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Sample records for activation time constants

  1. Time place learning and activity profile under constant light and constant dark in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Moura, Clarissa de Almeida; Lima, Jéssica Polyana da Silva; Silveira, Vanessa Augusta Magalhães; Miguel, Mário André Leocadio; Luchiari, Ana Carolina

    2017-05-01

    The ability to learn about the signs of variability in space and time is known as time place learning (TPL). To adjust their circadian rhythms, animals use stimuli that change regularly, such as the light-dark cycle, temperature, food availability or even social stimuli. Because light-dark cycle is the most important environmental temporal cue, we asked how a diurnal animal would perform TPL if this cue was removed. Zebrafish has been extensively studied in the chronobiology area due to it diurnal chronotype, thus, we studied the effects of constant light and constant dark on the time-place learning and activity profile in zebrafish. Our data show that while under constant light and dark condition zebrafish was not able of TPL, after 30days under the constant conditions, constant light led to higher activity level and less significant (robust) 24h rhythm.

  2. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion.

    PubMed

    Correia Grácio, B J; de Winkel, K N; Groen, E L; Wentink, M; Bos, J E

    2013-02-01

    Without visual feedback, humans perceive tilt when experiencing a sustained linear acceleration. This tilt illusion is commonly referred to as the somatogravic illusion. Although the physiological basis of the illusion seems to be well understood, the dynamic behavior is still subject to discussion. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the illusion was measured experimentally for three motion profiles with different frequency content. Subjects were exposed to pure centripetal accelerations in the lateral direction and were asked to indicate their tilt percept by means of a joystick. Variable-radius centrifugation during constant angular rotation was used to generate these motion profiles. Two self-motion perception models were fitted to the experimental data and were used to obtain the time constant of the somatogravic illusion. Results showed that the time constant of the somatogravic illusion was on the order of two seconds, in contrast to the higher time constant found in fixed-radius centrifugation studies. Furthermore, the time constant was significantly affected by the frequency content of the motion profiles. Motion profiles with higher frequency content revealed shorter time constants which cannot be explained by self-motion perception models that assume a fixed time constant. Therefore, these models need to be improved with a mechanism that deals with this variable time constant. Apart from the fundamental importance, these results also have practical consequences for the simulation of sustained accelerations in motion simulators.

  3. The Effects of Constant Time Delay Embedded into Teaching Activities for Teaching the Names of Clothes for Preschool Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odluyurt, Serhat

    2011-01-01

    The general purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of constant time delay embedded in activities for teaching clothes name for preschool children with developmental disabilities. This study included four participants having Down syndrome with an age range of 43-46 months. All experimental sessions were conducted in one to one…

  4. Effect of coil orientation on strength–duration time constant and I-wave activation with controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    D’Ostilio, Kevin; Goetz, Stefan M.; Hannah, Ricci; Ciocca, Matteo; Chieffo, Raffaella; Chen, Jui-Cheng A.; Peterchev, Angel V.; Rothwell, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the strength–duration (S–D) time constants of motor cortex structures activated by current pulses oriented posterior–anterior (PA) or anterior–posterior (AP) across the central sulcus. Methods Motor threshold and input–output curve, along with motor evoked potential (MEP) latencies, of first dorsal interosseus were determined at pulse widths of 30, 60, and 120 μs using a controllable pulse parameter (cTMS) device, with the coil oriented PA or AP. These were used to estimate the S–D time constant and we compared with data for responses evoked by cTMS of the ulnar nerve at the elbow. Results The S–D time constant with PA was shorter than for AP stimulation (230.9 ± 97.2 vs. 294.2 ± 90.9 μs; p < 0.001). These values were similar to those calculated after stimulation of ulnar nerve (197 ± 47 μs). MEP latencies to AP, but not PA stimulation were affected by pulse width, showing longer latencies following short duration stimuli. Conclusion PA and AP stimuli appear to activate the axons of neurons with different time constants. Short duration AP pulses are more selective than longer pulses in recruiting longer latency corticospinal output. Significance More selective stimulation of neural elements may be achieved by manipulating pulse width and orientation. PMID:26077634

  5. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 12: Time Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on time constants is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each energy…

  6. Time constants of flat superconducting cables

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, S.; Yamamoto, J.

    1997-06-01

    The frequency dependence of coupling losses is calculated for flat superconducting cables, including the electromagnetic coupling between different current loops on the cable. It is shown that there are two characteristic time constants for both parallel and transverse coupling losses. The values of these time constants {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1} are calculated by introducing effective inductances for the current loops. In both cases, {tau}{sub 1} is considerably smaller than {tau}{sub 0}. As the most important methods of determining {tau}{sub 0} from AC losses - namely, the limiting slope of loss/cycle at zero frequency and the position of the maximum loss/cycle vs. frequency - estimate {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1}, respectively, the results are important for practical measurements and evaluation of time constants from AC losses. At larger frequencies, the losses are more likely to those in normal conductors (skin effect). The calculation schemes can be applied to cables with closely wound strands (like the cable-in-conduit conductors), too. However, several other effects should be considered being different and/or more important with respect to other cable types (demagnetization factor of strands and cables, larger regions near the cable edges, smaller number of strands and subcables, etc.).

  7. Time constants in thermal laser medicine: II. Distributions of time constants and thermal relaxation of tissue.

    PubMed

    van Gemert, M J; Lucassen, G W; Welch, A J

    1996-08-01

    The thermal response of a semi-infinite medium in air, irradiated by laser light in a cylindrical geometry, cannot accurately be approximately by single radial and axial time constants for heat conduction. This report presents an analytical analysis of hear conduction where the thermal response is expressed in terms of distributions over radial and axial time constants. The source term for heat production is written as the product of a Gaussian shaped radial term and an exponentially shaped axial term. The two terms are expanded in integrals over eigenfunctions of the radial and axial parts of the Laplace heat conduction operator. The result is a double integral over the coupled distributions of the two time constants to compute the temperature rise as a function of time and of axial and radial positions. The distribution of axial time constants is a homogeneous slowly decreasing function of spatial frequency (v) indicating that one single axial time constant cannot reasonably characterize axial heat conduction. The distribution of radial time constants is a function centred around a distinguished maximum in the spatial frequency (lambda) close to the single radial time constant value used previously. This suggests that one radial time constant to characterize radial heat conduction may be a useful concept. Special cases have been evaluated analytically, such as short and long irradiation times, axial or radial heat conduction (shallow or deep penetrating laser beams) and, especially, thermal relaxation (cooling) of the tissue. For shallow penetrating laser beams the asymptotic cooling rate is confirmed to be proportional to [(t)0.5-(t-tL)0.5] which approaches 1/t0.5 for t > tL, where t is the time and tL is the laser pulse duration. For deep penetrating beams this is proportional to 1/(t-tL). For intermediate penetration, i.e. penetration depths about equal to spot size diameters, this is proportional to 1/(t-tL)1.5. The double integral has been evaluated

  8. Measuring the RC time constant with Arduino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, N. S. A.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we use the Arduino UNO R3 open source hardware platform to assemble an experimental apparatus for the measurement of the time constant of an RC circuit. With adequate programming, the Arduino is used as a signal generator, a data acquisition system and a basic signal visualisation tool. Theoretical calculations are compared with direct observations from an analogue oscilloscope. Data processing and curve fitting is performed on a spreadsheet. The results obtained for the six RC test circuits are within the expected interval of values defined by the tolerance of the components. The hardware and software prove to be adequate to the proposed measurements and therefore adaptable to a laboratorial teaching and learning context.

  9. Using Constant Time Delay to Teach Braille Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Jonathan; Ivy, Sarah; Hatton, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Constant time delay has been identified as an evidence-based practice to teach print sight words and picture recognition (Browder, Ahlbrim-Delzell, Spooner, Mims, & Baker, 2009). For the study presented here, we tested the effectiveness of constant time delay to teach new braille words. Methods: A single-subject multiple baseline…

  10. Stability of neutral equations with constant time delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Whitesides, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for determining the stability of a scalar neutral equation with constant coefficients and constant time delays. A neutral equation is basically a differential equation in which the highest derivative appears both with and without a time delay. Time delays may appear also in the lower derivatives or the independent variable itself. The method is easily implemented, and an illustrative example is presented.

  11. Time optimal paths for a constant speed unicycle

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper uses the Pontryagin maximum principle to find time optimal paths for a constant speed unicycle. The time optimal paths consist of sequences of arcs of circles and straight lines. The maximum principle introduced concepts (dual variables, bang-bang solutions, singular solutions, and transversality conditions) that provide important insight into the nature of the time optimal paths. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Scattering in an external electric field asymptotically constant in time

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Tadayoshi; Ishida, Atsuhide

    2011-06-15

    We show the asymptotic completeness for two-body quantum systems in an external electric field asymptotically non-zero constant in time. One of the main ingredients of this paper is to give some propagation estimates for physical propagators generated by time-dependent Hamiltonians which govern the systems under consideration.

  13. Early universe constraints on time variation of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Susana J.; Mosquera, Mercedes E.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Vucetich, Hector

    2008-10-15

    We study the time variation of fundamental constants in the early Universe. Using data from primordial light nuclei abundances, cosmic microwave background, and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, we put constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant {alpha} and the Higgs vacuum expectation value without assuming any theoretical framework. A variation in leads to a variation in the electron mass, among other effects. Along the same line, we study the variation of {alpha} and the electron mass m{sub e}. In a purely phenomenological fashion, we derive a relationship between both variations.

  14. Enhancement of energy spectra through constant fraction timing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, Elif Ebru; Celiktas, Cuneyt

    2017-02-01

    The energy spectra of 137Cs, 60Co and 14C were achieved by using the spectrometers composed of different types of detectors. In this work, constant fraction timing method was used to enhance their energy spectra. Energy resolution values of 137Cs and 60Co gamma energy spectra were improved through this timing method. In addition, electronic noise appeared in the energy spectrum of 14C was discriminated through the timing method, leading to clear beta energy spectrum.

  15. The cosmological constant problem and re-interpretation of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, M. J.

    2014-07-01

    We abandon the interpretation that time is a global parameter in quantum mechanics, replace it by a quantum dynamical variable playing the role of time. This operational re-interpretation of time provides a solution to the cosmological constant problem. The expectation value of the zero-point energy under the new time variable vanishes. The fluctuation of the vacuum energy as the leading contribution to the gravitational effect gives a correct order to the observed "dark energy". The "dark energy" as a mirage is always seen comparable with the matter energy density by an observer using the internal clock time. Conceptual consequences of the re-interpretation of time are also discussed.

  16. Time constant determination for electrical equivalent of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Ashutosh Kumar; Dutta-Gupta, Shourya; Kumar, Ravi; Tewari, Abhishek; Basu, Bikramjit

    2009-04-01

    The electric field interactions with biological cells are of significant interest in various biophysical and biomedical applications. In order to study such important aspect, it is necessary to evaluate the time constant in order to estimate the response time of living cells in the electric field (E-field). In the present study, the time constant is evaluated by considering the hypothesis of electrical analog of spherical shaped cells and assuming realistic values for capacitance and resistivity properties of cell/nuclear membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. In addition, the resistance of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm was computed based on simple geometrical considerations. Importantly, the analysis on the basis of first principles shows that the average values of time constant would be around 2-3 μs, assuming the theoretical capacitance values and the analytically computed resistance values. The implication of our analytical solution has been discussed in reference to the cellular adaptation processes such as atrophy/hypertrophy as well as the variation in electrical transport properties of cellular membrane/cytoplasm/nuclear membrane/nucleoplasm.

  17. Fluorescence decay-time constants in organic liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Ulrich, A.; Winter, J.; Wurm, M.

    2009-04-15

    The fluorescence decay-time constants have been measured for several scintillator mixtures based on phenyl-o-xylylethane (PXE) and linear alkylbenzene (LAB) solvents. The resulting values are of relevance for the physics performance of the proposed large-volume liquid scintillator detector Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA). In particular, the impact of the measured values to the search for proton decay via p{yields}K{sup +}{nu} is evaluated in this work.

  18. Minimizing the area required for time constants in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    When a medium- or large-scale integrated circuit is designed, efforts are usually made to avoid the use of resistor-capacitor time constant generators. The capacitor needed for this circuit usually takes up more surface area on the chip than several resistors and transistors. When the use of this network is unavoidable, the designer usually makes an effort to see that the choice of resistor and capacitor combinations is such that a minimum amount of surface area is consumed. The optimum ratio of resistance to capacitance that will result in this minimum area is equal to the ratio of resistance to capacitance which may be obtained from a unit of surface area for the particular process being used. The minimum area required is a function of the square root of the reciprocal of the products of the resistance and capacitance per unit area. This minimum occurs when the area required by the resistor is equal to the area required by the capacitor.

  19. Influence of a constant magnetic field on thrombocytes. [delay of blood coagulation time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerova, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    In an experiment on white mice it was found that a constant electromagnetic field with strength of 250-275 oersteds is biologically active at an exposure of 55 minutes. Qualitative and morphological changes in thrombocytes 1-3 days following exposure reduced their numbers, prolonged blood coagulation time and increased the number of leucocytes.

  20. Time constant of round superconducting structures determined from the time development of the induced magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.

    2016-12-01

    It is shown that evaluating the time development of the penetrated magnetic field into the superconductors can be used for the determination of time constant for round structures, too. The calculations are very similar to those used for the flat structures. The method is very simple, both by the practical realization of the experiment and by the evaluation of the time evolution of the penetrated magnetic field above the superconductor. The procedure uses an exponential decrease of the applied magnetic field, which can be easily performed by discharging an external circuit. By determining the position of the maximum of the difference between the penetrated field induction and the applied magnetic field induction, the corresponding time constant can be evaluated by a very simple equation, which is calculated in the paper. The results are very similar to the previous calculations, obtained for the flat superconducting cables. In addition, it is suggested that knowing the time constant of superconducting structures could be in many cases more important both for research aspects and for practical applications.

  1. Shaping traffic flow with a ratio of time constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bîrlea, Nicolae Marius

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present how the main parameters of an optimal velocity model, the velocity adaptation time, τ, and the desired time gap between consecutive vehicles (time headway), T, control the structure of vehicular traffic flow. We show that the ratio between the desired time gap and the velocity adaptation time, T /τ, establishes the pattern formation in congested traffic flow. This ratio controls both the collective behavior and the individual response of vehicles in traffic. We also introduced a response (transfer) function, which shows how perturbation is transmitted between adjacent vehicles and permits the study of collective stability of traffic flow.

  2. Dark Energy Models with a Time-Dependent Gravitational Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Saibal; Mukhopadhyay, Utpal; Choudhury, S. B. Dutta

    Two phenomenological models of Λ, viz. Λ ˜ (˙ a/a)2 and Λ ˜ ḋ a/a, are studied under the assumption that G is a time-variable parameter. Both models show that G is inversely proportional to time, as suggested earlier by others, including Dirac. The models considered here can be matched with observational results by properly tuning the parameters of the models. Our analysis shows that the Λ ˜ ḋ a/a model corresponds to a repulsive situation and hence correlates with the present status of the accelerating Universe. The other model, Λ ˜ (˙ a/a)2, is in general attractive in nature. Moreover, it is seen that due to the combined effect of time-variable Λ and G the Universe evolved with acceleration as well as deceleration. Deceleration indicates a "big crunch".

  3. IS THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY SPECTRUM CONSTANT IN TIME?

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David; Kumar, Rahul; Pohl, Martin E-mail: rahuliitk@gmail.com

    2013-06-01

    The hypothesis is considered that the present, local Galactic cosmic-ray spectrum is, due to source intermittency, softer than average over time and over the Galaxy. Measurements of muogenic nuclides underground could provide an independent measurement of the time-averaged spectrum. Source intermittency could also account for the surprising low anisotropy reported by the IceCube Collaboration. Predictions for Galactic emission of ultrahigh-energy (UHE) quanta, such as UHE gamma rays and neutrinos, might be higher or lower than previously estimated.

  4. Constant pressure and temperature discrete-time Langevin molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Farago, Oded

    2014-11-21

    We present a new and improved method for simultaneous control of temperature and pressure in molecular dynamics simulations with periodic boundary conditions. The thermostat-barostat equations are built on our previously developed stochastic thermostat, which has been shown to provide correct statistical configurational sampling for any time step that yields stable trajectories. Here, we extend the method and develop a set of discrete-time equations of motion for both particle dynamics and system volume in order to seek pressure control that is insensitive to the choice of the numerical time step. The resulting method is simple, practical, and efficient. The method is demonstrated through direct numerical simulations of two characteristic model systems—a one-dimensional particle chain for which exact statistical results can be obtained and used as benchmarks, and a three-dimensional system of Lennard-Jones interacting particles simulated in both solid and liquid phases. The results, which are compared against the method of Kolb and Dünweg [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 4453 (1999)], show that the new method behaves according to the objective, namely that acquired statistical averages and fluctuations of configurational measures are accurate and robust against the chosen time step applied to the simulation.

  5. Time and Space Resolved Heat Transfer Measurements Under Nucleate Bubbles with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2003-01-01

    Investigations into single bubble pool boiling phenomena are often complicated by the difficulties in obtaining time and space resolved information in the bubble region. This usually occurs because the heaters and diagnostics used to measure heat transfer data are often on the order of, or larger than, the bubble characteristic length or region of influence. This has contributed to the development of many different and sometimes contradictory models of pool boiling phenomena and dominant heat transfer mechanisms. Recent investigations by Yaddanapyddi and Kim and Demiray and Kim have obtained time and space resolved heat transfer information at the bubble/heater interface under constant temperature conditions using a novel micro-heater array (10x10 array, each heater 100 microns on a side) that is semi-transparent and doubles as a measurement sensor. By using active feedback to maintain a state of constant temperature at the heater surface, they showed that the area of influence of bubbles generated in FC-72 was much smaller than predicted by standard models and that micro-conduction/micro-convection due to re-wetting dominated heat transfer effects. This study seeks to expand on the previous work by making time and space resolved measurements under bubbles nucleating on a micro-heater array operated under constant heat flux conditions. In the planned investigation, wall temperature measurements made under a single bubble nucleation site will be synchronized with high-speed video to allow analysis of the bubble energy removal from the wall.

  6. Design verification of large time constant thermal shields for optical reference cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Wu, W.; Shi, X. H.; Zeng, X. Y.; Deng, K.; Lu, Z. H.

    2016-02-01

    In order to achieve high frequency stability in ultra-stable lasers, the Fabry-Pérot reference cavities shall be put inside vacuum chambers with large thermal time constants to reduce the sensitivity to external temperature fluctuations. Currently, the determination of thermal time constants of vacuum chambers is based either on theoretical calculation or time-consuming experiments. The first method can only apply to simple system, while the second method will take a lot of time to try out different designs. To overcome these limitations, we present thermal time constant simulation using finite element analysis (FEA) based on complete vacuum chamber models and verify the results with measured time constants. We measure the thermal time constants using ultrastable laser systems and a frequency comb. The thermal expansion coefficients of optical reference cavities are precisely measured to reduce the measurement error of time constants. The simulation results and the experimental results agree very well. With this knowledge, we simulate several simplified design models using FEA to obtain larger vacuum thermal time constants at room temperature, taking into account vacuum pressure, shielding layers, and support structure. We adopt the Taguchi method for shielding layer optimization and demonstrate that layer material and layer number dominate the contributions to the thermal time constant, compared with layer thickness and layer spacing.

  7. Design verification of large time constant thermal shields for optical reference cavities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wu, W; Shi, X H; Zeng, X Y; Deng, K; Lu, Z H

    2016-02-01

    In order to achieve high frequency stability in ultra-stable lasers, the Fabry-Pérot reference cavities shall be put inside vacuum chambers with large thermal time constants to reduce the sensitivity to external temperature fluctuations. Currently, the determination of thermal time constants of vacuum chambers is based either on theoretical calculation or time-consuming experiments. The first method can only apply to simple system, while the second method will take a lot of time to try out different designs. To overcome these limitations, we present thermal time constant simulation using finite element analysis (FEA) based on complete vacuum chamber models and verify the results with measured time constants. We measure the thermal time constants using ultrastable laser systems and a frequency comb. The thermal expansion coefficients of optical reference cavities are precisely measured to reduce the measurement error of time constants. The simulation results and the experimental results agree very well. With this knowledge, we simulate several simplified design models using FEA to obtain larger vacuum thermal time constants at room temperature, taking into account vacuum pressure, shielding layers, and support structure. We adopt the Taguchi method for shielding layer optimization and demonstrate that layer material and layer number dominate the contributions to the thermal time constant, compared with layer thickness and layer spacing.

  8. EBR-II time constant calculation using the EROS kinetics code

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-01-01

    System time constants are important parameters in determining the dynamic behavior of reactors. One method of determining basic time constants is to apply a step change in power level and determine the resulting temperature change. This methodology can be done using any computer code that calculates temperature versus time given either a power input or a reactivity input. In the current analysis this is done using the reactor kinetics code EROS. As an example of this methodology, the time constant is calculated for an Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel pin.

  9. Dynamics of Perceived Exertion in Constant-Power Cycling: Time- and Workload-Dependent Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balagué, Natàlia; Hristovski, Robert; García, Sergi; Aguirre, Cecilia; Vázquez, Pablo; Razon, Selen; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the dynamics of perceived exertion shifts (PES) as a function of time and workload during constant-power cycling. Method: Fifty-two participants assigned to 4 groups performed a cycling task at 4 different constant workloads corresponding to their individual rates of perceived exertion (RPEs = 13, 15,…

  10. The Pyramid House: A ten-day thermal time constant passive solar home

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, T.

    1999-07-01

    The Pyramid House is a passive solar home being designed and built to operate without back-up heating. Having told people this, the fear that someday the author might have to swallow his pride and seek the warmth of a neighbor's cozy wood-heated cabin has encouraged him to analyze the Pyramid House's projected winter performance. This performance is easy to visualize when described in terms of the home's thermal time constant, {tau}--an easily calculated measure of the time it takes the house to reach equilibrium with the ambient temperature. The Pyramid House obtains its long time constant using conventional insulation, and a very high degree of thermal mass via a radiant heat flooring system and water storage. After presenting the time constant concept, it is employed to analyze building materials and then the Pyramid House. The analyses show the ineffectuality of adding solar gain to homes with low time constants, such as typical US homes.

  11. Regional T1 relaxation time constants in Ex vivo human brain: Longitudinal effects of formalin exposure

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Mekala R.; Shu, Yunhong; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Relaxation time constants are useful as markers of tissue properties. Imaging ex vivo tissue is done for research purposes; however, T1 relaxation time constants are altered by tissue fixation in a time‐dependent manner. This study investigates regional changes in T1 relaxation time constants in ex vivo brain tissue over 6 months of fixation. Methods Five ex vivo human brain hemispheres in 10% formalin were scanned over 6 months. Mean T1 relaxation time constants were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) representing gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) regions and analyzed as a function of fixation time. Results Cortical GM ROIs had longer T1 relaxation time constants than WM ROIs; the thalamus had T1 relaxation time constants similar to those of WM ROIs. T1 relaxation time constants showed rapid shortening within the first 6 weeks after fixation followed by a slower rate of decline. Conclusion Both GM and WM T1 relaxation time constants of fixed brain tissue show rapid decline within the first 6 weeks after autopsy and slow by 6 months. This information is useful for optimizing MR imaging acquisition parameters according to fixation time for ex vivo brain imaging studies. Magn Reson Med 77:774–778, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26888162

  12. Effect of coefficient changes on stability of linear retarded systems with constant time delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.

    1977-01-01

    A method is developed to determine the effect of coefficient changes on the stability of a retarded system with constant time delays. The method, which uses the tau-decomposition method of stability analysis, is demonstrated by an example.

  13. Activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Ignjatovic, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) is a commonly used coagulation assay that is easy to perform, is affordable, and is therefore performed in most coagulation laboratories, both clinical and research, worldwide. The APTT is based on the principle that in citrated plasma, the addition of a platelet substitute, factor XII activator, and CaCl2 allows for formation of a stable clot. The time required for the formation of a stable clot is recorded in seconds and represents the actual APTT result.

  14. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor) subassembly types

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-09-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel.

  15. Estimating the rate constant of cyclic GMP hydrolysis by activated phosphodiesterase in photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingruber, Jürgen; Holcman, David

    2008-10-01

    The early steps of light response occur in the outer segment of rod and cone photoreceptor. They involve the hydrolysis of cGMP, a soluble cyclic nucleotide, that gates ionic channels located in the outer segment membrane. We shall study here the rate by which cGMP is hydrolyzed by activated phosphodiesterase (PDE). This process has been characterized experimentally by two different rate constants βd and βsub: βd accounts for the effect of all spontaneously active PDE in the outer segment, and βsub characterizes cGMP hydrolysis induced by a single light-activated PDE. So far, no attempt has been made to derive the experimental values of βd and βsub from a theoretical model, which is the goal of this work. Using a model of diffusion in the confined rod geometry, we derive analytical expressions for βd and βsub by calculating the flux of cGMP molecules to an activated PDE site. We obtain the dependency of these rate constants as a function of the outer segment geometry, the PDE activation and deactivation rates and the aqueous cGMP diffusion constant. Our formulas show good agreement with experimental measurements. Finally, we use our derivation to model the time course of the cGMP concentration in a transversally well-stirred outer segment.

  16. Computation of Rate Constants for Diffusion of Small Ligands to and from Buried Protein Active Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-H; De Sancho, D; Best, R B; Blumberger, J

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of ligands to actives sites of proteins is essential to enzyme catalysis and many cellular signaling processes. In this contribution we review our recently developed methodology for calculation of rate constants for diffusion and binding of small molecules to buried protein active sites. The diffusive dynamics of the ligand obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is coarse grained and described by a Markov state model. Diffusion and binding rate constants are then obtained either from the reactive flux formalism or by fitting the time-dependent population of the Markov state model to a phenomenological rate law. The method is illustrated by applications to diffusion of substrate and inhibitors in [NiFe] hydrogenase, CO-dehydrogenase, and myoglobin. We also discuss a recently developed sensitivity analysis that allows one to identify hot spots in proteins, where mutations are expected to have the strongest effects on ligand diffusion rates.

  17. On the use of measured time delays in gravitational lenses to determine the Hubble constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, C.; Anderson, N.

    1985-01-01

    Gravitational lenses are rare in the known samples of quasars, indicating that the conditions involved in their formation are unusual. In particular, the distribution of matter along the light rays from the observer through the deflector to the quasar may be very different from mean conditions. It is shown that reasonable deviations in the density of matter along the beams can significantly alter the relationship between time delays and the Hubble constant, and it is concluded that gravitational lenses are not promising estimators of this constant. However, should an independent, precise determination of the Hubble constant become available, gravitational lenses could be used to probe long-range density fluctuations.

  18. The Oppenheimer-Snyder space-time with a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Ken-Ichi

    1992-10-01

    We investigate the Oppenheimer-Snyder space-time with a positive cosmological constant A. The interior of the dust sphere is described by the closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-time while the exterior is the Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time. Due to the cosmological constant A, when the gravitational massM o of the dust sphere is very large, there is no collapsing solution with the de Sitter-like asymptotic region which expands exponentially in the expanding universe frame. This fact suggests that the very large initial inhomogeneity does not necessarily lead to the failure of the cosmic no hair conjecture.

  19. Influence of the loss of time-constants repertoire in pathologic heartbeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Vargas, L.; Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Angulo-Brown, F.

    2005-03-01

    We present a fractal analysis of diurnal heart interbeat time series from healthy young subjects and patients with congestive heart failure. We describe some differences between these groups by means of the calculation of some scale-invariant exponents. A previous simple model to reproduce the observed differences is briefly described (Phys. Rev. E 67 (2003) 052901). The model is based in first-order autoregressive processes and consists in the combination of time constants. We suggest that some changes occurring with disease could be related to the participation or absence of time constants. Finally, we also present a multifractal analysis of simulated sequences and their comparison with real data.

  20. Holographic Dark Energy Model with Interaction and Cosmological Constant in the Flat Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we consider holographic dark energy model with interaction in the flat space-time with non-zero cosmological constant. We calculate cosmic scale factor and Hubble expansion parameter by using the time-dependent dark energy density. Then, we obtain phenomenological interaction between holographic dark energy and matter. We fixed our solution by using the observational data.

  1. Application of fiber laser in time constant measurement of thin wire thermal resistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junwei; Feng, Shuanglian; Zhang, Zhigang; Qiang, Xiwen; Zong, Fei; Feng, Gang; Hu, Yuehong

    2016-01-01

    Measuring principle of time constant for thin wire thermal resistor was put forward. An 1.07μm fiber laser was used to output a rectangle laser pulse with edges of several tens microns and width of 100ms, and the thermal resistor under test was shined by the laser. As a result, the temperature of the thermal resistor rose and gradually went up to a fixed level with the irradiation. And then the thermal resistor's temperature dropped and gradually went down to the room temperature with the laser powered off. Time constant of the thermal resistor could be obtained by means of measuring the temperature variation of the thermal resistor due to the laser pulse. A device was designed and experiments were carried out, the time constants of three commonly used thin wire thermal resistors were measured.

  2. Measurements of the time constant for steady ionization in shaped-charge barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoch, Edward L.; Hallinan, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of three solar illuminated shaped-charge barium releases injected at small angles to the magnetic field were made using a calibrated color television camera. Two of the releases were from 1989. The third release, a reanalysis of an event included in Hallinan's 1988 study of three 1986 releases, was included to provide continuity between the two studies. Time constants for ionization, measured during the first 25 s of each release, were found to vary considerably. The two 1989 time constants differed substantially, and both were significantly less than any of the 1986 time constants. On the basis of this variability, we conclude that the two 1989 releases showed evidence of continuous nonsolar ionization. One release showed nonsolar ionization which could not he attributed to Alfven's critical ionization velocity process, which requires a component of velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field providing a perpendicular energy greater than the ionization potential.

  3. Competing bounds on the present-day time variation of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Dent, Thomas; Stern, Steffen; Wetterich, Christof

    2009-04-15

    We compare the sensitivity of a recent bound on time variation of the fine structure constant from optical clocks with bounds on time-varying fundamental constants from atomic clocks sensitive to the electron-to-proton mass ratio, from radioactive decay rates in meteorites, and from the Oklo natural reactor. Tests of the weak equivalence principle also lead to comparable bounds on present variations of constants. The 'winner in sensitivity' depends on what relations exist between the variations of different couplings in the standard model of particle physics, which may arise from the unification of gauge interactions. Weak equivalence principle tests are currently the most sensitive within unified scenarios. A detection of time variation in atomic clocks would favor dynamical dark energy and put strong constraints on the dynamics of a cosmological scalar field.

  4. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  5. Characterization of retinal blood vessel by laser speckle correlation time constant (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Chieh; Lai, Wan-Huseh; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Laser speckle imaging is an optical metrology technique for examining various forms of object motion in fields from material engineering to bio-medical. As highly coherent illumination encounters the rough surface or scattering medium, due to the multiple interference, the randomly distributed black and white spots formed and are known as speckles. By analyzing speckle images, surface information or scattering medium motion could be recovered. In this study, an optical system for acquiring speckle images from rabbit retina is built for characterizing the blood vessel properties with speckle correlation time constant. As laser illuminates onto the rabbit retina, speckles are formed due to the moving red blood cells inside the retinal blood vessel. The intensity of speckles fluctuate along time and are recorded with high speed CMOS at frame rate 150 frames per second. Speckle correlation time constant describe the relation between frames as the decay rate. Two approaches are used for the processing of image sequences for correlation time constant, one is utilizing asymptotic equation from speckle contrast result, and another is correlation based approach. To determine the performance of our system and algorithms, we compare two regions on the retina with different properties, one region contains faster blood flow while another with slower blood flow. Both approaches shows distinct differences in the value of correlation time constant of two regions.

  6. A Comparison of Simultaneous Prompting and Constant Time Delay Procedures in Teaching State Capitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Kenneth David; Collins, Belva C.; Schuster, John W.; Ault, Melinda Jones

    2011-01-01

    This investigation compared the effectiveness and efficiency of constant time delay (CTD) and simultaneous prompting (SP) procedures in teaching discrete social studies facts to 4 high school students with learning and behavior disorders using an adapted alternating treatments design nested within a multiple probe design. The results indicated…

  7. Constant and Progressive Time Delay Procedures for Teaching Children with Autism: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    A review of 22 empirical studies examining the use of constant (CTD) and progressive (PTD) time delay procedures employed with children with autism frames an indirect analysis of the demographic, procedural, methodological, and outcome parameters of existing research. None of the previous manuscripts compared the two response prompting procedures.…

  8. Using a Constant Time Delay Procedure to Teach Foundational Swimming Skills to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Laura; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Wolery, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a constant time delay procedure to teach foundational swimming skills to three children with autism. The skills included flutter kick, front-crawl arm strokes, and head turns to the side. A multiple-probe design across behaviors and replicated across participants was used.…

  9. Bianchi type-I transit cosmological models with time dependent gravitational and cosmological constants: reexamined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, A.; Saha, B.; Rikhvitsky, V.

    2015-05-01

    The Einstein's field equations with variable gravitational and cosmological "constants" for a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-I space-time are obtained in present study. To study the transit behaviour of Universe, we consider a law of variation of scale factor a(t) = ( tk et) ^{1/n}, which yields a time dependent deceleration parameter q = -1 + nk/(k + t)2, comprising a class of models that depicts a transition of the universe from the early decelerated phase to the recent accelerating phase. We find that the time dependent deceleration parameter is reasonable for the present day Universe and gives an appropriate description of the evolution of the universe. For n = 0.27k, we obtain q0 = -0.73, which is similar to observed value of deceleration parameter at present epoch. It is also observed that for n ≥ 2 and k = 1, we obtain a class of transit models of the universe from early decelerating to present accelerating phase. For k = 0, the universe has non-singular origin. In these models, we arrive at the decision that, from the structure of the field equations, the behaviour of cosmological and gravitational constants and are related. Taking into consideration the observational data, we conclude that the cosmological constant behaves as a positive decreasing function of time, whereas gravitational constant is increasing and tends to a constant value at late time. H(z)/(1+z) data (32 points) and model prediction as a function of redshift for different k and n are successfully presented by using recent data. Some physical and geometric properties of the models are also discussed.

  10. Delay decomposition at a single server queue with constant service time and multiple inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, C.; Schilling, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Two network consisting of single server queues, each with a constant service time, are considered. The external inputs to each network are assumed to follow some general probability distribution. Several interesting equivalencies that exist between the two networks considered are derived. This leads to the introduction of an important concept in delay decomposition. It is shown that the waiting time experienced by a customer can be decomposed into two basic components called self-delay and interference delay.

  11. A constant-momentum/energy-selector time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, C P; Håkansson, P; Barofsky, D F; Piyadasa, C K G

    2007-01-01

    A matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been built with an ion source that can be operated in either constant-energy or constant-momentum acceleration modes. A decreasing electric field distribution in the ion-accelerating region makes it possible to direct ions onto a space-focal plane in either modes of operation. Ions produced in the constant-momentum mode have velocities and, thus, flight times that are linearly dependent on mass and kinetic energies that are inversely dependent on mass. The linear mass dispersion doubles mass resolving power of ions accelerated with space-focusing conditions in constant-momentum mode. The mass-dependent kinetic energy is exploited to disperse ions according to mass in a simple kinetic energy filter constructed from two closely spaced, oblique ion reflectors. Focusing velocity of ions of the same mass can substantially improve ion selection for subsequent post source decay or tandem time-of-flight analyses.

  12. Gravitational lensing effects in a time-variable cosmological 'constant' cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratra, Bharat; Quillen, Alice

    1992-01-01

    A scalar field phi with a potential V(phi) varies as phi exp -alpha(alpha is greater than 0) has an energy density, behaving like that of a time-variable cosmological 'constant', that redshifts less rapidly than the energy densities of radiation and matter, and so might contribute significantly to the present energy density. We compute, in this spatially flat cosmology, the gravitational lensing optical depth, and the expected lens redshift distribution for fixed source redshift. We find, for the values of alpha of about 4 and baryonic density parameter Omega of about 0.2 consistent with the classical cosmological tests, that the optical depth is significantly smaller than that in a constant-Lambda model with the same Omega. We also find that the redshift of the maximum of the lens distribution falls between that in the constant-Lambda model and that in the Einstein-de Sitter model.

  13. Report of the IAU Working Group on Reference Systems Sub-Group on Time and Sub-Group on Astronomical Constants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    The author reports the activity of two Sub-Groups (SG) of IAU Working Group on Reference Systems (IAU/WGRS), SG on Time and SG on Astronomical Constants. Also he gives explanations on some recommendations from IAU/WSGRS adopted at the IAU Colloquium No. 127 held at Virginia Beach on October, 1990; two on the introduction of general relativity, three on the new time-scales, and one for the continuation of activity on astronomical constants and other new tasks.

  14. Memory efficient and constant time 2D-recursive spatial averaging filter for embedded implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Qifeng; Seoud, Lama; Ben Tahar, Houssem; Langlois, J. M. Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Spatial Averaging Filters (SAF) are extensively used in image processing for image smoothing and denoising. Their latest implementations have already achieved constant time computational complexity regardless of kernel size. However, all the existing O(1) algorithms require additional memory for temporary data storage. In order to minimize memory usage in embedded systems, we introduce a new two-dimensional recursive SAF. It uses previous resultant pixel values along both rows and columns to calculate the current one. It can achieve constant time computational complexity without using any additional memory usage. Experimental comparisons with previous SAF implementations shows that the proposed 2D-Recursive SAF does not require any additional memory while offering a computational time similar to the most efficient existing SAF algorithm. These features make it especially suitable for embedded systems with limited memory capacity.

  15. Bipolar square-wave current source for transient electromagnetic systems based on constant shutdown time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shilong; Yin, Changchun; Lin, Jun; Yang, Yu; Hu, Xueyan

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative work of multiple magnetic transmitting sources is a new trend in the development of transient electromagnetic system. The key is the bipolar current waves shutdown, concurrently in the inductive load. In the past, it was difficult to use the constant clamping voltage technique to realize the synchronized shutdown of currents with different peak values. Based on clamping voltage technique, we introduce a new controlling method with constant shutdown time. We use the rising time to control shutdown time and use low voltage power source to control peak current. From the viewpoint of the circuit energy loss, by taking the high-voltage capacitor bypass resistance and the capacitor of the passive snubber circuit into account, we establish the relationship between the rising time and the shutdown time. Since the switch is not ideal, we propose a new method to test the shutdown time by the low voltage, the high voltage and the peak current. Experimental results show that adjustment of the current rising time can precisely control the value of the clamp voltage. When the rising time is fixed, the shutdown time is unchanged. The error for shutdown time deduced from the energy consumption is less than 6%. The new controlling method on current shutdown proposed in this paper can be used in the cooperative work of borehole and ground transmitting system.

  16. The learning of isometric force time scales is differentially influenced by constant and variable practice.

    PubMed

    King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2013-06-01

    This experiment was set up to investigate the influence of constant and variable practice on performance accuracy and the time- and frequency-dependent structure of the force output dynamics in the learning of an irregular isometric force pattern. Traditional approaches to the variability of practice hypothesis have demonstrated benefits of task-induced variability at the outcome level of behavior, but there have been limited investigations of the effect of practice conditions on movement execution and particularly the multiple time scale processes of force output. During the practice phase, variability was induced along the force-time dimension of the target pattern for the variable practice condition (different wave forms), but the wave forms exhibited the same distributional properties of the frequency content (1/f noise: β = -1.5) as the constant practice condition. The results showed that both practice conditions exhibited similar reductions in task error as a function of practice. However, constant practice produced greater changes in the time- and frequency-dependent properties of force output than variable practice, including a higher relative change in the contribution from faster (4-12 Hz) time scale mechanisms. Generalization tests to novel target patterns revealed that the task dynamics had a greater influence than the effect of practice conditions. Collectively, the findings support the adaptive nature of force output structure and the perspective that practice conditions can produce differential effects on the outcome and execution levels of motor behavior.

  17. Real-time method and apparatus for measuring the decay-time constant of a fluorescing phosphor

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Beshears, David L.; Simpson, Marc L.; Cates, Michael R.; Allison, Steve W.

    1999-01-01

    A method for determining the decay-time constant of a fluorescing phosphor is provided, together with an apparatus for performing the method. The apparatus includes a photodetector for detecting light emitted by a phosphor irradiated with an excitation pulse and for converting the detected light into an electrical signal. The apparatus further includes a differentiator for differentiating the electrical signal and a zero-crossing discrimination circuit that outputs a pulse signal having a pulse width corresponding to the time period between the start of the excitation pulse and the time when the differentiated electrical signal reaches zero. The width of the output pulse signal is proportional to the decay-time constant of the phosphor.

  18. Delay decomposition at a single server queue with constant service time and multiple inputs. [Waiting time on computer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, C.; Schilling, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Two networks consisting of single server queues, each with a constant service time, are considered. The external inputs to each network are assumed to follow some general probability distribution. Several interesting equivalencies that exist between the two networks considered are derived. This leads to the introduction of an important concept in delay decomposition. It is shown that the waiting time experienced by a customer can be decomposed into two basic components called self delay and interference delay.

  19. Peculiarities of the time evolution of magnetoresistance of granular HTSC in a constant applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, D. A.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Shaykhutdinov, K. A.; Popkov, S. I.; Petrov, M. I.

    2008-08-01

    The time evolution of the magnetoresistance of bulk YBCO + CuO composites at T=4.2 K in constant applied magnetic fields was studied to clarify the mechanism of hysteretic behavior of magnetoresistance R(H) of granular HTSC. The composites represent "model" granular HTSC with weakened Josephson coupling between superconducting (YBCO) crystallites. It was found for the first time that on the ascending branch of R(H) dependence, the resistance at H=const decreased with time while on the descending branch, the resistance increased with time in an applied constant magnetic field. In the range of low magnetic fields (below the minimum point of the descending branch of the R(H) dependence), the resistance at H=const decreased again. Similar measurements performed on pure polycrystalline YBCO at T=77.4 K have shown that the behavior of evolution of resistance with time is similar to that observed for the composite. This proves the peculiarity of time evolution of magnetoresistance to be a common feature of granular HTSCs. The behavior revealed is well described by the model of granular HTSC, where the intergrain media is in an effective magnetic field which is the superposition of the external field and the field induced by superconducting grains. The time evolution of resistance reflects the time relaxation of magnetization of HTSC grains due to the intragrain flux creep processes.

  20. Time and voltage dependences of nanoscale dielectric constant modulation on indium tin oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Hao, Haoyue; Zhao, Hua

    2017-01-01

    The modulation of indium tin oxide (ITO) films through surface charge accumulation plays an important role in many different applications. In order to elaborately study the modulation, we measured the dielectric constant of the modulated layer through examining the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. Charges were pumped on the surfaces of ITO films through applying high voltage in appropriate directions. Experiments unveiled that the dielectric constant of the modulated layer had large variation along with the nanoscale charge accumulation. Corresponding numerical results were worked out through combining Drude model and Mayadas-Shatzkes model. Based on the above results, we deduced the time and voltage dependences of accumulated charge density, which revealed a long-time charge accumulation process.

  1. The method of variation of constants and multiple time scales in orbital mechanics.

    PubMed

    Newman, William I; Efroimsky, Michael

    2003-06-01

    The method of variation of constants is an important tool used to solve systems of ordinary differential equations, and was invented by Euler and Lagrange to solve a problem in orbital mechanics. This methodology assumes that certain "constants" associated with a homogeneous problem will vary in time in response to an external force. It also introduces one or more constraint equations. We show that these constraints can be generalized in analogy to gauge theories in physics, and that different constraints can offer conceptual advances and methodological benefits to the solution of the underlying problem. Examples are given from linear ordinary differential equation theory and from orbital mechanics. However, a slow driving force in the presence of multiple time scales contained in the underlying (homogeneous) problem nevertheless requires special care, and this has strong implications to the analytic and numerical solutions of problems ranging from celestial mechanics to molecular dynamics. (c) 2003 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Placing constraints on the time-variation of fundamental constants using atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisbet-Jones, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Optical atomic frequency standards, such as those based on a single trapped ion of 171Yb+, now demonstrate systematic frequency uncertainties in the 10-17 -10-18 range. These standards rely on the principle that the unperturbed energy levels in atoms are fixed and can thus provide absolute frequency references. A frequency standard's uncertainty is therefore limited by the uncertainty in realising the idealized unperturbed environment. There exists the possibility however that the unperturbed level spacing is not fixed. Some theories that go beyond the Standard Model involve a time-variation of the fundamental ``constants'' - such as the fine structure constant - which determine these energy levels. Measurements of spectral lines in radiation emitted from distant galaxies around 1010 years ago are inconclusive, with some results suggesting the existence of a time-variation, and others observing nothing. By virtue of their very small measurement uncertainty atomic-clock experiments can, in timescales of only a few years, perform tests of present-day variation that are complementary to astrophysical data. Comparisons of frequency measurements between two or more atomic ``clock'' transitions that have different sensitivities to these constants enables us to directly measure any present-day time-variation. Combining recent results from the NPL 171Yb+ clock with measurements from other experiments worldwide places upper limits on the present-day time-variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ and the fine-structure constant α of μ˙ / μ = 0 . 2 (1 . 1) ×10-16 yr-1 and μ˙ / μ = - 0 . 7 (2 . 1) ×10-17 .

  3. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry in Nanoliter Droplets with Sub-Second Time Constants

    PubMed Central

    Lubbers, Brad; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2011-01-01

    We reduced the reaction volume in microfabricated suspended-membrane titration calorimeters to nanoliter droplets and improved the sensitivities to below a nanowatt with time constants of around 100ms, The device performance was characterized using exothermic acid-base neutralizations and a detailed numerical model. The finite element based numerical model allowed us to determine the sensitivities within 1% and the temporal dynamics of the temperature rise in neutralization reactions as a function of droplet size. The model was used to determine the optimum calorimeter design (membrane size and thickness, junction area, and thermopile thickness) and sensitivities for sample volumes of 1 nl for silicon nitride and polymer membranes. We obtained a maximum sensitivity of 153 pW/√Hz for a 1 μm SiN membrane and 79 pW/√Hz for a 1 μm polymer membrane. The time constant of the calorimeter system was determined experimentally by using a pulsed laser to increase the temperature of nanoliter sample volumes. For a 2.5 nanoliter sample volume, we experimentally determined a noise equivalent power of 500 pW/√Hz and a 1/e time constant of 110ms for a modified commercially available infrared sensor with a thin-film thermopile. Furthermore, we demonstrated detection of 1.4 nJ reaction energies from injection of 25 pl of 1 mM HCl into a 2.5 nl droplet of 1 mM NaOH. PMID:21913688

  4. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes

    PubMed Central

    Buis, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm – Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable. PMID:27695626

  5. Dividing line between quantum and classical trajectories in a measurement problem: Bohmian time constant.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Antonio B; Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2013-10-11

    This Letter proposes an answer to a challenge posed by Bell on the lack of clarity in regards to the dividing line between the quantum and classical regimes in a measurement problem. To this end, a generalized logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation is proposed to describe the time evolution of a quantum dissipative system under continuous measurement. Within the Bohmian mechanics framework, a solution to this equation reveals a novel result: it displays a time constant that should represent the dividing line between the quantum and classical trajectories. It is shown that continuous measurements and damping not only disturb the particle but compel the system to converge in time to a Newtonian regime. While the width of the wave packet may reach a stationary regime, its quantum trajectories converge exponentially in time to classical trajectories. In particular, it is shown that damping tends to suppress further quantum effects on a time scale shorter than the relaxation time of the system. If the initial wave packet width is taken to be equal to 2.8×10(-15) m (the approximate size of an electron), the Bohmian time constant is found to have an upper limit, i.e., τ(Bmax)=10(-26) s.

  6. Near constant-time optimal piecewise LDR to HDR inverse tone mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Su, Guan-Ming; Yin, Peng

    2015-02-01

    In a backward compatible HDR image/video compression, it is a general approach to reconstruct HDR from compressed LDR as a prediction to original HDR, which is referred to as inverse tone mapping. Experimental results show that 2- piecewise 2nd order polynomial has the best mapping accuracy than 1 piece high order or 2-piecewise linear, but it is also the most time-consuming method because to find the optimal pivot point to split LDR range to 2 pieces requires exhaustive search. In this paper, we propose a fast algorithm that completes optimal 2-piecewise 2nd order polynomial inverse tone mapping in near constant time without quality degradation. We observe that in least square solution, each entry in the intermediate matrix can be written as the sum of some basic terms, which can be pre-calculated into look-up tables. Since solving the matrix becomes looking up values in tables, computation time barely differs regardless of the number of points searched. Hence, we can carry out the most thorough pivot point search to find the optimal pivot that minimizes MSE in near constant time. Experiment shows that our proposed method achieves the same PSNR performance while saving 60 times computation time compared to the traditional exhaustive search in 2-piecewise 2nd order polynomial inverse tone mapping with continuous constraint.

  7. Time variation of the fine structure constant in the early universe and the Bekenstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, M. E.; Scóccola, C. G.; Landau, S. J.; Vucetich, H.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:We calculate the bounds on the variation in the fine structure constant at the time of primordial nucleosynthesis and at the time of neutral hydrogen formation. We used these bounds and other bounds from the late universe to test the Bekenstein model. Methods: We modified the Kawano code, CAMB, and CosmoMC to include the possible variation in the fine structure constant. We used observational primordial abundances of D, ^4He, and ^7Li, recent data from the cosmic microwave background, and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, to obtain bounds on the variation in α. We calculated a piecewise solution to the scalar field equation of the Bekenstein model in two different regimes: i) matter and radiation, ii) matter and cosmological constant. We match both solutions with the appropriate boundary conditions. We performed a statistical analysis, using the bounds obtained from the early universe and other bounds from the late universe to constrain the free parameters of the model. Results: Results are consistent with no variation in α for the early universe. Limits on α are inconsistent with the scale length of the theory l being larger than the Planck scale. Conclusions: In order to fit all observational and experimental data, the assumption l > Lp implied in Bekenstein's model has to be relaxed.

  8. HUBBLE CONSTANT, LENSING, AND TIME DELAY IN RELATIVISTIC MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yong; Ko, Chung-Ming; Chiu, Mu-Chen E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2013-06-20

    The time delay in galaxy gravitational lensing systems has been used to determine the value of the Hubble constant. As with other dynamical phenomena on the galaxy scale, dark matter is often invoked in gravitational lensing to account for the 'missing mass' (the apparent discrepancy between the dynamical mass and the luminous mass). Alternatively, modified gravity can be used to explain the discrepancy. In this paper, we adopt the tensor-vector-scalar gravity (TeVe S), a relativistic version of Modified Newtonian Dynamics, to study gravitational lensing phenomena and derive the formulae needed to evaluate the Hubble constant. We test our method on quasar lensing by elliptical galaxies in the literature. We focus on double-image systems with time delay measurement. Three candidates are suitable for our study: HE 2149-2745, FBQ J0951+2635, and SBS 0909+532. The Hubble constant obtained is consistent with the value used to fit the cosmic microwave background result in a neutrino cosmological model.

  9. Measuring JHH values with a selective constant-time 2D NMR protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Proton-proton scalar couplings play important roles in molecule structure elucidation. However, measurements of JHH values in complex coupled spin systems remain challenging. In this study, we develop a selective constant-time (SECT) 2D NMR protocol with which scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons can be revealed, and corresponding JHH values can be measured through doublets along the F1 dimension. All JHH values within a network of n fully coupled protons can be separately determined with (n - 1) SECT experiments. Additionally, the proposed pulse sequence possesses satisfactory sensitivity and handy implementation. Therefore, it will interest scientists who intend to address structural analyzes of molecules with overcrowded spectra, and may greatly facilitate the applications of scalar-coupling constants in molecule structure studies.

  10. Constraining a Possible Time Variation of the Gravitational Constant through ``Gravitochemical Heating'' of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofré, Paula; Reisenegger, Andreas; Fernández, Rodrigo

    2006-09-01

    A hypothetical time variation of the gravitational constant G would cause neutron star matter to depart from beta equilibrium, due to the changing hydrostatic equilibrium. This induces nonequilibrium beta processes, which release energy that is invested partly in neutrino emission and partly in internal heating. Eventually, the star arrives at a stationary state in which the temperature remains nearly constant, as the forcing through the change of G is balanced by the ongoing reactions. Using the surface temperature of the nearest millisecond pulsar, PSR J0437-4715, inferred from ultraviolet observations, we estimate two upper limits for this variation: (1) |G˙/G|<2×10-10yr-1, if direct Urca reactions are allowed, and (2) |G˙/G|<4×10-12yr-1, considering only modified Urca reactions. The latter is among the most restrictive obtained by other methods.

  11. Electric field observations of time constants related to charging and charge neutralization processes in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Evans, D. S.; Troim, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Polar 5 electric field results are reviewed, and the transients from Polar 3 are presented. The phenomena are discussed from the standpoint of space charge. On the basis of the Polar 5 results, the large magnitude of the electric field from Polar 3 is seen as indicating that the observed space charge was probably within a few km or less of the payload. Reference is made to Cole's prediction (1960) that charges in the ionosphere would reach equilibrium with a time constant of the order of a few microsec. The processes involved in the two cases presented here require time constants of the order of ms. If the sheath dimensions are taken to be between 50 and 100 m, which is not considered unreasonable in view of the electric field measurements, then a qualitative estimate of the neutralization time would be the transit time for ions across the sheath. Since the kinetic velocity of a 1-eV proton is approximately 14 m/s, it would traverse the distance in 4 to 8 ms, assuming freedom of movement across magnetic field lines. This is the order of the decay times observed on Polar 5.

