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Sample records for activation-induced deaminase aid

  1. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) efficiently targets DNA in nucleosomes but only during transcription

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong Ming; Poirier, Michael G.; Allen, Michael J.; North, Justin; Lal, Ratnesh; Widom, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation, class-switch recombination, and gene conversion of immunoglobulin genes. In vitro, AID has been shown to target single-stranded DNA, relaxed double-stranded DNA, when transcribed, or supercoiled DNA. To simulate the in vivo situation more closely, we have introduced two copies of a nucleosome positioning sequence, MP2, into a supercoiled AID target plasmid to determine where around the positioned nucleosomes (in the vicinity of an ampicillin resistance gene) cytidine deaminations occur in the absence or presence of transcription. We found that without transcription nucleosomes prevented cytidine deamination by AID. However, with transcription AID readily accessed DNA in nucleosomes on both DNA strands. The experiments also showed that AID targeting any DNA molecule was the limiting step, and they support the conclusion that once targeted to DNA, AID acts processively in naked DNA and DNA organized within transcribed nucleosomes. PMID:19380635

  2. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is localized to subnuclear domains enriched in splicing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yi Ericsson, Ida Doseth, Berit Liabakk, Nina B. Krokan, Hans E. Kavli, Bodil

    2014-03-10

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutator enzyme in adaptive immunity. AID initiates the antibody diversification processes in activated B cells by deaminating cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. To some extent other genes are also targeted, which may lead to genome instability and B cell malignancy. Thus, it is crucial to understand its targeting and regulation mechanisms. AID is regulated at several levels including subcellular compartmentalization. However, the complex nuclear distribution and trafficking of AID has not been studied in detail previously. In this work, we examined the subnuclear localization of AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 and found that they associate with spliceosome-associated structures including Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. Moreover, protein kinase A (PKA), which activates AID by phosphorylation at Ser38, is present together with AID in nuclear speckles. Importantly, we demonstrate that AID physically associates with the major spliceosome subunits (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, snRNPs), as well as other essential splicing components, in addition to the transcription machinery. Based on our findings and the literature, we suggest a transcription-coupled splicing-associated model for AID targeting and activation. - Highlights: • AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 localize to Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. • AID associates with its activating kinase PKA in nuclear speckles. • AID is linked to the splicing machinery in switching B-cells. • Our findings suggest a transcription-coupled splicing associated mechanism for AID targeting and activation.

  3. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  4. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H; Goodman, Myron F; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ∼ 5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer. PMID:26681117

  5. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants. PMID:23183374

  6. Activation induced deaminase: how much and where?

    PubMed

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Di Noia, Javier M

    2012-08-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) plays a central role in adaptive immunity by initiating the processes of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). On the other hand, AID also predisposes to lymphoma and plays a role in some autoimmune diseases, for which reasons AID expression and activity are regulated at various levels. Post-translational mechanisms regulating the amount and subcellular localization of AID are prominent in balancing AID physiological and pathological functions in B cells. Mechanisms regulating AID protein levels include stabilizing chaperones in the cytoplasm and proteins efficiently targeting AID to the proteasome within the nucleus. Nuclear export and cytoplasmic retention contribute to limit the amount of AID accessing the genome. Additionally, a number of factors have been implicated in AID active nuclear import. We review these intertwined mechanisms proposing two scenarios in which they could interact as a network or as a cycle for defining the optimal amount of AID protein. We also comparatively review the expression levels of AID necessary for its function during the immune response, present in different cancers as well as in those tissues in which AID has been implicated in epigenetic remodeling of the genome by demethylating DNA. PMID:22687198

  7. High-throughput mutagenesis reveals functional determinants for DNA targeting by activation-induced deaminase.

    PubMed

    Gajula, Kiran S; Huwe, Peter J; Mo, Charlie Y; Crawford, Daniel J; Stivers, James T; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Kohli, Rahul M

    2014-09-01

    Antibody maturation is a critical immune process governed by the enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID), a member of the AID/APOBEC DNA deaminase family. AID/APOBEC deaminases preferentially target cytosine within distinct preferred sequence motifs in DNA, with specificity largely conferred by a small 9-11 residue protein loop that differs among family members. Here, we aimed to determine the key functional characteristics of this protein loop in AID and to thereby inform our understanding of the mode of DNA engagement. To this end, we developed a methodology (Sat-Sel-Seq) that couples saturation mutagenesis at each position across the targeting loop, with iterative functional selection and next-generation sequencing. This high-throughput mutational analysis revealed dominant characteristics for residues within the loop and additionally yielded enzymatic variants that enhance deaminase activity. To rationalize these functional requirements, we performed molecular dynamics simulations that suggest that AID and its hyperactive variants can engage DNA in multiple specific modes. These findings align with AID's competing requirements for specificity and flexibility to efficiently drive antibody maturation. Beyond insights into the AID-DNA interface, our Sat-Sel-Seq approach also serves to further expand the repertoire of techniques for deep positional scanning and may find general utility for high-throughput analysis of protein function. PMID:25064858

  8. High-throughput mutagenesis reveals functional determinants for DNA targeting by activation-induced deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Gajula, Kiran S.; Huwe, Peter J.; Mo, Charlie Y.; Crawford, Daniel J.; Stivers, James T.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Kohli, Rahul M.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody maturation is a critical immune process governed by the enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID), a member of the AID/APOBEC DNA deaminase family. AID/APOBEC deaminases preferentially target cytosine within distinct preferred sequence motifs in DNA, with specificity largely conferred by a small 9–11 residue protein loop that differs among family members. Here, we aimed to determine the key functional characteristics of this protein loop in AID and to thereby inform our understanding of the mode of DNA engagement. To this end, we developed a methodology (Sat-Sel-Seq) that couples saturation mutagenesis at each position across the targeting loop, with iterative functional selection and next-generation sequencing. This high-throughput mutational analysis revealed dominant characteristics for residues within the loop and additionally yielded enzymatic variants that enhance deaminase activity. To rationalize these functional requirements, we performed molecular dynamics simulations that suggest that AID and its hyperactive variants can engage DNA in multiple specific modes. These findings align with AID's competing requirements for specificity and flexibility to efficiently drive antibody maturation. Beyond insights into the AID-DNA interface, our Sat-Sel-Seq approach also serves to further expand the repertoire of techniques for deep positional scanning and may find general utility for high-throughput analysis of protein function. PMID:25064858

  9. Women, autoimmunity, and cancer: a dangerous liaison between estrogen and activation-induced deaminase?

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W.; Gearhart, Patricia J.

    2009-01-01

    Why women are more susceptible to autoimmune diseases is not completely clear, but new data suggest that the hormone estrogen may play an important role. A new study now shows that estrogen activates the expression of activation-induced deaminase (AID), a protein that drives antibody diversification by deaminating cytosine in DNA to uracil. If estrogen increases the level of AID, increased mutations could transform benign antibodies into anti-self pariahs. AID might also contribute to cancer—particularly in breast tissue, which is highly responsive to estrogen—by introducing mutations and strand breaks into the genome. PMID:19139165

  10. microRNA-155 is a negative regulator of Activation Induced Cytidine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Grace; Hakimpour, Paul; Landgraf, Pablo; Rice, Amanda; Tuschl, Thomas; Casellas, Rafael; Papavasiliou, F. Nina

    2008-01-01

    Summary B lymphocytes perform somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of the immunoglobulin locus to generate an antibody repertoire diverse in both affinity and function. These somatic diversification processes are catalyzed by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a potent DNA mutator whose expression and function are highly regulated. Here we show that AID is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a lymphocyte-specific microRNA, miR-155. We find that miR-155 is upregulated in murine B lymphocytes undergoing CSR, and furthermore targets a conserved site in the AID 3′untranslated region. Disruption of this target site in vivo results in quantitative and temporal deregulation of AID expression, accompanied by functional consequences for CSR and affinity maturation. Thus, miR-155, which has recently been shown to play important roles in regulating the germinal center reaction, does so in part by directly downmodulating AID expression. PMID:18450484

  11. Epigenetic Function of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and Its Link to Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Pilar M.; Shaknovich, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes during B cell maturation and immune response. Expression of AID is tightly regulated due to its mutagenic and recombinogenic potential, which is known to target not only Ig genes, but also non-Ig genes, contributing to lymphomagenesis. In recent years, a new epigenetic function of AID and its link to DNA demethylation came to light in several developmental systems. In this review, we summarize existing evidence linking deamination of unmodified and modified cytidine by AID to base-excision repair and mismatch repair machinery resulting in passive or active removal of DNA methylation mark, with the focus on B cell biology. We also discuss potential contribution of AID-dependent DNA hypomethylation to lymphomagenesis. PMID:25566255

  12. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase acts on double-strand breaks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong Ming

    2007-02-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is likely responsible for DNA cytidine deamination, although it may also act as an RNA deaminase. It functions on single-stranded DNA, the non-template strand in double-stranded DNA during transcription, or both strands in supercoiled DNA. To ask whether AID is able to deaminate cytidine at DNA breaks, plasmids, containing a SnaBI site (TAC downward arrowGTA) that forms blunt ends after digestion with SnaBI, were generated. If AID deaminates cytidine at the upstream blunt end, the ATG start codon in either of two drug resistance genes will be regenerated after ligation and replication in UDG-null E. coli cells. This study shows that AID targets cytidine at the break. The extent of deamination activity beyond the break is correlated with the base composition in the break region. If the break region is A, T-rich, C > T transitions are extensive. However, when the break region is not A, T-rich, mutations are mainly restricted to the break, similar to findings in vivo. The results indicate that AID has activity on double strand breaks (DSBs). Based on previous and current findings, a somatic hypermutation (SHM) model is proposed, in which collision between the transcription apparatus and the replication fork generates DSBs. After AID acts on break ends, the error-prone DNA repair machinery fixes and creates mutations. PMID:16697045

  13. Nucleic acid determinants for selective deamination of DNA over RNA by activation-induced deaminase.

    PubMed

    Nabel, Christopher S; Lee, Jae W; Wang, Laura C; Kohli, Rahul M

    2013-08-27

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID), a member of the larger AID/APOBEC family, is the key catalyst in initiating antibody somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination. The DNA deamination model accounting for AID's functional role posits that AID deaminates genomic deoxycytosine bases within the immunoglobulin locus, activating downstream repair pathways that result in antibody maturation. Although this model is well supported, the molecular basis for AID's selectivity for DNA over RNA remains an open and pressing question, reflecting a broader need to elucidate how AID/APOBEC enzymes engage their substrates. To address these questions, we have synthesized a series of chimeric nucleic acid substrates and characterized their reactivity with AID. These chimeric substrates feature targeted variations at the 2'-position of nucleotide sugars, allowing us to interrogate the steric and conformational basis for nucleic acid selectivity. We demonstrate that modifications to the target nucleotide can significantly alter AID's reactivity. Strikingly, within a substrate that is otherwise DNA, a single RNA-like 2'-hydroxyl substitution at the target cytosine is sufficient to compromise deamination. Alternatively, modifications that favor a DNA-like conformation (or sugar pucker) are compatible with deamination. AID's closely related homolog APOBEC1 is similarly sensitive to RNA-like substitutions at the target cytosine. Inversely, with unreactive 2'-fluoro-RNA substrates, AID's deaminase activity was rescued by introducing a trinucleotide DNA patch spanning the target cytosine and two nucleotides upstream. These data suggest a role for nucleotide sugar pucker in explaining the molecular basis for AID's DNA selectivity and, more generally, suggest how other nucleic acid-modifying enzymes may distinguish DNA from RNA. PMID:23942124

  14. A coming-of-age story: activation-induced cytidine deaminase turns 10.

    PubMed

    Delker, Rebecca K; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-11-01

    The discovery and characterization of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) 10 years ago provided the basis for a mechanistic understanding of secondary antibody diversification and the subsequent generation and maintenance of cellular memory in B lymphocytes, which signified a major advance in the field of B cell immunology. Here we celebrate and review the triumphs in the mission to understand the mechanisms through which AID influences antibody diversification, as well as the implications of AID function on human physiology. We also take time to point out important ongoing controversies and outstanding questions in the field and highlight key experiments and techniques that hold the potential to elucidate the remaining mysteries surrounding this vital protein. PMID:19841648

  15. A coming-of-age story: activation-induced cytidine deaminase turns 10

    PubMed Central

    Delker, Rebecca K; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and characterization of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) 10 years ago provided the basis for a mechanistic understanding of secondary antibody diversification and the subsequent generation and maintenance of cellular memory in B lymphocytes, which signified a major advance in the field of B cell immunology. Here we celebrate and review the triumphs in the mission to understand the mechanisms through which AID influences antibody diversification, as well as the implications of AID function on human physiology. We also take time to point out important ongoing controversies and outstanding questions in the field and highlight key experiments and techniques that hold the potential to elucidate the remaining mysteries surrounding this vital protein. PMID:19841648

  16. Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase in B Cell Immunity and Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an enzyme that is predominantly expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a pivotal role in immunoglobulin class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation for antibody (Ab) maturation. These two genetic processes endow Abs with protective functions against a multitude of antigens (pathogens) during humoral immune responses. In B cells, AID expression is regulated at the level of either transcriptional activation on AID gene loci or post-transcriptional suppression of AID mRNA. Furthermore, AID stabilization and targeting are determined by post-translational modifications and interactions with other cellular/nuclear factors. On the other hand, aberrant expression of AID causes B cell leukemias and lymphomas, including Burkitt's lymphoma caused by c-myc/IgH translocation. AID is also ectopically expressed in T cells and non-immune cells, and triggers point mutations in relevant DNA loci, resulting in tumorigenesis. Here, I review the recent literatures on the function of AID, regulation of AID expression, stability and targeting in B cells, and AID-related tumor formation. PMID:23396757

  17. Mutations in activation-induced cytidine deaminase in patients with hyper IgM syndrome.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Y; Lavoie, A; Cunningham-Rundles, C; Bédard, P M; Hébert, J; Côté, L; Dan, K; Sedlak, D; Buckley, R H; Fischer, A; Durandy, A; Conley, M E

    2000-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that mutations in a newly described RNA editing enzyme, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), can cause an autosomal recessive form of hyper IgM syndrome. To determine the relative frequency of mutations in AID, we evaluated a group of 27 patients with hyper IgM syndrome who did not have defects in CD40 ligand and 23 patients with common variable immunodeficiency. Three different mutations in AID were identified in 18 patients with hyper IgM syndrome, including 14 French Canadians, 2 Lumbee Indians, and a brother and sister from Okinawa. No mutations were found in the remaining 32 patients. In the group of patients with hyper IgM syndrome, the patients with mutations in AID were older at the age of diagnosis, were more likely to have positive isohemagglutinins, and were less likely to have anemia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia. Lymphoid hyperplasia was seen in patients with hyper IgM syndrome and normal AID as well as the patients with hyper IgM syndrome and defects in AID. PMID:11112359

  18. AID/APOBEC deaminases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rebhandl, Stefan; Huemer, Michael; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are the basis for evolution and the development of genetic diseases. Especially in cancer, somatic mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes alongside the occurrence of passenger mutations have been observed by recent deep-sequencing approaches. While mutations have long been considered random events induced by DNA-replication errors or by DNA damaging agents, genome sequencing led to the discovery of non-random mutation signatures in many human cancer. Common non-random mutations comprise DNA strand-biased mutation showers and mutations restricted to certain DNA motifs, which recently have become attributed to the activity of the AID/APOBEC family of DNA deaminases. Hence, APOBEC enzymes, which have evolved as key players in natural and adaptive immunity, have been proposed to contribute to cancer development and clonal evolution of cancer by inducing collateral genomic damage due to their DNA deaminating activity. This review focuses on how mutagenic events through AID/APOBEC deaminases may contribute to cancer development. PMID:26097867

  19. Mechanisms underlying the effects of LPS and activation-induced cytidine deaminase on IgA isotype expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Hyun-A; Chun, Sung-Ki; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2005-06-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is needed for Ig class switch recombination (CSR). We explored the effect of LPS on the expression of AID during B cell differentiation, and the role of AID in IgA isotype expression. In normal spleen B cells, LPS increased AID transcription up to 48 h post-stimulation, i.e. around the time of Ig CSR. TGF-b1 and AID were required for IgA expression, and LPS contributed to TGFb1-induced IgA production largely by inducing AID. Interestingly, LPS repressed AID transcription in sIgA+ B cells but still stimulated IgA production mainly by increasing the rate of IgA secretion. Our data indicate that LPS contributes to TGFb1-induced IgA isotype expression in at least two ways: by stimulating AID transcription before CSR and by enhancing the IgA secretion rate after CSR. PMID:15995363

  20. Involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase in skin cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yoshinobu; Hiai, Hiroshi; Uemura, Munehiro; Nakamura, Motonobu; Hattori, Yukari; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Minato, Nagahiro

    2016-01-01

    Most skin cancers develop as the result of UV light–induced DNA damage; however, a substantial number of cases appear to occur independently of UV damage. A causal link between UV-independent skin cancers and chronic inflammation has been suspected, although the precise mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Here, we have proposed that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, encoded by AICDA) links chronic inflammation and skin cancer. We demonstrated that Tg mice expressing AID in the skin spontaneously developed skin squamous cell carcinoma with Hras and Trp53 mutations. Furthermore, genetic deletion of Aicda reduced tumor incidence in a murine model of chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. AID was expressed in human primary keratinocytes in an inflammatory stimulus–dependent manner and was detectable in human skin cancers. Together, the results of this study indicate that inflammation-induced AID expression promotes skin cancer development independently of UV damage and suggest AID as a potential target for skin cancer therapeutics. PMID:26974156

  1. Restricting activation-induced cytidine deaminase tumorigenic activity in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Casellas, Rafael; Yamane, Arito; Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Potter, Michael

    2009-03-01

    DNA breaks play an essential role in germinal centre B cells as intermediates to immunoglobulin class switching, a recombination process initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Immunoglobulin gene hypermutation is likewise catalysed by AID but is believed to occur via single-strand DNA breaks. When improperly repaired, AID-mediated lesions can promote chromosomal translocations (CTs) that juxtapose the immunoglobulin loci to heterologous genomic sites, including oncogenes. Two of the most studied translocations are the t(8;14) and T(12;15), which deregulate cMyc in human Burkitt's lymphomas and mouse plasmacytomas, respectively. While a complete understanding of the aetiology of such translocations is lacking, recent studies using diverse mouse models have shed light on two important issues: (1) the extent to which non-specific or AID-mediated DNA lesions promote CTs, and (2) the safeguard mechanisms that B cells employ to prevent AID tumorigenic activity. Here we review these advances and discuss the usage of pristane-induced mouse plasmacytomas as a tool to investigate the origin of Igh-cMyc translocations and B-cell tumorigenesis. PMID:19302140

  2. Structural analysis of the activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase required in immunoglobulin diversification.

    PubMed

    Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Shimoda, Mayuko; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Pedersen, Lars C; Goodman, Myron F

    2016-07-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating C→U during transcription of Ig-variable (V) and Ig-switch (S) region DNA, which is essential to produce high-affinity antibodies. Here we report the crystal structure of a soluble human AID variant at 2.8Å resolution that favors targeting WRC motifs (W=A/T, R=A/G) in vitro, and executes Ig V SHM in Ramos B-cells. A specificity loop extending away from the active site to accommodate two purine bases next to C, differs significantly in sequence, length, and conformation from APOBEC proteins Apo3A and Apo3G, which strongly favor pyrimidines at -1 and -2 positions. Individual amino acid contributions to specificity and processivity were measured in relation to a proposed ssDNA binding cleft. This study provides a structural basis for residue contributions to DNA scanning properties unique to AID, and for disease mutations in human HIGM-2 syndrome. PMID:27258794

  3. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Does Not Impact Murine Meiotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Cortesao, Catarina S.; Freitas, Raquel F.; Barreto, Vasco M.

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) was first described as the triggering enzyme of the B-cell−specific reactions that edit the immunoglobulin genes, namely somatic hypermutation, gene conversion, and class switch recombination. Over the years, AID was also detected in cells other than lymphocytes, and it has been assigned additional roles in the innate defense against transforming retroviruses, in retrotransposition restriction and in DNA demethylation. Notably, AID expression was found in germline tissues, and in heterologous systems it can induce the double-strand breaks required for the initiation of meiotic recombination and proper gamete formation. However, because AID-deficient mice are fully fertile, the molecule is not essential for meiosis. Thus, the remaining question that we addressed here is whether AID influences the frequency of meiotic recombination in mice. We measured the recombination events in the meiosis of male and female mice F1 hybrids of C57BL/6J and BALB/c, in Aicda+/+ and Aicda−/− background by using a panel of single-nucleotide polymorphisms that distinguishes C57BL/6J from BALB/c genome across the 19 autosomes. In agreement with the literature, we found that the frequency of recombination in the female germline was greater than in male germline, both in the Aicda+/+ and Aicda−/− backgrounds. No statistical difference was found in the average recombination events between Aicda+/+ and Aidca−/− animals, either in females or males. In addition, the recombination frequencies between single-nucleotide polymorphisms flanking the immunoglobulin heavy and immunoglobulin kappa loci was also not different. We conclude that AID has a minor impact, if any, on the overall frequency of meiotic recombination. PMID:23550130

  4. Critical role of activation induced cytidine deaminase in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonglian; Peng, Ivan; Senger, Kate; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Reichelt, Mike; Baca, Miriam; Yeh, Ronald; Lorenzo, Maria N; Sebrell, Andrew; Dela Cruz, Christopher; Tam, Lucinda; Corpuz, Racquel; Wu, Jiansheng; Sai, Tao; Roose-Girma, Merone; Warming, Søren; Balazs, Mercedesz; Gonzalez, Lino C; Caplazi, Patrick; Martin, Flavius; Devoss, Jason; Zarrin, Ali A

    2013-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative autoimmune disorder caused by chronic inflammation and demyelination within the central nervous system (CNS). Clinical studies in MS patients have demonstrated efficacy with B cell targeted therapies such as anti-CD20. However, the exact role that B cells play in the disease process is unclear. Activation Induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an essential enzyme for the processes of antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. To evaluate the impact of affinity maturation and isotype switching, we have interrogated the effect of AID-deficiency in an animal model of MS. Here, we show that the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the extracellular domain of human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG1-125) is significantly reduced in Aicda deficient mice, which, unlike wild-type mice, lack serum IgG to myelin associated antigens. MOG specific T cell responses are comparable between wild-type and Aicda knockout mice suggesting an active role for antigen experienced B cells. Thus affinity maturation and/or class switching are critical processes in the pathogenesis of EAE. PMID:23167594

  5. Critical role of activation induced cytidine deaminase in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative autoimmune disorder caused by chronic inflammation and demyelination within the central nervous system (CNS). Clinical studies in MS patients have demonstrated efficacy with B cell targeted therapies such as anti-CD20. However, the exact role that B cells play in the disease process is unclear. Activation Induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an essential enzyme for the processes of antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. To evaluate the impact of affinity maturation and isotype switching, we have interrogated the effect of AID-deficiency in an animal model of MS. Here, we show that the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the extracellular domain of human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG1-125) is significantly reduced in Aicda deficient mice, which, unlike wild-type mice, lack serum IgG to myelin associated antigens. MOG specific T cell responses are comparable between wild-type and Aicda knockout mice suggesting an active role for antigen experienced B cells. Thus affinity maturation and/or class switching are critical processes in the pathogenesis of EAE. PMID:23167594

  6. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase-mediated sequence diversification is transiently targeted to newly integrated DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu Yuan; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Gramlich, Hillary S; Schatz, David G

    2007-08-31

    The molecular features that allow activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to target Ig and certain non-Ig genes are not understood, although transcription has been implicated as one important parameter. We explored this issue by testing the mutability of a non-Ig transcription cassette in Ig and non-Ig loci of the chicken B cell line DT40. The cassette did not act as a stable long term mutation target but was able to be mutated in an AID-dependent manner for a limited time post-integration. This indicates that newly integrated DNA has molecular characteristics that render it susceptible to modification by AID, with implications for how targeting and mis-targeting of AID occurs. PMID:17613522

  7. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types.

  8. Isotype-switched follicular lymphoma displays dissociation between activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Florian; Navarrete, Marcelo A; Bertinetti-Lapatki, Cristina; Boehm, Joachim; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Veelken, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    In B-cells, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin genes. AID introduces mutations in immunoglobulin variable regions (IGV) during B-cell receptor affinity maturation, but may also introduce aberrant mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes, most commonly BCL6. Follicular lymphoma (FL) B-cells constitutively express AID and undergo CSR, SHM and aberrant SHM. We have studied AID expression, the presence of SHM mutations, CSR, and aberrant SHM in BCL6 in a cohort of 75 FL patients. Whereas IgM-expressing (non-switched) FL were characterized by an expected positive correlation between AID and IGV and BCL6 mutations, isotype-switched FL showed dissociation between AID expression and aberrant SHM, and inverse correlation between SHM and AID expression. Our results unveil two manifest biological subgroups of FL and indicate that the specific dissociation between AID and SHM after isotype switch may correlate with the clinical outcome of this heterogeneous disease. PMID:25860234

  9. Aberrant activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression in Philadelphia chromosome-positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Durkin, Lisa; Rogers, Heesun Joyce; Hsi, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a critical role in somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes. Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis and is specifically treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Interestingly, AID has been shown to be aberrantly expressed and functional in Ph+ ALL and is thought to contribute to genetic instability. We hypothesized that AID might be detectable in routinely processed bone marrow biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and assist in identifying Ph+ ALL. We found that AID was expressed in 26 (70%) of 37 cases of Ph+ ALL but only 1 (2.9%) of 38 cases of Ph- ALL cases. There was a significant difference in AID expression between these 2 ALL groups (P < .001, Fisher exact test). The expression of AID was confirmed by RT-PCR (reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) and correlated with IHC scoring. AID protein is expressed in a large proportion of Ph+ ALL cases at levels detectable by IHC in clinical samples and might be useful to rapidly identify cases likely to have a BCR/ABL1 fusion. PMID:26980048

  10. Whole-genome sequencing reveals activation-induced cytidine deaminase signatures during indolent chronic lymphocytic leukaemia evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kasar, S.; Kim, J.; Improgo, R.; Tiao, G.; Polak, P.; Haradhvala, N.; Lawrence, M. S.; Kiezun, A.; Fernandes, S. M.; Bahl, S.; Sougnez, C.; Gabriel, S.; Lander, E. S.; Kim, H. T.; Getz, G.; Brown, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chromosome 13q deletion or normal cytogenetics represent the majority of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cases, yet have relatively few driver mutations. To better understand their genomic landscape, here we perform whole-genome sequencing on a cohort of patients enriched with these cytogenetic characteristics. Mutations in known CLL drivers are seen in only 33% of this cohort, and associated with normal cytogenetics and unmutated IGHV. The most commonly mutated gene in our cohort, IGLL5, shows a mutational pattern suggestive of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) activity. Unsupervised analysis of mutational signatures demonstrates the activities of canonical AID (c-AID), leading to clustered mutations near active transcriptional start sites; non-canonical AID (nc-AID), leading to genome-wide non-clustered mutations, and an ageing signature responsible for most mutations. Using mutation clonality to infer time of onset, we find that while ageing and c-AID activities are ongoing, nc-AID-associated mutations likely occur earlier in tumour evolution. PMID:26638776

  11. Whole-genome sequencing reveals activation-induced cytidine deaminase signatures during indolent chronic lymphocytic leukaemia evolution.

    PubMed

    Kasar, S; Kim, J; Improgo, R; Tiao, G; Polak, P; Haradhvala, N; Lawrence, M S; Kiezun, A; Fernandes, S M; Bahl, S; Sougnez, C; Gabriel, S; Lander, E S; Kim, H T; Getz, G; Brown, J R

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chromosome 13q deletion or normal cytogenetics represent the majority of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cases, yet have relatively few driver mutations. To better understand their genomic landscape, here we perform whole-genome sequencing on a cohort of patients enriched with these cytogenetic characteristics. Mutations in known CLL drivers are seen in only 33% of this cohort, and associated with normal cytogenetics and unmutated IGHV. The most commonly mutated gene in our cohort, IGLL5, shows a mutational pattern suggestive of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) activity. Unsupervised analysis of mutational signatures demonstrates the activities of canonical AID (c-AID), leading to clustered mutations near active transcriptional start sites; non-canonical AID (nc-AID), leading to genome-wide non-clustered mutations, and an ageing signature responsible for most mutations. Using mutation clonality to infer time of onset, we find that while ageing and c-AID activities are ongoing, nc-AID-associated mutations likely occur earlier in tumour evolution. PMID:26638776

  12. Biochemical Basis of Immunological and Retroviral Responses to DNA-targeted Cytosine Deamination by Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase and APOBEC3G*

    PubMed Central

    Chelico, Linda; Pham, Phuong; Petruska, John; Goodman, Myron F.

    2009-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and APOBEC3G catalyze deamination of cytosine to uracil on single-stranded DNA, thereby setting in motion a regulated hypermutagenic process essential for human well-being. However, if regulation fails, havoc ensues. AID plays a central role in the synthesis of high affinity antibodies, and APOBEC3G inactivates human immunodeficiency virus-1. This minireview highlights biochemical and structural properties of AID and APOBEC3G, showing how studies using the purified enzymes provide valuable insight into the considerably more complex biology governing antibody generation and human immunodeficiency virus inactivation. PMID:19684020

  13. A Portable Hot Spot Recognition Loop Transfers Sequence Preferences from APOBEC Family Members to Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase*

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Rahul M.; Abrams, Shaun R.; Gajula, Kiran S.; Maul, Robert W.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Stivers, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes of the AID/APOBEC family, characterized by the targeted deamination of cytosine to generate uracil within DNA, mediate numerous critical immune responses. One family member, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), selectively introduces uracil into antibody variable and switch regions, promoting antibody diversity through somatic hypermutation or class switching. Other family members, including APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G, play an important role in retroviral defense by acting on viral reverse transcripts. These enzymes are distinguished from one another by targeting cytosine within different DNA sequence contexts; however, the reason for these differences is not known. Here, we report the identification of a recognition loop of 9–11 amino acids that contributes significantly to the distinct sequence motifs of individual family members. When this recognition loop is grafted from the donor APOBEC3F or 3G proteins into the acceptor scaffold of AID, the mutational signature of AID changes toward that of the donor proteins. These loop-graft mutants of AID provide useful tools for dissecting the biological impact of DNA sequence preferences upon generation of antibody diversity, and the results have implications for the evolution and specialization of the AID/APOBEC family. PMID:19561087

  14. Increased expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase is associated with anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Chen, Jian; Grizzle, William E.; Chatham, W. Winn; Stockard, Cecil R.; Wu, Qi; Yang, PingAr; Holers, V. Michael; Mountz, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with higher levels of autoantibodies and IL-17. Here, we investigated if ectopic lymphoid follicles and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from RA patients exhibit increased activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and if increased AID is correlated with serum levels of autoantibodies and IL-17. The results of immunohistochemical staining showed that organized germinal centers were observed in 6 of the 12 RA synovial samples, and AID+ cells were found almost exclusively in the B-cell areas of these follicles. Aggregated but not organized lymphoid follicles were found in only one OA synovial sample without AID+ cells. Significantly higher levels of AID mRNA (Aicda) detected by RT-PCR were found in the PBMCs from RA patients than PBMCs from normal controls (p<0.01). In the PBMCs from RA patients, AID was expressed predominately by the CD10+IgM+CD20+ B-cell population and the percentage of these cells that expressed AID was significantly higher than in normal controls (p < 0.01). Aicda expression in the PBMCs correlated significantly and positively with the serum levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) (p ≤ 0.0001) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) (p = 0.0005). Serum levels of IFN-γ (p = 0.0005) and IL-17 (p = 0.007), but not IL-4, also exhibited positive correlation with the expression of AID. These results suggest that the higher levels of AID expression in B cells of RA patients correlate with, and may be associated with the higher levels of T helper cell cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17, leading to the development of anti-CCP and RF. PMID:19703021

  15. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  16. ATM increases activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity at downstream S regions during class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Khair, Lyne; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Linehan, Erin K; Ucher, Anna J; Leus, Niek G J; Ogilvie, Colin; Lou, Zhenkun; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2014-05-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ab class-switch recombination (CSR) in activated B cells resulting in exchanging the IgH C region and improved Ab effector function. During CSR, AID instigates DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation in switch (S) regions located upstream of C region genes. DSBs are necessary for CSR, but improper regulation of DSBs can lead to chromosomal translocations that can result in B cell lymphoma. The protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important proximal regulator of the DNA damage response (DDR), and translocations involving S regions are increased in its absence. ATM phosphorylates H2AX, which recruits other DNA damage response (DDR) proteins, including mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DNA damage. As these DDR proteins all function to promote repair and recombination of DSBs during CSR, we examined whether mouse splenic B cells deficient in these proteins would show alterations in S region DSBs when undergoing CSR. We find that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs are increased, whereas DSBs in downstream Sγ regions are decreased. We also find that mutations in the unrearranged Sγ3 segment are reduced in atm(-/-) cells. Our data suggest that ATM increases AID targeting and activity at downstream acceptor S regions during CSR and that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs accumulate as they lack a recombination partner. PMID:24729610

  17. Uracil residues dependent on the deaminase AID in immunoglobulin gene variable and switch regions

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W; Saribasak, Huseyin; Martomo, Stella A; McClure, Rhonda L; Yang, William; Vaisman, Alexandra; Gramlich, Hillary S; Schatz, David G; Woodgate, Roger; Wilson, David M; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates diversity of immunoglobulin genes through deamination of cytosine to uracil. Two opposing models have been proposed for the deamination of DNA or RNA by AID. Although most data support DNA deamination, there is no physical evidence of uracil residues in immunoglobulin genes. Here we demonstrate their presence by determining the sensitivity of DNA to digestion with uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) and abasic endonuclease. Using several methods of detection, we identified uracil residues in the variable and switch regions. Uracil residues were generated within 24 h of B cell stimulation, were present on both DNA strands and were found to replace mainly cytosine bases. Our data provide direct evidence for the model that AID functions by deaminating cytosine residues in DNA. PMID:21151102

  18. A source of the single-stranded DNA substrate for activation-induced deaminase during somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohua; Fan, Manxia; Kalis, Susan; Wei, Lirong; Scharff, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    During somatic hypermutation (SHM), activation-induced deaminase (AID) mutates deoxycytidine on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) generated by the transcription machinery, but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. Here we report a higher abundance of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (Igh-V) region compared with the constant region and partially transcribed Igh RNAs, suggesting a slower Pol II progression at Igh-V that could result in some early/premature transcription termination after prolonged pausing/stalling of Pol II. Knocking down RNA-exosome complexes, which could decrease premature transcription termination, leads to decreased SHM. Knocking down Spt5, which can augment premature transcription termination, leads to increase in both, SHM and the abundance of ssDNA substrates. Collectively, our data support the model that, following the reduction of Pol II progression (pausing or stalling) at the Igh-V, additional steps such as premature transcription termination are involved in providing ssDNA substrates for AID during SHM. PMID:24923561

  19. S-S Synapsis during Class Switch Recombination Is Promoted by Distantly Located Transcriptional Elements and Activation-Induced Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Wuerffel, Robert; Wang, Lili; Grigera, Fernando; Manis, John; Selsing, Erik; Perlot, Thomas; Alt, Frederick W.; Cogne, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Kenter, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular mechanisms underlying synapsis of activation-induced deaminase (AID)-targeted S regions during class switch recombination (CSR) are poorly understood. By using chromosome conformation capture techniques, we found that in B cells, the Eμ and 3′Eα enhancers were in close spatial proximity, forming a unique chromosomal loop configuration. B cell activation led to recruitment of the germline transcript (GLT) promoters to the Eμ:3′Eα complex in a cytokine-dependent fashion. This structure facilitated S-S synapsis because Sμ was proximal to Eμ and a downstream S region was corecruited with the targeted GLT promoter to Eμ:3′Eα. We propose that GLT promoter association with the Eμ:3′Eα complex creates an architectural scaffolding that promotes S-S synapsis during CSR and that these interactions are stabilized by AID. Thus, the S-S synaptosome is formed as a result of the self-organizing transcription system that regulates GLT expression and may serve to guard against spurious chromosomal translocations. PMID:17980632

  20. IGHV-unmutated and IGHV-mutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells produce activation-induced deaminase protein with a full range of biologic functions

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Piers E. M.; Chu, Charles C.; Albesiano, Emilia; Damle, Rajendra N.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Kim, Dorothy; Zhang, Lu; Magli, Amanda R.; Barrientos, Jacqueline; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; Roa, Sergio; Mongini, Patricia K.; MacCarthy, Thomas; Scharff, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Clonal evolution occurs during the course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and activation-induced deaminase (AID) could influence this process. However, this possibility has been questioned in CLL because the number of circulating AID mRNA+ cells is exceedingly low; synthesis of AID protein by blood CLL cells has not been demonstrated; the full range of AID functions is lacking in unmutated CLL (U-CLL), and no prospective analysis linking AID expression and disease severity has been reported. The results of the present study show that circulating CLL cells and those within secondary lymphoid tissues can make AID mRNA and protein. This production is related to cell division because more AID mRNA was detected in recently divided cells and AID protein was limited to the dividing fraction and was up-regulated on induction of cell division. AID protein was functional because AID+ dividing cells exhibited more double-stranded DNA breaks, IGH class switching, and new IGHV-D-J mutations. Each of these actions was documented in U-CLL and mutated CLL (M-CLL). Furthermore, AID protein was associated with worse patient outcome and adverse cytogenetics. We conclude that the production of fully functional AID protein by U-CLL and M-CLL cells could be involved in clonal evolution of the disease. PMID:23071276

  1. Analysis of activation-induced cytidine deaminase mRNA levels in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia with different cytogenetic status.

    PubMed

    Gelmez, Metin Y; Teker, Aysegul B A; Aday, Aynur D; Yavuz, Akif S; Soysal, Teoman; Deniz, Gunnur; Aktan, Melih

    2014-02-01

    Activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) enzyme, which converts cytosine into uracil and is expressed only by activated B lymphocytes, plays a role in B cells in both the mechanisms of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). There are studies showing that AID can cause numerous translocations in different lymphoproliferative diseases. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by the accumulation of monoclonal B cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood. The predictability and clinical status of B-CLL are difficult to determine. About 30-50% of patients have chromosomal abnormalities. AID, which is thought to create fraction segments for translocations, might also cause deletions in DNA regions of 17p13, 11q22.3, 13q14 and 13q34 that are associated with prognostic implications in patients with CLL. In this study, the AID gene expression in patients with CLL with and without deletions was investigated. When compared to healthy subjects and patients without deletions, increased levels of AID expression in patients with deletions of 17p13, 11q22.3 or 13q14 were found, but not for the 13q34 region. Our results show that AID expression may be associated with deletions in patients with CLL. PMID:23662991

  2. Expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase enhances the clearance of pneumococcal pneumonia: evidence of a subpopulation of protective anti-pneumococcal B1a cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Natsuo; Kerfoot, Steven M; Hutchinson, Andrew T; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Nakazawa, Naomi; Szczepanik, Marian; Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ohana, Noboru; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Mori, Tsutomu; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Askenase, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    We describe a protective early acquired immune response to pneumococcal pneumonia that is mediated by a subset of B1a cells. Mice deficient in B1 cells (xid), or activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID(-/-) ), or invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells (Jα18(-/-) ), or interleukin-13 (IL-13(-/-) ) had impaired early clearance of pneumococci in the lung, compared with wild-type mice. In contrast, AID(-/-) mice adoptively transferred with AID(+/+) B1a cells, significantly cleared bacteria from the lungs as early as 3 days post infection. We show that this early bacterial clearance corresponds to an allergic contact sensitivity-like cutaneous response, probably due to a subpopulation of initiating B1a cells. In the pneumonia model, these B1a cells were found to secrete higher affinity antigen-specific IgM. In addition, as in contact sensitivity, iNKT cells were required for the anti-pneumococcal B1a cell initiating response, probably through early production of IL-13, given that IL-13(-/-) mice also failed to clear infection. Our study is the first to demonstrate the importance of AID in generating an appropriate B1a cell response to pathogenic bacteria. Given the antibody affinity and pneumonia resistance data, natural IgM produced by conventional B1a cells are not responsible for pneumonia clearance compared with the AID-dependent subset. PMID:26456931

  3. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes. PMID:25740947

  4. Characterization of a new V gene replacement in the absence of activation-induced cytidine deaminase and its contribution to human B-cell receptor diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Ghamlouch, Hussein; Regnier, Aline; Trudel, Stephanie; Herent, Didier; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Marolleau, Jean Pierre; Gubler, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    In B cells, B-cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulin revision is a common route for modifying unwanted antibody specificities via a mechanism called VH replacement. This in vivo process, mostly affecting heavy-chain rearrangement, involves the replacement of all or part of a previously rearranged IGHV gene with another germline IGHV gene located upstream. Two different mechanisms of IGHV replacement have been reported: type 1, involving the recombination activating genes complex and requiring a framework region 3 internal recombination signal; and type 2, involving an unidentified mechanism different from that of type 1. In the case of light-chain loci, BCR immunoglobulin editing ensures that a second V-J rearrangement occurs. This helps to maintain tolerance, by generating a novel BCR with a new antigenic specificity. We report that human B cells can, surprisingly, undergo type 2 replacement associated with κ light-chain rearrangements. The de novo IGKV-IGKJ products result from the partial replacement of a previously rearranged IGKV gene by a new germline IGKV gene, in-frame and without deletion or addition of nucleotides. There are wrcy/rgyw motifs at the ‘IGKV donor–IGKV recipient chimera junction’ as described for type 2 IGHV replacement, but activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression was not detected. This unusual mechanism of homologous recombination seems to be a variant of gene conversion-like recombination, which does not require AID. The recombination phenomenon described here provides new insight into immunoglobulin locus recombination and BCR immunoglobulin repertoire diversity. PMID:24134819

  5. Delta Inulin Adjuvant Enhances Plasmablast Generation, Expression of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and B-Cell Affinity Maturation in Human Subjects Receiving Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Li, Connie; Sajkov, Dimitar; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    There is a major need for new adjuvants to improve the efficacy of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Advax is a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin that has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in animal models and human clinical trials. To better understand the mechanism for this enhancement, we sought to assess its effect on the plasmablast response in human subjects. This pilot study utilised cryopreserved 7 day post-vaccination (7dpv) peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples obtained from a subset of 25 adult subjects from the FLU006-12 trial who had been immunized intramuscularly with a standard dose of 2012 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) alone (n=9 subjects) or combined with 5mg (n=8) or 10mg (n=8) of Advax adjuvant. Subjects receiving Advax adjuvant had increased 7dpv plasmablasts, which in turn exhibited a 2-3 fold higher rate of non-silent mutations in the B-cell receptor CDR3 region associated with higher expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the major enzyme controlling BCR affinity maturation. Together, these data suggest that Advax adjuvant enhances influenza immunity in immunized subjects via multiple mechanisms including increased plasmablast generation, AID expression and CDR3 mutagenesis resulting in enhanced BCR affinity maturation and increased production of high avidity antibody. How Advax adjuvant achieves these beneficial effects on plasmablasts remains the subject of ongoing investigation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12612000709842 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362709 PMID:26177480

  6. Estrogen receptors bind to and activate the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter to potentiate HoxC4-mediated activation-induced cytosine deaminase induction, immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination, and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thach; Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Hawkins, J Seth; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2010-11-26

    Estrogen enhances antibody and autoantibody responses through yet to be defined mechanisms. It has been suggested that estrogen up-regulates the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID), which is critical for antibody class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), through direct activation of this gene. AID, as we have shown, is induced by the HoxC4 homeodomain transcription factor, which binds to a conserved HoxC4/Oct site in the AICDA/Aicda promoter. Here we show that estrogen-estrogen receptor (ER) complexes do not directly activate the AID gene promoter in B cells undergoing CSR. Rather, they bind to three evolutionarily conserved and cooperative estrogen response elements (EREs) we identified in the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter. By binding to these EREs, ERs synergized with CD154 or LPS and IL-4 signaling to up-regulate HoxC4 expression, thereby inducing AID and CSR without affecting B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Estrogen administration in vivo significantly potentiated CSR and SHM in the specific antibody response to the 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten conjugated with chicken γ-globulin. Ablation of HoxC4 (HoxC4(-/-)) abrogated the estrogen-mediated enhancement of AID gene expression and decreased CSR and SHM. Thus, estrogen enhances AID expression by activating the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter and inducing the critical AID gene activator, HoxC4. PMID:20855884

  7. Active RNAP pre-initiation sites are highly mutated by cytidine deaminases in yeast, with AID targeting small RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are single stranded DNA mutators diversifying antibodies and restricting viral infection. Improper access to the genome leads to translocations and mutations in B cells and contributes to the mutation landscape in cancer, such as kataegis. It remains unclear how deaminases access double stranded genomes and whether off-target mutations favor certain loci, although transcription and opportunistic access during DNA repair are thought to play a role. In yeast, AID and the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G preferentially mutate transcriptionally active genes within narrow regions, 110 base pairs in width, fixed at RNA polymerase initiation sites. Unlike APOBEC3G, AID shows enhanced mutational preference for small RNA genes (tRNAs, snoRNAs and snRNAs) suggesting a putative role for RNA in its recruitment. We uncover the high affinity of the deaminases for the single stranded DNA exposed by initiating RNA polymerases (a DNA configuration reproduced at stalled polymerases) without a requirement for specific cofactors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03553.001 PMID:25237741

  8. Non-redundancy of cytidine deaminases in class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Sebastian D; Rush, James S; Schatz, David G

    2004-03-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation, and gene conversion are immunoglobulin diversification mechanisms that are strictly dependent on the activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). The precise role and substrate(s) of AID in these processes remain to be well defined. The closest homologue of AID is APOBEC-1, a bona fide mRNA-editing enzyme, which shares with AID the ability to deaminate cytidines within single-stranded DNA in vitro and in prokaryotic cells. To determine whether APOBEC-1 can therefore substitute for AID in activated B cells, we expressed human AID, a catalytic mutant thereof, and rat APOBEC-1 in AID-deficient murine B cells. Whereas AID rescued CSR, neither the inactive mutant nor APOBEC-1 could complement AID deficiency. This indicates that cytidine deaminase activity is necessary but not sufficient to initiate CSR, and suggests that AID is specifically targeted to its cognate substrate, the immunoglobulin genes or a distinct mRNA, by an as-yet-unknown mechanism. PMID:14991614

  9. Induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase-targeting adaptor 14-3-3γ is mediated by NF-κB-dependent recruitment of CFP1 to the 5'-CpG-3'-rich 14-3-3γ promoter and is sustained by E2A.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thach; Pone, Egest J; Li, Guideng; Lam, Tonika S; Moehlman, J'aime; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-08-15

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) crucially diversifies Ab biologic effector functions. 14-3-3γ specifically binds to the 5'-AGCT-3' repeats in the IgH locus switch (S) regions. By interacting directly with the C-terminal region of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), 14-3-3γ targets this enzyme to S regions to mediate CSR. In this study, we showed that 14-3-3γ was expressed in germinal center B cells in vivo and induced in B cells by T-dependent and T-independent primary CSR-inducing stimuli in vitro in humans and mice. Induction of 14-3-3γ was rapid, peaking within 3 h of stimulation by LPSs, and sustained over the course of AID and CSR induction. It was dependent on recruitment of NF-κB to the 14-3-3γ gene promoter. The NF-κB recruitment enhanced the occupancy of the CpG island within the 14-3-3γ promoter by CFP1, a component of the COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, and promoter-specific enrichment of histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), which is indicative of open chromatin state and marks transcription-competent promoters. NF-κB also potentiated the binding of B cell lineage-specific factor E2A to an E-box motif located immediately downstream of the two closely-spaced transcription start sites for sustained 14-3-3γ expression and CSR induction. Thus, 14-3-3γ induction in CSR is enabled by the CFP1-mediated H3K4me3 enrichment in the promoter, dependent on NF-κB and sustained by E2A. PMID:23851690

  10. Complexes between nuclear factor-κB p65 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 are key actors in inducing activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and immunoglobulin A production in CD40L plus interleukin-10-treated human blood B cells.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, S; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Richard, Y; Pozzetto, B; Cogné, M; Cognasse, F; Garraud, O

    2011-11-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor pathway plays an important role in many biological phenomena. STAT3 transcription is triggered by cytokine-associated signals. Here, we use isolated human B cells to analyse the role of STAT3 in interleukin (IL)-10 induced terminal B cell differentiation and in immunoglobulin (Ig)A production as a characteristic readout of IL-10 signalling. We identified optimal conditions for inducing in-vitro IgA production by purified blood naive B cells using IL-10 and soluble CD40L. We show that soluble CD40L consistently induces the phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 but not of STAT3, while IL-10 induces the phosphorylation of STAT3 but not of NF-κB p65. Interestingly, while soluble CD40L and IL-10 were synergistic in driving the terminal maturation of B cells into IgA-producing plasma cells, they did not co-operate earlier in the pathway with regard to the transcription factors NF-κB p65 or STAT3. Blocking either NF-κB p65 or STAT3 profoundly altered the production of IgA and mRNA for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme strictly necessary for Ig heavy chain recombination. Finally, the STAT3 pathway was directly activated by IL-10, while IL-6, the main cytokine otherwise known for activating the STAT3 pathway, did not appear to be involved in IL-10-induced-STAT3 activation. Our results suggest that STAT3 and NF-κB pathways co-operate in IgA production, with soluble CD40L rapidly activating the NF-κB pathway, probably rendering STAT3 probably more reactive to IL-10 signalling. This novel role for STAT3 in B cell development reveals a potential therapeutic or vaccine target for eliciting IgA humoral responses at mucosal interfaces. PMID:21985363

  11. Complexes between nuclear factor-κB p65 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 are key actors in inducing activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and immunoglobulin A production in CD40L plus interleukin-10-treated human blood B cells

    PubMed Central

    Lafarge, S; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Richard, Y; Pozzetto, B; Cogné, M; Cognasse, F; Garraud, O

    2011-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor pathway plays an important role in many biological phenomena. STAT3 transcription is triggered by cytokine-associated signals. Here, we use isolated human B cells to analyse the role of STAT3 in interleukin (IL)-10 induced terminal B cell differentiation and in immunoglobulin (Ig)A production as a characteristic readout of IL-10 signalling. We identified optimal conditions for inducing in-vitro IgA production by purified blood naive B cells using IL-10 and soluble CD40L. We show that soluble CD40L consistently induces the phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 but not of STAT3, while IL-10 induces the phosphorylation of STAT3 but not of NF-κB p65. Interestingly, while soluble CD40L and IL-10 were synergistic in driving the terminal maturation of B cells into IgA-producing plasma cells, they did not co-operate earlier in the pathway with regard to the transcription factors NF-κB p65 or STAT3. Blocking either NF-κB p65 or STAT3 profoundly altered the production of IgA and mRNA for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme strictly necessary for Ig heavy chain recombination. Finally, the STAT3 pathway was directly activated by IL-10, while IL-6, the main cytokine otherwise known for activating the STAT3 pathway, did not appear to be involved in IL-10-induced-STAT3 activation. Our results suggest that STAT3 and NF-κB pathways co-operate in IgA production, with soluble CD40L rapidly activating the NF-κB pathway, probably rendering STAT3 probably more reactive to IL-10 signalling. This novel role for STAT3 in B cell development reveals a potential therapeutic or vaccine target for eliciting IgA humoral responses at mucosal interfaces. PMID:21985363

  12. AID and APOBECs span the gap between innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Arnaud; Murray, Shannon; Cardinaud, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The activation-induced deaminase (AID)/APOBEC cytidine deaminases participate in a diversity of biological processes from the regulation of protein expression to embryonic development and host defenses. In its classical role, AID mutates germline-encoded sequences of B cell receptors, a key aspect of adaptive immunity, and APOBEC1, mutates apoprotein B pre-mRNA, yielding two isoforms important for cellular function and plasma lipid metabolism. Investigations over the last ten years have uncovered a role of the APOBEC superfamily in intrinsic immunity against viruses and innate immunity against viral infection by deamination and mutation of viral genomes. Further, discovery in the area of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection revealed that the HIV viral infectivity factor protein interacts with APOBEC3G, targeting it for proteosomal degradation, overriding its antiviral function. More recently, our and others’ work have uncovered that the AID and APOBEC cytidine deaminase family members have an even more direct link between activity against viral infection and induction and shaping of adaptive immunity than previously thought, including that of antigen processing for cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and natural killer cell activation. Newly ascribed functions of these cytodine deaminases will be discussed, including their newly identified roles in adaptive immunity, epigenetic regulation, and cell differentiation. Herein this review we discuss AID and APOBEC cytodine deaminases as a link between innate and adaptive immunity uncovered by recent studies. PMID:25352838

  13. AID AND SOMATIC HYPERMUTATION

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W.; Gearhart, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    In response to an assault by foreign organisms, peripheral B cells can change their antibody affinity and isotype by somatically mutating their genomic DNA. The ability of a cell to modify its DNA is exceptional in light of the potential consequences of genetic alterations to cause human disease and cancer. Thus, as expected, this mechanism of antibody diversity is tightly regulated and coordinated through one protein, activation induced deaminase (AID). AID produces diversity by converting cytosine to uracil within the immunoglobulin loci. The deoxyuracil residue is mutagenic when paired with deoxyguanosine, since it mimics thymidine during DNA replication. Additionally, B cells can manipulate the DNA repair pathways so that deoxyuracils are not faithfully repaired. Therefore, an intricate balance exists which is regulated at multiple stages to promote mutation of immunoglobulin genes, while retaining integrity of the rest of the genome. Here we discuss and summarize the current understanding of how AID functions to cause somatic hypermutation. PMID:20510733

  14. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is affected. Here, we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a noncoding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of noncoding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction. PMID:26799454

  15. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  16. Generation and Repair of AID-initiated DNA Lesions in B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangguo; Wang, Jing H.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates the secondary antibody diversification process in B lymphocytes. In mammalian B cells, this process includes somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), both of which require AID. AID induces U:G mismatch lesions in DNA that are subsequently converted into point mutations or DNA double stranded breaks during SHM/CSR. In a physiological context, AID targets immunoglobulin (Ig) loci to mediate SHM/CSR. However, recent studies reveal genome-wide access of AID to numerous non-Ig loci. Thus, AID poses a threat to the genome of B cells if AID-initiated DNA lesions cannot be properly repaired. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the specificity of AID targeting and the repair pathways responsible for processing AID-initiated DNA lesions. PMID:24748462

  17. AID targeting: old mysteries and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vivek; Bortnick, Alexandra; Murre, Cornelis

    2015-09-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mediates cytosine deamination and underlies two central processes in antibody diversification: somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination. AID deamination is not exclusive to immunoglobulin loci; it can instigate DNA lesions in non-immunoglobulin genes and thus stringent checks are in place to constrain and restrict its activity. Recent findings have provided new insights into the mechanisms that target AID activity to specific genomic regions, revealing an involvement for noncoding RNAs associated with polymerase pausing and with enhancer transcription as well as genomic architecture. We review these findings and integrate them into a model for multilevel regulation of AID expression and targeting in immunoglobulin and non-immunoglobulin loci. Within this framework we discuss gaps in understanding, and outline important areas of further research. PMID:26254147

  18. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma. PMID:26921193

  19. Functional requirements of AID's higher order structures and their interaction with RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Samiran; Begum, Nasim A; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. Although both the N and C termini of AID have unique functions in DNA cleavage and recombination, respectively, during SHM and CSR, their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay combined with glycerol gradient fractionation, we revealed that the AID C terminus is required for a stable dimer formation. Furthermore, AID monomers and dimers form complexes with distinct heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). AID monomers associate with DNA cleavage cofactor hnRNP K whereas AID dimers associate with recombination cofactors hnRNP L, hnRNP U, and Serpine mRNA-binding protein 1. All of these AID/ribonucleoprotein associations are RNA-dependent. We propose that AID's structure-specific cofactor complex formations differentially contribute to its DNA-cleavage and recombination functions. PMID:26929374

  20. Targeting of AID-mediated sequence diversification to immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2011-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a key enzyme for antibody-mediated immune responses. Antibodies are encoded by the immunoglobulin genes and AID acts as a transcription-dependent DNA mutator on these genes to improve antibody affinity and effector functions. An emerging theme in field is that many transcribed genes are potential targets of AID, presenting an obvious danger to genomic integrity. Thus there are mechanisms in place to ensure that mutagenic outcomes of AID activity are specifically restricted to the immunoglobulin loci. Cis-regulatory targeting elements mediate this effect and their mode of action is probably a combination of immunoglobulin gene specific activation of AID and a perversion of faithful DNA repair towards error-prone outcomes. PMID:21295456

  1. Targeting of AID-mediated sequence diversification to immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Fugmann, Sebastian D.

