changes in isolated and restrained rats largely reproduced the trends observed during unloading. Finally, we detected no augmentation of tachycardia during moderate exercise in rats after 14 days of unloading. Thus, we concluded that both social isolation and restraint, as an integral part of the model conditions, contribute essentially to cardiovascular reactions during head-down hindlimb unloading, compared to the little changes in the hydrostatic gradient. PMID:22768322

  6. From Squid to Mammals with the HH Model through the Nav Channels’ Half-Activation-Voltage Parameter

    PubMed Central

    Krouchev, Nedialko I.; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad; Vinet, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The model family analyzed in this work stems from the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model (HHM). for a single-compartment (space-clamp) and continuous variation of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) half-activation-voltage parameter ΔV1/2, which controls the window of sodium-influx currents. Unlike the baseline HHM, its parametric extension exhibits a richer multitude of dynamic regimes, such as multiple fixed points (FP’s), bi- and multi-stability (coexistence of FP’s and/or periodic orbits). Such diversity correlates with a number of functional properties of excitable neural tissue, such as the capacity or not to evoke an action potential (AP) from the resting state, by applying a minimal absolute rheobase current amplitude. The utility of the HHM rooted in the giant squid for the descriptions of the mammalian nervous system is of topical interest. We conclude that the model’s fundamental principles are still valid (up to using appropriate parameter values) for warmer-blooded species, without a pressing need for a substantial revision of the mathematical formulation. We demonstrate clearly that the continuous variation of the ΔV1/2 parameter comes close to being equivalent with recent HHM ‘optimizations’. The neural dynamics phenomena described here are nontrivial. The model family analyzed in this work contains the classical HHM as a special case. The validity and applicability of the HHM to mammalian neurons can be achieved by picking the appropriate ΔV1/2 parameter in a significantly broad range of values. For such large variations, in contrast to the classical HHM, the h and n gates’ dynamics may be uncoupled - i.e. the n gates may no longer be considered in mere linear correspondence to the h gates. ΔV1/2 variation leads to a multitude of dynamic regimes—e.g. models with either 1 fixed point (FP) or with 3 FP’s. These may also coexist with stable and/or unstable periodic orbits. Hence, depending on the initial conditions, the system may

  7. The effects of dietary boron compounds in supplemented diet on hormonal activity and some biochemical parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucukkurt, Ismail; Akbel, Erten; Karabag, Funda; Ince, Sinan

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the effects of dietary boric acid or borax, as a boron (B) source, on hormonal status (leptin, insulin, triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine) and some biochemical parameter levels as glucose, carnitine, nonesterified fatty acids, and betahydroxybutyric acid in rats. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into three equal groups: the animals in the first group (control) were fed with a standard rodent diet containing 6.4 mg B/kg, and the animals in the experimental group were fed with a standard rodent diet added with boric acid and borax (100 mg B/kg) throughout the experimental period of 28 days. The B compounds especially borax decreased leptin, insulin, and glucose levels, whereas increased T3 and carnitine levels in plasma. In addition, body weight of rats was found to be low in the boric acid group at the end of 4 weeks. Consequently, our results demonstrate that B supplementation (100 mg/kg) in diet decreases body weight, leptin, and insulin, whereas increases T3 levels in plasma, so enhances the metabolic activity of rats. Between the B compounds used in this study, it was found that borax had a greater effect on hormonal status than boric acid. PMID:23293135

  8. The effect of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae) on quality parameters, and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of olive oil.

    PubMed

    Medjkouh, Lynda; Tamendjari, Abderezak; Keciri, Sonia; Santos, Joana; Nunes, M Antónia; Oliveira, M B P P

    2016-06-15

    The present study was performed on olives from two Algerian cultivars (Limli and Rougette de Metidja) with different rates of attack by the Bactrocera oleae fly (0%, not attacked; 100%, all attacked; and real attacked %) and the corresponding olive oils. The aim was to verify the attack effect on quality parameters (free fatty acid, peroxide value, K232 and K270, oxidation stability), bioactive compounds (fatty acids and tocopherols, and total phenols and flavonoids), and on the antioxidant (reducing power, FRAP, β-carotene bleaching inhibition, ABTS and DPPH) and antibacterial (against 8 referenced human enteropathogenic bacteria by the agar disc diffusion method) capacities. Oils from infested olives were downgraded to the virgin olive oil category. Rougette de Metidja, the cultivar with a higher drupe size, was more attacked than Limli. The B. oleae attack causes an important decrease in the total phenolic contents (>30%) but to a lesser degree in the case of tocopherols. Among them, α-tocopherol is the most affected. The antioxidant and antibacterial activities were highly correlated with phenolic levels. The results of this study show the importance of controlling the fly attack because it causes a decrease in the beneficial health effects of olive oils. PMID:27220688