  12. Short time Fourier analysis of the electromyogram - Fast movements and constant contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannaford, Blake; Lehman, Steven

    1986-01-01

    Short-time Fourier analysis was applied to surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded during rapid movements, and during isometric contractions at constant forces. A portion of the data to be transformed by multiplying the signal by a Hamming window was selected, and then the discrete Fourier transform was computed. Shifting the window along the data record, a new spectrum was computed each 10 ms. The transformed data were displayed in spectograms or 'voiceprints'. This short-time technique made it possible to see time-dependencies in the EMG that are normally averaged in the Fourier analysis of these signals. Spectra of EMGs during isometric contractions at constant force vary in the short (10-20 ms) term. Short-time spectra from EMGs recorded during rapid movements were much less variable. The windowing technique picked out the typical 'three-burst pattern' in EMG's from both wrist and head movements. Spectra during the bursts were more consistent than those during isometric contractions. Furthermore, there was a consistent shift in spectral statistics in the course of the three bursts. Both the center frequency and the variance of the spectral energy distribution grew from the first burst to the second burst in the same muscle. The analogy between EMGs and speech signals is extended to argue for future applicability of short-time spectral analysis of EMG.

  13. Direct observation of single stationary-phase bacteria reveals a surprisingly long period of constant protein production activity

    PubMed Central

    Gefen, Orit; Fridman, Ofer; Ronin, Irine; Balaban, Nathalie Q.

    2014-01-01

    Exponentially growing bacteria are rarely found in the wild, as microorganisms tend to spend most of their lifetime at stationary phase. Despite this general prevalence of stationary-phase bacteria, they are as yet poorly characterized. Our goal was to quantitatively study this phase by direct observation of single bacteria as they enter into stationary phase and by monitoring their activity over several days during growth arrest. For this purpose, we devised an experimental procedure for starving single Escherichia coli bacteria in microfluidic devices and measured their activity by monitoring the production rate of fluorescent proteins. When amino acids were the sole carbon source, the production rate decreased by an order of magnitude upon entry into stationary phase. We found that, even while growth-arrested, bacteria continued to produce proteins at a surprisingly constant rate over several days. Our identification of this newly observed period of constant activity in nongrowing cells, designated as constant activity stationary phase, makes possible the conduction of assays that require constant protein expression over time, and are therefore difficult to perform under exponential growth conditions. Moreover, we show that exogenous protein expression bears no fitness cost on the regrowth of the population when starvation ends. Further characterization of constant activity stationary phase—a phase where nongrowing bacteria can be quantitatively studied over several days in a reproducible manner—should contribute to a better understanding of this ubiquitous but overlooked physiological state of bacteria in nature. PMID:24344288

  14. Strategies for obtaining long constant-pressure test times in shock tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Matthew Frederick; Parise, T.; Tulgestke, A. M.; Spearrin, R. M.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2015-09-22

    Several techniques have been developed for obtaining long, constant-pressure test times in reflected shock wave experiments in a shock tube, including the use of driver inserts, driver gas tailoring, helium gas diaphragm interfaces, driver extensions, and staged driver gas filling. Here, we detail these techniques, including discussion on the most recent strategy, staged driver gas filling. Experiments indicate that this staged filling strategy increases available test time by roughly 20 % relative to single-stage filling of tailored driver gas mixtures, while simultaneously reducing the helium required per shock by up to 85 %. This filling scheme involves firstly mixing a tailored helium–nitrogen mixture in the driver section as in conventional driver filling and, secondly, backfilling a low-speed-of-sound gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide from a port close to the end cap of the driver section. Using this staged driver gas filling, in addition to the other techniques listed above, post-reflected shock test times of up to 0.102 s (102 ms) at 524 K and 1.6 atm have been obtained. Spectroscopically based temperature measurements in non-reactive mixtures have confirmed that temperature and pressure conditions remain constant throughout the length of these long test duration trials. Finally, these strategies have been used to measure low-temperature n-heptane ignition delay times.

  15. Strategies for obtaining long constant-pressure test times in shock tubes

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Matthew Frederick; Parise, T.; Tulgestke, A. M.; ...

    2015-09-22

    Several techniques have been developed for obtaining long, constant-pressure test times in reflected shock wave experiments in a shock tube, including the use of driver inserts, driver gas tailoring, helium gas diaphragm interfaces, driver extensions, and staged driver gas filling. Here, we detail these techniques, including discussion on the most recent strategy, staged driver gas filling. Experiments indicate that this staged filling strategy increases available test time by roughly 20 % relative to single-stage filling of tailored driver gas mixtures, while simultaneously reducing the helium required per shock by up to 85 %. This filling scheme involves firstly mixing amore » tailored helium–nitrogen mixture in the driver section as in conventional driver filling and, secondly, backfilling a low-speed-of-sound gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide from a port close to the end cap of the driver section. Using this staged driver gas filling, in addition to the other techniques listed above, post-reflected shock test times of up to 0.102 s (102 ms) at 524 K and 1.6 atm have been obtained. Spectroscopically based temperature measurements in non-reactive mixtures have confirmed that temperature and pressure conditions remain constant throughout the length of these long test duration trials. Finally, these strategies have been used to measure low-temperature n-heptane ignition delay times.« less

  16. A flexible active and reactive power control strategy for a variable speed constant frequency generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Xu, L.

    1995-07-01

    Variable-speed constant-frequency generating systems are used in wind power, hydro power, aerospace, and naval power generations to enhance efficiency and reduce friction. In these applications, an attractive candidate is the slip power recovery system comprising of doubly excited induction machine or doubly excited brushless reluctance machine and PWM converters with a dc link. In this paper, a flexible active and reactive power control strategy is developed, such that the optimal torque-speed profile of the turbine can be followed and overall reactive power can be controlled, while the machine copper losses have been minimized. At the same time, harmonics injected into the power network has also been minimized. In this manner, the system can function as both a high-efficient power generator and a flexible reactive power compensator.

  17. Estimation of Nutation Time Constant Model Parameters for On-Axis Spinning Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlee, Keith; Sudermann, James

    2008-01-01

    Calculating an accurate nutation time constant for a spinning spacecraft is an important step for ensuring mission success. Spacecraft nutation is caused by energy dissipation about the spin axis. Propellant slosh in the spacecraft fuel tanks is the primary source for this dissipation and can be simulated using a forced motion spin table. Mechanical analogs, such as pendulums and rotors, are typically used to simulate propellant slosh. A strong desire exists for an automated method to determine these analog parameters. The method presented accomplishes this task by using a MATLAB Simulink/SimMechanics based simulation that utilizes the Parameter Estimation Tool.

  18. Time constants and transfer functions for a homogeneous 900 MWt metallic fueled LMR

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1988-01-01

    Nodal transfer functions are calculated for a 900 MWt U10Zr-fueled sodium cooled reactor. From the transfer functions the time constants, feedback reactivity transfer function coefficients, and power coefficients can be determined. These quantities are calculated for core fuel, upper and lower axial reflector steel, radial blanket fuel, radial reflector steel, and B/sub 4/C rod shaft expansion effect. The quantities are compared to the analogous quantities of a 60 MWt metallic-fueled sodium cooled Experimental Breeder Reactor II configuration. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Developmental Times of Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) at Constant Temperatures and Applications in Forensic Entomology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xue-Bo; Shao, Ru-Yue; Lyu, Zhou; Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Gen-Ping; Xu, Lyu-Zi; Wan, Li-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The characteristic life stages of infesting blowflies (Calliphoridae) such as Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) are powerful evidence for estimating the death time of a corpse, but an established reference of developmental times for local blowfly species is required. We determined the developmental rates of C. megacephala from southwest China at seven constant temperatures (16-34°C). Isomegalen and isomorphen diagrams were constructed based on the larval length and time for each developmental event (first ecdysis, second ecdysis, wandering, pupariation, and eclosion), at each temperature. A thermal summation model was constructed by estimating the developmental threshold temperature D0 and the thermal summation constant K. The thermal summation model indicated that, for complete development from egg hatching to eclosion, D0 = 9.07 ± 0.54°C and K = 3991.07 ± 187.26 h °C. This reference can increase the accuracy of estimations of postmortem intervals in China by predicting the growth of C. megacephala.

  20. A Different Look at Dark Energy and the Time Variation of Fundamental Constants

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Marvin; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    This paper makes the simple observation that a fundamental length, or cutoff, in the context of Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology implies very different things than for a static universe. It is argued that it is reasonable to assume that this cutoff is implemented by fixing the number of quantum degrees of freedom per co-moving volume (as opposed to a Planck volume) and the relationship of the vacuum-energy of all of the fields in the theory to the cosmological constant (or dark energy) is re-examined. The restrictions that need to be satisfied by a generic theory to avoid conflicts with current experiments are discussed, and it is shown that in any theory satisfying these constraints knowing the difference between w and minus one allows one to predict w. It is argued that this is a robust result and if this prediction fails the idea of a fundamental cutoff of the type being discussed can be ruled out. Finally, it is observed that, within the context of a specific theory, a co-moving cutoff implies a predictable time variation of fundamental constants. This is accompanied by a general discussion of why this is so, what are the strongest phenomenological limits upon this predicted variation, and which limits are in tension with the idea of a co-moving cutoff. It is pointed out, however, that a careful comparison of the predicted time variation of fundamental constants is not possible without restricting to a particular model field-theory and that is not done in this paper.

  1. The modelling of carbon-based supercapacitors: Distributions of time constants and Pascal Equivalent Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Stephen; Kirkpatrick, Iain; Dring, Roderick; Puttock, Robert; Thring, Rob; Howroyd, Simon

    2017-03-01

    Supercapacitors are an emerging technology with applications in pulse power, motive power, and energy storage. However, their carbon electrodes show a variety of non-ideal behaviours that have so far eluded explanation. These include Voltage Decay after charging, Voltage Rebound after discharging, and Dispersed Kinetics at long times. In the present work, we establish that a vertical ladder network of RC components can reproduce all these puzzling phenomena. Both software and hardware realizations of the network are described. In general, porous carbon electrodes contain random distributions of resistance R and capacitance C, with a wider spread of log R values than log C values. To understand what this implies, a simplified model is developed in which log R is treated as a Gaussian random variable while log C is treated as a constant. From this model, a new family of equivalent circuits is developed in which the continuous distribution of log R values is replaced by a discrete set of log R values drawn from a geometric series. We call these Pascal Equivalent Circuits. Their behaviour is shown to resemble closely that of real supercapacitors. The results confirm that distributions of RC time constants dominate the behaviour of real supercapacitors.

  2. Estimation of the left ventricular relaxation time constant tau requires consideration of the pressure asymptote.

    PubMed

    Langer, S F J; Habazettl, H; Kuebler, W M; Pries, A R

    2005-01-01

    The left ventricular isovolumic pressure decay, obtained by cardiac catheterization, is widely characterized by the time constant tau of the exponential regression p(t)=Pomega+(P0-Pomega)exp(-t/tau). However, several authors prefer to prefix Pomega=0 instead of coestimating the pressure asymptote empirically; others present tau values estimated by both methods that often lead to discordant results and interpretation of lusitropic changes. The present study aims to clarify the relations between the tau estimates from both methods and to decide for the more reliable estimate. The effect of presetting a zero asymptote on the tau estimate was investigated mathematically and empirically, based on left ventricular pressure decay data from isolated ejecting rat and guinea pig hearts at different preload and during spontaneous decrease of cardiac function. Estimating tau with preset Pomega=0 always yields smaller values than the regression with empirically estimated asymptote if the latter is negative and vice versa. The sequences of tau estimates from both methods can therefore proceed in reverse direction if tau and Pomega change in opposite directions between the measurements. This is exemplified by data obtained during an increasing preload in spontaneously depressed isolated hearts. The estimation of the time constant of isovolumic pressure fall with a preset zero asymptote is heavily biased and cannot be used for comparing the lusitropic state of the heart in hemodynamic conditions with considerably altered pressure asymptotes.

  3. DEMETER Observations of Ionospheric Heating Time Constants Above the NWC VLF Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. F.; Graf, K. L.; Inan, U. S.; Parrot, M.

    2011-12-01

    As demonstrated by recent DEMETER observations, intense 19.8 kHz VLF signals from the powerful (1 MW) NWC transmitter in Australia significantly heat the overlying ionosphere and produce significant changes in local electron and ion density and temperature at 700 km altitude [Parrot et al., 2007]. These changes are accompanied by a unique VLF plasma wave structure covering a 5 to 10 kHz band below the NWC signals and by quasi-electrostatic ELF turbulence. In order to determine the heating and cooling time constants of this effect, a campaign was carried out in which the NWC transmitter was programed to transmit a single CW pulse of 2 second duration every 10 seconds during periods in which the DEMETER spacecraft passed over the transmitter location. The data from this campaign show that the time constant for production of the unique VLF plasma wave structure and the quasi-electrostatic ELF turbulence ranged from 100 to 300 msec. However significant changes in electron and ion density and temperature during the 2 second pulses occurred only sporadically. This result suggests that small scale ( 10-100 m) plasma density irregularities are produced quickly by the heating pulses, but larger scale irregularities take significantly longer than 2 seconds to develop. We discuss the observations obtained during the campaign and the physical mechanisms involved in the heating process.

  4. Procedural Adaptations for Use of Constant Time Delay to Teach Highly Motivating Words to Beginning Braille Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivy, Sarah E.; Guerra, Jennifer A.; Hatton, Deborah D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Constant time delay is an evidence-based practice to teach sight word recognition to students with a variety of disabilities. To date, two studies have documented its effectiveness for teaching braille. Methods: Using a multiple-baseline design, we evaluated the effectiveness of constant time delay to teach highly motivating words to…

  5. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in the VOR

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Katsarkas, Athanasios; Galiana, Henrietta L.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which otherwise can be distorted by peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain. In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e., different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies. PMID:27065839

  6. Highly precise determination of optical constants in olive oil using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiusheng; Yao, Jianquan

    2008-12-01

    Recently, there has been a remarkable effort in employing terahertz (THz) spectroscopy for investigating material properties. Pulsed THz time-domain spectroscopy is a coherent technique, in which both the amplitude and the phase of a THz pulse are measured. Coherent detection enables direct calculations of both the imaginary and the real parts of the refractive index without using the Kramers-Kronig relations. In this letter, the terahertz absorption spectra and the refractive indices of olive oil were measured by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the frequency range extending from 0.2 to 2.5 THz. The terahertz dielectric properties of olive oil were characterized by THz-TDS, and the consistency with the known parameters was identified. A novel iterative algorithm improves the existing data extraction algorithms and further enhances the accuracy of the parameter extraction for terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The results obtained in this study suggest that the THz-TDS method is a useful tool for vegetable oils characterization in the far infrared region. This method can be applied not only to terahertz time-domain spectroscopy but also to any kind of optical constant measurement in the time domain.

  7. Grain boundary effects on the optical constants and Drude relaxation times of silver films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yajie; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A.

    2016-12-01

    Silver demonstrates the unique optical properties that make it suitable for various plasmonic applications. Determining the accurate optical constants for silver and investigating its dependence on grain structures are necessary for reliable theoretical predictions. This work investigates the effects of different deposition conditions and the resultant variable grain sizes, upon the optical properties of the silver films in conjunction with ellipsometry and optical characterization. Annealing conditions of substrate SiNx films were also studied to ensure good quality of deposited polycrystalline silver films. The effects of grain sizes of silver on its electronic relaxation times were studied and shown to be consistent with the theoretical electrical resistivity model. This study shows that voids and surface layers can affect the optical constant values and that reproducible results can be obtained by avoiding such artefacts. The results will have implications on the analysis of different silver based nanostructures like nanowires and nanorods where grain boundary scattering can affect the optical and electrical properties like reflection and resistivity.

  8. Effects of magnetic dipolar interactions on the specific time constant in superparamagnetic nanoparticle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, N.; Schinteie, G.; Bartha, C.; Palade, P.; Vekas, L.; Kuncser, V.

    2016-07-01

    A quantitative treatment of the effects of magnetic mutual interactions on the specific absorption rate of a superparamagnetic system of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleic acid is reported. The nanoparticle concentration of the considered ferrofluid samples varied from a very low (0.005) to a medium (0.16) value of the volume fraction, whereas the amplitude of the exciting AC magnetic field ranged from 14-35 kA m-1. It was proved that a direct effect of the interparticle interactions resides in the regime of the modified superparamagnetism, dealing, besides the usual increase in the anisotropy energy barrier per nanoparticle, with the decrease in the specific time constant {τ0} of the relaxation law, usually considered as a material constant. Consequently, the increase in the specific absorption rate versus the volume fraction is significantly diminished in the presence of the interparticle interactions compared to the case of non-interacting superparamagnetic nanoparticles, with direct influence on the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency.

  9. Time and Space Resolved Wall Temperature Measurements during Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work is to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleate bubbles on a constant heat flux surface. This was performed using a microheater array with 100 micron resolution that allowed effectively simultaneous measurements of surface temperature while supplying a constant dissipative heat flux. This data is then correlated with high speed (> 1000Hz) visual recordings of the bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that a significant source of energy during bubble nucleation and initial growth is the superheated layer around the bubble. Bubble coalescence was not observed to decrease surface temperature as significantly as bubble departure from the surface. Since bubble departure is typically followed by a sharp increase in the heater surface temperature, it is surmised that the departing bubble effectively removes the superheated layer, allowing a high local heat transfer rate with the bulk fluid through transient conduction/micro-convection during rewetting.

  10. Time and Space Resolved Heat Flux Measurements During Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work was to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleating bubbles on a constant heat flux surface using a microheater array with 100x 100 square microns resolution, then numerically determine the wall to liquid heat flux. This data was then correlated with high speed (greater than l000Hz) visual recordings of The bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that microlayer evaporation and contact line heat transfer are not major heat transfer mechanisms for bubble growth. The dominant heat transfer mechanism appears to be transient conduction into the liquid as the liquid rewets the wall during the bubble departure process.

  11. Determination of the Newtonian Gravitational Constant G with Time-of-Swing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Jun; Liu Qi; Tu Liangcheng; Shao Chenggang; Liu Linxia; Yang Shanqing; Li Qing; Zhang Yating

    2009-06-19

    We present a new value of the Newtonian gravitational constant G by using the time-of-swing method. Several improvements greatly reduce the uncertainties: (1) measuring the anelasticity of the fiber directly; (2) using spherical source masses minimizes the effects of density inhomogeneity and eccentricities; (3) using a quartz block pendulum simplifies its vibration modes and minimizes the uncertainty of inertial moment; (4) setting the pendulum and source masses both in a vacuum chamber reduces the error of measuring the relative positions. By two individual experiments, we obtain G=6.673 49(18)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2} with a standard uncertainty of about 2.6 parts in 10{sup 5}.

  12. A multiple relaxation time extension of the constant speed kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadehgol, Abed; Ashrafizaadeh, Mahmud

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a multiple relaxation time (MRT) extension of the recently introduced constant speed kinetic model (CSKM) is proposed. The CSKM, which is an entropic kinetic model and based on unconventional entropies of Burg and Tssalis, was introduced in [A. Zadehgol and M. Ashrafizaadeh, J. Comput. Phys. 274, 803 (2014)]; [A. Zadehgol Phys. Rev. E 91, 063311 (2015)] as an extension of the model of Boghosian et al. [Phys. Rev. E 68, 025103 (2003)] in the limit of fixed speed continuous velocities. The present extension improves the stability of the previous models at very high Reynolds numbers, while allowing for a more convenient orthogonal lattice. The model is verified by solving the following benchmark problems: (i) the lid driven square cavity and (ii) the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of thin shear layers in a doubly periodic square domain.

  13. Second order rate constants for intramolecular conversions: Application to gas-phase NMR relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Lazaar, K. I.

    1983-09-01

    The usually quoted expression for the second order rate constant, for a unimolecular reaction at the low pressure limit, is valid only for strictly irreversible processes. Its application to isomerization reactions (which are to some extent reversible) is demonstrably in error; corrected expressions have been published. Attention is directed to intramolecular conversions over low barriers, for which the inappropriateness of the unidirectional expression becomes obvious. For such isomerizations we propose a model which incorporates only operationally observable states, so that an essential conceptual ambiguity is avoided. Use of this model is illustrated for the syn⇄anti conversions of methyl nitrite, derived from a gas phase NMR coalescence curve (Mc:Tc). The present data suggest that during isomerization the alkyl nitrites may not be completely ergodic on a time scale of 10-9 s. A regional phase-space model is proposed which has the appropriate formalism to account for this behavior.

  14. Time constant of defect relaxation in ion-irradiated 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, J. B.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Shao, L.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2015-05-01

    Above room temperature, the buildup of radiation damage in SiC is a dynamic process governed by the mobility and interaction of ballistically generated point defects. Here, we study the dynamics of radiation defects in 3C-SiC bombarded at 100 °C with 500 keV Ar ions, with the total ion dose split into a train of equal pulses. Damage-depth profiles are measured by ion channeling for a series of samples irradiated under identical conditions except for different durations of the passive part of the beam cycle. Results reveal an effective defect relaxation time constant of ˜ 3 ms (for second order kinetics) and a dynamic annealing efficiency of ˜ 40 % for defects in both Si and C sublattices. This demonstrates a crucial role of dynamic annealing at elevated temperatures and provides evidence of the strong coupling of defect accumulation processes in the two sublattices of 3C-SiC.

  15. High dielectric constant, low loss and high photocatalytic activity in Gd doped ZnO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, N. K.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced photocatalytic activity and high dielectric constant values are achieved by gadolinium (Gd) doping in ZnO. The changes that happened to the wurtzite structure of ZnO on doping are depicted in detail by using x-ray diffraction spectroscopy. The chemical composition is confirmed using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). The influence of Gd incorporation in the emission spectra of ZnO is analysed from photoluminescence studies. The photocatalytic activity enhancement occurred in ZnO system on Gd doping was explored by kinetic rate analysis. The optimum incorporation of Gd has enhanced the dielectric constant value and decreased the loss of pristine. The high dielectric constant value and low loss make the system suitable for large scale of applications in microelectronics. The work also proposes large scale synthesis of highly efficient fluorescent Gd doped ZnO photocatalysts.

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase activity of rat epididymis and spermatozoa: effect of constant light.

    PubMed

    Ponc, R H; Carriazo, C S; Vermouth, N T

    2001-01-01

    During its passage through the epididymis, the gamete undergoes a process of "maturation" leading to the acquisition of its fertilizing ability. The epididymis displays regional variations in the morphology and metabolic properties of its epithelium which are relevant for the progressive development of mature sperm characteristics. The epididymis has spontaneous peristaltic contractions and receives sympathetic innervation that is modulated by melatonin, a hormone synthesized and released by the pineal gland. Constant lighting disrupts melatonin synthesis and secretion. We have studied the effect of constant light on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) and its isozyme C4 activities and protein content in whole epididymis, epididymal tissue and in spermatozoa from caput and cauda segments. Animals were exposed from birth to an illumination schedule of 14 h light:10 h dark (group L:D). At 60 days of age one group of animals was submitted to constant light over 50 days (group L:L). In order to test the fertilizing ability, the rats of each group were mated with soliciting estrous females. The percentage of pregnancies in females mated with males maintained in L:L was remarkably lower than those in females mated with males maintained in the L:D photoperiod (44% and 88% respectively). Constant light increased protein concentration and LDH activity in caput as well as in cauda of total epididymis. On the contrary, in epididymal tissue, the protein content decreased in both epididymal sections compared with controls. When enzymatic activity was expressed in Units per spermatozoa, constant light induced a significant reduction of total LDH and LDHC4 in caput and cauda spermatozoa while LDH activity of epididymal tissue was not affected. In spite of the decrease in LDH per sperm cell when rats were exposed to constant light, in total epididymis (epididymis tissue plus sperm cells content) and in spermatozoa, values of enzyme activities expressed per weight unit were

  17. Stability and Relative Stability of Linear Systems with Many Constant Time Delays. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Larry Keith

    1976-01-01

    A method of determining the stability of linear systems with many constant time delays is developed. This technique, an extension of the tau-decomposition method, is used to examine not only the stability but also the relative stability of retarded systems with many delays and a class of neutral equations with one delay. Analytical equations are derived for partitioning the delay space of a retarded system with two time delays. The stability of the system in each of the regions defined by the partitioning curves in the parameter plane is determined using the extended tau-decomposition method. In addition, relative stability boundaries are defined using the extended tau-decompositon method in association with parameter plane techniques. Several applications of the extended tau-decomposition method are presented and compared with stability results obtained from other analyses. In all cases the results obtained using the method outlined herein coincide with and extend those of previous investigations. The extended tau-decomposition method applied to systems with time delays requires less computational effort and yields more complete stability analyses than previous techniques.

  18. Melatonin administration modifies circadian motor activity under constant light depending on the lighting conditions during suckling.

    PubMed

    Carpentieri, Agata R; Oliva, Clara; Díez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat

    2015-01-01

    Early lighting conditions have been described to produce long-term effects on circadian behavior, which may also influence the response to agents acting on the circadian system. It has been suggested that melatonin (MEL) may act on the circadian pacemaker and as a scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Here, we studied the oxidative and behavioral changes caused by prolonged exposure to constant light (LL) in groups of rats that differed in MEL administration and in lighting conditions during suckling. The rats were exposed to either a light-dark cycle (LD) or LL. At 40 days old, rats were treated for 2 weeks with a daily subcutaneous injection of MEL (10 mg/kg body weight) or a vehicle at activity onset. Blood samples were taken before and after treatment, to determine catalase (CAT) activity and nitrite level in plasma. As expected, LL-reared rats showed a more stable motor activity circadian rhythm than LD rats. MEL treatment produced more reactivity in LD- than in LL rats, and was also able to alter the phase of the rhythm in LD rats. There were no significant differences in nitrite levels or CAT activity between the groups, although both variables increased with time. Finally, we also tested depressive signs by means of sucrose consumption, and anhedonia was found in LD males treated with MEL. The results suggest that the lighting conditions in early infancy are important for the long-term functionality of the circadian system, including rhythm manifestation, responses to MEL and mood alterations.

  19. The time course of the effects of constant-angle and constant-torque stretching on the muscle-tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Herda, T J; Costa, P B; Walter, A A; Ryan, E D; Cramer, J T

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the time course of passive range of motion (PROM), passive torque (PASTQ), and musculo-tendinous stiffness (MTS) responses during constant-angle (CA) and constant-torque (CT) stretching of the leg flexors. Eleven healthy men [mean ± standard deviation (SD): age = 21.5 ± 2.3 years] performed 16 30-s bouts of CA and CT stretching of the leg flexors. PROM, PASTQ , and MTS were measured during stretches 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16. For PROM and PASTQ , there were no differences between CA and CT stretching treatments (P > 0.05); however, there were stretch-related differences (P < 0.001). PROM increased following one 30-s bout of stretching (collapsed across CA and CT stretching) with additional increases up to 8 min of stretching. PASTQ decreased following one 30-s bout of stretching (collapsed across CA and CT stretching) and continued to decrease up to 4 min of stretching. In contrast, only the CT stretching treatment resulted in changes to MTS (P < 0.001). MTS decreased after one 30-s bout of CT stretching, with subsequent decreases in MTS up to 6 min of stretching. These results suggested that CT stretching may be more appropriate than a stretch held at a constant muscle length for decreasing MTS.

  20. Tonic GABAA conductance decreases membrane time constant and increases EPSP-spike precision in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka I; Xu, Chun; Song, Inseon; Doronin, Maxim; Wu, Yu-Wei; Walker, Matthew C; Semyanov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Because of a complex dendritic structure, pyramidal neurons have a large membrane surface relative to other cells and so a large electrical capacitance and a large membrane time constant (τm). This results in slow depolarizations in response to excitatory synaptic inputs, and consequently increased and variable action potential latencies, which may be computationally undesirable. Tonic activation of GABAA receptors increases membrane conductance and thus regulates neuronal excitability by shunting inhibition. In addition, tonic increases in membrane conductance decrease the membrane time constant (τm), and improve the temporal fidelity of neuronal firing. Here we performed whole-cell current clamp recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and found that bath application of 10μM GABA indeed decreases τm in these cells. GABA also decreased first spike latency and jitter (standard deviation of the latency) produced by current injection of 2 rheobases (500 ms). However, when larger current injections (3-6 rheobases) were used, GABA produced no significant effect on spike jitter, which was low. Using mathematical modeling we demonstrate that the tonic GABAA conductance decreases rise time, decay time and half-width of EPSPs in pyramidal neurons. A similar effect was observed on EPSP/IPSP pairs produced by stimulation of Schaffer collaterals: the EPSP part of the response became shorter after application of GABA. Consistent with the current injection data, a significant decrease in spike latency and jitter was obtained in cell attached recordings only at near-threshold stimulation (50% success rate, S50). When stimulation was increased to 2- or 3- times S50, GABA significantly affected neither spike latency nor spike jitter. Our results suggest that a decrease in τm associated with elevations in ambient GABA can improve EPSP-spike precision at near-threshold synaptic inputs.

  1. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. I. THE CONSTANT COOLING TIME CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Scott; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: tomsc@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: aaron.boley@gmail.com

    2012-02-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protostellar disk, subject to a constant global cooling time and susceptible to gravitational instabilities (GIs), at a time when heating and cooling are roughly balanced. Our goal is to determine the gravitational torques produced by GIs, the level to which transport can be represented by a simple {alpha}-disk formulation, and to examine fragmentation criteria. Four simulations are conducted, identical except for the number of azimuthal computational grid points used. A Fourier decomposition of non-axisymmetric density structures in cos (m{phi}), sin (m{phi}) is performed to evaluate the amplitudes A{sub m} of these structures. The A{sub m} , gravitational torques, and the effective Shakura and Sunyaev {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses are determined for each resolution. We find nonzero A{sub m} for all m-values and that A{sub m} summed over all m is essentially independent of resolution. Because the number of measurable m-values is limited to half the number of azimuthal grid points, higher-resolution simulations have a larger fraction of their total amplitude in higher-order structures. These structures act more locally than lower-order structures. Therefore, as the resolution increases the total gravitational stress decreases as well, leading higher-resolution simulations to experience weaker average gravitational torques than lower-resolution simulations. The effective {alpha} also depends upon the magnitude of the stresses, thus {alpha}{sub eff} also decreases with increasing resolution. Our converged {alpha}{sub eff} is consistent with predictions from an analytic local theory for thin disks by Gammie, but only over many dynamic times when averaged over a substantial volume of the disk.

  2. Automated Method for Estimating Nutation Time Constant Model Parameters for Spacecraft Spinning on Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Calculating an accurate nutation time constant (NTC), or nutation rate of growth, for a spinning upper stage is important for ensuring mission success. Spacecraft nutation, or wobble, is caused by energy dissipation anywhere in the system. Propellant slosh in the spacecraft fuel tanks is the primary source for this dissipation and, if it is in a state of resonance, the NTC can become short enough to violate mission constraints. The Spinning Slosh Test Rig (SSTR) is a forced-motion spin table where fluid dynamic effects in full-scale fuel tanks can be tested in order to obtain key parameters used to calculate the NTC. We accomplish this by independently varying nutation frequency versus the spin rate and measuring force and torque responses on the tank. This method was used to predict parameters for the Genesis, Contour, and Stereo missions, whose tanks were mounted outboard from the spin axis. These parameters are incorporated into a mathematical model that uses mechanical analogs, such as pendulums and rotors, to simulate the force and torque resonances associated with fluid slosh.

  3. New determination of the gravitational constant G with time-of-swing method

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Liangcheng; Li Qing; Wang Qinglan; Shao Chenggang; Yang Shanqing; Liu Linxia; Liu Qi; Luo Jun

    2010-07-15

    A new determination of the Newtonian gravitational constant G is presented by using a torsion pendulum with the time-of-swing method. Compared with our previous measurement with the same method, several improvements greatly reduced the uncertainties as follows: (i) two stainless steel spheres with more homogeneous density are used as the source masses instead of the cylinders used in the previous experiment, and the offset of the mass center from the geometric center is measured and found to be much smaller than that of the cylinders; (ii) a rectangular glass block is used as the main body of the pendulum, which has fewer vibration modes and hence improves the stability of the period and reduces the uncertainty of the moment of inertia; (iii) both the pendulum and source masses are placed in the same vacuum chamber to reduce the error of measuring the relative positions; (iv) changing the configurations between the ''near'' and ''far'' positions is remotely operated by using a stepper motor to lower the environmental disturbances; and (v) the anelastic effect of the torsion fiber is first measured directly by using two disk pendulums with the help of a high-Q quartz fiber. We have performed two independent G measurements, and the two G values differ by only 9 ppm. The combined value of G is (6.673 49{+-}0.000 18)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2} with a relative uncertainty of 26 ppm.

  4. A 45-year time series of dune mobility indicating constant windiness over the central Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.; Leprince, S.

    2012-07-01

    Although evidence is mounting that links global warming to changes in atmospheric dynamics over the Atlantic realm, similar studies over the African continent are lacking. And even if such models would exist, it would be difficult to verify their validity due to the paucity of meteorological observations and anemometers in the central Sahara. A pragmatic way around this problem is to monitor barchan dune velocity as a proxy for the windiness of desert areas. Dune migration rates are a measure of the amount of work done by the wind which does not require field measurements but can be observed from space instead. This paper presents a novel application of the remote sensing tool COSI-Corr for the construction of time series of dune mobility from sequences of optical satellite imagery. The technique has been applied to the Bodélé Depression in northern Chad, to demonstrate that dune migration rates in the central Sahara have been remarkably constant for nearly half a century, leading us to conclude that wind velocities have not changed more than 0.2% per year over that period. It is therefore unlikely that the frequency and intensity of dust storms originating from this ‘hot spot’ has significantly changed over the past decades either.

  5. Characterization of the Dielectric Constant in the Trichoderma reesei Cel7B Active Site.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiangfei; Wang, Yefei; Zhang, Shujun; Yan, Shihai; Li, Tong; Yao, Lishan

    2015-07-27

    An attempt is made to evaluate the dielectric constant of the Trichoderma reesei Cel7B active site. Through kinetic measurements, the pKa value of the catalytic acid E201 is determined. Mutations (away from E201) with net charge changes are introduced to perturb the E201 pKa. It is shown that the mutation with a +1 charge change (including G225R, G230R, and A335R) decreases the pKa of E201, whereas the mutation with a -1 charge change (including Q149E, A222D, G225D, and G230D) increases the pKa. This effect is consistent with the electrostatic interaction between the changed charge and the E201 side chain. The fitting of the experimental data yields an apparent dielectric constant of 25-80. Molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules indicate that the high solvent accessibility of the active site contributes largely to the high dielectric constant. ONIOM calculations show that high dielectric constant benefits the catalysis through decreasing the energy of the transition state relative to that of the enzyme substrate complex.

  6. Time Activities at the BIPM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Time Section, and have been available, in the form of computer-readable files, in the BIPM INTERNET anonymous FTP since 5 April 1994. For yrars...TIME ACTIVITIES AT THE BIPM Claudine Thomas Bureau International des Poids et Mesures Pa,villion de Breteuil 32312 Skvres Cedex France...Abstract The generation and dissemination of International Atomic Time, TAI, and of Coordinated Universal Time, UTC, are explicitly mentioned in the list

  7. Time activities at the BIPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Claudine

    1995-01-01

    The generation and dissemination of International Atomic Time, TAI, and of Coordinated Universal Time, UTC, are explicitly mentioned in the list of the principal tasks of the BIPM, recalled in the Comptes Rendus of the 18th Conference Generale des Poids et Mesures, in 1987. These tasks are fulfilled by the BIPM Time Section, thanks to international cooperation with national timing centers, which maintain, under metrological conditions, the clocks used to generate TAI. Besides the current work of data collection and processing, research activities are carried out in order to adapt the computation of TAI to the most recent improvements occurring in the time and frequency domains. Studies concerning the application of general relativity and pulsar timing to time metrology are also actively pursued. This paper summarizes the work done in all these fields and outlines future projects.

  8. Bayesian Estimation of the Active Concentration and Affinity Constants Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Kepler, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has previously been employed to measure the active concentration of analyte in addition to the kinetic rate constants in molecular binding reactions. Those approaches, however, have a few restrictions. In this work, a Bayesian approach is developed to determine both active concentration and affinity constants using SPR technology. With the appropriate prior probabilities on the parameters and a derived likelihood function, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is applied to compute the posterior probability densities of both the active concentration and kinetic rate constants based on the collected SPR data. Compared with previous approaches, ours exploits information from the duration of the process in its entirety, including both association and dissociation phases, under partial mass transport conditions; do not depend on calibration data; multiple injections of analyte at varying flow rates are not necessary. Finally the method is validated by analyzing both simulated and experimental datasets. A software package implementing our approach is developed with a user-friendly interface and made freely available.

  9. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  10. Conditioned reinforcement in chain schedules when time to reinforcement is held constant.

    PubMed

    Bell, Matthew C; Williams, Ben A

    2013-03-01

    Two alternative approaches describe determinants of responding to a stimulus temporally distant from primary reinforcement. One emphasizes the temporal relation of each stimulus to the primary reinforcer, with relative proximity of the stimulus determining response rate. A contrasting view emphasizes immediate consequences of responding to the stimulus, the key factor being the conditioned reinforcement value of those immediate consequences. To contrast these approaches, 4 pigeons were exposed to a two-component multiple schedule with three-link chain schedules in each component. Only middle-link stimuli differed between chains. Baseline reinforcement probabilities were 0.50 for both chains; during discrimination phases it was 1.0 for one chain and 0.0 for the other. During discrimination phases pigeons responded more to the reinforcement-correlated middle link than to the extinction-correlated middle link, demonstrating that responding was affected by the probability change. Terminal link responding was also higher in the reinforced chain, even though the terminal link stimulus was identical in both chains. Of greatest interest is initial link responding, which was temporally most distant from reinforcement. Initial link responding, necessarily equal in the two chains, was significantly higher during the 1.0/0.0 discrimination phases, even though overall reinforcement probability remained constant. For 3 of 4 birds, in fact, initial-link response rates were higher than terminal-link response rates, an outcome that can be ascribed only to the potent conditioned reinforcement properties of the middle-link stimulus during the discrimination phases. Results are incompatible with any account of chain behavior based solely on relative time to reinforcement.

  11. Hydraulic time constants for transpiration of loblolly pine at a free-air carbon dioxide enrichment site.

    PubMed

    Ward, Eric J; Bell, David M; Clark, James S; Oren, Ram

    2013-02-01

    The impact of stored water on estimates of transpiration from scaled sap flux measurements was assessed in mature Pinus taeda (L.) at the Duke Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) site. We used a simple hydraulic model with measurements of sap flux (J) at breast height and the base of the live crown for 26 trees over 6 months to examine the effects of elevated CO(2) (eCO(2)) and fertilization (N(F)) treatments, as well as temporal variation in soil moisture (M(()(t)())), on estimates of the hydraulic time constant (κ). At low M(()(t)()), there was little (<12%) difference in κ of different treatments. At high M(()(t)()), differences were much greater, with κ reductions of 27, 52 and 34% in eCO(2), N(F) and eCO(2) × N(F) respective to the control. Incorporating κ with these effects into the analysis of a larger data set of previous J measurements at this site (1998-2008) improved agreement between modeled and measured values in 92% of cases. However, a simplified calibration of κ that neglected treatment and soil moisture effects performed more dependably, improving agreement in 98% of cases. Incorporating κ had the effect of increasing estimates of reference stomatal conductance at 1 kPa vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and saturating photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) an average of 12-14%, while increasing estimated sensitivities to VPD and PAR. A computationally efficient hydraulic model, such as the one presented here, incorporated into a hierarchical model of stomatal conductance presents a novel approach to including hydraulic time constants in estimates of stomatal responses from long-term sap flux data sets.

  12. The demise of constant price impact functions and single-time step models of speculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challet, Damien

    2007-08-01

    Constant and symmetric price impact functions, most commonly used in agent-based market modelling, are shown to give rise to paradoxical and inconsistent outcomes in the simplest case of arbitrage exploitation when open-hold-close actions are considered. The solution of the paradox lies in the non-constant nature of real-life price impact functions. A simple model that includes explicit position opening, holding, and closing is briefly introduced and its information ecology discussed, shedding new light on the relevance of the Minority Game to the study of financial markets.

  13. An Evaluation of Constant Time Delay and Simultaneous Prompting Procedures in Skill Acquisition for Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Julie A. Ackerlund; Weinkauf, Sara; Zeug, Nicole; Klatt, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that various prompting procedures are effective in teaching skills to children and adults with developmental disabilities. Simultaneous prompting includes proving a prompt immediately following an instruction; whereas constant time-delay procedures include a set time delay (i.e., 5 s or 10 s) prior to delivering a…

  14. Note: Extraction of hydrogen bond thermodynamic properties of water from dielectric constant and relaxation time data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Abhishek; Yadav, Siddharth; Suresh, S. J.

    2011-08-01

    We recently proposed a theory [Suresh, J. Chem. Phys. 113, 9727 (2000)], 10.1063/1.1320822, based on the principles of statistical mechanics, for describing the temperature variation of static dielectric constant of water and the average number of H-bonds per molecule in the liquid phase. The theoretical model contains three parameters; two of them pertain to the energy and entropy changes accompanying bond-formation, and the third (ɛ∞) represents the dielectric constant at a frequency that is sufficiently low for atomic and electronic polarization, but sufficiently high for intermolecular relaxation processes involving the movement of permanent dipole moments to be inoperative. In the absence of a consensus in the literature for the value of ɛ∞ to be used in dielectric constant calculations, it was arbitrarily set to a commonly accepted value of 1.77 (corresponding to refractive index of 1.33). Values for H-bond parameters were then estimated by best fitting model calculations to experimental data for dielectric constant across temperatures ranging from melting to the critical point of water. It is the purpose of the present Note to eliminate the ambiguity on the choice of ɛ∞ and propose refined values for the H-bond parameters.

  15. Constant versus variable response signal delays in speed--accuracy trade-offs: effects of advance preparation for processing time.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeff; Sproesser, Gudrun; Ulrich, Rolf

    2008-07-01

    In two experiments, we used response signals (RSs) to control processing time and trace out speed--accuracy trade-off(SAT) functions in a difficult perceptual discrimination task. Each experiment compared performance in blocks of trials with constant and, hence, temporally predictable RS lags against performance in blocks with variable, unpredictable RS lags. In both experiments, essentially equivalent SAT functions were observed with constant and variable RS lags. We conclude that there is little effect of advance preparation for a given processing time, suggesting that the discrimination mechanisms underlying SAT functions are driven solely by bottom-up information processing in perceptual discrimination tasks.

  16. Studies on chalcone derivatives: Complex formation, thermal behavior, stability constant and antioxidant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Yusif S.; Gaber, M.

    2015-02-01

    The chalcone 3-[4‧-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPP) and 3-(4‧-diethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-pyridinyl) prop-2-en-1-one abbreviated as DEAPP have been synthesized and characterized with IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques as described previously (El-Daly et al., 2008; Gaber et al., 2009; El-Sayed, 2013). By using UV visible spectroscopy method the mole fraction ratio for copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes were determined and it was found to be 1:1. The stability constants of this complex have been determined by Job's method. The stability constant (Kf) of copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes in universal buffer pH = 3.2 was determined to be 9.9 × 104 and 5.2 × 104 respectively. The effect of Cu(II) ion on the emission spectrum of the free chalcone is also assigned. Adherence to Beer's law and Ringbom optimum concentration ranges are determined. The thermal decomposition of the metal complexes is studied by TGA technique. The kinetic parameters like activation energy, pre-exponential factor and entropy of activation are estimated. The structure of complexes was energetically optimized through molecular mechanics applying MM+ force field coupled with molecular dynamics simulation. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the chalcone to copper nanoparticles was studied. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles:chalcone complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) chalcone complexes. Antioxidant activity of these chalcones was evaluated by using 1,1‧-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad) radicals scavenging method, which showed that the antioxidant activity of DMAPP has higher value than the DEAPP. Semi-empirical study results showed that DMAPP have higher dipole moment than DEAPP [1].

  17. Measurement of the biotransfer and time constant of radon from ingested water by human breath analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.L.; Hess, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    Forty-one tests were performed on 38 volunteers to measure elimination rates of (222)Rn in expired breath. Participants ranged from ages 9 to 85 y, with 16 males and 22 females. The levels of physical activity of the subjects ranged from very inactive to marathon level. Calibration of the flow-through scintillation cell was accomplished using a medical ventilator and (222)Rn reservoir for 5-15 L/min flow rates. The authors found a wide range of percent elimination (12-68%) in 30 min. The percent elimination has a mild correlation with the predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s and with time passed since eating. Their observations of bio-retention half-times range from 17-400 min. The whole-body dose calculations yield a mean of 2.70 + or - 3.43 nGy/Bq, and the stomach dose calculations yield a mean of 276 + or - 186 nGy/Bq. These means range beyond those previously reported. (Copyright (c) 1992 Health Physics Society.)

  18. Asymptotic structure of space-time with a positive cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavan, Aruna

    In general relativity a satisfactory framework for describing isolated systems exists when the cosmological constant Lambda is zero. The detailed analysis of the asymptotic structure of the gravitational field, which constitutes the framework of asymptotic flatness, lays the foundation for research in diverse areas in gravitational science. However, the framework is incomplete in two respects. First, asymptotic flatness provides well-defined expressions for physical observables such as energy and momentum as 'charges' of asymptotic symmetries at null infinity, [special character omitted] +. But the asymptotic symmetry group, called the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs group is infinite-dimensional and a tensorial expression for the 'charge' integral of an arbitrary BMS element is missing. We address this issue by providing a charge formula which is a 2-sphere integral over fields local to the 2-sphere and refers to no extraneous structure. The second, and more significant shortcoming is that observations have established that Lambda is not zero but positive in our universe. Can the framework describing isolated systems and their gravitational radiation be extended to incorporate this fact? In this dissertation we show that, unfortunately, the standard framework does not extend from the Lambda = 0 case to the Lambda > 0 case in a physically useful manner. In particular, we do not have an invariant notion of gravitational waves in the non-linear regime, nor an analog of the Bondi 'news tensor', nor positive energy theorems. In addition, we argue that the stronger boundary condition of conformal flatness of intrinsic metric on [special character omitted]+, which reduces the asymptotic symmetry group from Diff([special character omitted]) to the de Sitter group, is insufficient to characterize gravitational fluxes and is physically unreasonable. To obtain guidance for the full non-linear theory with Lambda > 0, linearized gravitational waves in de Sitter space-time are analyzed in

  19. Using Video Prompting and Constant Time Delay to Teach an Internet Search Basic Skill to Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios; Sigafoos, Jeff; Koutromanos, George

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated a video prompting and a constant time delay procedure for teaching three primary school students with moderate intellectual disabilities to access the Internet and download pictures related to participation in a classroom History project. Video clips were used as an antecedent prompt and as an error correction technique within a…

  20. Teaching Generalized Reading of Product Warning Labels to Young Adults with Autism Using the Constant Time Delay Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogoe, Maud S.; Banda, Devender R.; Lock, Robin H.; Feinstein, Rita

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the constant timed delay procedure for teaching two young adults with autism to read, define, and state the contextual meaning of keywords on product warning labels of common household products. Training sessions were conducted in the dyad format using flash cards. Results indicated that both participants…

  1. The Effects of Constant Time Delay and Instructive Feedback on the Acquisition of English and Spanish Sight Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelman, Michelle; Vail, Cynthia O.; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca G.

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this study evaluated the acquisition of instructive feedback information presented to four kindergarten children with mild delays taught in dyads using a constant time delay (CTD) procedure. They also assessed the learning of observational (dyadic partner) information within this instructional arrangement. A multiple probe design…

  2. Constant Time Delay: One Way to Provide Positive Behavioral Support for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Kay B.; Lingo, Amy S.

    2005-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) understand conceptually, emotionally, and legally the importance of using research-based procedures as well as positive behavioral supports. One way to provide positive behavioral support for students with EBD is constant time delay (CTD). CTD is an instructional delivery procedure…

  3. Identification of Printed Nonsense Words for an Individual with Autism: A Comparison of Constant Time Delay and Stimulus Fading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redhair, Emily

    2011-01-01

    This study compared a stimulus fading (SF) procedure with a constant time delay (CTD) procedure for identification of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) nonsense words for a participant with autism. An alternating treatments design was utilized through a computer-based format. Receptive identification of target words was evaluated using a computer…

  4. Identification of Printed Nonsense Words for an Individual with Autism: A Comparison of Constant Time Delay and Stimulus Fading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redhair, Emily I.; McCoy, Kathleen M.; Zucker, Stanley H.; Mathur, Sarup R.; Caterino, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This study compared a stimulus fading (SF) procedure with a constant time delay (CTD) procedure for identification of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) nonsense words for a participant with autism. An alternating treatments design was utilized through a computer-based format. Receptive identification of target words was evaluated using a computer…

  5. Effects of Vocabulary Instruction Using Constant Time Delay on Expository Reading of Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Youjia; Woods-Groves, Suzanne; Kaldenberg, Erica R.; Scheidecker, Bethany J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of using constant time delay (CTD) with young adults with intellectual disability on their vocabulary acquisition and retention, as well as expository reading comprehension. Four learners, ages 19 to 21 years, from a postsecondary education program for individuals with disabilities participated in the study.…

  6. Effects of Constant Time Delay Procedure on the Halliwick's Method of Swimming Rotation Skills for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Ilker; Konukman, Ferman; Birkan, Binyamin; Ozen, Arzu; Yanardag, Mehmet; Camursoy, Ilhan

    2010-01-01

    Effects of a constant time delay procedure on the Halliwick's method of swimming rotation skills (i.e., vertical and lateral rotation) for children with autism were investigated. A single subject multiple baseline model across behaviors with probe conditions was used. Participants were three boys, 8-9 years old. Data were collected over a 10-week…

  7. Asymptotics of solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with a small Planck constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omuraliev, A. S.

    2007-10-01

    A regularized asymptotics of the solution to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in which the spatial derivative is multiplied by a small Planck constant is constructed. It is shown that the asymptotics of the solution contains a rapidly oscillating boundary layer function.

  8. Isothermal titration calorimetry determination of individual rate constants of trypsin catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, César; Condado-Morales, Itzel; Olguin, Luis F; Costas, Miguel

    2015-06-15

    Determination of individual rate constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions is central to the understanding of their mechanism of action and is commonly obtained by stopped-flow kinetic experiments. However, most natural substrates either do not fluoresce/absorb or lack a significant change in their spectra while reacting and, therefore, are frequently chemically modified to render adequate molecules for their spectroscopic detection. Here, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to obtain Michaelis-Menten plots for the trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of several substrates at different temperatures (278-318K): four spectrophotometrically blind lysine and arginine N-free esters, one N-substituted arginine ester, and one amide. A global fitting of these data provided the individual rate constants and activation energies for the acylation and deacylation reactions, and the ratio of the formation and dissociation rates of the enzyme-substrate complex, leading also to the corresponding free energies of activation. The results indicate that for lysine and arginine N-free esters deacylation is the rate-limiting step, but for the N-substituted ester and the amide acylation is the slowest step. It is shown that ITC is able to produce quality kinetic data and is particularly well suited for those enzymatic reactions that cannot be measured by absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy.

  9. Time variation of the proton-electron mass ratio and the fine structure constant with a runaway dilaton

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2007-02-15

    Recent astrophysical observations indicate that the proton-electron mass ratio and the fine structure constant have gone through nontrivial time evolution. We discuss their time variation in the context of a dilaton runaway scenario with gauge coupling unification at the string scale M{sub s}. We show that the choice of adjustable parameters allows them to fit the same order magnitude of both variations and their (opposite) signs in such a scenario.

  10. Quantum logic gates from time-dependent global magnetic field in a system with constant exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Nenashev, A. V. Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Zinovieva, A. F.; Gornov, A. Yu.; Zarodnyuk, T. S.

    2015-03-21

    We propose a method that implements a universal set of one- and two-quantum-bit gates for quantum computation in a system of coupled electron pairs with constant non-diagonal exchange interaction. In our proposal, suppression of the exchange interaction is performed by the continual repetition of single-spin rotations. A small g-factor difference between the electrons allows for addressing qubits and avoiding strong magnetic field pulses. Numerical experiments were performed to show that, to implement the one- and two-qubit operations, it is sufficient to change the strength of the magnetic field by a few Gauss. This introduces one and then the other electron in a resonance. To determine the evolution of the two-qubit system, we use the algorithms of optimal control theory.

  11. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  12. Real-time association rate constant measurement using combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip-probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonds, Boris; Wang, Chun-Wei; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2010-02-01

    This document reports a novel method of measuring association rate constant (ka) for antibody-antigen interaction using evanescent wave-based combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip-probes. The method was demonstrated by measuring association rate constant for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA antibody interaction. "Direct method" was used for detection; goat anti-BSA "capture" antibodies were immobilized on the probe surfaces while the antigen (BSA) was directly labeled with Alexa 488 dye. The probes were subsequently submerged in 3nM Labeled BSA in egg albumin (1 mg/ml). The fluorescence signal recorded was proportional to BSA anti-BSA conjugates and continuous signal was acquired suing a fiber optic spectrometer (Ocean Optics, Inc.). A 476 nm diode laser was use as an excitation source. Association constant was estimated from a plot of signal as a function of time. Measured association rate constant ka for the binding of BSA with anti-BSA at room temperature is (8.33 +/- 0.01) x 104 M-1s-1.

  13. A compensatory algorithm for the slow-down effect on constant-time-separation approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    1991-01-01

    In seeking methods to improve airport capacity, the question arose as to whether an electronic display could provide information which would enable the pilot to be responsible for self-separation under instrument conditions to allow for the practical implementation of reduced separation, multiple glide path approaches. A time based, closed loop algorithm was developed and simulator validated for in-trail (one aircraft behind the other) approach and landing. The algorithm was designed to reduce the effects of approach speed reduction prior to landing for the trailing aircraft as well as the dispersion of the interarrival times. The operational task for the validation was an instrument approach to landing while following a single lead aircraft on the same approach path. The desired landing separation was 60 seconds for these approaches. An open loop algorithm, previously developed, was used as a basis for comparison. The results showed that relative to the open loop algorithm, the closed loop one could theoretically provide for a 6 pct. increase in runway throughput. Also, the use of the closed loop algorithm did not affect the path tracking performance and pilot comments indicated that the guidance from the closed loop algorithm would be acceptable from an operational standpoint. From these results, it is concluded that by using a time based, closed loop spacing algorithm, precise interarrival time intervals may be achievable with operationally acceptable pilot workload.