    2011-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a key enzyme for antibody-mediated immune responses. Antibodies are encoded by the immunoglobulin genes and AID acts as a transcription-dependent DNA mutator on these genes to improve antibody affinity and effector functions. An emerging theme in field is that many transcribed genes are potential targets of AID, presenting an obvious danger to genomic integrity. Thus there are mechanisms in place to ensure that mutagenic outcomes of AID activity are specifically restricted to the immunoglobulin loci. Cis-regulatory targeting elements mediate this effect and their mode of action is likely a combination of immunoglobulin gene specific activation of AID and a perversion of faithful DNA repair towards error-prone outcomes. PMID:21295456

  2. Non-coding RNA generated following lariat-debranching mediates targeting of AID to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Simin; Vuong, Bao Q.; Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Lin, Jia-Yu; Huang, Feng-Ting; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription through immunoglobulin switch (S) regions is essential for class switch recombination (CSR) but no molecular function of the transcripts has been described. Likewise, recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to S regions is critical for CSR; however, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that intronic switch RNA acts in trans to target AID to S region DNA. AID binds directly to switch RNA through G-quadruplexes formed by the RNA molecules. Disruption of this interaction by mutation of a key residue in the putative RNA-binding domain of AID impairs recruitment of AID to S region DNA, thereby abolishing CSR. Additionally, inhibition of RNA lariat processing leads to loss of AID localization to S regions and compromises CSR; both defects can be rescued by exogenous expression of switch transcripts in a sequence-specific manner. These studies uncover an RNA-mediated mechanism of targeting AID to DNA. PMID:25957684

  3. Class-switch recombination: after the dawn of AID

    PubMed Central

    Kenter, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    Isotype class switching is central to the humoral immune response. The discovery that mutations in the activation-induced deaminase (AID) gene inhibit class-switch recombination, somatic hypermutation and gene conversion is a major step forward in defining the underlying mechanisms of these gene modification events. The propensity of mutations to occur at dC/dG nucleotides during somatic hypermutation and the homology between AID and cytidine deaminase has resulted in studies demonstrating that AID has the properties of a cytidine-specific mutator and also that elements of the base-excision repair pathway play a central role in class switching and hypermutation. AID is not a promiscuous mutator in the B cell, suggesting that there are specific molecular targeting mechanisms that regulate the accessibility of DNA to AID and differentially regulate class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. During class switching, isotype-specific targeting occurs independently of AID and provides another level of specificity to this recombination event. PMID:12633669

  4. AIDing cancer treatment: Reducing AID activity via HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rebhandl, Stefan; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    The activation induced deaminase (AID) catalyses the two key events underlying humoral adaptive immunity: class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of antibody genes in B lymphocytes. AID accomplishes this task by directly deaminating cytosines within the genomic immunoglobulin locus, thereby triggering a complex mutagenic process eventually leading to improved effector function of antibodies. However, it has long been noticed that AID can be aberrantly expressed in cancer and that its activity is not absolutely restricted to antibody genes, as substantial genome-wide off-target mutations have been observed, which contribute to tumorigenesis and clonal evolution of AID-expressing malignancies. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Montamat-Sicotte et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2365-2376] investigate the feasibility and efficacy of in vivo inhibition of AID with HSP90 inhibitors in a mouse model of B-cell leukemia and in vitro with a human breast cancer cell line, thereby demonstrating that cancer patients may benefit from preventing noncanonical AID functions. PMID:26151367

  5. AID to overcome the limitations of genomic information by introducing somatic DNA alterations

    PubMed Central

    Honjo, Tasuku; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Shinkura, Reiko

    2006-01-01

    The immune system has adopted somatic DNA alterations to overcome the limitations of the genomic information. Activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an essential enzyme to regulate class switch recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM) and gene conversion (GC) of the immunoglobulin gene. AID is known to be required for DNA cleavage of S regions in CSR and V regions in SHM. However, its molecular mechanism is a focus of extensive debate. RNA editing hypothesis postulates that AID edits yet unknown mRNA, to generate specific endonucleases for CSR and SHM. By contrast, DNA deamination hypothesis assumes that AID deaminates cytosine in DNA, followed by DNA cleavage by base excision repair enzymes. We summarize the basic knowledge for molecular mechanisms for CSR and SHM and then discuss the importance of AID not only in the immune regulation but also in the genome instability. PMID:25873751

  6. Cell Cycle Regulates Nuclear Stability of AID and Determines the Cellular Response to AID

    PubMed Central

    Le, Quy; Maizels, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    AID (Activation Induced Deaminase) deaminates cytosines in DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification and to reprogram CpG methylation in early development. AID is potentially highly mutagenic, and it causes genomic instability evident as translocations in B cell malignancies. Here we show that AID is cell cycle regulated. By high content screening microscopy, we demonstrate that AID undergoes nuclear degradation more slowly in G1 phase than in S or G2-M phase, and that mutations that affect regulatory phosphorylation or catalytic activity can alter AID stability and abundance. We directly test the role of cell cycle regulation by fusing AID to tags that destabilize nuclear protein outside of G1 or S-G2/M phases. We show that enforced nuclear localization of AID in G1 phase accelerates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, and is well-tolerated; while nuclear AID compromises viability in S-G2/M phase cells. We identify AID derivatives that accelerate somatic hypermutation with minimal impact on viability, which will be useful tools for engineering genes and proteins by iterative mutagenesis and selection. Our results further suggest that use of cell cycle tags to regulate nuclear stability may be generally applicable to studying DNA repair and to engineering the genome. PMID:26355458

  7. AID downregulation is a novel function of the DNMT inhibitor 5-aza-deoxycytidine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chiou-Tsun; Yang, Pei-Ming; Chern, Ting-Rong; Chuang, Shu-Hui; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Klemm, Lars; Müschen, Markus; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2014-01-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) was originally identified as an inducer of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) in immunoglobulin genes. However, AID can also cause mutations in host genes and contribute to cancer progression and drug resistance. In this study, molecular docking showed the interaction of free 5-aza-CdR and Zebularine (Zeb) with AID. However, only 5-aza-CdR-incorporated ssDNA bound to the active site of AID and inhibited AID expression through proteasomal degradation. 5-aza-CdR demonstrated cytotoxicity against AID-positive and -negative hematopoietic cancer cells. In contrast, Zeb exhibited a cytotoxic effect only in AID-negative cells due to its inability to inhibit AID expression. This differential effect might be due to the DNMT1 stabilization induced by AID, thus restricting the ability of Zeb to deplete DNMT1 and induce tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), such as p21, in AID-positive cells. Moreover, the in vivo anticancer effect of 5-aza-CdR but not Zeb in AID-positive hematopoietic cancer cells was demonstrated. The study not only displays the association of AID and DNMT1 and identifies a novel biological function of AID, but also provides novel information regarding the use of DNMT inhibitors to treat AID-positive hematopoietic cancers. PMID:24457556

  8. Attenuating homologous recombination stimulates an AID-induced antileukemic effect

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Kristin R.; Hasham, Muneer G.; Donghia, Nina M.; Branca, Jane; Chavaree, Margaret; Chase, Betsy; Breggia, Anne; Hedlund, Jacquelyn; Emery, Ivette; Cavallo, Francesca; Jasin, Maria; Rüter, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is critical in normal B cells to initiate somatic hypermutation and immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Accumulating evidence suggests that AID is also prooncogenic, inducing cancer-promoting mutations or chromosome rearrangements. In this context, we find that AID is expressed in >40% of primary human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases, consistent with other reports. Using a combination of human B lymphoid leukemia cells and mouse models, we now show that AID expression can be harnessed for antileukemic effect, after inhibition of the RAD51 homologous recombination (HR) factor with 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2-2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS). As a proof of principle, we show that DIDS treatment inhibits repair of AID-initiated DNA breaks, induces apoptosis, and promotes cytotoxicity preferentially in AID-expressing human CLL. This reveals a novel antineoplastic role of AID that can be triggered by inhibition of HR, suggesting a potential new paradigm to treat AID-expressing tumors. Given the growing list of tumor types with aberrant AID expression, this novel therapeutic approach has potential to impact a significant patient population. PMID:23589568

  9. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Liztler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Muschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert non-canonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  10. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells.

    PubMed

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Litzler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Müschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-08-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert noncanonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  11. A critical role for AID in the initiation of reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Nidhi; Decker, Matthew N.; Brady, Jennifer J.; Bussat, Rose T.; Burns, David M.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Blau, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic insights into the reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are limited, particularly for early acting molecular regulators. Here we use an acute loss of function approach to demonstrate that activation-induced deaminase (AID) activity is necessary for the initiation of reprogramming to iPSCs. While AID is well known for antibody diversification, it has also recently been shown to have a role in active DNA demethylation in reprogramming toward pluripotency and development. These findings suggested a potential role for AID in iPSC generation, yet, iPSC yield from AID-knockout mouse fibroblasts was similar to that of wild-type (WT) fibroblasts. We reasoned that an acute loss of AID function might reveal effects masked by compensatory mechanisms during development, as reported for other proteins. Accordingly, we induced an acute reduction (>50%) in AID levels using 4 different shRNAs and determined that reprogramming to iPSCs was significantly impaired by 79 ± 7%. The deaminase activity of AID was critical, as coexpression of WT but not a catalytic mutant AID rescued reprogramming. Notably, AID was required only during a 72-h time window at the onset of iPSC reprogramming. Our findings show a critical role for AID activity in the initiation of reprogramming to iPSCs.—Bhutani, N., Decker, M. N., Brady, J. J., Bussat, R. T., Burns, D. M., Corbel, S. Y., Blau, H. M. A critical role for AID in the initiation of reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23212122

  12. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency adenosine ...

  13. Plasmodium Infection Promotes Genomic Instability and AID Dependent B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Robbiani, Davide F.; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Feldhahn, Niklas; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Callen, Elsa; Wang, Qiao; Jankovic, Mila; Silva, Israel T.; Rommel, Philipp C.; Bosque, David; Eisenreich, Tom; Nussenzweig, André; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic infection with Plasmodium falciparum was epidemiologically associated with endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma, a mature B cell cancer characterized by chromosome translocation between the c-myc oncogene and Igh, over 50 years ago. Whether infection promotes B cell lymphoma, and if so by what mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between parasitic disease and lymphomagenesis we used Plasmodium chabaudi (Pc) to produce chronic malaria infection in mice. Pc induces prolonged expansion of germinal centers (GCs), unique compartments where B cells undergo rapid clonal expansion and express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA mutator. GC B cells elicited during Pc infection suffer widespread DNA damage leading to chromosome translocations. Although infection does not change the overall rate, it modifies lymphomagenesis to favor mature B cell lymphomas that are AID dependent and show chromosome translocations. Thus, malaria infection favors mature B cell cancers by eliciting protracted AID expression in GC B cells. PMID:26276629

  14. Interplay between Target Sequences and Repair Pathways Determines Distinct Outcomes of AID-Initiated Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangguo; Eder, Maxwell D.; Elos, Mihret T.; Viboolsittiseri, Sawanee S.; Chen, Xiaomi

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) functions by deaminating cytosines and causing U:G mismatches, a rate-limiting step of Ab gene diversification. However, precise mechanisms regulating AID deamination frequency remain incompletely understood. Moreover, it is not known whether different sequence contexts influence the preferential access of mismatch repair or uracil glycosylase (UNG) to AID-initiated U:G mismatches. In this study, we employed two knock-in models to directly compare the mutability of core Sμ and VDJ exon sequences and their ability to regulate AID deamination and subsequent repair process. We find that the switch (S) region is a much more efficient AID deamination target than the V region. Igh locus AID-initiated lesions are processed by error-free and error-prone repair. S region U:G mismatches are preferentially accessed by UNG, leading to more UNG-dependent deletions, enhanced by mismatch repair deficiency. V region mutation hotspots are largely determined by AID deamination. Recurrent and conserved S region motifs potentially function as spacers between AID deamination hotspots. We conclude that the pattern of mutation hotspots and DNA break generation is influenced by sequence-intrinsic properties, which regulate AID deamination and affect the preferential access of downstream repair. Our studies reveal an evolutionarily conserved role for substrate sequences in regulating Ab gene diversity and AID targeting specificity. PMID:26810227

  15. Multiple transcription factor binding sites predict AID targeting in non-immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Jamie L.; Liu, Man; Yaari, Gur; Khalil, Ashraf M.; Tomayko, Mary M.; Shlomchik, Mark J.; Schatz, David G.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant targeting of the enzyme Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) results in the accumulation of somatic mutations in approximately 25% of expressed genes in germinal center B cells. Observations in Ung−/− Msh2−/− mice suggest that many other genes efficiently repair AID-induced lesions, so that up to 45% of genes may actually be targeted by AID. It is important to understand the mechanisms that recruit AID to certain genes, as this mis-targeting represents an important risk for genome instability. We hypothesize that several mechanisms will combine to target AID to each locus. In order to resolve which mechanisms affect AID targeting, we analyze 7.3Mb of sequence data, along with the regulatory context, from 83 genes in Ung−/− Msh2−/− mice to identify common properties of AID targets. This analysis identifies the involvement of three transcription factor binding sites (E-box motifs, along with YY1 and C/EBP-beta binding sites) that may work together to recruit AID. Based on previous knowledge and these newly discovered features, a classification tree model was built to predict genome-wide AID targeting. Using this predictive model we were able to identify a set of 101 high-interest genes that are likely targets of AID. PMID:23514741

  16. Interplay between Target Sequences and Repair Pathways Determines Distinct Outcomes of AID-Initiated Lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangguo; Eder, Maxwell D; Elos, Mihret T; Viboolsittiseri, Sawanee S; Chen, Xiaomi; Wang, Jing H

    2016-03-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) functions by deaminating cytosines and causing U:G mismatches, a rate-limiting step of Ab gene diversification. However, precise mechanisms regulating AID deamination frequency remain incompletely understood. Moreover, it is not known whether different sequence contexts influence the preferential access of mismatch repair or uracil glycosylase (UNG) to AID-initiated U:G mismatches. In this study, we employed two knock-in models to directly compare the mutability of core Sμ and VDJ exon sequences and their ability to regulate AID deamination and subsequent repair process. We find that the switch (S) region is a much more efficient AID deamination target than the V region. Igh locus AID-initiated lesions are processed by error-free and error-prone repair. S region U:G mismatches are preferentially accessed by UNG, leading to more UNG-dependent deletions, enhanced by mismatch repair deficiency. V region mutation hotspots are largely determined by AID deamination. Recurrent and conserved S region motifs potentially function as spacers between AID deamination hotspots. We conclude that the pattern of mutation hotspots and DNA break generation is influenced by sequence-intrinsic properties, which regulate AID deamination and affect the preferential access of downstream repair. Our studies reveal an evolutionarily conserved role for substrate sequences in regulating Ab gene diversity and AID targeting specificity. PMID:26810227

  17. Local Sequence Targeting in the AID/APOBEC Family Differentially Impacts Retroviral Restriction and Antibody Diversification*

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Rahul M.; Maul, Robert W.; Guminski, Amy F.; McClure, Rhonda L.; Gajula, Kiran S.; Saribasak, Huseyin; McMahon, Moira A.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Stivers, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleic acid cytidine deaminases of the activation-induced deaminase (AID)/APOBEC family are critical players in active and innate immune responses, playing roles as target-directed, purposeful mutators. AID specifically deaminates the host immunoglobulin (Ig) locus to evolve antibody specificity, whereas its close relative, APOBEC3G (A3G), lethally mutates the genomes of retroviral pathogens such as HIV. Understanding the basis for the target-specific action of these enzymes is essential, as mistargeting poses significant risks, potentially promoting oncogenesis (AID) or fostering drug resistance (A3G). AID prefers to deaminate cytosine in WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motifs, whereas A3G favors deamination of CCC motifs. This specificity is largely dictated by a single, divergent protein loop in the enzyme family that recognizes the DNA sequence. Through grafting of this substrate-recognition loop, we have created enzyme variants of A3G and AID with altered local targeting to directly evaluate the role of sequence specificity on immune function. We find that grafted loops placed in the A3G scaffold all produced efficient restriction of HIV but that foreign loops in the AID scaffold compromised hypermutation and class switch recombination. Local targeting, therefore, appears alterable for innate defense against retroviruses by A3G but important for adaptive antibody maturation catalyzed by AID. Notably, AID targeting within the Ig locus is proportionally correlated to its in vitro ability to target WRC sequences rather than non-WRC sequences. Although other mechanisms may also contribute, our results suggest that local sequence targeting by AID/APOBEC3 enzymes represents an elegant example of co-evolution of enzyme specificity with its target DNA sequence. PMID:20929867

  18. Consecutive interactions with HSP90 and eEF1A underlie a functional maturation and storage pathway of AID in the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Methot, Stephen P.; Litzler, Ludivine C.; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Zahn, Astrid; Robert, Francis; Pelletier, Jerry; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates mutagenic pathways to diversify the antibody genes during immune responses. The access of AID to the nucleus is limited by CRM1-mediated nuclear export and by an uncharacterized mechanism of cytoplasmic retention. Here, we define a conformational motif in AID that dictates its cytoplasmic retention and demonstrate that the translation elongation factor eukaryotic elongation factor 1 α (eEF1A) is necessary for AID cytoplasmic sequestering. The mechanism is independent of protein synthesis but dependent on a tRNA-free form of eEF1A. Inhibiting eEF1A prevents the interaction with AID, which accumulates in the nucleus and increases class switch recombination as well as chromosomal translocation byproducts. Most AID is associated to unspecified cytoplasmic complexes. We find that the interactions of AID with eEF1A and heat-shock protein 90 kD (HSP90) are inversely correlated. Despite both interactions stabilizing AID, the nature of the AID fractions associated with HSP90 or eEF1A are different, defining two complexes that sequentially produce and store functional AID in the cytoplasm. In addition, nuclear export and cytoplasmic retention cooperate to exclude AID from the nucleus but might not be functionally equivalent. Our results elucidate the molecular basis of AID cytoplasmic retention, define its functional relevance and distinguish it from other mechanisms regulating AID. PMID:25824822

  19. Perspectives of bacterial ACC deaminase in phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Muhammad; Saleem, Muhammad; Hussain, Sarfraz

    2007-08-01

    Phytoremediation of contaminated soil and water environments is regulated and coordinated by the plant root system, yet root growth is often inhibited by pollutant-induced stress. Prolific root growth could maximize rates of hyperaccumulation of inorganic contaminants or rhizodegradation of organic pollutants, and thus accelerate phytoremediation. Accelerated ethylene production in response to stress induced by contaminants is known to inhibit root growth and is considered as a major limitation in improving phytoremediation efficiency. Recent work shows that bacterial 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase regulates ethylene levels in plants by metabolizing its precursor ACC into alpha-ketobutyric acid and ammonia. Plants inoculated with ACC deaminase bacteria or transgenic plants that express bacterial ACC deaminase genes can regulate their ethylene levels and consequently contribute to a more extensive root system. Such proliferation of roots in contaminated soil can lead to enhanced uptake of heavy metals or rhizodegradation of xenobiotics. PMID:17573137

  20. B Cell Super-Enhancers and Regulatory Clusters Recruit AID Tumorigenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jason; Wang, Qiao; Dose, Marei; Pruett, Nathanael; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Resch, Wolfgang; Liang, Genqing; Tang, Zhonghui; Mathé, Ewy; Benner, Christopher; Dubois, Wendy; Nelson, Steevenson; Vian, Laura; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Jankovic, Mila; Hakim, Ofir; Gazumyan, Anna; Pavri, Rushad; Awasthi, Parirokh; Song, Bin; Liu, Geng; Chen, Longyun; Zhu, Shida; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Staudt, Louis; Murre, Cornelis; Ruan, Yijun; Robbiani, Davide F.; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Casellas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The antibody gene mutator activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) promiscuously damages oncogenes, leading to chromosomal translocations and tumorigenesis. Why nonimmunoglobulin loci are susceptible to AID activity is unknown. Here, we study AID-mediated lesions in the context of nuclear architecture and the B cell regulome. We show that AID targets are not randomly distributed across the genome but are predominantly grouped within super-enhancers and regulatory clusters. Unexpectedly, in these domains, AID deaminates active promoters and eRNA+ enhancers interconnected in some instances over megabases of linear chromatin. Using genome editing, we demonstrate that 3D-linked targets cooperate to recruit AID-mediated breaks. Furthermore, a comparison of hypermutation in mouse B cells, AID-induced kataegis in human lymphomas, and translocations in MEFs reveals that AID damages different genes in different cell types. Yet, in all cases, the targets are predominantly associated with topological complex, highly transcribed super-enhancers, demonstrating that these compartments are key mediators of AID recruitment. PMID:25483777

  1. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-10-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8(+) T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms. PMID:26282919

  2. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8+ T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms. PMID:26282919

  3. AIDing Chromatin and Transcription-Coupled Orchestration of Immunoglobulin Class-Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Yen, Wei-Feng; Pucella, Joseph N.; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    Secondary diversification of the antibody repertoire upon antigenic challenge, in the form of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) class-switch recombination (CSR) endows mature, naïve B cells in peripheral lymphoid organs with a limitless ability to mount an optimal humoral immune response, thus expediting pathogen elimination. CSR replaces the default constant (CH) region exons (Cμ) of IgH with any of the downstream CH exons (Cγ, Cε, or Cα), thereby altering effector functions of the antibody molecule. This process depends on, and is orchestrated by, activation-induced deaminase (AID), a DNA cytidine deaminase that acts on single-stranded DNA exposed during transcription of switch (S) region sequences at the IgH locus. DNA lesions thus generated are processed by components of several general DNA repair pathways to drive CSR. Given that AID can instigate DNA lesions and genomic instability, stringent checks are imposed that constrain and restrict its mutagenic potential. In this review, we will discuss how AID expression and substrate specificity and activity is rigorously enforced at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, post-translational, and epigenetic levels, and how the DNA-damage response is choreographed with precision to permit targeted activity while limiting bystander catastrophe. PMID:24734031

  4. AID-induced remodeling of immunoglobulin genes and B cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Laffleur, Brice; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Moreau, Jeanne; Cogné, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Survival and phenotype of normal and malignant B lymphocytes are critically dependent on constitutive signals by the B cell receptor (BCR) for antigen. In addition, either antigen ligation of the BCR or various mitogenic stimuli result in B cell activation and induction of activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID activity can in turn mediate somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) V regions and also deeply remodel the Ig heavy chain locus through class switch recombination (CSR) or locus suicide recombination (LSR). In addition to changes linked to affinity for antigen, modifying the class/isotype (i.e. the structure and function) of the BCR or suddenly deleting BCR expression also modulates the fate of antigen-experienced B cells. PMID:24851241

  5. AID in aging and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    FRASCA, DANIELA; ANDRISANI, GIANLUCA; DIAZ, ALAIN; FELICE, CARLA; GUIDI, LUISA; BLOMBERG, BONNIE B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of B cell responses in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and healthy individuals of different ages, vaccinated with the pandemic (p)2009 influenza vaccine. The in vivo response was measured by the hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay, which represents the most established correlate with vaccine protectiveness. The in vitro response was measured by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in cultures of vaccine-stimulated PBMC. Both responses are somewhat impaired in IBD patients undergoing anti-TNF-α treatment but these are much more decreased in IBD patients undergoing treatment with anti-TNF-α and immunosuppressive (IS) drugs. These latter patients had in vivo and in vitro B cell responses similar to those of elderly individuals. Moreover, as we have previously demonstrated in healthy subjects, the in vitro response to the polyclonal stimulus CpG may be used as a biomarker for subsequent vaccine response and AID activation is correlated with the serum response in IBD patients, as it is in healthy individuals. These results altogether indicate that IBD patients on anti-TNF-α and IS have significantly impaired in vivo and in vitro B cell responses, as compared to those on monotherapy. This is the first report to demonstrate that B cell defects, as measured by the autonomous AID reporter, in IBD patients contribute to reduced humoral responses to the influenza vaccine, as we have previously shown for elderly individuals. PMID:23190037

  6. Rescue of the Orphan Enzyme Isoguanine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    D Hitchcock; A Fedorov; E Fedorov; L Dangott; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from Escherichia coli was shown to catalyze the deamination of isoguanine (2-oxoadenine) to xanthine. Isoguanine is an oxidation product of adenine in DNA that is mutagenic to the cell. The isoguanine deaminase activity in E. coli was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, and anion exchange chromatography. The active protein was identified by peptide mass fingerprint analysis as cytosine deaminase. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoguanine at pH 7.7 are as follows: k{sub cat} = 49 s{sup -1}, K{sub m} = 72 {micro}M, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 6.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The kinetic constants for the deamination of cytosine are as follows: k{sub cat} = 45 s{sup -1}, K{sub m} = 302 {micro}M, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 1.5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Under these reaction conditions, isoguanine is the better substrate for cytosine deaminase. The three-dimensional structure of CDA was determined with isoguanine in the active site.

  7. Efficient AID targeting of switch regions is not sufficient for optimal class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Bonaud, Amélie; Lechouane, Fabien; Le Noir, Sandrine; Monestier, Olivier; Cogné, Michel; Sirac, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation relies on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-dependent somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) loci. Class switch recombination (CSR) can in parallel occur between AID-targeted, transcribed, spliced and repetitive switch (S) regions. AID thus initiates not only mutations but also double-strand breaks (DSBs). What governs the choice between those two outcomes remains uncertain. Here we explore whether insertion of transcribed intronic S regions in a locus (Igκ) strongly recruiting AID is sufficient for efficient CSR. Although strongly targeted by AID and carrying internal deletions, the knocked-in S regions only undergo rare CSR-like events. This model confirms S regions as exquisite SHM targets, extending AID activity far from transcription initiation sites, and shows that such spliced and repetitive AID targets are not sufficient by themselves for CSR. Beyond transcription and AID recruitment, additional IgH elements are thus needed for CSR, restricting this hazardous gene remodelling to IgH loci. PMID:26146363

  8. AID induces intraclonal diversity and genomic damage in CD86+ chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Huemer, Michael; Rebhandl, Stefan; Zaborsky, Nadja; Gassner, Franz J; Hainzl, Stefan; Weiss, Lukas; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mediates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes by directly deaminating cytosines to uracils. As AID causes a substantial amount of off-target mutations, its activity has been associated with lymphomagenesis and clonal evolution of B-cell malignancies. Although it has been shown that AID is expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a clear analysis of in vivo AID activity in this B-cell malignancy remained elusive. In this study performed on primary human CLL samples, we report that, despite the presence of a dominant VDJ heavy chain region, a substantial intraclonal diversity was observed at VDJ as well as at IgM switch regions (Sμ), showing ongoing AID activity in vivo during disease progression. This AID-mediated heterogeneity was higher in CLL subclones expressing CD86, which we identified as the proliferative CLL fraction. Finally, CD86 expression correlated with shortened time to first treatment and increased γ-H2AX focus formation. Our data demonstrate that AID is active in CLL in vivo and thus, AID likely contributes to clonal evolution of CLL. PMID:25179679

  9. The Interaction between AID and CIB1 Is Nonessential for Antibody Gene Diversification by Gene Conversion or Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Demorest, Zachary L.; MacDuff, Donna A.; Brown, William L.; Morham, Scott G.; Parise, Leslie V.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2010-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation, gene conversion and class switch recombination by deaminating variable and switch region DNA cytidines to uridines. AID is predominantly cytoplasmic and must enter the nuclear compartment to initiate these distinct antibody gene diversification reactions. Nuclear AID is relatively short-lived, as it is efficiently exported by a CRM1-dependent mechanism and it is susceptible to proteasome-dependent degradation. To help shed light on mechanisms of post-translational regulation, a yeast-based screen was performed to identify AID-interacting proteins. The calcium and integrin binding protein CIB1 was identified by sequencing and the interaction was confirmed by immunoprecipitation experiments. The AID/CIB1 resisted DNase and RNase treatment, and it is therefore unlikely to be mediated by nucleic acid. The requirement for CIB1 in AID-mediated antibody gene diversification reactions was assessed in CIB1-deficient DT40 cells and in knockout mice, but immunoglobulin gene conversion and class switch recombination appeared normal. The DT40 system was also used to show that CIB1 over-expression has no effect on gene conversion and that AID-EGFP subcellular localization is normal. These combined data demonstrate that CIB1 is not required for AID to mediate antibody gene diversification processes. It remains possible that CIB1 has an alternative, a redundant or a subtle non-limiting regulatory role in AID biology. PMID:20652029

  10. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  11. Convergent Transcription At Intragenic Super-Enhancers Targets AID-initiated Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fei-Long; Du, Zhou; Federation, Alexander; Hu, Jiazhi; Wang, Qiao; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Meyers, Robin M.; Amor, Corina; Wasserman, Caitlyn R.; Neuberg, Donna; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bradner, James E.; Liu, X. Shirley; Alt, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates both somatic hypermutation (SHM) for antibody affinity maturation and DNA breakage for antibody class switch recombination (CSR) via transcription-dependent cytidine deamination of single stranded DNA targets. While largely specific for immunoglobulin genes, AID also acts on a limited set of off-targets, generating oncogenic translocations and mutations that contribute to B cell lymphoma. How AID is recruited to off-targets has been a long-standing mystery. Based on deep GRO-Seq studies of mouse and human B lineage cells activated for CSR or SHM, we report that most robust AID off-target translocations occur within highly focal regions of target genes in which sense and antisense transcription converge. Moreover, we found that such AID-targeting “convergent” transcription arises from antisense transcription that emanates from Super-Enhancers within sense transcribed gene bodies. Our findings provide an explanation for AID off-targeting to a small subset of mostly lineage-specific genes in activated B cells. PMID:25483776

  12. E3-ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 determines the fate of AID-associated RNA polymerase II in B cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianbo; Keim, Celia D; Wang, Jiguang; Kazadi, David; Oliver, Paula M; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2013-08-15

    Programmed mutagenesis of the immunoglobulin locus of B lymphocytes during class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation requires RNA polymerase II (polII) transcription complex-dependent targeting of the DNA mutator activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). AID deaminates cytidine residues on substrate sequences in the immunoglobulin (Ig) locus via a transcription-dependent mechanism, and this activity is stimulated by the RNA polII stalling cofactor Spt5 and the 11-subunit cellular noncoding RNA 3'-5' exonucleolytic processing complex RNA exosome. The mechanism by which the RNA exosome recognizes immunoglobulin locus RNA substrates to stimulate AID DNA deamination activity on its in vivo substrate sequences is an important question. Here we report that E3-ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 destabilizes AID-associated RNA polII by a ubiquitination event, leading to generation of 3' end free RNA exosome RNA substrates at the Ig locus and other AID target sequences genome-wide. We found that lack of Nedd4 activity in B cells leads to accumulation of RNA exosome substrates at AID target genes and defective CSR. Taken together, our study links noncoding RNA processing following RNA polII pausing with regulation of the mutator AID protein. Our study also identifies Nedd4 as a regulator of noncoding RNAs that are generated by stalled RNA polII genome-wide. PMID:23964096

  13. Adenosine deaminase in disorders of purine metabolism and in immune deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tritsch, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the selection titles are: Adenosine Deaminase Impairment and Ribonucleotide Reductase in Human Cells; Adenosine Deaminase and Malignant Cells; Inhibition of Adenosine Deaminase to Increase the Antitumor Activity of Adenine Nucleoside Analogues; and Molecular Biology of the Adenosine Deaminase Gene and Messenger RNA.

  14. Generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells from Aid-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Ren; Amano, Naoki; Ichisaka, Tomoko; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okita, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that DNA demethylation plays a pivotal role in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this action is still unclear. Previous reports indicated that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aid, also known as Aicda) is involved in DNA demethylation in several developmental processes, as well as cell fusion-mediated reprogramming. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that Aid may be involved in the DNA demethylation that occurs during the generation of iPS cells. In this study, we examined the function of Aid in iPS cell generation using Aid knockout (Aid⁻/⁻) mice expressing a GFP reporter under the control of a pluripotent stem cell marker, Nanog. By introducing Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, Nanog-GFP-positive iPS cells could be generated from the fibroblasts and primary B cells of Aid⁻/⁻ mice. Their induction efficiency was similar to that of wild-type (Aid⁺/⁺) iPS cells. The Aid⁻/⁻ iPS cells showed normal proliferation and gave rise to chimeras, indicating their capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. A comprehensive DNA methylation analysis showed only a few differences between Aid⁺/⁺ and Aid⁻/⁻ iPS cells. These data suggest that Aid does not have crucial functions in DNA demethylation during iPS cell generation. PMID:24718089

  15. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Risa; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  16. Discovery of a Bacterial 5-Methylcytosine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    5-Methylcytosine is found in all domains of life, but the bacterial cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli (CodA) will not accept 5-methylcytosine as a substrate. Since significant amounts of 5-methylcytosine are produced in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, this compound must eventually be catabolized and the fragments recycled by enzymes that have yet to be identified. We therefore initiated a comprehensive phylogenetic screen for enzymes that may be capable of deaminating 5-methylcytosine to thymine. From a systematic analysis of sequence homologues of CodA from thousands of bacterial species, we identified putative cytosine deaminases where a “discriminating” residue in the active site, corresponding to Asp-314 in CodA from E. coli, was no longer conserved. Representative examples from Klebsiella pneumoniae (locus tag: Kpn00632), Rhodobacter sphaeroides (locus tag: Rsp0341), and Corynebacterium glutamicum (locus tag: NCgl0075) were demonstrated to efficiently deaminate 5-methylcytosine to thymine with values of kcat/Km of 1.4 × 105, 2.9 × 104, and 1.1 × 103 M–1 s–1, respectively. These three enzymes also catalyze the deamination of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil with values of kcat/Km of 1.2 × 105, 6.8 × 104, and 2.0 × 102 M–1 s–1, respectively. The three-dimensional structure of Kpn00632 was determined by X-ray diffraction methods with 5-methylcytosine (PDB id: 4R85), 5-fluorocytosine (PDB id: 4R88), and phosphonocytosine (PDB id: 4R7W) bound in the active site. When thymine auxotrophs of E. coli express these enzymes, they are capable of growth in media lacking thymine when supplemented with 5-methylcytosine. Expression of these enzymes in E. coli is toxic in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, due to the efficient transformation to 5-fluorouracil. PMID:25384249

  17. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn(2+) before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO(4). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe(II) /Fe(II) ]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H(2)O(2) to O(2) and H(2)O. The values of k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for the catalase activity are 200 s(-1) and 2.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H(2)O(2) before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g(ave) = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H(2)O(2) by [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  18. Histone H3.3 promotes IgV gene diversification by enhancing formation of AID-accessible single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Romanello, Marina; Schiavone, Davide; Frey, Alexander; Sale, Julian E

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin diversification is driven by activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytidine to uracil within the Ig variable (IgV) regions. Central to the recruitment of AID to the IgV genes are factors that regulate the generation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), the enzymatic substrate of AID Here, we report that chicken DT40 cells lacking variant histone H3.3 exhibit reduced IgV sequence diversification. We show that this results from impairment of the ability of AID to access the IgV genes due to reduced formation of ssDNA during IgV transcription. Loss of H3.3 also diminishes IgV R-loop formation. However, reducing IgV R-loops by RNase HI overexpression in wild-type cells does not affect IgV diversification, showing that these structures are not necessary intermediates for AID access. Importantly, the reduction in the formation of AID-accessible ssDNA in cells lacking H3.3 is independent of any effect on the level of transcription or the kinetics of RNAPII elongation, suggesting the presence of H3.3 in the nucleosomes of the IgV genes increases the chances of the IgV DNA becoming single-stranded, thereby creating an effective AID substrate. PMID:27220848

  19. Regulation of Aicda expression and AID activity.

    PubMed

    Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in a B cell differentiation stage-specific fashion and is essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). CSR and SHM play a central role in the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. AID displays a mutagenic activity by catalyzing targeted deamination of deoxycytidine (dC) residues in DNA resulting in dU:dG mismatches, which are processed into point-mutations in SHM or double-strand breaks (DSBs) in CSR. Although AID specifically targets the Ig gene loci (IgH, Igκ and Igλ), it can also home into a wide array of non-Ig genes in B-and non-B-cell backgrounds. Aberrant expression of AID is associated with multiple diseases such as allergy, inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. In autoimmune systemic lupus erythematosus, dysregulated AID expression underpins increased CSR, SHM and autoantibody production. As a potent mutator, AID is under stringent transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation. AID is also regulated in its targeting and enzymatic function. In resting naïve or memory B cells, AID transcripts and protein are undetectable. These, however, are readily and significantly up-regulated in B cells induced to undergo CSR and/or SHM. Transcription factors, such as HoxC4 and NF-κB, which are up-regulated in a B cell lineage-and/or differentiation stage-specific manner, regulate the induction of AID. HoxC4 induces AID expression by directly binding to the AID gene promoter through an evolutionarily conserved 5'-ATTT-3' motif. HoxC4 is induced by the same stimuli that induce AID and CSR. It is further up-regulated by estrogen through three estrogen responsive elements in its promoter region. The targeting of AID to switch (S) regions is mediated by 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, which specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats that are exist at high frequency in S region cores. Like HoxC4, 14-3-3 adaptors are induced

  20. Individual Substitution Mutations in the AID C Terminus That Ablate IgH Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kadungure, Tatenda; Ucher, Anna J.; Linehan, Erin K.; Schrader, Carol E.; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of Ig genes. The C terminus of AID is required for CSR but not for SHM, but the reason for this is not entirely clear. By retroviral transduction of mutant AID proteins into aid-/- mouse splenic B cells, we show that 4 amino acids within the C terminus of mouse AID, when individually mutated to specific amino acids (R190K, A192K, L196S, F198S), reduce CSR about as much or more than deletion of the entire C terminal 10 amino acids. Similar to ΔAID, the substitutions reduce binding of UNG to Ig Sμ regions and some reduce binding of Msh2, both of which are important for introducing S region DNA breaks. Junctions between the IgH donor switch (S)μ and acceptor Sα regions from cells expressing ΔAID or the L196S mutant show increased microhomology compared to junctions in cells expressing wild-type AID, consistent with problems during CSR and the use of alternative end-joining, rather than non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Unlike deletion of the AID C terminus, 3 of the substitution mutants reduce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) detected within the Sμ region in splenic B cells undergoing CSR. Cells expressing these 3 substitution mutants also have greatly reduced mutations within unrearranged Sμ regions, and they decrease with time after activation. These results might be explained by increased error-free repair, but as the C terminus has been shown to be important for recruitment of NHEJ proteins, this appears unlikely. We hypothesize that Sμ DNA breaks in cells expressing these C terminus substitution mutants are poorly repaired, resulting in destruction of Sμ segments that are deaminated by these mutants. This could explain why these mutants cannot undergo CSR. PMID:26267846

  1. AID expression increased by TNF-α is associated with class switch recombination of Igα gene in cancers.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhi; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Haidan; Li, Ming; Tang, Min; Weng, Xinxian; Yi, Wei; Bode, Ann M; Cao, Ya

    2016-07-01

    Recently, immunoglobulins (Igs) were unexpectedly found to be expressed in epithelial cancers. Immunoglobulin class switching or class switch recombination (CSR) is a natural biological process that alters a B cell's production of antibodies (immunoglobulins) from one class to another. However, the mechanism of CSR of Ig genes in cancer is still unknown. Here, we confirmed by detecting the hallmark of CSR that the Igα gene in cancer underwent CSR. Then we focused on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a crucial factor for initiating CSR. Further studies using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulation and specific inhibitor of NF-κB revealed that TNF-α could increase AID expression through NF-κB signaling. Finally, we demonstrated that AID could co-localize with protein kinase A and bind to the switching (Sα) region of the Igα gene. Overexpression of AID obviously enhanced Igα heavy chain expression and its binding ability to the Sα region. These findings indicated that TNF-α-induced AID expression is involved with CSR in cancer. PMID:25849121

  2. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein EBNA3C directly induces expression of AID and somatic mutations in B cells.