  9. Effects of a Multicomponent Exercise Program on Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters, Risk of Falling and Physical Activity in Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perrochon, Anaïck; Tchalla, Achille E.; Bonis, Joelle; Perucaud, Florian; Mandigout, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise programs are presumed to rehabilitate gait disorders and to reduce the risk of falling in dementia patients. This study aimed to analyze the specific effects of multicomponent exercise on gait disorders and to determine the association between gait impairments and the risk of falling in dementia patients before and after intervention. Methods We conducted an 8-week multicomponent exercise program in 16 dementia patients (age 86.7 ± 5.4 years). All participants were assessed several times for gait analysis (Locométrix®), Tinetti score and physical activity (Body Media SenseWear® Pro armband). Results After 8 weeks of the exercise program, the mean gait speed was 0.12 m/s faster than before the intervention (0.55 ± 0.17 vs. 0.67 ± 0.14 m/s). The multicomponent exercise program improved gait performance and Tinetti score (p < 0.05). Gait performance (gait speed, stride length) was correlated with the Tinetti score (p < 0.05). Conclusion Analysis of spatiotemporal gait parameters using an accelerometer method provided a quick and easy tool to estimate the benefits of an exercise program and the risk of falling. PMID:26557134

  10. Variation in antioxidant enzyme activities, growth and some physiological parameters of bitter melon (Momordica charantia) under salinity and chromium stress.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Mahsa; Heidari, Mostafa; Ghorbani, Hadi

    2016-07-01

    In general, salinity and heavy metals interfere with several physiological processes and reduce plant growth. In order to evaluate of three levels of salinity (0, 4 and 8 ds m(-1)) and three concentration of chromium (0, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) soil) in bitter melon (Momordica charantia), a plot experiment was conducted in greenhouse at university of Shahrood, Iran. The results revealed that chromium treatment had no significant affect on fresh and dry weight, but salinity caused reduction of fresh and dry weight in growth parameter. Salinity and chromium enhanced antioxidant enzymes activities like catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and sodium content in leaves. However salinity and chromium treatments had no effect on potassium, phosphorus in leaves, soluble carbohydrate concentration in leaves and root, but decreased the carotenoid content in leaves. On increasing salinity from control to 8 ds m(-1) chlorophyll a, b and anthocyanin content decreased by 41.6%, 61.1% and 26.5% respectively but chromium treatments had no significant effect on these photosynthetic pigments. PMID:27498497

  11. Equilibrium thermodynamics in modified gravitational theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-04-01

    We show that it is possible to obtain a picture of equilibrium thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in the expanding cosmological background for a wide class of modified gravity theories with the Lagrangian density f(R,ϕ,X), where R is the Ricci scalar and X is the kinetic energy of a scalar field ϕ. This comes from a suitable definition of an energy-momentum tensor of the “dark” component that respects to a local energy conservation in the Jordan frame. In this framework the horizon entropy S corresponding to equilibrium thermodynamics is equal to a quarter of the horizon area A in units of gravitational constant G, as in Einstein gravity. For a flat cosmological background with a decreasing Hubble parameter, S globally increases with time, as it happens for viable f(R) inflation and dark energy models. We also show that the equilibrium description in terms of the horizon entropy S is convenient because it takes into account the contribution of both the horizon entropy S' in non-equilibrium thermodynamics and an entropy production term.

  12. Phase structures of holographic screen thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei-Jian; Chen, Yi-Xin; Li, Jian-Long

    2014-07-01

    Holographic screens are the generalization of the event horizon of a black hole in entropic force scheme, which are defined by setting Newton potential ϕ constant, i.e. e2ϕ = c = const. We demonstrate that the integrated first law of thermodynamics is equivalent to the (r-r) component of Einstein equations, so that we strengthen the correspondence between thermodynamics and gravity. We show that there are not only the first law of thermodynamics, but also kinds of phase transitions of holographic screens. These phase transitions are characterized by the discontinuity of their heat capacities. In (n+1)-dimensional Reissner-Nordström-anti-de Sitter (RN-AdS) spacetime, we analyze three kinds of phase transitions, which are of the holographic screens with Q = 0 (charge), constant Φ (electrostatic potential) and nonzero constant Q. In the Q = 0 case, only the holographic screens with 0≤c<1 can undergo phase transition. In the constant Φ case, the constraints become as 0<= c+16˜ {Γ }2Φ 2<1, where ˜ {Γ } is a dimensional-dependent parameter. By verifying the Ehrenfest equations, we show that the phase transitions in this case are all second order phase transitions. In the constant Q case, there might be two, or one, or no phase transitions of holographic screens, depending on the values of Q and c.