  14. Gravitational Lens Time Delays: A Statistical Assessmentof Lens Model Dependences and Implications for the Global Hubble Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-09-29

    Time delays between lensed multiple images have been known to provide an interesting probe of the Hubble constant, but such application is often limited by degeneracies with the shape of lens potentials. We propose a new statistical approach to examine the dependence of time delays on the complexity of lens potentials, such as higher-order perturbations, non-isothermality, and substructures. Specifically, we introduce a reduced time delay of the dimensionless form, and explore its behavior analytically and numerically as a function of the image configuration that is characterized by the asymmetry and opening angle of the image pair. In particular we derive a realistic conditional probability distribution for a given image configuration from Monte-Carlo simulations. We find that the probability distribution is sensitive to the image configuration such that more symmetric and/or smaller opening angle image pairs are more easily affected by perturbations on the primary lens potential. On average time delays of double lenses are less scattered than those of quadruple lenses. Furthermore, the realistic conditional distribution allows a new statistical method to constrain the Hubble constant from observed time delays. We find that 15 published time delay quasars constrain the Hubble constant to be H{sub 0} = 70 {+-} 3km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}. While systematic errors coming from the heterogeneous nature of the quasar sample and the uncertainty of the input distribution of lens potentials should be considered, reasonable agreement with other estimates indicates the usefulness of our new approach as a cosmological and astrophysical probe, particularly in the era of large-scale synoptic surveys.

  15. The Solution of the Cosmological Constant Problem and the Formation of the Space-Time Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukalov, A. V.

    The application of the microscopic theory of superconductivity to describe the early Universe makes it possible to solve the problem of dark energy. In the cosmological models with superconductivity (CMS) this problem is solved in a natural way: dark energy is the result of pairing of primary fermions with the Planck mass, and its calculated density is equal to 6×10-30 g/cm3 and is in good agreement with data of PLANK collaboration. At the same time the birth of space-time domains can also be described in the proposed model. Characteristic parameters of interaction of primary fermions determine the changes of the scale and values of different, but conjugate with each other, phase transitions - for the dark energy, the observed evolving Universe and other component of the condensate of primary fermions.

  16. An Efficient Format for Nearly Constant-Time Access to Arbitrary Time Intervals in Large Trace Files

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, Anthony; Gropp, William; Lusk, Ewing

    2008-01-01

    A powerful method to aid in understanding the performance of parallel applications uses log or trace files containing time-stamped events and states (pairs of events). These trace files can be very large, often hundreds or even thousands of megabytes. Because of the cost of accessing and displaying such files, other methods are often used that reduce the size of the tracefiles at the cost of sacrificing detail or other information. This paper describes a hierarchical trace file format that provides for display of an arbitrary time window in a time independent of the total size of the file andmore » roughly proportional to the number of events within the time window. This format eliminates the need to sacrifice data to achieve a smaller trace file size (since storage is inexpensive, it is necessary only to make efficient use of bandwidth to that storage). The format can be used to organize a trace file or to create a separate file of annotations that may be used with conventional trace files. We present an analysis of the time to access all of the events relevant to an interval of time and we describe experiments demonstrating the performance of this file format.« less

  17. Theoretical determination of chemical rate constants using novel time-dependent methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.

    1994-01-01

    The work completed within the grant period 10/1/91 through 12/31/93 falls primarily in the area of reaction dynamics using both quantum and classical mechanical methodologies. Essentially four projects have been completed and have been or are in preparation of being published. The majority of time was spent in the determination of reaction rate coefficients in the area of hydrocarbon fuel combustion reactions which are relevant to NASA's High Speed Research Program (HSRP). These reaction coefficients are important in the design of novel jet engines with low NOx emissions, which through a series of catalytic reactions contribute to the deterioration of the earth's ozone layer. A second area of research studied concerned the control of chemical reactivity using ultrashort (femtosecond) laser pulses. Recent advances in pulsed-laser technologies have opened up a vast new field to be investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The photodissociation of molecules adsorbed on surfaces using novel time-independent quantum mechanical methods was a third project. And finally, using state-of-the-art, high level ab initio electronic structure methods in conjunction with accurate quantum dynamical methods, the rovibrational energy levels of a triatomic molecule with two nonhydrogen atoms (HCN) were calculated to unprecedented levels of agreement between theory and experiment.

  18. Light deflection, lensing, and time delays from gravitational potentials and Fermat's principle in the presence of a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Ishak, Mustapha

    2008-11-15

    The contributions of the cosmological constant to the deflection angle and the time delays are derived from the integration of the gravitational potential as well as from Fermat's principle. The findings are in agreement with recent results using exact solutions to Einstein's equations and reproduce precisely the new {lambda} term in the bending angle and the lens equation. The consequences on time-delay expressions are explored. While it is known that {lambda} contributes to the gravitational time delay, it is shown here that a new {lambda} term appears in the geometrical time delay as well. Although these newly derived terms are perhaps small for current observations, they do not cancel out as previously claimed. Moreover, as shown before, at galaxy cluster scale, the {lambda} contribution can be larger than the second-order term in the Einstein deflection angle for several cluster lens systems.

  19. Lab-scale experimental strategy for determining micropollutant partition coefficient and biodegradation constants in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Pomiès, M; Choubert, J M; Wisniewski, C; Miège, C; Budzinski, H; Coquery, M

    2015-03-01

    The nitrifying/denitrifying activated sludge process removes several micropollutants from wastewater by sorption onto sludge and/or biodegradation. The objective of this paper is to propose and evaluate a lab-scale experimental strategy for the determination of partition coefficient and biodegradation constant for micropollutant with an objective of modelling their removal. Four pharmaceutical compounds (ibuprofen, atenolol, diclofenac and fluoxetine) covering a wide hydrophobicity range (log Kow from 0.16 to 4.51) were chosen. Dissolved and particulate concentrations were monitored for 4 days, inside two reactors working under aerobic and anoxic conditions, and under different substrate feed conditions (biodegradable carbon and nitrogen). We determined the mechanisms responsible for the removal of the target compounds: (i) ibuprofen was biodegraded, mainly under aerobic conditions by cometabolism with biodegradable carbon, whereas anoxic conditions suppressed biodegradation; (ii) atenolol was biodegraded under both aerobic and anoxic conditions (with a higher biodegradation rate under aerobic conditions), and cometabolism with biodegradable carbon was the main mechanism; (iii) diclofenac and fluoxetine were removed by sorption only. Finally, the abilities of our strategy were evaluated by testing the suitability of the parameters for simulating effluent concentrations and removal efficiency at a full-scale plant.

  20. Spectral editing of weakly coupled spins using variable flip angles in PRESS constant echo time difference spectroscopy: Application to GABA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Jeff; Hanstock, Chris C.; Wilman, Alan H.

    2009-10-01

    A general in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy editing technique is presented to detect weakly coupled spin systems through subtraction, while preserving singlets through addition, and is applied to the specific brain metabolite γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at 4.7 T. The new method uses double spin echo localization (PRESS) and is based on a constant echo time difference spectroscopy approach employing subtraction of two asymmetric echo timings, which is normally only applicable to strongly coupled spin systems. By utilizing flip angle reduction of one of the two refocusing pulses in the PRESS sequence, we demonstrate that this difference method may be extended to weakly coupled systems, thereby providing a very simple yet effective editing process. The difference method is first illustrated analytically using a simple two spin weakly coupled spin system. The technique was then demonstrated for the 3.01 ppm resonance of GABA, which is obscured by the strong singlet peak of creatine in vivo. Full numerical simulations, as well as phantom and in vivo experiments were performed. The difference method used two asymmetric PRESS timings with a constant total echo time of 131 ms and a reduced 120° final pulse, providing 25% GABA yield upon subtraction compared to two short echo standard PRESS experiments. Phantom and in vivo results from human brain demonstrate efficacy of this method in agreement with numerical simulations.

  1. A Comparison of Constant Time Delay and Most-to-Least Prompting in Teaching Laundry Skills to Students with Moderate Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Utahnah C.; Test, David W.

    1989-01-01

    This study found both constant time delay and a most-to-least prompting strategy were effective in teaching 4 moderately mentally retarded 18-year-olds to operate a washing machine and dryer.The constant time delay procedure, however, was more efficient in terms of instructional time and number of instructional errors. (Author/DB)

  2. Direct measurement of dipole-dipole/CSA cross-correlated relaxation by a constant-time experiment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yizhou; Prestegard, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Relaxation rates in NMR are usually measured by intensity modulation as a function of a relaxation delay during which the relaxation mechanism of interest is effective. Other mechanisms are often suppressed during the relaxation delay by pulse sequences which eliminate their effects, or cancel their effects when two data sets with appropriate combinations of relaxation rate effects are added. Cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) involving dipole-dipole and CSA interactions differ from auto-correlated relaxation (ACR) in that the signs of contributions can be changed by inverting the state of one spin involved in the dipole-dipole interaction. This property has been exploited previously using CPMG sequences to refocus CCR while ACR evolves. Here we report a new pulse scheme that instead eliminates intensity modulation by ACR and thus allows direct measurement of CCR. The sequence uses a constant time relaxation period for which the contribution of ACR does not change. An inversion pulse is applied at various points in the sequence to effect a decay that depends on CCR only. A 2-D experiment is also described in which chemical shift evolution in the indirect dimension can share the same constant period. This improves sensitivity by avoiding the addition of a separate indirect dimension acquisition time. We illustrate the measurement of residue specific CCR rates on the non-myristoylated yeast ARF1 protein and compare the results to those obtained following the conventional method of measuring the decay rates of the slow and fast-relaxing 15N doublets. The performances of the two methods are also quantitatively evaluated by simulation. The analysis shows that the shared constant-time CCR (SCT-CCR) method significantly improves sensitivity. PMID:18406649

  3. Change in fibrinolytic activity under the influence of a constant magnetic field. [blood coagulation normilization in heart patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yepishina, S. G.

    1974-01-01

    The fibrinolytic activity of plasma changes under the influence of a constant magnetic field (CMF) with a strength of 250 or 2500 oersteds. CMF shows a tendency toward normalization of fibrinolytic processes in the presence of pathological disturbances in fibrinolysis activation.

  4. Initial Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Data Acquired from Soyuz Landings: Establishing a Functional Performance Recovery Time Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Kofman, I. S.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Stenger, M. B.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Fisher, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Testing of crew responses following long-duration flights has not been previously possible until a minimum of more than 24 hours after landing. As a result, it has not been possible to determine the trend of the early recovery process, nor has it been possible to accurately assess the full impact of the decrements associated with long-duration flight. To overcome these limitations, both the Russian and U.S. programs have implemented joint testing at the Soyuz landing site. This International Space Station research effort has been identified as the functional Field Test, and represents data collect on NASA, Russian, European Space Agency, and Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency crews. RESEARCH The primary goal of this research is to determine functional abilities associated with long-duration space flight crews beginning as soon after landing as possible on the day of landing (typically within 1 to 1.5 hours). This goal has both sensorimotor and cardiovascular elements. To date, a total of 15 subjects have participated in a 'pilot' version of the full 'field test'. The full version of the 'field test' will assess functional sensorimotor measurements included hand/eye coordination, standing from a seated position (sit-to-stand), walking normally without falling, measurement of dynamic visual acuity, discriminating different forces generated with the hands (both strength and ability to judge just noticeable differences of force), standing from a prone position, coordinated walking involving tandem heel-to-toe placement (tested with eyes both closed and open), walking normally while avoiding obstacles of differing heights, and determining postural ataxia while standing (measurement of quiet stance). Sensorimotor performance has been obtained using video records, and data from body worn inertial sensors. The cardiovascular portion of the investigation has measured blood pressure and heart rate during a timed stand test in conjunction with postural ataxia

  5. Non-linear effects in the determination of the gravitational constant by means of the swing time method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. T.

    1984-11-01

    Nonlinear effects on the experimental measurement of the gravitational constant by the swing-time method (Reich, 1852; Heyl and Chrzanowski, 1942; Luther and Towler, 1982) are evaluated analytically, extending the results of Cook and Chen (1982) and Chen et al. (1984) to treat both near and far positions of the pendulum for an attracting mass of arbitrary shape. Particular attention is given to the appearance of theta-squared terms in the far-position case, and the experimental conditions under which these nonlinear effects cancel each other are defined.

  6. Effect of UV curing time on physical and electrical properties and reliability of low dielectric constant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Kai-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lung; Chang, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Yu-Min; Leu, Jihperng

    2014-11-01

    This study comprehensively investigates the effect of ultraviolet (UV) curing time on the physical, electrical, and reliability characteristics of porous low-k materials. Following UV irradiation for various periods, the depth profiles of the chemical composition in the low-k dielectrics were homogeneous. Initially, the UV curing process preferentially removed porogen-related CH{sub x} groups and then modified Si-CH{sub 3} and cage Si-O bonds to form network Si-O bonds. The lowest dielectric constant (k value) was thus obtained at a UV curing time of 300 s. Additionally, UV irradiation made porogen-based low-k materials hydrophobic and to an extent that increased with UV curing time. With a short curing time (<300 s), porogen was not completely removed and the residues degraded reliability performance. A long curing time (>300 s) was associated with improved mechanical strength, electrical performance, and reliability of the low-k materials, but none of these increased linearly with UV curing time. Therefore, UV curing is necessary, but the process time must be optimized for porous low-k materials on back-end of line integration in 45 nm or below technology nodes.

  7. Higgs potential from extended Brans–Dicke theory and the time-evolution of the fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solà, Joan; Karimkhani, Elahe; Khodam-Mohammadi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the enormous significance of the Higgs potential in the context of the standard model of electroweak interactions and in grand unified theories, its ultimate origin is fundamentally unknown and must be introduced by hand in accordance with the underlying gauge symmetry and the requirement of renormalizability. Here we propose a more physical motivation for the structure of the Higgs potential, which we derive from a generalized Brans–Dicke (BD) theory containing two interacting scalar fields. One of these fields is coupled to curvature as in the BD formulation, whereas the other is coupled to gravity both derivatively and non-derivatively through the curvature scalar and the Ricci tensor. By requiring that the cosmological solutions of the model are consistent with observations, we show that the effective scalar field potential adopts the Higgs potential form with a mildly time-evolving vacuum expectation value. This residual vacuum dynamics could be responsible for the possible time variation of the fundamental constants, and is reminiscent of former Bjorken’s ideas on the cosmological constant problem.

  8. Comparing Teacher-Directed and Computer-Assisted Constant Time Delay for Teaching Functional Sight Words to Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mari Beth; Hurley, Kevin J.; Cihak, David F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of teacher-directed and computer-assisted constant time delay strategies for teaching three students with moderate intellectual disability to read functional sight words. Target words were those found in recipes and were taught via teacher-delivered constant time delay or…

  9. Constantly stirred sorbent and continuous flow integrative sampler: new integrative samplers for the time weighted average water monitoring.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Julio; Gutiérrez, Cristina; Capilla, Elisabeth; Tortajada, Rafael; Sanjuán, Lorena; Fuentes, Alicia; Valor, Ignacio

    2009-07-31

    Two innovative integrative samplers have been developed enabling high sampling rates unaffected by turbulences (thus avoiding the use of performance reference compounds) and with negligible lag time values. The first, called the constantly stirred sorbent (CSS) consists of a rotator head that holds the sorbent. The rotation speed given to the head generates a constant turbulence around the sorbent making it independent of the external hydrodynamics. The second, called the continuous flow integrative sampler (CFIS) consists of a small peristaltic pump which produces a constant flow through a glass cell. The sorbent is located inside this cell. Although different sorbents can be used, poly(dimethylsiloxane) PDMS under the commercial twister format (typically used for stir bar sorptive extraction) was evaluated for the sampling of six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and three organochlorine pesticides. These new devices have many analogies with passive samplers but cannot truly be defined as such since they need a small energy supply of around 0.5 W supplied by a battery. Sampling rates from 181 x 10(-3) to 791 x 10(-3) L/day were obtained with CSS and 18 x 10(-3) to 53 x 10(-3) with CFIS. Limits of detection for these devices are in the range from 0.3 to 544 pg/L with a precision below 20%. An in field evaluation for both devices was carried out for a 5 days sampling period in the outlet of a waste water treatment plant with comparable results to those obtained with a classical sampling method.

  10. The Leisure-Time Activity of Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedova, N. N.

    2011-01-01

    Survey data show that Russians relegate free time and leisure activity to secondary status compared to work, and free time faces the threat of becoming devalued and losing its importance as a life value. At the same time, in the structure of Russians' leisure activities there is an ongoing tendency for leisure to become simpler, for active types…

  11. Time-frequency analysis of nonstationary vibration signals for deployable structures by using the constant-Q nonstationary gabor transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Yan, Shaoze; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Deployable structures have been widely used in on-orbit servicing spacecrafts, and the vibration properties of such structures have become increasingly important in the aerospace industry. The constant-Q nonstationary Gabor transform (CQ-NSGT) is introduced in this paper to accurately evaluate the variation in the frequency and amplitude of vibration signals along with time. First, an example signal is constructed on the basis of the vibration properties of deployable structures and is processed by the short-time Fourier transform, Wigner-Ville distribution, Hilbert-Huang transform, and CQ-NSGT. Results show that time and frequency resolutions are simultaneously fine only by employing CQ-NSGT. Subsequently, a zero padding operation is conducted to correct the calculation error at the end of the transform results. Finally, a set of experimental devices is constructed. The vibration signal of the experimental mode is processed by CQ-NSGT. On this basis, the experimental signal properties are discussed. This time-frequency method may be useful for formulating the dynamics for complex deployable structures.

  12. Energy landscape analysis of native folding of the prion protein yields the diffusion constant, transition path time, and rates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Gupta, Amar Nath; Liu, Xia; Neupane, Krishna; Brigley, Angela M; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T

    2012-09-04

    Protein folding is described conceptually in terms of diffusion over a configurational free-energy landscape, typically reduced to a one-dimensional profile along a reaction coordinate. In principle, kinetic properties can be predicted directly from the landscape profile using Kramers theory for diffusive barrier crossing, including the folding rates and the transition time for crossing the barrier. Landscape theory has been widely applied to interpret the time scales for protein conformational dynamics, but protein folding rates and transition times have not been calculated directly from experimentally measured free-energy profiles. We characterized the energy landscape for native folding of the prion protein using force spectroscopy, measuring the change in extension of a single protein molecule at high resolution as it unfolded/refolded under tension. Key parameters describing the landscape profile were first recovered from the distributions of unfolding and refolding forces, allowing the diffusion constant for barrier crossing and the transition path time across the barrier to be calculated. The full landscape profile was then reconstructed from force-extension curves, revealing a double-well potential with an extended, partially unfolded transition state. The barrier height and position were consistent with the previous results. Finally, Kramers theory was used to predict the folding rates from the landscape profile, recovering the values observed experimentally both under tension and at zero force in ensemble experiments. These results demonstrate how advances in single-molecule theory and experiment are harnessing the power of landscape formalisms to describe quantitatively the mechanics of folding.

  13. Recovery and radiation corrections and time constants of several sizes of shielded and unshielded thermocouple probes for measuring gas temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.; Holanda, R.; Krause, L. N.

    1978-01-01

    Performance characteristics were experimentally determined for several sizes of a shielded and unshielded thermocouple probe design. The probes are of swaged construction and were made of type K wire with a stainless steel sheath and shield and MgO insulation. The wire sizes ranged from 0.03- to 1.02-mm diameter for the unshielded design and from 0.16- to 0.81-mm diameter for the shielded design. The probes were tested through a Mach number range of 0.2 to 0.9, through a temperature range of room ambient to 1420 K, and through a total-pressure range of 0.03 to 0.2.2 MPa (0.3 to 22 atm). Tables and graphs are presented to aid in selecting a particular type and size. Recovery corrections, radiation corrections, and time constants were determined.

  14. Zoom-TOFMS: addition of a constant-momentum-acceleration "zoom" mode to time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Elise A; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Ray, Steven J; Enke, Christie G; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the performance of a new mass spectrometry concept called zoom time-of-flight mass spectrometry (zoom-TOFMS). In our zoom-TOFMS instrument, we combine two complementary types of TOFMS: conventional, constant-energy acceleration (CEA) TOFMS and constant-momentum acceleration (CMA) TOFMS to provide complete mass-spectral coverage as well as enhanced resolution and duty factor for a narrow, targeted mass region, respectively. Alternation between CEA- and CMA-TOFMS requires only that electrostatic instrument settings (i.e., reflectron and ion optics) and ion acceleration conditions be changed. The prototype zoom-TOFMS instrument has orthogonal-acceleration geometry, a total field-free distance of 43 cm, and a direct-current glow-discharge ionization source. Experimental results demonstrate that the CMA-TOFMS "zoom" mode offers resolution enhancement of 1.6 times over single-stage acceleration CEA-TOFMS. For the atomic mass range studied here, the maximum resolving power at full-width half-maximum observed for CEA-TOFMS was 1,610 and for CMA-TOFMS the maximum was 2,550. No difference in signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio was observed between the operating modes of zoom-TOFMS when both were operated at equivalent repetition rates. For a 10-kHz repetition rate, S/N values for CEA-TOFMS varied from 45 to 990 and from 67 to 10,000 for CMA-TOFMS. This resolution improvement is the result of a linear TOF-to-mass scale and the energy-focusing capability of CMA-TOFMS. Use of CMA also allows ions outside a given m/z range to be rejected by simple ion-energy barriers to provide a substantial improvement in duty factor.

  15. Time constants for temperature elevation in human models exposed to dipole antennas and beams in the frequency range from 1 to 30 GHz.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Ryota; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Ziskin, Marvin C; Foster, Kenneth R

    2017-03-07

    This study computes the time constants of the temperature elevations in human head and body models exposed to simulated radiation from dipole antennas, electromagnetic beams, and plane waves. The frequency range considered is from 1 to 30 GHz. The specific absorption rate distributions in the human models are first computed using the finite-difference time-domain method for the electromagnetics. The temperature elevation is then calculated by solving the bioheat transfer equation. The computational results show that the thermal time constants (defined as the time required to reach 63% of the steady state temperature elevation) decrease with the elevation in radiation frequency. For frequencies higher than 4 GHz, the computed thermal time constants are smaller than the averaging time prescribed in the ICNIRP guidelines, but larger than the averaging time in the IEEE standard. Significant differences between the different head models are observed at frequencies higher than 10 GHz, which is attributable to the heat diffusion from the power absorbed in the pinna. The time constants for beam exposures become large with the increase in beam diameter. The thermal time constant in the brain is larger than that in the superficial tissues at high frequencies, because the brain temperature elevation is caused by the heat conduction of energy absorbed in the superficial tissue. The thermal time constant is minimized with an ideal beam with a minimum investigated diameter of 10 mm; this minimal time constant is approximately 30 s and is almost independent of the radiation frequency, which is supported by analytic methods. In addition, the relation between the time constant, as defined in this paper, and 'averaging time' as it appears in the exposure limits is discussed, especially for short intense pulses. Similar to the laser guidelines, provisions should be included in the limits to limit the fluence for such pulses.

  16. Blade synchronous vibration measurement based on tip-timing at constant rotating speed without once-per-revolution sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Wang, Meng

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a blade synchronous vibration measurement method based on tip-timing at constant rotating speed is presented. This method requires no once-per revolution sensor, which makes it more generally applicable, especially for high pressure compressors of the dual rotor engines. The vibration amplitude and engine order are identified with this method. The theoretical analysis is presented, and the least square method is utilized for vibration parameter identification. The method requires at least four tip-timing sensors if the Campbell diagram is previously known and five sensors if the Campbell diagram is unknown. The method has no strict requirement on the angles among sensors which facilitate the installation of the sensors in the measurement. In some special conditions the method will fail and these conditions are analyzed. Experiments are conducted on a high speed rotor with a fiber based tip-timing system, and the experimental results indicate that the theoretical analysis is correct and the method is feasible.

  17. Time constants for temperature elevation in human models exposed to dipole antennas and beams in the frequency range from 1 to 30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Ziskin, Marvin C.; Foster, Kenneth R.

    2017-03-01

    This study computes the time constants of the temperature elevations in human head and body models exposed to simulated radiation from dipole antennas, electromagnetic beams, and plane waves. The frequency range considered is from 1 to 30 GHz. The specific absorption rate distributions in the human models are first computed using the finite-difference time-domain method for the electromagnetics. The temperature elevation is then calculated by solving the bioheat transfer equation. The computational results show that the thermal time constants (defined as the time required to reach 63% of the steady state temperature elevation) decrease with the elevation in radiation frequency. For frequencies higher than 4 GHz, the computed thermal time constants are smaller than the averaging time prescribed in the ICNIRP guidelines, but larger than the averaging time in the IEEE standard. Significant differences between the different head models are observed at frequencies higher than 10 GHz, which is attributable to the heat diffusion from the power absorbed in the pinna. The time constants for beam exposures become large with the increase in beam diameter. The thermal time constant in the brain is larger than that in the superficial tissues at high frequencies, because the brain temperature elevation is caused by the heat conduction of energy absorbed in the superficial tissue. The thermal time constant is minimized with an ideal beam with a minimum investigated diameter of 10 mm this minimal time constant is approximately 30 s and is almost independent of the radiation frequency, which is supported by analytic methods. In addition, the relation between the time constant, as defined in this paper, and ‘averaging time’ as it appears in the exposure limits is discussed, especially for short intense pulses. Similar to the laser guidelines, provisions should be included in the limits to limit the fluence for such pulses.

  18. [Inotropic activity induced by carbamazepine-alkyne derivative in an isolated heart model and perfused to constant flow].

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Valverde, Lauro; Díaz-Cedillo, Francisco; López-Ramos, María; García-Cervera, Elodia; Quijano-Ascencio, Karen

    2011-06-01

    Inotropic activity induced by carbamazepine-alkyne derivative in an isolated heart model and perfused to constant flow Introduction. Few data exist with respect to the effects of carbamazepine and its derivatives at cardiovascular level; furthermore, the molecular mechanisms and cellular site of action are still unclear. Objective. The effects induced by carbamazepine-alquine derivative on perfusion pressure, vascular resistance and left ventricular pressure were evaluated. Materials and methods. The effects of carbamazepine and carbamazepine-alquine on the perfusion pressure, vascular resistance and left ventricular pressure were examined in isolated rat hearts (Langendorff model). Results. Four results were obtained: (1) The carbamazepine-alquine derivative 10-9 mM increased the perfusion pressure and vascular resistance in comparison with the carbamazepine 10-9 mM; (2) the effect of carbamazepine-alquine derivative 10-9-10-4 mM on left ventricular pressure not was inhibited by metoprolol or prazosin at a dose of 10-6 mM; (3) nifedipine 10-6 mM blocked the effects exerted by the carbamazepine-alquine derivative 10-9-10--4 mM on left ventricular pressure, and (4) the carbamazepine-alquine derivative at dose of 10-9 mM increased the concentration of intracellular calcium over a time period of 3-18 min; nevertheless, in presence of nifedipine 10-6 mM this effect was inhibited significantly (p=0.005). Conclusions. The activity exerted by carbamazepine-alquine derivative on perfusion pressure, vascular resistance and left ventricular pressure involved activation of calcium channel type-L, brought indirectly changes in the intracellular calcium levels and subsequently induced a positive inotropic effect.

  19. Temperature dependence of the damping constant and the relaxation time close to the tetragonal-cubic phase transition in SrZrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtseven, H.; Kiraci, A.

    2017-01-01

    The damping constant Γsp due to the pseudospin-phonon coupling is calculated as a function of temperature using the pseudospin-phonon coupled model and the energy fluctuation model close to the tetragonal-cubic transition (TC = 1443 K) in SrZrO3. Using the observed Raman frequencies and the linewidth (FWHM) of the soft modes (Eg and A1g) from the literature, predictions of both models studied, are examined for the tetragonal-cubic transition in this crystalline system. Values of the activation energy U are extracted and also the inverse relaxation time is predicted as a function of temperature close to the phase transition studied in SrZrO3. Divergence behaviour of the damping constant (FWHM) of the soft modes is predicted from both models as also observed experimentally when TC is approached from the tetragonal to the cubic phase in SrZrO3. The relaxation time also diverges close to the TC in this crystal. It is indicated that the tetragonal-cubic transition is of a second order as predicted from both models studied here, as also observed experimentally in SrZrO3.

  20. Cryogenic liquid hydrogen reorientation activated by constant reverse gravity acceleration of geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    A key objective for cryogenic fluid management in a spacecraft propulsion system is development of the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid outflow or vapor venting. Numerical simulation of positive liquid acquisition is attempted by introducing a reverse gravity acceleration from the propulsive thrust of auxiliary engines which exceeds critical value for the initiation of a geyser. Based on the computer simulation of flow fields during the course of fluid reorientation, six dimensionless parameters resulted. These parameters hold near-constant values through the entire range of liquid filled levels, from 30 to 80 percent, during the course of fluid reorientation.

  1. Constant reverse thrust activated reorientation of liquid hydrogen with Geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    A key objective of the cryogenic fluid management of the spacecraft propulsion system is to develop the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid outflow or vapor venting. Numerical simulation of positive liquid acquisition is attempted by introducing reverse gravity acceleration, resulting from the propulsive thrust of auxiliary engines, which exceeds critical value for the initiation of geyser. Based on the computer simulation of flowfields during the course of fluid reorientation, six dimensionless parameters resulted in this study. It shows that these parameters hold near-constant values through the entire ranges of liquid filled levels, from 30-80 percent, during the course of fluid reorientation.

  2. The Sun-Earth connect 2: Modelling patterns of a fractal Sun in time and space using the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-similar matrices of the fine structure constant of solar electromagnetic force and its inverse, multiplied by the Carrington synodic rotation, have been previously shown to account for at least 98% of the top one hundred significant frequencies and periodicities observed in the ACRIM composite irradiance satellite measurement and the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Flux data sets. This self-similarity allows for the development of a time-space differential equation (DE) where the solutions define a solar model for transmissions through the core, radiative, tachocline, convective and coronal zones with some encouraging empirical and theoretical results. The DE assumes a fundamental complex oscillation in the solar core and that time at the tachocline is smeared with real and imaginary constructs. The resulting solutions simulate for tachocline transmission, the solar cycle where time-line trajectories either 'loop' as Hermite polynomials for an active Sun or 'tail' as complementary error functions for a passive Sun. Further, a mechanism that allows for the stable energy transmission through the tachocline is explored and the model predicts the initial exponential coronal heating from nanoflare supercharging. The twisting of the field at the tachocline is then described as a quaternion within which neutrinos can oscillate. The resulting fractal bubbles are simulated as a Julia Set which can then aggregate from nanoflares into solar flares and prominences. Empirical examples demonstrate that time and space fractals are important constructs in understanding the behaviour of the Sun, from the impact on climate and biological histories on Earth, to the fractal influence on the spatial distributions of the solar system. The research suggests that there is a fractal clock underpinning solar frequencies in packages defined by the fine structure constant, where magnetic flipping and irradiance fluctuations at phase changes, have periodically impacted on the

  3. Gravity currents produced by constant and time varying inflow in a circular cross-section channel: Experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, S.; Ungarish, M.; Di Federico, V.; Chiapponi, L.; Addona, F.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate high-Reynolds number gravity currents (GC) in a horizontal channel of circular cross-section. We focus on GC sustained by constant or time varying inflow (volume of injected fluid ∝ tα, with α = 1 and α > 1). The novelty of our work is in the type of the gravity currents: produced by influx/outflux boundary conditions, and propagation in circular (or semi-circular) channel. The objective is to elucidate the main propagation features and correlate them to the governing dimensionless parameters; to this end, we use experimental observations guided by shallow-water (SW) theoretical models. The system is of Boussinesq type with the denser fluid (salt water) injected into the ambient fluid (tap water) at one end section of a circular tube of 19 cm diameter and 605 cm long. The ambient fluid fills the channel of radius r* up to a given height H* = βr* (0 < β < 2) where it is open to the atmosphere. This fluid is displaced by the intruding current and outflows either at the same or at the opposite end-side of the channel. The two different configurations (with return and no-return flow) allow to analyze the impact of the motion of the ambient fluid on the front speed of the intruding current. For Q larger than some threshold value, the current is expected theoretically to undergo a choking process which limits the speed/thickness of propagation. Two series of experiments were conducted with constant and time varying inflow. The choking effect was observed, qualitatively, in both series. The theory correctly predicts the qualitative behavior, but systematically overestimates the front speed of the current (consistent with previously-published data concerning rectangular and non-rectangular cross-sections), with larger discrepancies for the no-return flow case. These discrepancies are mainly due to: (i) the variations of the free-surface of the ambient fluid with respect to its nominal value (the theoretical model assumes a fixed free-slip top of the

  4. ESTIMATION OF CONSTANT AND TIME-VARYING DYNAMIC PARAMETERS OF HIV INFECTION IN A NONLINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION MODEL.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hua; Miao, Hongyu; Wu, Hulin

    2010-03-01

    Modeling viral dynamics in HIV/AIDS studies has resulted in deep understanding of pathogenesis of HIV infection from which novel antiviral treatment guidance and strategies have been derived. Viral dynamics models based on nonlinear differential equations have been proposed and well developed over the past few decades. However, it is quite challenging to use experimental or clinical data to estimate the unknown parameters (both constant and time-varying parameters) in complex nonlinear differential equation models. Therefore, investigators usually fix some parameter values, from the literature or by experience, to obtain only parameter estimates of interest from clinical or experimental data. However, when such prior information is not available, it is desirable to determine all the parameter estimates from data. In this paper, we intend to combine the newly developed approaches, a multi-stage smoothing-based (MSSB) method and the spline-enhanced nonlinear least squares (SNLS) approach, to estimate all HIV viral dynamic parameters in a nonlinear differential equation model. In particular, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to propose a comparatively thorough procedure, accounting for both efficiency and accuracy, to rigorously estimate all key kinetic parameters in a nonlinear differential equation model of HIV dynamics from clinical data. These parameters include the proliferation rate and death rate of uninfected HIV-targeted cells, the average number of virions produced by an infected cell, and the infection rate which is related to the antiviral treatment effect and is time-varying. To validate the estimation methods, we verified the identifiability of the HIV viral dynamic model and performed simulation studies. We applied the proposed techniques to estimate the key HIV viral dynamic parameters for two individual AIDS patients treated with antiretroviral therapies. We demonstrate that HIV viral dynamics can be well characterized and

  5. RC time constant of single lung equals that of both lungs together: a study in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saouti, N; Westerhof, N; Helderman, F; Marcus, J T; Stergiopulos, N; Westerhof, B E; Boonstra, A; Postmus, P E; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A

    2009-12-01

    The product of resistance, R, and compliance, C (RC time), of the entire pulmonary circulation is constant. It is unknown if this constancy holds for individual lungs. We determined R and C in individual lungs in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) patients where resistances differ between both lungs. Also, the contribution of the proximal pulmonary arteries (PA) to total lung compliance was assessed. Patients (n=23) were referred for the evaluation of CTEPH. Pressure was measured by right heart catheterization and flows in the main, left, and right PA by magnetic resonance imaging. Total, left, and right lung resistances were calculated as mean pressure divided by mean flow. Total, left, and right lung compliances were assessed by the pulse pressure method. Proximal compliances were derived from cross-sectional area change DeltaA and systolic-diastolic pressure difference DeltaP (DeltaA/DeltaP) in main, left, and right PA, multiplied by vessel length. The lung with the lowest blood flow was defined "low flow" (LF), the contralateral lung "high flow" (HF). Total resistance was 0.57+/-0.28 mmHg.s(-1).ml(-1), and resistances of LF and HF lungs were 1.57+/-0.2 vs. 1.00+/-0.1 mmHg.s(-1).ml(-1), respectively, P<0.0001. Total compliance was 1.22+/-1.1 ml/mmHg, and compliances of LF and HF lung were 0.47+/-0.11 and 0.62+/-0.12 ml/mmHg, respectively, P=0.01. Total RC time was 0.49+/-0.2 s, and RC times for the LF and HF lung were 0.45+/-0.2 and 0.45+/-0.1 s, respectively, not different. Proximal arterial compliance, given by the sum of main, right, and left PA compliances, was only 19% of total lung compliance. The RC time of a single lung equals that of both lungs together, and pulmonary arterial compliance comes largely from the distal vasculature.

  6. Communication: Constant uncertainty molecular dynamics: A simple and efficient algorithm to incorporate quantum nature into a real-time molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Taisuke

    2016-11-07

    We propose a novel molecular dynamics (MD) algorithm for approximately dealing with a nuclear quantum dynamics in a real-time MD simulation. We have found that real-time dynamics of the ensemble of classical particles acquires quantum nature by introducing a constant quantum mechanical uncertainty constraint on its classical dynamics. The constant uncertainty constraint is handled by the Lagrange multiplier method and implemented into a conventional MD algorithm. The resulting constant uncertainty molecular dynamics (CUMD) is applied to the calculation of quantum position autocorrelation functions on quartic and Morse potentials. The test calculations show that CUMD gives better performance than ring-polymer MD because of the inclusion of the quantum zero-point energy during real-time evolution as well as the quantum imaginary-time statistical effect stored in an initial condition. The CUMD approach will be a possible starting point for new real-time quantum dynamics simulation in condensed phase.

  7. Communication: Constant uncertainty molecular dynamics: A simple and efficient algorithm to incorporate quantum nature into a real-time molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Taisuke

    2016-11-01

    We propose a novel molecular dynamics (MD) algorithm for approximately dealing with a nuclear quantum dynamics in a real-time MD simulation. We have found that real-time dynamics of the ensemble of classical particles acquires quantum nature by introducing a constant quantum mechanical uncertainty constraint on its classical dynamics. The constant uncertainty constraint is handled by the Lagrange multiplier method and implemented into a conventional MD algorithm. The resulting constant uncertainty molecular dynamics (CUMD) is applied to the calculation of quantum position autocorrelation functions on quartic and Morse potentials. The test calculations show that CUMD gives better performance than ring-polymer MD because of the inclusion of the quantum zero-point energy during real-time evolution as well as the quantum imaginary-time statistical effect stored in an initial condition. The CUMD approach will be a possible starting point for new real-time quantum dynamics simulation in condensed phase.

  8. Timed Maternal Melatonin Treatment Reverses Circadian Disruption of the Fetal Adrenal Clock Imposed by Exposure to Constant Light

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Natalia; Abarzua-Catalan, Lorena; Vilches, Nelson; Galdames, Hugo A.; Spichiger, Carlos; Richter, Hans G.; Valenzuela, Guillermo J.; Seron-Ferre, Maria; Torres-Farfan, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Surprisingly, in our modern 24/7 society, there is scant information on the impact of developmental chronodisruption like the one experienced by shift worker pregnant women on fetal and postnatal physiology. There are important differences between the maternal and fetal circadian systems; for instance, the suprachiasmatic nucleus is the master clock in the mother but not in the fetus. Despite this, several tissues/organs display circadian oscillations in the fetus. Our hypothesis is that the maternal plasma melatonin rhythm drives the fetal circadian system, which in turn relies this information to other fetal tissues through corticosterone rhythmic signaling. The present data show that suppression of the maternal plasma melatonin circadian rhythm, secondary to exposure of pregnant rats to constant light along the second half of gestation, had several effects on fetal development. First, it induced intrauterine growth retardation. Second, in the fetal adrenal in vivo it markedly affected the mRNA expression level of clock genes and clock-controlled genes as well as it lowered the content and precluded the rhythm of corticosterone. Third, an altered in vitro fetal adrenal response to ACTH of both, corticosterone production and relative expression of clock genes and steroidogenic genes was observed. All these changes were reversed when the mother received a daily dose of melatonin during the subjective night; supporting a role of melatonin on overall fetal development and pointing to it as a ‘time giver’ for the fetal adrenal gland. Thus, the present results collectively support that the maternal circadian rhythm of melatonin is a key signal for the generation and/or synchronization of the circadian rhythms in the fetal adrenal gland. In turn, low levels and lack of a circadian rhythm of fetal corticosterone may be responsible of fetal growth restriction; potentially inducing long term effects in the offspring, possibility that warrants further research. PMID

  9. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, “The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations,” J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of “solvated ionic radius” assumed by earlier studies.

  10. A procedure to find thermodynamic equilibrium constants for CO2 and CH4 adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Trinh, T T; van Erp, T S; Bedeaux, D; Kjelstrup, S; Grande, C A

    2015-03-28

    Thermodynamic equilibrium for adsorption means that the chemical potential of gas and adsorbed phase are equal. A precise knowledge of the chemical potential is, however, often lacking, because the activity coefficient of the adsorbate is not known. Adsorption isotherms are therefore commonly fitted to ideal models such as the Langmuir, Sips or Henry models. We propose here a new procedure to find the activity coefficient and the equilibrium constant for adsorption which uses the thermodynamic factor. Instead of fitting the data to a model, we calculate the thermodynamic factor and use this to find first the activity coefficient. We show, using published molecular simulation data, how this procedure gives the thermodynamic equilibrium constant and enthalpies of adsorption for CO2(g) on graphite. We also use published experimental data to find similar thermodynamic properties of CO2(g) and of CH4(g) adsorbed on activated carbon. The procedure gives a higher accuracy in the determination of enthalpies of adsorption than ideal models do.

  11. Ghrelin receptor-knockout mice display alterations in circadian rhythms of activity and feeding under constant lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Lamont, E Waddington; Bruton, J; Blum, I D; Abizaid, A

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach. Ghrelin, however, may also be a modulator of the circadian system given that ghrelin receptors are expressed in the master clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and several outputs of this region. To investigate this, we performed analyses of running wheel activity and neuronal activation in wild type (WT) and growth hormone secretagogue receptor-knockout (GHSR-KO) mice under various lighting conditions. GHSR-KO and WT mice were maintained under constant dark (DD) or constant light (LL) with ad libitum access to food before being placed on a schedule of temporally restricted access to food (4 h/day) for 2 weeks. There were no differences between KO and WT mice in free-running period under DD, but GHSR-KO mice required more days to develop a high level of food anticipatory activity, and this was lower than that observed in WT mice. Under LL, GHSR-KO mice showed greater activity overall, lengthening of their circadian period, and more resistance to the disorganisational effects of LL. Furthermore, GHSR-KO mice showed greater activity overall, and greater activity in anticipation of a scheduled meal under LL. These behavioral effects were not correlated with changes in the circadian expression of the Fos, Per1 or Per2 proteins under any lighting conditions. These results suggest that the ghrelin receptor plays a role in modulating the activity of the circadian system under normal conditions and under restricted feeding schedules, but does so through mechanisms that remain to be determined.

  12. Simultaneous recording of hippocampal oxygen and glucose in real time using constant potential amperometry in the freely-moving rat.

    PubMed

    Kealy, John; Bennett, Rachel; Lowry, John P

    2013-04-30

    Amperometric sensors for oxygen and glucose allow for real time recording from the brain in freely-moving animals. These sensors have been used to detect activity- and drug-induced changes in metabolism in a number of brain regions but little attention has been given over to the hippocampus despite its importance in cognition and disease. Sensors for oxygen and glucose were co-implanted into the hippocampus and allowed to record for several days. Baseline recordings show that basal concentrations of hippocampal oxygen and glucose are 100.26±5.76 μM and 0.60±0.06 mM respectively. Furthermore, stress-induced changes in neural activity have been shown to significantly alter concentrations of both analytes in the hippocampus. Administration of O2 gas to the animals' snouts results in significant increases in hippocampal oxygen and glucose and administration of N2 gas results in a significant decrease in hippocampal oxygen. Chloral hydrate-induced anaesthesia causes a significant increase in hippocampal oxygen whereas treatment with the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide significantly increases hippocampal oxygen and glucose. These findings provide real time electrochemical data for the hippocampus which has been previously impossible with traditional methods such as microdialysis or ex vivo analysis. As such, these sensors provide a window into hippocampal function which can be used in conjunction with behavioural and pharmacological interventions to further elucidate the functions and mechanisms of action of the hippocampus in normal and disease states.

  13. Cosmology with varying constants.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos J A P

    2002-12-15

    The idea of possible time or space variations of the 'fundamental' constants of nature, although not new, is only now beginning to be actively considered by large numbers of researchers in the particle physics, cosmology and astrophysics communities. This revival is mostly due to the claims of possible detection of such variations, in various different contexts and by several groups. I present the current theoretical motivations and expectations for such variations, review the current observational status and discuss the impact of a possible confirmation of these results in our views of cosmology and physics as a whole.

  14. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better

  15. Time-driven activity-based costing.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Anderson, Steven R

    2004-11-01

    In the classroom, activity-based costing (ABC) looks like a great way to manage a company's limited resources. But executives who have tried to implement ABC in their organizations on any significant scale have often abandoned the attempt in the face of rising costs and employee irritation. They should try again, because a new approach sidesteps the difficulties associated with large-scale ABC implementation. In the revised model, managers estimate the resource demands imposed by each transaction, product, or customer, rather than relying on time-consuming and costly employee surveys. This method is simpler since it requires, for each group of resources, estimates of only two parameters: how much it costs per time unit to supply resources to the business's activities (the total overhead expenditure of a department divided by the total number of minutes of employee time available) and how much time it takes to carry out one unit of each kind of activity (as estimated or observed by the manager). This approach also overcomes a serious technical problem associated with employee surveys: the fact that, when asked to estimate time spent on activities, employees invariably report percentages that add up to 100. Under the new system, managers take into account time that is idle or unused. Armed with the data, managers then construct time equations, a new feature that enables the model to reflect the complexity of real-world operations by showing how specific order, customer, and activity characteristics cause processing times to vary. This Tool Kit uses concrete examples to demonstrate how managers can obtain meaningful cost and profitability information, quickly and inexpensively. Rather than endlessly updating and maintaining ABC data,they can now spend their time addressing the deficiencies the model reveals: inefficient processes, unprofitable products and customers, and excess capacity.

  16. cVEMP morphology changes with recording electrode position, but single motor unit activity remains constant.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Sally M; Colebatch, James G; Borire, Adeniyi; Straumann, Dominik; Weber, Konrad P

    2016-04-15

    Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) recorded over the lower quarter of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle in normal subjects may have opposite polarity to those recorded over the midpoint. It has thus been suggested that vestibular projections to the lower part of SCM might be excitatory rather than inhibitory. We tested the hypothesis that the SCM muscle receives both inhibitory and excitatory vestibular inputs. We recorded cVEMPs in 10 normal subjects with surface electrodes placed at multiple sites along the anterior (sternal) component of the SCM muscle. We compared several reference sites: sternum, ipsilateral and contralateral earlobes, and contralateral wrist. In five subjects, single motor unit responses were recorded at the upper, middle, and lower parts of the SCM muscle using concentric needle electrodes. The surface cVEMP had the typical positive-negative polarity at the midpoint of the SCM muscle. In all subjects, as the recording electrode was moved toward each insertion point, p13 amplitude became smaller and p13 latency increased, then the polarity inverted to a negative-positive waveform (n1-p1). Changing the reference site did not affect reflex polarity. There was a significant short-latency change in activity in 61/63 single motor units, and in each case this was a decrease or gap in firing, indicating an inhibitory reflex. Single motor unit recordings showed that the reflex was inhibitory along the entire SCM muscle. The cVEMP surface waveform inversion near the mastoid and sternal insertion points likely reflects volume conduction of the potential occurring with increasing distance from the motor point.

  17. Matched elastic constants for a perfect helical planar state and a fast switching time in chiral nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meina; Zhou, Xiaochen; Jiang, Jinghua; Yang, Huai; Yang, Deng-Ke

    2016-05-11

    Chiral nematic liquid crystals possess a self-assembled helical structure and exhibit unique selective reflection in visible and infrared light regions. Their optical properties can be electrically tuned. The tuning involves the unwinding and restoring of the helical structure. We carried out an experimental study on the mechanism of the restoration of the helical structure. We constructed chiral nematic liquid crystals with variable elastic constants by doping bent-dimers and studied their impact on the restoration. With matched twist and bend elastic constants, the helical structure can be restored dramatically fast from the field-induced homeotropic state. Furthermore, defects can be eliminated to produce a perfect planar state which exhibits high selective reflection.

  18. Sunspot Time Series: Passive and Active Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zięba, S.; Nieckarz, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Solar activity slowly and irregularly decreases from the first spotless day (FSD) in the declining phase of the old sunspot cycle and systematically, but also in an irregular way, increases to the new cycle maximum after the last spotless day (LSD). The time interval between the first and the last spotless day can be called the passive interval (PI), while the time interval from the last spotless day to the first one after the new cycle maximum is the related active interval (AI). Minima of solar cycles are inside PIs, while maxima are inside AIs. In this article, we study the properties of passive and active intervals to determine the relation between them. We have found that some properties of PIs, and related AIs, differ significantly between two group of solar cycles; this has allowed us to classify Cycles 8 - 15 as passive cycles, and Cycles 17 - 23 as active ones. We conclude that the solar activity in the PI declining phase (a descending phase of the previous cycle) determines the strength of the approaching maximum in the case of active cycles, while the activity of the PI rising phase (a phase of the ongoing cycle early growth) determines the strength of passive cycles. This can have implications for solar dynamo models. Our approach indicates the important role of solar activity during the declining and the rising phases of the solar-cycle minimum.

  19. The effect of magnetisation relaxation of superconducting grains on time relaxation of the resistance of granular HTSC in constant applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, D. A.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Shaykhutdinov, K. A.; Popkov, S. I.; Petrov, M. I.

    2009-03-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of hysteretic behavior of magnetoresistance of granular HTSC the magnetoresistance curves R(H) and time evolution of the resistance in constant applied magnetic fields have been studied in granular YBCO at T=77 K. It was found that on ascending branch of R(H) dependence the resistance at H=const decreased with time while on the descending branch the resistance increased with time in applied constant magnetic field. For the range of low magnetic fields (below the minimum point of the descending branch of R(H) dependence) the resistance at H=const decreased again. The behavior observed is well described by the model of granular HTSC, where the intergrain space is in effective magnetic field which is the superposition of the applied field and the field induced by superconducting grains. The time evolution of resistance reflects processes of time relaxation of magnetization of HTSC grains due to the intragrain flux creep.

  20. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas‐Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical

    PubMed Central

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second‐order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140‐mL gas‐phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10−12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7–2.2) × 10−12) and 2.6 × 10−12 (CI: (2.3–2.9) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10−12 (CI: (2.5–3.2) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30–37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5–10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol. PMID:27708500

  1. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas-Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Macleod, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second-order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140-mL gas-phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10(-12) (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7-2.2) × 10(-12)) and 2.6 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.3-2.9) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.5-3.2) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30-37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5-10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol.

  2. Preference as a Function of Active Interresponse Times: A Test of the Active Time Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misak, Paul; Cleaveland, J. Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe a test of the active time model for concurrent variable interval (VI) choice. The active time model (ATM) suggests that the time since the most recent response is one of the variables controlling choice in concurrent VI VI schedules of reinforcement. In our experiment, pigeons were trained in a multiple concurrent…

  3. A subsequent fit of time series and amplitude histogram of patch-clamp records reveals rate constants up to 1 per microsecond.

    PubMed

    Schröder, I; Harlfinger, P; Huth, T; Hansen, U P

    2005-01-01

    Fast gating in time series of patch-clamp current demands powerful tools to reveal the rate constants of the adequate Hidden Markov model. Here, two approaches are presented to improve the temporal resolution of the direct fit of the time series. First, the prediction algorithm is extended to include intermediate currents between the nominal levels as caused by the anti-aliasing filter. This approach can reveal rate constants that are about 4 times higher than the corner frequency of the anti-aliasing filter. However, this approach is restricted to time series with very low noise. Second, the direct fit of the time series is combined with a beta fit, i.e., a fit of the deviations of the amplitude histogram from the Gaussian distribution. Since the "theoretical" amplitude histograms for higher-order Bessel filters cannot be calculated by analytical tools, they are generated from simulated time series. In a first approach, a simultaneous fit of the time series and of the Beta fit is tested. This simultaneous fit, however, inherits the drawbacks of both approaches, not the benefits. More successful is a subsequent fit: The fit of the time series yields a set of rate constants. The subsequent Beta fit uses the slow rate constants of the fit of the time series as fixed parameters and the optimization algorithm is restricted to the fast ones. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by means of time series obtained from simulation and from the dominant K+ channel in Chara. This shows that temporal resolution can reach the microsecond range.

  4. Comparison of Simultaneous Prompting and Constant Time Delay Procedures in Teaching Children with Autism the Responses to Questions about Personal Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akmanoglu, Nurgul; Kurt, Onur; Kapan, Alper

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare simultaneous prompting (SP) and constant time delay (CTD) in terms of their effectiveness and efficiency in teaching children with autism how to respond to questions about personal information. The adapted alternating treatments model was used in the study. Three male students with autism aged 4, 6, and…

  5. Abnormal activated partial thromboplastin time and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Delicata, M; Hambley, H

    2011-08-01

    Malignancy often results in clotting abnormalities. The aetiology of haemostasis problems in cancer is complex, and is still not completely understood. We describe a case of a patient with malignant mesothelioma, who was found to have elevated activated partial thromboplastin time, due to lupus anticoagulant. We suggest that patients with malignancy should have their coagulation checked prior to any invasive procedures.

  6. TOWARD A NEW GEOMETRIC DISTANCE TO THE ACTIVE GALAXY NGC 4258. III. FINAL RESULTS AND THE HUBBLE CONSTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, E. M. L.; Reid, M. J.; Moran, J. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Argon, A. L.