    PubMed

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Paschos, Kostas; Gillman, Adam C T; Styles, Christine T; Kellam, Paul; Allday, Martin J

    2016-05-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme responsible for induction of sequence variation in immunoglobulins (Igs) during the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and also Ig class switching, can have a potent mutator phenotype in the development of lymphoma. Using various Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) recombinants, we provide definitive evidence that the viral nuclear protein EBNA3C is essential in EBV-infected primary B cells for the induction of AID mRNA and protein. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) established with EBV recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, this was confirmed, and it was shown that transactivation of the AID gene (AICDA) is associated with EBNA3C binding to highly conserved regulatory elements located proximal to and upstream of the AICDA transcription start site. EBNA3C binding initiated epigenetic changes to chromatin at specific sites across the AICDA locus. Deep sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the IgH V-D-J region from the conditional LCL was used to formally show that SHM is activated by functional EBNA3C and induction of AID. These data, showing the direct targeting and induction of functional AID by EBNA3C, suggest a novel role for EBV in the etiology of B cell cancers, including endemic Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:27217538

  3. APRIL stimulates NF-κB-mediated HoxC4 induction for AID expression in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun; Lee, Kyu-Seon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Seo, Goo-Young; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Casali, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) plays a key role in B cell immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). We have previously reported that the highly conserved homeodomain HoxC4 transcription factor binds to the Aicda (AID gene) promoter to induce AID expression. Here, we investigated the regulation of HoxC4 transcription by a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and B cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) in mouse B cells. APRIL substantially increased both HoxC4 and AID expression, whereas BAFF induced the expression of AID but not HoxC4. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we constructed a HoxC4 gene promoter reporter vector and analyzed the promoter induction after APRIL stimulation. APRIL enhanced the HoxC4 promoter activity by 2.3-fold, and this increase disappeared when the second putative NF-κB-binding promoter element (NBE2) was mutated. Based on ChIP assays, we found that NF-κB bound to the HoxC4 promoter NBE2 region. Furthermore, the overexpression of NF-κB augmented the APRIL-induced HoxC4 promoter activity, while the expression of dominant negative-IκBα suppressed it. Taken together, our findings suggest that NF-κB mediates APRIL-induced HoxC4 transcription. PMID:23178148

  4. AID expression increased by TNF-α is associated with class switch recombination of Igα gene in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhi; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Haidan; Li, Ming; Tang, Min; Weng, Xinxian; Yi, Wei; Bode, Ann M.; Cao, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunoglobulins (Igs) were unexpectedly found to be expressed in epithelial cancers. Immunoglobulin class switching or class switch recombination (CSR) is a natural biological process that alters a B cell's production of antibodies (immunoglobulins) from one class to another. However, the mechanism of CSR of Ig genes in cancer is still unknown. Here, we confirmed by detecting the hallmark of CSR that the Igα gene in cancer underwent CSR. Then we focused on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a crucial factor for initiating CSR. Further studies using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulation and specific inhibitor of NF-κB revealed that TNF-α could increase AID expression through NF-κB signaling. Finally, we demonstrated that AID could co-localize with protein kinase A and bind to the switching (Sα) region of the Igα gene. Overexpression of AID obviously enhanced Igα heavy chain expression and its binding ability to the Sα region. These findings indicated that TNF-α-induced AID expression is involved with CSR in cancer. PMID:25849121

  5. AID-initiated purposeful mutations in immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Myron F; Scharff, Matthew D; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2007-01-01

    Exposure brings risk to all living organisms. Using a remarkably effective strategy, higher vertebrates mitigate risk by mounting a complex and sophisticated immune response to counter the potentially toxic invasion by a virtually limitless army of chemical and biological antagonists. Mutations are almost always deleterious, but in the case of antibody diversification there are mutations occurring at hugely elevated rates within the variable (V) and switch regions (SR) of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes that are responsible for binding to and neutralizing foreign antigens throughout the body. These mutations are truly purposeful. This chapter is centered on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). AID is required for initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the V regions and class switch recombination (CSR) in the SR portions of Ig genes. By converting C --> U, while transcription takes place, AID instigates a cascade of mutational events involving error-prone DNA polymerases, base excision and mismatch repair enzymes, and recombination pathways. Together, these processes culminate in highly mutated antibody genes and the B cells expressing antibodies that have achieved optimal antigenic binding undergo positive selection in germinal centers. We will discuss the biological role of AID in this complex process, primarily in terms of its biochemical properties in relation to SHM in vivo. The chapter also discusses recent advances in experimental methods to characterize antibody dynamics as a function of SHM to help elucidate the role that the AID-induced mutations play in tailoring molecular recognition. The emerging experimental techniques help to address long-standing conundrums concerning evolution-imposed constraints on antibody structure and function. PMID:17560274

  6. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  7. Regulation of aicda expression and AID activity: Relevance to somatic hypermutation and class switch DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenming; Pone, Egest J.; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Park, Seok-Rae; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Expression and activity of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) encoded by the aicda gene are essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch DNA recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR unfold in general in germinal centers and are central to the maturation of effective antibody responses. AID expression is induced by activated B cell CD40 signaling, which is critical for the germinal center reaction, and is further enhanced by other stimuli, including interleukin-4 (IL-4) secreted from CD4+ T cells or Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activating bacterial and/or viral molecules. Integration of different intracellular signal transduction pathways, as activated by these stimuli, leads to a dynamic aicda-regulating program, which involves both positively acting trans-factors, such as Pax5, HoxC4, E47 and Irf8, and negative modulators, such as Blimp1 and Id2, to restrict aicda expression primarily to germinal center B cells. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), which functions downstream of activated B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, likely plays an important role in triggering the downregulation of aicda expression in post-germinal center B cells and throughout plasmacytoid differentiation. In B cells undergoing SHM and CSR, AID activity and, possibly, AID targeting to the Ig locus are regulated at a post-translational level, including AID dimerization/oligomerization, nuclear/cytoplasmic AID translocation and phosphorylation of the AID Ser38 residue by protein kinase A (PKA). Here, we will discuss the role of B cell activation signals, transcription regulation programs and post-translational modifications in controlling aicda expression and AID activity, thereby delineating an integrated model of modulation of SHM and CSR in the germinal center reaction. PMID:18197815

  8. Effects of bacterial ACC deaminase on Brassica napus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Jennifer C; Woody, Owen Z; McConkey, Brendan J; Glick, Bernard R

    2012-05-01

    Plants in association with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria can benefit from lower plant ethylene levels through the action of the bacterial enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase. This enzyme cleaves the immediate biosynthetic precursor of ethylene, ACC. Ethylene is responsible for many aspects of plant growth and development but, under stressful conditions, it exacerbates stress symptoms. The ACC deaminase-containing bacterium Pseudomonas putida UW4 is a potent plant growth-promoting strain and, as such, was used to elaborate the detailed role of bacterial ACC deaminase in Brassica napus (canola) plant growth promotion. Transcriptional changes in bacterially treated canola plants were investigated with the use of an Arabidopsis thaliana oligonucleotide microarray. A heterologous approach was necessary because there are few tools available at present to measure global expression changes in nonmodel organisms, specifically with the sensitivity of microarrays. The results indicate that the transcription of genes involved in plant hormone regulation, secondary metabolism, and stress response was altered in plants by the presence of the bacterium, whereas the upregulation of genes for auxin response factors and the downregulation of stress response genes was observed only in the presence of bacterial ACC deaminase. These results support the suggestion that there is a direct link between ethylene and the auxin response, which has been suggested from physiological studies, and provide more evidence for the stress-reducing benefits of ACC deaminase-expressing plant growth-promoting bacteria. PMID:22352713

  9. Adenosine deaminase--the non-invasive marker of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Shyamali; Gupta, Sanjoy

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is the India's biggest health problem especially in rural areas. A quick and dependable investigation is absolutely essential. Adenosine deaminase was estimated from the biological fluids (ascitic/pleural/CSF) with the help of the kit obtained from Tulip India Pvt Ltd. The method is based on the principle of Galati & Giusti colorimetric method. The method is simple, inexpensive and results are also reproducible. Elevation of adenosine deaminase has shown high specificity in all biological fluids. As the estimation principle is based on synthesis of ammonia so there is limitation of the procedure when the site is kidney. Similarly if the site is skin, as fluid cannot be collected from the site, adenosine deaminase estimation is also not possible. PMID:23029824

  10. Adenosine deaminase from Streptomyces coelicolor: recombinant expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pornbanlualap, Somchai; Chalopagorn, Pornchanok

    2011-08-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) identified seven putative adenine/adenosine deaminases and adenosine deaminase-like proteins, none of which have been biochemically characterized. This report describes recombinant expression, purification and characterization of SCO4901 which had been annotated in data bases as a putative adenosine deaminase. The purified putative adenosine deaminase gives a subunit Mr=48,400 on denaturing gel electrophoresis and an oligomer molecular weight of approximately 182,000 by comparative gel filtration. These values are consistent with the active enzyme being composed of four subunits with identical molecular weights. The turnover rate of adenosine is 11.5 s⁻¹ at 30 °C. Since adenine is deaminated ∼10³ slower by the enzyme when compared to that of adenosine, these data strongly show that the purified enzyme is an adenosine deaminase (ADA) and not an adenine deaminase (ADE). Other adenine nucleosides/nucleotides, including 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-adenine (ara-A), 5'-AMP, 5'-ADP and 5'-ATP, are not substrates for the enzyme. Coformycin and 2'-deoxycoformycin are potent competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with inhibition constants of 0.25 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment of ScADA with ADAs from other organisms reveals that eight of the nine highly conserved catalytic site residues in other ADAs are also conserved in ScADA. The only non-conserved residue is Asn317, which replaces Asp296 in the murine enzyme. Based on these data, it is suggested here that ADA and ADE proteins are divergently related enzymes that have evolved from a common α/β barrel scaffold to catalyze the deamination of different substrates, using a similar catalytic mechanism. PMID:21511036

  11. AID-deficient Bcl-xL transgenic mice develop delayed atypical plasma cell tumors with unusual Ig/Myc chromosomal rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Alexander L; duBois, Wendy; Mushinski, Elizabeth; McNeil, Nicole E; Hirt, Carsten; Qi, Chen-Feng; Li, Zhaoyang; Janz, Siegfried; Honjo, Tasuku; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Ried, Thomas; Behrens, Timothy; Potter, Michael

    2007-11-26

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, and has also been implicated in translocations between Ig switch regions and c-Myc in plasma cell tumors in mice. We asked if AID is required for accelerated tumor development in pristane-treated Bcl-xL transgenic BALB/c mice deficient in AID (pBxAicda-/-). pBxAicda-/- mice developed tumors with a lower frequency (24 vs. 62%) and a longer mean latency (108 vs. 36 d) than AID-sufficient mice. The tumors appeared in oil granuloma tissue and did not form ascites. By interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization, six out of nine pBxAicda-/- primary tumors had T(12;15) and one had T(6;15) chromosomal translocations. Two tumors were transplantable and established as stable cell lines. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses showed that one had an unusual unbalanced T(12;15) translocation, with IgH Cmu and Pvt-1 oriented head to tail at the breakpoint, resulting in an elevated expression of c-Myc. In contrast, the second was T(12;15) negative, but had an elevated N-Myc expression caused by a paracentric inversion of chromosome 12. Thus, novel mechanisms juxtapose Ig and Myc-family genes in AID-deficient plasma cell tumors. PMID:17998390

  12. Guanine deaminase functions as dihydropterin deaminase in the biosynthesis of aurodrosopterin, a minor red eye pigment of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaekwang; Park, Sang Ick; Ahn, Chiyoung; Kim, Heuijong; Yim, Jeongbin

    2009-08-28

    Dihydropterin deaminase, which catalyzes the conversion of 7,8-dihydropterin to 7,8-dihydrolumazine, was purified 5850-fold to apparent homogeneity from Drosophila melanogaster. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 48 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is a monomer under native conditions. The pI value, temperature, and optimal pH of the enzyme were 5.5, 40 degrees C, and 7.5, respectively. Interestingly the enzyme had much higher activity for guanine than for 7,8-dihydropterin. The specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) for guanine (8.6 x 10(6) m(-1).s(-1)) was 860-fold higher than that for 7,8-dihydropterin (1.0 x 10(4) m(-1).s(-1)). The structural gene of the enzyme was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis as CG18143, located at region 82A1 on chromosome 3R. The cloned and expressed CG18143 exhibited both 7,8-dihydropterin and guanine deaminase activities. Flies with mutations in CG18143, SUPor-P/Df(3R)A321R1 transheterozygotes, had severely decreased activities in both deaminases compared with the wild type. Among several red eye pigments, the level of aurodrosopterin was specifically decreased in the mutant, and the amount of xanthine and uric acid also decreased considerably to 76 and 59% of the amounts in the wild type, respectively. In conclusion, dihydropterin deaminase encoded by CG18143 plays a role in the biosynthesis of aurodrosopterin by providing one of its precursors, 7,8-dihydrolumazine, from 7,8-dihydropterin. Dihydropterin deaminase also functions as guanine deaminase, an important enzyme for purine metabolism. PMID:19567870

  13. AID-mediated diversification within the IgL locus of chicken DT40 cells is restricted to the transcribed IgL gene.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Anjali R; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2008-04-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and gene conversion (GCV) are closely related processes that increase the diversity the primary immunoglobulin repertoire. In both processes the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) converts cytosine residues to uracils within the DNA of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes in a transcription-dependent manner, and subsequent error-prone repair processes lead to changes in the antigen recognition site of the encoded receptors. This activity is specifically recruited to the Ig loci by unknown mechanisms. Our analyses of the chicken B-cell line DT40, and derivatives thereof, now revealed that even the closest neighbors of the Ig light chain (IgL) gene are protected from AID activity, albeit being transcribed and thus acting as potential targets of AID. Our findings are in support of a model in which cis-acting DNA boundary elements restrict AID activity to the IgL locus and guard the genome in the vicinity of the IgL gene from deleterious mutations. PMID:18023479

  14. AID-mediated diversification within the IgL locus of chicken DT40 cells is restricted to the transcribed IgL gene

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Anjali R.; Fugmann, Sebastian D.

    2008-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and gene conversion (GCV) are closely related processes that increase the diversity the primary immunoglobulin repertoire. In both processes the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) converts cytosine residues to uracils within the DNA of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes in a transcription-dependent manner, and subsequent error-prone repair processes lead to changes in the antigen recognition site of the encoded receptors. This activity is specifically recruited to the Ig loci by unknown mechanisms. Our analyses of the chicken B-cell line DT40, and derivatives thereof, now revealed that even the closest neighbors of the Ig light chain (IgL) gene are protected from AID activity, albeit being transcribed and thus acting as potential targets of AID. Our findings are in support of a model in which cis-acting DNA boundary elements restrict AID activity to the IgL locus and guard the genome in the vicinity of the IgL gene from deleterious mutations. PMID:18023479

  15. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  16. Enzymatic production of 5'-inosinic acid by AMP deaminase from a newly isolated Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Li, Shubo; Chen, Leitao; Hu, Yangjun; Fang, Guohui; Zhao, Mouming; Guo, Yuan; Pang, Zongwen

    2017-02-01

    5'-adenylic acid deaminase (AMP deaminase), an important enzyme for the food industry, can catalyze the irreversible hydrolysis of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to inosine monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. In this study, a new strain was screened that efficiently produces 3191.6U/g of AMP deaminase at 32°C. After purification, the optimal temperature and pH of the AMP deaminase were found to be 40°C and 6.0, respectively, but it was partially inhibited by Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Al(3+), and Zn(2+). With amplification of the AMP deaminase production system, 6mL of crude enzyme could produce 2.00mg/g of IMP from 2.04mg/g of dried yeast with an 84.8% molar yield after 40min. These results provide a new insight into AMP deaminase production and offer a potential platform for producing 5'-IMP. PMID:27596420

  17. Characterization of unexplored amidohydrolase enzyme-pterin deaminase.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Angayarkanni; Thandeeswaran, Murugesan; Priyadarsini, Ulaganathan; Sabarathinam, Shanmugam; Nawaz, K A Ayub; Palaniswamy, Muthusamy

    2016-06-01

    Pterin deaminase is an amidohydrolase enzyme hydrolyzing pteridines to form lumazine derivatives and ammonia. The enzyme captured the attention of scientists as early as 1959 and had been patented for its application as an anticancer agent. It is ubiquitously present in prokaryotes and has been reported in some eukaryotes such as honey bee, silkworm and rats. The enzyme has been observed to have a spectrum of substrates with the formation of respective lumazines. The role of the substrates of the enzyme in various metabolic pathways warrants a significant role in the biological activity of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Even though the functions of the enzyme have been explored in prokaryotes, their niche in the eukaryotic system is not clear. There is very few information on the structural and functional properties of the enzyme. This review has been congregated to emphasize the significance of pterin deaminase and analyzes the lacunae in understanding the biological characters of the enzyme. PMID:27094187

  18. Regulation of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase synthesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Datta, A

    1979-02-19

    A basal level of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase is detected in yeast cells grown on glucose. However, a burst of enzyme production occurs in the presence of N-acetylglucosamine in pathogenic Candida albicans and non-pathogenic Saccharomyces cervisiae. The enzyme synthesis stops and its concentration in the cells declines rapidly as soon as N-acetylglucosamine is removed from the medium. Experiments with RNA- and protein-synthesis inhibitors indicate that the appearance of new enzyme activity is dependent on concomitant new protein synthesis and the inducer operates at a transcriptional level. However, inhibition of DNA synthesis either by hydroxyurea or by mitomycin-C does not impair the synthesis of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase. PMID:369615

  19. Nbs1 ChIP-Seq Identifies Off-Target DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by AID in Activated Splenic B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, Erin K.; Schrader, Carol E.; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for initiation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody genes during immune responses. AID has also been shown to induce chromosomal translocations, mutations, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) involving non-Ig genes in activated B cells. To determine what makes a DNA site a target for AID-induced DSBs, we identify off-target DSBs induced by AID by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for Nbs1, a protein that binds DSBs, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We detect and characterize hundreds of off-target AID-dependent DSBs. Two types of tandem repeats are highly enriched within the Nbs1-binding sites: long CA repeats, which can form Z-DNA, and tandem pentamers containing the AID target hotspot WGCW. These tandem repeats are not nearly as enriched at AID-independent DSBs, which we also identified. Msh2, a component of the mismatch repair pathway and important for genome stability, increases off-target DSBs, similar to its effect on Ig switch region DSBs, which are required intermediates during CSR. Most of the off-target DSBs are two-ended, consistent with generation during G1 phase, similar to DSBs in Ig switch regions. However, a minority are one-ended, presumably due to conversion of single-strand breaks to DSBs during replication. One-ended DSBs are repaired by processes involving homologous recombination, including break-induced replication repair, which can lead to genome instability. Off-target DSBs, especially those present during S phase, can lead to chromosomal translocations, deletions and gene amplifications, resulting in the high frequency of B cell lymphomas derived from cells that express or have expressed AID. PMID:26263206

  20. Purification and properties of porphobilinogen deaminase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R M; Jordan, P M

    1994-01-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (EC 4.3.1.8) has been purified to homogeneity (16,000-fold) from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana in yields of 8%. The deaminase is a monomer of M(r) 35,000, as shown by SDS/PAGE, and 31,000, using gel-filtration chromatography. The pure enzyme has a Vmax. of 4.5 mumol/h per mg and a Km of 17 +/- 4 microM. Determination of the pI and pH optimum revealed values of 5.2 and 8.0 respectively. The sequence of the N-terminus was found to be NH2-XVAVEQKTRTAI. The deaminase is heat-stable up to 70 degrees C and is inhibited by NH3 and hydroxylamine. The enzyme is inactivated by arginine-, histidine- and lysine-specific reagents. Incubation with the substrate analogue and suicide inhibitor, 2-bromoporphobilinogen, results in chain termination and in inactivation. Images Figure 1 PMID:8192681

  1. Noncoding RNA transcription targets AID to divergently transcribed loci in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Chao, Jaime; Rabadan, Raul; Economides, Aris N.; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of the mammalian genome has the potential to expressnoncoding RNA (ncRNA). The 11-subunit RNA exosome complex is the main source of cellular 3′–5′ exoribonucleolytic activity and potentially regulates the mammalian noncoding transcriptome1. Here we generated a mouse model in which the essential subunit Exosc3 of the RNA exosome complex can be conditionally deleted. Exosc3-deficient B cells lack the ability to undergo normal levels of class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, two mutagenic DNA processes used to generate antibody diversity via the B-cell mutator protein activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)2,3. The transcriptome of Exosc3-deficient B cells has revealed the presence of many novel RNA exosome substrate ncRNAs. RNA exosome substrate RNAs include xTSS-RNAs, transcription start site (TSS)-associated antisense transcripts that can exceed 500 base pairs in length and are transcribed divergently from cognate coding gene transcripts. xTSS-RNAs are most strongly expressed at genes that accumulate AID-mediated somatic mutations and/or are frequent translocation partners of DNA double-strand breaks generated at Igh in B cells4,5. Strikingly, translocations near TSSs or within gene bodies occur over regions of RNA exosome substrate ncRNA expression. These RNA exosome-regulated, antisense-transcribed regions of the B-cell genome recruit AID and accumulate single-strand DNA structures containing RNA–DNA hybrids. We propose that RNA exosome regulation of ncRNA recruits AID to single-strand DNA-forming sites of antisense and divergent transcription in the B-cell genome, thereby creating a link between ncRNA transcription and overall maintenance of B-cell genomic integrity. PMID:25119026

  2. Staggered AID-dependent DNA double strand breaks are the predominant DNA lesions targeted to S mu in Ig class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Rush, James S; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Schatz, David G

    2004-04-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) is the process whereby B cells alter the effector properties of their Ig molecules. Whilst much is known about the cellular regulation of this process, many of the molecular details remain elusive. Recent evidence suggests that CSR involves blunt DNA double strand breaks (dsbs), and that formation of these dsbs requires the function of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We sought to characterize the structural properties and kinetics of induction of the DNA lesions associated with CSR. Using ligation-mediated PCR, we found that AID-dependent DNA dsbs were specifically induced in the S mu region of murine B cells stimulated to undergo CSR. While blunt dsbs were detected, they were only a minor species, with staggered breaks being more than an order of magnitude more abundant. In addition, these breaks could be detected at equal frequency at upstream and downstream portions of S mu, and were induced prior to expression of newly switched isotypes. Collectively, these results provide direct evidence that staggered, S mu-targeted AID-dependent dsbs are the predominant DNA lesion associated with CSR, with important implications for the mechanisms by which CSR DNA lesions are made and processed. PMID:15039385

  3. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  4. A 138-kDa glycoprotein from Dictyostelium membranes with folate deaminase and folate binding activity.

    PubMed

    Greiner, R A; Jacobs-Krahnen, D; Mutzel, R; Malchow, D; Wurster, B

    1992-03-15

    A 138-kDa glycoprotein comprising folate deaminase activity was purified to apparent homogeneity from membranes of Dictyostelium discoideum. Deaminase activity could be effectively inhibited by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonate. This treatment protected folate from deamination and thus allowed investigation of folate binding to deaminase fractions. Two types of folate binding sites, differing in affinity and specificity, were detected on the folate deaminase glycoprotein. One type displays high affinity and binds folate stronger than N10-methylfolate. This binding site appears to be identical with the catalytic site of folate deaminase. The other type of binding site shows lower affinity but prefers N10-methylfolate relative to folate. A similar preference for N10-methylfolate was observed in chemotaxis tests pointing to the possibility that the second type of binding site is involved in chemotactic perception of folate compounds. Folate perception and deamination could thus be performed by activities residing on the same polypeptide. PMID:1544893

  5. Disappearance of Porphobilinogen Deaminase Activity in Leaves Before the Onset of Senescence 1

    PubMed Central

    Frydman, Rosalia B.; Frydman, Benjamin

    1979-01-01

    The activity of porphobilinogen deaminase was measured in young and senescent or mature leaves of pepper (Capsicum annuum), and poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima). Whereas high activity was found in the crude extracts of the young leaves, almost no activity was found in the extracts of senescent or mature leaves. The decrease in deaminase activity was not due to the presence of an isolatable inhibitor. By purifying the crude enzyme extracts from leaves of different ages on DEAE-cellulose columns it was shown that the decrease in deaminase activity was due to a real decrease in the amount of enzyme. Fruiting also decreased porphobilinogen deaminase activity. Several kinetic constants of the C. annuum deaminase were determined. PMID:16660874

  6. Disappearance of porphobilinogen deaminase activity in leaves before the onset of senescence.

    PubMed

    Frydman, R B; Frydman, B

    1979-06-01

    The activity of porphobilinogen deaminase was measured in young and senescent or mature leaves of pepper (Capsicum annuum), and poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima). Whereas high activity was found in the crude extracts of the young leaves, almost no activity was found in the extracts of senescent or mature leaves. The decrease in deaminase activity was not due to the presence of an isolatable inhibitor. By purifying the crude enzyme extracts from leaves of different ages on DEAE-cellulose columns it was shown that the decrease in deaminase activity was due to a real decrease in the amount of enzyme. Fruiting also decreased porphobilinogen deaminase activity. Several kinetic constants of the C. annuum deaminase were determined. PMID:16660874

  7. Biosynthesis of riboflavin. Characterization of the product of the deaminase.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P; Bacher, A

    1981-12-15

    The 2'5-diamino-6-ribitylamino-4(3H)-pyrimidinone 5'-phosphate deaminase was partially purified from cell extracts of Candida guilliermondii ATCC 9058. The enzyme requires Mg2+ for activity. Maximal activity was observed at pH 7,3. The enzyme converts its substrate, 2,5-diamino-6-ribitylamino-4(3H)-pyrimidinone 5'-phosphate, to 2,5-diamino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione 5'-phosphate. This labile compound was treated with diacetyl and the resulting 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine 5'-phosphate was identified by comparison with a synthetic sample. PMID:7317443

  8. New Insights into 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Phylogeny, Evolution and Ecological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Francisco X.; Rossi, Márcio J.; Soares, Cláudio R. F. S.; McConkey, Brendan J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the study of the phylogeny, evolution and ecological importance of the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, the activity of which represents one of the most important and studied mechanisms used by plant growth–promoting microorganisms. The ACC deaminase gene and its regulatory elements presence in completely sequenced organisms was verified by multiple searches in diverse databases, and based on the data obtained a comprehensive analysis was conducted. Strain habitat, origin and ACC deaminase activity were taken into account when analyzing the results. In order to unveil ACC deaminase origin, evolution and relationships with other closely related pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes a phylogenetic analysis was also performed. The data obtained show that ACC deaminase is mostly prevalent in some Bacteria, Fungi and members of Stramenopiles. Contrary to previous reports, we show that ACC deaminase genes are predominantly vertically inherited in various bacterial and fungal classes. Still, results suggest a considerable degree of horizontal gene transfer events, including interkingdom transfer events. A model for ACC deaminase origin and evolution is also proposed. This study also confirms the previous reports suggesting that the Lrp-like regulatory protein AcdR is a common mechanism regulating ACC deaminase expression in Proteobacteria, however, we also show that other regulatory mechanisms may be present in some Proteobacteria and other bacterial phyla. In this study we provide a more complete view of the role for ACC deaminase than was previously available. The results show that ACC deaminase may not only be related to plant growth promotion abilities, but may also play multiple roles in microorganism's developmental processes. Hence, exploring the origin and functioning of this enzyme may be the key in a variety of important agricultural and biotechnological applications. PMID:24905353

  9. Cloning of cDNAs encoding mammalian double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, M A; Krause, S; Higuchi, M; Hsuan, J J; Totty, N F; Jenny, A; Keller, W

    1995-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-specific adenosine deaminase converts adenosine to inosine in dsRNA. The protein has been purified from calf thymus, and here we describe the cloning of cDNAs encoding both the human and rat proteins as well as a partial bovine clone. The human and rat clones are very similar at the amino acid level except at their N termini and contain three dsRNA binding motifs, a putative nuclear targeting signal, and a possible deaminase motif. Antibodies raised against the protein encoded by the partial bovine clone specifically recognize the calf thymus dsRNA adenosine deaminase. Furthermore, the antibodies can immunodeplete a calf thymus extract of dsRNA adenosine deaminase activity, and the activity can be restored by addition of pure bovine deaminase. Staining of HeLa cells confirms the nuclear localization of the dsRNA-specific adenosine deaminase. In situ hybridization in rat brain slices indicates a widespread distribution of the enzyme in the brain. PMID:7862132

  10. Combinatorial H3K9acS10ph histone modification in IgH locus S regions targets 14-3-3 adaptors and AID to specify antibody class-switch DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Guideng; White, Clayton A; Lam, Tonika; Pone, Egest J; Tran, Daniel C; Hayama, Ken L; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-11-14

    Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the antibody response, in that it changes the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region, thereby diversifying biological effector functions of antibodies. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-centered CSR machinery excises and rejoins DNA between an upstream (donor) and a downstream (acceptor) S region, which precede the respective constant region DNA. AID is stabilized on S regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. These adaptors display a high affinity for 5'-AGCT-3' repeats, which recur in all S regions. However, how 14-3-3, AID, and the CSR machinery target exclusively the donor and acceptor S regions is poorly understood. Here, we show that histone methyltransferases and acetyltransferases are induced by CD40 or Toll-like receptor signaling and catalyze H3K4me3 and H3K9ac/K14ac histone modifications, which are enriched in S regions but do not specify the S region targets of CSR. By contrast, the combinatorial H3K9acS10ph modification specifically marks the S regions set to recombine and directly recruits 14-3-3 adaptors for AID stabilization there. Inhibition of the enzymatic activity of GCN5 and PCAF histone acetyltransferases reduces H3K9acS10ph in S regions, 14-3-3 and AID stabilization, and CSR. Thus, H3K9acS10ph is a histone code that is "written" specifically in S regions and is "read" by 14-3-3 adaptors to target AID for CSR as an important biological outcome. PMID:24209747

  11. Discovery and Structure Determination of the Orphan Enzyme Isoxanthopterin Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Hitchcock, D.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2010-05-25

    Two previously uncharacterized proteins have been identified that efficiently catalyze the deamination of isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The genes encoding these two enzymes, NYSGXRC-9339a (gi|44585104) and NYSGXRC-9236b (gi|44611670), were first identified from DNA isolated from the Sargasso Sea as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Project. The genes were synthesized, and the proteins were subsequently expressed and purified. The X-ray structure of Sgx9339a was determined at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 2PAJ). This protein folds as a distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and contains a single zinc ion in the active site. These enzymes are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and belong to cog0402 within the clusters of orthologous groups (COG). Enzymes in cog0402 have previously been shown to catalyze the deamination of guanine, cytosine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and 8-oxoguanine. A small compound library of pteridines, purines, and pyrimidines was used to probe catalytic activity. The only substrates identified in this search were isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoxanthopterin with Sgx9339a were determined to be 1.0 s{sup -1}, 8.0 {micro}M, and 1.3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} (k{sub cat}, K{sub m}, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, respectively). The active site of Sgx9339a most closely resembles the active site for 8-oxoguanine deaminase (Protein Data Bank entry 2UZ9). A model for substrate recognition of isoxanthopterin by Sgx9339a was proposed on the basis of the binding of guanine and xanthine in the active site of guanine deaminase. Residues critical for substrate binding appear to be conserved glutamine and tyrosine residues that form hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at C4, a conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with N5, and another conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl group at C7. These conserved active site

  12. Discovery and structure determination of the orphan enzyme isoxanthopterin deaminase .

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard S; Agarwal, Rakhi; Hitchcock, Daniel; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Raushel, Frank M

    2010-05-25

    Two previously uncharacterized proteins have been identified that efficiently catalyze the deamination of isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The genes encoding these two enzymes, NYSGXRC-9339a ( gi|44585104 ) and NYSGXRC-9236b ( gi|44611670 ), were first identified from DNA isolated from the Sargasso Sea as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Project. The genes were synthesized, and the proteins were subsequently expressed and purified. The X-ray structure of Sgx9339a was determined at 2.7 A resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 2PAJ ). This protein folds as a distorted (beta/alpha)(8) barrel and contains a single zinc ion in the active site. These enzymes are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and belong to cog0402 within the clusters of orthologous groups (COG). Enzymes in cog0402 have previously been shown to catalyze the deamination of guanine, cytosine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and 8-oxoguanine. A small compound library of pteridines, purines, and pyrimidines was used to probe catalytic activity. The only substrates identified in this search were isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoxanthopterin with Sgx9339a were determined to be 1.0 s(-1), 8.0 muM, and 1.3 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (k(cat), K(m), and k(cat)/K(m), respectively). The active site of Sgx9339a most closely resembles the active site for 8-oxoguanine deaminase (Protein Data Bank entry 2UZ9 ). A model for substrate recognition of isoxanthopterin by Sgx9339a was proposed on the basis of the binding of guanine and xanthine in the active site of guanine deaminase. Residues critical for substrate binding appear to be conserved glutamine and tyrosine residues that form hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at C4, a conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with N5, and another conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl group at C7. These conserved active site residues were used to identify 24 other genes

  13. MSH6- or PMS2-deficiency causes re-replication in DT40 B cells, but it has little effect on immunoglobulin gene conversion or on repair of AID-generated uracils

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Vanina A.; Patenaude, Anne-Marie; Kaden, Svenja; Horb, Lori; Firka, Daniel; Jiricny, Josef; Di Noia, Javier M.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian antibody repertoire is shaped by somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of the immunoglobulin (Ig) loci of B lymphocytes. SHM and CSR are triggered by non-canonical, error-prone processing of G/U mismatches generated by activation-induced deaminase (AID). In birds, AID does not trigger SHM, but it triggers Ig gene conversion (GC), a ‘homeologous’ recombination process involving the Ig variable region and proximal pseudogenes. Because recombination fidelity is controlled by the mismatch repair (MMR) system, we investigated whether MMR affects GC in the chicken B cell line DT40. We show here that Msh6−/− and Pms2−/− DT40 cells display cell cycle defects, including genomic re-replication. However, although IgVλ GC tracts in MMR-deficient cells were slightly longer than in normal cells, Ig GC frequency, donor choice or the number of mutations per sequence remained unaltered. The finding that the avian MMR system, unlike that of mammals, does not seem to contribute towards the processing of G/U mismatches in vitro could explain why MMR is unable to initiate Ig GC in this species, despite initiating SHM and CSR in mammalian cells. Moreover, as MMR does not counteract or govern Ig GC, we report a rare example of ‘homeologous’ recombination insensitive to MMR. PMID:23314153

  14. ADA (adenosine deaminase) gene therapy enters the competition

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Around the world, some 70 children are members of a select and deadly club. Born with an immune deficiency so severe that they will die of infection unless their immune systems can be repaired, they have captured the attention of would-be gene therapists who believe that a handful of these kids--the 15 or 20 who lack functioning levels of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA)--could be saved by a healthy ADA gene. A team of gene therapists is ready to put the theory to the test. In April 1987, a team of NIH researchers headed by R. Michael Blaese and W. French Anderson came up with the first formal protocol to introduce a healthy ADA gene into an unhealthy human. After 3 years of line-by-line scrutiny by five review committees, they have permission to go ahead. Two or three children will be treated in the next year, and will be infused with T lymphocytes carrying the gene for ADA. If the experiment works, the ADA gene will begin producing normal amounts of ADA. An interesting feature of ADA deficiency, that makes it ideal for initial gene studies, is that the amount of ADA one needs for a healthy immune system is quite variable. Hence, once inside a patient's T cells, the new ADA gene needs only to express the enzyme in moderate amounts. No precise gene regulation is necessary.

  15. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  16. Functions and Regulation of RNA Editing by ADAR Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    One type of RNA editing converts adenosines to inosines (A→I editing) in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. A→I RNA editing is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes. A→I RNA editing of protein-coding sequences of a limited number of mammalian genes results in recoding and subsequent alterations of their functions. However, A→I RNA editing most frequently targets repetitive RNA sequences located within introns and 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Although the biological significance of noncoding RNA editing remains largely unknown, several possibilities, including its role in the control of endogenous short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs), have been proposed. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the biogenesis and functions of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) are regulated by the editing of their precursors. Here, I review the recent findings that indicate new functions for A→I editing in the regulation of noncoding RNAs and for interactions between RNA editing and RNA interference mechanisms. PMID:20192758

  17. Erythrocyte Adenosine Deaminase: Diagnostic Value for Diamond-Blackfan Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, John H.; Kratz, Christian P.; Giri, Neelam; Savage, Sharon A.; Wong, Carolyn; Backer, Karen; Alter, Blanche P.; Glader, Bertil

    2012-01-01

    Summary Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS) characterized by red cell aplasia. Mutations in ribosomal genes are found in more than 50% of cases. Elevated erythrocyte adenosine deaminase (eADA) was first noted in DBA in 1983. In this study we determined the value of eADA for the diagnosis of DBA compared with other IBMFS; the association of eADA in DBA with age, gender or other haematological parameters; and the association with known DBA-related gene mutations. For the diagnosis of DBA compared with non-DBA patients with other bone marrow failure syndromes, eADA had a sensitivity of 84%, specificity 95%, and positive and negative predictive values of 91%. In patients with DBA there was no association between eADA and gender, age, or other haematological parameters. Erythrocyte ADA segregated with, as well as independent of, known DBA gene mutations. While eADA was an excellent confirmatory test for DBA, 16% of patients with classical clinical DBA had a normal eADA. PMID:23252420

  18. Regulation of Adenosine Deaminase on Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dongchun; Zuo, Aijun; Zhao, Ronglan; Shao, Hui; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2016-03-15

    Adenosine is an important regulator of the immune response, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibits this regulatory effect by converting adenosine into functionally inactive molecules. Studies showed that adenosine receptor agonists can be anti- or proinflammatory. Clarification of the mechanisms that cause these opposing effects should provide a better guide for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we investigated the effect of ADA on the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunizing EAU-prone mice with a known uveitogenic peptide, IRBP1-20. Our results showed that the effective time to administer a single dose of ADA to suppress induction of EAU was 8-14 d postimmunization, shortly before EAU expression; however, ADA treatment at other time points exacerbated disease. ADA preferentially inhibited Th17 responses, and this effect was γδ T cell dependent. Our results demonstrated that the existing immune status strongly influences the anti- or proinflammatory effects of ADA. Our observations should help to improve the design of ADA- and adenosine receptor-targeted therapies. PMID:26856700

  19. The ONIOM molecular dynamics method for biochemical applications: cytidine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-03-22

    Abstract We derived and implemented the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method for biochemical applications. The implementation allows the characterization of the functions of the real enzymes taking account of their thermal motion. In this method, the direct MD is performed by calculating the ONIOM energy and gradients of the system on the fly. We describe the first application of this ONOM-MD method to cytidine deaminase. The environmental effects on the substrate in the active site are examined. The ONIOM-MD simulations show that the product uridine is strongly perturbed by the thermal motion of the environment and dissociates easily from the active site. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  20. Purification and characterization of Plasmodium yoelii adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sarika; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar; Dwivedi, U N

    2011-12-01

    Plasmodium lacks the de novo pathway for purine biosynthesis and relies exclusively on the salvage pathway. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), first enzyme of the pathway, was purified and characterized from Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malarial species, using ion exchange and gel exclusion chromatography. The purified enzyme is a 41 kDa monomer. The enzyme showed K(m) values of 41 μM and 34 μM for adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine, respectively. Erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine competitively inhibited P. yoelii ADA with K(i) value of 0.5 μM. The enzyme was inhibited by DEPC and protein denaturing agents, urea and GdmCl. Purine analogues significantly inhibited ADA activity. Inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzoate (pCMB) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) indicated the presence of functional -SH groups. Tryptophan fluorescence maxima of ADA shifted from 339 nm to 357 nm in presence of GdmCl. Refolding studies showed that higher GdmCl concentration irreversibly denatured the purified ADA. Fluorescence quenchers (KI and acrylamide) quenched the ADA fluorescence intensity to the varied degree. The observed differences in kinetic properties of P. yoelii ADA as compared to the erythrocyte enzyme may facilitate in designing specific inhibitors against ADA. PMID:21945268

  1. Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency – More Than Just an Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Kathryn V.; Gaspar, Hubert B.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is best known as a form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that results from mutations in the gene encoding ADA. Affected patients present with clinical and immunological manifestations typical of a SCID. Therapies are currently available that can target these immunological disturbances and treated patients show varying degrees of clinical improvement. However, there is now a growing body of evidence that deficiency of ADA has significant impact on non-immunological organ systems. This review will outline the impact of ADA deficiency on various organ systems, starting with the well-understood immunological abnormalities. We will discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and also highlight ways in which current treatments could be improved. In doing so, we aim to present ADA deficiency as more than an immunodeficiency and suggest that it should be recognized as a systemic metabolic disorder that affects multiple organ systems. Only by fully understanding ADA deficiency and its manifestations in all organ systems can we aim to deliver therapies that will correct all the clinical consequences. PMID:27579027

  2. Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency - More Than Just an Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Kathryn V; Gaspar, Hubert B

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is best known as a form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that results from mutations in the gene encoding ADA. Affected patients present with clinical and immunological manifestations typical of a SCID. Therapies are currently available that can target these immunological disturbances and treated patients show varying degrees of clinical improvement. However, there is now a growing body of evidence that deficiency of ADA has significant impact on non-immunological organ systems. This review will outline the impact of ADA deficiency on various organ systems, starting with the well-understood immunological abnormalities. We will discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and also highlight ways in which current treatments could be improved. In doing so, we aim to present ADA deficiency as more than an immunodeficiency and suggest that it should be recognized as a systemic metabolic disorder that affects multiple organ systems. Only by fully understanding ADA deficiency and its manifestations in all organ systems can we aim to deliver therapies that will correct all the clinical consequences. PMID:27579027

  3. Structural and biological function of NYD-SP15 as a new member of cytidine deaminases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yidan; Li, Lei; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-05-25

    Recent studies were mainly focus on the cytidine deaminase family genes, which contained a lot of members that varied on the function of catalytic deamination in RNA or DNA and were involved in the process of growth maintenance, host immunity, retroviral infection, tumorigenesis, and drug resistance with a feature of C-U deamination. In this study, we identified a new member of cytidine deaminase family, NYD-SP15. Previous work showed that the deduced structure of the protein contained two dCMP_cyt_deam domains, which were involved in zinc ion binding. NYD-SP15 was expressed variably in a wide range of tissues, indicating its worthy biological function and creative significances. Sequence analysis, RT-PCR, western blot, flow cytometry, direct-site mutation and GST pull-down assay were performed to analyze the construction and function of NYD-SP15. The results in our studies showed that NYD-SP15 was closely related to deoxycytidylate deaminase and cytidine deaminase, with authentic cytidine deaminase activity in vivo and vitro as well as homo dimerization effects. NYD-SP15 contained nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and nuclear export-signal (NES) and could dynamically shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, NYD-SP15 gene over-expression reduced the cells growth and blocked G1 to S phase, which implied a potential inhibition effect on cell growth. PMID:26945630

  4. Structural and Metabolic Specificity of Methylthiocoformycin for Malarial Adenosine Deaminases

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Cassera, M; Madrid, D; Ting, L; Tyler, P; Kim, K; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is a purine auxotroph requiring hypoxanthine as a key metabolic precursor. Erythrocyte adenine nucleotides are the source of the purine precursors, making adenosine deaminase (ADA) a key enzyme in the pathway of hypoxanthine formation. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a substrate for most malarial ADAs, but not for human ADA. The catalytic site specificity of malarial ADAs permits methylthiocoformycin (MT-coformycin) to act as a Plasmodium-specific transition state analogue with low affinity for human ADA. The structural basis for MTA and MT-coformycin specificity in malarial ADAs is the subject of speculation. Here, the crystal structure of ADA from Plasmodium vivax (PvADA) in a complex with MT-coformycin reveals an unprecedented binding geometry for 5?-methylthioribosyl groups in the malarial ADAs. Compared to malarial ADA complexes with adenosine or deoxycoformycin, 5?-methylthioribosyl groups are rotated 130 degrees. A hydrogen bonding network between Asp172 and the 3?-hydroxyl of MT-coformycin is essential for recognition of the 5?-methylthioribosyl group. Water occupies the 5?-hydroxyl binding site when MT-coformycin is bound. Mutagenesis of Asp172 destroys the substrate specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural analyses of PvADA and kinetic analysis of five other Plasmodium ADAs establish the unique structural basis for its specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Plasmodium gallinaceum ADA does not use MTA as a substrate, is not inhibited by MT-coformycin, and is missing Asp172. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with coformycin or MT-coformycin in the presence of MTA is effective in inhibiting parasite growth.

  5. Guanine deaminase inhibitor from rat liver. Isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ali, S; Sitaramayya, A; Kumar, K S; Krishnan, P S

    1974-01-01

    1. An inhibitor of cytoplasmic guanine deaminase of rat liver was isolated from liver ;heavy mitochondrial' fraction after freezing and thawing and treatment with Triton X-100. 2. Submitochondrial fractionation revealed that the inhibitor was localized in the outer-membrane fraction. 3. The method of purification of inhibitor, involving precipitation with (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, its precipitability by trichloroacetic acid and the pattern of absorption in the u.v. indicated that the inhibitor was a protein. In confirmation, tryptic digestion of the isolated material resulted in destruction of the inhibitor activity. The inhibitor was stable to acid, but labile to heat. 4. The isolated inhibitor required phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) for activity. Phosphatidylcholine also partially protected the inhibitor against heat inactivation. 5. When detergent treatment was omitted, the inhibitor activity of frozen mitochondria was precipitated by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) in a fully active form without supplementation with phosphatidylcholine, indicating that Triton X-100 ruptured the linkage between inhibitor and lipid. 6. A reconstituted sample of inhibitor-phosphatidylcholine complex was precipitated in a fully active form by dialysis against 2-mercaptoethanol, but treatment of the precipitate with NaCl yielded an extract which was inactive unless supplemented with fresh phosphatidylcholine. 7. We interpret the results as evidence that the inhibitor was present in vivo as a lipoprotein and that once the complex was dissociated by the action of detergent and the protein precipitated, there was an absolute need for exogenous phosphatidylcholine for its activity. The manner in which inhibitor associated with the outer membrane of rat liver mitochondria might regulate the activity of the enzyme in the supernatant has been suggested. PMID:4821397

  6. Autoimmune Dysregulation and Purine Metabolism in Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha Vanessa; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Genetic defects in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are among the most common causes for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). ADA-SCID patients suffer from lymphopenia, severely impaired cellular and humoral immunity, failure to thrive, and recurrent infections. Currently available therapeutic options for this otherwise fatal disorder include bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy with bovine ADA (PEG-ADA), or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (HSC-GT). Although varying degrees of immune reconstitution can be achieved by these treatments, breakdown of tolerance is a major concern in ADA-SCID. Immune dysregulation such as autoimmune hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hemolytic anemia, and immune thrombocytopenia are frequently observed in milder forms of the disease. However, several reports document similar complications also in patients on long-term PEG-ADA and after BMT or GT treatment. A skewed repertoire and decreased immune functions have been implicated in autoimmunity observed in certain B-cell and/or T-cell immunodeficiencies, but it remains unclear to what extent specific mechanisms of tolerance are affected in ADA deficiency. Herein we provide an overview about ADA-SCID and the autoimmune manifestations reported in these patients before and after treatment. We also assess the value of the ADA-deficient mouse model as a useful tool to study both immune and metabolic disease mechanisms. With focus on regulatory T- and B-cells we discuss the lymphocyte subpopulations particularly prone to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance and onset of autoimmunity in ADA deficiency. Moreover we address which aspects of immune dysregulation are specifically related to alterations in purine metabolism caused by the lack of ADA and the subsequent accumulation of metabolites with immunomodulatory properties. PMID:22969765

  7. In vitro Assay for Cytidine Deaminase Activity of APOBEC3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Smita; Rein, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are enzymes that catalyze the removal of an amino group from cytidine, forming uridine. APOBEC3 (ApolipoproteinB mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide like) proteins are cytidine deaminases that deaminate cytidines in polynucleotides (RNA/DNA), resulting in editing of their target substrates. Mammalian APOBEC3 proteins are an important element in cellular defenses against retrovirus replication, and this “restriction” of retroviral infections is partially due to the cytidine deaminase activity of the APOBEC3. The present protocol (Nair et al., 2014) describes the assay to detect the deaminase activity of mouse APOBEC3 protein, which targets cytidines present in TCC or TTC motifs in a single-stranded DNA substrate. In brief, the protein preparation to be assayed is incubated with a fluorophore-labeled oligodeoxynucleotide containing the deamination target motif (radiolabeled oligonucleotide substrates have also been successfully used by other groups). Cytidines in the oligonucleotide are deaminated to uridines; the addition of Uracil DNA Glycosylase (UDG) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosylic bond between uracil and sugar, generating an abasic (AB) site in the oligonucleotide. Mild alkali treatment cleaves the substrate oligonucleotide at the AB site; cleaved products are resolved from uncleaved substrate by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized on a fluorescence scanner. The protocol described here is mainly adapted from that described by Iwatani et al. (2006) with modifications. The assay can, of course, be used to detect the activity of other APOBEC3 deaminases targeting DNA substrates, using oligonucleotides containing the cytidine-containing target sequence for the deaminase.

  8. The AID/APOBEC family of nucleic acid mutators

    PubMed Central

    Conticello, Silvestro G

    2008-01-01

    The AID/APOBECs, a group of cytidine deaminases, represent a somewhat unusual protein family that can insert mutations in DNA and RNA as a result of their ability to deaminate cytidine to uridine. The ancestral AID/APOBECs originated from a branch of the zinc-dependent deaminase superfamily at the beginning of the vertebrate radiation. Other members of the family have arisen in mammals and present a history of complex gene duplications and positive selection. All AID/APOBECs have a characteristic zinc-coordination motif, which forms the core of the catalytic site. The crystal structure of human APOBEC2 shows remarkable similarities to that of the bacterial tRNA-editing enzyme TadA, which suggests a conserved mechanism by which polynucleotides are recognized and deaminated. The AID/APOBECs seem to have diverse roles. AID and the APOBEC3s are DNA mutators, acting in antigen-driven antibody diversification processes and in an innate defense system against retroviruses, respectively. APOBEC1 edits the mRNA for apolipoprotein B, a protein involved in lipid transport. A detailed understanding of the biological roles of the family is still some way off, however, and the functions of some members of the family are completely unknown. Given their ability to mutate DNA, a role for the AID/APOBECs in the onset of cancer has been proposed. PMID:18598372

  9. Mutations, kataegis, and translocations in B lymphocytes: towards a mechanistic understanding of AID promiscuous activity

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, Rafael; Basu, Uttiya; Yewdell, William T.; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Robbiani, Davide F.; Di Noia, Javier M.