  13. Dynamics and thermodynamics in spinor quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaljohann, H.; Erhard, M.; Kronjäger, J.; Sengstock, K.; Bongs, K.

    2004-12-01

    We discuss magnetism in spinor quantum gases theoretically and experimentally with emphasis on temporal dynamics of the spinor order parameter in the presence of an external magnetic field. In a simple coupled Gross Pitaevskii picture we observe a dramatic suppression of spin dynamics due to quadratic Zeeman “dephasing”. In view of an inhomogeneous density profile of the trapped condensate we present evidence of spatial variations of spin dynamics. In addition we study spinor quantum gases as a model system for thermodynamics of Bose Einstein condensation. As a particular example we present measurements on condensate magnetisation due to the interaction with a thermal bath.

  14. Hidden Markov models for stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John

    2015-07-01

    The formalism of state estimation and hidden Markov models can simplify and clarify the discussion of stochastic thermodynamics in the presence of feedback and measurement errors. After reviewing the basic formalism, we use it to shed light on a recent discussion of phase transitions in the optimized response of an information engine, for which measurement noise serves as a control parameter. The HMM formalism also shows that the value of additional information displays a maximum at intermediate signal-to-noise ratios. Finally, we discuss how systems open to information flow can apparently violate causality; the HMM formalism can quantify the performance gains due to such violations.

  15. bbThermodynamic quantities and Urmia Sea water evaporation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The relation between climatic parameters (relative air humidity) and the water activity of the Urmia Sea water determines the possible maximum evaporation of the lake. Using the Pitzer thermodynamic approach, the activity of the Urmia Lake water during evaporation was calculated and compared to the present relative air humidity above the water. Present climatic conditions allow the Urmia Sea water to evaporate down to water with activity of 0.55, corresponding to the lowest air humidity measured over the lake. This water activity falls in the range of halite precipitation, while carnalite precipitation starts at somewhat lower (a H2O = 0.499) point. Our dynamic model predicts that for air humidity as low as 55% (reflecting present climate conditions), the Urmia Sea level may drop to as low as 1270 m (i. e., 1270 m above mean sea level). At that point, the lake water volume will have a volume of 11 km3. For the sake of comparison, at the beginning of 1990, the level of the lake was 1275 m, its volume was 25 km3, and its surface area was 5145 km2. PMID:20356384

  16. bbThermodynamic quantities and Urmia Sea water evaporation.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Nosrat; Roudgar, Mina; Ebrahimpour, Neda

    2010-01-01

    The relation between climatic parameters (relative air humidity) and the water activity of the Urmia Sea water determines the possible maximum evaporation of the lake. Using the Pitzer thermodynamic approach, the activity of the Urmia Lake water during evaporation was calculated and compared to the present relative air humidity above the water. Present climatic conditions allow the Urmia Sea water to evaporate down to water with activity of 0.55, corresponding to the lowest air humidity measured over the lake. This water activity falls in the range of halite precipitation, while carnalite precipitation starts at somewhat lower (a H2O = 0.499) point. Our dynamic model predicts that for air humidity as low as 55% (reflecting present climate conditions), the Urmia Sea level may drop to as low as 1270 m (i. e., 1270 m above mean sea level). At that point, the lake water volume will have a volume of 11 km3. For the sake of comparison, at the beginning of 1990, the level of the lake was 1275 m, its volume was 25 km3, and its surface area was 5145 km2. PMID:20356384