    2013-09-20

    We report a new geometric maser distance estimate to the active galaxy NGC 4258. The data for the new model are maser line-of-sight (LOS) velocities and sky positions from 18 epochs of very long baseline interferometry observations, and LOS accelerations measured from a 10 yr monitoring program of the 22 GHz maser emission of NGC 4258. The new model includes both disk warping and confocal elliptical maser orbits with differential precession. The distance to NGC 4258 is 7.60 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.15 Mpc, a 3% uncertainty including formal fitting and systematic terms. The resulting Hubble constant, based on the use of the Cepheid variables in NGC 4258 to recalibrate the Cepheid distance scale, is H{sub 0} = 72.0 {+-} 3.0 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}.

  7. Timing of cortical excitability changes during the reaction time of movements superimposed on tonic motor activity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Cyril; Lavoie, Brigitte A; Barbeau, Hugues; Capaday, Charles

    2004-12-01

    Seated subjects were instructed to react to an auditory cue by simultaneously contracting the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of each ankle isometrically. Focal transcranial magnetic stimulation of the leg area of the motor cortex (MCx) was used to determine the time course of changes in motor-evoked potential amplitude (MEP) during the reaction time (RT). In one condition the voluntary contraction was superimposed on tonic EMG activity maintained at 10% of maximal voluntary contraction. In the other condition the voluntary contraction was made starting from rest. MEPs in the TA contralateral to the stimulation coil were evoked at various times during the RT in each condition. These were compared to the control MEPs evoked during tonic voluntary activity or with the subject at rest. The RT was measured trial by trial from the EMG activity of the TA ipsilateral to the magnetic stimulus, taking into account the nearly constant time difference between the two sides. The MEPs became far greater than control MEPs during the RT (mean = 332%, SD = 44 %, of control MEPs, P < 0.001) without any measurable change in the background level of EMG activity. The onset of this facilitation occurred on average 12.80 ms (SD = 7.55 ms) before the RT. There was no difference in the onset of facilitation between the two conditions. Because MEPs were facilitated without a change in the background EMG activity, it is concluded that this facilitation is specifically due to an increase of MCx excitability just before voluntary muscle activation. This conclusion is further reinforced by the observation that MEPs evoked by near-threshold anodal stimuli to the MCx were not facilitated during the RT, in contrast to those evoked by near-threshold transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, several observations in the present and previous studies indicate that MEP amplitude may be more sensitive to alpha-motoneuron activity than to motor cortical neuron activity, an idea that has important

  8. Low-energy reaction rate constants for the Ni+-assisted decomposition of acetaldehyde: observation of C-H and C-C activation.

    PubMed

    Dee, S Jason; Castleberry, Vanessa A; Villarroel, Otsmar J; Laboren, Ivanna E; Bellert, Darrin J

    2010-02-04

    Rate constants for the low-energy Ni(+)-assisted dissociative reaction of acetaldehyde have been measured under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. The rate constants are acquired through monitoring the time dependence of fragment Ni(+)CO formation. The decomposition of the precursor Ni(+)-acetaldehyde cluster ion proceeds via consecutive, parallel reaction coordinates that originate with the Ni(+)-assisted cleavage of either a C-C or an aldehyde C-H bond. The energies used to initiate these reactions are well below that required to cleave sigma-bonds in the isolated acetaldehyde molecule. Direct measurement of the reaction kinetics over a range of energies indicates that the rate-limiting step in the dissociative mechanism changes at cluster ion internal energies = 17,200 +/- 400 cm(-1). Arguments are presented that this energy marks the closure of the dissociative coordinate that initiates with C-H sigma-bond activation and thus provides a measure of the activation energy of this dissociative pathway.

  9. Electronic setup for fluorescence emission measurements and long-time constant-temperature maintenance of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes in water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, Matteo; De Nardo, Laura; Bello, Michele; Uzunov, Nikolay

    2017-03-01

    In our previous research we have observed that the fluorescence emission from water solutions of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes (SWCNT), excited by a laser with a wavelength of 830nm, diminishes with the time. We have already proved that such a fading is a function of the storage time and the storage temperature. In order to study the emission of the SWCNT as a function of these two parameters we have designed and realized a special measurement compartment with a cuvette holder where the SWCNT solutions can be measured and stored at a fixed constant temperature for periods of time as long as several weeks. To maintain the measurement setup under a constant temperature we have designed special experimental setup based on two Peltier cells with electronic temperature control.

  10. The effect of the magnetic nanoparticle's size dependence of the relaxation time constant on the specific loss power of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harabech, Mariem; Leliaert, Jonathan; Coene, Annelies; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Van Roost, Dirk; Dupré, Luc

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is a cancer treatment in which magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are subjected to an alternating magnetic field to induce heat in the tumor. The generated heat of MNPs is characterized by the specific loss power (SLP) due to relaxation phenomena of the MNP. Up to now, several models have been proposed to predict the SLP, one of which is the Linear Response Theory. One parameter in this model is the relaxation time constant. In this contribution, we employ a macrospin model based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation to investigate the relation between the Gilbert damping parameter and the relaxation time constant. This relaxation time has a pre-factor τ0 which is often taken as a fixed value ranging between 10-8 and 10-12 s. However, in reality it has small size dependence. Here, the influence of this size dependence on the calculation of the SLP is demonstrated, consequently improving the accuracy of this estimate.

  11. Science Is Constantly Cool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichinger, John

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students attempt to keep water at a constant temperature. Helps students in grades three to six hone their skills in prediction, observation, measurement, data collection, graphing, data analysis, and communication. (JRH)

  12. Solar activity affects avian timing of reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Marcel E.; Sanz, Juan José

    2009-01-01

    Avian timing of reproduction is strongly affected by ambient temperature. Here we show that there is an additional effect of sunspots on laying date, from five long-term population studies of great and blue tits (Parus major and Cyanistes caeruleus), demonstrating for the first time that solar activity not only has an effect on population numbers but that it also affects the timing of animal behaviour. This effect is statistically independent of ambient temperature. In years with few sunspots, birds initiate laying late while they are often early in years with many sunspots. The sunspot effect may be owing to a crucial difference between the method of temperature measurements by meteorological stations (in the shade) and the temperatures experienced by the birds. A better understanding of the impact of all the thermal components of weather on the phenology of ecosystems is essential when predicting their responses to climate change. PMID:19574283

  13. Absolute rate constants for the quenching of reactive excited states by melanin and related 5,6-dihydroxyindole metabolites: implications for their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Erb, C; Flammer, J; Nau, W M

    2000-05-01

    The triplet-excited state of benzophenone and the singlet-excited state of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (Fluorazophore-P) have been employed as kinetic probes to obtain information on the antioxidant activity of the skin and eye pigment melanin and its biogenetic precursors 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). The excited states were generated by the laser-flash photolysis technique and their reaction kinetics was examined by time-resolved transient absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. The reaction between triplet benzophenone and DHI produced with unit efficiency the corresponding 6O-centered semiquinone radical, which was characterized by its characteristic transient absorption. The quenching rate constants for DHI (3.1-8.4 x 10(9) M-1 s-1) and DHICA (3.3-5.5 x 10(9) M-1 s-1) were near the diffusion-controlled limit, indicating excellent antioxidant properties. Kinetic solvent effects were observed. The reactivity of synthetic melanin, assessed through the quenching rate constant of Fluorazophore-P and normalized to the number of monomer units, was more than one order of magnitude lower (2.7 x 10(8) M-1 s-1) than that of its precursors. The trend of the quenching rate constants, i.e. DHI > DHICA approximately alpha-tocopherol > melanin, along with the preferential solubility of DHICA in aqueous environments, serves to account for several experimental results from biochemical studies on the inhibition of lipid peroxidation by these natural antioxidants.

  14. Dynamical Constants and Time Universals: A First Step toward a Metrical Definition of Ordered and Abnormal Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Mark A.; du Bois, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    From the point of view of the cognitive dynamicist the organization of brain circuitry into assemblies defined by their synchrony at particular (and precise) oscillation frequencies is important for the correct correlation of all independent cortical responses to the different aspects of a given complex thought or object. From the point of view of anyone operating complex mechanical systems, i.e., those comprising independent components that are required to interact precisely in time, it follows that the precise timing of such a system is essential – not only essential but measurable, and scalable. It must also be reliable over observations to bring about consistent behavior, whatever that behavior is. The catastrophic consequence of an absence of such precision, for instance that required to govern the interference engine in many automobiles, is indicative of how important timing is for the function of dynamical systems at all levels of operation. The dynamics and temporal considerations combined indicate that it is necessary to consider the operating characteristic of any dynamical, cognitive brain system in terms, superficially at least, of oscillation frequencies. These may, themselves, be forensic of an underlying time-related taxonomy. Currently there are only two sets of relevant and necessarily systematic observations in this field: one of these reports the precise dynamical structure of the perceptual systems engaged in dynamical binding across form and time; the second, derived both empirically from perceptual performance data, as well as obtained from theoretical models, demonstrates a timing taxonomy related to a fundamental operator referred to as the time quantum. In this contribution both sets of theory and observations are reviewed and compared for their predictive consistency. Conclusions about direct comparability are discussed for both theories of cognitive dynamics and time quantum models. Finally, a brief review of some experimental data

  15. Responses to startling acoustic stimuli indicate that movement-related activation is constant prior to action: a replication with an alternate interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Maslovat, Dana; Franks, Ian M; Leguerrier, Alexandra; Carlsen, Anthony N

    2015-01-01

    A recent study by Marinovic et al. (J. Neurophysiol., 2013, 109: 996–1008) used a loud acoustic stimulus to probe motor preparation in a simple reaction time (RT) task. Based on decreasing RT latency and increases in motor output measures as the probe stimulus approached the “go” stimulus, the authors concluded that response-related activation increased abruptly 65 ms prior to the imperative stimulus, a result in contrast to previous literature. However, this study did not measure reflexive startle activity in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle, which has been used to delineate between response triggering by a loud acoustic stimuli and effects of stimulus intensity and/or intersensory facilitation. Due to this methodological limitation, it was unclear if the data accurately represented movement-related activation changes. In order to provide a measure as to whether response triggering occurred on each trial, the current experiment replicated the study by Marinovic et al., with the collection of muscle activation in the SCM. While the replication analyses involving all trials confirmed similar results to those reported by Marinovic et al., when data were limited to those in which startle-related SCM activation occurred, the results indicated that movement-related activation is constant in the 65 ms prior to action initiation. The difference between analyses suggests that when SCM activation is not considered, results may be confounded by trials in which the probe stimulus does not trigger the prepared response. Furthermore, these results provide additional confirmation that reflexive startle activation in the SCM is a robust indicator of response triggering by a loud acoustic stimulus. PMID:25663524

  16. Activated partial thromboplastin time and minor coagulopathies.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, W E; Assmus, S L; Montgomery, R R; Dubansky, A S

    1979-01-01

    Five commercially available activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test systems were compared with the kaolin partial thromboplastin time (KPTT) method to determine sensitivity in detecting minor coagulation defects. All reagent systems detected severe factor VIII-, IX-, and XI-deficient hemophilia. Homozygous states of factor XII deficiency, Fletcher factor deficiency, and high-molecular-weight kininogen deficiency (Fitzgerald trait) also showed abnormally long APTTs by all systems. Of 19 samples from patients with deficiencies of factors XII, VIII, IX, XI, and II ranging from 2.5 to 52%, eight had deficiencies that were not detected by reagent A (ellagic acid); two, by reagent B (ellagic acid); two, by reagent C (kaolin); one, by reagent D (silica); one, by the KPTT method. All deficiencies were detected by reagent E (celite). Heparin effect on plasma was less well detected by reagent A (ellagic acid) than with the other test systems. APTT test systems can vary greatly in their abilities to detect minor coagulation abnormalities.

  17. A "theory of relativity" for cognitive elasticity of time and modality dimensions supporting constant working memory capacity: involvement of harmonics among ultradian clocks?

    PubMed

    Glassman, R B

    2000-02-01

    1. The capacity of working memory (WM) for about 7+/-2 ("the magical number") serially organized simple verbal items may represent a fundamental constant of cognition. Indeed, there is the same capacity for sense of familiarity of a number of recently encountered places, observed in radial maze performance both of lab rats and of humans. 2. Moreover, both species show a peculiar capacity for retaining WM of place over delays. The literature also describes paradoxes of extended time duration in certain human verbal recall tasks. Certain bird species have comparable capacity for delayed recall of about 4 to 8 food caches in a laboratory room. 3. In addition to these paradoxes of the time dimension with WM (still sometimes called "short-term" memory) there are another set of paradoxes of dimensionality for human judgment of magnitudes, noted by Miller in his classic 1956 paper on "the magical number." We are able to reliably refer magnitudes to a rating scale of up to about seven divisions. Remarkably, that finding is largely independent of perceptual modality or even of the extent of a linear interval selected within any given modality. 4. These paradoxes suggest that "the magical number 7+/2" depends on fundamental properties of mammalian brains. 5. This paper theorizes that WM numerosity is conserved as a fundamental constant, by means of elasticity of cognitive dimensionality, including the temporal pace of arrival of significant items of cognitive information. 6. A conjectural neural code for WM item-capacity is proposed here, which extends the hypothetical principle of binding-by-synchrony. The hypothesis is that several coactive frequencies of brain electrical rhythms each mark a WM item. 7. If, indeed, WM does involve a brain wave frequency code (perhaps within the gamma frequency range that has often been suggested with the binding hypothesis) mathematical considerations suggest additional relevance of harmonic relationships. That is, if copresent sinusoids

  18. Correction of dead-time and pile-up in a detector array for constant and rapidly varying counting rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E.; Wright, T.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of dead-time and pile-up in counting experiments may become a significant source of uncertainty if not properly taken into account. Although analytical solutions to this problem have been proposed for simple set-ups with one or two detectors, these are limited when it comes to arrays where time correlation between the detector modules is used, and also in situations of variable counting rates. In this paper we describe the dead-time and pile-up corrections applied to the n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC), a 4π γ-ray detector made of 40 BaF2 modules operating at the CERN n_TOF facility. Our method is based on the simulation of the complete signal detection and event reconstruction processes and can be applied as well in the case of rapidly varying counting rates. The method is discussed in detail and then we present its successful application to the particular case of the measurement of 238U(n, γ) reactions with the TAC detector.

  19. Analysis of the tensile stress-strain behavior of elastomers at constant strain rates. I - Criteria for separability of the time and strain effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. D.; Fedors, R. F.; Schwarzl, F.; Moacanin, J.; Landel, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the tensile stress-strain relation of elastomers at constant strain rate is presented which shows that the time and the stress effect are separable if the experimental time scale coincides with a segment of the relaxation modulus that can be described by a single power law. It is also shown that time-strain separability is valid if the strain function is linearly proportional to the Cauchy strain, and that when time-strain separability holds, two strain-dependent quantities can be obtained experimentally. In the case where time and strain effect are not separable, superposition can be achieved only by using temperature and strain-dependent shift factors.

  20. Calculation of the magnetic circular dichroism B term from the imaginary part of the Verdet constant using damped time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Seth, Michael; Ziegler, Tom; Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-12-01

    A time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) formalism with damping for the calculation of the magnetic optical rotatory dispersion and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) from the complex Verdet constant is presented. For a justification of such an approach, we have derived the TDDFT analog of the sum-over-states formula for the Verdet constant. The results of the MCD calculations by this method for ethylene, furan, thiophene, selenophene, tellurophene, and pyrrole are in good agreement with our previous theoretical sum-over-states MCD spectra. For the π →π* transition of propene, we have obtained a positive Faraday B term. It is located between the two negative B terms. This finding is in agreement with experiment in the range of 6-8eV.

  1. Application of the Constant Exposure Time Technique to Transformation Experiments with Fission Neutrons; Failure to Demonstrate Dose-Rate Dependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    morphologic character- linear energy YF= 21 k’Vipm. dose mean lineal energy YD istics to one with the characteristics ofa tumour cell, a = 42 keV’pm in...in icells is horizontal position at all times to ficilitate attach- described in the reports cited above. New batches or mentreattachment of mitotic ...calculationis Nerhinski et al. I )ui1iliv 198 1 at. b,. Briefly, the( mecan values of’ lineal energy init. 11 1 R. + I-3 141.2 +012 l lid based on

  2. Analysis of agonism and inverse agonism in functional assays with constitutive activity: estimation of orthosteric ligand affinity constants for active and inactive receptor states.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Suga, Hinako; Griffin, Michael T

    2011-08-01

    We describe a modification of receptor theory for the estimation of observed affinities (K(obs)) and relative efficacies of orthosteric ligands in functional assays that exhibit constitutive activity. Our theory includes parameters for the fractions of the occupied receptor population in the active (intrinsic efficacy, ε) and inactive (ε(i)) states and analogous parameters for the fractions of the free receptor population in the active (ε(sys)) and inactive (ε(i-sys)) states. The total stimulus represents the summation of the active states of the free and occupied receptor populations. A modified operational model is developed that expresses the response as a logistic function of the total stimulus. This function includes the standard parameters related to affinity and efficacy (K(obs) and τ) as well as a parameter proportional to the activity of the free receptor complex, τ(sys). Two related parameters are proportional to the fraction of the free (τ(i-sys)) and occupied (τ(i)) receptor populations in the inactive state. We show that the estimates of the affinity constants of orthosteric ligands for the active (K(b)) and inactive (K(a)) states of the receptor are equivalent to τK(obs)/τ(sys) and τ(i)K(obs)/τ(i-sys), respectively. We verify our method with computer simulation techniques and apply it to the analysis of M(2) and M(3) muscarinic receptors. Our method is applicable in the analysis of ligand bias in drug discovery programs.

  3. Fermion Interactions, Cosmological Constant and Space-Time Dimensionality in a Unified Approach Based on Affine Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio; Dorokhov, Alexander E.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main features of unified models, based on affine geometries, is that all possible interactions and fields naturally arise under the same standard. Here, we consider, from the effective Lagrangian of the theory, the torsion induced 4-fermion interaction. In particular, how this interaction affects the cosmological term, supposing that a condensation occurs for quark fields during the quark-gluon/hadron phase transition in the early universe. We explicitly show that there is no parity-violating pseudo-scalar density, dual to the curvature tensor (Holst term) and the spinor-bilinear scalar density has no mixed couplings of A-V form. On the other hand, the space-time dimensionality cannot be constrained from multidimensional phenomenological models admitting torsion.

  4. How Constant Momentum Acceleration Decouples Energy and Space Focusing in Distance-of-Flight and Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometries

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Elise; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Enke, Chris; Ray, Steven J.; Carado, Anthony J.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2013-05-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) and distance-of-flight (DOF) mass spectrometers require means for focusing ions at the detector(s) because of initial dispersions of position and energy at the time of their acceleration. Time-of-flight mass spectrometers ordinarily employ constant energy acceleration (CEA), which creates a space-focus plane at which the initial spatial dispersion is corrected. In contrast, constant-momentum acceleration (CMA), in conjunction with an ion mirror, provides focus of the initial energy dispersion at the energy focus time for ions of all m/z at their respective positions along the flight path. With CEA, the initial energy dispersion is not simultaneously correctable as its effect on ion velocity is convoluted with that of the spatial dispersion. The initial spatial dispersion with CMA remains unchanged throughout the field-free region of the flight path, so spatial dispersion can be reduced before acceleration. Improved focus is possible when each dispersion can be addressed independently. With minor modification, a TOF mass spectrometer can be operated in CMA mode by treating the TOF detector as though it were a single element in the array of detectors that would be used in a DOF mass spectrometer. Significant improvement in mass resolution is thereby achieved, albeit over a narrow range of m/z values. In this paper, experimental and theoretical results are presented that illustrate the energy-focusing capabilities of both DOF and TOF mass spectrometry.

  5. Effective intercellular communication distances are determined by the relative time constants for cyto/chemokine secretion and diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Karl; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    1997-01-01

    A cell’s ability to effectively communicate with a neighboring cell is essential for tissue function and ultimately for the organism to which it belongs. One important mode of intercellular communication is the release of soluble cyto- and chemokines. Once secreted, these signaling molecules diffuse through the surrounding medium and eventually bind to neighboring cell’s receptors whereby the signal is received. This mode of communication is governed both by physicochemical transport processes and cellular secretion rates, which in turn are determined by genetic and biochemical processes. The characteristics of transport processes have been known for some time, and information on the genetic and biochemical determinants of cellular function is rapidly growing. Simultaneous quantitative analysis of the two is required to systematically evaluate the nature and limitations of intercellular signaling. The present study uses a solitary cell model to estimate effective communication distances over which a single cell can meaningfully propagate a soluble signal. The analysis reveals that: (i) this process is governed by a single, key, dimensionless group that is a ratio of biological parameters and physicochemical determinants; (ii) this ratio has a maximal value; (iii) for realistic values of the parameters contained in this dimensionless group, it is estimated that the domain that a single cell can effectively communicate in is ≈250 μm in size; and (iv) the communication within this domain takes place in 10–30 minutes. These results have fundamental implications for interpretation of organ physiology and for engineering tissue function ex vivo. PMID:9356436

  6. Influence of constant, alternating and cyclotron low-intensity electromagnetic fields on fibroblast proliferative activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Afinogenov, Gennadi; Afinogenova, Anna; Kalinin, Andrey

    2009-12-16

    Available data allow assuming the presence of stimulation of reparative processes under influence of low-intensity electromagnetic field, commensurable with a magnetic field of the Earth. Research of effects of low-intensity electromagnetic fields on fibroblast proliferative activity in human lungs in cell culture was performed.The influence of a constant electromagnetic field, an alternating electromagnetic field by frequency of 50 Hz and cyclotron electromagnetic field with identical intensity for all kinds of fields - 80 mcTl - on value of cellular mass and a correlation of live and dead cells in culture is investigated in three series of experiments. We used the universal electromagnetic radiator generating all three kinds of fields and supplied by a magnetometer which allows measuring the intensity of accurate within 0.1 mcTl including taking into account the Earth's magnetic field intensity.The peak value for stimulation cellular proliferation in the present experiences was two-hour influence by any of the specified kinds of electromagnetic fields. The irradiation by cyclotron electromagnetic field conducts positive dynamics in growth of live cells (up to 206+/-22%) and decreases the number of dead cells (down to 31+/-6%). Application of cyclotron magnetic fields promoted creation of optimum conditions for proliferation. As a result of researches we observed the reliable 30% increase of nitro-tetrazolium index (in nitro-tetrazolium blue test) after irradiation by cyclotron electromagnetic field in experience that testifies to strengthening of the cell breathing of living cells.In our opinion, it is necessary to pay attention not only to a pure gain of cells, but also to reduction of number dead cells that can be criterion of creation of optimum conditions for their specific development and valuable functioning.

  7. REAL TIME DATA FOR REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES [11505

    SciTech Connect

    BROCK CT

    2011-01-13

    Health physicists from the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company collaborated with Berkeley Nucleonics Corporation to modify the SAM 940 isotope identifier instrument to be used for nuclear waste remediation. These modifications coupled with existing capabilities of the SAM 940 have proven to be invaluable during remediation activities, reducing disposal costs by allowing swift remediation of targeted areas that have been identified as having isotopes of concern (IOC), and eliminating multiple visits to sites by declaring an excavation site clear of IOCs before demobilizing from the site. These advantages are enabled by accumulating spectral data for specific isotopes that is nearly 100 percent free of false positives, which are filtered out in 'real time.'

  8. Experimental investigation of the excess charge and time constant of minority carriers in the thin diffused layer of 0.1 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Lindholm, F. A.; Sah, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental method is presented that can be used to interpret the relative roles of bandgap narrowing and recombination processes in the diffused layer. This method involves measuring the device time constant by open-circuit voltage decay and the base region diffusion length by X-ray excitation. A unique illuminated diode method is used to obtain the diode saturation current. These data are interpreted using a simple model to determine individually the minority carrier lifetime and the excess charge. These parameters are then used to infer the relative importance of bandgap narrowing and recombination processes in the diffused layer.

  9. Half-logistic time constants as inotropic and lusitropic indices for four sequential phases of isometric tension curves in isolated rabbit and mouse papillary muscles.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Morita, Shigeho; Otsuji, Mikiya; Arita, Hideko; Hanaoka, Kazuo; Akins, Robert E; Hirano, Shuta; Kusakari, Yoichiro; Kurihara, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    The waveforms of myocardial tension and left ventricular (LV) pressure curves are useful for evaluating myocardial and LV performance, and especially for inotropism and lusitropism. Recently, we found that half-logistic (h-L) functions provide better fits for the two partial rising and two partial falling phases of the isovolumic LV pressure curve compared to mono-exponential (m-E) functions, and that the h-L time constants for the four sequential phases are superior inotropic and lusitropic indices compared to the m-E time constants. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the four sequential phases of the isometric tension curves in mammalian cardiac muscles could be curve-fitted accurately using h-L functions. The h-L and m-E curve-fits were compared for the four phases of the isometric twitch tension curves in 7 isolated rabbit right ventricular and 15 isolated mouse LV papillary muscles. The isometric tension curves were evaluated in the four temporal phases: from the beginning of twitch stimulation to the maximum of the first order time derivative of tension (dF/dt(max)) (Phase I), from dF/dt(max) to the peak tension (Phase II), from the peak tension to the minimum of the first order time derivative of tension (dF/dt(min)) (Phase III), and from dF/dt(min) to the resting tension (Phase IV). The mean h-L correlation coefficients (r) of 0.9958, 0.9996, 0.9995, and 0.9999 in rabbit and 0.9950, 0.9996, 0.9994, and 0.9997 in mouse for Phases I, II, III, and IV, respectively, were higher than the respective m-E r-values (P < 0.001). The h-L function quantifies the amplitudes and time courses of the two partial rising and two partial falling phases of the isometric tension curve, and the h-L time constants for the four partial phases serve as accurate and useful indices for estimation of inotropic and lusitropic effects.

  10. A Time Scheduling Model of Logistics Service Supply Chain Based on the Customer Order Decoupling Point: A Perspective from the Constant Service Operation Time

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC. PMID:24715818

  11. A time scheduling model of logistics service supply chain based on the customer order decoupling point: a perspective from the constant service operation time.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC.

  12. Measurement of homonuclear magnetic dipole-dipole interactions in multiple 1/2-spin systems using constant-time DQ-DRENAR NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinjun; Eckert, Hellmut

    2015-11-01

    A new pulse sequence entitled DQ-DRENAR (Double-Quantum based Dipolar Recoupling Effects Nuclear Alignment Reduction) was recently described for the quantitative measurement of magnetic dipole-dipole interactions in homonuclear spin-1/2 systems involving multiple nuclei. As described in the present manuscript, the efficiency and performance of this sequence can be significantly improved, if the measurement is done in the constant-time mode. We describe both the theoretical analysis of this method and its experimental validation of a number of crystalline model compounds, considering both symmetry-based and back-to-back (BABA) DQ-coherence excitation schemes. Based on the combination of theoretical analysis and experimental results we discuss the effect of experimental parameters such as the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), the spinning rate, and the radio frequency field inhomogeneity upon its performance. Our results indicate that constant-time (CT-) DRENAR is a method of high efficiency and accuracy for compounds with multiple homonuclear spin systems with particular promise for the analysis of stronger-coupled and short T2 spin systems.

  13. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Slaughter, Daniel S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Rude, Bruce S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Neppl, Stefan; Cryan, James P.; Siefermann, Katrin R.; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Fraund, Matthew W.; Khurmi, Champak; Wright, Travis W.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Gessner, Oliver; Hertlein, Marcus P.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Huse, Nils; and others

    2014-09-15

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ∼0.1 mm spatial resolution and ∼150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E{sub p} = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503–508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ∼9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ∼1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular

  14. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S.; Cryan, James P.; Siefermann, Katrin R.; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W.; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P.; Wright, Travis W.; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A.; Rude, Bruce S.; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ˜0.1 mm spatial resolution and ˜150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy Ep = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ˜9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ˜1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  15. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  16. Time-Dependent Quantum Wave Packet Study of the Si + OH → SiO + H Reaction: Cross Sections and Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Rivero Santamaría, Alejandro; Dayou, Fabrice; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus; Monnerville, Maurice

    2017-02-15

    The dynamics of the Si((3)P) + OH(X(2)Π) → SiO(X(1)Σ(+)) + H((2)S) reaction is investigated by means of the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach using an ab initio potential energy surface recently developed by Dayou et al. ( J. Chem. Phys. 2013 , 139 , 204305 ) for the ground X(2)A' electronic state. Total reaction probabilities have been calculated for the first 15 rotational states j = 0-14 of OH(v=0,j) at a total angular momentum J = 0 up to a collision energy of 1 eV. Integral cross sections and state-selected rate constants for the temperature range 10-500 K were obtained within the J-shifting approximation. The reaction probabilities display highly oscillatory structures indicating the contribution of long-lived quasibound states supported by the deep SiOH/HSiO wells. The cross sections behave with collision energies as expected for a barrierless reaction and are slightly sensitive to the initial rotational excitation of OH. The thermal rate constants show a marked temperature dependence below 200 K with a maximum value around 15 K. The TDWP results globally agree with the results of earlier quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations carried out by Rivero-Santamaria et al. ( Chem. Phys. Lett. 2014 , 610-611 , 335 - 340 ) with the same potential energy surface. In particular, the thermal rate constants display a similar temperature dependence, with TDWP values smaller than the QCT ones over the whole temperature range.

  17. Time-dependent changes in skeletal response to teriparatide: Escalating versus constant dose teriparatide (PTH 1–34) in osteoporotic women

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Elaine W.; Neer, Robert M.; Lee, Hang; Wyland, Jason J.; de la Paz, Amanda V.; Davis, Melissa C.; Okazaki, Makoto; Finkelstein, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Once-daily injections of teriparatide initially increase biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption, but markers peak after 6–12 months and then decline despite continued treatment. We sought to determine whether increasing teriparatide doses in a stepwise fashion could prolong skeletal responsiveness. We randomized 52 postmenopausal women with low spine and/or hip bone mineral density (BMD) to either a constant or an escalating subcutaneous teriparatide dose (30 mcg daily for 18 months or 20 mcg daily for 6 months, then 30 mcg daily for 6 months, then 40 mcg daily for 6 months). Serum procollagen I N-terminal propeptide, osteocalcin, and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen were assessed frequently. BMD of the spine, hip, radius, and total body was measured every 6 months. Acute changes in urinary cyclic AMP in response to teriparatide were examined in a subset of women in the constant dose group. All bone markers differed significantly between the two treatment groups. During the final six months, bone markers declined in the constant dose group but remained stable or increased in the escalating dose group (all markers, p<0.017). Nonetheless, mean area under the curve did not differ between treatments for any bone marker, and BMD increases were equivalent in both treatment groups. Acute renal response to teriparatide, as assessed by urinary cyclic AMP, did not change over 18 months of teriparatide administration. In conclusion, stepwise increases in teriparatide prevented the decline in bone turnover markers that is observed with chronic administration without altering BMD increases. The time-dependent waning of the response to teriparatide appears to be bone-specific. PMID:21111078

  18. Multipoint measurements of substorm timing and activations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuyin, Pu; Cao, X.; Zhang, H.; Ma, Z. W.; Mishin, M. V.; Kubyshkina, M. V.; Pulkkinen, T.; Reeves, G. D.; Escoubet, C. Philippe

    Substorm timing and activations are studied based on Double Star TC1, Cluster, Polar, IM- AGE, LANL satellites and ground-based Pi2 measurements. Substorm expansion onset is found to begin in the near-Earth tail around X= -(8-9) Re, then progresses both earthward and tailward. About 8-10 minutes before aurora breakup, Cluster measured an earthward flow associated with plasma sheet thinning. A couple of minutes after the breakup, TC1 first detects plasma sheet expansion and then LANL satellites near the midnight measure energetic electron injections, or vise versus. About 20 minutes (or more) later, Cluster and Polar observe plasma sheet expansion successively. Of interest are also the following findings. Auroral bulge is found to quickly broaden and expand poleward when the open magnetic flux of the polar cap is rapidly dissipated, indicating the role of tail lobe reconnection of open field lines in the development of the expansion phase. In addition, poleward expansion of auroral bulges and tailward progression of substorm expansion are shown to be closely related. An initial dipolarization in the near-Earth eventually evolve to enable disruption of the cross-tail current in a wide range of the magnetotail, until the open magnetic flux of the polar cap reaches its minimum. Acknowledgements This work is supported by the NSFC Grants 40390152 and 40536030 and Chinese Key Research Project Grant 2006CB806300. The authors acknowledge all PIs of instruments onboard Double Star and Cluster spacecraft. We also appreciate the useful discussions with R. L. McPherron and A. T. Y. Lui.

  19. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  20. Mimicking acceleration in the constant-bang-time Lemaître-Tolman model: Shell crossings, density distributions, and light cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasiński, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    The Lemaître-Tolman model with Λ=0 and constant bang time that imitates the luminosity distance-redshift relation of the ΛCDM model using the energy function E alone contains shell crossings. In this paper, the location in spacetime and the consequences of existence of the shell-crossing set (SCS) are investigated. The SCS would come into view of the central observer only at t ≈1064T to the future from now, where T is the present age of the Universe, but would not leave any recognizable trace in her observations. Light rays emitted near to the SCS are blueshifted at the initial points, but the blueshift is finite, and is overcompensated by later-induced redshifts if the observer is sufficiently far. The local blueshifts cause that z along a light ray is not a monotonic function of the comoving radial coordinate r. As a consequence, the angular diameter distance DA and the luminosity distance DL from the central observer fail to be functions of z; the relations DA(z) and DL(z) are multiple-valued in a vicinity of the SCS. The following quantities are calculated and displayed: (1) The distribution of mass density on a few characteristic hypersurfaces of constant time; some of them intersect the SCS. (2) The distribution of density along the past light cone of the present central observer. (3) A few light cones intersecting the SCS at characteristic instants. (4) The redshift profiles along several light cones. (5) The extremum-redshift hypersurface. (6) The DA(z) and DL(z) relations. (7) The last scattering time and its comparison with the ΛCDM last scattering epoch.

  1. Sieve Estimation of Constant and Time-Varying Coefficients in Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equation Models by Considering Both Numerical Error and Measurement Error.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hongqi; Miao, Hongyu; Wu, Hulin

    2010-01-01

    This article considers estimation of constant and time-varying coefficients in nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) models where analytic closed-form solutions are not available. The numerical solution-based nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimator is investigated in this study. A numerical algorithm such as the Runge-Kutta method is used to approximate the ODE solution. The asymptotic properties are established for the proposed estimators considering both numerical error and measurement error. The B-spline is used to approximate the time-varying coefficients, and the corresponding asymptotic theories in this case are investigated under the framework of the sieve approach. Our results show that if the maximum step size of the p-order numerical algorithm goes to zero at a rate faster than n(-1/(p∧4)), the numerical error is negligible compared to the measurement error. This result provides a theoretical guidance in selection of the step size for numerical evaluations of ODEs. Moreover, we have shown that the numerical solution-based NLS estimator and the sieve NLS estimator are strongly consistent. The sieve estimator of constant parameters is asymptotically normal with the same asymptotic co-variance as that of the case where the true ODE solution is exactly known, while the estimator of the time-varying parameter has the optimal convergence rate under some regularity conditions. The theoretical results are also developed for the case when the step size of the ODE numerical solver does not go to zero fast enough or the numerical error is comparable to the measurement error. We illustrate our approach with both simulation studies and clinical data on HIV viral dynamics.

  2. Sieve Estimation of Constant and Time-Varying Coefficients in Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equation Models by Considering Both Numerical Error and Measurement Error

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hongqi; Miao, Hongyu; Wu, Hulin

    2010-01-01

    This article considers estimation of constant and time-varying coefficients in nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) models where analytic closed-form solutions are not available. The numerical solution-based nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimator is investigated in this study. A numerical algorithm such as the Runge–Kutta method is used to approximate the ODE solution. The asymptotic properties are established for the proposed estimators considering both numerical error and measurement error. The B-spline is used to approximate the time-varying coefficients, and the corresponding asymptotic theories in this case are investigated under the framework of the sieve approach. Our results show that if the maximum step size of the p-order numerical algorithm goes to zero at a rate faster than n−1/(p∧4), the numerical error is negligible compared to the measurement error. This result provides a theoretical guidance in selection of the step size for numerical evaluations of ODEs. Moreover, we have shown that the numerical solution-based NLS estimator and the sieve NLS estimator are strongly consistent. The sieve estimator of constant parameters is asymptotically normal with the same asymptotic co-variance as that of the case where the true ODE solution is exactly known, while the estimator of the time-varying parameter has the optimal convergence rate under some regularity conditions. The theoretical results are also developed for the case when the step size of the ODE numerical solver does not go to zero fast enough or the numerical error is comparable to the measurement error. We illustrate our approach with both simulation studies and clinical data on HIV viral dynamics. PMID:21132064

  3. Influence of L 10 order parameter on Gilbert damping constants for FePd thin films investigated by means of time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iihama, Satoshi; Sakuma, Akimasa; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Oogane, Mikihiko; Mizukami, Shigemi; Ando, Yasuo

    2016-11-01

    We have systematically investigated the Gilbert damping constant α for L 10 -FePd films using the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TRMOKE). The field angle dependence of TRMOKE signals was measured and analyzed. The field angle dependence of the lifetime of magnetization precession was explained by evaluating extrinsic contributions such as the anisotropy distribution and two-magnon scattering. The crystalline uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy constant Ku and α values were evaluated for FePd films for various L 10 order parameters S . Ku values of approximately 15 Merg/cm3 were obtained for films with large-S values (i.e., over 0.8). In addition, α for the low-S film was found to be approximately 0.007 and decreased with increasing S . Smaller values of α (of 0.002-0.004) were obtained for films with S values of approximately 0.6-0.8. Results revealed that FePd films have both large-Ku and small-α values, which is a useful property for low-power magnetization switching while maintaining high thermal stability in spin-transfer-torque magnetoresistive random access memory applications.

  4. Uranium(IV) hydrolysis constants and solubility product of UO sub 2 times xH sub 2 O(am)

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, D.; Felmy, A.R.; Ryan, J.L. )

    1990-01-24

    The solubility of UO{sub 2} {times} xH{sub 2}O was examined in dilute solutions at room temperature in the pH range from 2 to 12. Iron powder and Eu{sup 2+} were used to effectively eliminate O{sub 2} and to maintain the possibility of oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) during the experiments. The UO{sub 2} {times} xH{sub 2}O was found to be amorphous to x-rays, and its solubility, especially at pH values > 4, was found to be 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than previously reported. Values of log K at zero ionic strength for the solubility reaction UO{sub 2} {times} xH{sub 2}O(am) + 3H{sup +} {r equilibrium} UOH{sup 3+} + (x+1)H{sub 2}, and recalculation of values of the first hydrolysis constant from spectrophotometric data reported in the literature were consistent with both the reliable solubility and spectrophotometric data and the thermodynamic properties of other actinides. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Comparison of constant and time-variant optimal forcing approaches in El Niño simulations by using the Zebiak-Cane model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ben; Duan, Wansuo

    2016-06-01

    Model errors offset by constant and time-variant optimal forcing vector approaches (termed COF and OFV, respectively) are analyzed within the framework of El Ni˜no simulations. Applying the COF and OFV approaches to the well-known Zebiak-Cane model, we re-simulate the 1997 and 2004 El Ni˜no events, both of which were poorly degraded by a certain amount of model error when the initial anomalies were generated by coupling the observed wind forcing to an ocean component. It is found that the Zebiak-Cane model with the COF approach roughly reproduced the 1997 El Ni˜no, but the 2004 El Ni˜no simulated by this approach defied an ENSO classification, i.e., it was hardly distinguishable as CP-El Ni˜no or EP-El Ni˜no. In both El Ni˜no simulations, substituting the COF with the OFV improved the fit between the simulations and observations because the OFV better manages the time-variant errors in the model. Furthermore, the OFV approach effectively corrected the modeled El Ni˜no events even when the observational data (and hence the computational time) were reduced. Such a cost-effective offset of model errors suggests a role for the OFV approach in complicated CGCMs.

  6. Invoking the frequency dependence in square modulated light intensity techniques for the measurement of electron time constants in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaithan, Hamid M.; Qaid, Saif M.; Hezam, Mahmoud; Siddique, Muhemmad B.; Bedja, Idriss M.; Aldwayyana, Abdullah S.

    2015-08-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been considered as one of the most promising new generation solar cells. Enormous research efforts have been invested to improve the efficiency of solar energy conversion which is determined by the light harvesting efficiency, electron injection efficiency and undesirable electron lifetime. A simple, cheap and trustable laser-induced photovoltage and photocurrent decay (LIPVCD) technique is adopted in this work in order to determine the electron lifetime (τe) and electron transport (τtr) in DSSCs. In LIPVCD technique, DSSC is illuminated by a small squared intensity-modulated laser beam. Time-based response of the DSSC is recorded using a transient digitized oscilloscope for further analysis. Frequency-based response was also investigated in this work. The frequency-dependent measurements turned out to be a powerful method to determine electron time constants in a fast, real-time fashion. Measurements were carried out using a standard dye-sensitized solar cell, and results were in excellent agreement with results obtained from traditional IMVS-MPS measurements. Measurements were also performed for a variety of DSSCs, having various electrodes including TiO2 nanoparticles, TiO2 nanosheets with exposed {001} facets and ZnO vertically aligned nanowires. Results will also be presented and discussed in this work.

  7. Time and Frequency Transfer Activities at NIST

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Metrologia (SIM) Time Network The Sistema Interamericano de Metrologia (SIM) consists of national metrology institutes (NMIs) located in the 34...2003, “Time Transfer to TAI Using Geodetic Receivers,” Metrologia , 40, 184-188. [5] K. M. Larson, J. Levine, L. M. Nelson, and T. E. Parker, 2000... Metrologia , 40, 270-288. [7] G. Petit and Z. Jiang, 2008, “Precise point positioning for TAI computation,” International Journal of Navigation

  8. Physical terms and leisure time activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valovičová, Ľubomíra; Siptáková, Mária; ŠtubÅa, Martin

    2017-01-01

    People have to educate not only in school but also outside it. One approach to acquire new knowledge are leisure activities such as hobby groups or camps. Leisure activities, more and more seem to be the appropriate form for informal learning of physics concepts. Within leisure activities pupils have the possibility to acquire new concepts in unusual and interesting way. It is possible to inspire their intrinsic motivation on the matter or the phenomenon which is the aim of all teachers. This article deals with the description of and insights on acquisition of the concept of uniform and non-uniform rectilinear movement during a physics camp where pupils had the opportunity to use modern technologies which are despite of modernization of education still unconventional teaching methods in our schools.

  9. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  10. Reliability of time-to-exhaustion and selected psycho-physiological variables during constant-load cycling at the maximal lactate steady-state.

    PubMed

    Faude, Oliver; Hecksteden, Anne; Hammes, Daniel; Schumacher, Franck; Besenius, Eric; Sperlich, Billy; Meyer, Tim

    2017-02-01

    The maximal lactate steady-state (MLSS) is frequently assessed for prescribing endurance exercise intensity. Knowledge of the intra-individual variability of the MLSS is important for practical application. To date, little is known about the reliability of time-to-exhaustion and physiological responses to exercise at MLSS. Twenty-one healthy men (age, 25.2 (SD 3.3) years; height, 1.83 (0.06) m; body mass, 78.9 (8.9) kg; maximal oxygen uptake, 57.1 (10.7) mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed 1 incremental exercise test, and 2 constant-load tests to determine MLSS intensity. Subsequently, 2 open-end constant-load tests (MLSS 1 and 2) at MLSS intensity (3.0 (0.7) W·kg(-1), 76% (10%) maximal oxygen uptake) were carried out. During the tests, blood lactate concentrations, heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), variables of gas exchange, and core body temperature were determined. Time-to-exhaustion was 50.8 (14.0) and 48.2 (16.7) min in MLSS 1 and 2 (mean change: -2.6 (95% confidence interval: -7.8, 2.6)), respectively. The coefficient of variation (CV) was high for time-to-exhaustion (24.6%) and for mean (4.8 (1.2) mmol·L(-1)) and end (5.4 (1.7) mmol·L(-1)) blood lactate concentrations (15.7% and 19.3%). The CV of mean exercise values for all other parameters ranged from 1.4% (core temperature) to 8.3% (ventilation). At termination, the CVs ranged from 0.8% (RPE) to 11.8% (breathing frequency). The low reliability of time-to-exhaustion and blood lactate concentration at MLSS indicates that the precise individual intensity prescription may be challenging. Moreover, the obtained data may serve as reference to allow for the separation of intervention effects from random variation in our sample.

  11. Haida Story Telling Time with Activity Folder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogo, Robert

    One in a series of curriculum materials on Southeast Alaska Natives, this booklet contains seven myths and legends from the Haida oral tradition, each accompanied by discussion questions and suggested learning activities. Intended for use in the intermediate grades, the stories are two to four pages long with many Haida words included in the text…

  12. Estimation of the receptor-state affinity constants of ligands in functional studies using wild type and constitutively active mutant receptors: Implications for estimation of agonist bias.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Stein, Richard S L

    We describe a method for estimating the affinities of ligands for active and inactive states of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Our protocol involves measuring agonist-induced signaling responses of a wild type GPCR and a constitutively active mutant of it under control conditions and after partial receptor inactivation or reduced receptor expression. Our subsequent analysis is based on the assumption that the activating mutation increases receptor isomerization into the active state without affecting the affinities of ligands for receptor states. A means of confirming this assumption is provided. Global nonlinear regression analysis yields estimates of 1) the active (Kact) and inactive (Kinact) receptor-state affinity constants, 2) the isomerization constant of the unoccupied receptor (Kq-obs), and 3) the sensitivity constant of the signaling pathway (KE-obs). The latter two parameters define the output response of the receptor, and hence, their ratio (Kq-obs/KE) is a useful measure of system bias. If the cellular system is reasonably stable and the Kq-obs and KE-obs values of the signaling pathway are known, the Kact and Kinact values of additional agonists can be estimated in subsequent experiments on cells expressing the wild type receptor. We validated our method through computer simulation, an analytical proof, and analysis of previously published data. Our approach provides 1) a more meaningful analysis of structure-activity relationships, 2) a means of validating in silico docking experiments on active and inactive receptor structures and 3) an absolute, in contrast to relative, measure of agonist bias.

  13. Capturing Cognitive Processing Time for Active Authentication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    biometrics, extracted from keystroke dynamics , as “something a user is” for active authentication. This scheme performs continual verification in the...fingerprint for continuous authentication. Its effectiveness has been verified through a large-scale dataset. 2.0 INTRODUCTION Keystroke dynamics —the...measure the similarity. A recent survey on biometric authentication using keystroke dynamics classified research papers on the basis of their

  14. Basophil activation tests: time for a reconsideration.

    PubMed

    Uyttebroek, Astrid P; Sabato, Vito; Faber, Margaretha A; Cop, Nathalie; Bridts, Chris H; Lapeere, Hilde; De Clerck, Luc S; Ebo, Didier G

    2014-10-01

    Challenges in in vitro allergy diagnostics lie in the development of accessible and reliable assays allowing identification of all offending allergens and cross-reactive structures. Flow-assisted analysis and quantification of in vitro activated basophils serves as a diagnostic instrument with increasing applications developed over the years. From the earliest days it was clear that the test could constitute a diagnostic asset in basophil-mediated hypersensitivity. However, utility of the basophil activation test should be reassessed regarding difficulties with preparation, characterization and validation of allergen extracts; availability and the potential of more accessible diagnostics. Today, the added value mainly lies in diagnosis of immediate drug hypersensitivity. Other potential indications are monitoring venom-immunotherapy and follow-up of natural history of food allergies. However, results in these nondiagnostic applications are preliminary. We review the most relevant clinical applications of the basophil activation test. Some personal comments and views about perspectives and challenges about flow-assisted allergy diagnosis are made.

  15. Structure of nitrogen-converting communities induced by hydraulic retention time and COD/N ratio in constantly aerated granular sludge reactors treating digester supernatant.

    PubMed

    Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Rusanowska, Paulina; Zielińska, Magdalena; Bernat, Katarzyna; Wojnowska-Baryła, Irena

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated how hydraulic retention time (HRT) and COD/N ratio affect nitrogen-converting consortia in constantly aerated granules treating high-ammonium digester supernatant. Three HRTs (10, 13, 19 h) were tested at COD/N ratios of 4.5 and 2.3. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and relative real-time PCR were used to characterize the microbial communities. When changes in HRT and COD/N increased nitrogen loading, the ratio of the relative abundance of aerobic to anaerobic ammonium-oxidizers decreased. The COD/N ratio determined the species composition of the denitrifiers; however, Thiobacillus denitrificans, Pseudomonas denitrificans and Azoarcus sp. showed a high tolerance to the environmental conditions and occurred in the granules from all reactors. Denitrifier genera that support granule formation were identified, such as Pseudomonas, Shinella, and Flavobacterium. In aerated granules, nirK-possessing bacteria were more diverse than nirS-possessing bacteria. At a low COD/N ratio, N2O-reducer diversity increased because of the presence of bacteria known as aerobic denitrifiers.

  16. Effect of time of day on bird activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.; Ralph, C. John; Scott, J. Michael

    1981-01-01

    Breeding season activity, based on detections recorded on more than a million 3. minute Breeding Bird Survey stops, reaches a peak for most species during the hour centered at sunrise or in the following hour. Activity of most species then declines gradually as the morning progresses. When large samples are considered, activity patterns for a given species are quite constant from year to year; but each species has its own characteristic pattern and there is much similarity among members of the same genus. Activity reaches a low point in midday, and may almost cease in some habitats (e. g. deserts); but in deciduous forests, activity of many species continues at a reduced rate. By reducing walking rate or lengthening listening periods, productive censusing of many species could be extended into midday. Winter activity is even more strongly oriented toward the early morning.

  17. Time perspective and physical activity among central Appalachian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gulley, Tauna

    2013-04-01

    Time perspective is a cultural behavioral concept that reflects individuals' orientations or attitudes toward the past, present, or future. Individuals' time perspectives influence their choices regarding daily activities. Time perspective is an important consideration when teaching adolescents about the importance of being physically active. However, little is known about the relationship between time perspective and physical activity among adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine the time perspective of central Appalachian adolescents and explore the relationship between time perspective and physical activity. This study was guided by The theory of planned behavior (TPB). One hundred and ninety-three students completed surveys to examine time perspective and physical activity behaviors. Data were collected in one school. Results of this study can inform school nurses and high school guidance counselors about the importance of promoting a future-oriented time perspective to improve physical activity and educational outcomes.

  18. Real-time monitoring of matrix metalloproteinase-9 collagenolytic activity with a surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Atsushi; Kabeya, Mitsutaka; Sugawara, Masao

    2011-12-01

    We describe a simple method for real-time monitoring of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) collagenolytic activity for native triple helical collagen IV with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. The proteolytic activity of MMP-9 is measured as a decrease in the SPR signal resulting from the cleavage of collagen IV immobilized on the sensor surface. The kinetic parameters of full-length MMP-9 and its catalytic domain-catalytic constant (k(cat)), association rate constant (k(a)), and dissociation rate constant (k(d))-were estimated by the SPR method. The presence of sodium chloride and a nonionic detergent Brij-35 in a reaction solution led to the lower collagenolytic activity of MMP-9, whereas they suppressed the nonspecific interaction between MMP-9 and a cysteamine-modified chip. The comparison of kinetic parameters between MMP-9 and its catalytic domain revealed that the association constant of MMP-9 is much larger than that of the catalytic domain, suggesting that the interplay among hemopexin-like domain, fibronectin type II repeats motif, and linker region (O-glycosylated domain) plays an important role in recognizing collagen IV.

  19. How constant momentum acceleration decouples energy and space focusing in distance-of-flight and time-of-flight mass spectrometries.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Elise A; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Enke, Christie G; Ray, Steven J; Carado, Anthony J; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2013-05-01

    Resolution in time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) is ordinarily limited by the initial energy and space distributions within an instrument's acceleration region and by the length of the field-free flight zone. With gaseous ion sources, these distributions lead to systematic flight-time errors that cannot be simultaneously corrected with conventional static-field ion-focusing devices (i.e., an ion mirror). It is known that initial energy and space distributions produce non-linearly correlated errors in both ion velocity and exit time from the acceleration region. Here we reinvestigate an old acceleration technique, constant-momentum acceleration (CMA), to decouple the effects of initial energy and space distributions. In CMA, only initial ion energies (and not their positions) affect the velocity ions gain. Therefore, with CMA, the spatial distribution within the acceleration region can be manipulated without creating ion-velocity error. The velocity differences caused by a spread in initial ion energy can be corrected with an ion mirror. We discuss here the use of CMA and independent focusing of energy and space distributions for both distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) and TOFMS. Performance characteristics of our CMA-DOFMS and CMA-TOFMS instrument, fitted with a glow-discharge ionization source, are described. In CMA-DOFMS, resolving powers (FWHM) of greater than 1000 are achieved for atomic ions with a flight length of 285 mm. In CMA-TOFMS, only ions over a narrow range of m/z values can be energy-focused; however, the technique offers improved resolution for these focused ions, with resolving powers of greater than 2000 for a separation distance of 350 mm.