    2016-01-01

    As B cells engage in the immune response they express the deaminase AID to initiate the hypermutation and recombination of immunoglobulin genes, which are crucial processes for the efficient recognition and disposal of pathogens, However, AID must be tightly controlled in B cells to minimize off-targeting mutations, which can drive chromosomal translocations and the development of B cell malignancies, such as lymphomas. Recent genomic and biochemical analyses have begun to unravel the crucial question of how AID-mediated deamination is targeted outside immunoglobulin genes. Here, we discuss the transcriptional and topological features that are emerging as key drivers of AID promiscuous activity. PMID:26898111

  10. V-region mutation in vitro, in vivo, and in silico reveal the importance of the enzymatic properties of AID and the sequence environment

    PubMed Central

    MacCarthy, Thomas; Kalis, Susan L.; Roa, Sergio; Pham, Phuong; Goodman, Myron F.; Scharff, Matthew D.; Bergman, Aviv

    2009-01-01

    The somatic hypermutation of Ig variable regions requires the activity of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) which has previously been shown to preferentially deaminate WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motif hot spots in in vivo and in vitro assays. We compared mutation profiles of in vitro assays for the 3′ flanking intron of VhJ558-Jh4 region to previously reported in vivo profiles for the same region in the Msh2−/−Ung−/− mice that lack base excision and mismatch repair. We found that the in vitro and in vivo mutation profiles were highly correlated for the top (nontranscribed) strand, while for the bottom (transcribed) strand the correlation is far lower. We used an in silico model of AID activity to elucidate the relative importance of motif targeting in vivo. We found that the mutation process entails substantial complexity beyond motif targeting, a large part of which is captured in vitro. To elucidate the contribution of the sequence environment to the observed differences between the top and bottom strands, we analyzed intermutational distances. The bottom strand shows an approximately exponential distribution of distances in vivo and in vitro, as expected from a null model. However, the top strand deviates strongly from this distribution in that mutations approximately 50 nucleotides apart are greatly reduced, again both in vivo and in vitro, illustrating an important strand asymmetry. While we have confirmed that AID targeting of hot and cold spots is a key part of the mutation process, our results suggest that the sequence environment plays an equally important role. PMID:19443686

  11. Isolation and characterization of human liver guanine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N K; Glantz, M D

    1985-01-01

    Guanine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.3, guanine aminohydrolase [GAH]) was purified 3248-fold from human liver to homogeneity with a specific activity of 21.5. A combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, and DEAE-cellulose, hydroxylapatite, and affinity chromatography with guanine triphosphate ligand were used to purify the enzyme. The enzyme was a dimer protein of a molecular weight of 120,000 with each subunit of 59,000 as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. Isoelectric focusing gave a pI of 4.76. It was found to be an acidic protein, as evidenced by the amino acid analysis, enriched with glutamate, aspartate, alanine and glycine. It showed a sharp pH optimum of 8.0. The apparent Km for guanine was determined to be 1.53 X 10(-5) M at pH 6.0 and 2 X 10(-4) M for 8-azaguanine as a substrate at pH 6.0. The enzyme was found to be sensitive to p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibition with a Ki of 1.53 X 10(-5) M and a Ki of 5 X 10(-5) M with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide as an inhibitor. The inhibition with iodoacetic acid showed only a 7% loss in the activity at 1 X 10(-4) M and a 24% loss at 1 X 10(-3) M after 30 min of incubation, whereas p-hydroxymercuribenzoate incubation for 30 min resulted in a 91% loss of activity at a concentration of 1 X 10(-4) M. Guanine was the substrate for all of the inhibition studies. The enzyme was observed to be stable up to 40 degrees C, with a loss of almost all activity at 65 degrees C with 30 min incubation. Two pKa values were obtained at 5.85 and 8.0. Analysis of the N-terminal amino acid proved to be valine while the C-terminal residue was identified as alanine. PMID:3966794

  12. Novel and recurrent AID mutations underlie prevalent autosomal recessive form of HIGM in consanguineous patients.

    PubMed

    Ouadani, Hanen; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Ben-ali, Meriem; Ben-khemis, Leila; Larguèche, Beya; Boussoffara, Raoudha; Maalej, Sonia; Fetni, Ilhem; Hassayoun, Saida; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid; Mellouli, Fethi; Yalaoui, Sadok; Masmoudi, Hatem; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-D) are characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM level and absence of IgG, IgA, and IgE. Most reported cases are due to X-linked CD40L deficiency. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency is the most frequent autosomal recessive form, whereas CD40 deficiency is more rare. Herein, we present the first North African study on hyper IgM (HIGM) syndrome including 16 Tunisian patients. Phenotypic and genetic studies allowed us to determine their molecular basis. Three CD40LG mutations have been identified including two novels (c.348_351dup and c.782_*2del) and one already reported mutation (g.6182G>A). No mutation has been found in another patient despite the lack of CD40L expression. Interestingly, three AICDA mutations have been identified in 11 patients. Two mutations were novel (c.91T>C and c.389A>C found in one and five patients respectively), and one previously reported splicing mutation (c.156+1T>G) was found in five patients. Only one CD40-deficient patient, bearing a novel mutation (c.109T>G), has been identified. Thus, unlike previous reports, AID deficiency is the most frequent underlying molecular basis (68%) of Ig-CSR-D in Tunisian patients. This finding and the presence of specific recurrent mutations are probably due to the critical role played by inbreeding in North African populations. PMID:26545377

  13. Macrophages increase the resistance of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells to gemcitabine by upregulating cytidine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Moran; Gil, Ziv

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages play a central role in tumor progression and metastasis. Macrophages can also promote the resistance of malignant cells to chemotherapy by stimulating the upregulation of cytidine deaminase, an intracellular enzyme that catabolizes the active form of gemcitabine. Targeting macrophage-dependent chemoresistance may reduce tumor-associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:24498570

  14. The Effect of Acute Exercise upon Adenosin Deaminase Oxidant and Antioxidant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafkas, M. Emin; Karabulut, Aysun Bay; Sahin, Armagan; Otlu, Onder; Savas, Seyfi; Aytac, Aylin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of MDA, glutation (GSH), Adenozine deaminase (ADA) and superoxidase dismutaze (SOD) levels with exercise training in obese middle-aged women (body mass index, MMI [greater than or equal to] 30.0). Twelve obese middle-aged women participated in this study. The descriptive statistics of some of…

  15. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures. PMID:25227763

  16. SELECTIVE IMMUNOTOXIC EFFECTS IN MICE TREATED WITH THE ADENOSINE DEAMINASE INHIBITOR 2-DEOXYCOFORMYCIN (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice given the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2-deoxycoformycin, for five days were evaluated 24 h, 72 h and 6 days after the final dose. Spleen weight was decreased for up to 6 days after treatment. The number and relative percentage of circulating lymphocytes were decreased 24 a...

  17. IMMUNE FUNCTION IN MICE EXPOSED TO THE ADENOSINE DEAMINASE INHIBITOR 2'-DEOXYCOFORMYCIN DURING IMMUNE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnant mice were administered 2'-deoxycoformycin (2dCF), a potent inhibitor of adensoine deaminase activity, by intraperitoneal injection on day 7 or 15 of gestation or from day 8-12 or 14-18 of gestation. A total dose of 0, 0.5 or 2.0 micrograms 2dCF/g of maternal body weight ...

  18. Cutting edge: a cis-acting DNA element targets AID-mediated sequence diversification to the chicken Ig light chain gene locus.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Nagarama; Norton, Darrell D; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2008-02-15

    Somatic hypermutation and gene conversion are two closely related processes that increase the diversity of the primary Ig repertoire. Both processes are initiated by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase that converts cytosine residues to uracils in a transcription-dependent manner; these lesions are subsequently fixed in the genome by direct replication and error-prone DNA repair. Two alternative mechanisms were proposed to explain why this mutagenic activity is targeted almost exclusively to Ig loci: 1) specific cis-acting DNA sequences; or 2) very high levels of Ig gene transcription. In this study we now identify a novel 3' regulatory region in the chicken Ig light chain gene containing not only a classical transcriptional enhancer but also cis-acting DNA elements essential for targeting activation-induced cytidine deaminase-mediated sequence diversification to this locus. PMID:18250404

  19. Chloroviruses Encode a Bifunctional dCMP-dCTP Deaminase That Produces Two Key Intermediates in dTTP Formation▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanzheng; Maley, Frank; Maley, Gladys F.; Duncan, Garry; Dunigan, David D.; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    The chlorovirus PBCV-1, like many large double-stranded DNA-containing viruses, contains several genes that encode putative proteins involved in nucleotide biosynthesis. This report describes the characterization of the PBCV-1 dCMP deaminase, which produces dUMP, a key intermediate in the synthesis of dTTP. As predicted, the recombinant protein has dCMP deaminase activity that is activated by dCTP and inhibited by dTTP. Unexpectedly, however, the viral enzyme also has dCTP deaminase activity, producing dUTP. Typically, these two reactions are catalyzed by proteins in separate enzyme classes; to our knowledge, this is the first example of a protein having both deaminase activities. Kinetic experiments established that (i) the PBCV-1 enzyme has a higher affinity for dCTP than for dCMP, (ii) dCTP serves as a positive heterotropic effector for the dCMP deaminase activity and a positive homotropic effector for the dCTP deaminase activity, and (iii) the enzymatic efficiency of the dCMP deaminase activity is about four times higher than that of the dCTP deaminase activity. Inhibitor studies suggest that the same active site is involved in both dCMP and dCTP deaminations. The discovery that the PBCV-1 dCMP deaminase has two activities, together with a previous report that the virus also encodes a functional dUTP triphosphatase (Y. Zhang, H. Moriyama, K. Homma, and J. L. Van Etten, J. Virol. 79:9945-9953, 2005), means that PBCV-1 is the first virus to encode enzymes involved in all three known pathways to form dUMP. PMID:17475641

  20. Effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase for growth promotion of peas (Pisum sativum) under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahir, Z A; Munir, A; Asghar, H N; Shaharoona, B; Arshad, M

    2008-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to assess the effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane- 1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase for growth promotion of peas under drought conditions. Ten rhizobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of different crops (peas, wheat, and maize) were screened for their growth promoting ability in peas under axenic condition. Three rhizobacterial isolates, Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5), P. fluorescens (ACC-14), and P. putida biotype A (Q-7), were selected for pot trial on the basis of their source, ACC deaminase activity, root colonization, and growth promoting activity under axenic conditions. Inoculated and uninoculated (control) seeds of pea cultivar 2000 were sown in pots (4 seeds/pot) at different soil moisture levels (25, 50, 75, and 100% of field capacity). Results revealed that decreasing the soil moisture levels from 100 to 25% of field capacity significantly decreased the growth of peas. However, inoculation of peas with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase significantly decreased the "drought stress imposed effects" on growth of peas, although with variable efficacy at different moisture levels. At the lowest soil moisture level (25% field capacity), rhizobacterial isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5) was found to be more promising compared with the other isolates, as it caused maximum increases in fresh weight, dry weight, root length, shoot length, number of leaves per plant, and water use efficiency on fresh and dry weight basis (45, 150, 92, 45, 140, 46, and 147%, respectively) compared with respective uninoculated controls. It is highly likely that rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase might have decreased the drought-stress induced ethylene in inoculated plants, which resulted in better growth of plants even at low moisture levels. Therefore, inoculation with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase could be helpful in eliminating the inhibitory effects of drought stress on the

  1. Zinc enhancement of cytidine deaminase activity highlights a potential allosteric role of loop-3 in regulating APOBEC3 enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Ailie; Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The strong association of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases with somatic mutations leading to cancers accentuates the importance of their tight intracellular regulation to minimize cellular transformations. We reveal a novel allosteric regulatory mechanism of APOBEC3 enzymes showing that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3A coordination of a secondary zinc ion, reminiscent to ancestral deoxycytidylate deaminases, enhances deamination activity. Zinc binding is pinpointed to loop-3 which whilst highly variable harbors a catalytically essential and spatially conserved asparagine at its N-terminus. We suggest that loop-3 may play a general role in allosterically tuning the activity of zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family members. PMID:26678087

  2. Zinc enhancement of cytidine deaminase activity highlights a potential allosteric role of loop-3 in regulating APOBEC3 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The strong association of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases with somatic mutations leading to cancers accentuates the importance of their tight intracellular regulation to minimize cellular transformations. We reveal a novel allosteric regulatory mechanism of APOBEC3 enzymes showing that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3A coordination of a secondary zinc ion, reminiscent to ancestral deoxycytidylate deaminases, enhances deamination activity. Zinc binding is pinpointed to loop-3 which whilst highly variable harbors a catalytically essential and spatially conserved asparagine at its N-terminus. We suggest that loop-3 may play a general role in allosterically tuning the activity of zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family members. PMID:26678087

  3. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Understanding HIV/AIDS AIDS was first reported in the United States in ... and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or ...

  4. Methylphenidate Actively Induces Emergence from General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Ken; Cotten, Joseph F.; Cimenser, Aylin; Wong, Kin F.K.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although accumulating evidence suggests that arousal pathways in the brain play important roles in emergence from general anesthesia, the roles of monoaminergic arousal circuits are unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that methylphenidate (an inhibitor of dopamine and norepinephrine transporters) induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. Methods Using adult rats we tested the effect of methylphenidate IV on time to emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then performed experiments to test separately for methylphenidate-induced changes in arousal and changes in minute ventilation. A dose-response study was performed to test for methylphenidate–induced restoration of righting during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. Surface electroencephalogram recordings were performed to observe neurophysiological changes. Plethysmography recordings and arterial blood gas analysis were performed to assess methylphenidate-induced changes in respiratory function. Droperidol IV was administered to test for inhibition of methylphenidate's actions. Results Methylphenidate decreased median time to emergence from 280 to 91 s. The median difference in time to emergence without compared to with methylphenidate was 200 [155, 331] s (median, [95% confidence interval]). During continuous inhalation of isoflurane, methylphenidate induced return of righting in a dose-dependent manner, induced a shift in electroencephalogram power from delta to theta, and induced an increase in minute ventilation. Administration of droperidol (0.5 mg/kg IV) prior to methylphenidate (5 mg/kg IV) largely inhibited methylphenidate-induced emergence behavior, electroencephalogram changes, and changes in minute ventilation. Conclusions Methylphenidate actively induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia by increasing arousal and respiratory drive, possibly through activation of dopaminergic and adrenergic arousal circuits. Our findings suggest that methylphenidate may be clinically

  5. Orientation-Specific Joining of AID-initiated DNA Breaks Promotes Antibody Class Switching

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Jiazhi; Volpi, Sabrina A.; Meyers, Robin M.; Ho, Yu-Jui; Du, Zhou; Robbiani, Davide F.; Meng, Feilong; Gostissa, Monica; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Manis, John P.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    During B cell development, RAG endonuclease cleaves immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) V, D, and J gene segments and orchestrates their fusion as deletional events that assemble a V(D)J exon in the same transcriptional orientation as adjacent Cμ constant region exons1,2. In mice, six additional sets of constant region exons (CHs) lie 100-200 kb downstream in the same transcriptional orientation as V(D)J and Cμ exons2. Long repetitive switch (S) regions precede Cμ and downstream CHs. In mature B cells, class switch recombination (CSR) generates different antibody classes by replacing Cμ with a downstream CH2. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) initiates CSR by promoting deamination lesions within Sμ and a downstream acceptor S region2,3; these lesions are converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by general DNA repair factors3. Productive CSR must occur in a deletional orientation by joining the upstream end of an Sμ DSB to the downstream end of an acceptor S region DSB (Fig. 1a). However, the relative frequency of deletional to inversional CSR junctions had not been measured. Thus, whether orientation-specific joining is a programmed mechanistic feature of CSR as it is for V(D)J recombination and, if so, how this is achieved was unknown. To address this question, we adapted high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS)4 into a highly sensitive DSB end-joining assay and applied it to endogenous AID-initiated S region DSBs. We find that CSR indeed is programmed to occur in a productive deletional orientation and does so via an unprecedented mechanism that involves in cis IgH organizational features in combination with frequent S region DSBs initiated by AID. We further implicate ATM-dependent DSB response (DSBR) factors in enforcing this mechanism and provide a solution to the enigma of why CSR is so reliant on the 53BP1 DSBR factor. PMID:26308889

  6. Assessing the effects of heavy metals in ACC deaminase and IAA production on plant growth-promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Mendoza-Hernández José; Stefani, Perea-Vélez Yazmin; Janette, Arriola-Morales; Melani, Martínez-Simón Sara; Gabriela, Pérez-Osorio

    2016-01-01

    This study poses a methodology in order to simultaneously quantify ACC deaminase and IAA levels in the same culture medium. Ten bacterial strains isolated from plant rhizosphere naturally settled in mining residues were chosen. These bacterial strains were characterized as PGPB, and all of them showed at least three characteristics (indole-3 acetic acid and siderophore production, ACC deaminase enzyme activity, and inorganic phosphate solubilization). Taxonomic identification showed that the strains belong to Enterobacter, Serratia, Klebsiella, and Escherichia genera. Similarly, both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis in the presence of Cu, As, Pb, Ni, Cd, and Mn were measured. The results showed that both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis were higher with the Pb, As, and Cu treatments than with the Escherichia N16, Enterobacter K131, Enterobacter N9, and Serratia K120 control treatments. On the other hand, Ni, Cd, and Mn negatively affected both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA production on every bacterium except on the Klebsiella Mc173 strain. Serratia K120 bacterium got a positive correlation between ACC deaminase and IAA in the presence of every heavy metal, and it also promoted Helianthus annuus plant growth, showing a potential use in phytoremediation systems. PMID:27296962

  7. Plant Purine Nucleoside Catabolism Employs a Guanosine Deaminase Required for the Generation of Xanthosine in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Dahncke, Kathleen; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleotide catabolism is common to most organisms and involves a guanine deaminase to convert guanine to xanthine in animals, invertebrates, and microorganisms. Using metabolomic analysis of mutants, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana uses an alternative catabolic route employing a highly specific guanosine deaminase (GSDA) not reported from any organism so far. The enzyme is ubiquitously expressed and deaminates exclusively guanosine and 2’-deoxyguanosine but no other aminated purines, pyrimidines, or pterines. GSDA belongs to the cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminase family of proteins together with a deaminase involved in riboflavin biosynthesis, the chloroplastic tRNA adenosine deaminase Arg and a predicted tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase 2 in A. thaliana. GSDA is conserved in plants, including the moss Physcomitrella patens, but is absent in the algae and outside the plant kingdom. Our data show that xanthosine is exclusively generated through the deamination of guanosine by GSDA in A. thaliana, excluding other possible sources like the dephosphorylation of xanthosine monophosphate. Like the nucleoside hydrolases NUCLEOSIDE HYDROLASE1 (NSH1) and NSH2, GSDA is located in the cytosol, indicating that GMP catabolism to xanthine proceeds in a mostly cytosolic pathway via guanosine and xanthosine. Possible implications for the biosynthetic route of purine alkaloids (caffeine and theobromine) and ureides in other plants are discussed. PMID:24130159

  8. APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases in Double-Strand DNA Break Repair and Cancer Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions were identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with ssDNA, double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs and clustered mutations. PMID:23598277

  9. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. PMID:23598277

  10. A Novel Serine Protease Secreted by Medicinal Maggots Enhances Plasminogen Activator-Induced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Andersen, Anders S.; Nazir, Sheresma; van Tilburg, Nico H.; Oestergaard, Peter R.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Hensbergen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As haemostatic processes play an important role in wound healing, this study focused on the effects of maggot secretions on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The results showed that maggot secretions enhance plasminogen activator-induced formation of plasmin and fibrinolysis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By contrast, coagulation was not affected by secretions. Biochemical studies indicated that a novel serine protease within secretions, designated Sericase, cleaved plasminogen to several fragments. Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis by Sericase. We conclude from our in vitro studies that the novel serine protease Sericase, with the aid of a non-proteolytic cofactor, enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. PMID:24647546

  11. Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Mutants with Increased Thermostability Impart Sensitivity to 5-Fluorocytosine

    PubMed Central

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S.; Korkegian, Aaron M.; Willmon, Candice L.; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L.; Black, Margaret E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of cytosine deaminase-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of cytosine deaminase are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated Tm values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in the temperature that induces protein unfolding and aggregation in thermal denaturation experiments measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and an increase in the half-life of enzyme activity at physiological temperature, as well as more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models. PMID:18291415

  12. Pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine in fibroblasts and lymphoid cells: role of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Green, H; Chan, T

    1973-11-23

    In the presence of 10(-4) to 10(-5) molar adenosine, established cell lines of fibroblastic or lymphoid origin die of pyrimidine starvation. Less than lethal concentrations inhibit cell growth. Over a broad concentration range, the effects of adenosine are prevented by providing a suitable pyrimidine source. We suggest that the recently described immune deficiency disease associated with absence of adenosine deaminase may be the result of pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine nucleotides in cells of the lymphoid system. PMID:4795749

  13. Investigation into the nature of substrate binding to the dipyrromethane cofactor of Escherichia coli porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.J.; Jordan, P.M.

    1988-12-13

    The formation of the dipyrromethane cofactor of Escherichia coli porphobilinogen deaminase was shown to depend on the presence of 5-aminolevulinic acid. A hemA/sup -/ mutant formed inactive deaminase when grown in the absence of 5-aminolevulinic acid since this strain was unable to biosynthesize the dipyrromethane cofactor. The mutant formed normal levels of deaminase, however, when grown in the presence of 5-aminolevulinic acid. Porphobilinogen, the substrate, interacts with the free ..cap alpha..-position of the dipyrromethane cofactor to give stable enzyme-intermediate complexes. Experiments with regiospecifically labeled intermediate complexes have shown that, in the absence of further substrate molecules, the complexes are interconvertible by the exchange of the terminal pyrrole ring of each complex. The formation of enzyme-intermediate complexes is accompanied by the exposure of a cysteine residue, suggesting that substantial conformational changes occur on binding substrate. Specific labeling of the dipyrromethane cofactor by growth of the E. coli in the presence of 5-amino(5-/sup 14/C)levulinic acid has confirmed that the cofactor is not subject to catalytic turnover. Experiments with the ..cap alpha..-substituted substrate analogue ..cap alpha..-bromoporphobilinogen have provided further evidence that the cofactor is responsible for the covalent binding of the substrate at the catalytic site. On the basis of these cummulative findings, it has been possible to construct a mechanistic scheme for the deaminase reaction involving a single catalytic site which is able to catalyze the addition or removal of either NH/sub 3/ or H/sub 2/O. The role of the cofactor both as a primer and as a means for regulating the number of substrates bound in each catalytic cycle is discussed.

  14. A novel zinc-binding motif found in two ubiquitous deaminase families.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J.; Buskirk, S.; Bairoch, A.; Reizer, A.; Saier, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Two families of deaminases, one specific for cytidine, the other for deoxycytidylate, are shown to possess a novel zinc-binding motif, here designated ZBS. We have (1) identified the protein members of these 2 families, (2) carried out sequence analyses that allow specification of this zinc-binding motif, and (3) determined signature sequences that will allow identification of additional members of these families as their sequences become available. PMID:8061614

  15. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V.; Ennis, Riley C.; Griswold, Karl E.; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-01-01

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42 °C as compared to 30 °C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions. PMID:25820125

  16. Various effects of fluorescent bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas containing ACC deaminase on wheat seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Magnucka, Elżbieta G; Pietr, Stanisław J

    2015-12-01

    The study evaluates the effect of rhizobacteria having 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCd) on the development of wheat seedlings. This enzyme has been proposed to play a key role in microbe-plant association. Three fluorescent pseudomonads containing this deaminase were selected from 70 strains of pseudomonads isolated from rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rape (Brassica napus L.). These bacteria, varied significantly in the ability to both biosynthesize auxins and hydrolyze ACC. Among them, Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. brassicacearum strain RZ310 presented the highest activities of ACC deaminase during 96h of growth in liquid Dworkin and Foster (DF) salt medium. Additionally, this rape rhizosphere strain did not produce indoles. Two other isolates, Pseudomonas sp. PO283 and Pseudomonas sp. PO366, secreted auxins only in the presence of their precursor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and four other protein-encoding genes indicated that these wheat rhizosphere isolates belonged to the fluorescent Pseudomonas group. Moreover, the effects of these strains on wheat seedling growth under in vitro conditions were markedly dependent on both their cell suspensions used to grain inoculation and nutrient conditions. Strains tested had beneficial influence on wheat seedlings mainly at low cell densities. In addition, access to nutrients markedly changed bacteria action on cereal growth. Their presence generally favored the positive effects of pseudomonads on length and the estimated biomasses of wheat coleoptiles. Despite these general rules, impacts of each isolate on the growth parameters of cereal seedlings were unique. PMID:25983132

  17. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Ennis, Riley C; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-06-10

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42°C as compared to 30°C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions. PMID:25820125

  18. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  19. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medication can suppress symptoms. ...

  20. Association of purified skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase with a histidine-proline-rich-glycoprotein-like molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri-Raggi, M; Montali, U; Ronca, F; Sabbatini, A; Brown, P E; Moir, A J; Raggi, A

    1997-01-01

    Denaturation of rabbit skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase in acidic medium followed by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose in 8 M urea atpH 8.0 allows separation of two main peptide components of similar apparent molecular mass (75-80 kDa) that we tentatively assume correspond to two different enzyme subunits. Whereas the amino acid composition of one of the two peptides is in good agreement with that derived from the nucleotide sequence of the known rat and human AMPD1 cDNAs, the second component shows much higher contents of proline, glycine and histidine. N-Terminal sequence analysis of the fragments liberated by limited proteolysis with trypsin of the novel peptide reveals a striking similarity to the fragments produced by plasmin cleavage of the rabbit plasma protein called histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein (HPRG). However, some divergence is observed between the sequence of one of the fragments liberated from AMP deaminase by a more extensive trypsinization and rabbit plasma HPRG in the region containing residues 472-477. A fragment with a blocked N-terminus, which was found among those liberated by proteolysis with pepsin of either whole AMP deaminase or the novel component of the enzyme, shows an amino acid composition quite different from that of the N-terminus of the known subunit of AMP deaminase. By coupling this observation with the detection in freshly prepared AMP deaminase of a low yield of the sequence (LTPTDX) corresponding to that of HPRG N-terminus, it can be deduced that in comparison with HPRG, the putative HPRG-like component of AMP deaminase contains an additional fragment with a blocked N-terminus, which is liberated by a proteolytic process during purification of the enzyme. The implications of the association to rabbit skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase of a HPRG-like protein species are discussed. PMID:9307011

  1. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... type and degree of loss. Are there different styles of hearing aids? Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Behind-the- ... the ear canal and are available in two styles. The in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is ...

  2. Adenosine deaminase isoenzyme levels in patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, I; Sagawa, K; Shichijo, S; Yokoyama, M M; Ou, D W; Wiederhold, M D

    1995-01-01

    In serum, the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) is known to be divided into two isoenzymes, ADA1 and ADA2, which have different molecular weights and kinetic properties. The present study investigated ADA isoenzyme levels in the sera of patients infected with retroviruses associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy (HAM), and AIDS, ADA isoenzyme activities were found to be significantly (P < 0.001) higher in the sera of patients with ATL, HAM, and AIDS than in the sera of healthy controls. In the case of the ADA subtypes in the sera of patients with ATL, ADA1 activity was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in patients with the acute and lymphoma types of ATL compared with that in patients with the chronic and smoldering types of ATL. ADA2 activity was significantly elevated in the sera of patients with the acute, lymphoma, and chronic types of ATL (P < 0.001) compared with that in patients with smoldering ATL and HTLV-1 carriers. In the case of patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, ADA1 and ADA2 activities in the sera of patients with AIDS and HIV-1 antibody-positive individuals were significantly (P < 0.001) higher than those in the sera of HIV-1 antibody-negative individuals. A significant elevation in ADA2 activity was also seen in the sera of AIDS patients (P < 0.01) compared with that in the sera of HIV-1 antibody-positive individuals. These results suggest that the magnitude of elevation of ADA isoenzyme levels in serum correlates well with the clinical conditions of the patients with these diseases. Measurement of the activities of ADA isoenzymes may therefore provide an additional parameter for distinguishing the subtypes of ATL and may prove to be useful as prognostic and therapeutic monitors in diseases associated with HTLV-1 and HIV-1 infections. PMID:8548545

  3. Somatic hypermutation of human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases, a pathway for DNA catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Aynaud, Marie-Ming; Guétard, Denise; Henry, Michel; Eckhoff, Grace; Marchio, Agnès; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 (A3A–A3H) locus encodes six cytidine deaminases that edit single-stranded DNA, the result being DNA peppered with uridine. Although several cytidine deaminases are clearly restriction factors for retroviruses and hepadnaviruses, it is not known if APOBEC3 enzymes have roles outside of these settings. It is shown here that both human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA are vulnerable to somatic hypermutation by A3 deaminases, with APOBEC3A standing out among them. The degree of editing is much greater in patients lacking the uracil DNA-glycolyase gene, indicating that the observed levels of editing reflect a dynamic composed of A3 editing and DNA catabolism involving uracil DNA-glycolyase. Nonetheless, hyper- and lightly mutated sequences went hand in hand, raising the hypothesis that recurrent low-level mutation by APOBEC3A could catalyze the transition from a healthy to a cancer genome. PMID:21368204

  4. Increased ability of transgenic plants expressing the bacterial enzyme ACC deaminase to accumulate Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn.

    PubMed

    Grichko, V P; Filby, B; Glick, B R

    2000-07-28

    Transgenic tomato plants Lycopersicon esculentum (Solanaceae) cv. Heinz 902 expressing the bacterial gene 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, under the transcriptional control of either two tandem 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoters (constitutive expression), the rolD promoter from Agrobacterium rhizogenes (root specific expression) or the pathogenesis related PRB-1b promoter from tobacco, were compared to non-transgenic tomato plants in their ability to grow in the presence of Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Ni, Pb, or Zn and to accumulate these metals. Parameters that were examined include metal concentration and ACC deaminase activity in both plant shoots and roots; root and shoot development; and leaf chlorophyll content. In general, transgenic tomato plants expressing ACC deaminase, especially those controlled by the PRB-1b promoter, acquired a greater amount of metal within the plant tissues, and were less subject to the deleterious effects of the metals on plant growth than were non-transgenic plants. PMID:10936659

  5. The effect of native and ACC deaminase-containing Azospirillum brasilense Cd1843 on the rooting of carnation cuttings.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaosi; Saleh-Lakha, Saleema; Glick, Bernard R

    2005-06-01

    Carnation cuttings treated with non-transformed and 1-aminocyclopropane (ACC) deaminase-containing Azospirillum brasilense Cd1843 produced significantly more roots than untreated controls and fewer roots than cuttings treated with 0.1% indolebutyric acid (IBA). The roots produced by cuttings treated with ACC deaminase-containing Azospirillum brasilense Cd1843 were the longest roots resulting from any of the treatments, followed by non-transformed Azospirillum brasilense Cd1843, 0.1% IBA, and treatment with water. The results are interpreted in terms of a previously proposed model of bacterial promotion of plant growth by ACC deaminase and indoleacetic acid, and may have implications for the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria in the flower industry. PMID:16121231

  6. Yin and yang of cytidine deaminase roles in clinical response to azacitidine in the elderly: a pharmacogenetics tale.

    PubMed

    Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Mercier, Cédric; Serdjebi, Cindy; Venton, Geoffroy; Colle, Julien; Fina, Frédéric; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Lacarelle, Bruno; Ciccolini, Joseph; Costello, Régis

    2015-11-01

    Azacitidine is a mainstay for treating hematological disorders. Azacitidine is metabolized by cytidine deaminase, coded by a highly polymorphic gene. Here, we present two elderly patients with opposite clinical outcomes after azacitidine treatment. First, an acute myeloid leukemia patient showed life-threatening toxicities, but outstanding complete remission, after a single round of azacitidine. Further investigations showed that this patient was cytidine deaminase 79A>C (rs2072671) homozygous with a marked deficient phenotype. Next, a chronic myelomonocytic leukemia patient displayed complete lack of response despite several cycles of azacitidine. This patient had a rapid-deaminator phenotype linked to the -31delC deletion (rs3215400). These polymorphisms lead to opposite clinical outcomes in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes treated with azacitidine, thus suggesting that determining cytidine deaminase status could help to forecast clinical outcome. PMID:26556583

  7. Biochemistry and genetics of ACC deaminase: a weapon to “stress ethylene” produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajnish P.; Shelke, Ganesh M.; Kumar, Anil; Jha, Prabhat N.

    2015-01-01

    1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD), a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme, is widespread in diverse bacterial and fungal species. Owing to ACCD activity, certain plant associated bacteria help plant to grow under biotic and abiotic stresses by decreasing the level of “stress ethylene” which is inhibitory to plant growth. ACCD breaks down ACC, an immediate precursor of ethylene, to ammonia and α-ketobutyrate, which can be further metabolized by bacteria for their growth. ACC deaminase is an inducible enzyme whose synthesis is induced in the presence of its substrate ACC. This enzyme encoded by gene AcdS is under tight regulation and regulated differentially under different environmental conditions. Regulatory elements of gene AcdS are comprised of the regulatory gene encoding LRP protein and other regulatory elements which are activated differentially under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The role of some additional regulatory genes such as AcdB or LysR may also be required for expression of AcdS. Phylogenetic analysis of AcdS has revealed that distribution of this gene among different bacteria might have resulted from vertical gene transfer with occasional horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Application of bacterial AcdS gene has been extended by developing transgenic plants with ACCD gene which showed increased tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Moreover, distribution of ACCD gene or its homolog's in a wide range of species belonging to all three domains indicate an alternative role of ACCD in the physiology of an organism. Therefore, this review is an attempt to explore current knowledge of bacterial ACC deaminase mediated physiological effects in plants, mode of enzyme action, genetics, distribution among different species, ecological role of ACCD and, future research avenues to develop transgenic plants expressing foreign AcdS gene to cope with biotic and abiotic stressors. Systemic identification of regulatory circuits

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitors upregulate B cell microRNAs that silence AID and Blimp-1 expression for epigenetic modulation of antibody and autoantibody responses.

    PubMed

    White, Clayton A; Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Tat, Connie; Hayama, Ken L; Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2014-12-15

    Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), which require activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and plasma cell differentiation, which requires B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1), are critical for the generation of class-switched and hypermutated (mature) Ab and autoantibody responses. We show that histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid and butyrate dampened AICDA/Aicda (AID) and PRDM1/Prdm1 (Blimp-1) mRNAs by upregulating miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361 to silence AICDA/Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b to silence PRDM1/Prdm1, in human and mouse B cells. This led to downregulation of AID, Blimp-1, and X-box binding protein 1, thereby inhibiting CSR, SHM, and plasma cell differentiation without altering B cell viability or proliferation. The selectivity of histone deacetylase inhibitor-mediated silencing of AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 was emphasized by unchanged expression of HoxC4 and Irf4 (important inducers/modulators of AICDA/Aicda), Rev1 and Ung (central elements for CSR/SHM), and Bcl6, Bach2, or Pax5 (repressors of PRDM1/Prdm1 expression), as well as unchanged expression of miR-19a/b, miR-20a, and miR-25, which are not known to regulate AICDA/Aicda or PRDM1/Prdm1. Through these B cell-intrinsic epigenetic mechanisms, valproic acid blunted class-switched and hypermutated T-dependent and T-independent Ab responses in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, it decreased class-switched and hypermutated autoantibodies, ameliorated disease, and extended survival in lupus MRL/Fas(lpr/lpr) mice. Our findings outline epigenetic mechanisms that modulate expression of an enzyme (AID) and transcription factors (Blimp-1 and X-box binding protein 1) that are critical to the B cell differentiation processes that underpin Ab and autoantibody responses. They also provide therapeutic proof-of-principle in autoantibody-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:25392531

  9. Significance of the D-serine-deaminase and D-serine metabolism of Staphylococcus saprophyticus for virulence.

    PubMed

    Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc, Türkan; Kline, Kimberly; Nielsen, Hailyn V; Hultgren, Scott; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species of Staphylococcus that is typically uropathogenic and possesses a gene coding for a D-serine-deaminase (DsdA). As D-serine is prevalent in urine and toxic or bacteriostatic to many bacteria, it is not surprising that the D-serine-deaminase gene is found in the genome of uropathogens. It has been suggested that D-serine-deaminase or the ability to respond to or to metabolize D-serine is important for virulence. For uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a high intracellular D-serine concentration affects expression of virulence factors. S. saprophyticus is able to grow in the presence of high D-serine concentrations; however, its D-serine metabolism has not been described. The activity of the D-serine-deaminase was verified by analyzing the formation of pyruvate from D-serine in different strains with and without D-serine-deaminase. Cocultivation experiments were performed to show that D-serine-deaminase confers a growth advantage to S. saprophyticus in the presence of D-serine. Furthermore, in vivo coinfection experiments showed a disadvantage for the ΔdsdA mutant during urinary tract infection. Expression analysis of known virulence factors by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the surface-associated lipase Ssp is upregulated in the presence of D-serine. In addition, we show that S. saprophyticus is able to use D-serine as the sole carbon source, but interestingly, D-serine had a negative effect on growth when glucose was also present. Taken together, D-serine metabolism is associated with virulence in S. saprophyticus, as at least one known virulence factor is upregulated in the presence of D-serine and a ΔdsdA mutant was attenuated in virulence murine model of urinary tract infection. PMID:24082071

  10. Threonine deaminase from extremely halophilic bacteria - Cooperative substrate kinetics and salt dependence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, M. M.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of salt on the activity, stability, and allosteric properties of catabolic threonine deaminase from Halobacterium cutirubrum was studied. The enzyme exhibits sigmoidal kinetics with the substrate, threonine. The Hill slope is 1.55 at pH 10. The enzyme is activated by ADP at low substrate concentrations. In the presence of this effector, sigmoidal kinetics are no longer observed. At pH 10, in the absence of ADP, enzyme activity increases with increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M.

  11. Long-Term Expression of Human Adenosine Deaminase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Rats: A Model for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Carmel M.; Clowes, Monika M.; Osborne, William R. A.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Dusty Miller, A.

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli β-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  12. Financial Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Mary A.

    This workbook assists college and vocational school bound American Indian students in determining their financial needs and in locating sources of financial aid. A checklist helps students assess the state of their knowledge of financial programs; a glossary defines terms pertinent to the realm of financial aid (i.e., graduate study programs,…

  13. APOBEC3G enhances lymphoma cell radioresistance by promoting cytidine deaminase-dependent DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Wilner, Ofer I; Cheshin, Ori; Shahar, Or D; Kenig, Edan; Baraz, Leah; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Arnon; Harris, Reuben S; Goldberg, Michal; Willner, Itamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2012-07-12

    APOBEC3 proteins catalyze deamination of cytidines in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), providing innate protection against retroviral replication by inducing deleterious dC > dU hypermutation of replication intermediates. APOBEC3G expression is induced in mitogen-activated lymphocytes; however, no physiologic role related to lymphoid cell proliferation has yet to be determined. Moreover, whether APOBEC3G cytidine deaminase activity transcends to processing cellular genomic DNA is unknown. Here we show that lymphoma cells expressing high APOBEC3G levels display efficient repair of genomic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation and enhanced survival of irradiated cells. APOBEC3G transiently accumulated in the nucleus in response to ionizing radiation and was recruited to DSB repair foci. Consistent with a direct role in DSB repair, inhibition of APOBEC3G expression or deaminase activity resulted in deficient DSB repair, whereas reconstitution of APOBEC3G expression in leukemia cells enhanced DSB repair. APOBEC3G activity involved processing of DNA flanking a DSB in an integrated reporter cassette. Atomic force microscopy indicated that APOBEC3G multimers associate with ssDNA termini, triggering multimer disassembly to multiple catalytic units. These results identify APOBEC3G as a prosurvival factor in lymphoma cells, marking APOBEC3G as a potential target for sensitizing lymphoma to radiation therapy. PMID:22645179

  14. Discovery of a cAMP Deaminase That Quenches Cyclic AMP-Dependent Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Goble, Alissa M.; Feng, Youjun; Raushel, Frank M.; Cronan, John E.

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme of unknown function within the amidohydrolase superfamily was discovered to catalyze the hydrolysis of the universal second messenger, cyclic-3’, 5’-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The enzyme, which we have named CadD, is encoded by the human pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans. Although CadD is annotated as an adenosine deaminase, the protein specifically deaminates cAMP to cyclic-3’, 5’-inosine monophosphate (cIMP) with a kcat/Km of 2.7 ± 0.4 × 105 M−1 s−1 and has no activity on adenosine, adenine, or 5’-adenosine monophosphate (AMP). This is the first identification of a deaminase specific for cAMP. Expression of CadD in Escherichia coli mimics the loss of adenylate cyclase in that it blocks growth on carbon sources that require the cAMP-CRP transcriptional activator complex for expression of the cognate genes. The cIMP reaction product cannot replace cAMP as the ligand for CRP binding to DNA in vitro and cIMP is a very poor competitor of cAMP activation of CRP for DNA binding. Transcriptional analyses indicate that CadD expression represses expression of several cAMP-CRP dependent genes. CadD adds a new activity to the cAMP metabolic network and may be a useful tool in intracellular study of cAMP-dependent processes. PMID:24074367

  15. A 24-Year Enzyme Replacement Therapy in an Adenosine-deaminase-Deficient Patient.

    PubMed

    Tartibi, Hana M; Hershfield, Michael S; Bahna, Sami L

    2016-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a fatal childhood disease unless immune reconstitution is performed early in life, with either hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy. One of its subtypes is caused by adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme deficiency, which leads to the accumulation of toxic metabolites that impair lymphocyte development and function. With the development of polyethylene glycol-conjugated adenosine deaminase (PEG-ADA) enzyme replacement therapy, many ADA-deficient children with SCID who could not receive a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy survived and had longer and healthier lives. We report a 24-year course of treatment in a patient who was diagnosed with ADA deficiency at 4 months of age. The patient was treated with PEG-ADA, which was the only therapy available for him. The patient's plasma ADA level was regularly monitored and the PEG-ADA dose adjusted accordingly. This treatment has resulted in near-normalization of lymphocyte counts, and his clinical course has been associated with only minor to moderate infections. Thus far, he has had no manifestations of autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders. This patient is among the longest to be maintained on PEG-ADA enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:26684479

  16. ACC deaminase and IAA producing growth promoting bacteria from the rhizosphere soil of tropical rice plants.

    PubMed

    Bal, Himadri Bhusan; Das, Subhasis; Dangar, Tushar K; Adhya, Tapan K

    2013-12-01

    Beneficial plant-associated bacteria play a key role in supporting and/or promoting plant growth and health. Plant growth promoting bacteria present in the rhizosphere of crop plants can directly affect plant metabolism or modulate phytohormone production or degradation. We isolated 355 bacteria from the rhizosphere of rice plants grown in the farmers' fields in the coastal rice field soil from five different locations of the Ganjam district of Odisha, India. Six bacteria producing both ACC deaminase (ranging from 603.94 to 1350.02 nmol α-ketobutyrate mg(-1)  h(-1) ) and indole acetic acid (IAA; ranging from 10.54 to 37.65 μM ml(-1) ) in pure cultures were further identified using polyphasic taxonomy including BIOLOG((R)) , FAME analysis and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses of the isolates resulted into five major clusters to include members of the genera Bacillus, Microbacterium, Methylophaga, Agromyces, and Paenibacillus. Seed inoculation of rice (cv. Naveen) by the six individual PGPR isolates had a considerable impact on different growth parameters including root elongation that was positively correlated with ACC deaminase activity and IAA production. The cultures also had other plant growth attributes including ammonia production and at least two isolates produced siderophores. Study indicates that presence of diverse rhizobacteria with effective growth-promoting traits, in the rice rhizosphere, may be exploited for a sustainable crop management under field conditions. PMID:23681643

  17. Identification of small molecule compounds with higher binding affinity to guanine deaminase (cypin) than guanine.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José R; Sweet, Eric S; Welsh, William J; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2010-09-15

    Guanine deaminase (GDA; cypin) is an important metalloenzyme that processes the first step in purine catabolism, converting guanine to xanthine by hydrolytic deamination. In higher eukaryotes, GDA also plays an important role in the development of neuronal morphology by regulating dendritic arborization. In addition to its role in the maturing brain, GDA is thought to be involved in proper liver function since increased levels of GDA activity have been correlated with liver disease and transplant rejection. Although mammalian GDA is an attractive and potential drug target for treatment of both liver diseases and cognitive disorders, prospective novel inhibitors and/or activators of this enzyme have not been actively pursued. In this study, we employed the combination of protein structure analysis and experimental kinetic studies to seek novel potential ligands for human guanine deaminase. Using virtual screening and biochemical analysis, we identified common small molecule compounds that demonstrate a higher binding affinity to GDA than does guanine. In vitro analysis demonstrates that these compounds inhibit guanine deamination, and more surprisingly, affect GDA (cypin)-mediated microtubule assembly. The results in this study provide evidence that an in silico drug discovery strategy coupled with in vitro validation assays can be successfully implemented to discover compounds that may possess therapeutic value for the treatment of diseases and disorders where GDA activity is abnormal. PMID:20716488

  18. Ab Initio ONIOM-Molecular Dynamics (MD) Study on the Deamination Reaction by Cytidine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-08-23

    We applied the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method to the hydrolytic deamination of cytidine by cytidine deaminase, which is an essential step of the activation process of the anticancer drug inside the human body. The direct MD simulations were performed for the realistic model of cytidine deaminase calculating the energy and its gradient by the ab initio ONIOM method on the fly. The ONIOM-MD calculations including the thermal motion show that the neighboring amino acid residue is an important factor of the environmental effects and significantly affects not only the geometry and energy of the substrate trapped in the pocket of the active site but also the elementary step of the catalytic reaction. We successfully simulate the second half of the catalytic cycle, which has been considered to involve the rate-determining step, and reveal that the rate-determing step is the release of the NH3 molecule. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  19. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase from Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 Facilitates the Growth of Rice in the Presence of Salt or Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunlei; Wang, Rui; Yang, Zhirong; Zhan, Yuhua; Ma, Yao; Ping, Shuzhen; Zhang, Liwen; Lin, Min; Yan, Yongliang

    2015-07-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, which is encoded by some bacteria, can reduce the amount of ethylene, a root elongation inhibitor, and stimulate the growth of plants under various environmental stresses. The presence of ACC deaminase activity and the regulation of ACC in several rhizospheric bacteria have been reported. The nitrogen-fixing Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 is capable of endophytic association with rice plants and promotes the growth of rice. However, the functional identification of ACC deaminase has not been performed. In this study, the proposed effect of ACC deaminase in P. stutzeri A1501 was investigated. Genome mining showed that P. stutzeri A1501 carries a single gene encoding ACC deaminase, designated acdS. The acdS mutant was devoid of ACC deaminase activity and was less resistant to NaCl and NiCl2 compared with the wild-type. Furthermore, inactivation of acdS greatly impaired its nitrogenase activity under salt stress conditions. It was also observed that mutation of the acdS gene led to loss of the ability to promote the growth of rice under salt or heavy metal stress. Taken together, this study illustrates the essential role of ACC deaminase, not only in enhancing the salt or heavy metal tolerance of bacteria but also in improving the growth of plants, and provides a theoretical basis for studying the interaction between plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and plants. PMID:25674802

  20. Isolation and properties of AMP deaminase from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle from the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Rios, E; Pacheco-Aguilar, R; Castillo-Yañez, F J; Figueroa-Soto, C G; Ezquerra-Brauer, J M; Gollas-Galvan, T

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase was purified from jumbo squid mantle muscle by chromatography in cellulose phosphate, Q-Fast and 5'-AMP sepharose. Specific activity of 2.5U/mg protein, 4.5% recovery and 133.68 purification fold were obtained at the end of the experiment. SDS-PAGE showed a single band with 87kDa molecular mass, native PAGE proved a band of 178kDa, whereas gel filtration detected a 180kDa protein, suggesting the homodimeric nature of this enzyme, in which subunits are not linked by covalent forces. Isoelectric focusing of this enzyme showed a pI of 5.76, which agrees with pI values of AMP deaminase from other invertebrate organisms. AMP deaminase presented a kinetic sigmoidal plot with Vmax of 1.16μM/min/mg, Km of 13mM, Kcat of 3.48μM.s(-1) and a Kcat/Km of 267 (mol/L)(-1).s(-1). The apparent relative low catalytic activity of jumbo squid muscle AMP deaminase in the absence of positive effectors is similar to that reported for homologous enzymes in other invertebrate organisms. PMID:26050167

  1. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  2. Hearing Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Food and Drug Administration Staff FDA permits marketing of new laser-based hearing aid with potential ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  3. Teaching Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, W. Robert, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Provides evaluations of several aids for teaching chemistry. Included are The Use of Chemical Abstracts, Practical Technical Writing, Infrared Spectroscopy Programs, and a film titled "You Can't Go Back." (RH)

  4. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-encoded cytidine deaminase efficiently inactivates cytosine-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Vervaeke, Peter; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas may colonize tumor tissue in patients. The cytostatic activity of gemcitabine was dramatically decreased in Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected tumor cell cultures compared with non-infected tumor cell cultures. This mycoplasma-driven drug deamination could be prevented by exogenous administration of the cytidine deaminase (CDA) inhibitor tetrahydrouridine, but also by the natural nucleosides or by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor. The M. hyorhinis-encoded CDAHyor gene was cloned, expressed as a recombinant protein and purified. CDAHyor was found to be more catalytically active than its human equivalent and efficiently deaminates (inactivates) cytosine-based anticancer drugs. CDAHyor expression at the tumor site may result in selective drug inactivation and suboptimal therapeutic efficiency. PMID:26322268

  5. An APOBEC Cytidine Deaminase Mutagenesis Pattern is Widespread in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Steven A.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Klimczak, Leszek J.; Grimm, Sara A.; Fargo, David; Stojanov, Petar; Kiezun, Adam; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Carter, Scott L.; Saksena, Gordon; Harris, Shawn; Shah, Ruchir R.; Resnick, Michael A.; Getz, Gad; Gordenin, Dmitry A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that a subclass of APOBEC cytidine deaminases, which convert cytosine to uracil during RNA editing and retrovirus or retrotransposon restriction, may induce mutation clusters in human tumors. We show here that throughout cancer genomes APOBEC mutagenesis is pervasive and correlates with APOBEC mRNA levels. Mutation clusters in whole-genome and exome datasets conformed to stringent criteria indicative of an APOBEC mutation pattern. Applying these criteria to 954,247 mutations in 2,680 exomes of 14 cancer types, mostly from TCGA, revealed significant presence of the APOBEC mutation pattern in bladder, cervical, breast, head and neck and lung cancers, reaching 68% of all mutations in some samples. Within breast cancer, the HER2E subtype was clearly enriched with tumors displaying the APOBEC mutation pattern, suggesting this type of mutagenesis is functionally linked with cancer development. The APOBEC mutation pattern also extended to cancer-associated genes, implying that ubiquitous APOBEC mutagenesis is carcinogenic. PMID:23852170

  6. Adenosine monophosphate deaminase 3 activation shortens erythrocyte half-life and provides malaria resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hortle, Elinor; Nijagal, Brunda; Bauer, Denis C; Jensen, Lora M; Ahn, Seong Beom; Cockburn, Ian A; Lampkin, Shelley; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2016-09-01

    The factors that determine red blood cell (RBC) lifespan and the rate of RBC aging have not been fully elucidated. In several genetic conditions, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and G6PD deficiency, erythrocyte lifespan is significantly shortened. Many of these diseases are also associated with protection from severe malaria, suggesting a role for accelerated RBC senescence and clearance in malaria resistance. Here, we report a novel, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation that causes a gain of function in adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD3). Mice carrying the mutation exhibit rapid RBC turnover, with increased erythropoiesis, dramatically shortened RBC lifespan, and signs of increased RBC senescence/eryptosis, suggesting a key role for AMPD3 in determining RBC half-life. Mice were also found to be resistant to infection with the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi. We propose that resistance to P. chabaudi is mediated by increased RBC turnover and higher rates of erythropoiesis during infection. PMID:27465915

  7. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice reconstituted with retrovirus-transduced hematopoietic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.M.; Danos, O.; Grossman, M.; Raulet, D.H.; Mulligan, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses encoding human adenosine deaminase have been used to infect murine hematopoietic stem cells. In bone marrow transplant recipients reconstituted with the genetically modified cells, human ADA was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the recipients for at least 6 months after transplantation. In animals analyzed in detail 4 months after transplantation, human ADA and proviral sequences were detected in all hematopoietic lineages; in several cases, human ADA activity exceeded the endogenous activity. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a functional human ADA gene into hematopoietic stem cells and obtaining expression in multiple hematopoietic lineages long after transplantation. This approach should be helpful in designing effective gene therapies for severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes in humans.