  17. A novel active learning method for support vector regression to estimate biophysical parameters from remotely sensed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Begüm; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a novel active learning (AL) technique in the context of ɛ-insensitive support vector regression (SVR) to estimate biophysical parameters from remotely sensed images. The proposed AL method aims at selecting the most informative and representative unlabeled samples which have maximum uncertainty, diversity and density assessed according to the SVR estimation rule. This is achieved on the basis of two consecutive steps that rely on the kernel kmeans clustering. In the first step the most uncertain unlabeled samples are selected by removing the most certain ones from a pool of unlabeled samples. In SVR problems, the most uncertain samples are located outside or on the boundary of the ɛ-tube of SVR, as their target values have the lowest confidence to be correctly estimated. In order to select these samples, the kernel k-means clustering is applied to all unlabeled samples together with the training samples that are not SVs, i.e., those that are inside the ɛ-tube, (non-SVs). Then, clusters with non-SVs inside are rejected, whereas the unlabeled samples contained in the remained clusters are selected as the most uncertain samples. In the second step the samples located in the high density regions in the kernel space and as much diverse as possible to each other are chosen among the uncertain samples. The density and diversity of the unlabeled samples are evaluated on the basis of their clusters' information. To this end, initially the density of each cluster is measured by the ratio of the number of samples in the cluster to the distance of its two furthest samples. Then, the highest density clusters are chosen and the medoid samples closest to the centers of the selected clusters are chosen as the most informative ones. The diversity of samples is accomplished by selecting only one sample from each selected cluster. Experiments applied to the estimation of single-tree parameters, i.e., tree stem volume and tree stem diameter, show the

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of nanoparticle size effect on kinetics in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by lanthanum promoted iron catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhaei Pour, Ali; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Behroozsarand, Alireza; Khodagholi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-08-01

    The kinetic parameters of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on iron catalyst are analyzed by size-dependent thermodynamic method. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic equation is considered for evaluation of catalytic activity of lanthanum promoted iron catalyst. A series of unsupported iron catalysts with different particle sizes were prepared via microemulsion method. The experimental results showed that catalyst activity pass from a maximum value by increasing the iron particle size. Also, data presented that iron particle size has considerable effects on adsorption parameters and FTS rates. The ratio of surface tension ( σ) to nanoparticle radius ( r) is important in FTS reaction on iron catalyst. Finally, the results showed that by increasing of iron particle size from 18 to 45 nm the activation energies of catalysts and heats of adsorption of catalysts as two main parameters of FTS reaction increased from 89 to 114 kJ/mol and from 51 to 71 kJ/mol, respectively.

  19. Dependence of Ru2O3 Activity on Composition of Silicate Melts: Using Statistical Correlations to Infer Thermodynamic Behavior in the Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, R. O.; Malum, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding variations in activity with composition is an essential step in improving prediction of partition coefficients during magma evolution. Variations in activity with composition are complex and do not generally exhibit ideal behavior relative to a traditional melt-component set. Although deviations from component ideality can be modeled numerically by simply fitting to compositional variables (such as in a regular or subregular solution model), such models have not been particularly successful for describing variations in trace component activities. A better approach might be to try to identify components that do a better job of describing the behavior of the species in the melt. Electrochemical Measurement of Ru2O3 activities: Electrodes were inserted into silicate melt beads of various compositions (Table 1) suspended on Ptwire loops in a 1-atm gas mixing furnace. An electrical potential was imposed between the electrodes, the imposed potential increasing along a step ramp with a pulse imposed on each step (Fig. 1). Current flows between electrodes when electroactive species in the melt are oxidized or reduced at the electrodes. The resulting current was measured at the top and bottom of the voltage pulse, and the difference (the differential current) was plotted against potential. The peak of the resulting curve is related to the activity coefficient for the particular electroactive species (Ru2O3) in the melt [1, 2, 3]. A significant part of the nonideal contribution to activity is due not to intrinsic properties of the component in the melt, but to our ignorance about the state and mixing properties of the component in the melt.

  20. Ultrasonic determination of thermodynamic threshold parameters for irreversible cutaneous burns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo ultrasonic measurements of the depth of conductive cutaneous burns experimentally induced in anesthetized Yorkshire pigs are reported as a function of burn time for the case in which the skin surface temperature is maintained at 100 C. The data are used in the solution of the one-dimensional heat diffusion equation with time-dependent boundary conditions to obtain the threshold temperature and the energy of transformation per unit mass associated with the transition of the tissue from the state of viability to the state of necrosis. The simplicity of the mathematical model and the expediency of the ultrasonic measurements in studies of thermal injury are emphasized.