  20. Transglutaminase 2 gene ablation protects against renal ischemic injury by blocking constant NF-{kappa}B activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae-Seok; Kim, Bora; Tahk, Hongmin; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ahn, Eu-Ree; Choi, Changsun; Jeon, Yoon; Park, Seo Young; Lee, Ho; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Soo-Youl

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} No acute renal tubular necrotic lesions were found in TGase2{sup -/-} mice with ischemic kidney injury. {yields} NF-{kappa}B activation is reduced in TGase2{sup -/-} mice with ischemic kidney injury. {yields} Hypoxic stress did not increase NF-{kappa}B activity in MEFs from TGase2{sup -/-} mice. {yields} COX-2 induction is suppressed in TGase2{sup -/-} mice with ischemic kidney injury. -- Abstract: Transglutaminase 2 knockout (TGase2{sup -/-}) mice show significantly reduced inflammation with decreased myofibroblasts in a unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model, but the mechanism remains to be clarified. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activation plays a major role in the progression of inflammation in an obstructive nephropathy model. However, the key factors extending the duration of NF-{kappa}B activation in UUO are not known. In several inflammatory diseases, we and others recently found that TGase 2 plays a key role in extending NF-{kappa}B activation, which contributes to the pathogenesis of disease. In the current study, we found that NF-{kappa}B activity in mouse embryogenic fibroblasts (MEFs) from TGase2{sup -/-} mice remained at the control level while the NF-{kappa}B activity of wild-type (WT) MEFs was highly increased under hypoxic stress. Using the obstructive nephropathy model, we found that NF-{kappa}B activity remained at the control level in TGase2{sup -/-} mouse kidney tissues, as measured by COX-2 expression, but was highly increased in WT tissues. We conclude that TGase 2 gene ablation reduces the duration of NF-{kappa}B activation in ischemic injury.

  1. Detection analysis of surface hydroxyl active sites and simulation calculation of the surface dissociation constants of aqueous diatomite suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-02-01

    The surface properties of the diatomite were investigated using nitrogen adsorption/deadsorption isotherms, TG-DSC, FTIR, and XPS, and surface protonation-deprotonation behavior was determined by continuous acid-base potentiometric titration technique. The diatomite sample with porous honeycomb structure has a BET specific surface area of 10.21 m2/g and large numbers of surface hydroxyl functional groups (i.e. tbnd Si-OH, tbnd Fe-OH, and tbnd Al-OH). These surface hydroxyls can be protonated or deprotonated depending on the pH of the suspension. The experimental potentiometric data in two different ionic strength solutions (0.1 and 0.05 mol/L NaCl) were fitted using ProtoFit GUI V2.1 program by applying diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites and minimizing the sum of squares between a dataset derivative function and a model derivative function. The optimized surface parameters (i.e. surface dissociation constants (log K1, log K2) and surface site concentrations (log C)) of the sample were obtained. Based on the optimized surface parameters, the surface species distribution was calculated using Program-free PHREEQC 3.1.2. Thus, this work reveals considerable new information about surface protonation-deprotonation processes and surface adsorptive behaviors of the diatomite, which helps us to effectively use the cheap and cheerful diatomite clay adsorbent.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Constant and Specific Loci for Hematological Traits at Three Time Stages in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 Resource Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyan; Hong, Yuan; Gao, Jun; Xiao, Shijun; Ma, Junwu; Zhang, Wanchang; Ren, Jun; Huang, Lusheng

    2013-01-01

    Hematological traits are important indicators of immune function and have been commonly examined as biomarkers of disease and disease severity in humans. Pig is an ideal biomedical model for human diseases due to its high degree of similarity with human physiological characteristics. Here, we conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 18 hematological traits at three growth stages (days 18, 46 and 240) in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 intercross. In total, we identified 38 genome-wide significant regions containing 185 genome-wide significant SNPs by single-marker GWAS or LONG-GWAS. The significant regions are distributed on pig chromosomes (SSC) 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 17 and 18, and most of significant SNPs reside on SSC7 and SSC8. Of the 38 significant regions, 7 show constant effects on hematological traits across the whole life stages, and 6 regions have time-specific effects on the measured traits at early or late stages. The most prominent locus is the genomic region between 32.36 and 84.49 Mb on SSC8 that is associated with multiple erythroid traits. The KIT gene in this region appears to be a promising candidate gene. The findings improve our understanding of the genetic architecture of hematological traits in pigs. Further investigations are warranted to characterize the responsible gene(s) and causal variant(s) especially for the major loci on SSC7 and SSC8. PMID:23691082

  3. Green technology effect of injection pressure, timing and compression ratio in constant pressure heat addition cycle by an eco-friendly material.

    PubMed

    Karthikayan, S; Sankaranarayanan, G; Karthikeyan, R

    2015-11-01

    Present energy strategies focus on environmental issues, especially environmental pollution prevention and control by eco-friendly green technologies. This includes, increase in the energy supplies, encouraging cleaner and more efficient energy management, addressing air pollution, greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change. Biofuels provide the panorama of new fiscal opportunities for people in rural area for meeting their need and also the demand of the local market. Biofuels concern protection of the environment and job creation. Renewable energy sources are self-reliance resources, have the potential in energy management with less emissions of air pollutants. Biofuels are expected to reduce dependability on imported crude oil with connected economic susceptibility, reduce greenhouse gases, other pollutants and invigorate the economy by increasing demand and prices for agricultural products. The use of neat paradise tree oil and induction of eco-friendly material Hydrogen through inlet manifold in a constant pressure heat addition cycle engine (diesel engine) with optimized engine operating parameters such as injection timing, injection pressure and compression ratio. The results shows the heat utilization efficiency for neat vegetable oil is 29% and neat oil with 15% Hydrogen as 33%. The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) for 15% of H2 share as 450°C at full load and the heat release of 80J/deg. crank angle for 15% Hydrogen energy share.

  4. Influence of sludge retention time at constant food to microorganisms ratio on membrane bioreactor performances under stable and unstable state conditions.

    PubMed

    Villain, Maud; Marrot, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Food to microorganisms ratio (F/M) and sludge retention time (SRT) are known to affect in different ways biomass growth, bioactivities and foulants characteristics. Thus the aim of this study was to dissociate the effects of SRT from those of F/M ratio on lab-scale membrane bioreactors performances during stable and unstable state. Two acclimations were stabilized at a SRT of either 20 or 50 d with a constant F/M ratio of 0.2 kg(COD)kg(MLVSS)(-1) d(-1). During stable state, a higher N-NH(4)(+) removal rate (78%) was obtained at SRT of 50 d as an easier autotroph development was observed. Soluble microbial products (SMPs) release was double at 50 d with a majority of polysaccharides (49% of total SMP). The unstable conditions consisted in F/M ratio changes and operation without air and nutrient. Autotrophs were highly affected by the tested disturbances and SMP retention on membrane surface exhibited consistent changes during the performed stresses.

  5. Free Time Motivation and Physical Activity in Middle School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.; Farmer, James

    2011-01-01

    This study examined free time motivation and physical activity in 68 middle school children from a rural public school system (N = 24) and a private school located in the same area of the Midwest (N = 44). Results indicated that free time motivation did not explain variability in physical activity behavior during free time or while students were…

  6. Time Perspective and Physical Activity among Central Appalachian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulley, Tauna

    2013-01-01

    Time perspective is a cultural behavioral concept that reflects individuals' orientations or attitudes toward the past, present, or future. Individuals' time perspectives influence their choices regarding daily activities. Time perspective is an important consideration when teaching adolescents about the importance of being physically active.…

  7. How Young Children Spend Their Time: Television and Other Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huston, Aletha C.; Wright, John C.; Marquis, Janet; Green, Samuel B.

    1999-01-01

    Examined television viewing over three years among two cohorts of 2- and 4-year olds. Found that viewing declined with age. With age, time in reading and educational activities increased on weekdays but declined on weekends, and sex differences in time-use patterns increased. Increased time in educational activities, social interaction, and video…

  8. Determination of both the time constant of vO2 and DeltavO2/DeltaW from a single incremental exercise test: validation and repeatability.

    PubMed

    Wisén, Anita G M; Wohlfart, Björn

    2004-09-01

    A single incremental cycle exercise test including a steady-state load, combined with respiratory gas exchange, was performed with the objective of determining the time constant (tauVO(2)) and the amount of oxygen required at each load (DeltaVO(2)/DeltaW) by using a novel equation. The protocol was validated using four exercise tests at different constant loads and conventionally fitted mono-exponential functions to determine tauVO(2), and interpolation of VO(2) versus load to determine DeltaVO(2)/DeltaW. No significant differences were seen between the means of either tauVO(2) or DeltaVO(2)/DeltaW determined with the two protocols. The correlation coefficient was 0.62 for tauVO(2) and 0.48 for DeltaVO(2)/DeltaW. The absolute differences (2 SD) were 11.6 s for tauVO(2) and 1.1 ml min(-1) W(-1) for DeltaVO(2)/DeltaW. The equations were compared in the same steady-state test and good agreement of tauVO(2) was obtained (R = 0.99). The 5-6-week repeatability (incremental test) was evaluated. No statistical differences were seen between the mean of the repeated tests. The difference between the tests (2 SD) were 20 s for tauVO(2) and 1.2 ml min(-1) W(-1) for DeltaVO(2)/DeltaW. In conclusion, tauVO(2) and DeltaVO(2)/DeltaW can be determined from a single incremental test. The validation showed an acceptable agreement, although the variations in absolute values were not negligible. This could partly be explained by the natural day-to-day variation and fluctuations in incoming raw data. The test-retest variation in absolute values was considerable, which must be taken into account when using tauVO(2) and DeltaVO(2)/DeltaW for evaluation of aerobic function.

  9. How young children spend their time: television and other activities.

    PubMed

    Huston, A C; Wright, J C; Marquis, J; Green, S B

    1999-07-01

    Time-use diaries were collected over a 3-year period for 2 cohorts of 2- and 4-year-old children. TV viewing declined with age. Time spent in reading and educational activities increased with age on weekdays but declined on weekends. Time-use patterns were sex-stereotyped, and sex differences increased with age. As individuals' time in educational activities, social interaction, and video games increased, their time watching entertainment TV declined, but time spent playing covaried positively with entertainment TV. Educational TV viewing was not related to time spent in non-TV activities. Maternal education and home environment quality predicted frequent viewing of educational TV programs and infrequent viewing of entertainment TV. The results do not support a simple displacement hypothesis; the relations of TV viewing to other activities depend on the program content, the nature of the competing activity, and the environmental context.

  10. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    atoms together and the way light interacts with atoms. But are these fundamental physical constants really constant? Are those numbers always the same, everywhere in the Universe and at all times? This is not as naive a question as it may seem. Contemporary theories of fundamental interactions, such as the Grand Unification Theory or super-string theories that treat gravity and quantum mechanics in a consistent way, not only predict a dependence of fundamental physical constants with energy - particle physics experiments have shown the fine structure constant to grow to a value of about 1/128 at high collision energies - but allow for their cosmological time and space variations. A time dependence of the fundamental constants could also easily arise if, besides the three space dimensions, there exist more hidden dimensions. Already in 1955, the Russian physicist Lev Landau considered the possibility of a time dependence of alpha. In the late 1960s, George Gamow in the United States suggested that the charge of the electron, and therefore also alpha, may vary. It is clear however that such changes, if any, cannot be large or they would already have been detected in comparatively simple experiments. Tracking these possible changes thus requires the most sophisticated and precise techniques. Looking back in time In fact, quite strong constraints are already known to exist for the possible variation of the fine structure constant alpha. One such constraint is of geological nature. It is based on measures taken in the ancient natural fission reactor located near Oklo (Gabon, West Africa) and which was active roughly 2,000 million years ago. By studying the distribution of a given set of elements - isotopes of the rare earths, for example of samarium - which were produced by the fission of uranium, one can estimate whether the physical process happened at a faster or slower pace than we would expect it nowadays. Thus we can measure a possible change of the value of the

  11. Estimating the plasma effect-site equilibrium rate constant (Ke₀) of propofol by fitting time of loss and recovery of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Sun, Baozhu; Wang, Shuqin; Zhao, Lianying; Qi, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The present paper proposes a new approach for fitting the plasma effect-site equilibrium rate constant (Ke0) of propofol to satisfy the condition that the effect-site concentration (Ce) is equal at the time of loss of consciousness (LOC) and recovery of consciousness (ROC). Forty patients receiving intravenous anesthesia were divided into 4 groups and injected propofol 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, or 2 mg/kg at 1,200 mL/h. Durations from the start of injection to LOC and to ROC were recorded. LOC and ROC were defined as an observer's assessment of alertness and sedation scale change from 3 to 2 and from 2 to 3, respectively. Software utilizing bisection method iteration algorithms was built. Then, Ke0 satisfying the CeLOC=CeROC condition was estimated. The accuracy of the Ke0 estimated by our method was compared with the Diprifusor TCI Pump built-in Ke0 (0.26 min(-1)), and the Orchestra Workstation built-in Ke0 (1.21 min(-1)) in another group of 21 patients who were injected propofol 1.4 to 2 mg/kg. Our results show that the population Ke0 of propofol was 0.53 ± 0.18 min(-1). The regression equation for adjustment by dose (mg/kg) and age was Ke0=1.42-0.30 × dose-0.0074 × age. Only Ke0 adjusted by dose and age achieved the level of accuracy required for clinical applications. We conclude that the Ke0 estimated based on clinical signs and the two-point fitting method significantly improved the ability of CeLOC to predict CeROC. However, only the Ke0 adjusted by dose and age and not a fixed Ke0 value can meet clinical requirements of accuracy.

  12. Homonuclear BIRD-decoupled spectra for measuring one-bond couplings with highest resolution: CLIP/CLAP-RESET and constant-time-CLIP/CLAP-RESET.

    PubMed

    Reinsperger, Tony; Luy, Burkhard

    2014-02-01

    Heteronuclear one-bond couplings are of interest for various aspects of structural analysis of small organic molecules, including for example the distinction of axial and equatorial protons or the use of RDCs as angular constraints. Such couplings are most easily measured from pure doublets in HSQC-type spectra. Recently, the fully decoupled RESET HSQC experiment was reported and several other so-called pure-shift methods followed that allow for the removal of splittings due to homonuclear scalar interactions in one and two-dimensional NMR. In this work we present broadband homonuclear decoupled CLIP/CLAP-RESET experiments based on an isotope-selective BIRD filter element using a recently reported improved version of Zangger-Sterk data chunking. The concatenated FIDs result in multiplets in which most homonuclear splittings are removed while the heteronuclear one-bond couplings are retained. Couplings can be extracted in an IPAP fashion without scaling of subspectra by the use of optimized coherence transfer elements like the COB-INEPT. The method leads to complete homonuclear decoupling for CH groups and CH3 groups in isotropic samples, but leaves residual splittings with antiphase contributions for e.g. CH2 groups due to (2)JHH coupling evolution that is not affected by the BIRD element. For this case we present a constant-time version of the proposed BIRD decoupling scheme with full homonuclear decoupling. In addition, the effects of strong coupling are discussed. Strong coupling artifacts cannot be circumvented, but the proposed experiments allow their distinct recognition.

  13. Change is a Constant.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Provencher, Matthew T; Brand, Jefferson C; Rossi, Michael J; Poehling, Gary G

    2015-06-01

    In 2015, Henry P. Hackett, Managing Editor, Arthroscopy, retires, and Edward A. Goss, Executive Director, Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA), retires. Association is a positive constant, in a time of change. With change comes a need for continuing education, research, and sharing of ideas. While the quality of education at AANA and ISAKOS is superior and most relevant, the unique reason to travel and meet is the opportunity to interact with innovative colleagues. Personal interaction best stimulates new ideas to improve patient care, research, and teaching. Through our network, we best create innovation.

  14. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-21

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t{sub 1} and t{sub 3} periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C/{sup 13}C chemical shift correlations, the 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H experiment also provides a COSY-type {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices ({sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different {sup 13}C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the

  15. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-01

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond 13C/1H and 13C/13C chemical shift correlations, the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment also provides a COSY-type 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices (1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different 13C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D 1H/13C/1H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological

  16. American Time Use Survey: Sleep Time and Its Relationship to Waking Activities

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Mathias; Fomberstein, Kenneth M.; Razavi, Farid M.; Banks, Siobhan; William, Jeffrey H.; Rosa, Roger R.; Dinges, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To gain some insight into how various behavioral (lifestyle) factors influence sleep duration, by investigation of the relationship of sleep time to waking activities using the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). Design: Cross-sectional data from ATUS, an annual telephone survey of a population sample of US citizens who are interviewed regarding how they spent their time during a 24-hour period between 04:00 on the previous day and 04:00 on the interview day. Participants: Data were pooled from the 2003, 2004, and 2005 ATUS databases involving N=47,731 respondents older than 14 years of age. Interventions: N/A Results: Adjusted multiple linear regression models showed that the largest reciprocal relationship to sleep was found for work time, followed by travel time, which included commute time. Only shorter than average sleepers (<7.5 h) spent more time socializing, relaxing, and engaging in leisure activities, while both short (<5.5 h) and long sleepers (≥8.5 h) watched more TV than the average sleeper. The extent to which sleep time was exchanged for waking activities was also shown to depend on age and gender. Sleep time was minimal while work time was maximal in the age group 45–54 yr, and sleep time increased both with lower and higher age. Conclusions: Work time, travel time, and time for socializing, relaxing, and leisure are the primary activities reciprocally related to sleep time among Americans. These activities may be confounding the frequently observed association between short and long sleep on one hand and morbidity and mortality on the other hand and should be controlled for in future studies. Citation: Basner M; Fomberstein KM; Razavi FM; Banks S; William JH; Rosa RR; Dinges DF. American time use survey: sleep time and its relationship to waking activities. SLEEP 2007;30(9):1085-1095. PMID:17910380

  17. Activated partial thromboplastin time of owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus) plasma.

    PubMed

    Mrema, J E; Johnson, G S; Kelley, S T; Green, T J

    1984-06-01

    Owl monkey plasma samples produced short, reproducible activated partial thromboplastin times, similar to those obtained with samples from many other mammalian species. This was an apparent contradiction to an earlier report of long irreproducible activated partial thromboplastin times from owl monkey samples. The discrepant data could not be explained by differences in anticoagulants (citrate or oxalate), assay reagents (partial thromboplastin with either diatomaceous earth or ellagic acid), or activation incubation times (2, 5, or 10 minutes); nor could they be explained by differences in the monkeys' sex, age or previous experimental exposure to Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  18. Real-time spectroscopic monitoring of photocatalytic activity promoted by graphene in a microfluidic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifan; Lin, Beichen; Ge, Likai; Guo, Hongchen; Chen, Xinyi; Lu, Miao

    2016-06-01

    Photocatalytic microreactors have been utilized as rapid, versatile platforms for the characterization of photocatalysts. In this work, a photocatalytic microreactor integrated with absorption spectroscopy was proposed for the real-time monitoring of photocatalytic activity using different catalysts. The validity of this method was investigated by the rapid screening on the photocatalytic performance of a titanium oxide (TiO2)-decorated graphene oxide (GO) sheet for the degradation of methylene blue under monochromatic visible irradiation. The sampling interval time could be minimized to 10 s for achieving real-time detection. The best photocatalytic activity was observed for an optimized TiO2/GO weight mixing ratio of 7:11, with a reaction rate constant up to 0.067 min‑1. The addition of GO into TiO2 enhances photocatalytic activity and adsorption of MB molecules. The synthetic reaction rate constant was up to approximately 0.11 min‑1, which was also the highest among the catalysts. The microreactor exhibited good sensitivity and reproducibility without weakening the performance of the photocatalysts. Consequently, the photocatalytic microreactor is promising as a simple, portable, and rapid screening tool for new photocatalysts.

  19. Real-time spectroscopic monitoring of photocatalytic activity promoted by graphene in a microfluidic reactor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yifan; Lin, Beichen; Ge, Likai; Guo, Hongchen; Chen, Xinyi; Lu, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Photocatalytic microreactors have been utilized as rapid, versatile platforms for the characterization of photocatalysts. In this work, a photocatalytic microreactor integrated with absorption spectroscopy was proposed for the real-time monitoring of photocatalytic activity using different catalysts. The validity of this method was investigated by the rapid screening on the photocatalytic performance of a titanium oxide (TiO2)-decorated graphene oxide (GO) sheet for the degradation of methylene blue under monochromatic visible irradiation. The sampling interval time could be minimized to 10 s for achieving real-time detection. The best photocatalytic activity was observed for an optimized TiO2/GO weight mixing ratio of 7:11, with a reaction rate constant up to 0.067 min−1. The addition of GO into TiO2 enhances photocatalytic activity and adsorption of MB molecules. The synthetic reaction rate constant was up to approximately 0.11 min−1, which was also the highest among the catalysts. The microreactor exhibited good sensitivity and reproducibility without weakening the performance of the photocatalysts. Consequently, the photocatalytic microreactor is promising as a simple, portable, and rapid screening tool for new photocatalysts. PMID:27346555

  20. Associations between Screen Time and Physical Activity among Spanish Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Sanchez, Jose A.; Martí-Trujillo, Sara; Lera-Navarro, Angela; Dorado-García, Cecilia; González-Henríquez, Juan J.; Sanchís-Moysi, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    Background Excessive time in front of a single or several screens could explain a displacement of physical activity. The present study aimed at determining whether screen-time is associated with a reduced level of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in Spanish adolescents living in favorable environmental conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings A multi-stage stratified random sampling method was used to select 3503 adolescents (12–18 years old) from the school population of Gran Canaria, Spain. MVPA, screen-time in front of television, computer, video game console and portable console was assessed in the classroom by fulfilling a standardized questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted by a set of social-environmental variables were carried out. Forty-six percent of girls (95% CI±2.3%) and 26% of boys (95% CI±2.1%) did not meet the MVPA recommendations for adolescents. Major gender differences were observed in the time devoted to vigorous PA, video games and the total time spent on screen-based activities. Boys who reported 4 hours•week−1 or more to total screen-time showed a 64% (OR = 0.61, 95% CI, 0.44–0.86) increased risk of failing to achieve the recommended adolescent MVPA level. Participation in organized physical activities and sports competitions were more strongly associated with MVPA than screen-related behaviors. Conclusions/Significance No single screen-related behavior explained the reduction of MVPA in adolescents. However, the total time accumulated through several screen-related behaviors was negatively associated with MVPA level in boys. This association could be due to lower availability of time for exercise as the time devoted to sedentary screen-time activities increases. Participation in organized physical activities seems to counteract the negative impact of excessive time in front of screens on physical activity. PMID:21909435

  1. An active triple-catalytic hybrid enzyme engineered by linking cyclo-oxygenase isoform-1 to prostacyclin synthase that can constantly biosynthesize prostacyclin, the vascular protector.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ke-He; So, Shui-Ping; Cervantes, Vanessa; Wu, Hanjing; Wijaya, Cori; Jentzen, Rebecca R

    2008-12-01

    It remains a challenge to achieve the stable and long-term expression (in human cell lines) of a previously engineered hybrid enzyme [triple-catalytic (Trip-cat) enzyme-2; Ruan KH, Deng H & So SP (2006) Biochemistry45, 14003-14011], which links cyclo-oxygenase isoform-2 (COX-2) to prostacyclin (PGI(2)) synthase (PGIS) for the direct conversion of arachidonic acid into PGI(2) through the enzyme's Trip-cat functions. The stable upregulation of the biosynthesis of the vascular protector, PGI(2), in cells is an ideal model for the prevention and treatment of thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2))-mediated thrombosis and vasoconstriction, both of which cause stroke, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. Here, we report another case of engineering of the Trip-cat enzyme, in which human cyclo-oxygenase isoform-1, which has a different C-terminal sequence from COX-2, was linked to PGI(2) synthase and called Trip-cat enzyme-1. Transient expression of recombinant Trip-cat enzyme-1 in HEK293 cells led to 3-5-fold higher expression capacity and better PGI(2)-synthesizing activity as compared to that of the previously engineered Trip-cat enzyme-2. Furthermore, an HEK293 cell line that can stably express the active new Trip-cat enzyme-1 and constantly synthesize the bioactive PGI(2) was established by a screening approach. In addition, the stable HEK293 cell line, with constant production of PGI(2), revealed strong antiplatelet aggregation properties through its unique dual functions (increasing PGI(2) production while decreasing TXA(2) production) in TXA(2) synthase-rich plasma. This study has optimized engineering of the active Trip-cat enzyme, allowing it to become the first to stably upregulate PGI(2) biosynthesis in a human cell line, which provides a basis for developing a PGI(2)-producing therapeutic cell line for use against vascular diseases.

  2. In situ generation of a hydroxyl radical by nanoporous activated carbon derived from rice husk for environmental applications: kinetic and thermodynamic constants.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Sekaran, G

    2014-03-07

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) generation using nanoporous activated carbon (NPAC), derived from rice husk, and dissolved oxygen in water. The in situ production of the ˙OH radical was confirmed through the DMPO spin trapping method in EPR spectroscopy and quantitative determination by a deoxyribose assay procedure. NPAC served as a heterogeneous catalyst to degrade 2-deoxy-d-ribose (a reference compound) using hydroxyl radical generated from dissolved oxygen in water at temperatures in the range 313-373 K and pH 6, with first order rate constants (k = 9.2 × 10(-2) min(-1), k = 1.2 × 10(-1) min(-1), k = 1.3 × 10(-1) min(-1) and k = 1.68 × 10(-1) min(-1)). The thermodynamic constants for the generation of hydroxyl radicals by NPAC and dissolved oxygen in water were ΔG -1.36 kJ mol(-1) at 313 K, ΔH 17.73 kJ mol(-1) and ΔS 61.01 J mol(-1) K(-1).

  3. The Elasticity of Time: Associations between Physical Activity and Use of Time in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Tim; Ferrar, Katia E.; Gomersall, Sjaan R.; Maher, Carol; Walters, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    The way an individual uses one's time can greatly affect his or her health. The purpose of this article was to examine the cross-sectional cross-elasticity relationships for use of time domains in a sample of Australian adolescents. This study analyzed 24-hour recall time use data collected using the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and…

  4. Oxidations of p-alkoxyacylanilides catalyzed by human cytochrome P450 1A2: structure-activity relationships and simulation of rate constants of individual steps in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yun, C H; Miller, G P; Guengerich, F P

    2001-04-10

    Human cytochrome P450 (P450) 1A2 is involved in the oxidation of many important drugs and carcinogens. The prototype substrate phenacetin is oxidized to an acetol as well as the O-dealkylation product [Yun, C.-H., Miller, G. P., and Guengerich, F. P. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 11319-11329]. In an effort to improve rates of catalysis of P450 1A2 enzymes, we considered a set of p-alkoxyacylanilide analogues of phenacetin and found that variations in the O-alkyl and N-acyl substituents altered the rates of the two oxidation reactions and the ratio of acetol/phenol products. Moving one methylene group of phenacetin from the O-alkyl group to the N-acyl moiety increased rates of both oxidations approximately 5-fold and improved the coupling efficiency (oxidation products formed/NADPH consumed) from 6% to 38%. Noncompetitive kinetic deuterium isotope effects of 2-3 were measured for all O-dealkylation reactions examined with wild-type P450 1A2 and the E225I mutant, which has 6-fold higher activity. A trend of decreasing kinetic deuterium isotope effect for E225I > wild-type > mutant D320A was observed for O-demethylation of p-methoxyacetanilide, which follows the trend for k(cat). The set of O-dealkylation and acetol formation results for wild-type P450 1A2 and the E225I mutant with several of the protiated and deuterated substrates were fit to a model developed for the basic catalytic cycle and a set of microscopic rate constants in which the only variable was the rate of product formation (substrate oxygenation, including hydrogen abstraction). In this model, k(cat) is considerably less than any of the microscopic rate constants and is affected by several individual rate constants, including the rate of formation of the oxygenating species, the rate of substrate oxidation by the oxygenating species, and the rates of generation of reduced oxygen species (H(2)O(2), H(2)O). This analysis of the effects of the individual rate constants provides a framework for consideration of

  5. Circadian Activity Rhythms, Time Urgency, and Achievement Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Barbara L.

    Many physiological and psychological processes fluctuate throughout the day in fairly stable, rhythmic patterns. The relationship between individual differences in circadian activity rhythms and a sense of time urgency were explored as well as a number of achievement-related variables. Undergraduates (N=308), whose circadian activity rhythms were…

  6. Leisure-time physical activity in relation to occupational physical activity among women

    PubMed Central

    Ekenga, Christine C.; Parks, Christine G.; Wilson, Lauren E.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between occupational physical activity and leisure-time physical activity among US women in the Sister Study. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 26,334 women who had been employed in their current job for at least 1 year at baseline (2004–2009). Occupational physical activity was self-reported and leisure-time physical activity was estimated in metabolic equivalent hours per week. Log multinomial regression was used to evaluate associations between occupational (sitting, standing, manually active) and leisure-time (insufficient, moderate, high) activity. Models were adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, education, income, geographic region, and body mass index. Results Only 54% of women met or exceeded minimum recommended levels of leisure-time physical activity (moderate 32% and high 22%). Women who reported sitting (PR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74–0.92) or standing (PR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75–0.94) most of the time at work were less likely to meet the requirements for high leisure-time physical activity than manually active workers. Associations were strongest among women living in the Northeast and the South. Conclusion In this nationwide study, low occupational activity was associated with lower leisure-time physical activity. Women who are not active in the workplace may benefit from strategies to promote leisure-time physical activity. PMID:25773471

  7. Cosmological constant, fine structure constant and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we consider the cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the hint of varying fine structure constant α was found in 1998. If Λ ∝ α ^{-6} is right, it means that the cosmological constant Λ should also be varying. Here, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. Then we consider the observational constraints on these models by using the 293 Δ α /α data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the very narrow ranges of O(10^{-5}) typically. On the other hand, we can also view the varying cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6} from another perspective, namely it can be equivalent to a model containing "dark energy" and "warm dark matter", but there is no interaction between them. We find that this is also fully consistent with the observational constraints on warm dark matter.

  8. Identifying healthcare activities using a real-time location system.

    PubMed

    Cagle, Rick; Darling, Erika; Kim, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses human resource allocation in a Veterans Health Administration audiology clinic as a model for clinics facing similar challenges in maximizing quality, safety, and effectiveness of care. A framework is proposed combining automatic identification technology with simulation and visualization software, asserting a relationship between location of staff within the facility and clinical activity, focusing healthcare staff on high-value activities to deliver safe, quality care. This enables "what-if" analyses of potential resource allocation scenarios, correlating location information from radiofrequency identification tags worn by clinicians and technicians in the clinic as part of a real-time location system, then inferring probable activity from the data. Once the baseline "as-is" can be established, the model will be refined to supply predictive analyses of resource allocation and management. Simulations of activities in specialized spaces saves time managing resources, which means more time can be spent on patient safety and increased satisfaction.

  9. Trajectory Data Analyses for Pedestrian Space-time Activity Study

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Feng; Du, Fei

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that human movement in the spatial and temporal dimensions has direct influence on disease transmission1-3. An infectious disease typically spreads via contact between infected and susceptible individuals in their overlapped activity spaces. Therefore, daily mobility-activity information can be used as an indicator to measure exposures to risk factors of infection. However, a major difficulty and thus the reason for paucity of studies of infectious disease transmission at the micro scale arise from the lack of detailed individual mobility data. Previously in transportation and tourism research detailed space-time activity data often relied on the time-space diary technique, which requires subjects to actively record their activities in time and space. This is highly demanding for the participants and collaboration from the participants greatly affects the quality of data4. Modern technologies such as GPS and mobile communications have made possible the automatic collection of trajectory data. The data collected, however, is not ideal for modeling human space-time activities, limited by the accuracies of existing devices. There is also no readily available tool for efficient processing of the data for human behavior study. We present here a suite of methods and an integrated ArcGIS desktop-based visual interface for the pre-processing and spatiotemporal analyses of trajectory data. We provide examples of how such processing may be used to model human space-time activities, especially with error-rich pedestrian trajectory data, that could be useful in public health studies such as infectious disease transmission modeling. The procedure presented includes pre-processing, trajectory segmentation, activity space characterization, density estimation and visualization, and a few other exploratory analysis methods. Pre-processing is the cleaning of noisy raw trajectory data. We introduce an interactive visual pre-processing interface as well as an

  10. Trajectory data analyses for pedestrian space-time activity study.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feng; Du, Fei

    2013-02-25

    It is well recognized that human movement in the spatial and temporal dimensions has direct influence on disease transmission(1-3). An infectious disease typically spreads via contact between infected and susceptible individuals in their overlapped activity spaces. Therefore, daily mobility-activity information can be used as an indicator to measure exposures to risk factors of infection. However, a major difficulty and thus the reason for paucity of studies of infectious disease transmission at the micro scale arise from the lack of detailed individual mobility data. Previously in transportation and tourism research detailed space-time activity data often relied on the time-space diary technique, which requires subjects to actively record their activities in time and space. This is highly demanding for the participants and collaboration from the participants greatly affects the quality of data(4). Modern technologies such as GPS and mobile communications have made possible the automatic collection of trajectory data. The data collected, however, is not ideal for modeling human space-time activities, limited by the accuracies of existing devices. There is also no readily available tool for efficient processing of the data for human behavior study. We present here a suite of methods and an integrated ArcGIS desktop-based visual interface for the pre-processing and spatiotemporal analyses of trajectory data. We provide examples of how such processing may be used to model human space-time activities, especially with error-rich pedestrian trajectory data, that could be useful in public health studies such as infectious disease transmission modeling. The procedure presented includes pre-processing, trajectory segmentation, activity space characterization, density estimation and visualization, and a few other exploratory analysis methods. Pre-processing is the cleaning of noisy raw trajectory data. We introduce an interactive visual pre-processing interface as well as an

  11. Statistics of Infima and Stopping Times of Entropy Production and Applications to Active Molecular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Izaak; Roldán, Édgar; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-01-01

    We study the statistics of infima, stopping times, and passage probabilities of entropy production in nonequilibrium steady states, and we show that they are universal. We consider two examples of stopping times: first-passage times of entropy production and waiting times of stochastic processes, which are the times when a system reaches a given state for the first time. Our main results are as follows: (i) The distribution of the global infimum of entropy production is exponential with mean equal to minus Boltzmann's constant; (ii) we find exact expressions for the passage probabilities of entropy production; (iii) we derive a fluctuation theorem for stopping-time distributions of entropy production. These results have interesting implications for stochastic processes that can be discussed in simple colloidal systems and in active molecular processes. In particular, we show that the timing and statistics of discrete chemical transitions of molecular processes, such as the steps of molecular motors, are governed by the statistics of entropy production. We also show that the extreme-value statistics of active molecular processes are governed by entropy production; for example, we derive a relation between the maximal excursion of a molecular motor against the direction of an external force and the infimum of the corresponding entropy-production fluctuations. Using this relation, we make predictions for the distribution of the maximum backtrack depth of RNA polymerases, which follow from our universal results for entropy-production infima.

  12. When constants are important

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  13. "A waste of time": Hispanic women's attitudes toward physical activity.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lee, Bokim; Hwang, Hyenam; Yoo, Kyung Hee; Chee, Wonshik; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Walker, Lorraine; Brown, Adama; McPeek, Chelsea; Miro, Michelle; Chee, Eunice

    2010-09-01

    Despite a lack of studies on Hispanic midlife women's physical activity, the existing studies have indicated that Hispanics' ethnic-specific attitudes toward physical activity contributed to their lack of physical activity. However, little is still clearly known about Hispanic midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity. The purpose of this study was to explore Hispanic midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity using a feminist perspective. The study was a 6-month qualitative online forum among 23 Hispanic women who were recruited through Internet communities/groups. The data were collected using 17 online forum topics on attitudes toward physical activity and ethnic-specific contexts. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three major themes emerged from the data analysis process: (a) "family first, no time for myself," (b) "little exercise, but naturally healthy," and (c) "dad died of a heart attack." Although some of the women perceived the importance of physical activity due to their family history of chronic diseases, the study participants thought that physical activity would be a waste of time in their busy daily schedules. These findings provided directions for future health care practice and research to increase physical activity among Hispanic midlife women.

  14. Physical Activity, Study Sitting Time, Leisure Sitting Time, and Sleep Time Are Differently Associated With Obesity in Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Il Gyu; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, So Young; Sim, Songyong; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Low physical activity, long leisure sitting time, and short sleep time are risk factors for obesity, but the association with study sitting time is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between these factors and obesity. We analyzed the association between physical activity, study sitting time, leisure sitting time, and sleep time and subject weight (underweight, healthy weight, overweight, and obese), using data from a large population-based survey, the 2013 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. Data from 53,769 participants were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression analyses with complex sampling. Age, sex, region of residence, economic level, smoking, stress level, physical activity, sitting time for study, sitting time for leisure, and sleep time were adjusted as the confounders. Low physical activity (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] = 1.03, 1.12) and long leisure sitting time (AORs = 1.15, 1.32) were positively associated with overweight and obese. Low physical activity (AOR = 1.33) and long leisure sitting time (AOR = 1.12) were also associated with underweight. Study sitting time was negatively associated with underweight (AOR = 0.86) but was unrelated to overweight (AOR = 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.91–1.03) and obese (AOR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.84–1.04). Sleep time (<6 hours; ≥6 hours, <7 hours; ≥7 hours, <8 hours) was adversely associated with underweight (AORs = 0.67, 0.79, and 0.88) but positively associated with overweight (AORs = 1.19, 1.17, and 1.08) and obese (AORs = 1.33, 1.36, and 1.30) in a dose–response relationship. In adolescents, increasing physical activity, decreasing leisure sitting time, and obtaining sufficient sleep would be beneficial in maintaining a healthy weight. However, study sitting time was not associated with overweight or obese. PMID:26554807

  15. Time required for motor activity in lucid dreams.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schredl, Michael

    2004-12-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between the time required for specific tasks (counting and performing squats) in lucid dreams and in the waking state. Five proficient lucid dreamers (26-34 yr. old, M=29.8, SD=3.0; one woman and four men) participated. Analysis showed that the time needed for counting in a lucid dream is comparable to the time needed for counting in wakefulness, but motor activities required more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state.

  16. A constant threat for HIV: Fc-engineering to enhance broadly neutralizing antibody activity for immunotherapy of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2015-08-01

    Passive immunotherapy with polyclonal or hyperimmune serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations provides an efficient means of protecting immunocompromised patients from microbial infections. More recently, the use of passive immunotherapy to prevent or to treat established infections with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has gained much attention, due to promising preclinical data obtained in monkey and humanized mouse in vivo model systems, demonstrating that the transfer of HIV-specific antibodies can not only prevent HIV infection, but also diminish virus load during chronic infection. Furthermore, an array of broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies has become available and the importance of the IgG constant region as a critical modulator of broadly neutralizing activity has been demonstrated. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings with regard to the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for antibody-mediated clearance of HIV infection, and to discuss how this may help to improve HIV therapy via optimizing Fcγ-receptor-dependent activities of HIV-specific antibodies.

  17. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cesare, Marco; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-09-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  18. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  19. Assessing working memory capacity through time-constrained elementary activities.

    PubMed

    Lucidi, Annalisa; Loaiza, Vanessa; Camos, Valérie; Barrouillet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) capacity measured through complex span tasks is among the best predictors of fluid intelligence (Gf). These tasks usually involve maintaining memoranda while performing complex cognitive activities that require a rather high level of education (e.g., reading comprehension, arithmetic), restricting their range of applicability. Because individual differences in such complex activities are nothing more than the concatenation of small differences in their elementary constituents, complex span tasks involving elementary processes should be as good of predictors of Gf as traditional tasks. The present study showed that two latent variables issued from either traditional or new span tasks involving time-constrained elementary activities were similarly correlated with Gf. Moreover, a model with a single unitary WM factor had a similar fit as a model with two distinct WM factors. Thus, time-constrained elementary activities can be integrated in WM tasks, permitting the assessment of WM in a wider range of populations.

  20. Effect of altering starting length and activation timing of muscle on fiber strain and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-05-01

    Muscle strain injuries are some of the most frequent injuries in sports and command a great deal of attention in an effort to understand their etiology. These injuries may be the culmination of a series of subcellular events accumulated through repetitive lengthening (eccentric) contractions during exercise, and they may be influenced by a variety of variables including fiber strain magnitude, peak joint torque, and starting muscle length. To assess the influence of these variables on muscle injury magnitude in vivo, we measured fiber dynamics and joint torque production during repeated stretch-shortening cycles in the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, at short and long muscle lengths, while varying the timing of activation before muscle stretch. We found that a muscle subjected to repeated stretch-shortening cycles of constant muscle-tendon unit excursion exhibits significantly different joint torque and fiber strains when the timing of activation or starting muscle length is changed. In particular, measures of fiber strain and muscle injury were significantly increased by altering activation timing and increasing the starting length of the muscle. However, we observed differential effects on peak joint torque during the cyclic stretch-shortening exercise, as increasing the starting length of the muscle did not increase torque production. We conclude that altering activation timing and muscle length before stretch may influence muscle injury by significantly increasing fiber strain magnitude and that fiber dynamics is a more important variable than muscle-tendon unit dynamics and torque production in influencing the magnitude of muscle injury.

  1. Inconstant Planck’s constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Lizzi, Fedele; Porzio, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the Dirac idea that fundamental constants are dynamical variables and by conjectures on quantum structure of space-time at small distances, we consider the possibility that Planck constant ℏ is a time depending quantity, undergoing random Gaussian fluctuations around its measured constant mean value, with variance σ2 and a typical correlation timescale Δt. We consider the case of propagation of a free particle and a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator coherent state, and show that the time evolution in both cases is different from the standard behavior. Finally, we discuss how interferometric experiments or exploiting coherent electromagnetic fields in a cavity may put effective bounds on the value of τ = σ2Δt.

  2. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  3. Timing of Cortico-Muscle Transmission During Active Movement.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Gustaf M; Luchies, Carl W; Cheney, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies have reported large disparities between short cortico-muscle conduction latencies and long recorded delays between cortical firing and evoked muscle activity. Using methods such as spike- and stimulus-triggered averaging of electromyographic (EMG) activity, previous studies have shown that the time delay between corticomotoneuronal (CM) cell firing and onset of facilitation of forelimb muscle activity ranges from 6.7 to 9.8 ms, depending on the muscle group tested. In contrast, numerous studies have reported delays of 60-122 ms between cortical cell firing onset and either EMG or movement onset during motor tasks. To further investigate this disparity, we simulated rapid active movement by applying frequency-modulated stimulus trains to M1 cortical sites in a rhesus macaque performing a movement task. This yielded corresponding EMG modulations, the latency of which could be measured relative to the stimulus modulations. The overall mean delay from stimulus frequency modulation to EMG modulation was 11.5 ± 5.6 ms, matching closely the conduction time through the cortico-muscle pathway (12.6 ± 2.0 ms) derived from poststimulus facilitation peaks computed at the same sites. We conclude that, during active movement, the delay between modulated M1 cortical output and its impact on muscle activity approaches the physical cortico-muscle conduction time.

  4. Active controllers and the time duration to learn a task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Goodyear, C.

    1986-01-01

    An active controller was used to help train naive subjects involved in a compensatory tracking task. The controller is called active in this context because it moves the subject's hand in a direction to improve tracking. It is of interest here to question whether the active controller helps the subject to learn a task more rapidly than the passive controller. Six subjects, inexperienced to compensatory tracking, were run to asymptote root mean square error tracking levels with an active controller or a passive controller. The time required to learn the task was defined several different ways. The results of the different measures of learning were examined across pools of subjects and across controllers using statistical tests. The comparison between the active controller and the passive controller as to their ability to accelerate the learning process as well as reduce levels of asymptotic tracking error is reported here.

  5. On the Khinchin Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We prove known identities for the Khinchin constant and develop new identities for the more general Hoelder mean limits of continued fractions. Any of these constants can be developed as a rapidly converging series involving values of the Riemann zeta function and rational coefficients. Such identities allow for efficient numerical evaluation of the relevant constants. We present free-parameter, optimizable versions of the identities, and report numerical results.

  6. Understanding human activity patterns based on space-time-semantics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Songnian

    2016-11-01

    Understanding human activity patterns plays a key role in various applications in an urban environment, such as transportation planning and traffic forecasting, urban planning, public health and safety, and emergency response. Most existing studies in modeling human activity patterns mainly focus on spatiotemporal dimensions, which lacks consideration of underlying semantic context. In fact, what people do and discuss at some places, inferring what is happening at the places, cannot be simple neglected because it is the root of human mobility patterns. We believe that the geo-tagged semantic context, representing what individuals do and discuss at a place and a specific time, drives a formation of specific human activity pattern. In this paper, we aim to model human activity patterns not only based on space and time but also with consideration of associated semantics, and attempt to prove a hypothesis that similar mobility patterns may have different motivations. We develop a spatiotemporal-semantic model to quantitatively express human activity patterns based on topic models, leading to an analysis of space, time and semantics. A case study is conducted using Twitter data in Toronto based on our model. Through computing the similarities between users in terms of spatiotemporal pattern, semantic pattern and spatiotemporal-semantic pattern, we find that only a small number of users (2.72%) have very similar activity patterns, while the majority (87.14%) show different activity patterns (i.e., similar spatiotemporal patterns and different semantic patterns, similar semantic patterns and different spatiotemporal patterns, or different in both). The population of users that has very similar activity patterns is decreased by 56.41% after incorporating semantic information in the corresponding spatiotemporal patterns, which can quantitatively prove the hypothesis.

  7. Physical Activity in High School during "Free-Time" Periods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Pedro; Sousa, Michael; Sá, Carla; Ribeiro, José; Mota, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine youth physical activity (PA) in free-time periods during high school days and their contribution to total PA. Differences in terms of sex, age, body mass index and school level were assessed in a sample of Portuguese adolescents. Participants totalled 213 (135 girls), aged 14.6 ± 1.7, from two different…

  8. 23 CFR 771.113 - Timing of Administration activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... related environmental laws and regulations to the maximum extent possible during the NEPA process. This work includes environmental studies, related engineering studies, agency coordination and public... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.113 Timing of Administration activities. (a) The lead...

  9. 23 CFR 771.113 - Timing of Administration activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... related environmental laws and regulations to the maximum extent possible during the NEPA process. This work includes environmental studies, related engineering studies, agency coordination and public... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.113 Timing of Administration activities. (a) The lead...

  10. 23 CFR 771.113 - Timing of Administration activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... related environmental laws and regulations to the maximum extent possible during the NEPA process. This work includes environmental studies, related engineering studies, agency coordination and public... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.113 Timing of Administration activities. (a) The lead...

  11. 23 CFR 771.113 - Timing of Administration activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... related environmental laws and regulations to the maximum extent possible during the NEPA process. This work includes environmental studies, related engineering studies, agency coordination and public... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.113 Timing of Administration activities. (a) The lead...

  12. Influence of computer work under time pressure on cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Hu, Sijung; Yu, Hongliu

    2015-03-01

    Computer users are often under stress when required to complete computer work within a required time. Work stress has repeatedly been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The present study examined the effects of time pressure workload during computer tasks on cardiac activity in 20 healthy subjects. Heart rate, time domain and frequency domain indices of heart rate variability (HRV) and Poincaré plot parameters were compared among five computer tasks and two rest periods. Faster heart rate and decreased standard deviation of R-R interval were noted in response to computer tasks under time pressure. The Poincaré plot parameters showed significant differences between different levels of time pressure workload during computer tasks, and between computer tasks and the rest periods. In contrast, no significant differences were identified for the frequency domain indices of HRV. The results suggest that the quantitative Poincaré plot analysis used in this study was able to reveal the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the autonomically regulated cardiac rhythm. Specifically, heightened vagal tone occurred during the relaxation computer tasks without time pressure. In contrast, the stressful computer tasks with added time pressure stimulated cardiac sympathetic activity.

  13. Studies in the system MgO-SiO2-CO2-H2O(I): The activity-product constant of chrysotile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, P.B.; Christ, C.L.

    1968-01-01

    Chrysotile dissolves congruently in water according to the reaction: Mg3Si2O6(OH)4c + 5H2Ol = 3Mgaq2+ + 6OHaq- + 2H4SiO4aq. Experimental determination of the activity-product constant of chrysotile, Kchr = [Mg2+]3[OH-]6[H4SiO4aq]2, at 90??C, yields the value of Kchr = 10-49.2 ?? 100.5. A synthetic sample and a natural sample from New Idria, California, were used in the determination. Values of Kchr were calculated for temperatures ranging from 0??C to 200??C, using the thermochemical data of King et al. (1967) for chrysotile and antigorite, various solubility data for silica, and ionic partial molal heat capacities estimated by the method of criss and Cobble (1964a). Kchr is 10-54.1 at 0??C, rises to a maximum value of 10-48.5 at approximately 135??C, and is 10-49.1 at 200??C (all values for the three-phase system, chrysotile plus solution plus vapor). The calculated 90??C value is 10-49.1, in excellent agreement with the experimental value; for 25??C, the calculated value is 10-50.8. ?? 1968.

  14. Kaolin-correctable prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Briselli, M F; Ellman, L

    1980-11-01

    Seven patients who had normal prothrombin times but prolonged activated partial thromboplastin times (aPTT) are described. The prolonged aPTT, obtained with micronized silica as the contact activating agent in a semi-automated optical end-point system, a nonautomated optical end-point system, and a conductivity end-point system, corrected to normal when kaolin was used as the contact activating agent. Abnormal results were also obtained with celite and ellagic acid as contact activating agents. The activities of various clotting factors were within normal limits in all cases where they were assayed. The thromboplastin dilution test was uniformly negative, and mixtures of one patient's plasma with that of another patient failed to correct the abnormal aPTT. No patients had a personal or family history of bleeding, and all underwent surgery without bleeding difficulties. This pattern of a prolonged aPTT that corrects to normal when kaolin is used as the contact activator appears to represent a previously unrecognized laboratory phenomenon.

  15. Privileging physical activity over healthy eating: 'Time' to Choose?

    PubMed

    Chircop, Andrea; Shearer, Cindy; Pitter, Robert; Sim, Meaghan; Rehman, Laurene; Flannery, Meredith; Kirk, Sara

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity and healthy eating have long been promoted as key strategies in tackling the 'wicked problem' of obesity. Both practices are assumed to go hand-in-hand, but whether one dominates the other has largely remained unexamined. Moreover, time, a dimension beyond the socio-ecological model, is a critical factor of families' busy lives, but related challenges are rarely articulated. We conducted 47 family interviews as part of a mixed methods study examining environmental influences on youth obesity in Nova Scotia, Eastern Canada. Participants were recruited from six schools at the junior high school level (grades 7-9; age range 12-14 years) based on location (urban, suburban and rural) and neighborhood socioeconomic status (high and low socioeconomic status). Time pressure to meet the demands associated with scheduled physical activity for youth was the dominant theme across interviews from all neighborhoods. Physical activity and healthy eating were valued differently, with greater value placed on physical activity than healthy eating. The pressure to engage youth in organized physical activity appeared to outweigh the importance of healthy eating, which led to neglecting family meals at home and consuming fast food and take out options. Our findings further reinforce the need to move beyond the socio-ecological model and integrate critical dimensions such as 'time', its challenges and opportunities, to allow for a more nuanced understanding of contemporary healthy living. It appears 'timely' to focus on healthy public policy in support of families, instead of unwittingly supporting a fast food industry that profits from time-pressured families.

  16. On the replication of Kristofferson's (1980) quantal timing for duration discrimination: some learning but no quanta and not much of a Weber constant.

    PubMed

    Matthews, William J; Grondin, Simon

    2012-07-01

    This study revisited Kristofferson's (Perception & Psychophysics 27:300-306, 1980) report showing that, with sufficient practice at interval discrimination, the relationship between timing variability and physical time is a step function-in other words, that psychological time is quantized. Two participants completed 260 sessions of a temporal discrimination task, 20 consecutive sessions for each of 13 base durations ranging from 100 to 1,480 ms. The data do not replicate Kristofferson's (Perception & Psychophysics 27:300-306, 1980) quantal finding, and it is argued that the effect Kristofferson reported may have been due to specific methodological decisions. Importantly, the data show (1) some limitation of Weber's law for time, even for the narrow range of the present investigation, and (2) that extensive training provides some modest benefit to temporal discrimination, mainly for longer intervals, and that this benefit primarily occurs in the first few sessions.

  17. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  18. Monetary cost for time spent in everyday physical activities.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Anne S; Vlaev, Ivo

    2014-05-01

    We measured utility curves for the hypothetical monetary costs as a function of time engaged in three everyday physical activities: walking, standing, and sitting. We found that activities requiring more physical exertion resulted in steeper discount curves, i.e., perceived cost as a function of time. We also examined the effects of gain vs. loss framing (whether the activity brought additional rewards or prevented losses) as well as the effects of the individual factors of gender, income, and BMI. Steeper discount curves were associated with higher income (annual household ≥ median of $45,000) and gain framing (which indicates loss aversion). There were interactions between gender and frame, and also income and frame: Females and higher income participants showed loss aversion whereas males and lower income participants were not affected by framing. Males showed less discounting in gain frames relative to females, whereas females showed less discounting in loss frames relative to males. In gain frames, higher income participants discounted more but in loss frames there was no effect of income. We also found individual tendencies for discounting across activities: if an individual exhibited steeper discounting for one activity, they were also more likely to exhibit steeper discounting for the other activities. These results have implications for designers of interventions to encourage non-exercise physical activities, suggesting that loss-framed incentives are more effective for women and those with middle class (or greater) incomes. Furthermore loss framed incentives have more uniform impact across income brackets because people discount loss frames similarly regardless of income whereas those with middle-class incomes are not as motivated by gain frames. Our results also demonstrate a general method for examining the costs of effort associated with everyday activities.

  19. The Timing of Noise-Sensitive Activities in Residential Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Data from a nationally representative survey of time use was analyzed to provide estimates of the percentage of the population which is engaged in noise sensitive activities during each hour of the day on weekdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Estimates are provided of the percentage engaged in aural communication activities at home, sleeping at home, or simply at home. The day can be roughly divided into four noise sensitivity periods consisting of two relatively steady state periods, night and day and the early morning and evening transition periods. Weekends differ from weekdays in that the morning transition period is one hour later and the numbers of people engaged in aural communication during the day at home are approximately one-half to three-quarters greater. The extent and timing of noise sensitive activities was found to be similiar for all parts of the United States, for different sizes of urban areas, and for the three seasons surveyed (September through May). The timing of activity periods does not differ greatly by sex or age even though women and people over 65 are much more likely to be at home during the daytime.