  8. Synthesis of 5′-Methylthio Coformycins: Specific Inhibitors for Malarial Adenosine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Peter C.; Taylor, Erika A.; Fröhlich, Richard F. G.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2008-01-01

    Transition state theory suggests that enzymatic rate acceleration (kcat/knon) is related to the stabilization of the transition state for a given reaction. Chemically stable analogues of a transition state complex are predicted to convert catalytic energy into binding energy. Since transition state stabilization is a function of catalytic efficiency, differences in substrate specificity can be exploited in the design of tight-binding transition state analogue inhibitors. Coformycin and 2′-deoxycoformycin are natural product transition state analogue inhibitors of adenosine deaminases (ADAs). These compounds mimic the tetrahedral geometry of the ADA transition state and bind with picomolar dissociation constants to enzymes from bovine, human, and protozoan sources. The purine salvage pathway in malaria parasites is unique in that Plasmodium falciparum ADA (PfADA) catalyzes the deamination of both adenosine and 5’-methylthioadenosine. In contrast, human adenosine deaminase (HsADA) does not deaminate 5’-methylthioadenosine. 5′-Methylthio coformycin and 5’-meththio-2′-deoxycoformycin were synthesized to be specific transition state mimics of the P. falciparum enzyme. These analogues inhibited PfADA with dissociation constants of 430 and 790 pM, respectively. Remarkably, they gave no detectable inhibition of the human and bovine enzymes. Adenosine deamination is involved in the essential pathway of purine salvage in P. falciparum and prior studies have shown that inhibition of purine salvage results in parasite death. Inhibitors of HsADA are known to cause toxicity in humans and the availability of parasite-specific ADA inhibitors may prevent this side-effect. The potent and P. falciparum-specific inhibitors described here have potential for development as antimalarials without inhibition of host ADA. PMID:17488013

  9. Effects of an induced adenosine deaminase deficiency on T-cell differentiation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, R.W.

    1985-10-15

    Inherited deficiency of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) has been found in a significant proportion of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and inherited defect generally characterized by a deficiency of both B and T cells. Two questions are central to understanding the pathophysiology of this disease: (1) at what stage or stages in lymphocyte development are the effects of the enzyme deficiency manifested; (2) what are the biochemical mechanisms responsible for the selective pathogenicity of the lymphoid system. We have examined the stage or stages of rat T-cell development in vivo which are affected by an induced adenosine deaminase deficiency using the ADA inhibitors, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) and 2'-deoxycoformycin (DCF). In normal rats given daily administration of an ADA inhibitor, cortical thymocytes were markedly depleted; peripheral lymphocytes and pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) all were relatively unaffected. Since a deficiency of ADA affects lymphocyte development, the regeneration of cortical and medullary thymocytes and their precursors after sublethal irradiation was used as a model of lymphoid development. By Day 5 after irradiation the thymus was reduced to 0.10-0.5% of its normal size; whereas at Days 9 and 14 the thymus was 20-40% and 60-80% regenerated, respectively. When irradiated rats were given daily parenteral injections of the ADA inhibitor plus adenosine or deoxyadenosine, thymus regeneration at Days 9 and 14 was markedly inhibited, whereas the regeneration of thymocyte precursors was essentially unaffected. Thymus regeneration was at least 40-fold lower than in rats given adenosine or deoxyadenosine alone. Virtually identical results were obtained with both ADA inhibitors, EHNA and DCF.

  10. The ADA*2 allele of the adenosine deaminase gene (20q13.11) and recurrent spontaneous abortions: an age-dependent association

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Daniela Prudente Teixeira; Spegiorin, Lígia Cosentino Junqueira Franco; de Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão; Oliani, Antonio Helio; Vaz-Oliani, Denise Cristina Mós; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adenosine deaminase acts on adenosine and deoxyadenosine metabolism and modulates the immune response. The adenosine deaminase G22A polymorphism (20q.11.33) influences the level of adenosine deaminase enzyme expression, which seems to play a key role in maintaining pregnancy. The adenosine deaminase 2 phenotype has been associated with a protective effect against recurrent spontaneous abortions in European Caucasian women. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the G22A polymorphism of the adenosine deaminase gene is associated with recurrent spontaneous abortions in Brazilian women. METHODS: A total of 311 women were recruited to form two groups: G1, with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortions (N = 129), and G2, without a history of abortions (N = 182). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with a commercial kit and PCR-RFLP analysis was used to identify the G22A genetic polymorphism. Fisher's exact test and odds ratio values were used to compare the proportions of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between women with and without a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion (p<0.05). The differences between mean values for categorical data were calculated using unpaired t tests. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was assessed with a chi-square test. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were identified for the frequencies of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between the G1 and G2 groups when adjusted for maternal age. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the adenosine deaminase *2 allele is associated with a low risk for recurrent spontaneous abortions, but this association is dependent on older age. PMID:22086524

  11. Floriculture Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joyce; Looney, Era

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program for a floriculture aide, this program guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines and sample lesson plans are presented on eleven topics: occupational opportunities in the retail florist industry;…

  12. Classroom Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article describes 6 aids for science instruction, including (1) the use of fudge to represent lava; (2) the "Living by Chemistry" program, designed to make high school chemistry more accessible to a diverse pool of students without sacrificing content; (3) NOAA and NSTA's online coral reef teaching tool, a new web-based "science toolbox" for…

  13. Protein preparation and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a putative glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase from Streptococcus mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Guan-Jing; Li, Lan-Fen; Li, Dan; Liu, Cong; Wei, Shi-Cheng; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase homologue from S. mutans was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.4 Å resolution. The SMU.636 protein from Streptococcus mutans is a putative glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase with 233 residues. The smu.636 gene was PCR-amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET-28a(+). The resultant His-tagged fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity in two steps. Crystals of the fusion protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.83, b = 82.13, c = 134.70 Å.

  14. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcus aureus tRNA Adenosine Deaminase TadA in Complex with RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Losey,H.; Ruthenburg, A.; Verdine, G.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial tRNA adenosine deaminases (TadAs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNA(Arg2), a process that enables this single tRNA to recognize three different arginine codons in mRNA. In addition, inosine is also introduced at the wobble position of multiple eukaryotic tRNAs. The genes encoding these deaminases are essential in bacteria and yeast, demonstrating the importance of their biological activity. Here we report the crystallization and structure determination to 2.0 A of Staphylococcus aureus TadA bound to the anticodon stem-loop of tRNA(Arg2) bearing nebularine, a non-hydrolyzable adenosine analog, at the wobble position. The cocrystal structure reveals the basis for both sequence and structure specificity in the interactions of TadA with RNA, and it additionally provides insight into the active site architecture that promotes efficient hydrolytic deamination.

  15. Adenosine deaminase regulates Treg expression in autologous T cell-dendritic cell cocultures from patients infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Naval-Macabuhay, Isaac; Casanova, Víctor; Navarro, Gemma; García, Felipe; León, Agathe; Miralles, Laia; Rovira, Cristina; Martinez-Navio, José M; Gallart, Teresa; Mallol, Josefa; Gatell, José M; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; McCormick, Peter J; Climent, Núria

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells have an important role in immune suppression during HIV-1 infection. As regulatory T cells produce the immunomodulatory molecule adenosine, our aim here was to assess the potential of adenosine removal to revert the suppression of anti-HIV responses exerted by regulatory T cells. The experimental setup consisted of ex vivo cocultures of T and dendritic cells, to which adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, was added. In cells from healthy individuals, adenosine hydrolysis decreased CD4(+)CD25(hi) regulatory T cells. Addition of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, significantly decreased CD4(+)CD25(lo) cells, confirming a modulatory role of adenosine acting via adenosine receptors. In autologous cocultures of T cells with HIV-1-pulsed dendritic cells, addition of adenosine deaminase led to a significant decrease of HIV-1-induced CD4(+)CD25(hi) forkhead box p3(+) cells and to a significant enhancement of the HIV-1-specific CD4(+) responder T cells. An increase in the effector response was confirmed by the enhanced production of CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD25(-)CD45RO(+) memory cell generation and secretion of Th1 cytokines, including IFN-γ and IL-15 and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, and RANTES/CCL5. These ex vivo results show, in a physiologically relevant model, that adenosine deaminase is able to enhance HIV-1 effector responses markedly. The possibility to revert regulatory T cell-mediated inhibition of immune responses by use of adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, merits attention for restoring T lymphocyte function in HIV-1 infection. PMID:26310829

  16. Double-stranded-RNA-specific adenosine deaminase 1 (ADAR1) is proposed to contribute to the adaptation of equine infectious anemia virus from horses to donkeys.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Xiang; Na, Lei; Wang, Xue-Feng; Fu, Li-Hua; Zhu, Chun-Hui; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a member of the genus Lentivirus of the family Retroviridae. Horses are the most susceptible equids to EIAV infection and are therefore the primary hosts of this virus. In contrast, infected donkeys do not develop clinically active equine infectious anemia (EIA). This phenomenon is similar to what has been observed with HIV-1, which fails to induce AIDS in non-human primates. Interestingly, Shen et al. developed a donkey-tropic pathogenic virus strain (EIAVDV117, DV117) by serially passaging a horse-tropic pathogenic strain, EIAVLN40 (LN40), in donkeys. LN40, which was generated by passaging a field isolate in horses, displayed enhanced virulence in horses but caused no clinical symptoms in donkeys. Infection with DV117 induced acute EIA in nearly 100 % of donkeys. Genomic analysis of DV117 revealed a significantly higher frequency of A-to-G substitutions when compared to LN40. Furthermore, detailed analysis of dinucleotide editing showed that A-to-G mutations had a preference for 5'TpA and 5'ApA. These results strongly implicated the activity of the adenosine deaminase, ADAR1, in this type of mutation. Further investigation demonstrated that overexpression of donkey ADAR1 increased A-to-G mutations within the genome of EIAV. Together with our previous finding that multiple mutations in multiple genes are generated in DV117 during its adaptation from horses to donkeys, the present study suggests that ADAR1-induced A-to-G mutations occur during virus adaption to related new hosts contributing to the alteration of EIAV host tropism. PMID:27383210

  17. Cytosine deaminase as a negative selectable marker for the microalgal chloroplast: a strategy for the isolation of nuclear mutations that affect chloroplast gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Rosanna E B; Purton, Saul

    2014-12-01

    Negative selectable markers are useful tools for forward-genetic screens aimed at identifying trans-acting factors that are required for expression of specific genes. Transgenic lines harbouring the marker fused to a gene element, such as a promoter, may be mutagenized to isolate loss-of-function mutants able to survive under selection. Such a strategy allows the molecular dissection of factors that are essential for expression of the gene. Expression of individual chloroplast genes in plants and algae typically requires one or more nuclear-encoded factors that act at the post-transcriptional level, often through interaction with the 5' UTR of the mRNA. To study such nuclear control further, we have developed the Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase gene codA as a conditional negative selectable marker for use in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that a codon-optimized variant of codA with three amino acid substitutions confers sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) when expressed in the chloroplast under the control of endogenous promoter/5' UTR elements from the photosynthetic genes psaA or petA. UV mutagenesis of the psaA transgenic line allowed recovery of 5-FC-resistant, photosynthetically deficient lines harbouring mutations in the nuclear gene for the factor TAA1 that is required for psaA translation. Similarly, the petA line was used to isolate mutants of the petA mRNA stability factor MCA1 and the translation factor TCA1. The codA marker may be used to identify critical residues in known nuclear factors and to aid the discovery of additional factors required for expression of chloroplast genes. PMID:25234691

  18. HIV/AIDS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enter ZIP code or city Follow Act Against AIDS Act Against AIDS @talkHIV Act Against AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets HIV/ ...

  19. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Combined with Cytosine Deaminase-Endostatin for Suppression of Liver Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Yu, Hui; An, Yan-Li; Chen, Hua-Jun; Jia, ZhenYu; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Transplantation of gene transfected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) provides a novel method for treatment of human tumors. To study treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma using cytosine deaminase (CD)- and endostatin (ES)-transfected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), mouse bone marrow-derived EPCs were cultured and transfected with Lenti6.3-CD-EGFP and Lenti6.3-ES-Monomer-DsRed labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. DiD (lipophilic fluorescent dye)-labeled EPCs were injected into normal mice and mice with liver carcinoma. The EPCs loaded with CD-ES were infused into the mice through caudal veins and tumor volumes were measured. The tumor volumes in the EPC + SPIO + CD/5-Fc + ES group were found to be smaller as a result and grew more slowly than those from the EPC + SPIO + LV (lentivirus, empty vector control) group. Survival times were also measured after infusion of the cells into the mice. The median survival time was found to be longer in the EPC + SPIO + CD/5-Fc + ES group than in the others. In conclusion, the EPCs transfected with CD-ES suppressed the liver carcinoma cells in vitro, migrated primarily to the carcinoma, inhibited tumor growth, and also extended the median survival time for the mice with liver carcinoma. PMID:27319212

  20. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  1. Purine nucleoside metabolism in the erythrocytes of patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency and severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, R P; Crabtree, G W; Parks, R E; Nelson, J A; Keightley, R; Parkman, R; Rosen, F S; Stern, R C; Polmar, S H

    1976-01-01

    Deficiency of erythrocytic and lymphocytic adenosine deaminase (ADA) occurs in some patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). SCID with ADA deficiency is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. ADA is markedly reduced or undetectable in affected patients (homozygotes), and approximately one-half normal levels are found in individuals heterozygous for ADA deficiency. The metabolism of purine nucleosides was studied in erythrocytes from normal individuals, four ADA-deficiency patients, and two heterozygous individuals. ADA deficiency in intake erythrocytes was confirmed by a very sensitive ammonia-liberation technique. Erythrocytic ADA activity in three heterozygous individuals (0.07,0.08, and 0.14 mumolar units/ml of packed cells) was between that of the four normal controls (0.20-0.37 mumol/ml) and the ADA-deficient patients (no activity). In vitro, adenosine was incorporated principally into IMP in the heterozygous and normal individuals but into the adenosine nucleotides in the ADa-deficient patients. Coformycin (3-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-6,7,8-trihydroimidazo[4,5-4] [1,3] diazepin-8 (R)-ol), a potent inhibitor of ADA, made possible incorporation of adenosine nucleotides in the ADA-deficient patients... PMID:947948

  2. Integrase-defective Lentiviral Vectors as a Delivery Platform for Targeted Modification of Adenosine Deaminase Locus

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Alok V; Hollis, Roger P; Kuftinec, Gabriela; Senadheera, Shantha; Chan, Rebecca; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) for transient delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and donor templates for site-specific modification of the human adenosine deaminase (hADA) gene. Initially, we constructed IDLVs carrying ZFN monomers (Single-IDLVs) and found them to be able to deliver their gene-editing payload to K562 cells successfully upon cotransduction, with minimal cytotoxicity. To simplify delivery, we designed an IDLV construct to deliver both ZFN monomers from the same vector (Double-IDLV). However, this construct in its original state was prone to rearrangements of the vector genome, resulting in greatly reduced functionality; this was due to recombination between highly similar ZFN monomers arranged in tandem. We modified the Double-IDLV constructs to reduce recombination and restored simultaneous delivery of both ZFNs. We also tested an IDLV construct for delivery of donor templates and demonstrated its efficacy for gene modification. In summary, we highlighted the importance of modifying vector design for co-delivery of highly similar sequences inherent to genome-editing nucleases, and demonstrated significant improvement in the use of IDLVs for delivery of ZFNs and donor templates for genome modification. PMID:23857176

  3. Adenosine deaminase is a useful biomarker to diagnose pleural tuberculosis in low to medium prevalence settings.

    PubMed

    Michot, Jean-Marie; Madec, Yoann; Bulifon, Sophie; Thorette-Tcherniak, Cécile; Fortineau, Nicolas; Noël, Nicolas; Lambotte, Olivier; El Jahiri, Younes; Delacour, Hervé; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Blanc, François-Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity measurement in pleural fluid is a relevant test to diagnose pleural tuberculosis (pTB) in high tuberculosis prevalence settings. We investigated the diagnostic utility of pleural ADA using a retrospective analysis of patients admitted with newly diagnosed pleural effusion without identified etiology between 2001 and 2008 in Paris suburb, a low to medium tuberculosis prevalence area. 104 adults (mean age 55 years; 34 with pTB, 70 with other diagnoses) were analyzed. Median follow-up was 15.6 months. Mean [interquartile range] pleural ADA was 119 U/L [IQR: 83-143] in pTB and 24 U/L [IQR: 15-31] in non-tuberculous effusions (P<0.001). With an optimal pleural ADA cut-off value of 41.5 U/L for pTB diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity were 97.1% and 92.9%, while positive and negative predictive values were 86.8% and 98.5%, respectively. We conclude that pleural ADA activity could be integrated in the diagnostic procedures of pTB in low to medium tuberculosis prevalence settings. PMID:26707067

  4. PMMA/polysaccharides nanofilm loaded with adenosine deaminase inhibitor for targeted anti-inflammatory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Redolfi Riva, Eugenio; Desii, Andrea; Sartini, Stefania; La Motta, Concettina; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-10-29

    A novel drug delivery vector, a free-standing polymeric ultrathin film (nanofilm) composed of PMMA and a polysaccharides multilayer, is presented. Chitosan and sodium alginate are alternatively deposited by spin-assisted LbL assembly onto a plasma-treated PMMA thin film. Hydrophobic anti-inflammatory drugs, an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (APP) and its fluorescent dansyl derivate (APP-Dns), are encapsulated inside the LbL multilayer using a simple casting deposition procedure. The resulting drug loaded nanofilm can be suspended in water upon dissolution of a PVA sacrificial layer. Morphological characterization of the nanofilm shows that PMMA/LbL nanofilms possess nanometric thickness (<200 nm) and very low surface roughness (1-2 nm for drug loaded nanofilms and <1 nm for blank nanofilm). Drug loaded films exhibit a diffusion controlled release mechanism following the Korsmayer-Peppas release model, confirmed by the fit of release data with a characteristic power law. Drug release is impaired through the PMMA layer, which acts effectively as a barrier for drug transport. This ultrathin polymer film can find application as a nanopatch for targeted inflammatory drug delivery to treat localized pathologies as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24073802

  5. Heme-Biosynthetic Porphobilinogen Deaminase Protects Aspergillus nidulans from Nitrosative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengmin; Narukami, Toshiaki; Nameki, Misuzu; Ozawa, Tomoko; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms have developed mechanisms to combat reactive nitrogen species (RNS); however, only a few of the fungal genes involved have been characterized. Here we screened RNS-resistant Aspergillus nidulans strains from fungal transformants obtained by introducing a genomic DNA library constructed in a multicopy vector. We found that the AN0121.3 gene (hemC) encodes a protein similar to the heme biosynthesis enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and facilitates RNS-tolerant fungal growth. The overproduction of PBG-D in A. nidulans promoted RNS tolerance, whereas PBG-D repression caused growth that was hypersensitive to RNS. PBG-D levels were comparable to those of cellular protoheme synthesis as well as flavohemoglobin (FHb; encoded by fhbA and fhbB) and nitrite reductase (NiR; encoded by niiA) activities. Both FHb and NiR are hemoproteins that consume nitric oxide and nitrite, respectively, and we found that they are required for maximal growth in the presence of RNS. The transcription of hemC was upregulated by RNS. These results demonstrated that PBG-D is a novel NO-tolerant protein that modulates the reduction of environmental NO and nitrite levels by FHb and NiR. PMID:22038601

  6. Molecular and kinetic alterations of muscle AMP deaminase during chronic creatine depletion.

    PubMed

    Rush, J W; Tullson, P C; Terjung, R L

    1998-02-01

    We examined a possible mechanism to account for the maintenance of peak AMP deamination rate in fast-twitch muscle of rats fed the creatine analog beta-guanidinopropionic acid (beta-GPA), in spite of reduced abundance of the enzyme AMP deaminase (AMPD). AMPD enzymatic capacity (determined at saturating AMP concentration) and AMPD protein abundance (Western blot) were coordinately reduced approximately 80% in fast-twitch white gastrocnemius muscle by beta-GPA feeding over 7 wk. Kinetic analysis of AMPD in the soluble cell fraction demonstrated a single Michaelis-Menten constant (Km; approximately 1.5 mM) in control muscle extracts. An additional high-affinity Km (approximately 0.03 mM) was revealed at low AMP concentrations in extracts of beta-GPA-treated muscle. The kinetic alteration in AMPD reflects increased molecular activity at low AMP concentrations; this could account for high rates of deamination in beta-GPA-treated muscle in situ, despite the loss of AMPD enzyme protein. The elimination of this kinetic effect by treatment of beta-GPA-treated muscle extracts with acid phosphatase in vitro suggests that phosphorylation is involved in the kinetic control of skeletal muscle AMPD in vivo. PMID:9486137

  7. Adaptive evolution of threonine deaminase in plant defense against insect herbivores

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales-Vigil, Eliana; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2011-11-07

    Gene duplication is a major source of plant chemical diversity that mediates plant-herbivore interactions. There is little direct evidence, however, that novel chemical traits arising from gene duplication reduce herbivory. Higher plants use threonine deaminase (TD) to catalyze the dehydration of threonine (Thr) to {alpha}-ketobutyrate and ammonia as the committed step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine (Ile). Cultivated tomato and related Solanum species contain a duplicated TD paralog (TD2) that is coexpressed with a suite of genes involved in herbivore resistance. Analysis of TD2-deficient tomato lines showed that TD2 has a defensive function related to Thr catabolism in the gut of lepidopteran herbivores. During herbivory, the regulatory domain of TD2 is removed by proteolysis to generate a truncated protein (pTD2) that efficiently degrades Thr without being inhibited by Ile. We show that this proteolytic activation step occurs in the gut of lepidopteran but not coleopteran herbivores, and is catalyzed by a chymotrypsin-like protease of insect origin. Analysis of purified recombinant enzymes showed that TD2 is remarkably more resistant to proteolysis and high temperature than the ancestral TD1 isoform. The crystal structure of pTD2 provided evidence that electrostatic interactions constitute a stabilizing feature associated with adaptation of TD2 to the extreme environment of the lepidopteran gut. These findings demonstrate a role for gene duplication in the evolution of a plant defense that targets and co-opts herbivore digestive physiology.

  8. Platelet aggregation and serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity in pregnancy associated with diabetes, hypertension and HIV.

    PubMed

    Leal, Claudio A M; Leal, Daniela B R; Adefegha, Stephen A; Morsch, Vera M; da Silva, José E P; Rezer, João F P; Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Abdalla, Faida H; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2016-07-01

    Platelet aggregation and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity were evaluated in pregnant women living with some disease conditions including hypertension, diabetes mellitus and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The subject population is consisted of 15 non-pregnant healthy women [control group (CG)], 15 women with normal pregnancy (NP), 7 women with hypertensive pregnancy (HP), 10 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 12 women with human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnancy (HIP) groups. The aggregation of platelets was checked using an optical aggregometer, and serum ADA activity was determined using the colorimetric method. After the addition of 5 µM of agonist adenosine diphosphate, the percentage of platelet aggregation was significantly (p < 0·05) increased in NP, HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with the CG, while the addition of 10 µM of the same agonist caused significant (p < 0·05) elevations in HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with CG. Furthermore, ADA activity was significantly (p < 0·05) enhanced in NP, HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with CG. In this study, the increased platelet aggregation and ADA activity in pregnancy and pregnancy-associated diseases suggest that platelet aggregation and ADA activity could serve as peripheral markers for the development of effective therapy in the maintenance of homeostasis and some inflammatory process in these pathophysiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27273565

  9. Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David N.; Li, Yonghua; Kumar, Rajnish; Burke, Sean A.; Dawson, Rodney; Hioe, Catarina E.; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages. PMID:25272020

  10. AMP deaminase histochemical activity and immunofluorescent isozyme localization in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Sabina, R. L.; Ogasawara, N.; Riley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The cellular distribution of AMP deaminase (AMPda) isozymes was documented for rat soleus and plantaris muscles, utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoprecipitation methods. AMPda is a ubiquitous enzyme existing as three distinct isozymes, A, B and C, which were initially purified from skeletal muscle, liver (and kidney), and heart, respectively. AMPda-A is primarily concentrated subsarcolemmally and intermyofibrillarly within muscle cells, while isozymes B and C are concentrated within non-myofiber elements of muscle tissue. AMPda-B is principally associated with connective tissues surrounding neural elements and the muscle spindle capsule, and AMPda-C is predominantly associated with circulatory elements, such as arterial and venous walls, capillary endothelium, and red blood cells. These specific localizations, combined with documented differences in kinetic properties, suggest multiple functional roles for the AMPda isozymes or temporal segregation of similar AMPda functions. Linkage of the AMPda substrate with adenosine production pathways at the AMP level and the localization of isozyme-C in vascular tissue suggest a regulatory role in the microcirculation.

  11. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver. PMID:26908609

  12. Raised Serum Adenosine Deaminase Level in Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Bagchi, Debajit; Sen, Oishimaya; Bir, Aritri; Chakrabarti, Sasanka; Banerjee, Anindita

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammation being minimal in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in nonobese patients; the aim of the study was to investigate the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and see its association with diabetes mellitus. The preliminary case control study comprised of 56 cases and 45 healthy controls which were age and sex matched. 3 mL venous blood samples were obtained from the patients as well as controls after 8–10 hours of fasting. Serum ADA and routine biochemical parameters were analyzed. Serum ADA level was found significantly higher among nonobese T2DM subjects with respect to controls (38.77 ± 14.29 versus 17.02 ± 5.74 U/L; P < 0.0001). Serum ADA level showed a significant positive correlation with fasting plasma glucose (r = 0.657; P < 0.0001) level among nonobese T2DM subjects, but no significant correlation was observed in controls (r = −0.203; P = 0.180). However, no correlation was observed between serum ADA level compared to BMI and HbA1c levels. Our study shows higher serum ADA, triglycerides (TG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels in nonobese T2DM patients, and a strong correlation between ADA and FPG which suggests an association between ADA and nonobese T2DM subjects. PMID:24453844

  13. Raised serum adenosine deaminase level in nonobese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Bagchi, Debajit; Ghosh, Arindam; Sen, Oishimaya; Bir, Aritri; Chakrabarti, Sasanka; Banerjee, Anindita

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammation being minimal in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in nonobese patients; the aim of the study was to investigate the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and see its association with diabetes mellitus. The preliminary case control study comprised of 56 cases and 45 healthy controls which were age and sex matched. 3 mL venous blood samples were obtained from the patients as well as controls after 8-10 hours of fasting. Serum ADA and routine biochemical parameters were analyzed. Serum ADA level was found significantly higher among nonobese T2DM subjects with respect to controls (38.77 ± 14.29 versus 17.02 ± 5.74 U/L; P < 0.0001). Serum ADA level showed a significant positive correlation with fasting plasma glucose (r = 0.657; P < 0.0001) level among nonobese T2DM subjects, but no significant correlation was observed in controls (r = -0.203; P = 0.180). However, no correlation was observed between serum ADA level compared to BMI and HbA1c levels. Our study shows higher serum ADA, triglycerides (TG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels in nonobese T2DM patients, and a strong correlation between ADA and FPG which suggests an association between ADA and nonobese T2DM subjects. PMID:24453844

  14. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    PubMed Central

    BRAVO-TOBAR, Iván Darío; NELLO-PÉREZ, Carlota; FERNÁNDEZ, Alí; MOGOLLÓN, Nora; PÉREZ, Mary Carmen; VERDE, Juan; CONCEPCIÓN, Juan Luis; RODRIGUEZ-BONFANTE, Claudina; BONFANTE-CABARCAS, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  15. The Role of Zn2+ on the Structure and Stability of Murine Adenosine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Weiling; Shu, Qin; Chen, Zhiwei; Mathews, Scott; Cera, Enrico Di; Frieden, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a key enzyme in purine metabolism and crucial for normal immune competence. It is a 40 kDa-monomeric TIM-barrel protein containing a tightly bound Zn2+, which is required for activity. In this study, we have investigated the role of Zn2+with respect to ADA structure and stability. After removing Zn2+, the crystallographic structure of the protein remains highly ordered and similar to that of the holo protein with structural changes limited to regions capping the active site pocket. The stability of the protein, however, is decreased significantly in the absence of Zn2+. Denaturation with urea shows the midpoint to be about 3.5 M for the apo enzyme compared to 6.4 M for the holo enzyme. ADA contains four tryptophan residues distant from the Zn2+site. 19F-NMR studies in the presence and absence of Zn2+ were carried out after incorporation of 6-19F-tryptophan. Chemical shift differences were observed for three of the four tryptophan residues suggesting that, in contrast to the X-ray data, Zn2+-induced structural changes are propagated throughout the protein. Changes throughout the structure as suggested by the NMR data may explain the lower stability of the Zn2+-free protein. Real-time 19F-NMR spectroscopy measuring the loss of Zn2+ showed that structural changes correlated with the loss of enzymatic activity. PMID:20815357

  16. PORPHOBILINOGEN DEAMINASE Deficiency Alters Vegetative and Reproductive Development and Causes Lesions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, Víctor; Hricová, Andrea; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis rugosa1 (rug1) mutant has irregularly shaped leaves and reduced growth. In the absence of pathogens, leaves of rug1 plants have spontaneous lesions reminiscent of those seen in lesion-mimic mutants; rug1 plants also express cytological and molecular markers associated with defence against pathogens. These rug1 phenotypes are made stronger by dark/light transitions. The rug1 mutant also has delayed flowering time, upregulation of the floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and downregulation of the flowering promoters FT and SOC1/AGL20. Vernalization suppresses the late flowering phenotype of rug1 by repressing FLC. Microarray analysis revealed that 280 nuclear genes are differentially expressed between rug1 and wild type; almost a quarter of these genes are involved in plant defence. In rug1, the auxin response is also affected and several auxin-responsive genes are downregulated. We identified the RUG1 gene by map-based cloning and found that it encodes porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), also known as hydroxymethylbilane synthase, an enzyme of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway, which produces chlorophyll, heme, siroheme and phytochromobilin in plants. PBGD activity is reduced in rug1 plants, which accumulate porphobilinogen. Our results indicate that Arabidopsis PBGD deficiency impairs the porphyrin pathway and triggers constitutive activation of plant defence mechanisms leading to leaf lesions and affecting vegetative and reproductive development. PMID:23308205

  17. Modulatory effect of iron chelators on adenosine deaminase activity and gene expression in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Primon-Barros, Muriel; Rigo, Graziela Vargas; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; dos Santos, Odelta; Smiderle, Lisiane; Almeida, Silvana; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan that parasitises the urogenital human tract and causes trichomoniasis. During the infection, the acquisition of nutrients, such as iron and purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, is essential for the survival of the parasite. The enzymes for purinergic signalling, including adenosine deaminase (ADA), which degrades adenosine to inosine, have been characterised in T. vaginalis. In the evaluation of the ADA profile in different T. vaginalis isolates treated with different iron sources or with limited iron availability, a decrease in activity and an increase in ADA gene expression after iron limitation by 2,2-bipyridyl and ferrozine chelators were observed. This supported the hypothesis that iron can modulate the activity of the enzymes involved in purinergic signalling. Under bovine serum limitation conditions, no significant differences were observed. The results obtained in this study allow for the assessment of important aspects of ADA and contribute to a better understanding of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis and the role of iron in establishing infection and parasite survival. PMID:26517498

  18. A gold nanoparticle-based label free colorimetric aptasensor for adenosine deaminase detection and inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fen; He, Yue; Xing, Xiao-Jing; Tan, Dai-Di; Lin, Yi; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2015-03-01

    A novel strategy for the fabrication of a colorimetric aptasensor using label free gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is proposed in this work, and the strategy has been employed for the assay of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity. The aptasensor consists of adenosine (AD) aptamer, AD and AuNPs. The design of the biosensor takes advantage of the special optical properties of AuNPs and the interaction between AuNPs and single-strand DNA. In the absence of ADA, the AuNPs are aggregated and are blue in color under appropriate salt concentration because of the grid structure of an AD aptamer when binding to AD, while in the presence of the analyte, AuNPs remain dispersed with red color under the same concentration of salt owing to ADA converting AD into inosine which has no affinity with the AD aptamer, thus allowing quantitative investigation of ADA activity. The present strategy is simple, cost-effective, selective and sensitive for ADA with a detection limit of 1.526 U L(-1), which is about one order of magnitude lower than that previously reported. In addition, a very low concentration of the inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA) could generate a distinguishable response. Therefore, the AuNP-based colorimetric biosensor has great potential in the diagnosis of ADA-relevant diseases and drug screening. PMID:25597304

  19. Retrovirus-mediated transduction of a cytosine deaminase gene preserves the stemness of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Sung; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Ji-Hoi; Jung, Jin Hwa; Park, JoonSeong; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as attractive cellular vehicles to deliver therapeutic genes for ex-vivo therapy of diverse diseases; this is, in part, because they have the capability to migrate into tumor or lesion sites. Previously, we showed that MSCs could be utilized to deliver a bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene to brain tumors. Here we assessed whether transduction with a retroviral vector encoding CD gene altered the stem cell property of MSCs. MSCs were transduced at passage 1 and cultivated up to passage 11. We found that proliferation and differentiation potentials, chromosomal stability and surface antigenicity of MSCs were not altered by retroviral transduction. The results indicate that retroviral vectors can be safely utilized for delivery of suicide genes to MSCs for ex-vivo therapy. We also found that a single retroviral transduction was sufficient for sustainable expression up to passage 10. The persistent expression of the transduced gene indicates that transduced MSCs provide a tractable and manageable approach for potential use in allogeneic transplantation. PMID:23429359

  20. Lethal toxicity after administration of azacytidine: implication of the cytidine deaminase-deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Mercier, Cedric; Serdjebi, Cindy; Berda, Yaël; Fina, Frederic; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Lacarelle, Bruno; Ciccolini, Joseph; Costello, Regis

    2015-06-01

    Azacytidine, an antimetabolite with an original epigenetic mechanism of action, increases survival in patients diagnosed with high-risk myelodysplasic syndromes or acute myeloid leukemia with less than 30% medullar blasts. Azacytidine is a pyrimidine derivative that undergoes metabolic detoxification driven by cytidine deaminase (CDA), a liver enzyme whose gene is prone to genetic polymorphism, leading to erratic activity among patients. Clinical reports have shown that patients with the poor metabolizer (PM) phenotype are likely to experience early severe or lethal toxicities when treated with nucleosidic analogs such as gemcitabine or cytarabine. No clinical data have been available thus far on the relationships between CDA PM status and toxicities in azacytidine-treated patients. Here, we measured CDA activity in a case of severe toxicities with fatal outcome in a patient undergoing standard azacytidine treatment. Results showed that the patient was PM (i.e. residual activity reduced by 63%), thus suggesting that an impaired detoxification step could have given rise to the lethal toxicities observed. This case report calls for further prospective studies investigating the exact role that CDA status plays in the clinical outcome of patients treated with azacytidine. PMID:25850965

  1. Mitochondrial Damage and Apoptosis Induced by Adenosine Deaminase Inhibition and Deoxyadenosine in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gil, Mercedes; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Balestri, Francesco; Colombaioni, Laura; Camici, Marcella

    2016-07-01

    The treatment with deoxycoformycin, a strong adenosine deaminase inhibitor, in combination with deoxyadenosine, causes apoptotic cell death of two human neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and LAN5. Herein we demonstrate that, in SH-SY5Y cells, this combination rapidly decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and, in parallel, increases mitochondrial mass, while, later, induces nuclear fragmentation, and activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3. In previous papers we have shown that a human astrocytoma cell line, subjected to the same treatment, undergoes apoptotic death as well. Therefore, both astrocytoma and neuroblastoma cell lines undergo apoptotic death following the combined treatment with deoxycoformycin and deoxyadenosine, but several differences have been found in the mode of action, possibly reflecting a different functional and metabolic profile of the two cell lines. Overall this work indicates that the neuroblastoma cell lines, like the line of astrocytic origin, are very sensitive to purine metabolism perturbation thus suggesting new therapeutic approaches to nervous system tumors. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1671-1679, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26659614

  2. The Role of Histidine-Proline-Rich Glycoprotein as Zinc Chaperone for Skeletal Muscle AMP Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri-Raggi, Maria; Moir, Arthur J. G.; Raggi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Metallochaperones function as intracellular shuttles for metal ions. At present, no evidence for the existence of any eukaryotic zinc-chaperone has been provided although metallochaperones could be critical for the physiological functions of Zn2+ metalloenzymes. We propose that the complex formed in skeletal muscle by the Zn2+ metalloenzyme AMP deaminase (AMPD) and the metal binding protein histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein (HPRG) acts in this manner. HPRG is a major plasma protein. Recent investigations have reported that skeletal muscle cells do not synthesize HPRG but instead actively internalize plasma HPRG. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) performed on fresh preparations of rabbit skeletal muscle AMPD provided evidence for a dinuclear zinc site in the enzyme compatible with a (μ-aqua)(μ-carboxylato)dizinc(II) core with two histidine residues at each metal site. XAS on HPRG isolated from the AMPD complex showed that zinc is bound to the protein in a dinuclear cluster where each Zn2+ ion is coordinated by three histidine and one heavier ligand, likely sulfur from cysteine. We describe the existence in mammalian HPRG of a specific zinc binding site distinct from the His-Pro-rich region. The participation of HPRG in the assembly and maintenance of skeletal muscle AMPD by acting as a zinc chaperone is also demonstrated. PMID:24970226

  3. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Tobar, Iván Darío; Nello-Pérez, Carlota; Fernández, Alí; Mogollón, Nora; Pérez, Mary Carmen; Verde, Juan; Concepción, Juan Luis; Rodriguez-Bonfante, Claudina; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  4. Hereditary overexpression of adenosine deaminase in erythrocytes: Evidence for a cis-acting mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.H. ); Tartaglia, A.P. ); Mitchell, B.S. )

    1993-10-01

    Overexpression of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in red blood cells is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and causes hemolytic anemia. The increased ADA activity in erythrocytes is due to an increase in steady-state levels of ADA mRNA of normal sequence. Increased ADA mRNA may be due to a cis-acting mutation which results in increased transcription or a loss of down-regulation during erythroid differentiation. Alternatively, it is possible that the mutation is in a trans-acting factor which interacts with normal ADA transcriptional elements to cause overexpression in red blood cells. To discriminate between a cis-acting and a trans-acting mutation, the authors took advantage of a highly polymorphic TAAA repeat located at the tail end of an Alu repeat approximately 1.1 kb upstream of the ADA gene. Using PCR to amplify this region, the authors identified five different alleles in 19 members of the family. All 11 affected individuals had an ADA allele with 12 TAAA repeats, whereas none of the 8 normal individuals did. The authors conclude that this disorder results from a cis-acting mutation in the vicinity of the ADA gene. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amel; Booth, Claire; Brightwell, Alex; Allwood, Zoe; Veys, Paul; Rao, Kanchan; Hönig, Manfred; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Gennery, Andrew; Slatter, Mary; Bredius, Robbert; Finocchi, Andrea; Cancrini, Caterina; Aiuti, Alessandro; Porta, Fulvio; Lanfranchi, Arnalda; Ridella, Michela; Steward, Colin; Filipovich, Alexandra; Marsh, Rebecca; Bordon, Victoria; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Al-Mousa, Hamoud; Alsum, Zobaida; Al-Dhekri, Hasan; Al Ghonaium, Abdulaziz; Speckmann, Carsten; Fischer, Alain; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Nichols, Kim E; Grunebaum, Eyal; Al Zahrani, Daifulah; Roifman, Chaim M; Boelens, Jaap; Davies, E Graham; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Notarangelo, Luigi; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2012-10-25

    Deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme adenosine deaminase leads to SCID (ADA-SCID). Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can lead to a permanent cure of SCID; however, little data are available on outcome of HCT for ADA-SCID in particular. In this multicenter retrospective study, we analyzed outcome of HCT in 106 patients with ADA-SCID who received a total of 119 transplants. HCT from matched sibling and family donors (MSDs, MFDs) had significantly better overall survival (86% and 81%) in comparison with HCT from matched unrelated (66%; P < .05) and haploidentical donors (43%; P < .001). Superior overall survival was also seen in patients who received unconditioned transplants in comparison with myeloablative procedures (81% vs 54%; P < .003), although in unconditioned haploidentical donor HCT, nonengraftment was a major problem. Long-term immune recovery showed that regardless of transplant type, overall T-cell numbers were similar, although a faster rate of T-cell recovery was observed after MSD/MFD HCT. Humoral immunity and donor B-cell engraftment was achieved in nearly all evaluable surviving patients and was seen even after unconditioned HCT. These data detail for the first time the outcomes of HCT for ADA-SCID and show that, if patients survive HCT, long-term cellular and humoral immune recovery is achieved. PMID:22791287

  6. Manufacturing Aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    During a research program, MMTC/Textron invented a computer-aided automatic robotic system for spraying hot plasma onto a turbine blade. The need to control the thickness of the plasma deposit led to the development of advanced optical gaging techniques to monitor and control plasma spray build-up on blade surfaces. The techniques led to computerized optical gages for inspecting aircraft, industrial turbine blades, etc. MMTC offers 10 standard commercial robotic gages. The system also generates two dimensional profiles for assessing status and specifying repairs to the electromechanical cathodes used to make the parts. It is capable of accuracies to a ten-thousandth of an inch. An expanded product line is currently marketed. The gages offer multiple improvements in quality control and significant savings.