  1. Assessment of the thermodynamic properties of poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Stella K; Panayiotou, Costas

    2014-01-10

    The thermodynamic properties of poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (PTFEMA) were determined by the aid of the inverse gas chromatography technique (IGC), at infinite dilution. The interactions between the polymer and 15 solvents were examined in the temperature range of 120-150 °C via the estimation of the thermodynamic sorption parameters, the parameters of mixing at infinite dilution, the weight fraction activity coefficients and the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters. Additionally, the total and the partial solubility parameters of PTFEMA were estimated. The findings of this work indicate that the type and strength of the intermolecular interactions between the polymer and the solvents are strongly depended on the functional groups of the polymer and the solvents. The proton acceptor character of the polymer is responsible for the preferential solubility of PTFEMA in chloroform which acts as a proton donor solvent. The results also reveal that the polymer is insoluble in alkanes and alcohols whereas it presents good miscibility with polar solvents, especially with 2-butanone, 2-pentanone and 1,4-dioxane. Furthermore, the total and dispersive solubility parameters appear diminishing upon temperature rise, whereas the opposite behavior is noticed for the polar and hydrogen bonding solubility parameters. The latter increase with temperature, probably, due to conformational changes of the polymer on the solid support. Finally, comparison of the solubilization profiles of fluorinated methacrylic polymers studied by IGC, leads to the conclusion that PTFEMA is more soluble compared to polymers with higher fluorine content. PMID:24332349

  2. Drug targeting of HIV-1 RNA.DNA hybrid structures: thermodynamics of recognition and impact on reverse transcriptase-mediated ribonuclease H activity and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsai-Kun; Barbieri, Christopher M; Lin, Hsin-Chin; Rabson, Arnold B; Yang, Gengcheng; Fan, Yupeng; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Pilch, Daniel S

    2004-08-01

    RNA degradation via the ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) is a critical component of the reverse transcription process. In this connection, mutations of RT that inactivate RNase H activity result in noninfectious virus particles. Thus, interfering with the RNase H activity of RT represents a potential vehicle for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Here, we demonstrate an approach for inhibiting the RNase H activity of HIV-1 RT by targeting its RNA.DNA hybrid substrates. Specifically, we show that the binding of the 4,5-disubstituted 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides, neomycin, paromomycin, and ribostamycin, to two different chimeric RNA-DNA duplexes, which mimic two distinct intermediates in the reverse transcription process, inhibits specific RT-mediated RNase H cleavage, with this inhibition being competitive in nature. UV melting and isothermal titration calorimetry studies reveal a correlation between the relative binding affinities of the three drugs for each of the chimeric RNA-DNA host duplexes and the relative extents to which the drugs inhibit RT-mediated RNase H cleavage of the duplexes. Significantly, this correlation also extends to the relative efficacies with which the drugs inhibit HIV-1 replication. In the aggregate, our results highlight a potential strategy for AIDS chemotherapy that should not be compromised by the unusual genetic diversity of HIV-1. PMID:15274628

  3. Thermodynamical description of stationary, asymptotically flat solutions with conical singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Herdeiro, Carlos; Rebelo, Carmen; Radu, Eugen

    2010-05-15

    We examine the thermodynamical properties of a number of asymptotically flat, stationary (but not static) solutions having conical singularities, with both connected and nonconnected event horizons, using the thermodynamical description recently proposed in [C. Herdeiro, B. Kleihaus, J. Kunz, and E. Radu, Phys. Rev. D 81, 064013 (2010).]. The examples considered are the double-Kerr solution, the black ring rotating in either S{sup 2} or S{sup 1}, and the black Saturn, where the balance condition is not imposed for the latter two solutions. We show that not only the Bekenstein-Hawking area law is recovered from the thermodynamical description, but also the thermodynamical angular momentum is the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner angular momentum. We also analyze the thermodynamical stability and show that, for all these solutions, either the isothermal moment of inertia or the specific heat at constant angular momentum is negative, at any point in parameter space. Therefore, all these solutions are thermodynamically unstable in the grand canonical ensemble.

  4. Quantum Rényi relative entropies affirm universality of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Avijit; Singh, Uttam; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Rajagopal, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics in the Rényi entropic formalism exploiting the Rényi relative entropies, starting from the maximum entropy principle. In establishing the first and second laws of quantum thermodynamics, we have correctly identified accessible work and heat exchange in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases. The free energy (internal energy minus temperature times entropy) remains unaltered, when all the entities entering this relation are suitably defined. Exploiting Rényi relative entropies we have shown that this "form invariance" holds even beyond equilibrium and has profound operational significance in isothermal process. These results reduce to the Gibbs-von Neumann results when the Rényi entropic parameter α approaches 1. Moreover, it is shown that the universality of the Carnot statement of the second law is the consequence of the form invariance of the free energy, which is in turn the consequence of maximum entropy principle. Further, the Clausius inequality, which is the precursor to the Carnot statement, is also shown to hold based on the data processing inequalities for the traditional and sandwiched Rényi relative entropies. Thus, we find that the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium state and its deviation from equilibrium together determine the thermodynamic laws. This is another important manifestation of the concepts of information theory in thermodynamics when they are extended to the quantum realm. Our work is a substantial step towards formulating a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics and corresponding resource theory.