  20. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gloria; Martini, K. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE’s orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  1. Time-activity relationships to VOC personal exposure factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Rufus D.; Schweizer, Christian; Llacqua, Vito; Lai, Hak Kan; Jantunen, Matti; Bayer-Oglesby, Lucy; Künzli, Nino

    Social and demographic factors have been found to play a significant role in differences between time-activity patterns of population subgroups. Since time-activity patterns largely influence personal exposure to compounds as individuals move across microenvironments, exposure subgroups within the population may be defined by factors that influence daily activity patterns. Socio-demographic and environmental factors that define time-activity subgroups also define quantifiable differences in VOC personal exposures to different sources and individual compounds in the Expolis study. Significant differences in exposures to traffic-related compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were observed in relation to gender, number of children and living alone. Categorization of exposures further indicated time exposed to traffic at work and time in a car as important determinants. Increased exposures to decane, nonane and undecane were observed for males, housewives and self-employed. Categorization of exposures indicated exposure subgroups related to workshop use and living downtown. Higher exposures to 3-carene and α-pinene commonly found in household cleaning products and fragrances were associated with more children, while exposures to traffic compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were reduced with more children. Considerable unexplained variation remained in categorization of exposures associated with home product use and fragrances, due to individual behavior and product choice. More targeted data collection methods in VOC exposure studies for these sources should be used. Living alone was associated with decreased exposures to 2-methyl-1-propanol and 1-butanol, and traffic-related compounds. Identification of these subgroups may help to reduce the large amount of unexplained variation in VOC exposure studies. Further they may help in assessing impacts of urban planning that result in changes in behavior of individuals, resulting in shifts in

  2. Modified active disturbance rejection control for time-delay systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shen; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Industrial processes are typically nonlinear, time-varying and uncertain, to which active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has been shown to be an effective solution. The control design becomes even more challenging in the presence of time delay. In this paper, a novel modification of ADRC is proposed so that good disturbance rejection is achieved while maintaining system stability. The proposed design is shown to be more effective than the standard ADRC design for time-delay systems and is also a unified solution for stable, critical stable and unstable systems with time delay. Simulation and test results show the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed design. Linear matrix inequality (LMI) based stability analysis is provided as well.

  3. Autonomic activity during human sleep as a function of time and sleep stage.

    PubMed

    Trinder, J; Kleiman, J; Carrington, M; Smith, S; Breen, S; Tan, N; Kim, Y

    2001-12-01

    While there is a developing understanding of the influence of sleep on cardiovascular autonomic activity in humans, there remain unresolved issues. In particular, the effect of time within the sleep period, independent of sleep stage, has not been investigated. Further, the influence of sleep on central sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is uncertain because results using the major method applicable to humans, the low frequency (LF) component of heart rate variability (HRV), have been contradictory, and because the method itself is open to criticism. Sleep and cardiac activity were measured in 14 young healthy subjects on three nights. Data was analysed in 2-min epochs. All epochs meeting specified criteria were identified, beginning 2 h before, until 7 h after, sleep onset. Epoch values were allocated to 30-min bins and during sleep were also classified into stage 2, slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The measures of cardiac activity were heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), high frequency (HF) and LF components of HRV and pre-ejection period (PEP). During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep autonomic balance shifted from sympathetic to parasympathetic dominance, although this appeared to be more because of a shift in parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activity. Autonomic balance during REM was in general similar to wakefulness. For BP and the HF and LF components the change occurred abruptly at sleep onset and was then constant over time within each stage of sleep, indicating that any change in autonomic balance over the sleep period is a consequence of the changing distribution of sleep stages. Two variables, HR and PEP, did show time effects reflecting a circadian influence over HR and perhaps time asleep affecting PEP. While both the LF component and PEP showed changes consistent with reduced sympathetic tone during sleep, their pattern of change over time differed.

  4. The Drosophila Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase LAR Is Required for Development of Circadian Pacemaker Neuron Processes That Support Rhythmic Activity in Constant Darkness But Not during Light/Dark Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Parul

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, a transcriptional feedback loop that is activated by CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes and repressed by PERIOD-TIMELESS (PER-TIM) complexes keeps circadian time. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated post-translationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Although kinases that control PER, TIM, and CLK levels, activity, and/or subcellular localization have been identified, less is known about phosphatases that control clock protein dephosphorylation. To identify clock-relevant phosphatases, clock-cell-specific RNAi knockdowns of Drosophila phosphatases were screened for altered activity rhythms. One phosphatase that was identified, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase leukocyte-antigen-related (LAR), abolished activity rhythms in constant darkness (DD) without disrupting the timekeeping mechanism in brain pacemaker neurons. However, expression of the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), which mediates pacemaker neuron synchrony and output, is eliminated in the dorsal projections from small ventral lateral (sLNv) pacemaker neurons when Lar expression is knocked down during development, but not in adults. Loss of Lar function eliminates sLNv dorsal projections, but PDF expression persists in sLNv and large ventral lateral neuron cell bodies and their remaining projections. In contrast to the defects in lights-on and lights-off anticipatory activity seen in flies that lack PDF, Lar RNAi knockdown flies anticipate the lights-on and lights-off transition normally. Our results demonstrate that Lar is required for sLNv dorsal projection development and suggest that PDF expression in LNv cell bodies and their remaining projections mediate anticipation of the lights-on and lights-off transitions during a light/dark cycle. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In animals, circadian clocks drive daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism, and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. Because key circadian

  5. Monitoring Heparin Therapy with the Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, R. K.; Michel, A.

    1971-01-01

    Difficulties associated with the whole blood clotting time (W.B.C.T.) as a method of monitoring heparin therapy have led to the investigation of the activated partial thromboplastin time (A.P.T.T.) as an alternative. The conclusion is reached that the latter procedure possesses several advantages. Using the method described and a citrate-preserved blood sample collected just prior to the administration of the next serial dose of heparin, the suggested therapeutic duration of the A.P.T.T. is 70 seconds or twice the mean control value. A practical range for this method is 60 to 70 seconds. PMID:5557913

  6. Older Adults, Chronic Disease and Leisure-time Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, Maureen C.; Miller, William C.; Eng, Janice J.; Noreau, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Background Participating in regular physical activity is an important part of healthy aging. There is an increased risk for inactivity associated with aging and the risk becomes greater for adults who have a chronic disease. However, there is limited information on current physical activity levels for older adults and even less for those with chronic diseases. Objective Our primary objective was to determine the proportion of older adults who achieved a recommended amount of weekly physical activity (≥1000 kcal/week). The secondary objectives were to identify variables associated with meeting guideline leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), and to describe the type of physical activities that respondents reported across different chronic diseases. Methods In this study we used the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.1 (2000/2001) to report LTPA for adults aged 65 years and older. This was a population-based self-report telephone survey. We used univariate logistic regression to provide odds ratios to determine differences in activity and the likelihood of meeting guideline recommendations. Results For adults over 65 years of age with no chronic diseases, 30% reported meeting guideline LTPA, while only 23% met the recommendations if they had one or more chronic diseases. Factors associated with achieving the guideline amount of physical activity included a higher level of education, higher income and moderate alcohol consumption. Likelihood for not achieving the recommended level of LTPA included low BMI, pain and the presence of mobility and dexterity problems. Walking, gardening and home exercises were the three most frequent types of reported physical activities. Conclusion This study provides the most recent evidence to suggest that older Canadians are not active enough and this is accentuated if a chronic disease is present. It is important to develop community-based programs to facilitate LTPA, in particular for older people with a chronic disease. PMID

  7. Real-Time Enzyme Kinetics by Quantitative NMR Spectroscopy and Determination of the Michaelis-Menten Constant Using the Lambert-W Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her, Cheenou; Alonzo, Aaron P.; Vang, Justin Y.; Torres, Ernesto; Krishnan, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is an essential part of a chemistry curriculum, especially for students interested in biomedical research or in health care fields. Though the concept is routinely performed in undergraduate chemistry/biochemistry classrooms using other spectroscopic methods, we provide an optimized approach that uses a real-time monitoring of the…

  8. Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing in Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Yun, Brian J; Prabhakar, Anand M; Warsh, Jonathan; Kaplan, Robert; Brennan, John; Dempsey, Kyle E; Raja, Ali S

    2016-06-01

    Value in emergency medicine is determined by both patient-important outcomes and the costs associated with achieving them. However, measuring true costs is challenging. Without an understanding of costs, emergency department (ED) leaders will be unable to determine which interventions might improve value for their patients. Although ongoing research may determine which outcomes are meaningful, an accurate costing system is also needed. This article reviews current costing mechanisms in the ED and their pitfalls. It then describes how time-driven activity-based costing may be superior to these current costing systems. Time-driven activity-based costing, in addition to being a more accurate costing system, can be used for process improvements in the ED.

  9. On flows having constant vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Paul H.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2011-10-01

    Constant vorticity flows of a uniform fluid in a rigid ellipsoidal container rotating at a variable rate are considered. These include librationally driven and precessionally driven flows. The well-known Poincaré solution for precessionally driven flow in a spheroid is generalized to an ellipsoid with unequal principal axes. The dynamic stability of these flows is investigated, and of other flows in which the angular velocity of the container is constant in time. Solutions for the Chandler wobble are discussed. The role of an invariant, called here the Helmholtzian, is examined.

  10. Just-in-time automated counseling for physical activity promotion.

    PubMed

    Bickmore, Timothy; Gruber, Amanda; Intille, Stephen

    2008-11-06

    Preliminary results from a field study into the efficacy of automated health behavior counseling delivered at the moment of user decision-making compared to the same counseling delivered at the end of the day are reported. The study uses an animated PDA-based advisor with an integrated accelerometer that can engage users in dialogues about their physical activity throughout the day. Preliminary results indicate health counseling is more effective when delivered just-in-time than when delivered retrospectively.

  11. Effect of constant administration of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist on reproductive activity in mares: preliminary evidence on suppression of ovulation during the breeding season.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, B P; Peterson, K D; Silvia, P J

    1993-10-01

    During the breeding season, the effect of constant administration of an agonist analog of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; goserelin acetate) on reproductive activity of mares was determined. Twenty-four mares undergoing estrous cycles were allocated at random to 6 groups (n = 4/group) and, on May 29 (day 0), received no treatment (group 1, controls), 120 micrograms (group 2), 360 micrograms (group 3), 600 micrograms (group 4), or 1,200 micrograms (group 5) of GnRH agonist/d for 28 days via a depot implanted subcutaneously. The final group of mares (group 6) was treated with 120 micrograms of GnRH agonist/d for 84 days (3 occasions at 28-day intervals). During a pretreatment period (April 19 to May 29) and for 90 days after initiation of GnRH agonist treatment, follicular development and ovulation were monitored by transrectal ultrasonography of the reproductive tract at 2- to 3-day intervals. On each occasion a blood sample was collected for determination of luteinizing hormone (LH) and progesterone. Estrous behavior was monitored by teasing of mares with a stallion. Initiation of agonist treatment was random, relative to the stage of the estrous cycle, and all mares ovulated within 11 days before or after implantation. In 3 of 4 nontreated control mares, estrous cycles were observed throughout the study, with interovulatory intervals ranging from 18 to 26 days. In the remaining mare, concentration of progesterone was high after asynchronous double ovulation during the pretreatment period, suggestive of persistent corpus luteum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. "Recognizing Numerical Constants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of inexpensive, high performance computer and new efficient algorithms have made possible the automatic recognition of numerically computed constants. In other words, techniques now exist for determining, within certain limits, whether a computed real or complex number can be written as a simple expression involving the classical constants of mathematics. In this presentation, some of the recently discovered techniques for constant recognition, notably integer relation detection algorithms, will be presented. As an application of these methods, the author's recent work in recognizing "Euler sums" will be described in some detail.

  13. Measurements of the scintillation time constants of inorganic crystals for the development of a triple-Phoswich detector for high-energy X-ray quanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelis, Thilo

    1987-04-01

    A setup for the measurement of the rise time distribution of pulses measured by a triple-Phoswich detector that is planned as component of an imaging system of a rotation-modulation telescope (RMT) was built. The principles and characteristics of scintillation crystals, scintillation detectors, and RMT's are outlined. Measurements on CsT(Tl) test crystals show a strong dependence of rise time distribution on Tl-concentration, and a clear dependence on temperature. A system for optimum light collection was developed for a Phoswich detector. The scintillation crystals NaJ(Tl) and CsJ(Na) are very suitable for a strip Phoswich. Proposals for a triple-Phoswich as detector for an RMT are given.

  14. Are C-loss rates from drained peatlands constant over time? The additive value of soil profile based and flux budget approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, J.; Bader, C.; Borraz, E.; Hoffmann, M.; Giebels, M.; Sommer, M.; Augustin, J.

    2014-08-01

    Drained peatlands are CO2 hotspots and lose important soil functions over time. In contrast to mineral soils, their high carbon density induces long lasting and high emissions. These emissions can be estimated using various approaches which cover different system boundaries in time and space. Here we compare 5 years flux measurements from manual chambers with a soil profile based method to estimate carbon losses from two temperate fens under different management intensity drained at the end of the 19th century. According to the flux measurements, both grassland sites currently lose significant amounts of carbon as CO2 in the order of 7.1 and 9.1 t CO2-C ha-1a-1 when managed non-intensively or intensively, respectively. Profile based estimates, which make use of the difference in ash concentration along the soil profile, reveal a total of 284 and 619 t C ha-1 since the onset of drainage. These substantial losses are accompanied by a sharp decrease in peat quality as measured by NMR spectroscopy, confirming that a large part of former topsoil material is already mineralized. On average, the profile based estimate converts to smaller annual loss rates of 2.2 (non-intensive) and 4.8 t CO2-C ha-1a-1 (intensive) management. Our data, together with historical flux measurements at this site, provide evidence that peat decomposition rates increased over time, despite declining organic matter quality. We suggest that higher management intensities (i.e., higher fertilization and changes in carbon export from the field), including drainage, and increased mean annual temperature may be important factors for higher emissions today. These two methods are complementary in terms of time horizon and system boundary and, in conjunction, confirm the long-term emission potential of temperate drained organic grassland soils.

  15. Muscle Activation Characteristics of the Front Leg During Baseball Swings with Timing Correction for Sudden Velocity Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  16. Interevent time distributions of human multi-level activity in a virtual world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mryglod, O.; Fuchs, B.; Szell, M.; Holovatch, Yu.; Thurner, S.

    2015-02-01

    Studying human behavior in virtual environments provides extraordinary opportunities for a quantitative analysis of social phenomena with levels of accuracy that approach those of the natural sciences. In this paper we use records of player activities in the massive multiplayer online game Pardus over 1238 consecutive days, and analyze dynamical features of sequences of actions of players. We build on previous work where temporal structures of human actions of the same type were quantified, and provide an empirical understanding of human actions of different types. This study of multi-level human activity can be seen as a dynamic counterpart of static multiplex network analysis. We show that the interevent time distributions of actions in the Pardus universe follow highly non-trivial distribution functions, from which we extract action-type specific characteristic 'decay constants'. We discuss characteristic features of interevent time distributions, including periodic patterns on different time scales, bursty dynamics, and various functional forms on different time scales. We comment on gender differences of players in emotional actions, and find that while males and females act similarly when performing some positive actions, females are slightly faster for negative actions. We also observe effects on the age of players: more experienced players are generally faster in making decisions about engaging in and terminating enmity and friendship, respectively.

  17. Short-time effect of heavy metals upon microbial community activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Jun; Si, Yang; Chen, Huilun; Russel, Mohammad; Chen, Ke; Qian, Yiguang; Zaray, Gyula; Bramanti, Emilia

    2010-01-15

    Microcalorimetry was applied to assess and compare the toxic effect of heavy metals, such as As, Cu, Cd, Cr, Co, Pb and Zn, on the soil microbial activities and community. About 1.0 g soil spiked 5.0mg glucose and 5.0mg ammonium sulfate, the microbial activities were recorded as power-time curves, and their indices, microbial growth rate constant k, total heat evolution Q(T), metabolic enthalpy Delta H(met) and mass specific heat rate J(Q/S), were calculated. Comparing these thermodynamic parameters associated with growth yield, a general order of toxicity to the soil was found to be Cr>Pb>As>Co>Zn>Cd>Cu. When soil was exposed to heavy metals, the amount of bacteria and fungi decreased with the incubation time, and the bacterial number diminished sharply. It illustrates that fungi are more tolerant, and bacteria-fungi ratio would be altered under metal stress. To determine the status of the glucose consumed, a glucose biosensor with eggshell membrane was used to measure the remaining glucose in soil sample. Results showed that the time at which glucose was consumed completely was agreed with the microcalorimetric time to a large extent, and depended on the toxicity of heavy metals as well.

  18. Quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment problem with time delay for active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J. M.; Singh, K. V.; Datta, B. N.

    2009-08-01

    Partial pole assignment in active vibration control refers to reassigning a small set of unwanted eigenvalues of the quadratic eigenvalue problem (QEP) associated with the second order system of a vibrating structure, by using feedback control force, to suitably chosen location without altering the remaining large number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. There are several challenges of solving this quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment problem (QPEVAP) in a computational setting which the traditional pole-placement problems for first-order control systems do not have to deal with. In order to these challenges, there has been some work in recent years to solve QPEVAP in a computationally viable way. However, these works do not take into account of the practical phenomenon of the time-delay effect in the system. In this paper, a new "direct and partial modal" approach of the quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment problem with time-delay is proposed. The approach works directly in the quadratic system without requiring transformation to a standard state-space system and requires the knowledge of only a small number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors that can be computed or measured in practice. Two illustrative examples are presented in the context of active vibration control with constant time-delay to illustrate the success of our proposed approach. Future work includes generalization of this approach to a more practical complex time-delay system and extension of this work to the multi-input problem.

  19. The cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs.

  20. Timing of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Ho, A K; Price, D M; Terriff, D; Chik, C L

    2006-06-27

    Activation of members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family of signaling cascades is a tightly controlled event in rat pinealocytes. Cell culture studies indicate that whereas the NE-->cGMP activation of p42/44MAPK is rapid and transient, the NE-->cAMP activation of p38MAPK is slower and more sustained. The decline in the p42/44MAPK response is in part due to the induction of MAPK phosphatase-1 by NE. In comparison, p38MAPK activation is tightly coupled to the synthesis and degradation of an upstream element in its activation cascade. Whole animal studies confirm activation of p42/44MAPK occurring during the early part of night and precedes p38MAPK activation. Studies with selective MAPK inhibitors reveal a modulating effect of MAPKs on arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferse (AA-NAT) activity, with involvement of p42/44MAPK in the induction of AA-NAT and p38MAPK participating in the amplitude and duration of the AA-NAT response. These effects of p42/44MAPK and p38MAPK on AA-NAT activity match their timing of activation. Taken together, our studies on the timing of MAPK activation and regulation of AA-NAT by MAPKs add to the importance of MAPKs in regulating the circadian biology of the pineal gland.

  1. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  2. Activity time budget during foraging trips of emperor penguins.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Sato, Katsufumi; Ponganis, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    We developed an automated method using depth and one axis of body acceleration data recorded by animal-borne data loggers to identify activities of penguins over long-term deployments. Using this technique, we evaluated the activity time budget of emperor penguins (n = 10) both in water and on sea ice during foraging trips in chick-rearing season. During the foraging trips, emperor penguins alternated dive bouts (4.8 ± 4.5 h) and rest periods on sea ice (2.5 ± 2.3 h). After recorder deployment and release near the colony, the birds spent 17.9 ± 8.4% of their time traveling until they reached the ice edge. Once at the ice edge, they stayed there more than 4 hours before the first dive. After the first dive, the mean proportions of time spent on the ice and in water were 30.8 ± 7.4% and 69.2 ± 7.4%, respectively. When in the water, they spent 67.9 ± 3.1% of time making dives deeper than 5 m. Dive activity had no typical diurnal pattern for individual birds. While in the water between dives, the birds had short resting periods (1.2 ± 1.7 min) and periods of swimming at depths shallower than 5 m (0.25 ± 0.38 min). When the birds were on the ice, they primarily used time for resting (90.3 ± 4.1% of time) and spent only 9.7 ± 4.1% of time traveling. Thus, it appears that, during foraging trips at sea, emperor penguins traveled during dives >5 m depth, and that sea ice was primarily used for resting. Sea ice probably provides refuge from natural predators such as leopard seals. We also suggest that 24 hours of sunlight and the cycling of dive bouts with short rest periods on sea ice allow emperor penguins to dive continuously throughout the day during foraging trips to sea.

  3. Activity Time Budget during Foraging Trips of Emperor Penguins

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Sato, Katsufumi; Ponganis, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    We developed an automated method using depth and one axis of body acceleration data recorded by animal-borne data loggers to identify activities of penguins over long-term deployments. Using this technique, we evaluated the activity time budget of emperor penguins (n = 10) both in water and on sea ice during foraging trips in chick-rearing season. During the foraging trips, emperor penguins alternated dive bouts (4.8±4.5 h) and rest periods on sea ice (2.5±2.3 h). After recorder deployment and release near the colony, the birds spent 17.9±8.4% of their time traveling until they reached the ice edge. Once at the ice edge, they stayed there more than 4 hours before the first dive. After the first dive, the mean proportions of time spent on the ice and in water were 30.8±7.4% and 69.2±7.4%, respectively. When in the water, they spent 67.9±3.1% of time making dives deeper than 5 m. Dive activity had no typical diurnal pattern for individual birds. While in the water between dives, the birds had short resting periods (1.2±1.7 min) and periods of swimming at depths shallower than 5 m (0.25±0.38 min). When the birds were on the ice, they primarily used time for resting (90.3±4.1% of time) and spent only 9.7±4.1% of time traveling. Thus, it appears that, during foraging trips at sea, emperor penguins traveled during dives >5 m depth, and that sea ice was primarily used for resting. Sea ice probably provides refuge from natural predators such as leopard seals. We also suggest that 24 hours of sunlight and the cycling of dive bouts with short rest periods on sea ice allow emperor penguins to dive continuously throughout the day during foraging trips to sea. PMID:23185608

  4. Time-Elastic Generative Model for Acceleration Time Series in Human Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Munoz-Organero, Mario; Ruiz-Blazquez, Ramona

    2017-01-01

    Body-worn sensors in general and accelerometers in particular have been widely used in order to detect human movements and activities. The execution of each type of movement by each particular individual generates sequences of time series of sensed data from which specific movement related patterns can be assessed. Several machine learning algorithms have been used over windowed segments of sensed data in order to detect such patterns in activity recognition based on intermediate features (either hand-crafted or automatically learned from data). The underlying assumption is that the computed features will capture statistical differences that can properly classify different movements and activities after a training phase based on sensed data. In order to achieve high accuracy and recall rates (and guarantee the generalization of the system to new users), the training data have to contain enough information to characterize all possible ways of executing the activity or movement to be detected. This could imply large amounts of data and a complex and time-consuming training phase, which has been shown to be even more relevant when automatically learning the optimal features to be used. In this paper, we present a novel generative model that is able to generate sequences of time series for characterizing a particular movement based on the time elasticity properties of the sensed data. The model is used to train a stack of auto-encoders in order to learn the particular features able to detect human movements. The results of movement detection using a newly generated database with information on five users performing six different movements are presented. The generalization of results using an existing database is also presented in the paper. The results show that the proposed mechanism is able to obtain acceptable recognition rates (F = 0.77) even in the case of using different people executing a different sequence of movements and using different hardware. PMID

  5. Active Mining from Process Time Series by Learning Classifier System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurahashi, Setsuya; Terano, Takao

    Continuation processes in chemical and/or biotechnical plants always generate a large amount of time series data. However, since conventional process models are described as a set of control models, it is difficult to explain the complicated and active plant behaviors. Based on the background, this research proposes a novel method to develop a process response model from continuous time-series data. The method consists of the following phases: 1) Collect continuous process data at each tag point in a target plant; 2) Normalize the data in the interval between zero and one; 3) Get the delay time, which maximizes the correlation between given two time series data; 4) Select tags with the higher correlation; 5) Develop a process response model to describe the relations among the process data using the delay time and the correlation values; 6) Develop a process prediction model via several tag points data using a neural network; 1) Discover control rules from the process prediction model using Learning Classifier system. The main contribution of the research is to establish a method to mine a set of meaningful control rules from Learning Classifier System using the Minimal Description Length criteria. The proposed method has been applied to an actual process of a biochemical plant and has shown the validity and the effectiveness.

  6. Real-time segmentation by Active Geometric Functions.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qi; Angelini, Elsa D; Laine, Andrew F

    2010-06-01

    Recent advances in 4D imaging and real-time imaging provide image data with clinically important cardiac dynamic information at high spatial or temporal resolution. However, the enormous amount of information contained in these data has also raised a challenge for traditional image analysis algorithms in terms of efficiency. In this paper, a novel deformable model framework, Active Geometric Functions (AGF), is introduced to tackle the real-time segmentation problem. As an implicit framework paralleling to level-set, AGF has mathematical advantages in efficiency and computational complexity as well as several flexible feature similar to level-set framework. AGF is demonstrated in two cardiac applications: endocardial segmentation in 4D ultrasound and myocardial segmentation in MRI with super high temporal resolution. In both applications, AGF can perform real-time segmentation in several milliseconds per frame, which was less than the acquisition time per frame. Segmentation results are compared to manual tracing with comparable performance with inter-observer variability. The ability of such real-time segmentation will not only facilitate the diagnoses and workflow, but also enables novel applications such as interventional guidance and interactive image acquisition with online segmentation.

  7. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-05

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  8. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0–60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  9. Influence of short-time imidacloprid and acetamiprid application on soil microbial metabolic activity and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Jun; Chen, Huilun; Yi, Zhengji; Choi, Martin M F

    2014-09-01

    The influence of two neonicotinoids, i.e., imidacloprid (IMI) and acetamiprid (ACE), on soil microbial activities was investigated in a short period of time using a combination of the microcalorimetric approach and enzyme tests. Thermodynamic parameters such as Q T (J g(-1) soil), ∆H met (kJ mol(-1)), J Q/S (J g(-1) h(-1)), k (h(-1)), and soil enzymatic activities, dehydrogenase, phosphomonoesterase, arginine deaminase, and urease, were used to evaluate whole metabolic activity changes and acute toxicity following IMI and ACE treatment. Various profiles of thermogenic curves reflect different soil microbial activities. The microbial growth rate constant k, total heat evolution Q T (expect for IMI), and inhibitory ratio I show linear relationship with the doses of IMI and ACE. Q T for IMI increases at 0.0-20 μg g(-1) and then decreases at 20-80 μg g(-1), possibly attributing to the presence of tolerant microorganisms. The 50 % inhibitory ratios (IC50) of IMI and ACE are 95.7 and 77.2 μg g(-1), respectively. ACE displays slightly higher toxicity than IMI. Plots of k and Q T against microbial biomass-C indicate that the k and Q T are growth yield-dependent. IMI and ACE show 29.6; 40.4 and 23.0; and 23.3, 21.7, and 30.5 % inhibition of dehydrogenase, phosphomonoesterase, and urease activity, respectively. By contrast, the arginine deaminase activity is enhanced by 15.2 and 13.2 % with IMI and ACE, respectively. The parametric indices selected give a quantitative dose-response relationship of both insecticides and indicate that ACE is more toxic than IMI due to their difference in molecular structures.

  10. Detailed Analysis of the Interoccurrence Time Statistics in Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Aizawa, Yoji

    2017-02-01

    The interoccurrence time statistics of seismiciry is studied theoretically as well as numerically by taking into account the conditional probability and the correlations among many earthquakes in different magnitude levels. It is known so far that the interoccurrence time statistics is well approximated by the Weibull distribution, but the more detailed information about the interoccurrence times can be obtained from the analysis of the conditional probability. Firstly, we propose the Embedding Equation Theory (EET), where the conditional probability is described by two kinds of correlation coefficients; one is the magnitude correlation and the other is the inter-event time correlation. Furthermore, the scaling law of each correlation coefficient is clearly determined from the numerical data-analysis carrying out with the Preliminary Determination of Epicenter (PDE) Catalog and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Catalog. Secondly, the EET is examined to derive the magnitude dependence of the interoccurrence time statistics and the multi-fractal relation is successfully formulated. Theoretically we cannot prove the universality of the multi-fractal relation in seismic activity; nevertheless, the theoretical results well reproduce all numerical data in our analysis, where several common features or the invariant aspects are clearly observed. Especially in the case of stationary ensembles the multi-fractal relation seems to obey an invariant curve, furthermore in the case of non-stationary (moving time) ensembles for the aftershock regime the multi-fractal relation seems to satisfy a certain invariant curve at any moving times. It is emphasized that the multi-fractal relation plays an important role to unify the statistical laws of seismicity: actually the Gutenberg-Richter law and the Weibull distribution are unified in the multi-fractal relation, and some universality conjectures regarding the seismicity are briefly discussed.

  11. Medication Harmony: A Framework to Save Time, Improve Accuracy and Increase Patient Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfe, Frank; Crotty, Bradley H; Safran, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Incompletely reconciled medication lists contribute to prescribing errors and adverse drug events. Providers expend time and effort at every point of patient contact attempting to curate a best possible medication list, and yet often the list is incomplete or inaccurate. We propose a framework that builds upon the existing infrastructure of a health information exchange (HIE), centralizes data and encourages patient activation. The solution is a constantly accessible, singular, patient-adjudicated medication list that incorporates useful information and features into the list itself. We aim to decrease medication errors across transitions of care, increase awareness of potential drug-drug interactions, improve patient knowledge and self-efficacy regarding medications, decrease polypharmacy, improve prescribing safety and ultimately decrease cost to the health-care system. PMID:28269955

  12. Medication Harmony: A Framework to Save Time, Improve Accuracy and Increase Patient Activation.

    PubMed

    Pandolfe, Frank; Crotty, Bradley H; Safran, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Incompletely reconciled medication lists contribute to prescribing errors and adverse drug events. Providers expend time and effort at every point of patient contact attempting to curate a best possible medication list, and yet often the list is incomplete or inaccurate. We propose a framework that builds upon the existing infrastructure of a health information exchange (HIE), centralizes data and encourages patient activation. The solution is a constantly accessible, singular, patient-adjudicated medication list that incorporates useful information and features into the list itself. We aim to decrease medication errors across transitions of care, increase awareness of potential drug-drug interactions, improve patient knowledge and self-efficacy regarding medications, decrease polypharmacy, improve prescribing safety and ultimately decrease cost to the health-care system.

  13. Time delay between cardiac and brain activity during sleep transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B.; Aarts, Ronald M.; Haakma, Reinder; Fonseca, Pedro; Rolink, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Human sleep consists of wake, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep that includes light and deep sleep stages. This work investigated the time delay between changes of cardiac and brain activity for sleep transitions. Here, the brain activity was quantified by electroencephalographic (EEG) mean frequency and the cardiac parameters included heart rate, standard deviation of heartbeat intervals, and their low- and high-frequency spectral powers. Using a cross-correlation analysis, we found that the cardiac variations during wake-sleep and NREM sleep transitions preceded the EEG changes by 1-3 min but this was not the case for REM sleep transitions. These important findings can be further used to predict the onset and ending of some sleep stages in an early manner.

  14. Identities in flux: cognitive network activation in times of change.

    PubMed

    Menon, Tanya; Smith, Edward Bishop

    2014-05-01

    Using a dynamic cognitive model, we experimentally test two competing hypotheses that link identity and cognitive network activation during times of change. On one hand, affirming people's sense of power might give them confidence to think beyond the densest subsections of their social networks. Alternatively, if such power affirmations conflict with people's more stable status characteristics, this could create tension, deterring people from considering their networks' diversity. We test these competing hypotheses experimentally by priming people at varying levels of status with power (high/low) and asking them to report their social networks. We show that confirming identity-not affirming power-cognitively prepares people to broaden their social networks when the world is changing around them. The emotional signature of having a confirmed identity is feeling comfortable and in control, which mediates network activation. We suggest that stable, confirmed identities are the foundation from which people can exhibit greater network responsiveness.

  15. SMART: a system supporting medical activities in real-time.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, D M; Consorti, F; Merialdo, P

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the system SMART whose goal is real-time assistance to physicians who execute diagnostic or therapeutic protocols in a clinical context. SMART is able to retrieve a protocol from its knowledge base and to monitor its execution step by step for a single patient. Different protocols for different patients can be followed at the same time in a health care structure. The prototype realized supports the execution of protocols for evaluating surgical risks. It has been implemented according to the specifications given by the 4th Surgical Clinic of "Policlinico Umberto I" and reflects the activities actually performed in that hospital. However, the protocol model defined is general purpose and we envisage an easy application to other contexts and therefore to the informatization of other protocols.

  16. Choline chloride activates time-dependent and time-independent K+ currents in dog atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Fermini, B; Nattel, S

    1994-01-01

    Using the whole cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique, we studied the effect of isotonic replacement of bath sodium chloride (NaCl) by choline chloride (ChCl) in dog atrial myocytes. Our results show that ChCl triggered 1) activation of a time-independent background current, characterized by a shift of the holding current in the outward direction at potentials positive to the K+ equilibrium potential (EK), and 2) activation of a time- and voltage-dependent outward current, following depolarizing voltage steps positive to EK. Because the choline-induced current obtained by depolarizing steps exhibited properties similar to the delayed rectifier K+ current (IK), we named it IKCh. The amplitude of IKCh was determined by extracellular ChCl concentration, and this current was generally undetectable in the absence of ChCl. IKCh was not activated by acetylcholine (0.001-1.0 mM) or carbachol (10 microM) and could not be recorded in the absence of ChCl or when external NaCl was replaced by sucrose or tetramethylammonium chloride. IKCh was inhibited by atropine (0.01-1.0 microM) but not by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine (up to 10 microM). This current was carried mainly by K+ and was inhibited by CsCl (120 mM, in the pipette) or barium (1 mM, in the bath). We conclude that in dog atrial myocytes, ChCl activates a background conductance comparable to ACh-dependent K+ current, together with a time-dependent K+ current showing properties similar to IK.

  17. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  18. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  19. Time to trust: longitudinal integrated clerkships and entrustable professional activities.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, David A; Holmboe, Eric S; ten Cate, Olle

    2014-02-01

    Medical education shaped by the learning sciences can better serve medical students, residents, faculty, health care institutions, and patients. With increasing innovation in undergraduate and graduate medical education and more focused attention on educational principles and how people learn, this era of educational transformation offers promise. Principles manifest in "educational continuity" are informing changes in educational structures and venues and are enriching new discourse in educational pedagogy, assessment, and scholarship. The articles by Myhre and colleagues and Woloschuk and colleagues in this issue, along with mounting evidence preceding these works, should reassure that principle-driven innovation in medical education is not only possible but can be achieved safely. In this commentary, the authors draw from these works and the wider literature on longitudinal integrated educational design. They suggest that the confluences of movements for longitudinal integrated clerkships and entrustable professional activities open new possibilities for other educational and practice advancements in quality and safety. With the advent of competency-based education, explicit milestones, and improved assessment regimens, overseers will increasingly evaluate students, trainees, and other learners on their ability rather than relying solely on time spent in an activity. The authors suggest that, for such oversight to have the most value, assessors and learners need adequate oversight time, and redesign of educational models will serve this operational imperative. As education leaders are reassessing old medical school and training models, rotational blocks, and other barriers to progress, the authors explore the dynamic interplay between longitudinal integrated learning models and entrustment.

  20. Measurement of Ad Libitum Food Intake, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Time in Response to Overfeeding

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianying; Votruba, Susanne; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Bonfiglio, Susan; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Given the wide availability of highly palatable foods, overeating is common. Energy intake and metabolic responses to overfeeding may provide insights into weight gain prevention. We hypothesized a down-regulation in subsequent food intake and sedentary time, and up-regulation in non-exercise activity and core temperature in response to overfeeding in order to maintain body weight constant. In a monitored inpatient clinical research unit using a cross over study design, we investigated ad libitum energy intake (EI, using automated vending machines), core body temperature, and physical activity (using accelerometry) following a short term (3-day) weight maintaining (WM) vs overfeeding (OF) diet in healthy volunteers (n = 21, BMI, mean ± SD, 33.2±8.6 kg/m2, 73.6% male). During the ad libitum periods following the WM vs. OF diets, there was no significant difference in mean 3-d EI (4061±1084 vs. 3926±1284 kcal/day, p = 0.41), and there were also no differences either in core body temperature (37.0±0.2°C vs. 37.1±0.2°C, p = 0.75) or sedentary time (70.9±12.9 vs. 72.0±7.4%, p = 0.88). However, during OF (but not WM), sedentary time was positively associated with weight gain (r = 0.49, p = 0.05, adjusted for age, sex, and initial weight). In conclusion, short term overfeeding did not result in a decrease in subsequent ad libitum food intake or overall change in sedentary time although in secondary analysis sedentary time was associated with weight gain during OF. Beyond possible changes in sedentary time, there is minimal attempt to restore energy balance during or following short term overfeeding. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00342732 PMID:22629311

  1. Relationship between short activated partial thromboplastin times, thrombin generation, procoagulant factors and procoagulant phospholipid activity.

    PubMed

    Mina, Ashraf; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Koutts, Jerry

    2012-04-01

    Short activated partial thromboplastin times (APTTs) are associated with thrombosis. However, what short APTTs actually represent in terms of possible mechanistic pathways is not well characterized. We have assessed thrombin generation as compared with levels of procoagulant factor (fibrinogen, V, VIII, IX, XI and XII) activities, von Willebrand factor level and activity using collagen binding, as well as procoagulant phospholipid activity, in 113 consecutive samples exhibiting a short APTT compared with an equal number of age-matched and sex-matched samples yielding a normal APTT. We found a significant difference in peak thrombin generation, velocity index and area under the curve between the two groups, and that thrombin generation markers correlated with the APTT, procoagulant phospholipid activity and several procoagulant clotting factors. We conclude that short APTTs represent a procoagulant milieu, as represented by heightened thrombin generation and several other heightened procoagulant activities, which may help explain the association with thrombosis.

  2. Swimming path statistics of an active Brownian particle with time-dependent self-propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, S.; ten Hagen, B.; Löwen, H.

    2014-02-01

    Typically, in the description of active Brownian particles, a constant effective propulsion force is assumed, which is then subjected to fluctuations in orientation and translation, leading to a persistent random walk with an enlarged long-time diffusion coefficient. Here, we generalize previous results for the swimming path statistics to a time-dependent, and thus in many situations more realistic, propulsion which is a prescribed input. We analytically calculate both the noise-free and the noise-averaged trajectories for time-periodic propulsion under the action of an additional torque. In the deterministic case, such an oscillatory microswimmer moves on closed paths that can be much more complicated than the commonly observed straight lines and circles. When exposed to random fluctuations, the mean trajectories turn out to be self-similar curves which bear the characteristics of their noise-free counterparts. Furthermore, we consider a propulsion force which scales in time t as ∝tα (with α = 0,1,2, …) and analyze the resulting superdiffusive behavior. Our predictions are verifiable for diffusiophoretic artificial microswimmers with prescribed propulsion protocols.

  3. Time Use Patterns between Maintenance, Subsistence and Leisure Activities: A Case Study in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui-fen, Zhou; Zhen-shan, Li; Dong-qian, Xue; Yang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Chinese government conducted its first time use survey of the activities of Chinese individuals in 2008. Activities were classified into three broad types, maintenance activities, subsistence activities and leisure activities. Time use patterns were defined by an individuals' time spent on maintenance, subsistence and leisure activities each…

  4. Timing of activity of two fault systems on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galluzzi, V.; Guzzetta, L.; Giacomini, L.; Ferranti, L.; Massironi, M.; Palumbo, P.

    2015-10-01

    Here we discuss about two fault systems found in the Victoria and Shakespeare quadrangles of Mercury. The two fault sets intersect each other and show probable evidence for two stages of deformation. The most prominent system is N-S oriented and encompasses several tens to hundreds of kilometers long and easily recognizable fault segments. The other system strikes NE- SW and encompasses mostly degraded and short fault segments. The structural framework of the studied area and the morphological appearance of the faults suggest that the second system is older than the first one. We intend to apply the buffered crater counting technique on both systems to make a quantitative study of their timing of activity that could confirm the already clear morphological evidence.

  5. On the precision of automated activation time estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, D. T.; Smith, J. M.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Cohen, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    We examined how the assignment of local activation times in epicardial and endocardial electrograms is affected by sampling rate, ambient signal-to-noise ratio, and sinx/x waveform interpolation. Algorithms used for the estimation of fiducial point locations included dV/dtmax, and a matched filter detection algorithm. Test signals included epicardial and endocardial electrograms overlying both normal and infarcted regions of dog myocardium. Signal-to-noise levels were adjusted by combining known data sets with white noise "colored" to match the spectral characteristics of experimentally recorded noise. For typical signal-to-noise ratios and sampling rates, the template-matching algorithm provided the greatest precision in reproducibly estimating fiducial point location, and sinx/x interpolation allowed for an additional significant improvement. With few restrictions, combining these two techniques may allow for use of digitization rates below the Nyquist rate without significant loss of precision.

  6. Innovation diffusion on time-varying activity driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1960s, the theory of innovation diffusion has contributed to the advancement of several research fields, such as marketing management and consumer behavior. The 1969 seminal paper by Bass [F.M. Bass, Manag. Sci. 15, 215 (1969)] introduced a model of product growth for consumer durables, which has been extensively used to predict innovation diffusion across a range of applications. Here, we propose a novel approach to study innovation diffusion, where interactions among individuals are mediated by the dynamics of a time-varying network. Our approach is based on the Bass' model, and overcomes key limitations of previous studies, which assumed timescale separation between the individual dynamics and the evolution of the connectivity patterns. Thus, we do not hypothesize homogeneous mixing among individuals or the existence of a fixed interaction network. We formulate our approach in the framework of activity driven networks to enable the analysis of the concurrent evolution of the interaction and individual dynamics. Numerical simulations offer a systematic analysis of the model behavior and highlight the role of individual activity on market penetration when targeted advertisement campaigns are designed, or a competition between two different products takes place.

  7. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  8. Real-time analysis of RAG complex activity in V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Shimazaki, Noriko; Esguerra, Zitadel Anne; Watanabe, Go; Lieber, Michael R; Rothenberg, Eli

    2016-10-18

    Single-molecule FRET (smFRET) and single-molecule colocalization (smCL) assays have allowed us to observe the recombination-activating gene (RAG) complex reaction mechanism in real time. Our smFRET data have revealed distinct bending modes at recombination signal sequence (RSS)-conserved regions before nicking and synapsis. We show that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts as a cofactor in stabilizing conformational changes at the 12RSS heptamer and increasing RAG1/2 binding affinity for 23RSS. Using smCL analysis, we have quantitatively measured RAG1/2 dwell time on 12RSS, 23RSS, and non-RSS DNA, confirming a strict RSS molecular specificity that was enhanced in the presence of a partner RSS in solution. Our studies also provide single-molecule determination of rate constants that were previously only possible by indirect methods, allowing us to conclude that RAG binding, bending, and synapsis precede catalysis. Our real-time analysis offers insight into the requirements for RSS-RSS pairing, architecture of the synaptic complex, and dynamics of the paired RSS substrates. We show that the synaptic complex is extremely stable and that heptamer regions of the 12RSS and 23RSS substrates in the synaptic complex are closely associated in a stable conformational state, whereas nonamer regions are perpendicular. Our data provide an enhanced and comprehensive mechanistic description of the structural dynamics and associated enzyme kinetics of variable, diversity, and joining [V(D)J] recombination.

  9. Redshift in Hubble's constant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temple-Raston, M.

    1997-01-01

    A topological field theory with Bogomol'nyi solitons is examined. The Bogomol'nyi solitons have much in common with the instanton in Yang-Mills theory; consequently the author called them 'topological instantons'. When periodic boundary conditions are imposed, the field theory comments indirectly on the speed of light within the theory. In this particular model the speed of light is not a universal constant. This may or may not be relevant to the current debate in astronomy and cosmology over the large values of the Hubble constant obtained by the latest generation of ground- and space-based telescopes. An experiment is proposed to detect spatial variation in the speed of light.

  10. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  11. Percolation with Constant Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, Edward

    2014-06-01

    We introduce and study a model of percolation with constant freezing ( PCF) where edges open at constant rate , and clusters freeze at rate independently of their size. Our main result is that the infinite volume process can be constructed on any amenable vertex transitive graph. This is in sharp contrast to models of percolation with freezing previously introduced, where the limit is known not to exist. Our interest is in the study of the percolative properties of the final configuration as a function of . We also obtain more precise results in the case of trees. Surprisingly the algebraic exponent for the cluster size depends on the degree, suggesting that there is no lower critical dimension for the model. Moreover, even for , it is shown that finite clusters have algebraic tail decay, which is a signature of self organised criticality. Partial results are obtained on , and many open questions are discussed.

  12. Report on the Time and Frequency Activities of the Time Service Department of the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    33’’ Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting Administrators Secretary Engineers and Technicians REPORT ON THE TIME AND FREQUENCY OF...THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY ACTIVITIES OF THE TIME SERVICE DEPARTMENT 2 1 4 Demetrios Matsakis and the staff of the Time Service Department U.S...requirements of many real- time users, the best known among them being GPS. 1 THE BASICS The most important part of the USNO Time Service Department is its

  13. Influence of different anoxic time exposures on active biomass, protozoa and filamentous bacteria in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Perez, S; Fermoso, F G; Arnaiz, C

    Medium-sized wastewater treatment plants are considered too small to implement anaerobic digestion technologies and too large for extensive treatments. A promising option as a sewage sludge reduction method is the inclusion of anoxic time exposures. In the present study, three different anoxic time exposures of 12, 6 and 4 hours have been studied to reduce sewage sludge production. The best anoxic time exposure was observed under anoxic/oxic cycles of 6 hours, which reduced 29.63% of the biomass production compared with the oxic control conditions. The sludge under different anoxic time exposures, even with a lower active biomass concentration than the oxic control conditions, showed a much higher metabolic activity than the oxic control conditions. Microbiological results suggested that both protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria decrease under anoxic time exposures compared to oxic control conditions. The anoxic time exposures 6/6 showed the highest reduction in both protozoa density, 37.5%, and abundance of filamentous bacteria, 41.1%, in comparison to the oxic control conditions. The groups of crawling ciliates, carnivorous ciliates and filamentous bacteria were highly influenced by the anoxic time exposures. Protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria have been shown as promising bioindicators of biomass production reduction.

  14. Regularizing cosmological singularities by varying physical constants

    SciTech Connect

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Marosek, Konrad E-mail: k.marosek@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2013-02-01

    Varying physical constant cosmologies were claimed to solve standard cosmological problems such as the horizon, the flatness and the Λ-problem. In this paper, we suggest yet another possible application of these theories: solving the singularity problem. By specifying some examples we show that various cosmological singularities may be regularized provided the physical constants evolve in time in an appropriate way.

  15. Constant-pressure Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E

    1940-01-01

    The conventional axial blowers operate on the high-pressure principle. One drawback of this type of blower is the relatively low pressure head, which one attempts to overcome with axial blowers producing very high pressure at a given circumferential speed. The Schicht constant-pressure blower affords pressure ratios considerably higher than those of axial blowers of conventional design with approximately the same efficiency.

  16. Universe of constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  17. The Hubble Constant.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H0 values of around 72-74 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with typical errors of 2-3 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) and typical errors of 1-2 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  18. Endocrine (plasma cortisol and glucose) and behavioral (locomotor and self-feeding activity) circadian rhythms in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup 1858) exposed to light/dark cycles or constant light.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Catarina C V; Aparício, Rocio; Blanco-Vives, Borja; Chereguini, Olvido; Martín, Ignacio; Javier Sánchez-Vazquez, F

    2013-06-01

    The existence of daily rhythms under light/dark (LD) cycles in plasma cortisol, blood glucose and locomotor and self-feeding activities, as well as their persistence (circadian nature) under constant light (LL), was investigated in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis). For the cortisol and glucose rhythms study, 48 soles were equally distributed in 8 tanks and exposed to a 12:12 LD cycle and natural water temperature (experiment 1). After an acclimation period, blood was sampled every 3 h until a 24-h cycle was completed. Blood glucose levels were measured immediately after sampling, while plasma cortisol was measured later by ELISA. In experiment 2, the fish were exposed to LL for 11 days, and after this period, the same sampling procedure was repeated. For the study of locomotor and self-feeding rhythms (experiment 3), two groups of sole were used: one exposed to LD and the other to LL. Each group was distributed within 3 tanks equipped with infrared photocells for the record of locomotor activity, and self-feeders for feeding behavior characterization. The results revealed a marked oscillation in cortisol concentrations during the daily cycle under LD, with a peak (35.65 ± 3.14 ng/ml) in the afternoon (15:00 h) and very low levels during the night (5.30 ± 1.09 ng/ml). This cortisol rhythm persisted under LL conditions, with lower values (mean cortisol concentration = 7.12 ± 1.11 ng/ml) and with the peak shifted by 3 h. Both rhythms were confirmed by COSINOR analysis (p < 0.05). The synchronizing role of temperature and feeding schedule, in addition to light, is also discussed. Diel rhythms of glucose were not evident in LD or LL. As to locomotor and self-feeding activity, a very marked rhythm was observed under LD, with higher activity observed during the night, with acrophases located at 2:14 and 3:37 h, respectively. The statistical significance of daily rhythms was confirmed by COSINOR analysis. Under LL, both feeding and locomotor

  19. Does an ‘Activity-Permissive’ Workplace Change Office Workers’ Sitting and Activity Time?

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Erin; Ashe, Maureen C.; Dunstan, David W.; Hanson, Heather M.; Madden, Ken; Winkler, Elisabeth A. H.; McKay, Heather A.; Healy, Genevieve N.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To describe changes in workplace physical activity, and health-, and work-related outcomes, in workers who transitioned from a conventional to an ‘activity-permissive’ workplace. Methods A natural pre-post experiment conducted in Vancouver, Canada in 2011. A convenience sample of office-based workers (n=24, 75% women, mean [SD] age = 34.5 [8.1] years) were examined four months following relocation from a conventional workplace (pre) to a newly-constructed, purpose-built, movement-oriented physical environment (post). Workplace activity- (activPAL3-derived stepping, standing, and sitting time), health- (body composition and fasting cardio-metabolic blood profile), and work- (performance; job satisfaction) related outcomes were measured pre- and post-move and compared using paired t-tests. Results Pre-move, on average (mean [SD]) the majority of the day was spent sitting (364 [43.0] mins/8-hr workday), followed by standing (78.2 [32.1] mins/8-hr workday) and stepping (37.7 [15.6] mins/8-hr workday). The transition to the ‘activity-permissive’ workplace resulted in a significant increase in standing time (+18.5, 95% CI: 1.8, 35.2 mins/8-hr workday), likely driven by reduced sitting time (-19.7, 95% CI: -42.1, 2.8 mins/8-hr workday) rather than increased stepping time (+1.2, 95% CI: -6.2, 8.5 mins/8-hr workday). There were no statistically significant differences observed in health- or work-related outcomes. Discussion This novel, opportunistic study demonstrated that the broader workplace physical environment can beneficially impact on standing time in office workers. The long-term health and work-related benefits, and the influence of individual, organizational, and social factors on this change, requires further evaluation. PMID:24098555

  20. Real-time Neural Network predictions of geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, R.; Reiff, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Boyle potential or the Boyle Index (BI), Φ (kV)=10-4 (V/(km/s))2 + 11.7 (B/nT) sin3(θ/2), is an empirically-derived formula that can characterize the Earth's polar cap potential, which is readily derivable in real time using the solar wind data from ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer). The BI has a simplistic form that utilizes a non-magnetic "viscous" and a magnetic "merging" component to characterize the magnetospheric behavior in response to the solar wind. We have investigated its correlation with two of conventional geomagnetic activity indices in Kp and the AE index. We have shown that the logarithms of both 3-hr and 1-hr averages of the BI correlate well with the subsequent Kp: Kp = 8.93 log10(BI) - 12.55 along with 1-hr BI correlating with the subsequent log10(AE): log10(AE) = 1.78 log10(BI) - 3.6. We have developed a new set of algorithms based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) suitable for short term space weather forecasts with an enhanced lead-time and better accuracy in predicting Kp and AE over some leading models; the algorithms omit the time history of its targets to utilize only the solar wind data. Inputs to our ANN models benefit from the BI and its proven record as a forecasting parameter since its initiation in October, 2003. We have also performed time-sensitivity tests using cross-correlation analysis to demonstrate that our models are as efficient as those that incorporates the time history of the target indices in their inputs. Our algorithms can predict the upcoming full 3-hr Kp, purely from the solar wind data and achieve a linear correlation coefficient of 0.840, which means that it predicts the upcoming Kp value on average to within 1.3 step, which is approximately the resolution of the real-time Kp estimate. Our success in predicting Kp during a recent unexpected event (22 July ’09) is shown in the figure. Also, when predicting an equivalent "one hour Kp'', the correlation coefficient is 0.86, meaning on average a prediction

  1. Biodegradation of an Organophosphate Chemical Warfare Agent Simulant by Activated Sludge with Varying Solid Retention Times

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    coefficient close to that of VX, which may yield similar sorption kinetics between the two. Walters (2013) found that sorption of malathion to the activated...weapons in the activated sludge or under what conditions this removal is optimal. This study examined the fate of malathion , a surrogate compound for...activated sludge process in wastewater treatment facilities. Results show that a constant influent of malathion will be removed from the effluent

  2. WHY IS THE SOLAR CONSTANT NOT A CONSTANT?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. J.; Xu, J. C.; Gao, P. X.; Yang, L. H.; Liang, H. F.; Zhan, L. S.