  7. Crystal structure of a membrane-bound l-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yingchen; Tong, Shuilong; Gao, Yongxiang; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Qi; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Zhou, Huihao

    2016-09-01

    l-amino acid oxidases/deaminases (LAAOs/LAADs) are a class of oxidoreductases catalyzing the oxidative deamination of l-amino acids to α-keto acids. They are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and exhibit diverse substrate specificity, post-translational modifications and cellular localization. While LAAOs isolated from snake venom have been extensively characterized, the structures and functions of LAAOs from other species are largely unknown. Here, we reported crystal structure of a bacterial membrane-bound LAAD from Proteus vulgaris (pvLAAD) in complex with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). We found that the overall fold of pvLAAD does not resemble typical LAAOs. Instead it, is similar to d-amino acid oxidases (DAAOs) with an additional hydrophobic insertion module on protein surface. Structural analysis and liposome-binding assays suggested that the hydrophobic module serves as an extra membrane-binding site for LAADs. Bacteria from genera Proteus and Providencia were found to encode two classes of membrane-bound LAADs. Based on our structure, the key roles of residues Q278 and L317 in substrate selectivity were proposed and biochemically analyzed. While LAADs on the membrane were proposed to transfer electrons to respiratory chain for FAD re-oxidization, we observed that the purified pvLAAD could generate a significant amount of hydrogen peroxide in vitro, suggesting it could use dioxygen to directly re-oxidize FADH2 as what typical LAAOs usually do. These findings provide a novel insights for a better understanding this class of enzymes and will help developing biocatalysts for industrial applications. PMID:27422658

  8. Diagnostic value of sputum adenosine deaminase (ADA) level in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Jalali, Hadi; Zare, Mohammad Reza; Behravan, Farhad; Tafti, Arefeh Dehghani; Behnaz, Fatemah; Tabatabaee, Mohammad; Shahcheraghi, Seyed Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is still a considerable health problem in many countries. Rapid diagnosis of this disease is important, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) has been used as a diagnostic test. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of ADA in the sputum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods The current study included 40 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (culture positive, smear ±) and 42 patients with non tuberculosis pulmonary diseases (culture negative). ADA was measured on all of the samples. Results The median value of ADA in non-tuberculosis patients was 2.94 (4.2) U/L and 4.01 (6.54) U/L in tuberculosis patients, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.100). The cut-off point of 3.1 U/L had a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 53%, the cut-off point of 2.81 U/L had a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 50% and the cut-off point of 2.78 U/L had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 48%. The positive predictive values for cut-off points of 3.1, 2.81 and 2.78 U/L were 55.7%, 57.44% and 69.23%, respectively. The negative predictive values for the abovementioned cut-off points were 56.75%, 57.14% and 55.88%, respectively. Conclusion Our results showed that sputum ADA test is neither specific nor sensitive. Because of its low sensitivity and specificity, determination of sputum ADA for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis is not recommended. PMID:27482515

  9. Mutation Processes in 293-Based Clones Overexpressing the DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3B

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Jelmar S.; Temiz, Nuri A.; Tutt, Andrew N. J.; Grigoriadis, Anita; Harris, Reuben S.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have combined to demonstrate a contribution from the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) to the overall mutation load in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, ovarian, and other cancer types. However, the complete landscape of mutations attributable to this enzyme has yet to be determined in a controlled human cell system. We report a conditional and isogenic system for A3B induction, genomic DNA deamination, and mutagenesis. Human 293-derived cells were engineered to express doxycycline-inducible A3B-eGFP or eGFP constructs. Cells were subjected to 10 rounds of A3B-eGFP exposure that each caused 80–90% cell death. Control pools were subjected to parallel rounds of non-toxic eGFP exposure, and dilutions were done each round to mimic A3B-eGFP induced population fluctuations. Targeted sequencing of portions of TP53 and MYC demonstrated greater mutation accumulation in the A3B-eGFP exposed pools. Clones were generated and microarray analyses were used to identify those with the greatest number of SNP alterations for whole genome sequencing. A3B-eGFP exposed clones showed global increases in C-to-T transition mutations, enrichments for cytosine mutations within A3B-preferred trinucleotide motifs, and more copy number aberrations. Surprisingly, both control and A3B-eGFP clones also elicited strong mutator phenotypes characteristic of defective mismatch repair. Despite this additional mutational process, the 293-based system characterized here still yielded a genome-wide view of A3B-catalyzed mutagenesis in human cells and a system for additional studies on the compounded effects of simultaneous mutation mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27163364

  10. Degradation of the cancer genomic DNA deaminase APOBEC3B by SIV Vif

    PubMed Central

    Land, Allison M.; Wang, Jiayi; Law, Emily K.; Aberle, Ryan; Kirmaier, Andrea; Krupp, Annabel; Johnson, Welkin E.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3B is a newly identified source of mutation in many cancers, including breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, and ovarian. APOBEC3B is a member of the APOBEC3 family of enzymes that deaminate DNA cytosine to produce the pro-mutagenic lesion, uracil. Several APOBEC3 family members function to restrict virus replication. For instance, APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H combine to restrict HIV-1 in human lymphocytes. HIV-1 counteracts these APOBEC3s with the viral protein Vif, which targets the relevant APOBEC3s for proteasomal degradation. While APOBEC3B does not restrict HIV-1 and is not targeted by HIV-1 Vif in CD4-positive T cells, we asked whether related lentiviral Vif proteins could degrade APOBEC3B. Interestingly, several SIV Vif proteins are capable of promoting APOBEC3B degradation, with SIVmac239 Vif proving the most potent. This likely occurs through the canonical polyubiquitination mechanism as APOBEC3B protein levels are restored by MG132 treatment and by altering a conserved E3 ligase-binding motif. We further show that SIVmac239 Vif can prevent APOBEC3B mediated geno/cytotoxicity and degrade endogenous APOBEC3B in several cancer cell lines. Our data indicate that the APOBEC3B degradation potential of SIV Vif is an effective tool for neutralizing the cancer genomic DNA deaminase APOBEC3B. Further optimization of this natural APOBEC3 antagonist may benefit cancer therapy. PMID:26544511

  11. Purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Elucidating the role of a conserved cysteine in adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danielle V; Brown, Anne M; Xu, Huimin; Bevan, David R; White, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Adenine deaminases (Ade) and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferases (Hpt) are widely distributed enzymes involved in purine salvage. Characterization of the previously uncharacterized Ade (MJ1459 gene product) and Hpt (MJ1655 gene product) are discussed here and provide insight into purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Ade was demonstrated to use either Fe(II) and/or Mn(II) as the catalytic metal. Hpt demonstrated no detectable activity with adenine, but was equally specific for hypoxanthine and guanine with a kcat /KM of 3.2 × 10(7) and 3.0 × 10(7) s(- 1) M(- 1) , respectively. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine and IMP are the central metabolites in purine salvage in M. jannaschii for AMP and GMP production. A conserved cysteine (C127, M. jannaschii numbering) was examined due to its high conservation in bacterial and archaeal homologues. To assess the role of this highly conserved cysteine in M. jannaschii Ade, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. It was determined that mutation to serine (C127S) completely abolished Ade activity and mutation to alanine (C127A) exhibited 10-fold decrease in kcat over the wild type Ade. To further investigate the role of C127, detailed molecular docking and dynamics studies were performed and revealed adenine was unable to properly orient in the active site in the C127A and C127S Ade model structures due to distinct differences in active site conformation and rotation of D261. Together this work illuminates purine salvage in M. jannaschii and the critical role of a cysteine residue in maintaining active site conformation of Ade. Proteins 2016; 84:828-840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990095

  12. Adenosine deaminase activity in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Pimentel, Victor C; da Silva, Aleksandro S; de Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Souza, Viviane C G; Wolkmer, Patrícia; Rezer, João F P; Badke, Manoel R T; Leal, Daniela B R; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Monteiro, Silvia G; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2012-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a systemic disease of humans and domestic animals, mainly dogs, cattle and swine. The course of human leptospirosis varies from mild to severe fatal forms and the most severe form of human leptospirosis is principally caused by Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae (L. icterohaemorrhagiae). The enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays an important role in the production and differentiation of blood cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of ADA in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with L. icterohaemorrhagiae, as compared with non-infected rats. Twenty-four adult rats, divided into two uniform groups (A and B) were used for the enzymatic assays. The animals in Group B were inoculated intraperitoneally with 2×10(8) leptospires/rat, and the rodents in Group A (control) were not-inoculated. Blood collection was performed on days 5 and 15 post-infection (PI) and the blood used to assess the ADA activity. The infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae altered erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit, causing a decrease in all these parameters on day 15 PI. Lymphocytes decreased significantly on day 15 PI, and ADA activity in serum was inhibited in infected rats on days 5 and 15 PI and its activity in erythrocytes were increased on day 5 PI. On day 5 PI, we found an increase in ADA activity in erythrocytes of infected rats. No correlation was observed between hematocrit and erythrocyte ADA activity on days 5 and 15 PI. The ADA activity was inhibited in rats infected on day 15 PI. A positive correlation (r(2)=60) was also observed between the number of lymphocytes and ADA activity in lymphocytes on day 15 PI (P<0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that the ADA activity is altered in serum, lymphocytes and erythrocytes in experimental infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae in rats, concomitantly with hematological parameters. PMID:21320715

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of the Gene Cluster Encoding Allantoinase and Guanine Deaminase in Klebsiella pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Karla; Badia, Josefa; Giménez, Rosa; Aguilar, Juan; Baldoma, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Purines can be used as the sole source of nitrogen by several strains of K. pneumoniae under aerobic conditions. The genes responsible for the assimilation of purine nitrogens are distributed in three separated clusters in the K. pneumoniae genome. Here, we characterize the cluster encompassing genes KPN_01787 to KPN_01791, which is involved in the conversion of allantoin into allantoate and in the deamination of guanine to xanthine. These genes are organized in three transcriptional units, hpxSAB, hpxC, and guaD. Gene hpxS encodes a regulatory protein of the GntR family that mediates regulation of this system by growth on allantoin. Proteins encoded by hpxB and guaD display allantoinase and guanine deaminase activity, respectively. In this cluster, hpxSAB is the most tightly regulated unit. This operon was activated by growth on allantoin as a nitrogen source; however, addition of allantoin to nitrogen excess cultures did not result in hpxSAB induction. Neither guaD nor hpxC was induced by allantoin. Expression of guaD is mainly regulated by nitrogen availability through the action of NtrC. Full induction of hpxSAB by allantoin requires both HpxS and NAC. HpxS may have a dual role, acting as a repressor in the absence of allantoin and as an activator in its presence. HpxS binds to tandem sites, S1 and S2, overlapping the −10 and −35 sequences of the hpxSAB promoter, respectively. The NAC binding site is located between S1 and S2 and partially overlaps S2. In the presence of allantoin, interplay between NAC and HpxS is proposed. PMID:21357483

  14. Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Adenosine Deaminase over the Alopecic Area of the Patients with Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Perihan; Arıcan, Özer; Kurutaş, Ergül Belge; Mülayim, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune, T-cell mediated, and chronic inflammatory disorder. The pathological mechanisms of disease are unclear, but oxidative stress may be involved. To our knowledge, no studies have examined the oxidative stress levels or biomarkers within the lesional area and skin surface in patients with AA. Similarly, adenosine deaminase (ADA) has not been characterized in AA. Aims: Therefore, we aimed to define ADA levels and the factors involved in oxidative stress from scalp-scrapes of patients with AA. Study Design: Case-control study. Method: A total of 60 patients (30 diagnosed AA patients and 30 healthy controls) were included in the study. ADA as well as oxidative stress factors, including malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were analyzed from scalp-scrapes in both groups and quantified by spectrophotometry. Results: Activities of SOD (p=0.000), CAT (p=0.033), and ADA (p=0.004) as well as levels of GSH (p=0.000) and MDA (p=0.032) in patients with AA were higher than the controls statistically significant. Conclusion: Based on these results, factors associated with oxidative stress were elevated in AA patient scalp-scrapes compared to controls and may have a defined role the disease pathogenesis. Alterations in the activities of antioxidant enzymes from AA patient scraping samples may be a local effect of elevated oxidative stress levels. In this disease, oxidative stress may affect not only hair follicle but also any layers of the skin. PMID:27403388

  15. Mutation of Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase significantly enhances molecular chemotherapy of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, S A; Market, J M; Gillespie, G Y; Krendelchtchikova, V; Della Manna, D; Sellers, J C; Kaliberova, L N; Black, M E; Buchsbaum, D J

    2007-07-01

    Combined treatment using adenoviral (Ad)-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiation therapy has the potential to become a powerful method of cancer therapy. We have developed an Ad vector encoding a mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) gene (AdbCD-D314A), which has a higher affinity for cytosine than wild-type bCD (bCDwt). The purpose of this study was to evaluate cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo of the combination of AdbCD-D314A with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and ionizing radiation against human glioma. The present study demonstrates that AdbCD-D314A infection resulted in increased 5-FC-mediated cell killing, compared with AdbCDwt. Furthermore, a significant increase in cytotoxicity following AdbCD-D314A and radiation treatment of glioma cells in vitro was demonstrated as compared to AdbCDwt. Animal studies showed significant inhibition of subcutaneous or intracranial tumor growth of D54MG glioma xenografts by the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with ionizing radiation as compared with either agent alone, and with AdbCDwt/5-FC plus radiation. The results suggest that the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with radiation produces markedly increased cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that combined treatment with this novel mutant enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiotherapy provides a promising approach for cancer therapy. PMID:17495948

  16. Investigation into effects of antipsychotics on ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase in zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Kelly Juliana; Oliveira, Renata da Luz; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Senger, Mario Roberto; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-12-01

    Antipsychotic agents are used for the treatment of psychotic symptoms in patients with several brain disorders, such as schizophrenia. Atypical and typical antipsychotics differ regarding their clinical and side-effects profile. Haloperidol is a representative typical antipsychotic drug and has potent dopamine receptor antagonistic functions; however, atypical antipsychotics have been developed and characterized an important advance in the treatment of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Purine nucleotides and nucleosides, such as ATP and adenosine, constitute a ubiquitous class of extracellular signaling molecules crucial for normal functioning of the nervous system. Indirect findings suggest that changes in the purinergic system, more specifically in adenosinergic activity, could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We investigated the effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics on ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities, followed by an analysis of gene expression patterns in zebrafish brain. Haloperidol treatment (9 µM) was able to decrease ATP hydrolysis (35%), whereas there were no changes in hydrolysis of ADP and AMP in brain membranes after antipsychotic exposure. Adenosine deamination in membrane fractions was inhibited (38%) after haloperidol treatment when compared to the control; however, no changes were observed in ADA soluble fractions after haloperidol exposure. Sulpiride (250 µM) and olanzapine (100 µM) did not alter ectonucleotidase and ADA activities. Haloperidol also led to a decrease in entpd2_mq, entpd3 and adal mRNA transcripts. These findings demonstrate that haloperidol is an inhibitor of NTPDase and ADA activities in zebrafish brain, suggesting that purinergic signaling may also be a target of pharmacological effects promoted by this drug. PMID:26156500

  17. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  18. Adenosine Deaminase Enzyme Therapy Prevents and Reverses the Heightened Cavernosal Relaxation in Priapism

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Jiang, Xianzhen; Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Yujin; Tang, Yuxin; Sun, Hong; Mi, Tiejuan; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Priapism featured with painful prolonged penile erection is dangerous and commonly seen in sickle cell disease (SCD). The preventive approaches or effective treatment options for the disorder are limited because of poor understanding of its pathogenesis. Recent studies have revealed a novel role of excess adenosine in priapism caused by heightened cavernosal relaxation, and therefore present an intriguing mechanism-based therapeutic possibility. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the therapeutic effects of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme therapy to lower adenosine in priapism. Methods Both ADA-deficient mice and SCD transgenic (Tg) mice display priapism caused by excessive adenosine. Thus, we used these two distinct lines of mouse models of priapism as our investigative tools. Specifically, we treated both of these mice with different dosages of polyethylene glycol–modified ADA (PEG–ADA) to reduce adenosine levels in vivo. At the end points of the experiments, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of PEG–ADA treatment by measuring adenosine levels and monitoring the cavernosal relaxation. Main Outcome Measures Adenosine levels in penile tissues were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and cavernosal relaxation was quantified by electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced corporal cavernosal strip (CCS) assays. Results We found that lowering adenosine levels in penile tissues by PEG–ADA treatment from birth in ADA-deficient mice prevented the increased EFS-induced CCS relaxation associated with priapism. Intriguingly, in both ADA-deficient mice and SCD Tg mice with established priapism, we found that normalization of adenosine levels in penile tissues by PEG–ADA treatment relieved the heightened EFS-induced cavernosal relaxation in priapism. Conclusions Our studies have identified that PEG–ADA is a novel, safe, and mechanism-based drug to prevent and correct excess adenosine-mediated increased cavernosal relaxation

  19. Cytosine Deaminase/5-Fluorocytosine Exposure Induces Bystander and Radiosensitization Effects in Hypoxic Glioblastoma Cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jennifer K.; Hu, Lily J.; Wang Dongfang; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: dennisdeen@juno.com

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is limited by therapeutic ratio; therefore, successful therapy must be specifically cytotoxic to cancer cells. Hypoxic cells are ubiquitous in GBM, and resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and, thus, are logical targets for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) enzyme/prodrug treatment induced a bystander effect (BE) and/or radiosensitization in hypoxic GBM cells. Methods and Materials: We stably transfected cells with a gene construct consisting of the SV40 minimal promoter, nine copies of a hypoxia-responsive element, and the yeast CD gene. During hypoxia, a hypoxia-responsive element regulates expression of the CD gene and facilitates the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil, a highly toxic antimetabolite. We used colony-forming efficiency (CFE) and immunofluorescence assays to assess for BE in co-cultures of CD-expressing clone cells and parent, pNeo- or green fluorescent protein-stably transfected GBM cells. We also investigated the radiosensitivity of CD clone cells treated with 5-FC under hypoxic conditions, and we used flow cytometry to investigate treatment-induced cell cycle changes. Results: Both a large BE and radiosensitization occurred in GBM cells under hypoxic conditions. The magnitude of the BE depended on the number of transfected cells producing CD, the functionality of the CD, the administered concentration of 5-FC, and the sensitivity of cell type to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: Hypoxia-inducible CD/5-FC therapy in combination with radiation therapy shows both a pronounced BE and a radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic conditions.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Chittori, Sagar; Savithri, H. S.; Murthy, M. R. N.

    2006-03-01

    S. typhimurium biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB), a member of the β-family of PLP-dependent enzymes, has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in three different crystal forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) catalyzes the deamination of l-threonine to α-ketobutyrate, the first reaction in the anaerobic breakdown of l-threonine to propionate. Unlike the biosynthetic threonine deaminase, TdcB is insensitive to l-isoleucine and is activated by AMP. Here, the cloning of TdcB (molecular weight 36 kDa) from Salmonella typhimurium with an N-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag and its overexpression in Escherichia coli is reported. TdcB was purified to homogeneity using Ni–NTA affinity column chromatography and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in three different crystal forms. Crystal forms I (unit-cell parameters a = 46.32, b = 55.30, c = 67.24 Å, α = 103.09, β = 94.70, γ = 112.94°) and II (a = 56.68, b = 76.83, c = 78.50 Å, α = 66.12, β = 89.16, γ = 77.08°) belong to space group P1 and contain two and four molecules of TdcB, respectively, in the asymmetric unit. Poorly diffracting form III crystals were obtained in space group C2 and based on the unit-cell volume are most likely to contain one molecule per asymmetric unit. Two complete data sets of resolutions 2.2 Å (crystal form I) and 1.7 Å (crystal form II) were collected at 100 K using an in-house X-ray source.

  1. Southern blight disease of tomato control by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase producing Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ritu; Agrawal, Lalit; Gupta, Swati; Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Sumit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Tomato cultivation is highly susceptible for soil born diseases and among them southern blight disease caused by Scelerotium rolfsii is very common. For its management use of chemical fungicides is not very successful as their spores are able to survive for many years in the soil. As an alternative eco-friendly approach to control the disease antagonistic microbes are being characterized.Among them plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488 (B-30488) with antagonistic properties, multiple PGP attributes stress tolerance and ACC deaminase enzyme activity is characterized to decipher its mode of action against S. rolfsii under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro results obtained from this study clearly demonstrate that B-30488 has ability to show antagonistic properties under different abiotic stresses against S. rolfsii. Similar results were also obtained from in vivo experiments where B-30488 inoculation has efficiently controlled the disease caused by S. rolfsii and improve the plant growth. Deleterious enhanced ethylene level in S. rolfsii infected plants was also ameliorated by inoculation of ACC deaminase producing B-30488. The ACC accumulation, ACO and ACS activities were also modulated in S. rolfsii infected plants. Results from defense enzymes and other biochemical attributes were also support the role of B-30488 inoculation in ameliorating the biotic stress caused by S. rolfsii in tomato plants. These results were further validated by pathogen related gene expression analysis by real time PCR. Overall results from the present study may be concluded that ACC deaminase producing B-30488 has ability to control the southern blight disease caused by S. rolfsii and commercial bioinoculant package may be developed. PMID:26825539

  2. Southern blight disease of tomato control by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase producing Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ritu; Agrawal, Lalit; Gupta, Swati; Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Sumit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    abstract Tomato cultivation is highly susceptible for soil born diseases and among them southern blight disease caused by Scelerotium rolfsii is very common. For its management use of chemical fungicides is not very successful as their spores are able to survive for many years in the soil. As an alternative eco-friendly approach to control the disease antagonistic microbes are being characterized.Among them plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488 (B-30488) with antagonistic properties, multiple PGP attributes stress tolerance and ACC deaminase enzyme activity is characterized to decipher its mode of action against S. rolfsii under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro results obtained from this study clearly demonstrate that B-30488 has ability to show antagonistic properties under different abiotic stresses against S. rolfsii. Similar results were also obtained from in vivo experiments where B-30488 inoculation has efficiently controlled the disease caused by S. rolfsii and improve the plant growth. Deleterious enhanced ethylene level in S. rolfsii infected plants was also ameliorated by inoculation of ACC deaminase producing B-30488. The ACC accumulation, ACO and ACS activities were also modulated in S. rolfsii infected plants. Results from defense enzymes and other biochemical attributes were also support the role of B-30488 inoculation in ameliorating the biotic stress caused by S. rolfsii in tomato plants. These results were further validated by pathogen related gene expression analysis by real time PCR. Overall results from the present study may be concluded that ACC deaminase producing B-30488 has ability to control the southern blight disease caused by S. rolfsii and commercial bioinoculant package may be developed. PMID:26825539

  3. Role of the A2B receptor–adenosine deaminase complex in colonic dysmotility associated with bowel inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, L; Fornai, M; Awwad, O; Giustarini, G; Pellegrini, C; Tuccori, M; Caputi, V; Qesari, M; Castagliuolo, I; Brun, P; Giron, M C; Scarpignato, C; Blandizzi, C; Colucci, R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Adenosine A2B receptors regulate several physiological enteric functions. However, their role in the pathophysiology of intestinal dysmotility associated with inflammation has not been elucidated. Hence, we investigated the expression of A2B receptors in rat colon and their role in the control of cholinergic motility in the presence of bowel inflammation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Colitis was induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS). Colonic A2B receptor expression and localization were examined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The interaction between A2B receptors and adenosine deaminase was assayed by immunoprecipitation. The role of A2B receptors in the control of colonic motility was examined in functional experiments on longitudinal muscle preparations (LMPs). KEY RESULTS A2B receptor mRNA was present in colon from both normal and DNBS-treated rats but levels were increased in the latter. A2B receptors were predominantly located in the neuromuscular layer, but, in the presence of colitis, were increased mainly in longitudinal muscle. Functionally, the A2B receptor antagonist MRS 1754 enhanced both electrically-evoked and carbachol-induced cholinergic contractions in normal LMPs, but was less effective in inflamed tissues. The A2B receptor agonist NECA decreased colonic cholinergic motility, with increased efficacy in inflamed LMP. Immunoprecipitation and functional tests revealed a link between A2B receptors and adenosine deaminase, which colocalize in the neuromuscular compartment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Under normal conditions, endogenous adenosine modulates colonic motility via A2B receptors located in the neuromuscular compartment. In the presence of colitis, this inhibitory control is impaired due to a link between A2B receptors and adenosine deaminase, which catabolizes adenosine, thus preventing A2B receptor activation. PMID:24286264

  4. Studies on Plant Growth Promoting Properties of Fruit-Associated Bacteria from Elettaria cardamomum and Molecular Analysis of ACC Deaminase Gene.

    PubMed

    Jasim, B; Anish, Mathew Chacko; Shimil, Vellakudiyan; Jyothis, Mathew; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2015-09-01

    Endophytic microorganisms have been reported to have diverse plant growth promoting mechanisms including phosphate solubilization, N2 fixation, production of phyto-hormones and ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase and antiphyto-pathogenic properties. Among these, ACC deaminase production is very important because of its regulatory effect on ethylene which is a stress hormone with precise role in the control of fruit development and ripening. However, distribution of these properties among various endophytic bacteria associated with fruit tissue and its genetic basis is least investigated. In the current study, 11 endophytic bacteria were isolated and identified from the fruit tissue of Elettaria cardamomum and were studied in detail for various plant growth promoting properties especially ACC deaminase activity using both culture-based and PCR-based methods. PCR-based screening identified the isolates EcB 2 (Pantoea sp.), EcB 7 (Polaromonas sp.), EcB 9 (Pseudomonas sp.), EcB 10 (Pseudomonas sp.) and EcB 11 (Ralstonia sp.) as positive for ACC deaminase. The PCR products were further subjected to sequence analysis which proved the similarity of the sequences identified in the study with ACC deaminase sequences reported from other sources. The detailed bioinformatic analysis of the sequence including homology-based modelling and molecular docking confirmed the sequences to have ACC deaminase activity. The docking of the modelled proteins was done using patch dock, and the detailed scrutiny of the protein ligand interaction revealed conservation of key amino acids like Lys51, Ser78, Tyr268 and Tyr294 which play important role in the enzyme activity. These suggest the possible regulatory effect of these isolates on fruit physiology. PMID:26164855

  5. A conserved glutamate residue in the C-terminal deaminase domain of pentatricopeptide repeat proteins is required for RNA editing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael L; Dang, Kim N; Diaz, Michael F; Mulligan, R Michael

    2015-04-17

    Many transcripts expressed from plant organelle genomes are modified by C-to-U RNA editing. Nuclear encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins include an RNA binding domain that provides site specificity. In addition, many PPR proteins include a C-terminal DYW deaminase domain with characteristic zinc binding motifs (CXXC, HXE) and has recently been shown to bind zinc ions. The glutamate residue of the HXE motif is catalytically required in the reaction catalyzed by cytidine deaminase. In this work, we examine the activity of the DYW deaminase domain through truncation or mutagenesis of the HXE motif. OTP84 is required for editing three chloroplast sites, and transgenes expressing OTP84 with C-terminal truncations were capable of editing only one of the three cognate sites at high efficiency. These results suggest that the deaminase domain of OTP84 is required for editing two of the sites, but another deaminase is able to supply the deamination activity for the third site. OTP84 and CREF7 transgenes were mutagenized to replace the glutamate residue of the HXE motif, and transgenic plants expressing OTP84-E824A and CREF7-E554A were unable to efficiently edit the cognate editing sites for these genes. In addition, plants expressing CREF7-E554A exhibited substantially reduced capacity to edit a non-cognate site, rpoA C200. These results indicate that the DYW deaminase domains of PPR proteins are involved in editing their cognate editing sites, and in some cases may participate in editing additional sites in the chloroplast. PMID:25739442

  6. HIV-1 Vif Versus the APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases: An Intracellular Duel Between Pathogen and Host Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wissing, Silke; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Greene, Warner C.

    2010-01-01

    The Vif protein of HIV is essential for the effective propagation of this pathogenic retrovirus in vivo. Vif acts by preventing virion encapsidation of two potent antiviral factors, the APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F cytidine deaminases. Decreased encapsidation in part involves Vif-mediated recruitment of a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex that promotes polyubiquitylation and proteasome-mediated degradation of APOBEC3G/F. The resultant decline in intracellular levels of these enzymes leads to decreased encapsidation of APOBECG/F into budding virions. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the dynamic interplay of Vif with the antiviral APOBEC3 enzymes. PMID:20538015

  7. HIV-1 Vif versus the APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases: an intracellular duel between pathogen and host restriction factors.

    PubMed

    Wissing, Silke; Galloway, Nicole L K; Greene, Warner C

    2010-10-01

    The Vif protein of HIV is essential for the effective propagation of this pathogenic retrovirus in vivo. Vif acts by preventing virion encapsidation of two potent antiviral factors, the APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F cytidine deaminases. Decreased encapsidation in part involves Vif-mediated recruitment of a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex that promotes polyubiquitylation and proteasome-mediated degradation of APOBEC3G/F. The resultant decline in intracellular levels of these enzymes leads to decreased encapsidation of APOBECG/F into budding virions. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the dynamic interplay of Vif with the antiviral APOBEC3 enzymes. PMID:20538015

  8. A novel mutation in the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in an extended Chinese family with acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Honglian; Yin, Kunlun; Hua, Baolai; Zhu, Tienan; Zhao, Yongqiang; Guo, Shubin; Yu, Xuezhong; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-07-10

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), the third enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Establishing accurate diagnoses of the patient and asymptomatic family members with AIP involves identifying the PBGD enzyme mutations directly. Genetic testing provides a precise diagnosis for the patient and other asymptomatic family members, and thereby proper treatments can be initiated to prevent the disease from progressing. In this study, we report a novel PBGD missense mutation, A G-to-C, at the position 988 resulting in Alanine to Proline (Ala330Pro), in a Chinese family. PMID:25870942

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the tetrapyrrole-biosynthetic enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase from Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Azim, N.; Deery, E.; Warren, M. J.; Erskine, P.; Cooper, J. B.; Wood, S. P.; Akhtar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; hydroxymethylbilane synthase; EC 2.5.1.61) catalyses an early step of the tetrapyrrole-biosynthesis pathway in which four molecules of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen are condensed to form a linear tetrapyrrole. The enzyme possesses a dipyrromethane cofactor which is covalently linked by a thioether bridge to an invariant cysteine residue. Expression in Escherichia coli of a His-tagged form of Bacillus megaterium PBGD permitted the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the enzyme from this species at high resolution. PMID:23908040

  10. Crawling Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Institute for the Achievement of Human Potential developed a device known as the Vehicle for Initial Crawling (VIC); the acronym is a tribute to the crawler's inventor, Hubert "Vic" Vykukal; is an effective crawling aid. The VIC is used by brain injured children who are unable to crawl due to the problems of weight-bearing and friction, caused by gravity. It is a rounded plywood frame large enough to support the child's torso, leaving arms and legs free to move. On its underside are three aluminum discs through which air is pumped to create an air-bearing surface that has less friction than a film of oil. Upper side contains the connection to the air supply and a pair of straps which restrain the child and cause the device to move with him. VIC is used with the intent to recreate the normal neurological connection between brain and muscles. Over repetitive use of the device the child develops his arm and leg muscles as well as coordination. Children are given alternating therapy, with and without the VIC until eventually the device is no longer needed.

  11. Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase: a candidate biomarker to discriminate between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruolin; Wang, Junli; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Maoshui

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Delay in the treatment of pleural infection may contribute to its high mortality. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural adenosine deaminase in discrimination between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space prior to selecting antibiotics. METHODS: A total of 76 patients were enrolled and grouped into subgroups according to Gram staining: 1) patients with Gram-negative bacterial infections, aged 53.2±18.6 years old, of whom 44.7% had empyemas and 2) patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections, aged 53.5±21.5 years old, of whom 63.1% had empyemas. The pleural effusion was sampled by thoracocentesis and then sent for adenosine deaminase testing, biochemical testing and microbiological culture. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to examine the differences in adenosine deaminase levels between the groups. Correlations between adenosine deaminase and specified variables were also quantified using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural effusion adenosine deaminase. RESULTS: Mean pleural adenosine deaminase levels differed significantly between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space (191.8±32.1 U/L vs 81.0±16.9 U/L, p<0.01). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.570, 0.792, p<0.01) at the cutoff value of 86 U/L. Additionally, pleural adenosine deaminase had a sensitivity of 63.2% (46.0-78.2%); a specificity of 73.7% (56.9-86.6%); positive and negative likelihood ratios of 2.18 and 0.50, respectively; and positive and negative predictive values of 70.6% and 66.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase is a helpful alternative biomarker for early and quick discrimination of Gram-negative from Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

  12. The interferon-inducible, double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase gene (DSRAD) maps to human chromosome 1q21.1-21.2

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, H.U.G.; Greulich, K.M.; George, C.X.; Samuel, C.E.

    1995-11-20

    The interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase is an RNA-modifying enzyme implicated in the generation of biased hypermutations of viral RNAs and the site-selective editing of mammalian mRNAs of neural origin. The gene for the dsRNA-specific adenosine deaminase has been mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of genomic clones to a single locus on human chromosome 1 bands q21.1-21.2. Simultaneous multicolor FISH including X clones and yeast artificial chromosomes showed a localization of the gene in band 1q21 centromeric of D1S1705. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  13. HIV-AIDS Connection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area The HIV-AIDS Connection AIDS was first recognized in 1981 and ... is there overwhelming scientific consensus that HIV causes AIDS? Before HIV infection became widespread in the human ...

  14. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  15. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  16. Splinter, First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Splinter, First Aid A A A First Aid for Splinter: View ... wet, it makes the area prone to infection. First Aid Guide Self-care measures to remove a splinter ...

  17. Unconsciousness - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    Loss of consciousness - first aid; Coma - first aid; Mental status change; Altered mental status ... has a change in mental status, follow these first aid steps: Call or tell someone to call 911 . ...

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from Streptococcus pyogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Min-Je; Lee, Won-Ho; Nam, Ki-hyun; Rhee, Kyeong-hee; Lee, Ki-Seog; Kim, Eunice EunKyung; Yu, Myung-Hee; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2005-04-01

    The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria S. pyogenes has been overexpressed and crystallized. The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes (spTAD) has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} ion at 295 K using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Flash-cooled crystals of spTAD diffracted to 2.0 Å using 30%(v/v) glycerol as a cryoprotectant. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 81.042, c = 81.270 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one subunit of spTAD, with a corresponding crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 3.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 62.7%.

  19. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of Escherichia coli TadA, the Wobble-Specific tRNA Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,J.; Malashkevich, V.; Roday, S.; Lisbin, M.; Schramm, V.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The essential tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase catalyzes the deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNAs. This modification allows for a single tRNA species to recognize multiple synonymous codons containing A, C, or U in the last (3'-most) position and ensures that all sense codons are appropriately decoded. We report the first combined structural and kinetic characterization of a wobble-specific deaminase. The structure of the Escherichia coli enzyme clearly defines the dimer interface and the coordination of the catalytically essential zinc ion. The structure also identifies the nucleophilic water and highlights residues near the catalytic zinc likely to be involved in recognition and catalysis of polymeric RNA substrates. A minimal 19 nucleotide RNA stem substrate has permitted the first steady-state kinetic characterization of this enzyme (k{sub cat} = 13 {+-} 1 min{sup -1} and K{sub M} = 0.83 {+-} 0.22 {micro}M). A continuous coupled assay was developed to follow the reaction at high concentrations of polynucleotide substrates (>10 {micro}M). This work begins to define the chemical and structural determinants responsible for catalysis and substrate recognition and lays the foundation for detailed mechanistic analysis of this essential enzyme.

  20. Cellular HIV-1 Inhibition by Truncated Old World Primate APOBEC3A Proteins Lacking a Complete Deaminase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Katuwal, Miki; Wang, Yaqiong; Schmitt, Kimberly; Guo, Kejun; Halemano, Kalani; Santiago, Mario L.; Stephens, Edward B.

    2014-01-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) deaminases are retrovirus restriction factors that were proposed as inhibitory components of HIV-1 gene therapy vectors. However, A3 mutational activity may induce undesired genomic damage and enable HIV-1 to evade drugs and immune responses. Here, we show that A3A protein from Colobus guereza (colA3A) can restrict HIV-1 replication in producer cells in a deaminase-independent manner without inducing DNA damage. Neither HIV-1 reverse transcription nor integration were significantly affected by colA3A, but capsid protein synthesis was inhibited. The determinants for colA3A restriction mapped to the N-terminal region. These properties extend to A3A from mandrills and De Brazza’s monkeys. Surprisingly, truncated colA3A proteins expressing only the N-terminal 100 amino acids effectively exclude critical catalytic regions but retained potent cellular restriction activity. These highlight a unique mechanism of cellular HIV-1 restriction by several Old World monkey A3A proteins that may be exploited for functional HIV-1 cure strategies. PMID:25262471

  1. Two Arabidopsis Threonine Aldolases Are Nonredundant and Compete with Threonine Deaminase for a Common Substrate Pool[W

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijay; Laubengayer, Karen M.; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Jander, Georg

    2006-01-01

    Amino acids are not only fundamental protein constituents but also serve as precursors for many essential plant metabolites. Although amino acid biosynthetic pathways in plants have been identified, pathway regulation, catabolism, and downstream metabolite partitioning remain relatively uninvestigated. Conversion of Thr to Gly and acetaldehyde by Thr aldolase (EC 4.1.2.5) was only recently shown to play a role in plant amino acid metabolism. Whereas one Arabidopsis thaliana Thr aldolase (THA1) is expressed primarily in seeds and seedlings, the other (THA2) is expressed in vascular tissue throughout the plant. Metabolite profiling of tha1 mutants identified a >50-fold increase in the seed Thr content, a 50% decrease in seedling Gly content, and few other significant metabolic changes. By contrast, homozygous tha2 mutations cause a lethal albino phenotype. Rescue of tha2 mutants and tha1 tha2 double mutants by overproduction of feedback-insensitive Thr deaminase (OMR1) shows that Gly formation by THA1 and THA2 is not essential in Arabidopsis. Seed-specific expression of feedback-insensitive Thr deaminase in both tha1 and tha2 Thr aldolase mutants greatly increases seed Ile content, suggesting that these two Thr catabolic enzymes compete for a common substrate pool. PMID:17172352

  2. Characterization of ACC deaminase gene in Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae; Park, Seung-Moon; Chae, Jong-Chan; Yun, Bong-Sik; Lee, Yong Hoon; Park, Yool-Jin; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2010-04-01

    The enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into alpha-ketobutyrate and ammonia. The decreased level of ethylene allows the plant to be more resistant to a wide environmental stress including plant pathogens. In the present study, we characterized the ACC deaminase activity of a Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the red pepper rhizosphere region of red pepper grown at Jinan, Korea. The isolate produced 23.8 +/- 0.4 micromol of alpha-ketobutyrate/mg of protein/h during ACC deamination under in vitro conditions. Polymerase chain reaction for acdS gene showed that the isolated P. entomophila strain PS-PJH carry sequences similar to the known acdS genes. Results of the multiple sequence alignment revealed >99% identity (nucleotide and amino acid) with acdS gene of Pseudomonas putida strains AM15 and UW4. The isolated bacteria promoted 43.3 and 34.1% of growth in Raphanus sativus and Lactuca sativa plants, respectively. Based on the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region sequences, the isolate was identified as P. entomophila. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to report the acdS gene in P. entomophila. PMID:20082369

  3. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  4. Restriction of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus by Equine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Jörg; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Marino, Daniela; Conrad, Elea; Perković, Mario; Battenberg, Marion; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian APOBEC3 (A3) proteins comprise a multigene family of cytidine deaminases that act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. The A3 locus on the chromosome 28 of the horse genome contains multiple A3 genes: two copies of A3Z1, five copies of A3Z2, and a single copy of A3Z3, indicating a complex evolution of multiple gene duplications. We have cloned and analyzed for expression the different equine A3 genes and examined as well the subcellular distribution of the corresponding proteins. Additionally, we have tested the functional antiretroviral activity of the equine and of several of the human and nonprimate A3 proteins against the Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), the Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and the Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2). Hematopoietic cells of horses express at least five different A3s: A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2c-Z2d, A3Z2e, and A3Z3, whereas circulating macrophages, the natural target of EIAV, express only part of the A3 repertoire. The five A3Z2 tandem copies arose after three consecutive, recent duplication events in the horse lineage, after the split between Equidae and Carnivora. The duplicated genes show different antiviral activities against different viruses: equine A3Z3 and A3Z2c-Z2d are potent inhibitors of EIAV while equine A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2e showed only weak anti-EIAV activity. Equine A3Z1b and A3Z3 restricted AAV and all equine A3s, except A3Z1b, inhibited SIV. We hypothesize that the horse A3 genes are undergoing a process of subfunctionalization in their respective viral specificities, which might provide the evolutionary advantage for keeping five copies of the original gene. PMID:19458006

  5. Role of glutamate 64 in the activation of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jifeng; Sklenak, Stepan; Liu, Aizhuo; Felczak, Krzysztof; Wu, Yan; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao

    2012-01-10

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine to uracil as well as the deamination of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. In this study, the role of Glu64 in the activation of the prodrug 5FC was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational studies. Steady-state kinetics studies showed that the mutation of Glu64 causes a dramatic decrease in k(cat) and a dramatic increase in K(m), indicating Glu64 is important for both binding and catalysis in the activation of 5FC. (19)F NMR experiments showed that binding of the inhibitor 5-fluoro-1H-pyrimidin-2-one (5FPy) to the wild-type yCD causes an upfield shift, indicating that the bound inhibitor is in the hydrated form, mimicking the transition state or the tetrahedral intermediate in the activation of 5FC. However, binding of 5FPy to the E64A mutant enzyme causes a downfield shift, indicating that the bound 5FPy remains in an unhydrated form in the complex with the mutant enzyme. (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis revealed trans-hydrogen bond D/H isotope effects on the hydrogen of the amide of Glu64, indicating that the carboxylate of Glu64 forms two hydrogen bonds with the hydrated 5FPy. ONIOM calculations showed that the wild-type yCD complex with the hydrated form of the inhibitor 1H-pyrimidin-2-one is more stable than the initial binding complex, and in contrast, with the E64A mutant enzyme, the hydrated inhibitor is no longer favored and the conversion has a higher activation energy, as well. The hydrated inhibitor is stabilized in the wild-type yCD by two hydrogen bonds between it and the carboxylate of Glu64 as revealed by (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis. To explore the functional role of Glu64 in catalysis, we investigated the deamination of cytosine catalyzed by the E64A mutant by ONIOM calculations. The results showed that without the assistance of Glu64, both proton transfers before and

  6. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing rhizobacteria protect Ocimum sanctum plants during waterlogging stress via reduced ethylene generation.

    PubMed

    Barnawal, Deepti; Bharti, Nidhi; Maji, Deepamala; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Kalra, Alok

    2012-09-01

    Ocimum sanctum grown as rain-fed crop, is known to be poorly adapted to waterlogged conditions. Many a times the crop suffers extreme damages because of anoxia and excessive ethylene generation due to waterlogging conditions present under heavy rain. The usefulness of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria was investigated under waterlogging stress. The comparison of herb yield and stress induced biochemical changes of waterlogged and non-waterlogged plants with and without ACC deaminase-containing microbiological treatments were monitored in this study. Ten plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains containing ACC-deaminase were isolated and characterized. Four selected isolates Fd2 (Achromobacter xylosoxidans), Bac5 (Serratia ureilytica), Oci9 (Herbaspirillum seropedicae) and Oci13 (Ochrobactrum rhizosphaerae) had the potential to protect Ocimum plants from flood induced damage under waterlogged glass house conditions. Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of these ACC deaminase-containing selected strains for reducing the yield losses caused by waterlogging conditions. Bacterial treatments protected plants from waterlogging induced detrimental changes like stress ethylene production, reduced chlorophyll concentration, higher lipid peroxidation, proline concentration and reduced foliar nutrient uptake. Fd2 (A. xylosoxidans) induced maximum waterlogging tolerance as treated waterlogged plants recorded maximum growth and herb yield (46.5% higher than uninoculated waterlogged plants) with minimum stress ethylene levels (53% lower ACC concentration as compared to waterlogged plants without bacterial inoculation) whereas under normal non-waterlogged conditions O. rhizosphaerae was most effective in plant growth promotion. PMID:22846334

  7. Production of phenylpyruvic acid from L-phenylalanine using an L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus mirabilis: comparison of enzymatic and whole-cell biotransformation approaches.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng

    2015-10-01

    Phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) is an important organic acid that has a wide range of applications. In this study, the membrane-bound L-amino acid deaminase (L-AAD) gene from Proteus mirabilis KCTC 2566 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and then the L-AAD was purified. After that, we used the purified enzyme and the recombinant E. coli whole-cell biocatalyst to produce PPA via a one-step biotransformation from L-phenylalanine. L-AAD was solubilized from the membrane and purified 52-fold with an overall yield of 13 %, which corresponded to a specific activity of 0.94 ± 0.01 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1). Then, the biotransformation conditions for the pure enzyme and the whole-cell biocatalyst were optimized. The maximal production was 2.6 ± 0.1 g·L(-1) (specific activity of 1.02 ± 0.02 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1) protein, 86.7 ± 5 % mass conversion rate, and 1.04 g·L(-1)·h(-1) productivity) and 3.3 ± 0.2 g L(-1) (specific activity of 0.013 ± 0.003 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1) protein, 82.5 ± 4 % mass conversion rate, and 0.55 g·L(-1)·h(-1) productivity) for the pure enzyme and whole-cell biocatalyst, respectively. Comparative studies of the enzymatic and whole-cell biotransformation were performed in terms of specific activity, production, conversion, productivity, stability, need of external cofactors, and recycling. We have developed two eco-friendly and efficient approaches for PPA production. The strategy described herein may aid the biotransformational synthesis of other α-keto acids from their corresponding amino acids. PMID:26109004

  8. AIDS: Education's New Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, D. Kay; Faber, Charles F.

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an incurable, fatal disease that is caused by a virus that eventually destroys the body's immune system. While AIDS is contagious, the risk of contracting AIDS through casual contact is said to be negligible. A review of the court cases involving students with AIDS reveals that the precedent has…

  9. The master hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Curran, James R; Galster, Jason A

    2013-06-01

    As early as the 1930s the term Master Hearing Aid (MHA) described a device used in the fitting of hearing aids. In their original form, the MHA was a desktop system that allowed for simulated or actual adjustment of hearing aid components that resulted in a changed hearing aid response. Over the years the MHA saw many embodiments and contributed to a number of rationales for the fitting of hearing aids. During these same years, the MHA was viewed by many as an inappropriate means of demonstrating hearing aids; the audio quality of the desktop systems was often superior to the hearing aids themselves. These opinions and the evolution of the MHA have molded the modern perception of hearing aids and the techniques used in the fitting of hearing aids. This article reports on a history of the MHA and its influence on the fitting of hearing aids. PMID:23686682

  10. The Master Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    Curran, James R.

    2013-01-01

    As early as the 1930s the term Master Hearing Aid (MHA) described a device used in the fitting of hearing aids. In their original form, the MHA was a desktop system that allowed for simulated or actual adjustment of hearing aid components that resulted in a changed hearing aid response. Over the years the MHA saw many embodiments and contributed to a number of rationales for the fitting of hearing aids. During these same years, the MHA was viewed by many as an inappropriate means of demonstrating hearing aids; the audio quality of the desktop systems was often superior to the hearing aids themselves. These opinions and the evolution of the MHA have molded the modern perception of hearing aids and the techniques used in the fitting of hearing aids. This article reports on a history of the MHA and its influence on the fitting of hearing aids. PMID:23686682

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the hypothetical deaminase RPB_0146 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris HaA2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guofang; Yu, Dan; Yang, Guodong; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Tongcun; Liu, Xiang

    2014-11-01

    RPB_0146, a putative deaminase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris HaA2, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and purified using a His6 tag by Ni2+-chelating affinity chromatography for X-ray crystallographic analysis. Diffraction-quality crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 289 K and diffracted to a resolution of 2.44 Å using a wavelength of 1.000 Å at the Photon Factory (KEK), Japan. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2₁2₁2₁, with unit-cell parameters a=66.26, b=123.94, c=155.95 Å. PMID:25372831

  12. Increased level of soluble adenosine deaminase in bone marrow of visceral leishmaniasis patients: an inverse relation with parasite load.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ambak K; Kumar, Prabin; Saini, Sheetal; Thakur, Chandreshwar P; Seth, Tulika; Mitra, Dipendra K

    2016-09-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) which degrades adenosine to inosine, is known to be pro-inflammatory molecule in many diseases. Adenosine suppresses the functioning of the immune system and thus promotes dissemination of the parasite. In our previous finding, the level of soluble ADA in serum of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was found to be increased as compared to healthy controls. However, it cannot be fairly interpreted unless their level is demonstrated at the disease site, where the parasite resides. We designed this study to correlate the level of soluble ADA (sADA) with parasitic load at the disease site i.e. bone marrow (BM). We found increased levels of sADA in BM as compared to the unaffected BM. Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation is observed between the parasite load and level of sADA at the disease site. PMID:27447233

  13. Characterization of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from polluted soils and containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Belimov, A A; Safronova, V I; Sergeyeva, T A; Egorova, T N; Matveyeva, V A; Tsyganov, V E; Borisov, A Y; Tikhonovich, I A; Kluge, C; Preisfeld, A; Dietz, K J; Stepanok, V V

    2001-07-01

    Fifteen bacterial strains containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase were isolated from the rhizoplane of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) grown in different soils and a long-standing sewage sludge contaminated with heavy metals. The isolated strains were characterized and assigned to various genera and species, such as Pseudomonas brassicacearum, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas sp., Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Alcaligenes sp., Variovorax paradoxus, Bacillus pumilus, and Rhodococcus sp. by determination of 16S rRNA gene sequences. The root elongation of Indian mustard and rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera L.) germinating seedlings was stimulated by inoculation with 8 and 13 isolated strains, respectively. The bacteria were tolerant to cadmium toxicity and stimulated root elongation of rape seedlings in the presence of 300 microM CdCl2 in the nutrient solution. The effect of ACC-utilising bacteria on root elongation correlated with the impact of aminoethoxyvinylglycine and silver ions, chemical inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis. A significant improvement in the growth of rape caused by inoculation with certain selected strains was also observed in pot experiments, when the plants were cultivated in cadmium-supplemented soil. The biomass of pea cv. Sparkle and its ethylene sensitive mutant E2 (sym5), in particular, was increased through inoculation with certain strains of ACC-utilising bacteria in pot experiments in quartz sand culture. The beneficial effect of the bacteria on plant growth varied significantly depending on individual bacterial strains, plant genotype, and growth conditions. The results suggest that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase are present in various soils and offer promise as a bacterial inoculum for improvement of plant growth, particularly under unfavourable environmental conditions. PMID:11547884

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Simanshu, Dhirendra K; Chittori, Sagar; Savithri, H S; Murthy, M R N

    2006-03-01

    Biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) catalyzes the deamination of L-threonine to alpha-ketobutyrate, the first reaction in the anaerobic breakdown of L-threonine to propionate. Unlike the biosynthetic threonine deaminase, TdcB is insensitive to L-isoleucine and is activated by AMP. Here, the cloning of TdcB (molecular weight 36 kDa) from Salmonella typhimurium with an N-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag and its overexpression in Escherichia coli is reported. TdcB was purified to homogeneity using Ni-NTA affinity column chromatography and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in three different crystal forms. Crystal forms I (unit-cell parameters a = 46.32, b = 55.30, c = 67.24 A, alpha = 103.09, beta = 94.70, gamma = 112.94 degrees) and II (a = 56.68, b = 76.83, c = 78.50 A, alpha = 66.12, beta = 89.16, gamma = 77.08 degrees) belong to space group P1 and contain two and four molecules of TdcB, respectively, in the asymmetric unit. Poorly diffracting form III crystals were obtained in space group C2 and based on the unit-cell volume are most likely to contain one molecule per asymmetric unit. Two complete data sets of resolutions 2.2 A (crystal form I) and 1.7 A (crystal form II) were collected at 100 K using an in-house X-ray source. PMID:16511321

  15. Cloning of the ilvA538 gene coding for feedback-hypersensitive threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, D H; Gray, J E

    1982-01-01

    A variety of experimental results implicate the ilvA gene product, threonine deaminase, as an autoregulatory protein that affects the expression of its own gene and those coding for some related proteins. Some of the most direct evidence comes from the analysis of mutations in the ilvA gene with pleiotropic genetic regulatory effects. The most extensively documented mutation, ilvA538, lowers the expression of and abolishes repression control of the ilvGEDA transcription unit. A pleiotropic effect of the ilvA538 mutation, which may be either incidental or mechanistically related to the loss of repression control, renders threonine deaminase feedback hypersensitive to the inhibition of catalytic activity by the pathway end product, isoleucine. We transferred this mutation to lambda dilv phage and pBR322 derivatives. Direct enzyme assay of the plasmid- and phage-coded ilvA538 gene product in delta ilv hosts confirmed the feedback hypersensitivity of the enzyme product. In conjunction with the ilvG671 (phenotype, ILvG+ Valr; previously designated ilvO671) allele located in cis, high levels of the plasmid and lambda dilv phage-coded mutant enzyme suitable for protein purification were observed. Deletion mapping experiments with lambda dilv phage confirmed that the ilvA538 mutation, and not mutations promoter proximal to ilvD (transcription is from ilvG to ilvA), confer a loss of repression control. These genetic mapping studies indicate, however, that an additional mutation(s) may be present that contributes, at least in part, to the reduced enzyme levels in strains with the ilvA538 mutation. PMID:7045077

  16. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with ...

  17. How HIV Causes AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this: Main Content Area How HIV Causes AIDS HIV destroys CD4 positive (CD4+) T cells, which ... and disease, ultimately resulting in the development of AIDS. Most people who are infected with HIV can ...

  18. AIDS Myths and Misunderstandings

    MedlinePlus

    ... 21, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 158 AIDS Myths and Misunderstandings WHY ARE THERE SO MANY ... support this belief. Myth: Current medications can cure AIDS. It’s no big deal if you get infected. ...

  19. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ... cancers. When that happens, the illness is called AIDS. Once a person has the virus, it stays ...

  20. Frostbite, First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Frostbite, First Aid A A A Severe frostbite can result in ... became frozen). Frostbite is often associated with hypothermia. First Aid Guide In the case of mild frostbite, the ...

  1. Poisoning first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007579.htm Poisoning first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... or burns Stupor Unconsciousness Unusual breath odor Weakness First Aid Seek immediate medical help. For poisoning by swallowing: ...

  2. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  3. Heat Exhaustion, First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Heat Exhaustion, First Aid A A A Heat exhaustion signs and symptoms ... specific to the other stages of heat illness. First Aid Guide Use a combination of the following measures ...

  4. Heat Cramps, First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Heat Cramps, First Aid A A A Heat cramp signs and symptoms ... if later stages of heat illness are suspected. First Aid Guide Use a combination of the following measures, ...

  5. Heatstroke, First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Heatstroke, First Aid A A A Heatstroke signs and symptoms can ... specific to the earlier stages of heat illness. First Aid Guide When heatstroke is suspected, seek emergency medical ...

  6. Bruises, First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Bruises, First Aid A A A Bruises lighten and change color ... Bruises can be a sign of internal bleeding. First Aid Guide If there is external bleeding in addition ...

  7. Tick Bites, First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Tick Bites, First Aid A A A It is important to inspect ... temporary paralysis in their host (called tick paralysis). First Aid Guide To remove an embedded tick: Wash your ...

  8. First Aid: Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: The Flu KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: The Flu Print ... tiredness What to Do If Your Child Has Flu Symptoms: Call your doctor. Encourage rest. Keep your ...