  5. Quantum Rényi relative entropies affirm universality of thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Misra, Avijit; Singh, Uttam; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Rajagopal, A K

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics in the Rényi entropic formalism exploiting the Rényi relative entropies, starting from the maximum entropy principle. In establishing the first and second laws of quantum thermodynamics, we have correctly identified accessible work and heat exchange in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases. The free energy (internal energy minus temperature times entropy) remains unaltered, when all the entities entering this relation are suitably defined. Exploiting Rényi relative entropies we have shown that this "form invariance" holds even beyond equilibrium and has profound operational significance in isothermal process. These results reduce to the Gibbs-von Neumann results when the Rényi entropic parameter α approaches 1. Moreover, it is shown that the universality of the Carnot statement of the second law is the consequence of the form invariance of the free energy, which is in turn the consequence of maximum entropy principle. Further, the Clausius inequality, which is the precursor to the Carnot statement, is also shown to hold based on the data processing inequalities for the traditional and sandwiched Rényi relative entropies. Thus, we find that the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium state and its deviation from equilibrium together determine the thermodynamic laws. This is another important manifestation of the concepts of information theory in thermodynamics when they are extended to the quantum realm. Our work is a substantial step towards formulating a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics and corresponding resource theory. PMID:26565222

  6. Computing Thermodynamic And Transport Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B.; Gordon, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    CET89 calculates compositions in chemical equilibrium and properties of mixtures of any chemical system for which thermodynamic data available. Provides following options: obtains chemical-equilibrium compositions and corresponding thermodynamic mixture properties for assigned thermodynamic states; calculates dilute-gas transport properties of complex chemical mixtures; obtains Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties for gaseous mixtures; calculates properties of incident and reflected shocks in terms of assigned velocities; and calculates theoretical performance of rocket for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion. Rocket performance based on optional models of finite or infinite area combustor.

  7. The Thermodynamic Properties of Cubanite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, E. L.; Lauretta, D. S.; Keller, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    CuFe2S3 exists in two polymorphs, a low-temperature orthorhombic form (cubanite) and a high-temperature cubic form (isocubanite). Cubanite has been identified in the CI-chondrite and Stardust collections. However, the thermodynamic properties of cubanite have neither been measured nor estimated. Our derivation of a thermodynamic model for cubanite allows constraints to be placed on the formation conditions. This data, along with the temperature constraint afforded by the crystal structure, can be used to assess the environments in which cubanite formation is (or is not) thermodynamically favored.

  8. Stochastic thermodynamics of information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso Barato, Andre

    2015-03-01

    We consider two recent advancements on theoretical aspects of thermodynamics of information processing. First we show that the theory of stochastic thermodynamics can be generalized to include information reservoirs. These reservoirs can be seen as a sequence of bits which has its Shannon entropy changed due to the interaction with the system. Second we discuss bipartite systems, which provide a convenient description of Maxwell's demon. Analyzing a special class of bipartite systems we show that they can be used to study cellular information processing, allowing for the definition of an entropic rate that quantifies how much a cell learns about a fluctuating external environment and that is bounded by the thermodynamic entropy production.

  9. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 2: Kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2009-10-30

    The application of several monosolute equilibrium models has previously shown that Bromacil adsorption on SA-UF (Norit) powdered activated carbon (PAC) is probably effective on two types of sites. High reactivity sites were found to be 10-20 less present in a carbon surface than lower reactivity sites, according to the q(m) values calculated by isotherm models. The aims of this work were trying, primarily, to identify the kinetic-determinant stage of the sorption of Bromacil at a wide range of initial pesticide concentrations (approximately 5 to approximately 500 microg L(-1) at pH 7.8), and secondly, to specify the rate constants and other useful design parameters for the application in water treatment. It was therefore not possible to specify a priori whether the diffusion or surface reaction is the key step. It shows that many of the tested models which describe the stage of distribution or the surface reaction are correctly applied. However, the diffusivity values (D and D(0)) were found to be constant only constants for some specific experimental concentrations. The HSDM model of surface diffusion in pores was also applied but the values of the diffusion coefficient of surface (D(s)) were widely scattered and reduce significantly with the initial concentration or the equilibrium concentration in Bromacil. The model of surface reaction of pseudo-second order fitted particularly well and led to constant values which are independent of the equilibrium concentration, except for the low concentrations where the constants become significantly more important. This last observation confirms perfectly the hypothesis based on two types of sites as concluded by the equilibrium data (part 1). PMID:19560269