    2012-03-10

    In order to probe the mechanism of variations of the solar constant on the inter-solar-cycle scale, the total solar irradiance (TSI; the so-called solar constant) in the time interval of 1978 November 7 to 2010 September 20 is decomposed into three components through empirical mode decomposition and time-frequency analyses. The first component is the rotation signal, counting up to 42.31% of the total variation of TSI, which is understood to be mainly caused by large magnetic structures, including sunspot groups. The second is an annual-variation signal, counting up to 15.17% of the total variation, the origin of which is not known at this point in time. Finally, the third is the inter-solar-cycle signal, counting up to 42.52%, which is inferred to be caused by the network magnetic elements in quiet regions, whose magnetic flux ranges from (4.27-38.01) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx.

  3. Innovative techniques to analyze time series of geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic storms are undoubtedly among the most important phenomena in space physics and also a central subject of space weather. The non-extensive Tsallis entropy has been recently introduced, as an effective complexity measure for the analysis of the geomagnetic activity Dst index. The Tsallis entropy sensitively shows the complexity dissimilarity among different "physiological" (normal) and "pathological" states (intense magnetic storms). More precisely, the Tsallis entropy implies the emergence of two distinct patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a higher degree of organization, and (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a lower degree of organization. Other entropy measures such as Block Entropy, T-Complexity, Approximate Entropy, Sample Entropy and Fuzzy Entropy verify the above mentioned result. Importantly, the wavelet spectral analysis in terms of Hurst exponent, H, also shows the existence of two different patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian persistent behavior (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian anti-persistent behavior. Finally, we observe universality in the magnetic storm and earthquake dynamics, on a basis of a modified form of the Gutenberg-Richter law for the Tsallis statistics. This finding suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism. Signatures of discrete scale invariance in Dst time series further supports the aforementioned proposal.

  4. Predictive active disturbance rejection control for processes with time delay.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qinling; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has been shown to be an effective tool in dealing with real world problems of dynamic uncertainties, disturbances, nonlinearities, etc. This paper addresses its existing limitations with plants that have a large transport delay. In particular, to overcome the delay, the extended state observer (ESO) in ADRC is modified to form a predictive ADRC, leading to significant improvements in the transient response and stability characteristics, as shown in extensive simulation studies and hardware-in-the-loop tests, as well as in the frequency response analysis. In this research, it is assumed that the amount of delay is approximately known, as is the approximated model of the plant. Even with such uncharacteristic assumptions for ADRC, the proposed method still exhibits significant improvements in both performance and robustness over the existing methods such as the dead-time compensator based on disturbance observer and the Filtered Smith Predictor, in the context of some well-known problems of chemical reactor and boiler control problems.

  5. The Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Wendy; Madore, Barry; Mager, Violet; Persson, Eric; Rigby, Jane; Sturch, Laura

    2008-12-01

    We present a plan to measure a value of the Hubble constant having a final systematic uncertainty of only 3% by taking advantage of Spitzer's unique mid-infrared capabilities. This involves using IRAC to undertake a fundamental recalibration of the Cepheid distance scale and progressively moving it out to pure Hubble flow by an application of a revised mid-IR Tully-Fisher relation. The calibration and application, in one coherent and self-consistent program, will go continuously from distances of parsecs to several hundred megaparsecs. It will provide a first-ever mid-IR calibration of Cepheids in the Milky Way, LMC and Key Project spiral galaxies and a first-ever measurement and calibration of the TF relation at mid-infrared wavelengths, and finally a calibration of Type Ia SNe. Most importantly this program will be undertaken with a single instrument, on a single telescope, working exclusively at mid-infrared wavelengths that are far removed from the obscuring effects of dust extinction. Using Spitzer in this focused way will effectively eliminate all of the major systematics in the Cepheid and TF distance scales that have been the limiting factors in all previous applications, including the HST Key Project. By executing this program, based exclusively on Spitzer data, we will deliver a value of the Hubble constant, having a statistical precision better than 11%, with all currently known systematics quantified and constrained to a level of less than 3%. A value of Ho determined to this level of systematic accuracy is required for up-coming cosmology experiments, including Planck. A more accurate value of the Hubble constant will directly result in other contingently measured cosmological parameters (e.g., Omega_m, Omega_L, & w) having their covariant uncertainties reduced significantly now. Any further improvements using this route will have to await JWST, for which this study is designed to provide a lasting and solid foundation, and ultimately a value of Ho

  6. Simultaneous reconstruction of activity and attenuation in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Ahmadreza; Defrise, Michel; Bal, Girish; Michel, Christian; Conti, Maurizio; Watson, Charles; Nuyts, Johan

    2012-12-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT), attenuation correction is necessary for quantitative reconstruction of the tracer distribution. Previously, several attempts have been made to estimate the attenuation coefficients from emission data only. These attempts had limited success, because the problem does not have a unique solution, and severe and persistent "cross-talk" between the estimated activity and attenuation distributions was observed. In this paper, we show that the availability of time-of-flight (TOF) information eliminates the cross-talk problem by destroying symmetries in the associated Fisher information matrix. We propose a maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction algorithm for jointly estimating the attenuation and activity distributions from TOF PET data. The performance of the algorithm is studied with 2-D simulations, and further illustrated with phantom experiments and with a patient scan. The estimated attenuation image is robust to noise, and does not suffer from the cross-talk that was observed in non-TOF PET. However, some constraining is still mandatory, because the TOF data determine the attenuation sinogram only up to a constant offset.

  7. Total individual ion activity coefficients of calcium and carbonate in seawater at 25°C and 35%. salinity, and implications to the agreement between apparent and thermodynamic constants of calcite and aragonite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L. Neil; Sundquist, Eric T.

    1982-01-01

    We have calculated the total individual ion activity coefficients of carbonate and calcium,  and , in seawater. Using the ratios of stoichiometric and thermodynamic constants of carbonic acid dissociation and total mean activity coefficient data measured in seawater, we have obtained values which differ significantly from those widely accepted in the literature. In seawater at 25°C and 35%. salinity the (molal) values of  and  are 0.038 ± 0.002 and 0.173 ± 0.010, respectively. These values of  and  are independent of liquid junction errors and internally consistent with the value . By defining  and  on a common scale (), the product  is independent of the assigned value of  and may be determined directly from thermodynamic measurements in seawater. Using the value  and new thermodynamic equilibrium constants for calcite and aragonite, we show that the apparent constants of calcite and aragonite are consistent with the thermodynamic equilibrium constants at 25°C and 35%. salinity. The demonstrated consistency between thermodynamic and apparent constants of calcite and aragonite does not support a hypothesis of stable Mg-calcite coatings on calcite or aragonite surfaces in seawater, and suggests that the calcite critical carbonate ion curve of Broecker and Takahashi (1978,Deep-Sea Research25, 65–95) defines the calcite equilibrium boundary in the oceans, within the uncertainty of the data.

  8. Time-Resolved Records of Magnetic Activity on the Pallasite Parent Body and Psyche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, J. F. J.; Nichols, C. I. O.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Kronast, F.; Kasama, T.; Alimadadi, H.; van der Laan, G.; Nimmo, F.; Harrison, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Although many small bodies apparently generated dynamo fields in the early solar system, the nature and temporal evolution of these fields has remained enigmatic. Time-resolved records of the Earth's planetary field have been essential in understanding the dynamic history of our planet, and equivalent information from asteroids could provide a unique insight into the development of the solar system. Here we present time-resolved records of magnetic activity on the main-group pallasite parent body and (16) Psyche, obtained using newly-developed nanomagnetic imaging techniques. For the pallasite parent body, the inferred field direction remained relatively constant and the intensity was initially stable at ~100 μT before it decreased in two discrete steps down to 0 μT. We interpret this behaviour as due to vigorous dynamo activity driven by compositional convection in the core, ultimately transitioning from a dipolar to multipolar field as the inner core grew from the bottom-up. For Psyche (measured from IVA iron meteorites), the inferred field direction reversed, while the intensity remained stable at >50 μT. Psyche cooled rapidly as an unmantled core, although the resulting thermal convection alone cannot explain these observations. Instead, this behaviour required top-down core solidification, and is attributed either to compositional convection (if the core also solidified from the bottom-up) or convection generated directly by top-down solidification (e.g. Fe-snow). The mechanism governing convection in small body cores is an open question (due partly to uncertainties in the direction of core solidification), and these observations suggest that unconventional (i.e. not thermal) mechanisms acted in the early solar system. These mechanisms are very efficient at generating convection, implying a long-lasting and widespread epoch of dynamo activity among small bodies in the early solar system.

  9. Mixing tests: diagnostic aides in the investigation of prolonged prothrombin times and activated partial thromboplastin times.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Geoffrey; Orellana, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Mixing tests are a relatively simple procedure used in the hemostasis laboratory as a first-line investigation into the cause of an abnormal screening test, typically a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and/or a prolonged prothrombin time. The mixing test involves combining the test plasma with normal plasma, then repeating the screening test on the mixture to assess whether the clotting time becomes normal or remains prolonged. The primary purpose of a mixing test is to guide further investigations. When mixing test results "normalize," this suggests the test plasma is deficient in clotting factor(s) and thus specific factor assays can be performed to determine which are reduced. When the mixing test result does not "normalize," this suggests the presence of an inhibitor or other type of interference (e.g., the presence of an anticoagulant such as high-dose heparinoids), and so the laboratory needs to determine if this is a lupus anticoagulant or a specific coagulation factor inhibitor, or another type of inhibitor. Because these follow-up investigations are more costly and time-consuming than the basic screening tests, the appropriate performance and interpretation of mixing tests is advantageous for the laboratory. Moreover, the correct laboratory approach is also clinically relevant, as patient management is ultimately affected, and an incorrect interpretation may lead to inappropriate therapies being established. Components of a mixing test that can influence result interpretation include the sensitivity of the used screening reagents to various factor deficiencies and inhibitors, the source or composition of the normal plasma, and the setting of cutoffs for the formula used in expressing mixing test results. Numerous and differing criteria for mixing test interpretation have been suggested historically, which can lead to confusion as to which approach is the most appropriate. The use of differing criteria will also lead to differing

  10. Serum metabolites related to cardiorespiratory fitness, physical activity energy expenditure, sedentary time and vigorous activity.

    PubMed

    Wientzek, Angelika; Floegel, Anna; Knüppel, Sven; Vigl, Matthaeus; Drogan, Dagmar; Adamski, Jerzy; Pischon, Tobias; Boeing, Heiner

    2014-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between objectively measured physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and serum metabolites measured by targeted metabolomics in a population- based study. A total of 100 subjects provided 2 fasting blood samples and engaged in a CRF and PA measurement at 2 visits 4 months apart. CRF was estimated from a step test, whereas physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE), time spent sedentary and time spend in vigorous activity were measured by a combined heart rate and movement sensor for a total of 8 days. Serum metabolite concentrations were determined by flow injection analysis tandem mass spectrometry (FIA-MS/MS). Linear mixed models were applied with multivariable adjustment and p-values were corrected for multiple testing. Furthermore, we explored the associations between CRF, PA and two metabolite factors that have previously been linked to risk of Type 2 diabetes. CRF was associated with two phosphatidylcholine clusters independently of all other exposures. Lysophosphatidylcholine C14:0 and methionine were significantly negatively associated with PAEE and sedentary time. CRF was positively associated with the Type 2 diabetes protective factor. Vigorous activity was positively associated with the Type 2 diabetes risk factor in the mutually adjusted model. Our results suggest that CRF and PA are associated with serum metabolites, especially CRF with phosphatidylcholines and with the Type 2 diabetes protective factor. PAEE and sedentary time were associated with methionine. The identified metabolites could be potential mediators of the protective effects of CRF and PA on chronic disease risk.

  11. Impact of Structured Movement Time on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Kara K.; Matsuyama, Abigail L.; Robinson, Leah E.

    2017-01-01

    Preschool-aged children are not meeting national physical activity recommendations. This study compares preschoolers' physical activity engagement during two different physical activity opportunities: outdoor free play or a structured movement session. Eighty-seven children served as participants: 40 children participated in outdoor free play and…

  12. Patterns of leisure time and non-leisure time physical activity of Korean immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiwon; Wilbur, Joellen; Kim, Mi Ja

    2011-02-01

    Our purpose in this study was to examine the patterns of physical activity and demographic characteristics associated with those patterns in Korean immigrants in the United States. Participants were 197 women, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire was utilized. The inactive pattern was the most frequent pattern in all domains of physical activity except household physical activity. There were differences among the patterns of physical activity that were associated with variations in demographic characteristics. Health care providers who serve immigrants should assess physical activity level and demographic characteristics of the immigrants to enhance their physical activity.

  13. Food reward without a timing component does not alter the timing of activity under positive energy balance.

    PubMed

    van der Vinne, V; Akkerman, J; Lanting, G D; Riede, S J; Hut, R A

    2015-09-24

    Circadian clocks drive daily rhythms in physiology and behavior which allow organisms to anticipate predictable daily changes in the environment. In most mammals, circadian rhythms result in nocturnal activity patterns although plasticity of the circadian system allows activity patterns to shift to different times of day. Such plasticity is seen when food access is restricted to a few hours during the resting (light) phase resulting in food anticipatory activity (FAA) in the hours preceding food availability. The mechanisms underlying FAA are unknown but data suggest the involvement of the reward system and homeostatic regulation of metabolism. We previously demonstrated the isolated effect of metabolism by inducing diurnality in response to energetic challenges. Here the importance of reward timing in inducing daytime activity is assessed. The daily activity distribution of mice earning palatable chocolate at their preferred time by working in a running wheel was compared with that of mice receiving a timed palatable meal at noon. Mice working for chocolate (WFC) without being energetically challenged increased their total daily activity but this did not result in a shift to diurnality. Providing a chocolate meal at noon each day increased daytime activity, identifying food timing as a factor capable of altering the daily distribution of activity and rest. These results show that timing of food reward and energetic challenges are both independently sufficient to induce diurnality in nocturnal mammals. FAA observed following timed food restriction is likely the result of an additive effect of distinct regulatory pathways activated by energetic challenges and food reward.

  14. Time and Frequency Activities at the JHU Applied Physics Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Resolution Offset Generator  2 GPS Time Transfer Receivers Time and Frequency Dissemination  1 MHz, 5 MHz, 10 MHz, 100 MHz  1 PPS  IRIG ...B APL Local Time  IRIG -B UTC  Common View GPS Time Transfer •NIST, USNO, BIPM 41 st Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting...MASER* CESIUM 3 MICROPHASE STEPPER 5 MHZ DISTRIBUTION APL TIMESCALE PROCESSOR PREDICTION ALGORITHM TIMECODE 1PPS & IRIG 8 CHANNEL GPS A

  15. Observation of thermal effects due to an optical incident signal and high fluence on InGaAs/InP multiple-quantum-well saturable absorber nonlinear mirrors: evolution of characteristics and time constants.

    PubMed

    Le Cren, Elodie; Lobo, Sébastien; Fève, Sylvain; Simon, Jean-Claude

    2006-09-10

    We observe the effects of a temperature increase on the characteristics of an InGaAs/InP multiple-quantum-well (MQW) saturable absorber (SA) in a microcavity provided by an optical input signal under normal incidence. The temperature increase on the nonlinear mirror (NLM) due to an optical signal depends on the energy time filling factor (FF) of this input signal (analogous to the signal's duty cycle, which is the ratio between the repetition period and the pulse duration) and hence depends on the repetition rate of the signal for a given pulse time width. This increase in temperature is mostly responsible for a shift in the reflectivity spectrum of the device toward higher wavelengths. In this experimental study, we show the shift of the resonance cavity versus the optical input power at high FF, and we evaluate the thermal time constant of an Fe-doped InGaAs/InP MQW NLM. Finally, we report the consequences of such thermal effects and high fluence on the reflectivity and contrast of two different InGaAs/InP NLMs when the input signal FF rises up to 25%, which gets close to telecommunication transmission conditions.

  16. The Hubble Constant.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Neal

    2007-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with most now between 70 and 75 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  17. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  18. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  19. The Hubble constant.

    PubMed Central

    Tully, R B

    1993-01-01

    Five methods of estimating distances have demonstrated internal reproducibility at the level of 5-20% rms accuracy. The best of these are the cepheid (and RR Lyrae), planetary nebulae, and surface-brightness fluctuation techniques. Luminosity-line width and Dn-sigma methods are less accurate for an individual case but can be applied to large numbers of galaxies. The agreement is excellent between these five procedures. It is determined that Hubble constant H0 = 90 +/- 10 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16) m]. It is difficult to reconcile this value with the preferred world model even in the low-density case. The standard model with Omega = 1 may be excluded unless there is something totally misunderstood about the foundation of the distance scale or the ages of stars. PMID:11607391

  20. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  1. Significantly different coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of 'normal' activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Eui-Hoon; Ma, Youngeun; Park, In-Ae; Kim, Seon-Woo; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a widely used coagulation screening test in routine laboratories. The aPTT level in the control population varies and is reflected by the reference interval. However, there have been no studies to investigate the coagulation status determining the variability of the aPTT. The aim of this study was to investigate the coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of aPTT in the population. The study participants were reference individuals with prothrombin time and aPTT within reference intervals. The aPTT was determined using STA-PTT Automate (Diagnostica Stago, Asnieres, France; local reference interval, 29.1-41.9 s). Those with aPTT within the marginal ranges of reference interval were selected for factor assays. We defined the lower marginal group as the lowest 10 percentile of reference interval (29.1-30.9 s) and the upper marginal group as the highest 10 percentile (38.0-41.9 s). Activities of factor II, V, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII were determined in both groups. The lower marginal and upper marginal groups consisted of 220 and 209 individuals, respectively. All coagulation factors were significantly higher in the lower marginal than in the upper marginal group (P = 0.0127 for factor II and P < 0.0001 for the others). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed factor XII and VIII were two strongest contributors determining the aPTT level, whereas factor XI was not significantly different between the groups (P = 0.095). This study firstly demonstrated significantly different coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of aPTT in reference individuals. The results suggested the possibility of disease association or phenotypic contribution of variable coagulation activities in the population.

  2. Effects of passive computer use time and non-computer work time on the performance of electronic activity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yaw-Huei; Chen, Yen-Ting; Yeh, Jao-Yu; Liang, Huey-Wen

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of passive and non-computer work time on the estimation of computer use times by electronic activity monitoring. A total of 20 subjects with computers were monitored for 3 h. Average relative error for total computer use time estimation was about 4%, given that non-computer work time was 20% of the 3-h monitored period. No significant impact of passive computer use time was found in this study. Non-computer work time of 40% or less is suggested as criteria for the application of electronic activity monitoring to ensure reliability in the physical work loading assessment. Statement of Relevance: This research studied the criteria of non-computer work time for the appropriate use of electronic activity monitoring to ensure reliability in the assessment of physical work loading. It is suggested that it should be set to 40% or less of the 3-h monitoring period.

  3. The constant displacement scheme for tracking particles in heterogeneous aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, X.H.; Gomez-Hernandez, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Simulation of mass transport by particle tracking or random walk in highly heterogeneous media may be inefficient from a computational point of view if the traditional constant time step scheme is used. A new scheme which adjusts automatically the time step for each particle according to the local pore velocity, so that each particle always travels a constant distance, is shown to be computationally faster for the same degree of accuracy than the constant time step method. Using the constant displacement scheme, transport calculations in a 2-D aquifer model, with nature log-transmissivity variance of 4, can be 8.6 times faster than using the constant time step scheme.

  4. Cosmological constant from the emergent gravity perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2014-05-01

    Observations indicate that our universe is characterized by a late-time accelerating phase, possibly driven by a cosmological constant Λ, with the dimensionless parameter Λ {LP2} ˜= 10-122, where LP = (Għ/c3)1/2 is the Planck length. In this review, we describe how the emergent gravity paradigm provides a new insight and a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. After reviewing the necessary background material, we identify the necessary and sufficient conditions for solving the cosmological constant problem. We show that these conditions are naturally satisfied in the emergent gravity paradigm in which (i) the field equations of gravity are invariant under the addition of a constant to the matter Lagrangian and (ii) the cosmological constant appears as an integration constant in the solution. The numerical value of this integration constant can be related to another dimensionless number (called CosMIn) that counts the number of modes inside a Hubble volume that cross the Hubble radius during the radiation and the matter-dominated epochs of the universe. The emergent gravity paradigm suggests that CosMIn has the numerical value 4π, which, in turn, leads to the correct, observed value of the cosmological constant. Further, the emergent gravity paradigm provides an alternative perspective on cosmology and interprets the expansion of the universe itself as a quest towards holographic equipartition. We discuss the implications of this novel and alternate description of cosmology.

  5. DNA replication origin activation in space and time.

    PubMed

    Fragkos, Michalis; Ganier, Olivier; Coulombe, Philippe; Méchali, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    DNA replication begins with the assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs) at thousands of DNA replication origins during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. At the G1-S-phase transition, pre-RCs are converted into pre-initiation complexes, in which the replicative helicase is activated, leading to DNA unwinding and initiation of DNA synthesis. However, only a subset of origins are activated during any S phase. Recent insights into the mechanisms underlying this choice reveal how flexibility in origin usage and temporal activation are linked to chromosome structure and organization, cell growth and differentiation, and replication stress.

  6. Family Time Activities and Adolescents' Emotional Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offer, Shira

    2013-01-01

    The literature is divided on the issue of what matters for adolescents' well-being, with one approach focusing on quality and the other on routine family time. Using the experience sampling method, a unique form of time diary, and survey data drawn from the 500 Family Study ("N" = 237 adolescents with 8,122 observations), this study examined the…

  7. Active versus Passive Screen Time for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetser, Penelope; Johnson, Daniel; Ozdowska, Anne; Wyeth, Peta

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report some initial findings from our investigations into the Australian Government's Longitudinal Study of Australian Children dataset. It is revealed that the majority of Australian children are exceeding the government's Screen Time recommendations and that most of their screen time is spent as TV viewing, as opposed to video…

  8. Intrinsically Motivated, Free-Time Physical Activity: Considerations for Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellino, Megan Babkes; Sinclair, Christina D.

    2008-01-01

    The current childhood obesity rates raise concern about youths' health and the role that a sedentary lifestyle plays in this growing trend. Focusing on how children choose to spend their free time is one approach that may yield ideas for reducing childhood obesity. Recess is a regularly occurring "free time" period in elementary schools. It is,…

  9. Photo-activated ionic gelation of alginate hydrogel: real-time rheological monitoring of the two-step crosslinking mechanism.

    PubMed

    Higham, Alina K; Bonino, Christopher A; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Khan, Saad A

    2014-07-21

    We examine the gelation of alginate undergoing ionic crosslinking upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation using in situ dynamic rheology. Hydrogels are formed by combining alginate with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles and a photoacid generator (PAG). The PAG is photolyzed upon UV irradiation, resulting in the release of free calcium ions for ionic crosslinking. The viscous and elastic moduli during gelation are monitored as a function of the UV irradiation intensity, exposure time, alginate concentration, and the ratio between alginate and calcium carbonate. Gel time decreases as irradiation intensity increases because a larger concentration of PAG is photolyzed. Interestingly, dark curing, the continuing growth of microstructure in the absence of UV light, is observed. In some instances, the sample transitions from a solution to a gel during the dark curing phase. Additionally, when exposed to constant UV irradiation after the dark curing phase, samples reach the same plateau modulus as samples exposed to constant UV without dark curing, implying that dark curing does not affect the gelation mechanism. We believe the presence of dark curing is the result of the acidic environment persisting within the sample, allowing CaCO3 to dissociate, thereby releasing free Ca(2+) ions capable of binding with the available appropriate ionic blocks of the polymer chains. The growth of microstructure is then detected if the activation barrier has been crossed to release sufficient calcium ions. In this regard, we calculate a value of 30 J that represents the activation energy required to initiate gelation.

  10. Clinical NECR in 18F-FDG PET scans: optimization of injected activity and variable acquisition time. Relationship with SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, T.; Ferrer, L.; Necib, H.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Rousseau, C.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.

    2014-10-01

    The injected activity and the acquisition time per bed position for 18F-FDG PET scans are usually optimized by using metrics obtained from phantom experiments. However, optimal activity and time duration can significantly vary from a phantom set-up and from patient to patient. An approach using a patient-specific noise equivalent count rate (NECR) modelling has been previously proposed for optimizing clinical scanning protocols. We propose using the clinical NECR on a large population as a function of the body mass index (BMI) for deriving the optimal injected activity and acquisition duration per bed position. The relationship between the NEC and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was assessed both in a phantom and in a clinical setting. 491 consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated and divided into 4 BMI subgroups. Two criteria were used to optimize the injected activity and the time per bed position was adjusted using the NECR value while keeping the total acquisition time constant. Finally, the relationship between NEC and SNR was investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and a population of 507 other patients. While the first dose regimen suggested a unique injected activity (665 MBq) regardless of the BMI, the second dose regimen proposed a variable activity and a total acquisition time according to the BMI. The NEC improvement was around 35% as compared with the local current injection rule. Variable time per bed position was derived according to BMI and anatomical region. NEC and number of true events were found to be highly correlated with SNR for the phantom set-up and partially confirmed in the patient study for the BMI subgroup under 28 kg m-2 suggesting that for the scanner, the nonlinear reconstruction algorithm used in this study and BMI < 28 kg m-2, NEC, or the number of true events linearly correlated with SNR2.

  11. Inhibition of potato polyphenol oxidase by anions and activity in various carboxylate buffers (pH 4.8) at constant ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Malkin, B D; Thickman, K R; Markworth, C J; Wilcox, D E; Kull, F J

    2001-01-01

    The activity of potato polyphenol oxidase (tyrosinase) toward DL-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (K(M) 5.39 mM) was studied using a variety of carboxylate buffers at a common pH and ionic strength. Enzyme activity, greatest in citrate and least in oxalate, correlated with increasing carboxyl concentration and molecular mass. The lower activity in oxalate was attributed to more effective chelation of a copper(II) form of the enzyme by the oxalate dianion. Sodium halide salts inhibited the enzyme. Although there was little difference in inhibition between sodium and potassium salts, the degree and type of inhibition was anion dependent; K(is), values for NaCl and KCl, (competitive inhibitors) were 1.82 and 1.62 mM, whereas Na(2) SO(4) and K(2) SO(4) (mixed inhibitors) had K(is) and K(ii) values in the 250 to 450 mM range.

  12. Time well spent? Assessing nursing-supply chain activities.

    PubMed

    Ferenc, Jeff

    2010-02-01

    The amount of time nurses spend providing direct patient care seems to be continually eroding. So it's little wonder a survey conducted last year of critical care, OR nurses and nurse executives found that half of the 1600 respondents feel they spend too much time on supply chain duties. Most also said their supply chain duties impact patient safe ty and their ability to provide bedside care. Experts interviewed for this report believe it's time for supply chain leaders and nurses to develop a closer working partnership. Included are their recommendations to improve performance.

  13. Time Regained: When People Stop a Physical Activity Program, How Does Their Time Use Change? A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomersall, Sjaan; Maher, Carol; English, Coralie; Rowlands, Alex; Olds, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how previously inactive adults who had participated in a structured, partly supervised 6-week exercise program restructured their time budgets when the program ended. Using a randomised controlled trial design, 129 previously inactive adults were recruited and randomly allocated to one of three groups: a Moderate or Extensive six-week physical activity intervention (150 and 300 additional minutes of exercise per week, respectively) or a Control group. Additional physical activity was accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions with a wide range of activities. Use of time and time spent in energy expenditure zones was measured using a computerised 24-h self-report recall instrument, the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults, and accelerometry at baseline, mid- and end-program and at 3- and 6-months follow up. At final follow up, all significant changes in time use domains had returned to within 20 minutes of baseline levels (Physical Activity 1-2 min/d, Active Transport 3-9 min/d, Self-Care 0-2 min/d, Television/Videogames 13-18 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive group, relative to Controls, respectively, p>0.05). Similarly, all significant changes in time spent in the moderate energy expenditure zone had returned to within 1-3 min/d baseline levels (p>0.05), however time spent in vigorous physical activity according to accelerometry estimates remained elevated, although the changes were small in magnitude (1 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive groups, relative to Controls, p=0.01). The results of this study demonstrate strong recidivist patterns in physical activity, but also in other aspects of time use. In designing and determining the effectiveness of exercise interventions, future studies would benefit from considering the whole profile of time use, rather than focusing on individual activities. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000248066 PMID

  14. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. Cosmological constant and local gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, Jose; Espinoza, Catalina; Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2010-04-15

    We discuss the linearization of Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant, by expanding the solution for the metric around a flat Minkowski space-time. We demonstrate that one can find consistent solutions to the linearized set of equations for the metric perturbations, in the Lorentz gauge, which are not spherically symmetric, but they rather exhibit a cylindrical symmetry. We find that the components of the gravitational field satisfying the appropriate Poisson equations have the property of ensuring that a scalar potential can be constructed, in which both contributions, from ordinary matter and {Lambda}>0, are attractive. In addition, there is a novel tensor potential, induced by the pressure density, in which the effect of the cosmological constant is repulsive. We also linearize the Schwarzschild-de Sitter exact solution of Einstein's equations (due to a generalization of Birkhoff's theorem) in the domain between the two horizons. We manage to transform it first to a gauge in which the 3-space metric is conformally flat and, then, make an additional coordinate transformation leading to the Lorentz gauge conditions. We compare our non-spherically symmetric solution with the linearized Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric, when the latter is transformed to the Lorentz gauge, and we find agreement. The resulting metric, however, does not acquire a proper Newtonian form in terms of the unique scalar potential that solves the corresponding Poisson equation. Nevertheless, our solution is stable, in the sense that the physical energy density is positive.

  20. Circle Time: An Exploratory Study of Activities and Challenging Behavior in Head Start Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaghlawan, Hasan Y.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine circle time activities in eight Head Start classrooms. A total of 7 h of observations occurred in eight classrooms. Songs and academic activities were the most frequently occurring activities. Challenging behavior during circle time also was examined. The three activities with the highest…

  1. A solar cycle timing predictor - The latitude of active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1990-01-01

    A 'Spoerer butterfly' method is used to examine solar cycle 22. It is shown from the latitude of active regions that the cycle can now be expected to peak near November 1989 + or - 8 months, basically near the latter half of 1989.

  2. Can we understand time scales of solar activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremliovsky, M. N.

    1994-05-01

    The dynamo theory of the solar cycle faces numerous difficulties in regard to an explanation of the observed behavior of sunspot activity. In particular, there is an essential irregularity in the sequence of 11(22)-year cycles. In this paper we want to show how the complicated long-term evolution of solar activity can be understood within the framework of a simple model demonstrating low-dimensional chaotic behavior. According to this description we are able to give a definition for the periods of low activity (Global Minima), to describe how the transition to (from) a Global Minimum occurs and to show the role of the 11(22)-year cycle and its phase catastrophe. The explanations of the origin of the Gleissberg cycle and thousand-year variations of solar activity are given. In summary, the independence of the proposed scenario from the particular choice of model is shown. Thus one can formulate dynamics in the language of generalized instabilities which can aid the search for the underlying physical processes.

  3. Time for Action: Advocacy for Physical Activity in Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Bevan

    2010-01-01

    By 2050, the over 65 year's age group will account for approximately one quarter of the population. This will have many unprecedented social and economic consequences of which one is the cost associated with health. A preventive health related behaviour attracting considerable attention is physical activity, something that becomes less popular…

  4. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  5. Kinetic evaluation of highly active supported gold catalysts prepared from monolayer-protected clusters: an experimental Michaelis-Menten approach for determining the oxygen binding constant during CO oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Long, Cormac G; Gilbertson, John D; Vijayaraghavan, Ganesh; Stevenson, Keith J; Pursell, Christopher J; Chandler, Bert D

    2008-08-06

    Thiol monolayer-protected Au clusters (MPCs) were prepared using dendrimer templates, deposited onto a high-surface-area titania, and then the thiol stabilizers were removed under H2/N2. The resulting Au catalysts were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed CO. The Au catalysts prepared via this route displayed minimal particle agglomeration during the deposition and activation steps. Structural data obtained from the physical characterization of the Au catalysts were comparable to features exhibited from a traditionally prepared standard Au catalyst obtained from the World Gold Council (WGC). A differential kinetic study of CO oxidation catalysis by the MPC-prepared Au and the standard WGC catalyst showed that these two catalyst systems have essentially the same reaction order and Arrhenius apparent activation energies (28 kJ/mol). However, the MPC-prepared Au catalyst shows 50% greater activity for CO oxidation. Using a Michaelis-Menten approach, the oxygen binding constants for the two catalyst systems were determined and found to be essentially the same within experimental error. To our knowledge, this kinetic evaluation is the first experimental determination of oxygen binding by supported Au nanoparticle catalysts under working conditions. The values for the oxygen binding equilibrium constant obtained from the Michaelis-Menten treatment (ca. 29-39) are consistent with ultra-high-vacuum measurements on model catalyst systems and support density functional theory calculations for oxygen binding at corner or edge atoms on Au nanoparticles and clusters.

  6. Association among functional-movement ability, fatigue, sedentary time, and fitness in 40 years and older active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Armbruster, Carol; Evans, Ellen M; Sexauer, Lisa; Peterson, James; Wyatt, William

    2013-12-01

    Identifying potential modifiable determinants of functional movement ability and fatigue may inform efforts to maintain constant physical readiness, especially in active duty military over 40 years of age, who are largely sedentary throughout their work day. The primary aim of this study was to determine the associations among conventional fitness measures (body composition, flexibility, and strength), sedentary behavior (sitting time), functional movement ability, and fatigue in military personnel. Volunteer active duty personnel 40 years of age and older (n = 569 males; n = 121 females; mean ± SD for total sample = 44.5 ± 4.1 years) were assessed for adiposity (%Fat), strength, flexibility, self-reported sitting time, perceived fatigue using the fatigue severity scale, and functional movement ability using the functional movement screening criteria. Greater flexibility was associated with better functional movement screening scores (r = 0.34, p < 0.05), and waist circumference and %Fat were inversely related to function (r = -0.26 and -0.21, p < 0.05). Furthermore, less sitting time (p < 0.001) was associated with less fatigue. Our data suggest that exercise training, reductions in daily sitting time, and weight management may be viable intervention targets to enhance functional movement ability and reduce fatigue in 40+ year old active duty military personnel.

  7. Adolescents' Time Use: Effects on Substance Use, Delinquency and Sexual Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Grace M.; Hoffman, Joseph H.; Welte, John W.; Farrell, Michael P.; Dintcheff, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    Using an integration of social control theory and the routine activity perspective, adolescent time use was examined for effects on problem behaviors. We examined a wide variety of time use categories, including homework, extracurricular activities, sports time, alone time, paid work, housework, television watching, as well as indices of family…

  8. Activities at the State Time and Frequency Standard of Russia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    monitoring. The first Western results were obtained by P. Daly, the Russian ones by G. T. Cherenkov, N. Koshelyaevsky, and S. Pushkin [1]. Since...Koshelyaevsky, and S. B. Pushkin , 1991, “Satellite Time Transfer Between UTC (USNO) and UTC (SU) using NAVSTAR GPS and GLONASS,” in Proceedings of

  9. Using Online Active-Learning Techniques to Convey Time Compensated Sun Compass Orientation in the Eastern North American Monarch

    PubMed Central

    Green, Noah H.; McMahon, Douglas G.; Brame, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    A common tool that animals use to navigate in a constant direction is known as “time compensated sun compass orientation.” This is a process by which animals use the position of the sun along with information from their internal circadian clocks to determine and maintain a directional heading. Many circadian scientists and educators use this process as an example of how the internal circadian clock can directly influence animal behavior. However, many students have difficulty grasping this biological process due to its multivariable nature. We have created an online module that uses the principles of active learning to facilitate student comprehension of this process. Our module contains instructional videos, practice problems and an interactive diagram. We implemented the module in an undergraduate biological clocks class at Vanderbilt University, where its use significantly improved students’ understanding of time compensated sun compass orientation as well as their ability to solve complex problems involving principles associated with this process. PMID:28101270

  10. Time and Frequency Activities at the JHU Applied Physics Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    mass ejections (STEREO) to the examination of the outer planets and the Kuiper Belt objects (New Horizons). This support includes providing precise...missions that span our solar system from the study of the Sun’s coronal mass ejections (STEREO) to the examination of the outer planets and the Kuiper ... Belt objects (New Horizons). This support includes providing precise time and frequency to the integration and testing of flight hardware, frequency

  11. Multi-Wavelength Time Variability of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Ritaban

    2009-01-01

    Due to their large distances, AGNs are not spatially resolved with current and near-future technologies except by radio interferometry. However, we can use time variability, one of the defining properties of AGNs, to probe the location and physical processes related to the emission at resolutions even finer than provided by VLBI. I use extensive multi-frequency monitoring data of the blazars 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089 (over 10 years long) and the radio galaxy 3C 120 ( 5 years), including well-sampled light curves (radiative flux vs. time) at X-ray energies (2-10 keV), optical wavelengths (R band), and radio frequencies (14.5 GHz and 37 GHz), as well as monthly images obtained with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 43 GHz that follow changes in the emission structure of the jet on parsec scales. I have developed and applied a set of statistical tools to characterize the time variability of AGNs. This includes the power spectral density (PSD) and its uncertainties, discrete cross-correlation functions and their significance using random light curves simulated from the previously calculated PSDs, and decomposition of light curves into individual flares. I also model the time variable emission spectrum of an AGN jet using a numerical code that includes conical geometry, turbulent magnetic field and density, and energization of electrons due to a moving shock front. Comparing the results of the model calculations and the application of the above-mentioned statistical procedures on the real data, I draw conclusions about the location of the emission regions of these objects. I also identify the ongoing emission mechanisms and implications regarding the physics of jets. This work is supported by NASA through grants NNX08AJ64G (ADP) and NNX08AV65G (Fermi).

  12. A problem with estimating the pseudo- activation energy of kerogen thermal maturation from Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis as derived from first-order reaction kinetics is algebraically correct, but its application to natural petroleum generation is invalidated by the assumption that the ratio of initial kerogen concentration to degraded kerogen concentration is constant from deposition to the initiation of intense oil generation. The ratio can only remain constant if no reaction is occurring and, therefore, Connan's data on 'reaction time' in petroleum generation (assumed to be the age of the sediment) only measures the time elapsed since the system formed. Thus, the widely cited pseudo-activation energy of 11-14 kcal/mole computed from Connan's equation for the start of oil generation from kerogen is meaningless.-Author

  13. Para-chlorophenol containing synthetic wastewater treatment in an activated sludge unit: effects of hydraulic residence time.

    PubMed

    Kargi, Fikret; Konya, Isil

    2007-07-01

    Due to the toxic nature of chlorophenol compounds present in some chemical industry effluents, biological treatment of such wastewaters is usually realized with low treatment efficiencies. Para-chlorophenol (4-chlorophenol, 4-CP) containing synthetic wastewater was treated in an activated sludge unit at different hydraulic residence times (HRT) varying between 5 and 30 h while the feed COD (2500 mg l(-1)), 4-CP (500 mg l(-1)) and sludge age (SRT, 10 days) were constant. Effects of HRT variations on COD, 4-CP, toxicity removals and on settling characteristics of the sludge were investigated. Percent COD removals increased and the effluent COD concentrations decreased when HRT increased from 5 to 15 h and remained almost constant for larger HRT levels. Nearly, 91% COD and 99% 4-CP removals were obtained at HRT levels above 15 h. Because of the highly concentrated microbial population at HRT levels of above 15 h, low effluent (reactor) 4-CP concentrations and almost complete toxicity removals were obtained. High biomass concentrations obtained at HRT levels above 15 h were due to low 4-CP contents in the aeration tank yielding negligible inhibition effects and low maintenance requirements. The sludge volume index (SVI) decreased with increasing HRT up to 15 h due to high biomass concentrations at high HRT levels resulting in well settling sludge with low SVI values. Hydraulic residence times above 15 h resulted in more than 90% COD and complete 4-CP and toxicity removals along with well settling sludge.

  14. Effect of a school-based active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, M V; Fairclough, S J; Ridgers, N D; Knowles, Z R; Foweather, L; Stratton, G

    2013-12-01

    Early childhood is a critical time for promoting physical activity. Few studies have investigated the effect of interventions in this population. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a school-based active play intervention on preschool children's sedentary time and physical activity. Preschool children were recruited from randomly selected preschools. Schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or comparison group. One teacher per intervention school received training from active play professionals in the delivery of a 6-week active play programme. Comparison schools continued their usual practice. Children wore a uni-axial accelerometer for 7 days at baseline, immediately after and at 6-month post-intervention. No significant intervention effects were observed for sedentary time or physical activity. However, sex and hours spent at school were significant predictors of physical activity. Children who spent fewer hours (half-day children) at school were significantly more active than their full-day counterparts. Physical activity during the intervention classes was high even though neither daily physical activity nor sedentary time changed. Notably children who spent more time at preschool were less active suggesting that preschool was not as conducive to physical activity engagement as other environments.

  15. Locating and Activating Molecular 'Time Bombs': Induction of Mycolata Prophages.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Zoe A; Brown, Teagan L; Farrar, Ben; Doyle, Stephen R; Tucci, Joseph; Seviour, Robert J; Petrovski, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence, functionality and ecological roles of temperate phages for members of the mycolic acid producing bacteria, the Mycolata. While many lytic phages infective for these organisms have been isolated, and assessed for their suitability for use as biological control agents of activated sludge foaming, no studies have investigated how temperate phages might be induced for this purpose. Bioinformatic analysis using the PHAge Search Tool (PHAST) on Mycolata whole genome sequence data in GenBank for members of the genera Gordonia, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella revealed 83% contained putative prophage DNA sequences. Subsequent prophage inductions using mitomycin C were conducted on 17 Mycolata strains. This led to the isolation and genome characterization of three novel Caudovirales temperate phages, namely GAL1, GMA1, and TPA4, induced from Gordonia alkanivorans, Gordonia malaquae, and Tsukamurella paurometabola, respectively. All possessed highly distinctive dsDNA genome sequences.

  16. Understanding Time-driven Activity-based Costing.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-03-01

    Transitioning to a value-based health care system will require providers to increasingly scrutinize their outcomes and costs. Although there has been a great deal of effort to understand outcomes, cost accounting in health care has been a greater challenge. Currently the cost accounting methods used by hospitals and providers are based off a fee-for-service system. As resources become increasingly scarce and the health care system attempts to understand which services provide the greatest value, it will be critically important to understand the true costs of delivering a service. An understanding of the true costs of a particular service will help providers make smarter decisions on how to allocate and utilize resources as well as determine which activities are nonvalue added. Achieving value will require providers to have a greater focus on accurate outcome data as well as better methods of cost accounting.

  17. Constant current load matches impedances of electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    Constant current load with negative resistance characteristics actively compensates for impedance variations in circuit components. Through a current-voltage balancing operation the internal impedance of the diodes is maintained at a constant value. This constant current load circuit can be used in simple telemetry systems.

  18. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  19. Four-dimensional dose distributions of step-and-shoot IMRT delivered with real-time tumor tracking for patients with irregular breathing: Constant dose rate vs dose rate regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaocheng; Han-Oh, Sarah; Gui Minzhi; Niu Ying; Yu, Cedric X.; Yi Byongyong

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Dose-rate-regulated tracking (DRRT) is a tumor tracking strategy that programs the MLC to track the tumor under regular breathing and adapts to breathing irregularities during delivery using dose rate regulation. Constant-dose-rate tracking (CDRT) is a strategy that dynamically repositions the beam to account for intrafractional 3D target motion according to real-time information of target location obtained from an independent position monitoring system. The purpose of this study is to illustrate the differences in the effectiveness and delivery accuracy between these two tracking methods in the presence of breathing irregularities. Methods: Step-and-shoot IMRT plans optimized at a reference phase were extended to remaining phases to generate 10-phased 4D-IMRT plans using segment aperture morphing (SAM) algorithm, where both tumor displacement and deformation were considered. A SAM-based 4D plan has been demonstrated to provide better plan quality than plans not considering target deformation. However, delivering such a plan requires preprogramming of the MLC aperture sequence. Deliveries of the 4D plans using DRRT and CDRT tracking approaches were simulated assuming the breathing period is either shorter or longer than the planning day, for 4 IMRT cases: two lung and two pancreatic cases with maximum GTV centroid motion greater than 1 cm were selected. In DRRT, dose rate was regulated to speed up or slow down delivery as needed such that each planned segment is delivered at the planned breathing phase. In CDRT, MLC is separately controlled to follow the tumor motion, but dose rate was kept constant. In addition to breathing period change, effect of breathing amplitude variation on target and critical tissue dose distribution is also evaluated. Results: Delivery of preprogrammed 4D plans by the CDRT method resulted in an average of 5% increase in target dose and noticeable increase in organs at risk (OAR) dose when patient breathing is either 10% faster or

  20. Global Night-Time Lights for Observing Human Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hipskind, Stephen R.; Elvidge, Chris; Gurney, K.; Imhoff, Mark; Bounoua, Lahouari; Sheffner, Edwin; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Pettit, Donald R.; Fischer, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present a concept for a small satellite mission to make systematic, global observations of night-time lights with spatial resolution suitable for discerning the extent, type and density of human settlements. The observations will also allow better understanding of fine scale fossil fuel CO2 emission distribution. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey recommends more focus on direct observations of human influence on the Earth system. The most dramatic and compelling observations of human presence on the Earth are the night light observations taken by the Defence Meteorological System Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Beyond delineating the footprint of human presence, night light data, when assembled and evaluated with complementary data sets, can determine the fine scale spatial distribution of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Understanding fossil fuel carbon emissions is critical to understanding the entire carbon cycle, and especially the carbon exchange between terrestrial and oceanic systems.

  1. Time resolved studies of bond activation by organometallic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkens, Matthew J.

    1998-05-01

    In 1971, Jetz and Graham discovered that the silicon-hydrogen bond in silanes could be broken under mild photochemical conditions in the presence of certain transition metal carbonyls. Such reactions fall within the class of oxidative addition. A decade later, similar reactivity was discovered in alkanes. In these cases a C-H bond in non-functionalized alkanes was broken through the oxidative addition of Cp*Ir(H)2L (Cp* = (CH3)5C5, L = PPh3, Ph = C6H5) to form Cp*ML(R)(H) or of Cp*Ir(CO)2 to form Cp*Ir(CO)(R)(H). These discoveries opened an entirely new field of research, one which naturally included mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating the various paths involved in these and related reactions. Much was learned from these experiments but they shared the disadvantage of studying under highly non-standard conditions a system which is of interest largely because of its characteristics under standard conditions. Ultrafast time-resolved IR spectroscopy provides an ideal solution to this problem; because it allows the resolution of chemical events taking place on the femto-through picosecond time scale, it is possible to study this important class of reactions under the ambient conditions which are most of interest to the practicing synthetic chemist. Certain of the molecules in question are particularly well-suited to study using the ultrafast IR spectrophotometer described in the experimental section because they contain one or more carbonyl ligands.

  2. A hundred years of activated sludge: time for a rethink

    PubMed Central

    Sheik, Abdul R.; Muller, Emilie E. L.; Wilmes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment plants (BWWTPs) based on the activated sludge (AS) process have dramatically improved worldwide water sanitation despite increased urbanization and industrialization. However, current AS-based operations are considered economically and environmentally unsustainable. In this Perspective, we discuss our current understanding of microbial populations and their metabolic transformations in AS-based BWWTPs in view of developing more sustainable processes in the future. In particular, much has been learned over the course of the past 25 years about specialized microorganisms, which could be more comprehensively leveraged to recover energy and/or nutrients from wastewater streams. To achieve this, we propose a bottom-up design approach, focused around the concept of a “wastewater biorefinery column”, which would rely on the engineering of distinct ecological niches into a BWWTP in order to guarantee the targeted enrichment of specific organismal groups which in turn will allow the harvest of high-value resources from wastewater. This concept could be seen as a possible grand challenge to microbial ecologists and engineers alike at the centenary of the discovery of the AS process. PMID:24624120

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW The cosmological constant puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2011-04-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive vacuum energy density and negative vacuum pressure. A strong candidate is the cosmological constant in Einstein's equations of general relativity. Possible contributions are zero-point energies and the condensates associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The vacuum energy density extracted from astrophysics is 1056 times smaller than the value expected from quantum fields and standard model particle physics. Is the vacuum energy density time dependent? We give an introduction to the cosmological constant puzzle and ideas how to solve it.

  4. Is Planck's quantization constant unique?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-07-01

    A cornerstone of Quantum Mechanics is the existence of a non-zero least action, the Planck constant. However, the basic concepts and theoretical developments of Quantum Mechanics are independent of its specific numerical value. A different constant h _{*}, similar to the Planck constant h, but ˜12 orders of magnitude larger, characterizes plasmas. The study of >50 different geophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas, provided the first evidence for the universality and the quantum nature of h _{*}, revealing that it is a new quantization constant. The recent results show the diagnostics for determining whether plasmas are characterized by the Planck or the new quantization constant, compounding the challenge to reconcile both quantization constants in quantum mechanics.

  5. Time structure of the activity in neural network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstner, Wulfram

    1995-01-01

    Several neural network models in continuous time are reconsidered in the framework of a general mean-field theory which is exact in the limit of a large and fully connected network. The theory assumes pointlike spikes which are generated by a renewal process. The effect of spikes on a receiving neuron is described by a linear response kernel which is the dominant term in a weak-coupling expansion. It is shown that the resulting ``spike response model'' is the most general renewal model with linear inputs. The standard integrate-and-fire model forms a special case. In a network structure with several pools of identical spiking neurons, the global states and the dynamic evolution are determined by a nonlinear integral equation which describes the effective interaction within and between different pools. We derive explicit stability criteria for stationary (incoherent) and oscillatory (coherent) solutions. It is shown that the stationary state of noiseless systems is ``almost always'' unstable. Noise suppresses fast oscillations and stabilizes the system. Furthermore, collective oscillations are stable only if the firing occurs while the synaptic potential is increasing. In particular, collective oscillations in a network with delayless excitatory interaction are at most semistable. Inhibitory interactions with short delays or excitatory interactions with long delays lead to stable oscillations. Our general results allow a straightforward application to different network models with spiking neurons. Furthermore, the theory allows an estimation of the errors introduced in firing rate or ``graded-response'' models.

  6. "Active Living" Related to the Rural-Urban Continuum: A Time-Use Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Hugh; Spinney, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper assesses the degree to which "active living" varies along the rural-urban continuum, within the county-sized regional municipality of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Methods: Time-diary data from the Halifax Space-Time Activity Research project were used to compute daily participation rates (PRs) and time durations, at various…

  7. Productive Activities and Subjective Well-Being among Older Adults: The Influence of Number of Activities and Time Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Lindsey A.; Cahalin, Lawrence P.; Gerst, Kerstin; Burr, Jeffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines relationships among three measures of subjective well-being (life satisfaction, happiness and depressive symptoms), and two global measures of productive activity (number of activities and time commitment). We argue that participation in multiple productive activities should increase subjective well-being because these…

  8. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  9. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  10. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  11. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  12. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  13. Reported frequency of physical activity in a large epidemiological study: relationship to specific activities and repeatability over time

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background How overall physical activity relates to specific activities and how reported activity changes over time may influence interpretation of observed associations between physical activity and health. We examine the relationships between various physical activities self-reported at different times in a large cohort study of middle-aged UK women. Methods At recruitment, Million Women Study participants completed a baseline questionnaire including questions on frequency of strenuous and of any physical activity. About 3 years later 589,896 women also completed a follow-up questionnaire reporting the hours they spent on a range of specific activities. Time spent on each activity was used to estimate the associated excess metabolic equivalent hours (MET-hours) and this value was compared across categories of physical activity reported at recruitment. Additionally, 18,655 women completed the baseline questionnaire twice, at intervals of up to 4 years; repeatability over time was assessed using the weighted kappa coefficient (κweighted) and absolute percentage agreement. Results The average number of hours per week women reported doing specific activities was 14.0 for housework, 4.5 for walking, 3.0 for gardening, 0.2 for cycling, and 1.4 for all strenuous activity. Time spent and the estimated excess MET-hours associated with each activity increased with increasing frequency of any or strenuous physical activity reported at baseline (tests for trend, P < 0.003), although the associations for housework were by far the weakest (Spearman correlations, 0.01 and -0.03 respectively for housework, and 0.11-0.37 for all other activities). Repeatability of responses to physical activity questions on the baseline questionnaire declined significantly over time. For strenuous activity, absolute agreement was 64% (κweighted = 0.71) for questionnaires administered less than 6 months apart, and 52% (κweighted = 0.51) for questionnaires more than 2 years apart. Corresponding

  14. Physical Activity, Study Sitting Time, Leisure Sitting Time, and Sleep Time Are Differently Associated With Obesity in Korean Adolescents: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Kong, Il Gyu; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, So Young; Sim, Songyong; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2015-11-01

    Low physical activity, long leisure sitting time, and short sleep time are risk factors for obesity, but the association with study sitting time is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between these factors and obesity.We analyzed the association between physical activity, study sitting time, leisure sitting time, and sleep time and subject weight (underweight, healthy weight, overweight, and obese), using data from a large population-based survey, the 2013 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. Data from 53,769 participants were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression analyses with complex sampling. Age, sex, region of residence, economic level, smoking, stress level, physical activity, sitting time for study, sitting time for leisure, and sleep time were adjusted as the confounders.Low physical activity (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] = 1.03, 1.12) and long leisure sitting time (AORs = 1.15, 1.32) were positively associated with overweight and obese. Low physical activity (AOR = 1.33) and long leisure sitting time (AOR = 1.12) were also associated with underweight. Study sitting time was negatively associated with underweight (AOR = 0.86) but was unrelated to overweight (AOR = 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.91-1.03) and obese (AOR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.84-1.04). Sleep time (<6 hours; ≥6 hours, <7 hours; ≥7 hours, <8 hours) was adversely associated with underweight (AORs = 0.67, 0.79, and 0.88) but positively associated with overweight (AORs = 1.19, 1.17, and 1.08) and obese (AORs = 1.33, 1.36, and 1.30) in a dose-response relationship.In adolescents, increasing physical activity, decreasing leisure sitting time, and obtaining sufficient sleep would be beneficial in maintaining a healthy weight. However, study sitting time was not associated with overweight or obese.