  9. MICROFICHE AIDS DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains counts of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) cases reported to state and local health departments, by demographics; case-definition; HIV exposure group (risk factors for AIDS); Half-year of diagnosis, report, and death.

  10. Designing State Aid Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Bo; Bradbury, Katharine

    2009-01-01

    This paper designs a new equalization-aid formula based on fiscal gaps of local communities. When states are in transition to a new local aid formula, the issue of whether and how to hold existing aid harmless poses a challenge. The authors show that some previous studies and the formulas derived from them give differential weights to existing and…

  11. Hearing-aid tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessinger, R.; Polhemus, J. T.; Waring, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Hearing aids are automatically checked by circuit that applies half-second test signal every thirty minutes. If hearing-aid output is distorted, too small, or if battery is too low, a warning lamp is activated. Test circuit is incorporated directly into hearing-aid package.

  12. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Teens > HIV and AIDS Print A A A Text Size What's in ... in human history. HIV causes a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — better known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type ...

  13. AIDS Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horry County Board of Education, Conway, SC.

    This curriculum guide was developed, based on sound principles of human growth and development, to present the most recently available information on AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The curriculum presents information on the known facts about AIDS and the AIDS virus infection. It also addresses the potential for adolescents and adults…

  14. First Aid: Rashes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Rashes KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Rashes Print A A A Text Size Rashes ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC First Aid: Skin Infections Poison Ivy Erythema Multiforme Hives (Urticaria) ...

  15. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns Print A A A Text Size Scald ... THIS TOPIC Kitchen: Household Safety Checklist Fireworks Safety First Aid: Sunburn Firesetting Fire Safety Burns Household Safety: Preventing ...

  16. First Aid: Croup

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Croup KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Croup Print A A A Text Size Croup ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC First Aid: Coughing X-Ray Exam: Neck Why Is Hand ...

  17. First Aid: Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Falls KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Falls Print A A A Text Size en ... Floors, Doors & Windows, Furniture, Stairways: Household Safety Checklist First Aid: Broken Bones Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries ...

  18. First Aid: Choking

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Choking KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Choking Print A A A Text Size Choking ... usually are taught as part of any basic first-aid course. Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD Date reviewed: ...

  19. First Aid: Dehydration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Dehydration KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Dehydration Print A A A Text Size Dehydration ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Summer Safety Heat Illness First Aid: Heat Illness Sun Safety Dehydration Diarrhea Vomiting Word! ...

  20. First Aid: Animal Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Animal Bites KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Animal Bites Print A A A Text Size ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC First Aid & Safety Center Infections That Pets Carry Dealing With ...

  1. Children with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessee, Peggy O; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the prevalence of pediatric Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cases in the United States, the quality of life of children with AIDS, and concerns that parents and the community have about the disease. Suggests some responses for educational institutions and teachers to help confront AIDS and help children with the disease. (MDM)

  2. A Teaching Aids Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahanja, Salah

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exhibition for the benefit of teachers of English in Arab Primary Schools, which was prepared by third-year students at the Teachers College for Arab Teachers. The exhibition included games, songs, audiovisual aids, crossword puzzles, vocabulary, spelling booklets, preposition aids, and worksheet and lesson planning aids. (SED)

  3. Space Derived Health Aids (AID, Heart Monitor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    CPI's spinoff from miniaturized pace circuitry is the new heart-assist device, the AID implantable automatic pulse generator. AID pulse generator monitors the heart continuously, recognizes onset of fibrillation, then administers a corrective electrical shock. A mini- computer, a power source, and two electrodes which sense heart activity are included in the unit. An associated system was also developed. It includes an external recorder to be worn by AID patients and a physician's console to display the data stored by the recorder. System provides a record of fibrillation occurrences and the ensuing defibrillation.

  4. One Mann against AIDS.

    PubMed

    Stocker, C

    1990-11-30

    This article features Jonathan Mann, director of the International AIDS Center of the Harvard AIDS Institute and his efforts to combat AIDS in the global context. Mann built the largest program in the history of the World Health Organization specifically in fighting AIDS. He helped originate the World AIDS Day observed annually throughout the world. As the director of the International AIDS Center at Harvard, Mann is launching a new role for himself concerning with research and ideas related to AIDS issue. According to him, AIDS pandemic offers "opportunities" to speed up research and spur people around the globe to address longstanding social problems with new energy. Mann hopes to get involved with local AIDS efforts. He foresees AIDS as an escalating problem that will continue to persist in one or two generations, which could rise as high as tenfold in the 1990s. He believes a vaccine will be available in the middle to late 1990s but to purge the virus from those positive persons is impossible. If the World AIDS Day can bring about attitude change, Mann hopes it will able be to foster a feeling of unity among people and countries. PMID:12349354

  5. Role for Msh5 in the Regulation of Ig Class Switch Recombination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation serve to diversify antibody responses, and are orchestrated by the activity of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and a large number of proteins involved in DNA repair and genome surveillance. Here we show that ...

  6. Hearing Aid Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Progress in hearing aids has come a long way. Yet despite such progress hearing aids are not the perfect answer to many hearing problems. Some adult ears cannot accommodate tightly fitting hearing aids. Mouth movements such as chewing, talking, and athletic or other active endeavors also lead to loosely fitting ear molds. It is well accepted that loosely fitting hearing aids are the cause of feedback noise. Since feedback noise is the most common complaint of hearing aid wearers it has been the subject of various patents. Herein a hearing aid assembly is provided eliminating feedback noise. The assembly includes the combination of a hearing aid with a headset developed to constrict feedback noise.

  7. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C.; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J.; Angenent, Largus T.; Dangl, Jeffrey L.; Fowler, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate. PMID:26637602

  8. Tyr254 hydroxyl group acts as a two-way switch mechanism in the coupling of heterotropic and homotropic effects in Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Montero-Morán, G M; Horjales, E; Calcagno, M L; Altamirano, M M

    1998-05-26

    The involvement of tyrosine residues in the allosteric function of the enzyme glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli was first proposed on the basis of a theoretical analysis of the sequence and demonstrated by spectrophotometric experiments. Two tyrosine residues, Tyr121 and Tyr254, were indicated as involved in the mechanism of cooperativity and in the allosteric regulation of the enzyme [Altamirano et al. (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 220, 409-413]. Tyr121 replacement by threonine or tryptophan altered the symmetric character of the T --> R transition [Altamirano et al. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 6074-6082]. From crystallographic data of the R allosteric conformer, Tyr254 has been shown to be part of the allosteric pocket [Oliva et al. (1995) Structure 3, 1323-1332]. Although it is not directly involved in binding the allosteric activator, N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate, Tyr 254 is hydrogen bonded through its phenolic hydroxyl to the backbone carbonyl from residue 161 in the neighboring polypeptide chain. Kinetic and binding experiments with the mutant form Tyr254-Phe of the enzyme reveal that this replacement caused an uncoupling of the homotropic and heterotropic effects. Homotropic cooperativity diminished and the allosteric activation pattern changed from one of the K-type in the wild-type deaminase to a mixed K-V pattern. On the other hand, Tyr254-Trp deaminase is kinetically closer to a K-type enzyme and it has a higher catalytic efficiency than the wild-type protein. These results show that the interactions of Tyr254 are fundamental in coupling binding in the active site to events occurring in the allosteric pocket of E. coli glucosamine 6-P deaminase. PMID:9601045

  9. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3−) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3− than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3− into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3− formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3−. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  10. New assignment of the adenosine deaminase gene locus to chromosome 20q13 X 11 by study of a patient with interstitial deletion 20q.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, M B; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, N; Nygaard, P; Edwards, H

    1987-01-01

    A karyotype 46,XY,del(20)(q11 X 23q13 X 11) was found in a three year old boy with mental and growth retardation, low set ears, broad nasal bridge, and macrostomia. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was reduced by about 50%, assigning the gene locus to the deleted segment. A review of the previously reported regional assignments suggests that the ADA gene is in the region of band 20q13 X 11. Images PMID:3560174

  11. The first crystal structure of a dTTP-bound deoxycytidylate deaminase validates and details the allosteric-inhibitor binding site.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase is unique within the zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family as being allosterically regulated, activated by dCTP, and inhibited by dTTP. Here we present the first crystal structure of a dTTP-bound deoxycytidylate deaminase from the bacteriophage S-TIM5, confirming that this inhibitor binds to the same site as the dCTP activator. The molecular details of this structure, complemented by structures apo- and dCMP-bound, provide insights into the allosteric mechanism. Although the positioning of the nucleoside moiety of dTTP is almost identical to that previously described for dCTP, protonation of N3 in deoxythymidine and not deoxycytidine would facilitate hydrogen bonding of dTTP but not dCTP and may result in a higher affinity of dTTP to the allosteric site conferring its inhibitory activity. Further the functional group on C4 (O in dTTP and NH2 in dCTP) makes interactions with nonconserved protein residues preceding the allosteric motif, and the relative strength of binding to these residues appears to correspond to the potency of dTTP inhibition. The active sites of these structures are also uniquely occupied by dTMP and dCMP resolving aspects of substrate specificity. The methyl group of dTMP apparently clashes with a highly conserved tyrosine residue, preventing the formation of a correct base stacking shown to be imperative for deamination activity. The relevance of these findings to the wider zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family is also discussed. PMID:25404739

  12. The First Crystal Structure of a dTTP-bound Deoxycytidylate Deaminase Validates and Details the Allosteric-Inhibitor Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Ailie; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase is unique within the zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family as being allosterically regulated, activated by dCTP, and inhibited by dTTP. Here we present the first crystal structure of a dTTP-bound deoxycytidylate deaminase from the bacteriophage S-TIM5, confirming that this inhibitor binds to the same site as the dCTP activator. The molecular details of this structure, complemented by structures apo- and dCMP-bound, provide insights into the allosteric mechanism. Although the positioning of the nucleoside moiety of dTTP is almost identical to that previously described for dCTP, protonation of N3 in deoxythymidine and not deoxycytidine would facilitate hydrogen bonding of dTTP but not dCTP and may result in a higher affinity of dTTP to the allosteric site conferring its inhibitory activity. Further the functional group on C4 (O in dTTP and NH2 in dCTP) makes interactions with nonconserved protein residues preceding the allosteric motif, and the relative strength of binding to these residues appears to correspond to the potency of dTTP inhibition. The active sites of these structures are also uniquely occupied by dTMP and dCMP resolving aspects of substrate specificity. The methyl group of dTMP apparently clashes with a highly conserved tyrosine residue, preventing the formation of a correct base stacking shown to be imperative for deamination activity. The relevance of these findings to the wider zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family is also discussed. PMID:25404739

  13. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J; Angenent, Largus T; Dangl, Jeffrey L; Fowler, Douglas M; Ley, Ruth E

    2016-02-01

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate. PMID:26637602

  14. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... and your loved ones from HIV/AIDS. The AIDS Memorial Quilt In 1987, a total of 1, ...

  15. Spectrochemical evidence for the presence of a tyrosine residue in the allosteric site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, M M; Hernandez-Arana, A; Tello-Solis, S; Calcagno, M L

    1994-03-01

    The interaction of the enzyme glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli with its allosteric activator, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 6-phosphate, was studied by different spectrophotometric methods. Analysis of the circular-dichroism differential spectra produced by the binding of the allosteric activator or the competitive inhibitor 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucitol 6-phosphate (a homotropic ligand displacing the allosteric equilibrium to the R conformer), strongly suggests the presence of tyrosine residues at or near the allosteric site, although a conformational effect cannot be ruled out. The involvement of a single tyrosine residue in the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate binding site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase was supported by spectrophotometric pH titrations performed in the presence or absence of the homotropic and heterotropic ligand. In these experiments, a single titrated tyrosine residue is completely protected by saturation with the allosteric activator; this group is considerably acidic (pK 8.75). The analysis of the amino acid sequence of the deaminase using a set of indices for the prediction of surface accessibility of amino acid residues, suggests that the involved residue may be Tyr121 or Tyr254. PMID:8125098

  16. Structures of substrate- and inhibitor-bound adenosine deaminase from a human malaria parasite show a dramatic conformational change and shed light on drug selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric T.; Deng, Wei; Krumm, Brian E.; Napuli, Alberto; Mueller, Natascha; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Fan, Erkang; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G. J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites are deficient in purine biosynthesis, relying instead on the salvage of purines from their host environment. Therefore interference with the purine salvage pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. The plasmodial enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays a central role in purine salvage and, unlike mammalian ADA homologs, has a further secondary role in methylthiopurine recycling. For this reason, plasmodial adenosine deaminase accepts a wider range of substrates, as it is responsible for deamination of both adenosine and 5′-methylthioadenosine. The latter substrate is not accepted by mammalian ADA homologs. The structural basis for this natural difference in specificity between plasmodial and mammalian ADA has not been well understood. We now report crystal structures of Plasmodium vivax adenosine deaminase in complex with adenosine, guanosine, and the picomolar inhibitor 2′-deoxycoformycin. These structures highlight a drastic conformational change in plasmodial ADA upon substrate-binding that has not been observed for mammalian ADA enzymes. Further, these complexes illuminate the structural basis for the differential substrate specificity and potential drug selectivity between mammalian and parasite enzymes. PMID:18602399

  17. An expanded two-state model accounts for homotropic cooperativity in biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, E; Yu, H D; Fisher, K E; Iacuzio, D A; Ducote, K R; Schwarz, F P

    1995-07-25

    The linkage between substrate and regulatory effector binding to separate sites on allosteric enzymes results in shifts in their sigmoidal kinetics to regulate metabolism. Control of branched chain amino acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli occurs in part through shifts in the sigmoidal dependence of alpha-ketobutyrate production promoted by isoleucine and valine binding to biosynthetic threonine deaminase. The structural similarity of threonine, valine, and isoleucine have given rise to suggestions that there may be competition among different ligands for the same sites on this tetrameric enzyme, resulting in a complex pattern of regulation. In an effort to provide a coherent interpretation of the cooperative association of ligands to the active sites and to the effector sites of threonine deaminase, binding studies using single amino acid variants were undertaken. A previously-isolated, feedback-resistant mutant identified in Salmonella typhimurium, ilvA219, has been cloned and sequenced. The phenotype is attributable to a single amino acid substitution in the regulatory domain of the enzyme in which leucine at position 447 is substituted with phenylalanine. The mutant exhibits hyperbolic saturation curves in both ligand binding and steady-state kinetics. These results, in addition to calorimetric and spectroscopic measurements of isoleucine and valine binding, indicate that the low affinity (T) state is destabilized in the mutant and that it exists predominantly in the high affinity (R) conformation in the absence of ligands, providing an explanation for its resistance to isoleucine. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses of another mutant, in which alanine has replaced an essential lysine at position 62 that forms a Schiff base with pyridoxal phosphate, indicate that the cofactor is complexed to exogenous threonine and is therefore unable to bind additional amino acids at the active sites. Isoleucine and valine binding to this inactive, active site

  18. Analysis of the functional domains of biosynthetic threonine deaminase by comparison of the amino acid sequences of three wild-type alleles to the amino acid sequence of biodegradative threonine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Taillon, B E; Little, R; Lawther, R P

    1988-03-31

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene, ilvA, for biosynthetic threonine deaminase (Tda) from Salmonella typhimurium was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence was compared with the deduced amino acid sequences of the biosynthetic Tda from Escherichia coli K-12 (ilvA) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ILV1) and the biodegradative Tda from E. coli K-12 (tdc). The comparison indicated the presence of two types of blocks of homologous amino acids. The first type of homology is in the N-terminal portion of all four isozymes of Tda and probably indicates amino acids involved in catalysis. The second type of homology is found in the C-terminal portion of the three biosynthetic isozymes and presumably is involved in either (i) the binding or interaction of the allosteric effector isoleucine with the enzyme, or (ii) subunit interactions. The sites of amino acid changes of two E. coli K-12 ilvA alleles with altered response to isoleucine are consistent with the conclusion that the C-terminal portion of biosynthetic Tda is involved in allosteric regulation. PMID:3290055

  19. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  20. AIDS: the first decade.

    PubMed

    Turk, H N

    1989-01-01

    AIDS has had a profound effect on society and the workplace and has raised legal and social problems for which society was not prepared. This article will chronicle the evolution of federal, state and local law concerning AIDS and the workplace. Although there are some clear-cut answers and guidelines that address the relationship of employer and employee to the AIDS epidemic, current legislation and enforcement of those laws does not adequately address the AIDS victim as a handicapped individual. Emphasis is also placed on the problems peculiar to the health care industry, the constitutionality of present legislation, and the AIDS victim's right to privacy versus the employer's need to know. Finally, some practical solutions and guidelines will be presented that will help the employer deal with the AIDS victim and his or her co-worker. PMID:10295811

  1. AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ijsselmuiden, C; Evian, C; Matjilla, J; Steinberg, M; Schneider, H

    1993-01-01

    The National AIDS Convention in South Africa (NACOSA) in October 1992 was the first real attempt to address HIV/AIDS. In Soweto, government, the African National Congress, nongovernmental organizations, and organized industry and labor representatives worked for 2 days to develop a national plan of action, but it did not result in a united effort to fight AIDS. The highest HIV infection rates in South Africa are among the KwaZulu in Natal, yet the Inkatha Freedom Party did not attend NACOSA. This episode exemplifies the key obstacles for South Africa to prevent and control AIDS. Inequality of access to health care may explain why health workers did not diagnose the first AIDS case in blacks until 1985. Migrant labor, Bantu education, and uprooted communities affect the epidemiology of HIV infection. Further, political and social polarization between blacks and whites contributes to a mindset that AIDS is limited to the other race which only diminishes the personal and collective sense of susceptibility and the volition and aptitude to act. The Department of National Health and Population Development's voluntary register of anonymously reported cases of AIDS specifies 1517 cumulative AIDS cases (October 1992), but this number is low. Seroprevalence studies show between 400,000-450,000 HIV positive cases. Public hospitals cannot give AIDS patients AZT and DDI. Few communities provided community-based care. Not all hospitals honor confidentiality and patients' need for autonomy. Even though HIV testing is not mandatory, it is required sometimes, e.g., HIV testing of immigrants. AIDS Training, Information and Counselling Centers are in urban areas, but not in poor areas where the need is most acute. The government just recently developed in AIDS education package for schools, but too many people consider it improper, so it is not being used. The poor quality education provided blacks would make it useless anyhow. Lifting of the academic boycott will allow South African

  2. HIV / AIDS Network.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS Network and the Philippines Department of Health (DOH) collaborated to produce the AIDS Candlelight Memorial at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC), May 1995, and World AIDS Day activities on December 1, 1995. After the memorial, a fashion show, "Body Shots," provided a channel for information on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). On World AIDS Day, at the request of DOH, the Network provided speakers who lectured on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS in different government offices. Prior to World AIDS Day, the Network focused on strengthening its cohesiveness and building the capabilities of its member organizations through lectures and symposia during November. Network activities were coordinated by the Remedios AIDS Foundation with support from the other members of the Coordinating Council: Health Action Information Network (HAIN); Caritas; Kabalikat, Stop Trafficking of Pilopinos Foundation, Inc. (STOP);and the Library Foundation (TLF). The Coordinating Council elected for 1996 includes the Remedios AIDS Foundation, HAIN, Caritas, TLF, STOP, the Foundation for Adolescent Development (FAD), and the Salvation Army. PMID:12291699

  3. AIDS: Psychosocial Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Dan

    1986-01-01

    In order to provide comprehensive care to patients who have AIDS, it is important for the family physician to understand the psychosocial elements of the disease. Homosexual men who have AIDS face particular problems, such as the disclosure of sexual orientation to family and friends. Issues discussed in this article include the reactions of the patient, family and friends to the diagnosis, the stigma of AIDS, the patient's support network, and preparations for disability and death. The facts about AIDS are discussed briefly, and the psychosocial implications of the illness for patients and their “significant others” are examined. The role of the family physician is highlighted. PMID:21267233

  4. Music and hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Sara M K; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-01-01

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. PMID:25361601

  5. Music and Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. PMID:25361601

  6. [Mesenchymal stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase inhibit growth of murine melanoma B16F10 in vivo].

    PubMed

    Krasikova, L S; Karshieva, S S; Cheglakov, I B; Belyavsky, A V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell-based suicide gene therapy in mice bearing murine melanoma B16F10. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were transfected with plasmid constructs expressing cytosine deaminase fused with uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CDA/UPRT) or CDA/UPRT fused with HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 (CDA/UPRT/VP22). In this study, we demonstrate that direct intratumoral transplantation of MSCs expressing CDA/UPRT or CDA/UPRT/VP22 followed by systemic administration of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) results in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. There was a 53% reduction in tumor volume in mice treated with CDA/UPRT-MSCs and 58% reduction in tumor volume in mice treated with CDA/UPRT/VP22-MSCs as compared with control animals transplanted with B16F10 melanoma alone. Injection of CDA/UPRT-MSC and CDA/UPRT/VP22-MSC prolonged the life span of mice bearing B16F10 melanoma by 15 and 26%, respectively. The data indicate that in murine B16F10 melanoma model, MSCs encoding CDA/UPRT suicide gene have a significant antitumor effect. PMID:26710783

  7. Computational modeling and functional analysis of Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, Zhanli; Wei, Fang; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Liangren; Huang, Qian . E-mail: qhuang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2007-08-17

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1TK) and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase (CD) fusion protein was designed using InsightII software. The structural rationality of the fusion proteins incorporating a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed, and a suitable linker peptide was chosen for further investigated. The recombinant plasmid containing the coding regions of HSV-1TK and CD cDNA connected by this linker peptide coding sequence was generated and subsequently transfected into the human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). The Western blotting indicated that the recombinant fusion protein existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. The toxicity of the prodrug on the recombinant plasmid-transfected human lung cancer cell line NCIH460 was evaluated, which showed that TKglyCD-expressing cells conferred upon cells prodrug sensitivities equivalent to that observed for each enzyme independently. Most noteworthy, cytotoxicity could be enhanced by concurrently treating TKglyCD-expressing cells with prodrugs GCV and 5-FC. The results indicate that we have successfully constructed a HSV-1TKglyCD fusion gene which might have a potential application for cancer gene therapy.

  8. Combined QM(DFT)/MM molecular dynamics simulations of the deamination of cytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yuan; Yan, Honggao; Cao, Zexing; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-15

    Extensive combined quantum mechanical (B3LYP/6-31G*) and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to elucidate the hydrolytic deamination mechanism of cytosine to uracil catalyzed by the yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD). Though cytosine has no direct binding to the zinc center, it reacts with the water molecule coordinated to zinc, and the adjacent conserved Glu64 serves as a general acid/base to shuttle protons from water to cytosine. The overall reaction consists of several proton-transfer processes and nucleophilic attacks. A tetrahedral intermediate adduct of cytosine and water binding to zinc is identified and similar to the crystal structure of yCD with the inhibitor 2-pyrimidinone. The rate-determining step with the barrier of 18.0 kcal/mol in the whole catalytic cycle occurs in the process of uracil departure where the proton transfer from water to Glu64 and nucleophilic attack of the resulting hydroxide anion to C2 of the uracil ring occurs synchronously. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26813441

  9. Isolation, characterization and colonization of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase-producing bacteria XG32 and DP24.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Xia; Liu, Jia; Chen, Shuang-Lin; Yan, Shu-Zhen

    2012-03-01

    Two 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase-producing bacterial strains (DP24 and XG32) were isolated from surface-sterilized tomato roots and rizhospere soil. The strains were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar. IV (XG2) and Erwinia herbicola (DP24) by physiological and biochemical tests, and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Both strains showed positive plant growth-promoting activity when inoculated into cucumber (Cucumis sativus), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), pepper (Capsicum annuum) and rapeseed (Brassica napus L.). Colonization ability and behavior of these two strains were determined by treating mutant strains with rifampicin and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay with rRNA targeted probes, respectively. Both strains were endophytic colonizers of pepper plants. The behavior of the two strains was not identical. Strain XG32 only colonized the root and reached the max level of 27.7 × 10(7) c.f.u./g (fresh weight), after 12 days postinoculation, while strain DP24 was able to colonize the roots, stems and leaves. The max level was reached at 40.87 × 10(7) c.f.u./g (fresh weight) in the roots, 17 × 10(7) c.f.u./g in the stems after 7 days postinoculation and 44.84 × 10(7) c.f.u./g in the leaves after 12 days postinoculation. PMID:22805836

  10. Dietary Supplementation of Ginger and Turmeric Rhizomes Modulates Platelets Ectonucleotidase and Adenosine Deaminase Activities in Normotensive and Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Thomé, Gustavo Roberto; Morsch, Vera Maria; Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; de Oliveira, Lizielle Souza; Goularte, Jeferson Ferraz; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Oboh, Ganiyu; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with platelet alterations that could contribute to the development of cardiovascular complications. Several studies have reported antiplatelet aggregation properties of ginger (Zingiber officinale) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) with limited scientific basis. Hence, this study assessed the effect of dietary supplementation of these rhizomes on platelet ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) induced hypertensive rats. Animals were divided into seven groups (n = 10): normotensive control rats; induced (l-NAME hypertensive) rats; hypertensive rats treated with atenolol (10 mg/kg/day); normotensive and hypertensive rats treated with 4% supplementation of turmeric or ginger, respectively. After 14 days of pre-treatment, the animals were induced with hypertension by oral administration of l-NAME (40 mg/kg/day). The results revealed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in platelet ADA activity and ATP hydrolysis with a concomitant decrease in ADP and AMP hydrolysis of l-NAME hypertensive rats when compared with the control. However, dietary supplementation with turmeric or ginger efficiently prevented these alterations by modulating the hydrolysis of ATP, ADP and AMP with a concomitant decrease in ADA activity. Thus, these activities could suggest some possible mechanism of the rhizomes against hypertension-derived complications associated to platelet hyperactivity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27151061

  11. Functional analysis of a stable transcription arrest site in the first intron of the murine adenosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kash, S F; Innis, J W; Jackson, A U; Kellems, R E

    1993-01-01

    Transcription arrest plays a role in regulating the expression of a number of genes, including the murine adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene. We have previously identified two prominent arrest sites at the 5' end of the ADA gene: one in the first exon and one in the first intron (J. W. Innis and R. E. Kellems, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5398-5409, 1991). Here we report the functional characterization of the intron 1 arrest site, located 137 to 145 nucleotides downstream of the cap site. We have determined, using gel filtration, that the intron 1 arrest site is a stable RNA polymerase II pause site and that the transcription elongation factor SII promotes read-through at this site. Additionally, the sequence determinants for the pause are located within a 37-bp fragment encompassing this site (+123 to +158) and can direct transcription arrest in an orientation-dependent manner in the context of the ADA and adenovirus major late promoters. Specific point mutations in this region increase or decrease the relative pausing efficiency. We also show that the sequence determinants for transcription arrest can function when placed an additional 104 bp downstream of their natural position. Images PMID:8474437

  12. High-yield production of apoplast-directed human adenosine deaminase in transgenic tobacco BY-2 cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Singhabahu, Sanjeewa; George, John; Bringloe, David

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, where a deleterious mutation in the ADA gene of patients results in a dysfunctional immune system, is ultimately caused by an absence of ADA. Over the last 25 years the disease has been treated with PEG-ADA, made from purified bovine ADA coupled with polyethylene glycol (PEG). However, it is thought that an enzyme replacement therapy protocol based on recombinant human ADA would probably be a more effective treatment. With this end in mind, a human ADA cDNA was inserted into plant expression vectors used to transform tobacco plant cell suspensions. Transgenic calli expressing constructs containing apoplast-directing signals showed significantly higher levels of recombinant ADA expression than calli transformed with cytosolic constructs. The most significant ADA activities, however, were measured in the media of transgenic cell suspensions prepared from high expressing transformed calli: where incorporation of a signal for arabinogalactan addition to ADA led to a recombinant protein yield of approximately 16 mg L(-1) , a 336-fold increase over ADA produced by cell suspensions transformed with a cytosolic construct. PMID:24825606

  13. Adenosine deaminase in the modulation of immune system and its potential as a novel target for treatment of inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Luca; Colucci, Rocchina; La Motta, Concettina; Tuccori, Marco; Awwad, Oriana; Da Settimo, Federico; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo

    2012-06-01

    The adenosine pathway is a powerful evolutionarily selected mechanism aimed at a fine modulation of inflammatory responses and protection of tissues from injuries. Adenosine exerts its modulatory effects via interaction with G protein-coupled receptors, designated as A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3). In this regard, extracellular adenosine concentrations are critical in determining its ability of regulating several biological functions. The levels achieved by adenosine in close proximity of its receptors are strictly regulated by a variety of dynamic mechanisms, including intracellular and extracellular biosynthesis, transport and metabolism, based on tissue energy status. In this context, the catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) represents a critical checkpoint in the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels and, consequently, in the control of receptor stimulation, thus playing a pivotal role in the modulation of purinergic responses to several pathophysiological events, such as chronic pulmonary diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases and sepsis. This article reviews current data on the role played by ADA in the regulation of immune system activity through its modulation of adenosine pathways. Particular attention has been paid to the involvement of ADA in the pathophysiology of relevant inflammatory diseases. In addition, the interest in designing and developing novel ADA inhibitors, as new tools potentially useful for the therapeutic management of inflammatory disorders, has been discussed. PMID:22250650

  14. Adenosine reagent-free detection by co-immobilization of adenosine deaminase and phenol red on an optical biostrip.

    PubMed

    Bartzoka, Foteini; Venetsanou, Katerina; Clonis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine detection in human serum is important because this ribonucleoside has established clinical applications, modulating many physiological processes. Furthermore, a simple and cheap detection method is useful in adenosine production processes. Adenosine can be determined enzymatically using either S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and (3) [H]-adenosine, or adenosine kinase combined with GTP and luciferase, or an amperometric biosensor carrying adenosine deaminase (ADA), purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase. We developed a simple and cheap method relying on a transparent biostrip bearing ADA and the indicator phenol red (PR), co-immobilized to polyacrylamide, itself chemically adhered to a derivatized glass strip. The ADA-catalyzed conversion of adenosine to inosine and ammonia leads to a local pH alteration, changing the absorbance maximum of PR (from 425 to 567 nm), which is measured optically. The biostrip shows an analytical range 0.05-1.5 mM adenosine and is reusable when stored at 4 °C. When the biostrip was tested with serum, spiked with adenosine (70 and 100 μM), and filtered for protein and adenosine phosphates depletion, it showed good adenosine recovery. In summary, we show the proof-of-concept that adenosine can be determined reagent-free, at moderate sensitivity on an easy to construct, cheap, and reusable biostrip, based on commercially available molecular entities. PMID:25293641

  15. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters based label-free fluorescent molecular beacon for the detection of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ke; Xie, Minhao; Zhu, Xue; Xu, Lan; Yang, Runlin; Huang, Biao; Zhu, Xiaoli

    2014-02-15

    A general and reliable fluorescent molecular beacon is proposed in this work utilizing DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). The fluorescent molecular beacon has been employed for sensitive determination of the concentration of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and its inhibition. A well-designed oligonucleotide containing three functional regions (an aptamer region for adenosine assembly, a sequence complementary to the region of the adenosine aptamer, and an inserted six bases cytosine-loop) is adopted as the core element in the strategy. The enzymatic reaction of adenosine catalyzed by ADA plays a key role as well in the regulation of the synthesis of the DNA-templated AgNCs, i.e. the signal indicator. The intensity of the fluorescence signal may thereby determine the concentration of the enzyme and its inhibitor. The detection limit of the ADA can be lowered to 0.05 UL(-1). Also, 100 fM of a known inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine hydrochloride (EHNA) is enough to present distinguishable fluorescence emission. Moreover, since the fluorescent signal indicator is not required to be bound with the oligonucleotide, this fluorescent molecular beacon may integrate the advantages of both the label-free and signal-on strategies. PMID:24035856

  16. A Study on the Serum Adenosine Deaminase Activity in Patients with Typhoid Fever and Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Ketavarapu, Sameera; Ramani G., Uma; Modi, Prabhavathi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) has been suggested to be an important enzyme which is associated with the cell mediated immunity, but its clinical significance in typhoid fever has not yet been characterized. The present study was taken up to evaluate the serum ADA activity in patients of typhoid fever. The levels of ADA were also measured in the patients who were suffering from other febrile illnesses. Material and Method: This was a case control study. The subjects who were included in this study were divided into 3 groups. Group A consisted of 50 normal healthy individuals who served as the controls. Group B consisted of 50 patients, both males and females of all age groups, who were suffering from culture positive typhoid fever. Group C consisted of 50 patients who were suffering from febrile illnesses other than typhoid fever like viral fever, gastro enteritis, malaria, tonsillitis, upper respiratory tract infections, etc. The serum levels of ADA were estimated in all the subjects who were under study. Results: The serum ADA level was found to be increased in the patients of typhoid fever as compared to that in those with other febrile illnesses and in the controls. Conclusion: From the present study, it can be concluded that there was a statistically significant increase in the serum ADA levels in the patients with typhoid. PMID:23730630

  17. Role of the single deaminase domain APOBEC3A in virus restriction, retrotransposition, DNA damage and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqiong; Schmitt, Kimberly; Guo, Kejun; Santiago, Mario L; Stephens, Edward B

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3; A3) proteins are a family of seven cytidine deaminases (A3A, A3B, A3C, A3D, A3F, A3G and A3H) that restrict certain viral infections. These innate defence factors are best known for their ability to restrict the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) lacking a functional Vif protein (HIV-1Δvif) through the deamination of cytidine residues to uridines during reverse transcription, ultimately leading to lethal G → A changes in the viral genome. The best studied of the A3 proteins has been APOBEC3G because of its potent activity against HIV-1Δvif. However, one member of this family, A3A, has biological properties that make it unique among the A3 proteins. In this review, we will focus on the structural and phylogenetic features of the human and non-human primate A3A proteins, their role in the restriction of retroviruses and other viruses, and current findings on other biological properties affected by this protein. PMID:26489798

  18. Escherichia coli ASKA Clone Library Harboring tRNA-Specific Adenosine Deaminase (tadA) Reveals Resistance towards Xanthorrhizol.

    PubMed

    Yogiara; Kim, Dooil; Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2015-01-01

    Xanthorrhizol is a potent antimicrobial compound isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma xanthorrhiza. However, the mechanism of xanthorrhizol action is unknown. To screen for probable target(s), we introduced the ASKA pooled-plasmid library into Escherichia coli W3110 imp4213 and enriched the library for resistant clones with increasing concentrations of xanthorrhizol. After three rounds of enrichment, we found nine genes that increased xanthorrhizol resistance. The resistant clones were able to grow in LB medium containing 256 µg/mL xanthorrhizol, representing a 16-fold increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration. Subsequent DNA sequence analysis revealed that overexpression of tadA, galU, fucU, ydeA, ydaC, soxS, nrdH, yiiD, and mltF genes conferred increased resistance towards xanthorrhizol. Among these nine genes, tadA is the only essential gene. tadA encodes a tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase. Overexpression of E. coli W3110 imp4213 (pCA24N-tadA) conferred resistance to xanthorrhizol up to 128 µg/mL. Moreover, overexpression of two tadA mutant enzymes (A143V and F149G) led to a twofold increase in the MIC. These results suggest that the targets of xanthorrhizol may include tadA, which has never before been explored as an antibiotic target. PMID:26370953

  19. Plasma Adenosine Deaminase Enzyme Reduces with Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Nigerian Patients: Indication for Diagnosis and Treatment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ige, O; Edem, V F; Arinola, O G

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis(TB)-specific host biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment response have been identified as priorities for TB research. Macrophage and T cell lymphocytes play vital roles in Mycobacterium tuberculosis immune response and their associated biomarkers could form good candidates for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. The enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) is produced mainly by monocytes and macrophages and increase in biological fluids in the course of infection with microorganisms infecting macrophages. This study comprised sixty-eight (68) participants; twenty-four (24) multi-drug-resistant TB(MDR-TB) patients, twenty-four (24) drug-sensitive TB patients(DS-TB) and twenty (20) non-TB apparently healthy individuals. Five (5) milliliters of blood was drawn before commencement of chemotherapy and 6 anti-TB therapy. In DSTB and MDR-TB patients before commencement of chemotherapy and 6 months of anti-TB treatment, the mean plasma levels of ADA were significantly increased compared with control. At 6 months of anti-TB chemotherapy of DSTB or MDR TB patients, ADA level was significantly decreased compared with before chemotherapy. Plasma ADA in DSTB patients before and 6 months of chemotherapy were not significantly different compared MDR TB patients. Plasma ADA level is a promising biomarker for the screening and treatment monitoring of pulmonary tuberculosis but not to differentiate MDR TB from DSTB patients. PMID:27574764

  20. The growth of brain tumors can be suppressed by multiple transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Da-Young; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Hong, Youngtae; Kim, Sujeong; Kim, Se Joong; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Cho, Kyung-Gi; Paek, Sun Ha; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2010-10-15

    Suicide genes have recently emerged as an attractive alternative therapy for the treatment of various types of intractable cancers. The efficacy of suicide gene therapy relies on efficient gene delivery to target tissues and the localized concentration of final gene products. Here, we showed a potential ex vivo therapy that used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as cellular vehicles to deliver a bacterial suicide gene, cytosine deaminase (CD) to brain tumors. MSCs were engineered to produce CD enzymes at various levels using different promoters. When co-cultured, CD-expressing MSCs had a bystander, anti-cancer effect on neighboring C6 glioma cells in proportion to the levels of CD enzymes that could convert a nontoxic prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in vitro. Consistent with the in vitro results, for early stage brain tumors induced by intracranial inoculation of C6 cells, transplantation of CD-expressing MSCs reduced tumor mass in proportion to 5-FC dosages. However, for later stage, established tumors, a single treatment was insufficient, but only multiple transplantations were able to successfully repress tumor growth. Our findings indicate that the level of total CD enzyme activity is a critical parameter that is likely to affect the clinical efficacy for CD gene therapy. Our results also highlight the potential advantages of autograftable MSCs compared with other types of allogeneic stem cells for the treatment of recurrent glioblastomas through repetitive treatments. PMID:20473873

  1. Synthesis and activities of branched-chain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in threonine deaminase mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A L; Whitfield, S M; Williams, L S

    1978-01-01

    Valyl-, isoleucyl-, and leucyl-tRNA synthetase activities were examined in an Escherichia coli K-12 strain that possessed a deletion of three genes of the ilv gene cluster, ilvD, A, and C, and in a strain with the same deletion that also carried the lambdadilvCB bacteriophage. It was observed that the branched-chain tRNA synthetase activities of both strains were considerably less than those of the normal strain during growth in unrestricted medium. Furthermore, during an isoleucine limitation, there was a further reduction in isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase activity and an absence of the isoleucine-mediated derepression of valyl-tRNA synthetase formation in both of these mutants, as compared with the normal strain. In addition, it was observed that these branched-chain synthetase activities were reduced in steady-state cultures of several ilvA point mutants. However, upon the introduction of the ilv operon to these ilvA mutants by use of lambda bacteriophage, there was a specific increase in the branched-chain synthetase activities to levels comparable to those of the normal strain. These results support our previous findings that the stability and repression control of synthesis of these synthetases require some product(s) missing in the ilvDAC deletion strain and strongly suggest this component is some form of the ilvA gene product, threonine deaminase. PMID:348689

  2. A functional genetic variation of adenosine deaminase affects the duration and intensity of deep sleep in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rétey, J. V.; Adam, M.; Honegger, E.; Khatami, R.; Luhmann, U. F. O.; Jung, H. H.; Berger, W.; Landolt, H.-P.

    2005-01-01

    Slow, rhythmic oscillations (<5 Hz) in the sleep electroencephalogram may be a sign of synaptic plasticity occurring during sleep. The oscillations, referred to as slow-wave activity (SWA), reflect sleep need and sleep intensity. The amount of SWA is homeostatically regulated. It is enhanced after sleep loss and declines during sleep. Animal studies suggested that sleep need is genetically controlled, yet the physiological mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show in humans that a genetic variant of adenosine deaminase, which is associated with the reduced metabolism of adenosine to inosine, specifically enhances deep sleep and SWA during sleep. In contrast, a distinct polymorphism of the adenosine A2A receptor gene, which was associated with interindividual differences in anxiety symptoms after caffeine intake in healthy volunteers, affects the electroencephalogram during sleep and wakefulness in a non-state-specific manner. Our findings indicate a direct role of adenosine in human sleep homeostasis. Moreover, our data suggest that genetic variability in the adenosinergic system contributes to the interindividual variability in brain electrical activity during sleep and wakefulness. PMID:16221767

  3. Editing of HIV-1 RNA by the double-stranded RNA deaminase ADAR1 stimulates viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Margherita; Neri, Francesca; Gallo, Angela; Farace, Maria Giulia; Michienzi, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on dsRNA (ADARs) are enzymes that target double-stranded regions of RNA converting adenosines into inosines (A-to-I editing) thus contributing to genome complexity and fine regulation of gene expression. It has been described that a member of the ADAR family, ADAR1, can target viruses and affect their replication process. Here we report evidence showing that ADAR1 stimulates human immuno deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by using both editing-dependent and editing-independent mechanisms. We show that over-expression of ADAR1 in HIV-1 producer cells increases viral protein accumulation in an editing-independent manner. Moreover, HIV-1 virions generated in the presence of over-expressed ADAR1 but not an editing-inactive ADAR1 mutant are released more efficiently and display enhanced infectivity, as demonstrated by challenge assays performed with T cell lines and primary CD4+ T lymphocytes. Finally, we report that ADAR1 associates with HIV-1 RNAs and edits adenosines in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) and the Rev and Tat coding sequence. Overall these results suggest that HIV-1 has evolved mechanisms to take advantage of specific RNA editing activity of the host cell and disclose a stimulatory function of ADAR1 in the spread of HIV-1. PMID:19651874

  4. Development of a capillary electrophoresis method for analyzing adenosine deaminase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase and its application in inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanfei; Li, Youxin; Bao, James J

    2016-08-01

    A novel capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for simultaneous analysis of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) in red blood cells (RBCs). The developed method considered and took advantage of the natural conversion from the ADA product, inosine to hypoxanthine. The transformation ratio was introduced for ADA and PNP analysis to obtain more reliable results. After optimizing the enzymatic incubation and electrophoresis separation conditions, the determined activities of ADA and PNP in 12 human RBCs were 0.237-0.833 U/ml and 9.013-10.453 U/ml packed cells, respectively. The analysis of ADA in mice RBCs indicated that there was an apparent activity difference between healthy and hepatoma mice. In addition, the proposed method was also successfully applied in the inhibitor screening from nine traditional Chinese medicines, and data showed that ADA activities were strongly inhibited by Rhizoma Chuanxiong and Angelica sinensis. The inhibition effect of Angelica sinensis on ADA is first reported here and could also inhibit PNP activity. PMID:27173606

  5. Cytidine Deaminase Axis Modulated by miR-484 Differentially Regulates Cell Proliferation and Chemoresistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fu-Gui; Song, Chuan-Gui; Cao, Zhi-Gang; Xia, Chen; Chen, Dan-Na; Chen, Li; Li, Shan; Qiao, Feng; Ling, Hong; Yao, Ling; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2015-04-01

    There has been little study of how the evolution of chemoresistance in cancer affects other aspects of disease pathogenesis. Here, we show that an important chemoresistance axis driven by cytidine deaminase (CDA) also acts to suppress cell-cycle progression by regulating cyclin E-CDK2 signaling. We found that CDA was regulated by miR-484 in a gemcitabine-resistant model of breast cancer. Elevating miR-484 expression reversed the CDA effects, thereby enhancing gemcitabine sensitivity, accelerating cell proliferation, and redistributing cell-cycle progression. Conversely, elevating CDA to restore its expression counteracted the chemosensitization and cell proliferative effects of miR-484. In clinical specimens of breast cancer, CDA expression was frequently downregulated and inversely correlated with miR-484 expression. Moreover, high expression of CDA was associated with prolonged disease-free survival in studied cohorts. Collectively, our findings established that miR-484-modulated CDA has a dual impact in promoting chemoresistance and suppressing cell proliferation in breast cancer, illustrating the pathogenic tradeoffs associated with the evolution of chemoresistance in this malignant disease. PMID:25643696

  6. MicroRNA-146b-3p regulates retinal inflammation by suppressing adenosine deaminase-2 in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fulzele, Sadanand; El-Sherbini, Ahmed; Ahmad, Saif; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Matragoon, Suraporn; El-Remessy, Azza; Radhakrishnan, Reshmitha; Liou, Gregory I

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia- (HG-) Amadori-glycated albumin- (AGA-) induced activation of microglia and monocytes and their adherence to retinal vascular endothelial cells contribute to retinal inflammation leading to diabetic retinopathy (DR). There is a great need for early detection of DR before demonstrable tissue damages become irreversible. Extracellular adenosine, required for endogenous anti-inflammation, is regulated by the interplay of equilibrative nucleoside transporter with adenosine deaminase (ADA) and adenosine kinase. ADA, including ADA1 and ADA2, exists in all organisms. However, because ADA2 gene has not been identified in mouse genome, how diabetes alters adenosine-dependent anti-inflammation remains unclear. Studies of pig retinal microglia and human macrophages revealed a causal role of ADA2 in inflammation. Database search suggested miR-146b-3p recognition sites in the 3'-UTR of ADA2 mRNA. Coexpression of miR-146b-3p, but not miR-146-5p or nontargeting miRNA, with 3'-UTR of the ADA2 gene was necessary to suppress a linked reporter gene. In the vitreous of diabetic patients, decreased miR-146b-3p is associated with increased ADA2 activity. Ectopic expression of miR-146b-3p suppressed ADA2 expression, activity, and TNF-α release in the AGA-treated human macrophages. These results suggest a regulatory role of miR-146b-3p in diabetes related retinal inflammation by suppressing ADA2. PMID:25815338

  7. Localization of a bidirectional DNA replication origin in the native locus and in episomally amplified murine adenosine deaminase loci.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, S M; DeRose, M L; Kolman, J L; Nonet, G H; Kelly, R E; Wahl, G M

    1993-01-01

    Gene amplification is frequently mediated by the initial production of acentric, autonomously replicating extrachromosomal elements. The 4,000 extrachromosomal copies of the mouse adenosine deaminase (ADA) amplicon in B-1/50 cells initiate their replication remarkably synchronously in early S phase and at approximately the same time as the single-copy chromosomal locus from which they were derived. The abundance of ADA sequences and favorable replication timing characteristics in this system led us to determine whether DNA replication initiates in ADA episomes within a preferred region and whether this region is the same as that used at the corresponding chromosomal locus prior to amplification. This study reports the detection and localization of a discrete set of DNA fragments in the ADA amplicon which label soon after release of synchronized B-1/50 cells into S phase. A switch in template strand complementarity of Okazaki fragments, indicative of the initiation of bidirectional DNA replication, was found to lie within the same region. This putative replication origin is located approximately 28.5 kbp upstream of the 5' end of the ADA gene. The same region initiated DNA replication in the single-copy ADA locus of the parental cells. These analyses provide the first evidence that the replication of episomal intermediates involved in gene amplification initiates within a preferred region and that the same region is used to initiate DNA synthesis within the native locus. Images PMID:8474455

  8. AIDS is your business.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sydney; Simon, Jonathon; Vincent, Jeffrey R; MacLeod, William; Fox, Matthew; Thea, Donald M

    2003-02-01

    If your company operates in a developing country, AIDS is your business. While Africa has received the most attention, AIDS is also spreading swiftly in other parts of the world. Russia and Ukraine had the fastest-growing epidemics last year, and many experts believe China and India will suffer the next tidal wave of infection. Why should executives be concerned about AIDS? Because it is destroying the twin rationales of globalization strategy-cheap labor and fast-growing markets--in countries where people are heavily affected by the epidemic. Fortunately, investments in programs that prevent infection and provide treatment for employees who have HIV/AIDS are profitable for many businesses--that is, they lead to savings that outweigh the programs' costs. Due to the long latency period between HIV infection and the onset of AIDS symptoms, a company is not likely to see any of the costs of HIV/AIDS until five to ten years after an employee is infected. But executives can calculate the present value of epidemic-related costs by using the discount rate to weigh each cost according to its expected timing. That allows companies to think about expenses on HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programs as investments rather than merely as costs. The authors found that the annual cost of AIDS to six corporations in South Africa and Botswana ranged from 0.4% to 5.9% of the wage bill. All six companies would have earned positive returns on their investments if they had provided employees with free treatment for HIV/AIDS in the form of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), according to the mathematical model the authors used. The annual reduction in the AIDS "tax" would have been as much as 40.4%. The authors' conclusion? Fighting AIDS not only helps those infected; it also makes good business sense. PMID:12577655

  9. AIDS and student attitudes.

    PubMed

    Merrill, J M; Laux, L; Thornby, J I

    1989-04-01

    When recently polled, one half of 4,100 physicians believed they had the right not to treat patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and 15% said they would actually refuse to care for them. To assure medical care for the 365,000 AIDS patients projected for the US by 1992, it is imperative to know whether there is something unique about AIDS patients that produces aversion among physicians. We hypothesized that the desire to avoid AIDS patients derived from three fears: fear of contagion, homophobia, and a desire to avoid dying patients. To identify the extent to which these three fears affect the attitudes that students hold toward AIDS patients, we conducted three studies. In our first study, we discovered that students' views about a patient with a terminal illness are the same whether the illness is leukemia or AIDS. In the second study, we found that the patient's sexual preference was not the major reason students would avoid an AIDS patients. In a third study, we confirmed that fear of contagion is the principal cause of students' desire to avoid an AIDS patient. In the course of these studies, we found important differences between the attitudes of male and female students. Female students scored lower on the homophobic scale than male students, and they had less antipathy toward AIDS patients. Helping health care professionals understand their fears toward patients with AIDS will in the long run improve medical care. Since the origins of these fears are for the most part well hidden in our unconscious, dissemination of facts alone will not do the job. Interventions are needed to help health care professionals acknowledge and overcome their negative feelings about AIDS. PMID:2705068

  10. AIDS Epidemiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Fouad Lazhar

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present mathematical modelling of the spread of infection in the context of the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These models are based in part on the models suggested in the field of th AIDS mathematical modelling as reported by ISHAM [6].