  10. Theoretical investigation of the role of clay edges in prebiotic peptide bond formation. II - Structures and thermodynamics of the activated complex species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jack R.; Loew, Gilda H.; Luke, Brian T.; White, David H.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular orbital calculations are used to study amino acid activation by anhydride formation in neutral phosphates and in tetrahedral silicate and aluminate sites on clay edges. The results agree with previous ab initio studies of Luke et al. (1984) on the reactant species. Relative heats of formation of the anhydrides indicate the extent of anhydride formation to be the greatest for Al and the least for phosphate, which is the same order as the stability of hydrolysis.

  11. A New Application for Radioimmunoassay: Measurement of Thermodynamic Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angstadt, Carol N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which an equilibrium radioimmunoassay (RIA) is used to estimate thermodynamic parameters such as equilibrium constants. The experiment is simple and inexpensive, and it introduces a technique that is important in the clinical chemistry and research laboratory. Background information, procedures, and results are…

  12. Thermodynamical Limit of the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Pedro; Vidal, Julien; Mosseri, Remy

    2007-08-03

    A method based on the analysis of the Majorana polynomial roots is introduced to compute the spectrum of the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model in the thermodynamical limit. A rich structure made of four qualitatively different regions is revealed in the parameter space, whereas the ground state study distinguishes between only two phases.

  13. Thermodynamics of Damaged DNA Binding and Catalysis by Human AP Endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikova, A D; Kuznetsova, A A; Kuznetsov, N A; Fedorova, O S

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases play an important role in DNA repair and initiation of AP site elimination. One of the most topical problems in the field of DNA repair is to understand the mechanism of the enzymatic process involving the human enzyme APE1 that provides recognition of AP sites and efficient cleavage of the 5'-phosphodiester bond. In this study, a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction between APE1 and a DNA substrate containing a stable AP site analog lacking the C1' hydroxyl group (F site) was performed. Based on stopped-flow kinetic data at different temperatures, the steps of DNA binding, catalysis, and DNA product release were characterized. The changes in the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of sequential specific steps of the repair process were determined. The thermodynamic analysis of the data suggests that the initial step of the DNA substrate binding includes formation of non-specific contacts between the enzyme binding surface and DNA, as well as insertion of the amino acid residues Arg177 and Met270 into the duplex, which results in the removal of "crystalline" water molecules from DNA grooves. The second binding step involves the F site flipping-out process and formation of specific contacts between the enzyme active site and the everted 5'-phosphate-2'-deoxyribose residue. It was shown that non-specific interactions between the binding surfaces of the enzyme and DNA provide the main contribution into the thermodynamic parameters of the DNA product release step. PMID:27099790

  14. HPLC retention thermodynamics of grape and wine tannins.

    PubMed

    Barak, Jennifer A; Kennedy, James A

    2013-05-01

    The effect of grape and wine tannin structure on retention thermodynamics under reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography conditions on a polystyrene divinylbenzene column was investigated. On the basis of retention response to temperature, an alternative retention factor was developed to approximate the combined temperature response of the complex, unresolvable tannin mixture. This alternative retention factor was based upon relative tannin peak areas separated by an abrupt change in solvent gradient. Using this alternative retention factor, retention thermodynamics were calculated. Van't Hoff relationships of the natural log of the alternative retention factor against temperature followed Kirchoff's relationship. An inverse quadratic equation was fit to the data, and from this the thermodynamic parameters for tannin retention were calculated. All tannin fractions exhibited exothermic, spontaneous interaction, with enthalpy-entropy compensation observed. Normalizing for tannin size, distinct tannin compositional effects on thermodynamic parameters were observed. The results of this study indicate that HPLC can be valuable for measuring the thermodynamics of tannin interaction with a hydrophobic surface and provides a potentially valuable alternative to calorimetry. Furthermore, the information gathered may provide insight into understanding red wine astringency quality. PMID:23565723