  15. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, Martin Paul

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  16. ON THE VARIATIONS OF FUNDAMENTAL CONSTANTS AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK IN THE QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXY RXJ0911.4+0551 at z = 2.79

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, A.; Henkel, C.; Menten, K. M.; Walter, F.; Downes, D.; Cox, P.; Carrili, C. L.

    2012-07-10

    We report on sensitive observations of the CO(J = 7{yields}6) and C I({sup 3}P{sub 2} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 1}) transitions in the z = 2.79 QSO host galaxy RXJ0911.4+0551 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer. Our extremely high signal-to-noise spectra combined with the narrow CO line width of this source (FWHM = 120 km s{sup -1}) allows us to estimate sensitive limits on the spacetime variations of the fundamental constants using two emission lines. Our observations show that the C I and CO line shapes are in good agreement with each other but that the C I line profile is of the order of 10% narrower, presumably due to the lower opacity in the latter line. Both lines show faint wings with velocities up to {+-}250 km s{sup -1}, indicative of a molecular outflow. As such, the data provide direct evidence for negative feedback in the molecular gas phase at high redshift. Our observations allow us to determine the observed frequencies of both transitions with so far unmatched accuracy at high redshift. The redshift difference between the CO and C I lines is sensitive to variations of {Delta}F/F with F = {alpha}{sup 2}/{mu} where {alpha} is the fine structure constant and {mu} is the electron-to-proton mass ratio. We find {Delta}F/F (6.9 {+-} 3.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} at a look-back time of 11.3 Gyr, which, within the uncertainties, is consistent with no variations of the fundamental constants.

  17. Quantum electrodynamics, high-resolution spectroscopy and fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in high-resolution spectroscopy has delivered us a variety of accurate optical results, which can be used for the determination of the atomic fundamental constants and for constraining their possible time variation. We present a brief overview of the results discussing in particular, the determination of the Rydberg constant, the relative atomic weight of the electron and proton, their mass ratio and the fine structure constant. Many individual results on those constants are obtained with use of quantum electrodynamics, and we discuss which sectors of QED are involved. We derive constraints on a possible time variation of the fine structure constants and me/mp.

  18. Perceptual distortions in pitch and time reveal active prediction and support for an auditory pitch-motion hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Henry, Molly J; McAuley, J Devin

    2013-01-01

    A number of accounts of human auditory perception assume that listeners use prior stimulus context to generate predictions about future stimulation. Here, we tested an auditory pitch-motion hypothesis that was developed from this perspective. Listeners judged either the time change (i.e., duration) or pitch change of a comparison frequency glide relative to a standard (referent) glide. Under a constant-velocity assumption, listeners were hypothesized to use the pitch velocity (Δf/Δt) of the standard glide to generate predictions about the pitch velocity of the comparison glide, leading to perceptual distortions along the to-be-judged dimension when the velocities of the two glides differed. These predictions were borne out in the pattern of relative points of subjective equality by a significant three-way interaction between the velocities of the two glides and task. In general, listeners' judgments along the task-relevant dimension (pitch or time) were affected by expectations generated by the constant-velocity standard, but in an opposite manner for the two stimulus dimensions. When the comparison glide velocity was faster than the standard, listeners overestimated time change, but underestimated pitch change, whereas when the comparison glide velocity was slower than the standard, listeners underestimated time change, but overestimated pitch change. Perceptual distortions were least evident when the velocities of the standard and comparison glides were matched. Fits of an imputed velocity model further revealed increasingly larger distortions at faster velocities. The present findings provide support for the auditory pitch-motion hypothesis and add to a larger body of work revealing a role for active prediction in human auditory perception.

  19. Validation of activPAL defined sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time in 4- to 6-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Xanne; Cliff, Dylan P; Reilly, John J; Hinkley, Trina; Jones, Rachel A; Batterham, Marijka; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Soren; Okely, Anthony D

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the classification accuracy of the activPAL, including total time spent sedentary and total number of breaks in sedentary behavior (SB) in 4- to 6-year-old children. Forty children aged 4-6 years (5.3 ± 1.0 years) completed a ~150-min laboratory protocol involving sedentary, light, and moderate- to vigorous-intensity activities. Posture was coded as sit/lie, stand, walk, or other using direct observation. Posture was classified using the activPAL software. Classification accuracy was evaluated using sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC). Time spent in each posture and total number of breaks in SB were compared using paired sample t-tests. The activPAL showed good classification accuracy for sitting (ROC-AUC = 0.84) and fair classification accuracy for standing and walking (0.76 and 0.73, respectively). Time spent in sit/lie and stand was overestimated by 5.9% (95% CI = 0.6-11.1%) and 14.8% (11.6-17.9%), respectively; walking was underestimated by 10.0% (-12.9-7.0%). Total number of breaks in SB were significantly overestimated (55 ± 27 over the course of the protocol; p < .01). The activPAL performed well when classifying postures in young children. However, the activPAL has difficulty classifying other postures, such as kneeling. In addition, when predicting time spent in different postures and total number of breaks in SB the activPAL appeared not to be accurate.

  20. QCD coupling constants and VDM

    SciTech Connect

    Erkol, G.; Ozpineci, A.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2012-10-23

    QCD sum rules for coupling constants of vector mesons with baryons are constructed. The corresponding QCD sum rules for electric charges and magnetic moments are also derived and with the use of vector-meson-dominance model related to the coupling constants. The VDM role as the criterium of reciprocal validity of the sum rules is considered.

  1. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  2. Perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with leisure-time and transport physical activity in Mexican adults.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, Alejandra; Salvo, Deborah; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Hernández, Bernardo; Rivera, Juan A; Pratt, Michael

    2016-12-07

    Environmental factors have been associated with specific physical activity domains, including leisure-time and transport physical activity, in some high income countries. Few studies have examined the environmental correlates for domain-specific physical activity in low-and middle-income countries, and results are inconsistent. We aimed to estimate the associations between perceived environment and self-reported leisure-time walking, moderate-to-vigorous leisure-time physical activity and transport physical activity among adults living in Cuernavaca, Mexico. A population-based study of adults 20 to 64years old was conducted in Cuernavaca, Mexico in 2011 (n=677). Leisure and transport physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire - Long Form. Perceptions of neighborhood environment were obtained by questionnaire. Hurdle regression models estimated the association between environmental perceptions and participation and time spent in each physical activity domain. High perceived aesthetics were positively correlated with participation and time spent in leisure-time walking and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. SES differences existed for aesthetics in relation to participation in leisure-time walking. Participation in transport physical activity was positively associated with easy access to large parks, while closer distance to large parks was a negative correlate for participation and time-spent in this physical activity domain. Results suggest that perceived environmental characteristics related with physical activity are domain specific. High perceived aesthetics were an important correlate for leisure-time activities among Mexican adults, suggesting that policy strategies aimed at improving this environmental perception may be warranted. Patterns of associations between environmental correlates and transport physical activity differed from those reported in commonly studied high income countries.

  3. Time-resolved FTIR studies provide activation free energy, activation enthalpy and activation entropy for GTPase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2004-12-01

    GTPases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP and P i, play a key role in the regulation of many biological processes. In this work, we quantify the activation parameters ΔG0∗,ΔH0∗andΔS0∗ for the hydrolysis reaction of GTP in water, in water with Mg 2+ ions and in Ras. Ras belongs to the superfamily of small GTPases (guanine nucleotide-binding proteins; GNBPs). Surprisingly, we find that in all cases, the activation energy consists mainly of enthalpic contributions. Additionally, the small entropic contributions in water and in Ras are similar, so that ΔΔ S* is close to 0. Thus the entropic contributions are only minor in GTPase catalysis and the enthalpic contributions from electrostatic interactions are key to the catalysis. The protein induced change in charge distribution of GTP can be monitored by time-resolved difference FTIR spectroscopy. For Ras the main effect due to protein binding is a charge shift towards the β-phosphate of GTP. This seems to have the main contribution to the catalytic mechanism. Because the G-domain of Ras is highly conserved in GNBPs, we propose that the finding here holds for all GNBPs.

  4. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    35th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 23 TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY Demetrios...Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract The U. S. Naval Observatory (USNO) has provided... timing for the Navy and the Department of Defense since 1830 and, in cooperation with other institutions, has also provided timing for the United

  5. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    41 st Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 261 TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY...Demetrios Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract The U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) has...provided timing for the Navy since 1830 and, via DoD Directive 4650.05, is the sole source of timing for the Department of Defense. In cooperation

  6. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    38th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY Demetrios...Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract The U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) has provided timing ...for the Navy and the Department of Defense since 1830 and, in cooperation with other institutions, has also provided timing for the United States

  7. Time and Frequency Activities at The U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    43 rd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting 107 TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL...OBSERVATORY Demetrios Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract The U.S. Naval Observatory...USNO) has provided timing for the Navy since 1830 and via DoD Directives 4650.05 and 4650.07 is the sole source of timing for the Department of

  8. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    36th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 215 TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY Demetrios...Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract The U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) has provided... timing for the Navy and the Department of Defense since 1830 and, in cooperation with other institutions, has also provided timing for the United

  9. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    40th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 605 TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY...Demetrios Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract The U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) has...provided timing for the Navy since 1830 and, in cooperation with other institutions, has also provided timing for the United States and the international

  10. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    36th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 215 TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY Demetrios...Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract The U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) has provided... timing for the Navy and the Department of Defense since 1830 and, in cooperation with other institutions, has also provided timing for the United

  11. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    39th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY Demetrios...Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract The U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) has provided... timing for the Navy since 1830 and, in cooperation with other institutions, has also provided timing for the United States and the international

  12. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    42 nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 11 TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY...Demetrios Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract The U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) has...provided timing for the Navy since 1830 and, via DoD Directive 4650.05, is the sole source of timing for the Department of Defense. In cooperation

  13. Constant illumination reduces circulating melatonin and impairs immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Joanna; Michaelides, Ellie B; Rupasinghe, Thusitha; Tull, Dedreia; Green, Mark P; Jones, Therésa M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to constant light has a range of negative effects on behaviour and physiology, including reduced immune function in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is proposed that the associated suppression of melatonin (a ubiquitous hormone and powerful antioxidant) in response to the presence of light at night could be an underlying mechanistic link driving the changes to immune function. Here, we investigated the relationship between constant illumination, melatonin and immune function, using a model invertebrate species, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Crickets were reared under either a 12 h light: 12 h dark regimen or a constant 24 h light regimen. Circulating melatonin concentration and immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity and phenoloxidase (PO) activity) were assessed in individual adult crickets through the analysis of haemolymph. Constant illumination reduced melatonin and had a negative impact on haemocyte concentrations and lytic activity, but its effect on PO activity was less apparent. Our data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a link between exposure to constant illumination and variation in haemocyte concentration in an invertebrate model, while also highlighting the potential complexity of the immune response following exposure to constant illumination. This study provides insight into the possible negative effect of artificial night-time lighting on the physiology of invertebrates, but whether lower and potentially more ecologically relevant levels of light at night produce comparable results, as has been reported in several vertebrate taxa, remains to be tested.

  14. Constant illumination reduces circulating melatonin and impairs immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, Ellie B.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha; Tull, Dedreia; Green, Mark P.; Jones, Therésa M.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to constant light has a range of negative effects on behaviour and physiology, including reduced immune function in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is proposed that the associated suppression of melatonin (a ubiquitous hormone and powerful antioxidant) in response to the presence of light at night could be an underlying mechanistic link driving the changes to immune function. Here, we investigated the relationship between constant illumination, melatonin and immune function, using a model invertebrate species, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Crickets were reared under either a 12 h light: 12 h dark regimen or a constant 24 h light regimen. Circulating melatonin concentration and immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity and phenoloxidase (PO) activity) were assessed in individual adult crickets through the analysis of haemolymph. Constant illumination reduced melatonin and had a negative impact on haemocyte concentrations and lytic activity, but its effect on PO activity was less apparent. Our data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a link between exposure to constant illumination and variation in haemocyte concentration in an invertebrate model, while also highlighting the potential complexity of the immune response following exposure to constant illumination. This study provides insight into the possible negative effect of artificial night-time lighting on the physiology of invertebrates, but whether lower and potentially more ecologically relevant levels of light at night produce comparable results, as has been reported in several vertebrate taxa, remains to be tested. PMID:26339535

  15. Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Time Differ According to Education Level in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kantomaa, Marko T.; Tikanmäki, Marjaana; Kankaanpää, Anna; Vääräsmäki, Marja; Sipola-Leppänen, Marika; Ekelund, Ulf; Hakonen, Harto; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kajantie, Eero; Tammelin, Tuija H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the association of education level with objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in young adults. Data from the Finnish ESTER study (2009–2011) (n = 538) was used to examine the association between educational attainment and different subcomponents of physical activity and sedentary time measured using hip-worn accelerometers (ActiGraph GT1M) for seven consecutive days. Overall physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light-intensity physical activity and sedentary time were calculated separately for weekdays and weekend days. A latent profile analysis was conducted to identify the different profiles of sedentary time and the subcomponents of physical activity. The educational differences in accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary time varied according to the subcomponents of physical activity, and between weekdays and weekend days. A high education level was associated with high MVPA during weekdays and weekend days in both sexes, high sedentary time during weekdays in both sexes, and a low amount of light-intensity physical activity during weekdays in males and during weekdays and weekend days in females. The results indicate different challenges related to unhealthy behaviours in young adults with low and high education: low education is associated with a lack of MVPA, whereas high education is associated with a lack of light-intensity physical activity and high sedentary time especially during weekdays. PMID:27403958

  16. Cosmological constant in scale-invariant theories

    SciTech Connect

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2011-10-01

    The incorporation of a small cosmological constant within radiatively broken scale-invariant models is discussed. We show that phenomenologically consistent scale-invariant models can be constructed which allow a small positive cosmological constant, providing certain relation between the particle masses is satisfied. As a result, the mass of the dilaton is generated at two-loop level. Another interesting consequence is that the electroweak symmetry-breaking vacuum in such models is necessarily a metastable ''false'' vacuum which, fortunately, is not expected to decay on cosmological time scales.

  17. Are Canadian Seniors Becoming More Active? Empirical Evidence Based on Time-Use Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victorino, Charlemaigne C.; Gauthier, A. H.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we examine trends in the patterns of time use of seniors in Canada since the 1980s. In particular, we ask whether today's seniors devote more, or less, time to productive activities than 20 years ago. Our inquiry is motivated by the claims that today's seniors are not engaged in "active aging." This study uses data from a…

  18. Statistical Properties of Longitudinal Time-Activity Data for Use in Human Exposure Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the longitudinal properties of the time spent in different locations and activities is important in characterizing human exposure to pollutants. The results of a four-season longitudinal time-activity diary study in eight working adults are presented, with the goal ...

  19. Exploring Time Allocation for Academic Activities by University Students in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernex, Alain; Lima, Laurent; de Vries, Erica

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study how students allocate time to different university and extra-university activities and to identify factors that might explain variability both between and within fields of study. At the heart of this exercise is the question of the time students dedicate to academic activities in competition with a whole…

  20. Leadership Behaviour of College Students in Relation to Their Leisure Time Activities in College Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sethi, Priyanka

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the Leadership behaviour of college students in relation to their Leisure time activities in college life. In this study, the researcher wants to see the contribution of leisure time activities in developing the qualities of leadership of college students. The main objective of the study was to find out the relationship…

  1. The Association between Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Risk of Undetected Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Yili; Ning, Feng; Zhang, Chaoying

    2017-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of the study was to assess the effects of leisure-time physical activity on undetected prediabetes. Methods. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2012 were used in our analyses. Logistic regression was conducted to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of prediabetes associated with leisure-time physical activity. Results. A total of 8204 subjects were eligible for our analyses. For all subjects, high level of total leisure-time physical activity (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.94) and low level of vigorous leisure-time physical activity (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58, 0.90) were inversely associated with the risk of prediabetes in multivariate-adjusted model. For subjects under 45 years of age, high level of total leisure-time physical activity (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.61, 0.99) and low (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.45, 0.83) and high (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.00) level of vigorous leisure-time physical activity were associated with a decreased risk of prediabetes. In the 45 to 65 age group, only high level of total leisure-time physical activity (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.57, 0.95) had protective effect on prediabetes. Conclusions. Leisure-time physical activity may be associated with a decreased risk of prediabetes. PMID:28367452

  2. Self-Reported Sitting Time, Physical Activity and Fibrinolytic and Other Novel Cardio-Metabolic Biomarkers in Active Swedish Seniors

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Bethany J.; Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita; Olsson, Lovisa A.; Nilsson, Torbjörn K.; Dunstan, David W.; Wennberg, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Background Too much sitting is linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. The mediating mechanisms for these associations are largely unknown, however dysregulated fibrinolysis have emerged as a possible contributor. Objective We examined the associations of self-reported overall sitting time and physical activity with fibrinolytic and other novel cardio-metabolic biomarkers in older adults. Materials and Methods Data was analysed for 364 participants (74±7 yrs) of the Active Seniors group (retired, living independently in their own homes). Linear regression analyses examined associations of categories of categories of sitting time (≤3, 3–6, >6 hrs/day) and overall physical activity (Low, Moderate and High) with biomarkers in serum or plasma, adjusting for age, gender and smoking (with further adjustment for either overall physical activity or sitting time and BMI in secondary analyses). Results Compared to sitting ≤ 3 hrs/day, sitting >6 hrs/day was associated with higher tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex (tPA-PAI-1 complex). These associations were not independent of overall physical activity or BMI. Compared to those in the high physical activity, low physical activity was associated with a higher BMI, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tPA-PAI-1 complex levels. Only the associations of BMI and hs-CRP were independent of sitting time. Conclusions These findings provide preliminary cross-sectional evidence for the relationships of sitting time with fibrinolytic markers in older adults. They also reinforce the importance of regular physical activity for cardio-metabolic health. PMID:27658041

  3. Motives for and barriers to physical activity in twin pairs discordant for leisure time physical activity for 30 years.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, S; Leskinen, T; Morris, T; Alen, M; Kaprio, J; Liukkonen, J; Kujala, U

    2012-02-01

    Long-term persistent physical activity is important in the prevention of chronic diseases, but a large number of people do not participate in physical activity to obtain health benefits. The purpose of this study was to examine the motives and perceived barriers to long-term engagement in leisure time physical activity. Same-sex twin pairs (N=16, mean age 60) discordant for physical activity over 30 years were identified from the Finnish Twin Cohort. We evaluated participants' physical activity motivation with the 73-item Recreational Exercise Motivation Measure and assessed barriers to physical activity with a 25-item questionnaire. The characteristics of physical activity motivation and perceived barriers between the active and inactive co-twins were analysed using paired tests. Motives related to the sub-dimensions of enjoyment and physical fitness and psychological state were the most important reasons for participation in physical activity among all the twin individuals analysed. The sub-dimensions mastery (p=0.018, Cohen's d=0.76), physical fitness (p=0.029, Cohen's d=0.69), and psychological state (p=0.039, Cohen's d=0.65) differed significantly between active and inactive co-twins. More than half of the participants reported no reasons for not being physically active. If reasons existed, participation in physical activity was deterred mostly by pain and various health problems. This study found no differences in perceived barriers between active and inactive co-twins. We conclude from our results that the main factors promoting persistent leisure time physical activity were participants' wish to improve or maintain their physical skills or techniques, a feeling that exercise would improve their mental and physical health and that they found the activity enjoyable. This study helps us understand the importance of the role of motives and the minor role of perceived barriers for engagement in persistent physical activity.

  4. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    34th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 437 TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY Demetrios...Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20391-5420, USA E-mail: dnm@usno.navy.mil Abstract The U. S. Naval...Observatory (USNO) has provided timing for the Navy and the Department of Defense since 1830 and, in cooperation with other institutions, has also

  5. Educational Activities for the Life Over Time Exhibit at The Field Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laraba, Peter; Wickland, Thomas J.

    The activities presented in this book, designed to help 4th through 8th grade instructors teach about the history of life, help students prepare for a visit to a museum exhibit on life through time. The pre- and post-visit activities as well as the in-museum activities help students prepare for and enjoy their 4.5 billion year trip through time at…

  6. Oxygen Michaelis constants for tyrosinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-López, J N; Ros, J R; Varón, R; García-Cánovas, F

    1993-01-01

    The Michaelis constant of tyrosinase for oxygen in the presence of monophenols and o-diphenols, which generate a cyclizable o-quinone, has been studied. This constant depends on the nature of the monophenol and o-diphenol and is always lower in the presence of the former than of the latter. From the mechanism proposed for tyrosinase and from its kinetic analysis [Rodríguez-López, J. N., Tudela, J., Varón, R., García-Carmona, F. and García-Cánovas, F. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 3801-3810] a quantitative ratio has been established between the Michaelis constants for oxygen in the presence of monophenols and their o-diphenols. This ratio is used for the determination of the Michaelis constant for oxygen with monophenols when its value cannot be calculated experimentally. PMID:8352753

  7. Avogadro's Number and Avogadro's Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, R. O.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses three possible methods of thinking about the implications of the definitions of the Avogadro constant and number. Indicates that there is only one way to arrive at a simple and standard conclusion. (CC)

  8. SeD radical as a probe for the measurement of the time variation of the fine-structure constant α and proton-to-electron mass ratio μ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Gaurab; Sen, Avijit; Mukherjee, Manas; Paul, Ankan

    2014-07-01

    Based on the spectroscopic constants derived from highly accurate potential-energy surfaces, the SeD radical is identified as a spectroscopic probe for measuring spatial and temporal variation of fundamental physical constants such as the fine-structure constant (denoted as α =e2ℏc) and the proton-to-electron mass ratio (denoted as μ =mpme). The ground state of SeD (X2Π), due to spin-orbit coupling, splits into two fine-structure multiplets 2Π3/2 and 2Π1/2. The potential-energy surfaces of these spin-orbit components are derived from a state of the art electronic structure method, MRCI + Q inclusive of scalar relativistic effects with the spin-orbit effects accounted for through the Breit-Pauli operator. The relevant spectroscopic data are evaluated using a Murrel-Sorbie fit to the potential-energy surfaces. The spin-orbit splitting ωf between the two multiplets is similar in magnitude with the harmonic frequency ωe of the diatomic molecule. The amplification factor K derived from this theoretical method for this particular molecule can be as large as 350; on the lower side it can be about 34. The significantly large values of K indicate that the SeD radical can be a plausible experimental candidate for measuring variation in α and μ.

  9. Gender differences in social support and leisure-time physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Aldair J; Lopes, Claudia S; Rostila, Mikael; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Griep, Rosane Härter; de Leon, Antônio Carlos Monteiro Ponce; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify gender differences in social support dimensions’ effect on adults’ leisure-time physical activity maintenance, type, and time. METHODS Longitudinal study of 1,278 non-faculty public employees at a university in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Southeastern Brazil. Physical activity was evaluated using a dichotomous question with a two-week reference period, and further questions concerning leisure-time physical activity type (individual or group) and time spent on the activity. Social support was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Scale. For the analysis, logistic regression models were adjusted separately by gender. RESULTS A multinomial logistic regression showed an association between material support and individual activities among women (OR = 2.76; 95%CI 1.2;6.5). Affective support was associated with time spent on leisure-time physical activity only among men (OR = 1.80; 95%CI 1.1;3.2). CONCLUSIONS All dimensions of social support that were examined influenced either the type of, or the time spent on, leisure-time physical activity. In some social support dimensions, the associations detected varied by gender. Future studies should attempt to elucidate the mechanisms involved in these gender differences. PMID:25210819

  10. Understanding atom transfer radical polymerization: effect of ligand and initiator structures on the equilibrium constants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Kwak, Yungwan; Braunecker, Wade; Tsarevsky, Nicolay V; Coote, Michelle L; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2008-08-13

    Equilibrium constants in Cu-based atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were determined for a wide range of ligands and initiators in acetonitrile at 22 degrees C. The ATRP equilibrium constants obtained vary over 7 orders of magnitude and strongly depend on the ligand and initiator structures. The activities of the Cu(I)/ligand complexes are highest for tetradentate ligands, lower for tridentate ligands, and lowest for bidentate ligands. Complexes with tripodal and bridged ligands (Me6TREN and bridged cyclam) tend to be more active than those with the corresponding linear ligands. The equilibrium constants are largest for tertiary alkyl halides and smallest for primary alkyl halides. The activities of alkyl bromides are several times larger than those of the analogous alkyl chlorides. The equilibrium constants are largest for the nitrile derivatives, followed by those for the benzyl derivatives and the corresponding esters. Other equilibrium constants that are not readily measurable were extrapolated from the values for the reference ligands and initiators. Excellent correlations of the equilibrium constants with the Cu(II/I) redox potentials and the carbon-halogen bond dissociation energies were observed.

  11. Non-Formal Education in Free Time: Leisure- or Work-Orientated Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoidis, Ioannis; Pnevmatikos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the relationship between adults' free time and further education. More specifically, the paper addresses the question of whether there are similarities and analogies between the leisure time that adults dedicate to non-formal educational activities and free time per se. A structured questionnaire was used to examine the…

  12. Revisiting the Time Trade-off Hypothesis: Work, Organized Activities, and Academics during College

    PubMed Central

    Maggs, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    How adolescents spend their time has long-term implications for their educational, health, and labor market outcomes, yet surprisingly little research has explored the time use of students across days and semesters. The current study used longitudinal daily diary data from a sample of college students attending a large public university in the Northeastern US (n = 726, Mage = 18.4) that was followed for 14 days within each of 7 semesters (for up to 98 diary days per student). The study had two primary aims. The first aim was to explore demographic correlates of employment time, organized activity time, and academic time. The second aim was to provide a rigorous test of the time trade-off hypothesis, which suggests that students will spend less time on academics when they spend more time on employment and extracurricular activities. The results demonstrated that time use varied by gender, parental education, and race/ethnicity. Furthermore, the results from multi-level models provided some support for the time trade-off hypothesis, although associations varied by the activity type and whether the day was a weekend. More time spent on employment was linked to less time spent on academics across days and semesters whereas organized activities were associated with less time on academics at the daily level only. The negative associations between employment and academics were most pronounced on weekdays. These results suggest that students may balance certain activities across days, whereas other activities may be in competition over longer time frames (i.e., semesters). PMID:25381597

  13. Revisiting the Time Trade-Off Hypothesis: Work, Organized Activities, and Academics During College.

    PubMed

    Greene, Kaylin M; Maggs, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    How adolescents spend their time has long-term implications for their educational, health, and labor market outcomes, yet surprisingly little research has explored the time use of students across days and semesters. The current study used longitudinal daily diary data from a sample of college students attending a large public university in the Northeastern US (n = 726, M age = 18.4) that was followed for 14 days within each of seven semesters (for up to 98 diary days per student). The study had two primary aims. The first aim was to explore demographic correlates of employment time, organized activity time, and academic time. The second aim was to provide a rigorous test of the time trade-off hypothesis, which suggests that students will spend less time on academics when they spend more time on employment and extracurricular activities. The results demonstrated that time use varied by gender, parental education, and race/ethnicity. Furthermore, the results from multi-level models provided some support for the time trade-off hypothesis, although associations varied by the activity type and whether the day was a weekend. More time spent on employment was linked to less time spent on academics across days and semesters whereas organized activities were associated with less time on academics at the daily level only. The negative associations between employment and academics were most pronounced on weekdays. These results suggest that students may balance certain activities across days, whereas other activities may be in competition over longer time frames (i.e., semesters).

  14. Trade-offs between commuting time and health-related activities.

    PubMed

    Christian, Thomas J

    2012-10-01

    To further understand documented associations between obesity and urban sprawl, this research describes individuals' trade-offs between health-related activities and commuting time. A cross-section of 24,861 working-age individuals employed full-time and residing in urban counties is constructed from the American Time Use Survey (2003-2010). Data are analyzed using seemingly unrelated regressions to quantify health-related activity decreases in response to additional time spent commuting. Outcomes are total daily minutes spent in physical activity at a moderate or greater intensity, preparing food, eating meals with family, and sleeping. Commuting time is measured as all travel time between home and work and vice versa. The mean commuting time is 62 min daily, the median is 55 min, and 10.1% of workers commute 120 min or more. Spending an additional 60 min daily commuting above average is associated with a 6% decrease in aggregate health-related activities and spending an additional 120 min is associated with a 12% decrease. The greatest percentage of commuting time comes from sleeping time reductions (28-35%). Additionally, larger proportions of commuting time are taken from physical activity and food preparation relative to the mean commuting length: of 60 min spent commuting, 16.1% is taken from physical activity and 4.1% is taken from food preparation; of 120 min commuting, 20.3% is taken from physical activity and 5.6% is taken from food preparation. The results indicate that longer commutes are associated with behavioral patterns which over time may contribute to obesity and other poor health outcomes. These findings will assist both urban planners and researchers wishing to understand time constraints' impacts on health.

  15. Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality: A Detailed Pooled Analysis of the Dose-Response Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Arem, Hannah; Moore, Steven C.; Patel, Alpa; Hartge, Patricia; de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington; Visvanathan, Kala; Campbell, Peter T.; Freedman, Michal; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans Olov; Linet, Martha S.; Lee, I-Min; Matthews, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommended a minimum of 75 vigorous-intensity or 150 moderate-intensity minutes per week (7.5 metabolic equivalent hours per week (MET h/wk)) of aerobic activity for “substantial” health benefit, and suggested “additional” benefits by doing more than double this amount. However, the upper limit of longevity benefit or possible harm with more physical activity is unclear. Objective To quantify the dose-response association between leisure-time physical activity and mortality, and to define the upper limit of benefit or harm associated with more physical activity. Design We pooled data from six studies in the NCI Cohort Consortium (baseline 1992–2003). We used Cox proportional hazards regression with cohort stratification to generate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Median follow-up time was 14.2 years. Setting Population-based prospective cohorts in the U.S. and Europe with self-reported physical activity. Participants 661,137 men and women (116,686 deaths); median age 62 (range 21–98) years. Exposure Leisure-time moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity Main Outcome Mortality Results Compared to those reporting no leisure-time physical activity, we observed a 20% lower mortality risk among those performing less than the recommended 7.5 MET h/wk minimum (HR=0.80, 95% CI 0.78–0.82), a 31% lower risk at 1–2 times the recommended minimum (0.69, 0.67–0.70), and a 37% lower risk at 2–3 times the minimum (0.63, 0.62–0.65). An upper threshold for mortality benefit occurred at 3–5 times the physical activity recommendation (0.61, 0.59–0.62), but compared to the recommended minimum, the additional benefit was modest (31% vs. 39%). There was no evidence of harm at 10+ times the recommended minimum (0.68, 0.59–0.78). A similar dose-response was observed for mortality due to cardiovascular disease and to cancer. Conclusions and

  16. Constant fields and constant gradients in open ionic channels.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D P; Barcilon, V; Eisenberg, R S

    1992-01-01

    Ions enter cells through pores in proteins that are holes in dielectrics. The energy of interaction between ion and charge induced on the dielectric is many kT, and so the dielectric properties of channel and pore are important. We describe ionic movement by (three-dimensional) Nemst-Planck equations (including flux and net charge). Potential is described by Poisson's equation in the pore and Laplace's equation in the channel wall, allowing induced but not permanent charge. Asymptotic expansions are constructed exploiting the long narrow shape of the pore and the relatively high dielectric constant of the pore's contents. The resulting one-dimensional equations can be integrated numerically; they can be analyzed when channels are short or long (compared with the Debye length). Traditional constant field equations are derived if the induced charge is small, e.g., if the channel is short or if the total concentration gradient is zero. A constant gradient of concentration is derived if the channel is long. Plots directly comparable to experiments are given of current vs voltage, reversal potential vs. concentration, and slope conductance vs. concentration. This dielectric theory can easily be tested: its parameters can be determined by traditional constant field measurements. The dielectric theory then predicts current-voltage relations quite different from constant field, usually more linear, when gradients of total concentration are imposed. Numerical analysis shows that the interaction of ion and channel can be described by a mean potential if, but only if, the induced charge is negligible, that is to say, the electric field is spatially constant. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1376159

  17. A comparison between two commercially available activators for determining the partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Smith, L G; Kitchens, C S

    1985-03-01

    Activators that are used to determine the activated partial thromboplastin time should be sensitive enough to detect mild deficiencies of coagulation factors in a reproducible fashion. We compared two commercially available activators--a newly modified preparation of ellagic acid activator and a silica activator. Both reagents produced results that were reproducible over a broad range of concentrations of factors involved in the intrinsic coagulation pathway. The ellagic acid activator was more sensitive in detecting a partial deficiency of nearly all of these factors.

  18. Time-resolved observation of thermally activated rupture of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, Wan; Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Jhe, Wonho

    2015-01-05

    The capillary-condensed liquid bridge is one of the most ubiquitous forms of liquid in nature and contributes significantly to adhesion and friction of biological molecules as well as microscopic objects. Despite its important role in nanoscience and technology, the rupture process of the bridge is not well understood and needs more experimental works. Here, we report real-time observation of rupture of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge in ambient condition. During slow and stepwise stretch of the nanobridge, we measured the activation time for rupture, or the latency time required for the bridge breakup. By statistical analysis of the time-resolved distribution of activation time, we show that rupture is a thermally activated stochastic process and follows the Poisson statistics. In particular, from the Arrhenius law that the rupture rate satisfies, we estimate the position-dependent activation energies for the capillary-bridge rupture.

  19. Feature integration with random forests for real-time human activity recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Hirokatsu; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Aoki, Yoshimitsu

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an approach for real-time human activity recognition. Three different kinds of features (flow, shape, and a keypoint-based feature) are applied in activity recognition. We use random forests for feature integration and activity classification. A forest is created at each feature that performs as a weak classifier. The international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) proposed by WHO is applied in order to set the novel definition in activity recognition. Experiments on human activity recognition using the proposed framework show - 99.2% (Weizmann action dataset), 95.5% (KTH human actions dataset), and 54.6% (UCF50 dataset) recognition accuracy with a real-time processing speed. The feature integration and activity-class definition allow us to accomplish high-accuracy recognition match for the state-of-the-art in real-time.

  20. Time's up. descriptive epidemiology of multi-morbidity and time spent on health related activity by older Australians: a time use survey.

    PubMed

    Jowsey, Tanisha; McRae, Ian S; Valderas, Jose M; Dugdale, Paul; Phillips, Rebecca; Bunton, Robin; Gillespie, James; Banfield, Michelle; Jones, Lesley; Kljakovic, Marjan; Yen, Laurann

    2013-01-01

    Most Western health systems remain single illness orientated despite the growing prevalence of multi-morbidity. Identifying how much time people with multiple chronic conditions spend managing their health will help policy makers and health service providers make decisions about areas of patient need for support. This article presents findings from an Australian study concerning the time spent on health related activity by older adults (aged 50 years and over), most of whom had multiple chronic conditions. A recall questionnaire was developed, piloted, and adjusted. Sampling was undertaken through three bodies; the Lung Foundation Australia (COPD sub-sample), National Diabetes Services Scheme (Diabetes sub-sample) and National Seniors Australia (Seniors sub-sample). Questionnaires were mailed out during 2011 to 10,600 older adults living in Australia. 2540 survey responses were received and analysed. Descriptive analyses were completed to obtain median values for the hours spent on each activity per month. The mean number of chronic conditions was 3.7 in the COPD sub-sample, 3.4 in the Diabetes sub-sample and 2.0 in the NSA sub-sample. The study identified a clear trend of increased time use associated with increased number of chronic conditions. Median monthly time use was 5-16 hours per month overall for our three sub-samples. For respondents in the top decile with five or more chronic conditions the median time use was equivalent to two to three hours per day, and if exercise is included in the calculations, respondents spent from between five and eight hours per day: an amount similar to full-time work. Multi-morbidity imposes considerable time burdens on patients. Ageing is associated with increasing rates of multi-morbidity. Many older adults are facing high demands on their time to manage their health in the face of decreasing energy and mobility. Their time use must be considered in health service delivery and health system reform.

  1. Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in European adolescents: the HELENA study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B; Martínez-Gómez, David; Labayen, Idoia; Moreno, Luis A; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Manios, Yannis; Gonzalez-Gross, Marcela; Mauro, Beatrice; Molnar, Denes; Widhalm, Kurt; Marcos, Ascensión; Beghin, Laurent; Castillo, Manuel J; Sjöström, Michael

    2011-07-15

    The authors' aim in this cross-sectional study was to characterize levels of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in adolescents from 9 European countries. The study comprised 2,200 European adolescents (1,184 girls) participating in the HELENA cross-sectional study (2006-2008). Physical activity was measured by accelerometry and was expressed as average intensity (counts/minute) and amount of time (minutes/day) spent engaging in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA). Time spent in sedentary behaviors was also objectively measured. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by means of the 20-m shuttle run test. Level of maternal education was reported by the adolescents. A higher proportion of boys (56.8% of boys vs. 27.5% of girls) met the physical activity recommendations of at least 60 minutes/day of MVPA. Adolescents spent most of the registered time in sedentary behaviors (9 hours/day, or 71% of the registered time). Both average intensity and MVPA were higher in adolescents with high cardiorespiratory fitness, and sedentary time was lower in the high-fitness group. There were no physical activity or sedentary time differences between maternal education categories. These data provide an objective measure of physical activity and amount of time spent in sedentary behaviors in a relatively large number of European adolescents.

  2. Summary of the Effort to Use Active-induced Time Correlation Techniques to Measure the Enrichment of HEU

    SciTech Connect

    McConchie, Seth M.; Crye, Jason Michael; Pena, Kirsten; Sword, Eric; Mihalczo, John T.

    2015-09-30

    This document summarizes the effort to use active-induced time correlation techniques to measure the enrichment of bulk quantities of enriched uranium. In summary, these techniques use an external source to initiate fission chains, and the time distribution of the detected fission chain neutrons is sensitive to the fissile material enrichment. The number of neutrons emitted from a chain is driven by the multiplication of the item, and the enrichment is closely coupled to the multiplication of the item. As the enrichment increases (decreases), the multiplication increases (decreases) if the geometry is held constant. The time distribution of fission chain neutrons is a complex function of the enrichment and material configuration. The enrichment contributes to the probability of a subsequent fission in a chain via the likelihood of fissioning on an even-numbered isotope versus an odd-numbered isotope. The material configuration contributes to the same probability via solid angle effects for neutrons inducing subsequent fissions and the presence of any moderating material. To simplify the ability to accurately measure the enrichment, an associated particle imaging (API) D-T neutron generator and an array of plastic scintillators are used to simultaneously image the item and detect the fission chain neutrons. The image is used to significantly limit the space of enrichment and material configuration and enable the enrichment to be determined unambiguously.

  3. Motivation and Barriers for Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Women

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Inês; Ball, Kylie; Crawford, David; Teixeira, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between motivation and barriers for physical activity, and physical activity behavior in women living in socioeconomic disadvantage. This study also examined whether weight control intentions moderate those associations. Methods Data from 1664 women aged 18–46 years was collected at baseline and three-year follow-up as part of the Resilience for Eating and Activity Despite Inequality study. In mail-based surveys, women reported sociodemographic and neighborhood environmental characteristics, intrinsic motivation, goals and perceived family barriers to be active, weight control intentions and leisure-time physical activity (assessed through the IPAQ-L). Linear regression models assessed the association of intrinsic motivation, goals and barriers with physical activity at baseline and follow-up, adjusting for environmental characteristics and also physical activity at baseline (for longitudinal analyses), and the moderating effects of weight control intentions were examined. Results Intrinsic motivation and, to a lesser extent, appearance and relaxation goals for being physically active were consistently associated with leisure-time physical activity at baseline and follow-up. Perceived family barriers, health, fitness, weight and stress relief goals were associated with leisure-time physical activity only at baseline. Moderated regression analyses revealed that weight control intentions significantly moderated the association between weight goals and leisure-time physical activity at baseline (β = 0.538, 99% CI = 0.057, 0.990) and between intrinsic motivation and leisure-time physical activity at follow-up (β = 0.666, 99% CI = 0.188, 1.145). For women actively trying to control their weight, intrinsic motivation was significantly associated with leisure-time physical activity at follow-up (β = 0.184, 99% CI = 0.097, 0.313). Conclusions Results suggest that

  4. Softening of infrared-active mode of perovskite BaZrO{sub 3} proved by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Helal, M. A.; Mori, T.; Kojima, S.

    2015-05-04

    The low-frequency infrared-active optical modes were studied in a barium zirconate, BaZrO{sub 3}, single crystal with the perovskite structure using terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS). The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constants were accurately determined in the frequency range between 0.2 and 2.7 THz. Upon cooling from room temperature to 8 K, the lowest-frequency TO1 mode at 2.32 THz showed a pronounced softening to 1.94 THz. The real part of the dielectric constant at 0.5 THz determined by THz-TDS obeys Barrett's relation, and the existence of a plateau confirms that the quantum effects lead to saturation of the soft mode frequencies of the TO1 and TO2 modes below ≈20 K. This is reminiscent of incipient ferroelectrics with the perovskite structure such as CaTiO{sub 3}.

  5. Direct measurement of activation time and nucleation rate in capillary-condensed water nanomeniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Stambaugh, Corey; Chang, Sung-Jin; Jhe, Wonho

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate real-time observation of nucleation of the single water nanomeniscus formed via capillary condensation. We directly measure (i) activation time by time-resolved atomic force microscopy and (ii) nucleation rate by statistical analysis of its exponential distribution, which is the experimental evidence that the activation process is stochastic and follows the Poisson statistics. It implies that formation of the water nanomeniscus is triggered by nucleation, which requires activation for producing a nucleus. We also find the dependence of the nucleation rate on the tip-sample distance and temperature.

  6. Mobile phone usage in complex urban systems: a space-time, aggregated human activity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranos, Emmanouil; Nijkamp, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The present study aims to demonstrate the importance of digital data for investigating space-time dynamics of aggregated human activity in urban systems. Such dynamics can be monitored and modelled using data from mobile phone operators regarding mobile telephone usage. Using such an extensive dataset from the city of Amsterdam, this paper introduces space-time explanatory models of aggregated human activity patterns. Various modelling experiments and results are presented, which demonstrate that mobile telephone data are a good proxy of the space-time dynamics of aggregated human activity in the city.

  7. Revisiting the question: Does high-latitude solar activity lead low-latitude solar activity in time phase?

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D. F.; Qu, Z. N.; Guo, Q. L.

    2014-05-01

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are used to investigate whether high-latitude solar activity leads low-latitude solar activity in time phase or not, using the data of the Carte Synoptique solar filaments archive from 1919 March to 1989 December. From the cross-correlation analysis, high-latitude solar filaments have a time lead of 12 Carrington solar rotations with respect to low-latitude ones. Both the cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence indicate that high-latitude solar filaments lead low-latitude ones in time phase. Furthermore, low-latitude solar activity is better correlated with high-latitude solar activity of the previous cycle than with that of the following cycle, which is statistically significant. Thus, the present study confirms that high-latitude solar activity in the polar regions is indeed better correlated with the low-latitude solar activity of the following cycle than with that of the previous cycle, namely, leading in time phase.

  8. Physical Activity Measurement Device Agreement: Pedometer Steps/Minute and Physical Activity Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scruggs, Philip W.; Mungen, Jonathan D.; Oh, Yoonsin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine agreement between the Walk4Life DUO pedometer (W4L; Walk4Life, Plainfield, Illinois, USA) and two criterion instruments in the measurement of physical activity. Participants (N = 189, M = 16.74 years, SD = 0.99) in high school physical education concurrently wore the DUO (i.e., comparison instrument) and…

  9. Effects of reaction time variability and age on brain activity during Stroop task performance.

    PubMed

    Tam, Angela; Luedke, Angela C; Walsh, Jeremy J; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Garcia, Angeles

    2015-09-01

    Variability in reaction time during task performance may reflect fluctuations in attention and cause reduced performance in goal-directed tasks, yet it is unclear whether the mechanisms behind this phenomenon change with age. Using fMRI, we tested young and cognitively healthy older adults with the Stroop task to determine whether aging affects the neural mechanisms underlying intra-individual reaction time variability. We found significant between-group differences in BOLD activity modulated by reaction time. In older adults, longer reaction times were associated with greater activity in frontoparietal attentional areas, while in younger adults longer reaction times were associated with greater activity in default mode network areas. Our results suggest that the neural correlates of reaction time variability change with healthy aging, reinforcing the concept of functional plasticity to maintain high cognitive function throughout the lifespan.

  10. Leisure-time physical activity and psychological well-being in university students.

    PubMed

    Molina-García, J; Castillo, I; Queralt, A

    2011-10-01

    An analysis of psychological well-being (self-esteem and subjective vitality) of 639 Spanish university students was performed, while accounting for the amount of leisure-time physical activity. The Spanish versions of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Subjective Vitality Scale were employed. Participants were divided into four groups (Low, Moderate, High, and Very high) depending on estimation of energy expenditure in leisure-time physical activity. Men and women having higher physical activity rated higher mean subjective vitality; however, differences in self-esteem were observed only in men, specifically between Very high and the other physical activity groups.

  11. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented of the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micron region. K is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Using the previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorentz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for condensed CH4.

  12. Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    TIME AND FREQUENCY ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY Demetrios Matsakis Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory...Washington, DC 20392, USA Abstract: The U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) has provided timing for the Navy and the Department of Defense since 1830...and, in cooperation with other institutions, has also provided timing for the United States and the international community. Its Master Clock (MC

  13. Human intracranial high-frequency activity maps episodic memory formation in space and time

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John F.; Long, Nicole M.; Zaghloul, Kareem A.; Sharan, Ashwini D.; Sperling, Michael R.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive neuroimaging studies have revealed a network of brain regions that activate during human memory encoding; however, the relative timing of such activations remains unknown. Here we used intracranially recorded high-frequency activity (HFA) to first identify regions that activate during successful encoding. Then, we leveraged the high-temporal precision of HFA to investigate the timing of such activations. We found that memory encoding invokes two spatiotemporally distinct activations: early increases in HFA that involve the ventral visual pathway as well as the medial temporal lobe and late increases in HFA that involve the left inferior frontal gyrus, left posterior parietal cortex and left ventrolateral temporal cortex. We speculate that these activations reflect higher-order visual processing and top-down modulation of attention/semantic information, respectively. PMID:23827329

  14. Time use and physical activity: a shift away from movement across the globe.

    PubMed

    Ng, S W; Popkin, B M

    2012-08-01

    Technology linked with reduced physical activity (PA) in occupational work, home/domestic work, and travel and increased sedentary activities, especially television viewing, dominates the globe. Using detailed historical data on time allocation, occupational distributions, energy expenditures data by activity, and time-varying measures of metabolic equivalents of task (MET) for activities when available, we measure historical and current MET by four major PA domains (occupation, home production, travel and active leisure) and sedentary time among adults (>18 years). Trends by domain for the United States (1965-2009), the United Kingdom (1961-2005), Brazil (2002-2007), China (1991-2009) and India (2000-2005) are presented. We also project changes in energy expenditure by domain and sedentary time (excluding sleep and personal care) to 2020 and 2030 for each of these countries. The use of previously unexplored detailed time allocation and energy expenditures and other datasets represents a useful addition to our ability to document activity and inactivity globally, but highlights the need for concerted efforts to monitor PA in a consistent manner globally, increase global PA and decrease sedentary behavior. Given the potential impact on weight gain and other cardiometabolic health risks, the differential declines in MET of activity and increases in sedentary time across the globe represent a major threat to global health.

  15. Real-time fMRI-based activation analysis and stimulus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Tobias; Hollmann, Maurice; Bernarding, Johannes

    2007-03-01

    The real-time analysis of brain activation using functional MRI data offers a wide range of new experiments such as investigating self-regulation or learning strategies. However, besides special data acquisition and real-time data analysing techniques such examination requires dynamic and adaptive stimulus paradigms and self-optimising MRI-sequences. This paper presents an approach that enables the unified handling of parameters influencing the different software systems involved in the acquisition and analysing process. By developing a custom-made Experiment Description Language (EDL) this concept is used for a fast and flexible software environment which treats aspects like extraction and analysis of activation as well as the modification of the stimulus presentation. We describe how extracted real-time activation is subsequently evaluated by comparing activation patterns to previous acquired templates representing activated regions of interest for different predefined conditions. According to those results the stimulus presentation is adapted. The results showed that the developed system in combination with EDL is able to reliably detect and evaluate activation patterns in real-time. With a processing time for data analysis of about one second the approach is only limited by the natural time course of the hemodynamic response function of the brain activation.

  16. Seasonal variation in physical activity and sedentary time in different European regions. The HELENA study.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Marco, Luis; Ortega, Francisco B; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Williams, Craig A; Hagströmer, Maria; Manios, Yannis; Kafatos, Anthony; Béghin, Laurent; Polito, Angela; De Henauw, Stefaan; Valtueña, Jara; Widhalm, Kurt; Molnar, Denes; Alexy, Ute; Moreno, Luis A; Sjöström, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This report aims (1) to examine the association between seasonality and physical activity (PA) and sedentary time in European adolescents and (2) to investigate whether this association was influenced by geographical location (Central-North versus South of Europe), which implies more or less extreme weather and daylight hours. Valid data on PA, sedentary time and seasonality were obtained in 2173 adolescents (1175 females; 12.5-17.5 years) included in this study. Physical activity and sedentary time were measured by accelerometers. ANCOVA was conducted to analyse the differences in PA and sedentary time across seasons. Results showed that girls had lower levels of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) and average PA, and spent more time in sedentary activities in winter compared with spring (all P < 0.05). Stratified analyses showed differences in PA and sedentary time between winter and spring in European girls from Central-North of Europe (P < 0.05 for sedentary time). There were no differences between PA and sedentary time across seasonality in boys. In conclusion, winter is related with less time spent in MVPA, lower average PA and higher time spent in sedentary activities in European adolescent girls, compared with spring. These differences seem to mainly occur in Central-North Europe.

  17. Replication factory activation can be decoupled from the replication timing program by modulating Cdk levels

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alexander M.; Gillespie, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    In the metazoan replication timing program, clusters of replication origins located in different subchromosomal domains fire at different times during S phase. We have used Xenopus laevis egg extracts to drive an accelerated replication timing program in mammalian nuclei. Although replicative stress caused checkpoint-induced slowing of the timing program, inhibition of checkpoint kinases in an unperturbed S phase did not accelerate it. Lowering cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity slowed both replication rate and progression through the timing program, whereas raising Cdk activity increased them. Surprisingly, modest alteration of Cdk activity changed the amount of DNA synthesized during different stages of the timing program. This was associated with a change in the number of active replication factories, whereas the distribution of origins within active factories remained relatively normal. The ability of Cdks to differentially effect replication initiation, factory activation, and progression through the timing program provides new insights into the way that chromosomal DNA replication is organized during S phase. PMID:20083602

  18. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented on the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micrometer region. Deposition onto a substrate at 10 K produces glassy (semi-amorphous) material. Annealing this material at approximately 33 K for approximately 1 hour results in a crystalline material as seen by sharper, more structured bands and negligible background extinction due to scattering. The constant k is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Typical values (at absorption maxima) are in the .001 to .0001 range. Below lambda = 1.1 micrometers the bands are too weak to be detected by transmission through the films less than or equal to 215 micrometers in thickness, employed in the studies to date. Using previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K, n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorenz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for

  19. Weekday and weekend patterns of physical activity and sedentary time among Liverpool and Madrid youth.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Rico, Elena; Hilland, Toni A; Foweather, Lawrence; Fernández-Garcia, Emilia; Fairclough, Stuart J

    2014-01-01

    Levels of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour among English and Spanish youth are high and vary within different regions of each country. Little though is known about these during specific periods of the day. The purpose of this study was to describe physical activity (PA) and sedentary time during segments of the day and week, and compare these critical contexts between youth in the Liverpool and Madrid areas of England and Spain, respectively. PA was objectively assessed in 235 Liverpool- and 241 Madrid youth (aged 10-14 years) who wore accelerometers for seven consecutive days. Minutes of sedentary time, moderate PA, vigorous PA and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were calculated for weekdays, weekend days, school time, non-school time and after-school. Between-country differences were analysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Madrid youth spent significantly more time in sedentary activities than their Liverpool counterparts. Madrid youth engaged in more minutes of moderate intensity physical activity (MPA) than Liverpool youth during weekdays, school time and non-school time (P<0.01). Liverpool children recorded more time in vigorous physical activity (VPA) than Madrid peers during week days and weekend days (P<0.01) and during school time and after-school periods (P<0.01). The MVPA was significantly higher among Madrid youth during non-school time (P<0.01). Around 25% of all youth achieved recommended levels of MVPA. Low levels of MVPA and systematic differences in sedentary time, MPA and VPA exist between Liverpool and Madrid youth. Interventions targeted at the least-active children during weekends, after-school and non-school periods within the cultural contexts common to each city are required.

  20. Cosmological constant from quantum spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Shahn; Tao, Wen-Qing

    2015-06-01

    We show that a hypothesis that spacetime is quantum with coordinate algebra [xi,t ]=λPxi , and spherical symmetry under rotations of the xi, essentially requires in the classical limit that the spacetime metric is the Bertotti-Robinson metric, i.e., a solution of Einstein's equations with a cosmological constant and a non-null electromagnetic field. Our arguments do not give the value of the cosmological constant or the Maxwell field strength, but they cannot both be zero. We also describe the quantum geometry and the full moduli space of metrics that can emerge as classical limits from this algebra.