  15. Thermodynamic modeling of natural zeolite stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    Zeolites occur in a variety of geologic environments and are used in numerous agricultural, commercial, and environmental applications. It is desirable to understand their stability both to predict future stability and to evaluate the geochemical conditions resulting in their formation. The use of estimated thermodynamic data for measured zeolite compositions allows thermodynamic modeling of stability relationships among zeolites in different geologic environments (diagenetic, saline and alkaline lakes, acid rock hydrothermal, basic rock, deep sea sediments). This modeling shows that the relative cation abundances in both the aqueous and solid phases, the aqueous silica activity, and temperature are important factors in determining the stable zeolite species. Siliceous zeolites (e.g., clinoptilolite, mordenite, erionite) present in saline and alkaline lakes or diagenetic deposits formed at elevated silica activities. Aluminous zeolites (e.g., natrolite, mesolite/scolecite, thomsonite) formed in basic rocks in association with reduced silica activities. Likewise, phillipsite formation is favored by reduced aqueous silica activities. The presence of erionite, chabazite, and phillipsite are indicative of environments with elevated potassium concentrations. Elevated temperature, calcic water conditions, and reduced silica activity help to enhance the laumontite and wairakite stability fields. Analcime stability increases with increased temperature and aqueous Na concentration, and/or with decreased silica activity.

  16. Measuring the Thermodynamics of the Alloy/Scale Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed for the direct measurement of the thermodynamic properties of the alloy and oxide compound at the alloy/scale interface observed during steady-state oxidation. The thermodynamic properties of the alloy/scale interface define the driving force for solid-state transport in the alloy and oxide compound. Accurate knowledge of thermodynamic properties of the interface will advance our understanding of oxidation behavior. The method is based on the concept of local equilibrium and assumes that an alloy+scale equilibrium very closely approximates the alloy/scale interface observed during steady-state oxidation. The thermodynamics activities of this alloy+scale equilibrium are measured directly by Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometer (KEMS) using the vapor pressure technique. The theory and some practical considerations of this method are discussed in terms of beta-NiAl oxidation.

  17. Improved Engine Design Concepts Using the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-30

    This project was aimed at developing and using numerical tools which incorporate the second law of thermodynamics to better understand engine operation and particularly the combustion process. A major activity of this project was the continual enhancement and use of an existing engine cycle simulation to investigate a wide range of engine parameters and concepts. The major motivation of these investigations was to improve engine efficiency. These improvements were examined from both the first law and second law perspective. One of the most important aspects of this work was the identification of the combustion irreversibilities as functions of engine design and operating parameters. The combustion irreversibility may be quantified in a number of ways but one especially useful way is by determining the destruction of exergy (availability) during the combustion process. This destruction is the penalty due to converting the fuel exergy to thermal energy for producing work. The engine cycle simulation was used to examine the performance of an automotive (5.7 liter), V-8 spark-ignition engine. A base case was defined for operation at 1400 rpm, stoichiometric, MBT spark timing with a bmep of 325 kPa. For this condition, the destruction of exergy during the combustion process was 21.0%. Variations of many engine parameters (including speed, load, and spark timing) did not alter the level of destruction very much (with these variations, the exergy destruction was within the range of 20.5-21.5%). Also, the use of turbocharging or the use of an over-expanded engine design did not significantly change the exergy destruction. The exergy destruction during combustion was most affected by increased inlet oxygen concentration (which reduced the destruction due to the higher combustion temperatures) and by the use of cooled EGR (which increased the destruction). This work has demonstrated that, in general, the exergy destruction for conventional engines is fairly constant ({approx

  18. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  19. Thermodynamics of the hot BIon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grignani, Gianluca; Harmark, Troels; Marini, Andrea; Obers, Niels A.; Orselli, Marta

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of the recently obtained finite temperature BIon solution of [G. Grignani, T. Harmark, A. Marini, N.A. Obers, M. Orselli, Heating up the BIon, arXiv:1012.1494 [hep-th

  20. Thermodynamic efficiency of solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Narkis; Bortz, John; Winston, Roland

    2010-04-26

    The optical thermodynamic efficiency is a comprehensive metric that takes into account all loss mechanisms associated with transferring flux from the source to the target phase space, which may include losses due to inadequate design, non-ideal materials, fabrication errors, and less than maximal concentration. We discuss consequences of Fermat's principle of geometrical optics and review étendue dilution and optical loss mechanisms associated with nonimaging concentrators. We develop an expression for the optical thermodynamic efficiency which combines the first and second laws of thermodynamics. As such, this metric is a gold standard for evaluating the performance of nonimaging concentrators. We provide examples illustrating the use of this new metric for concentrating photovoltaic systems for solar power applications, and in particular show how skewness mismatch limits the attainable optical thermodynamic efficiency. PMID:20607882