  11. International Aid to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavot, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence highlights several worrisome trends regarding aid pledges and disbursements, which have been exacerbated by the global financial crisis. First, while overall development assistance rose in 2008, after 2 years of decline, the share of all sector aid going to the education sector has remained virtually unchanged at about 12 percent…

  12. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  13. Health Aides Serve...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huscher, John

    1976-01-01

    The student health aide program of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln is a paid, auxiliary, trained health position in dorms, co-ops, and Greek houses, with personnel evaluated on the assistance provided for any physical, personal, social, or environmental health concerns students may have in accordance with the aide's training. (MB)

  14. [Oral hygiene aids].

    PubMed

    Hovius, M; Leemans, G J

    1994-05-01

    Different dental hygiene aids are discussed, such as floss, tape, superfloss, gauze, flat shoelace, toothpick, interproximal brush, single-tufted brush, electric toothbrush, manual toothbrush and oral irrigation. Research shows that not one specific aid is superior to another if effectiveness is taken into consideration. Other factors which can influence oral hygiene efficacy are discussed as well. PMID:11830968

  15. A New AIDS Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    1993-01-01

    Thousands of young people are affected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) that causes the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). An effective AIDS education program must address functional knowledge, relevant skills, and motivation. The program must be comprehensive and taught by trained teachers. Lists a source of an annotated…

  16. [Epidemiology of AIDS].

    PubMed

    1988-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that some 300,000 AIDS cases will be diagnosed by the end of 1988. As of December 1987, 128 countries had reported a total of 72,000 cases, about half the number of cases that actually occurred. The WHO estimates that some 5-10 million persons are already infected with HIV, so that the number of AIDS cases will increase rapidly for the next 5 years at least. The number of cases reported in Africa increased considerably in 1987, reflecting greater awareness of AIDS and greater efforts at control. By late 1987 WHO was working actively with over 100 countries to combat AIDS. An expert meeting organized by the WHO Special Program to Combat AIDS recommended to governments and prison administrators that condoms be provided to inmates and that treatment programs be provided for intravenous drug addicts. Prison personnel should receive education about HIV infection and AIDS. Incarceration policies, especially for drug addicts, should be reviewed in light of the AIDS epidemic. An estimated average of 10% of the 270,000 prisoners enumerated in 17 European countries are believed to be HIV positive, but the proportion increases to 26% in the highest risk countries. The proportion of seropositive subjects in general exceeds that in the total population. Prison and health officials will be obliged to assign increasing resources to AIDS in prisons in the years to come. PMID:3201571

  17. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF TRAINING AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEONE, CHARLES J.

    THIS COMPILATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL AIDS FOR USE IN AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION TRAINING PROGRAMS CONTAINS LISTS OF VISUAL AND AUDIOVISUAL TRAINING AIDS AND GUEST LECTURERS AVAILABLE FROM MEMBER COMPANIES OF THE AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION INSTITUTE AS AN INDUSTRY SERVICE TO SCHOOL OFFICIALS INTERESTED IN CONDUCTING SUCH PROGRAMS. THE…

  18. AIDS and Chemical Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Melvin I.

    After defining HIV and the AIDS disease and outlining symptoms and means of infection, this fact sheet lists the ways alcohol and drugs are involved with the AIDS epidemic, noting that needle-sharing transmits the virus; that alcohol or mood-altering drugs like crack cocaine cause disinhibition, increase sex drive, encourage sex for drugs, and…

  19. What about AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyfuss, Katharine R.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Suggests ways in which camp directors can establish procedures for making appropriate decisions about accepting campers/staff workers with AIDS. Reviews aspects of environmental sanitation, physical health, confidentiality, camper/staff drug use and sexual behavior, medical…

  20. Cutaneous acanthamoebiasis in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Torno, M S; Babapour, R; Gurevitch, A; Witt, M D

    2000-02-01

    Acanthamoeba is a recognized pathogen in the immunocompromised patient, commonly presenting as chronic or subacute encephalitis. However, cutaneous disease in the absence of CNS involvement is increasingly recognized, especially in the setting of chronic, nonhealing skin lesions in the patient with AIDS. We describe a patient with AIDS and cutaneous acanthamoebiasis and review our experience with treatment and diagnosis. PMID:10640931

  1. AIDS Fact Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    The three fact sheets presented in this document address issues surrounding adolescent sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), especially the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The first fact sheet, "Young Women and AIDS: A Worldwide Perspective," suggests that since open discussions of adolescent sexuality have long been…

  2. AIDS PUBLIC INFORMATION DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The AIDS Public Information Data Set is computer software designed to run on a Microsoft Windows microcomputer, and contains information abstracted from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases reported in the United States. The data set is created by the Division of HIV/A...

  3. Preventing AIDS via Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Reese M.; Walker, Catherine M.

    1993-01-01

    Compares the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic to past epidemics, including social and political responses. Identifies populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Discusses current social and economic factors affecting AIDS education programs. Makes recommendations and identifies resources for starting…

  4. Aid, Development, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klees, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The world faces pervasive poverty and inequality. Hundreds of billions of dollars in international aid have been given or loaned to developing countries though bilateral and multilateral mechanisms, at least, ostensibly, in order to do something about these problems. Has such aid helped? Debates around this question have been ongoing for decades,…

  5. Games and Teaching Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

    This document is filled with suggestions for inexpensive teacher-made classroom aids that can be used for concept reinforcement with the total class, a small group, or individual students. The games and teaching aids provided, allow instructors to provide the motivational drill to develop speed and accuracy for basic computational skills. The…

  6. Teaching Children about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koop, C. Everett

    1987-01-01

    Calls for more education as the immediate preventative measure against acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Discusses the known ways that AIDS is transmitted and cautions that many innocent people may also contract the disease. Promotes the presentation of accurate and personally sensitive information to children. (TW)

  7. AIDS: Children Too.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Genevieve, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This journal issue is devoted to the many problems faced by children with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) who live in both developing and developed countries. Section 1 provides general information on the pandemic, defining AIDS and exploring the social aspects of the disease. It also addresses child health, child mortality, moral and…

  8. Trends in Student Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board, Washington, DC. Washington Office.

    This report presents annual data on the amount of financial assistance available to postsecondary students in the form of grants, loans, and work-study. The data cover virtually all federal aid and most state and institutional assistance; not included in the study is financial aid in the form of indirect subsidies, students' wages, employer-paid…

  9. Transcriptional stalling in B-lymphocytes: a mechanism for antibody diversification and maintenance of genomic integrity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianbo; Rothschild, Gerson; Pefanis, Evangelos; Basu, Uttiya

    2013-01-01

    B cells utilize three DNA alteration strategies-V(D)J recombination, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR)-to somatically mutate their genome, thereby expressing a plethora of antibodies tailor-made against the innumerable antigens they encounter while in circulation. Of these three events, the single-strand DNA cytidine deaminase, Activation Induced cytidine Deaminase (AID), is responsible for SHM and CSR. Recent advances, discussed in this review article, point toward various components of RNA polymerase II "stalling" machinery as regulators of AID activity during antibody diversification and maintenance of B cell genome integrity. PMID:23584095

  10. Signaling Mechanism of Cannabinoid Receptor-2 Activation-Induced β-Endorphin Release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fang; Zhang, Ling-Hong; Su, Tang-Feng; Li, Lin; Zhou, Rui; Peng, Miao; Wu, Cai-Hua; Yuan, Xiao-Cui; Sun, Ning; Meng, Xian-Fang; Tian, Bo; Shi, Jing; Pan, Hui-Lin; Li, Man

    2016-08-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) results in β-endorphin release from keratinocytes, which then acts on primary afferent neurons to inhibit nociception. However, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The CB2 receptor is generally thought to couple to Gi/o to inhibit cAMP production, which cannot explain the peripheral stimulatory effects of CB2 receptor activation. In this study, we found that in a keratinocyte cell line, the Gβγ subunits from Gi/o, but not Gαs, were involved in CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Inhibition of MAPK kinase, but not PLC, abolished CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Also, CB2 receptor activation significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+). Treatment with BAPTA-AM or thapsigargin blocked CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release. Using a rat model of inflammatory pain, we showed that the MAPK kinase inhibitor PD98059 abolished the peripheral effect of the CB2 receptor agonist on nociception. We thus present a novel mechanism of CB2 receptor activation-induced β-endorphin release through Gi/o-Gβγ-MAPK-Ca(2+) signaling pathway. Our data also suggest that stimulation of MAPK contributes to the peripheral analgesic effect of CB2 receptor agonists. PMID:26108183

  11. Measles Virus Defective Interfering RNAs Are Generated Frequently and Early in the Absence of C Protein and Can Be Destabilized by Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1-Like Hypermutations

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Christian K.; Mastorakos, George M.; Matchett, William E.; Ma, Xiao; Samuel, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defective interfering RNAs (DI-RNAs) of the viral genome can form during infections of negative-strand RNA viruses and outgrow full-length viral genomes, thereby modulating the severity and duration of infection. Here we document the frequent de novo generation of copy-back DI-RNAs from independent rescue events both for a vaccine measles virus (vac2) and for a wild-type measles virus (IC323) as early as passage 1 after virus rescue. Moreover, vaccine and wild-type C-protein-deficient (C-protein-knockout [CKO]) measles viruses generated about 10 times more DI-RNAs than parental virus, suggesting that C enhances the processivity of the viral polymerase. We obtained the nucleotide sequences of 65 individual DI-RNAs, identified breakpoints and reinitiation sites, and predicted their structural features. Several DI-RNAs possessed clusters of A-to-G or U-to-C transitions. Sequences flanking these mutation sites were characteristic of those favored by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1), which catalyzes in double-stranded RNA the C-6 deamination of adenosine to produce inosine, which is recognized as guanosine, a process known as A-to-I RNA editing. In individual DI-RNAs the transitions were of the same type and occurred on both sides of the breakpoint. These patterns of mutations suggest that ADAR1 edits unencapsidated DI-RNAs that form double-strand RNA structures. Encapsidated DI-RNAs were incorporated into virus particles, which reduced the infectivity of virus stocks. The CKO phenotype was dominant: DI-RNAs derived from vac2 with a CKO suppressed the replication of vac2, as shown by coinfections of interferon-incompetent lymphatic cells with viruses expressing different fluorescent reporter proteins. In contrast, coinfection with a C-protein-expressing virus did not counteract the suppressive phenotype of DI-RNAs. IMPORTANCE Recombinant measles viruses (MVs) are in clinical trials as cancer therapeutics and as vectored vaccines for HIV-AIDS and

  12. Health care and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Peck, J; Bezold, C

    1992-07-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a harbinger for change in health care. There are many powerful forces poised to transform the industrialized health care structure of the twentieth century, and AIDS may act as either a catalyst or an amplifier for these forces. AIDS could, for example, swamp local resources and thereby help trigger national reform in a health care system that has already lost public confidence. AIDS can also hasten the paradigm shift that is occurring throughout health care. Many of the choices society will confront when dealing with AIDS carry implications beyond health care. Information about who has the disease, for example, already pits traditional individual rights against group interests. Future information systems could make discrimination based upon medical records a nightmare for a growing number of individuals. Yet these systems also offer the hope of accelerated progress against not only AIDS but other major health threats as well. The policy choices that will define society's response to AIDS can best be made in the context of a clearly articulated vision of a society that reflects our deepest values. PMID:10119289

  13. Hearing Aids and Music

    PubMed Central

    Chasin, Marshall; Russo, Frank A.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the primary concern for hearing aid design and fitting is optimization for speech inputs. However, increasingly other types of inputs are being investigated and this is certainly the case for music. Whether the hearing aid wearer is a musician or merely someone who likes to listen to music, the electronic and electro-acoustic parameters described can be optimized for music as well as for speech. That is, a hearing aid optimally set for music can be optimally set for speech, even though the converse is not necessarily true. Similarities and differences between speech and music as inputs to a hearing aid are described. Many of these lead to the specification of a set of optimal electro-acoustic characteristics. Parameters such as the peak input-limiting level, compression issues—both compression ratio and knee-points—and number of channels all can deleteriously affect music perception through hearing aids. In other cases, it is not clear how to set other parameters such as noise reduction and feedback control mechanisms. Regardless of the existence of a “music program,” unless the various electro-acoustic parameters are available in a hearing aid, music fidelity will almost always be less than optimal. There are many unanswered questions and hypotheses in this area. Future research by engineers, researchers, clinicians, and musicians will aid in the clarification of these questions and their ultimate solutions. PMID:15497032

  14. AIDS in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Singh, J; Che'Rus, S; Chong, S; Chong, Y K; Crofts, N

    1994-01-01

    The first people to be infected with HIV in Malaysia were mainly homosexual men with foreign connections. IV drug users, however, rapidly became the population group with the highest prevalence of HIV. Accurate, timely data are needed in order to responsibly describe the pattern of HIV infection and AIDS in any given setting. In Malaysia, however, there has been little systematic surveillance in population groups other than blood donors. This surveillance indicates the existence of a rapidly increasing rate of seropositivity among blood donors. Otherwise, many people are loathe to undergo voluntary HIV testing to determine their serostatus. Moreover, some people with STDs avoid contact with the health system and the potential for HIV testing. The extent to which AIDS cases are underreported or reported late is unknown. On the other hand, an estimated 10% of notified AIDS cases have been wrongly classified as such. The lack of hard data on HIV/AIDS in Malaysia makes it difficult to project the future course of the epidemic in the country. Since Malaysia shares a land border with Thailand and there is much sea-borne traffic between the two countries, it is highly possible that Malaysia will experience a significant epidemic of HIV infection similar to its neighbors. A National AIDS Committee was established April 1985 to develop responses to the HIV epidemic, while the National AIDS Program Manager of the Ministry of Health is responsible for controlling STDs. A national plan of action for the prevention and control of AIDS, drawn up in 1985 and revised in 1988, includes planning for the continued surveillance of HIV infection and AIDS through existing notification systems, and for screening and sentinel programs for IV drug users, prostitutes, and STD patients. Recent nongovernmental organization responses complement government efforts to prevent HIV and AIDS in Malaysia. PMID:7857575

  15. American Foundation for AIDS Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Press Corporate Support amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research Research Overview Research Grants Research Accomplishments Scientific ... Archive TREAT Asia TREAT Asia About TREAT Asia AIDS in Asia Research and Treatment Education and AIDS ...

  16. HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... Victoria Cargill talks to students about HIV and AIDS at the opening of a National Library of ...

  17. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the body’s immune ... and often leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Each year in the United States, between 55, ...

  18. Research Report: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports » HIV/AIDS » Letter from the Director HIV/AIDS Email Facebook Twitter Letter from the Director Human ... the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) — has been with us for three decades now. ...

  19. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 ... turn Javascript on. Photo: The NAMES Project Foundation HIV and AIDS are a global catastrophe. While advances ...

  20. AIDS Training in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Jusanne M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Management training regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) begins with three needs assessment tools--instruments measuring fear of AIDS, knowledge of AIDS, and beliefs about the business consequences of the disease. (SK)

  1. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  2. [Implantable hearing aids].

    PubMed

    Luers, J C; Beutner, D; Hüttenbrink, K-B

    2011-10-01

    Strictly speaking, implantable hearing aids are technical systems that process audiological signals and convey these by direct mechanical stimulation of the ossicular chain or cochlea. They have certain benefits over conventional hearing aids in terms of wearing comfort and general acceptance. As current studies lack convincing audiological results, the indications for implantable hearing aids are primarily of medical or cosmetic nature. To date, three systems are available in Germany: Vibrant Soundbridge®, Carina®, and Esteem®. Because the performance of the different implantable and nonimplantable hearing systems together with various surgical procedures are currently undergoing major changes, audiological indications may also develop in the future. PMID:21956678

  3. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  4. Pyrimidine Pool Disequilibrium Induced by a Cytidine Deaminase Deficiency Inhibits PARP-1 Activity, Leading to the Under Replication of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gemble, Simon; Ahuja, Akshay; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Dairou, Julien; Biard, Denis S. F.; Lambert, Sarah; Lopes, Massimo; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2015-01-01

    Genome stability is jeopardized by imbalances of the dNTP pool; such imbalances affect the rate of fork progression. For example, cytidine deaminase (CDA) deficiency leads to an excess of dCTP, slowing the replication fork. We describe here a novel mechanism by which pyrimidine pool disequilibrium compromises the completion of replication and chromosome segregation: the intracellular accumulation of dCTP inhibits PARP-1 activity. CDA deficiency results in incomplete DNA replication when cells enter mitosis, leading to the formation of ultrafine anaphase bridges between sister-chromatids at “difficult-to-replicate” sites such as centromeres and fragile sites. Using molecular combing, electron microscopy and a sensitive assay involving cell imaging to quantify steady-state PAR levels, we found that DNA replication was unsuccessful due to the partial inhibition of basal PARP-1 activity, rather than slower fork speed. The stimulation of PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells restores replication and, thus, chromosome segregation. Moreover, increasing intracellular dCTP levels generates under-replication-induced sister-chromatid bridges as efficiently as PARP-1 knockdown. These results have direct implications for Bloom syndrome (BS), a rare genetic disease combining susceptibility to cancer and genomic instability. BS results from mutation of the BLM gene, encoding BLM, a RecQ 3’-5’ DNA helicase, a deficiency of which leads to CDA downregulation. BS cells thus have a CDA defect, resulting in a high frequency of ultrafine anaphase bridges due entirely to dCTP-dependent PARP-1 inhibition and independent of BLM status. Our study describes previously unknown pathological consequences of the distortion of dNTP pools and reveals an unexpected role for PARP-1 in preventing DNA under-replication and chromosome segregation defects. PMID:26181065

  5. Opposing Activity Changes in AMP Deaminase and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in the Hibernating Ground Squirrel

    PubMed Central

    Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E.; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A.; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel. PMID:25856396

  6. Adenosine deaminase inhibition enhances the inotropic response mediated by A1 adenosine receptor in hyperthyroid guinea pig atrium.

    PubMed

    Kemeny-Beke, Adam; Jakab, Anita; Zsuga, Judit; Vecsernyes, Miklos; Karsai, Denes; Pasztor, Fanni; Grenczer, Maria; Szentmiklosi, Andras Jozsef; Berta, Andras; Gesztelyi, Rudolf

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that inhibition of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enhances the efficiency of signal-transduction of myocardial A1 adenosine receptors in hyperthyroidism. The inotropic response to N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist resistant to ADA, was investigated in the absence or presence of erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA), an ADA and cGMP-stimulated 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE2) inhibitor, or of pentostatin (2'-deoxycoformycin; DCF), an exclusive ADA inhibitor, in left atria isolated from eu- or hyperthyroid guinea pigs. Both ADA inhibitors enhanced the effect of CPA only in hyperthyroid atria. EHNA significantly increased the Emax (mean+/-S.E.M.) from 83.8+/-1.2% to 93.4+/-1.2%, while DCF significantly decreased the logEC50 from -7.5+/-0.07 to -7.83+/-0.07 in hyperthyroid samples. Conversely, EHNA also diminished the logEC50 (from -7.5+/-0.07 to -7.65+/-0.07) and DCF also raised the Emax (from 83.8+/-1.2% to 85.7+/-2%) in hyperthyroidism, but these changes were not significant. In conclusion, ADA inhibition moderately but significantly enhanced the efficiency of A(1) adenosine receptor signaling pathway in the hyperthyroid guinea pig atrium. This suggests that elevated intracellular adenosine level caused by ADA inhibition may improve the suppressed responsiveness to A1 adenosine receptor agonists associated with the hyperthyroid state. Alternatively or in addition, the role of decreased concentration of adenosine degradation products cannot be excluded. Furthermore, in the case of EHNA, inhibition of PDE2 also appears to contribute to the enhanced A1 adenosine receptor signaling in the hyperthyroid guinea pig atrium. PMID:17574432

  7. Opposing activity changes in AMP deaminase and AMP-activated protein kinase in the hibernating ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, Miguel A; Epperson, L Elaine; Li, Nanxing; Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T; Rivard, Christopher J; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L; Johnson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel. PMID:25856396

  8. Hypoxia imaging predicts success of hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lee, B-F; Lee, C-H; Chiu, N-T; Hsia, C-C; Shen, L-H; Shiau, A-L

    2012-04-01

    Tc-99m-HL91 is a hypoxia imaging biomarker. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of Tc-99m-HL91 imaging for hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model. C57BL/6 mice were implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells transduced with the hypoxia-inducible promoter-driven CD gene (LL2/CD) or luciferase gene (LL2/Luc) serving as the control. When tumor volumes reached 100 mm(3), pretreatment images were acquired after injection of Tc-99m-HL91. The mice were divided into low and high hypoxic groups based on the tumor-to-non-tumor ratio of Tc-99m-HL91. They were injected daily with 5-FC (500 mg kg(-1)) or the vehicle for 1 week. When tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3), autoradiography and histological examinations were performed. Treatment with 5-FC delayed tumor growth and enhanced the survival of mice bearing high hypoxic LL2/CD tumors. The therapeutic effect of hypoxia-induced CD/5-FC gene therapy was more pronounced in high hypoxic tumors than in low hypoxic tumors. This study provides the first evidence that Tc-99m-HL91 can serve as an imaging biomarker for predicting the treatment responses of hypoxia-regulated CD/5-FC gene therapy in animal tumor models. Our results suggest that hypoxia imaging using Tc-99m-HL91 has the predictive value for the success of hypoxia-directed treatment regimens. PMID:22281757

  9. Update on the safety and efficacy of retroviral gene therapy for immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cicalese, Maria Pia; Ferrua, Francesca; Castagnaro, Laura; Pajno, Roberta; Barzaghi, Federica; Giannelli, Stefania; Dionisio, Francesca; Brigida, Immacolata; Bonopane, Marco; Casiraghi, Miriam; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Grunebaum, Eyal; Adeli, Mehdi; Bredius, Robbert G; Puck, Jennifer M; Stepensky, Polina; Tezcan, Ilhan; Rolfe, Katie; De Boever, Erika; Reinhardt, Rickey R; Appleby, Jonathan; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive systemic metabolic disease characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). The treatment of choice for ADA-deficient SCID (ADA-SCID) is hematopoietic stem cell transplant from an HLA-matched sibling donor, although <25% of patients have such a donor available. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) partially and temporarily relieves immunodeficiency. We investigated the medium-term outcome of gene therapy (GT) in 18 patients with ADA-SCID for whom an HLA-identical family donor was not available; most were not responding well to ERT. Patients were treated with an autologous CD34(+)-enriched cell fraction that contained CD34(+) cells transduced with a retroviral vector encoding the human ADA complementary DNA sequence (GSK2696273) as part of single-arm, open-label studies or compassionate use programs. Overall survival was 100% over 2.3 to 13.4 years (median, 6.9 years). Gene-modified cells were stably present in multiple lineages throughout follow up. GT resulted in a sustained reduction in the severe infection rate from 1.17 events per person-year to 0.17 events per person-year (n = 17, patient 1 data not available). Immune reconstitution was demonstrated by normalization of T-cell subsets (CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+)), evidence of thymopoiesis, and sustained T-cell proliferative capacity. B-cell function was evidenced by immunoglobulin production, decreased intravenous immunoglobulin use, and antibody response after vaccination. All 18 patients reported infections as adverse events; infections of respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts were reported most frequently. No events indicative of leukemic transformation were reported. Trial details were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00598481. PMID:27129325

  10. A novel association of adenosine deaminase with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a propensity score analysis from a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Hu, Cui-Fen; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Hai-Feng; Yang, Xiang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Prior work has identified age, body mass index, underlying heart disease, and other comorbidities as risk factors for atrial fibrillation. To date, studies have examined single baseline measures of traditional risk factors, and data on biomarker associations are lacking. Objective We sought to explore novel biochemical measures possibly associated with incident PAF after balancing the traditional risk factors. Methods Men or women aged ≥18 years that were hospitalized between 1st Jan. 2010 and 31st Dec. 2013 for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) and for health checkup (non-PAF) were included. We used propensity score methods to mitigate the influence of the nonrandom selection of PAF and non-PAF patients. Logistic regression was applied for analysis of risk factors for PAF. Results A total of 1,802 eligible patients were identified, in whom, 895 patients had at least one exclusion criterion. After excluding these patients, the total analytic cohort numbered 907 patients. Of these, 779 patients were for control group and 128 patients were for PAF group. Propensity score matching was used to obtain a balanced cohort of 124 patients per group. The PAF and non-PAF groups were well matched on demographic and clinical characteristics after propensity matching. Risk factors for PAF on multivariate stepwise logistic regression model included adenosine deaminase (ADA) [odds ratio (OR) =0.9160, P=0.015, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8536-0.9829], mitral valvular regurgitation (OR =3.4611, P=0.001, 95% CI: 1.7000-7.0467) and left atrial diameter (OR =1.0913, P=0.001, 95% CI: 1.0387-1.1465). Only the ADA was a protective factor for the occurrence of PAF. Conclusions The ADA seems to be associated with PAF. The current study provides new insights into the prevention and treatment of PAF. PMID:25973232

  11. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity in isolated rat adipocytes incubated with glucagon. Interactions with the effects of insulin, adrenaline and adenosine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, Victor A.; Corstorphine, Clark G.

    1982-01-01

    1. Adipocytes isolated from epididymal fat-pads of fed rats were incubated with different concentrations of glucagon, insulin, adrenaline and adenosine deaminase, and the effects of these agents on the `initial' activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the cells were studied. 2. Glucagon (at concentrations between 0.1 and 10nm) inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Maximal inhibition was approx. 70% of the `control' activity in the absence of added hormone, and the concentration of hormone required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.3–0.5nm-glucagon. 3. Incubation of cells with adenosine deaminase resulted in a similar inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Preincubation of adipocytes with adenosine deaminase did not alter either the sensitivity of carboxylase activity to increasing concentrations of glucagon or the maximal extent of inhibition. 4. Adrenaline inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase to the same extent as glucagon. Preincubation of the cells with glucagon did not alter the sensitivity of enzyme activity to adrenaline or the degree of maximal inhibition. 5. Insulin activated the enzyme by 70–80% of `control' activity. Preincubation of the cells with glucagon did not alter the concentration of insulin required to produce half the maximal stimulatory effect (about 12μunits of insulin/ml). The effects of insulin and glucagon appeared to be mediated completely independently, and were approximately quantitatively similar but opposite. These characteristics resulted in the mutual cancellation of the effects of the two hormones when they were both present at equally effective concentrations. 6. The implications of these findings with regard to current concepts about the mechanism of regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and to the regulation of the enzyme in vivo are discussed. PMID:6131671

  12. Identification and Characterization of d-Hydroxyproline Dehydrogenase and Δ1-Pyrroline-4-hydroxy-2-carboxylate Deaminase Involved in Novel l-Hydroxyproline Metabolism of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Seiya; Morimoto, Daichi; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Shinomiya, Hiroto; Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Sasai, Yuuki; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    l-Hydroxyproline (4-hydroxyproline) mainly exists in collagen, and most bacteria cannot metabolize this hydroxyamino acid. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa convert l-hydroxyproline to α-ketoglutarate via four hypothetical enzymatic steps different from known mammalian pathways, but the molecular background is rather unclear. Here, we identified and characterized for the first time two novel enzymes, d-hydroxyproline dehydrogenase and Δ1-pyrroline-4-hydroxy-2-carboxylate (Pyr4H2C) deaminase, involved in this hypothetical pathway. These genes were clustered together with genes encoding other catalytic enzymes on the bacterial genomes. d-Hydroxyproline dehydrogenases from P. putida and P. aeruginosa were completely different from known bacterial proline dehydrogenases and showed similar high specificity for substrate (d-hydroxyproline) and some artificial electron acceptor(s). On the other hand, the former is a homomeric enzyme only containing FAD as a prosthetic group, whereas the latter is a novel heterododecameric structure consisting of three different subunits (α4β4γ4), and two FADs, FMN, and [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster were contained in αβγ of the heterotrimeric unit. These results suggested that the l-hydroxyproline pathway clearly evolved convergently in P. putida and P. aeruginosa. Pyr4H2C deaminase is a unique member of the dihydrodipicolinate synthase/N-acetylneuraminate lyase protein family, and its activity was competitively inhibited by pyruvate, a common substrate for other dihydrodipicolinate synthase/N-acetylneuraminate lyase proteins. Furthermore, disruption of Pyr4H2C deaminase genes led to loss of growth on l-hydroxyproline (as well as d-hydroxyproline) but not l- and d-proline, indicating that this pathway is related only to l-hydroxyproline degradation, which is not linked to proline metabolism. PMID:22833679

  13. Crystal structures of Salmonella typhimurium biodegradative threonine deaminase and its complex with CMP provide structural insights into ligand-induced oligomerization and enzyme activation.

    PubMed

    Simanshu, Dhirendra K; Savithri, Handanahal S; Murthy, Mathur R N

    2006-12-22

    Two different pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-containing l-threonine deaminases (EC 4.3.1.19), biosynthetic and biodegradative, which catalyze the deamination of l-threonine to alpha-ketobutyrate, are present in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) catalyzes the first reaction in the anaerobic breakdown of l-threonine to propionate. TdcB, unlike the biosynthetic threonine deaminase, is insensitive to l-isoleucine and is activated by AMP. In the present study, TdcB from S. typhimurium was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli. In the presence of AMP or CMP, the recombinant enzyme was converted to the tetrameric form accompanied by significant enzyme activation. To provide insights into ligand-mediated oligomerization and enzyme activation, crystal structures of S. typhimurium TdcB and its complex with CMP were determined. In the native structure, TdcB is in a dimeric form, whereas in the TdcB.CMP complex, it exists in a tetrameric form with 222 symmetry and appears as a dimer of dimers. Tetrameric TdcB binds to four molecules of CMP, two at each of the dimer interfaces. Comparison of the dimer structure in the ligand (CMP)-free and -bound forms suggests that the changes induced by ligand binding at the dimer interface are essential for tetramerization. The differences observed in the tertiary and quaternary structures of TdcB in the absence and presence of CMP appear to account for enzyme activation and increased binding affinity for l-threonine. Comparison of TdcB with related pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes points to structural and mechanistic similarities. PMID:17046821

  14. Alpha-keto acids are novel siderophores in the genera Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella and are produced by amino acid deaminases.

    PubMed Central

    Drechsel, H; Thieken, A; Reissbrodt, R; Jung, G; Winkelmann, G

    1993-01-01

    Growth promotion and iron transport studies revealed that certain alpha-keto acids generated by amino acid deaminases, by enterobacteria of the Proteus-Providencia-Morganella group (of the tribe Proteeae), show significant siderophore activity. Their iron-binding properties were confirmed by the chrome azurol S assay and UV spectra. These compounds form ligand-to-metal charge transfer bands in the range of 400 to 500 nm. Additional absorption bands of the enolized ligands at 500 to 700 nm are responsible for color formation. Siderophore activity was most pronounced with alpha-keto acids possessing an aromatic or heteroaromatic side chain, like phenylpyruvic acid and indolylpyruvic acid, resulting from deamination of phenylalanine and tryptophan, respectively. In addition, alpha-keto acids possessing longer nonpolar side chains, like alpha-ketoisocaproic acid or alpha-ketoisovaleric acid and even alpha-ketoadipic acid, also showed siderophore activity which was absent or negligible with smaller alpha-keto acids or those possessing polar functional groups, like pyruvic acid, alpha-ketobutyric acid, or alpha-ketoglutaric acid. The fact that deaminase-negative enterobacteria, like Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp., could not utilize alpha-keto acids supports the view that specific iron-carboxylate transport systems have evolved in members of the tribe Proteeae and are designed to recognize ferric complexes of both alpha-hydroxy acids and alpha-keto acids, of which the latter can easily be generated by L-amino acid deaminases in an amino acid-rich medium. Exogenous siderophores, like ferric hydroxamates (ferrichromes) and ferric polycarboxylates (rhizoferrin and citrate), were also utilized by members of the tribe Proteeae. Images PMID:8478334

  15. Enhancement of heavy metal accumulation by tissue specific co-expression of iaaM and ACC deaminase genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Lihong; Wang, Yao; Yang, Baoyu; Chen, Shiyun

    2008-06-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane deaminase (ACC) and tryptophan monooxygenase are two enzymes involved in plant senescence-inhibiting and growth-promoting regulation, respectively. In this study, two binary vectors were constructed in which the Agrobacterium iaaM gene was under the transcriptional control of a xylem-specific glycine-rich protein promoter alone, or co-expressed with the bacterial ACC deaminase gene, which was driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. Transgenic petunia shoots co-expressing both genes were able to root on medium supplemented with 7.5 mg l(-1) CoCl2. When T1 transgenic tobacco plants were grown in sand supplemented with Cu2+ and Co2+, tissue specific co-expression of both iaaM and ACC deaminase genes showed faster growth with larger biomass with a more extensive root system, and accumulated a greater amount of heavy metals than the empty vector control plants. When T1 transgenic tobacco plants were grown in soil watered with different concentrations of CuSO4, xylem specific expression of the iaaM gene caused the accumulation of more Cu2+ than the empty vector control at lower CuSO4 concentrations, but showed severe toxic symptoms at concentration of 100 mg l(-1) CuSO4. T1 transgenic plants co-expressing both genes accumulated more heavy metals into the plant shoots and can tolerate CuSO4 at 150 mg l(-1). In addition, plants co-expressing these two genes can grow well in a complex contaminated soil containing both inorganic and organic pollutants, while the growth of the control plants was greatly inhibited. PMID:18471863

  16. Hyperglycemia alters E-NTPDases, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and ectosolic and cytosolic adenosine deaminase activities and expression from encephala of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Siebel, Anna Maria; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM). Some studies have demonstrated the relationship between DM and dysfunction on neurotransmission systems, such as the purinergic system. In this study, we evaluated the extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis and adenosine deamination activities from encephalic membranes of hyperglycemic zebrafish. A significant decrease in ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolyses was observed at 111-mM glucose-treated group, which returned to normal levels after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. A significant increase in ecto-adenosine deaminase activity was observed in 111-mM glucose group, which remain elevated after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. The soluble-adenosine deaminase activity was significantly increased just after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. We also evaluated the gene expressions of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases), ecto-5'-nucleotidase, ADA, and adenosine receptors from encephala of adult zebrafish. The entpd 2a.1, entpd 2a.2, entpd 3, and entpd 8 mRNA levels from encephala of adult zebrafish were decreased in 111-mM glucose-treated and glucose withdrawal groups. The gene expressions of adenosine receptors (adora 1 , adora 2aa , adora 2ab , and adora 2b ) were decreased in 111-mM glucose-treated and glucose withdrawal groups. The gene expression of ADA (ada 2a.1) was decreased in glucose withdrawal group. Maltodextrin, used as a control, did not affect the expression of adenosine receptors, ADA and E-NTPDases 2, 3, and 8, while the expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase was slightly increased and the E-NTPDases 1 decreased. These findings demonstrated that hyperglycemia might affect the ecto-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities and gene expression in zebrafish, probably through a mechanism involving the osmotic effect, suggesting that the modifications caused on purinergic system may also contribute to the diabetes-induced progressive cognitive impairment. PMID:26769247

  17. On the role of the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid on the allosteric kinetics of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Horjales, Eduardo; Calcagno, Mario L

    2002-05-24

    The active site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) has a complex lid formed by two antiparallel beta-strands connected by a helix-loop segment (158-187). This motif contains Arg172, which is a residue involved in binding the substrate in the active-site, and three residues that are part of the allosteric site, Arg158, Lys160 and Thr161. This dual binding role of the motif forming the lid suggests that it plays a key role in the functional coupling between active and allosteric sites. Previous crystallographic work showed that the temperature coefficients of the active-site lid are very large when the enzyme is in its T allosteric state. These coefficients decrease in the R state, thus suggesting that this motif changes its conformational flexibility as a consequence of the allosteric transition. In order to explore the possible connection between the conformational flexibility of the lid and the function of the deaminase, we constructed the site-directed mutant Phe174-Ala. Phe174 is located at the C-end of the lid helix and its side-chain establishes hydrophobic interactions with the remainder of the enzyme. The crystallographic structure of the T state of Phe174-Ala deaminase, determined at 2.02 A resolution, shows no density for the segment 162-181, which is part of the active-site lid (PDB 1JT9). This mutant form of the enzyme is essentially inactive in the absence of the allosteric activator, N-acetylglucosamine-6-P although it recovers its activity up to the wild-type level in the presence of this ligand. Spectrometric and binding studies show that inactivity is due to the inability of the active-site to bind ligands when the allosteric site is empty. These data indicate that the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid critically alters the binding properties of the active site, and that the occupation of the allosteric site restores the lid conformational flexibility to a functional state. PMID

  18. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It kills or damages the body's immune system cells. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the most advanced stage of infection with HIV. HIV most ...

  19. World AIDS Day 1998.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Excerpts of speeches given at a public rally on World AIDS Day 1998 underscore the need to energize support for those living with HIV/AIDS, emphasize the importance of increasing public education efforts, and memorialize those lost to the disease. Reverend Pat Bumgardner stressed the need to educate children about practicing safe sex and the dangers of drug use. He also focused attention on AIDS as a worldwide crisis, with the 30 million people who have HIV or AIDS. Councilwoman Margarita Lopez spoke about achieving objectives and securing resources through activism. She also condemned New York City's Mayor for trying to hinder the rally. Anne Chelimsky, who did not speak at the rally but attended it, reflected on her new role as an activist, and on how the rally affected her. PMID:11367196

  20. Implantable digital hearing aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissiah, A. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Hearing aid converts analog output of microphone into digital pulses in about 10 channels of audiofrequencies. Each pulse band could be directly connected to portion of auditory nerve most sensitive to that range.

  1. Hearing Aid Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Hearing aids often develop malfunctions that are not detected by the wearer. This is particularly true when the wearers are school-age children. Studies of selected groups showed that from 30 to more than 50 percent of school children were not getting adequate benefit from their hearing aids because of unrecognized malfunctions, usually low or dead batteries. This can be serious because hearing impairment retards a child's educational progress. NASA technology incorporated in the Hearing Aid Malfunction Detection Unit (HAMDU), the device pictured, is expected to provide an effective countermeasure to the childrens' hearing aid problem. A patent license has been awarded to a minority-owned firm, Hopkins International Company, a subsidiary of H. H. Aerospace Design Co., Inc., Elmford, New York. The company plans early commercial availability of its version of the device.

  2. Types of Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... They also have greater flexibility in hearing aid programming so that the sound they transmit can be ... 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332) Contact ...

  3. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV positive have been tested ... to everyone in the world. When the person's immune system has weakened and more of the blood's T ...

  4. First Aid and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... First-Aid Kit Food Safety for Your Family Gun Safety Halloween Candy Hints Household Safety Checklists Household ... Climbing, and Grabbing Household Safety: Preventing Injuries From Firearms Household Safety: Preventing Injuries in the Crib Household ...

  5. First aid kit

    MedlinePlus

    ... shield, pads, and bandages Latex or non-latex gloves to reduce contamination risk Sterile gauze pads, non- ... aid manual Hand sanitizer Latex or non-latex gloves to reduce contamination risk Save-A-Tooth storage ...

  6. Computer Aided Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Explores the conceptual components of a computer program designed to enhance creative thinking and reviews software that aims to stimulate creative thinking. Discusses BRAIN and ORACLE, programs intended to aid in creative problem solving. (JOW)

  7. AIDS: A National Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issues in Science and Technology, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Contains excerpts from a special study on the AIDS epidemic by the Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. Presents an overview of the problem, outlines educational needs and public health measures, and identifies future research needs. (ML)

  8. AIDS and economic disruption.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G S

    1996-10-01

    Child and adult mortality increases in Cameroon due to AIDS will cause life expectancy to fall by as many as 8 years, from just over 50 to just over 40 years. The social consequences of AIDS include grieving, stigmatizing, and the large-scale disruption of family and community structures. Widows and widowers due to AIDS mortality are affected differently from each other, with the widows of men who have died from AIDS facing potential sociocultural and economic hardship. The economic consequences of AIDS in Bamenda and elsewhere in Cameroon will occur mainly through the epidemic's impact upon the size and quality of the labor force. By killing a significant number of male and female workers aged 15-60 years, AIDS will reduce the size and growth rate of the labor force. Despite, rapid population growth, labor is a relatively scarce factor of agricultural production in Cameroon. The spread of HIV in rural areas, combined with the intensity and scarcity of agricultural labor, suggests that AIDS will have an impact upon production and per capita incomes, and increase the already high rates of hunger and absolute poverty. In the context of HIV/AIDS, young people must be empowered to make informed decisions about sex. Adolescents are most at risk because they tend to experiment more than married couples and have many sex partners. Sexual activity begins as early as age 8 years and penetrative sex at age 13 or earlier. The author considers the factors which encourage adolescents to engage in sexual activities. PMID:12293251

  9. Plasma-aided manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shohet, J. L.

    1993-12-01

    Plasma-aided manufacturing is used for producing new materials with unusual and superior properties, for developing new chemical compounds and processes, for machining, and for altering and refining materials and surfaces. Plasma-aided manufacturing has direct applications to semiconductor fabrication, materials synthesis, welding, lighting, polymers, anti-corrosion coatings, machine tools, metallurgy, electrical and electronics devices, hazardous waste removal, high performance ceramics, and many other items in both the high-technology and the more traditional industries in the United States.

  10. [The liver and AIDS].

    PubMed

    Rull, S; Sanchís, M J; Palacios, A; Anguiz, A; Colomina, J

    1992-02-01

    Hepatic disorders in AIDS are very common, although the injuries observed are usually non-specific. This is the reason why the real usefulness of hepatic biopsy in this patients is being currently discussed. In this work, such aspect and the hepatic injuries observed in patients with AIDS are discussed. Current indications for hepatic biopsy are summarized, as well as its later manipulation in order to obtain maximum profitability of it. PMID:1576316

  11. AIDS: the hidden enemy.

    PubMed

    Tinker, J; Sabatier, R

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic an its effect on developing countries, with emphasis on Africa. The AIDS death toll will be high in the US: 180,000 by 1991, but it will be in the millions in developing countries. In Africa, AIDS is mainly transmitted heterosexually, is as prevalent among women as among men, and is taking a serious toll among professional classes and young wage earners. The social costs of funerals has increased, and company clinics and sick pay funds have been overwhelmed. In Uganda, the epidemic adds to the state of psychological shock people have sufferred because of the civil war. Medical professionals have been hard-pressed to acquire equipment for testing blood for the virus, although there have been efforts to protect blood supplies through exhaustive testing. Endemic tuberculosis becomes an even more serious problem in developing countries, since AIDS lowers resistance to it. AIDS also effects many developing country children, usually through infected mothers, who can transmit AIDS through breast milk or during pregnancy of birth. This poses a dilemma for promoters of breastfeeding. It is also feared that innoculation of immunosuppressed children may be dangerous. The global picture suggests that Africa is hardest hit: seropositivity prevalence ranges from 0.7% of Congo blood donors to 33% of male donors in Lusaka Zambia. Brazil's cases are mainly homosexual, and in Asia the prevalence is mostly low, although there is a great potential danger in countries where prostitution and heroin addiction are prevalent. The only effective weapon against AIDS is education and blood testing to prevent spread. Despite good education programs in some countries, e.g. Rwanda, there is still widespread ignorance of how AIDS is spread. PMID:12314457

  12. Confronting AIDS: international consensus?

    PubMed

    1998-08-01

    A coordinated effort by the World Bank, the European Commission, and UNAIDS, and drawing from a number of academic disciplines, including epidemiology, public health, and public economics, the recently published book "Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities in a Global Epidemic" argues that the global HIV/AIDS epidemic can be overcome and that national governments have a major role in preventing the spread of AIDS and tempering its impact. Considerable evidence is presented in support of the argument. The original idea for the book came out of collaboration between individuals in the European Commission and the World Bank. The World Bank's recognition of the importance of AIDS is a milestone in the course of the pandemic. Confronting AIDS highlights the potential and actual impact of AIDS upon households, communities, and countries; argues the case for interventions in both HIV prevention and care; and generally considers some of the difficult choices which need to be made about how scarce resources will be allocated, especially in developing countries. PMID:12294024

  13. AIDS in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D; Armstrong, M; Lavelle, S

    1991-01-01

    Works on epidemiological, and social and behavioral science aspects of AIDS prevention and support in Africa are reviewed from the 7th Conference on AIDS. Participants were especially concerned with why AIDS spreads at disparate rates in different countries and regions of the world. Research on the casual factors of the spread of HIV generally focused upon patterns of sex behavior, the presence of other STDs, and the effect of circumcision. The roles of certain vaginal tightening agents used by Zairian prostitutes, vaginal bruising and bleeding, sex during menses, and oral contraception were also considered. Further, participants explored the possibility of a more coordinated, integrated approach to research and intervention development between the medical and social disciplines, and expressed the overall need for concurrent mass education interventions. In the face of ever increasing rates of HIV infection, including vertical transmission, making condoms ubiquitous, affordable, and highly publicized should garner higher general acceptance and use rates in these populations. Papers and models on the micro- and macro-socioeconomic impact of AIDS were finally discussed, followed by recommendations for a complete reassessment and reworking of policy for AIDS prevention. AIDS activities should, in fact, be integrated into the daily fabric of society, with prevention measures considered an ultimate necessity for social survival. PMID:1786270

  14. Mommy, Daddy--What's AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates and Practitioners, Cherry Hill, NJ.

    This brochure is designed to help parents answer the questions that their children may ask them about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS. It provides basic information about AIDS and HIV, as well as sources for further information, such as the National AIDS Hotline. It…

  15. Sensory Aids for the Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Committee on Prosthetics Research and Development.

    The problems of providing sensory aids for the blind are presented and a report on the present status of aids discusses direct translation and recognition reading machines as well as mobility aids. Aspects of required research considered are the following: assessment of needs; vision, audition, taction, and multimodal communication; reading aids,…

  16. Answering Your Questions about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.

    This book focuses on AIDS education and answers 350 commonly asked questions about Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) taken from questions addressed to two major urban AIDS hotlines (Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Houston, Texas). Chapter 1, "HIV - The Virus That Causes AIDS," discusses: the HIV virus; the…

  17. The First Aid Training Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Ian

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of first aid training provisions in the United Kingdom with respect to the outdoor industry, what to look for in a first aid training provider, an experiential model of first aid training, and the current National Governing Body requirements for first aid training for various types of coaches and instructors. (TD)

  18. AIDS and racism in America.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, J.

    1992-01-01

    Institutionalized racism affects general health care as well as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) health intervention and services in minority communities. The overrepresentation of minorities in various disease categories, including AIDS, is partially related to racism. The national response to the AIDS epidemic in minority communities has been slow, showing an insensitivity to ethnic diversity in prevention efforts and AIDS health services. PMID:1602509

  19. dADAR, a Drosophila double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase is highly developmentally regulated and is itself a target for RNA editing.

    PubMed Central

    Palladino, M J; Keegan, L P; O'Connell, M A; Reenan, R A

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a homolog of the ADAR (adenosine deaminases that act on RNA) class of RNA editases from Drosophila, dADAR. The dADAR locus has been localized to the 2B6-7 region of the X chromosome and the complete genomic sequence organization is reported here. dADAR is most homologous to the mammalian RNA editing enzyme ADAR2, the enzyme that specifically edits the Q/R site in the pre-mRNA encoding the glutamate receptor subunit GluR-B. Partially purified dADAR expressed in Pichia pastoris has robust nonspecific A-to-I deaminase activity on synthetic dsRNA substrates. Transcripts of the dADAR locus originate from two regulated promoters. In addition, alternative splicing generates at least four major dADAR isoforms that differ at their amino-termini as well as altering the spacing between their dsRNA binding motifs. dADAR is expressed in the developing nervous system, making it a candidate for the editase that acts on para voltage-gated Na+ channel transcripts in the central nervous system. Surprisingly, dADAR itself undergoes developmentally regulated RNA editing that changes a conserved residue in the catalytic domain. Taken together, these findings show that both transcription and processing of dADAR transcripts are under strict developmental control and suggest that the process of RNA editing in Drosophila is dynamically regulated. PMID:10917596

  20. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Dias, Ana Sofia; Pelletier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders. PMID:25210228

  1. Phylogenetic comparison of the pre-mRNA adenosine deaminase ADAR2 genes and transcripts: conservation and diversity in editing site sequence and alternative splicing patterns.

    PubMed

    Slavov, D; Gardiner, K

    2002-10-16

    Adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA -2 (ADAR2) is a member of a family of vertebrate genes that encode adenosine (A)-to-inosine (I) RNA deaminases, enzymes that deaminate specific A residues in specific pre-mRNAs to produce I. Known substrates of ADAR2 include sites within the coding regions of pre-mRNAs of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, GluR2-6, and the serotonin receptor, 5HT2C. Mammalian ADAR2 expression is itself regulated by A-to-I editing and by several alternative splicing events. Because the biological consequences of ADAR2 function are significant, we have undertaken a phylogenetic comparison of these features. Here we report a comparison of cDNA sequences, genomic organization, editing site sequences and patterns of alternative splicing of ADAR2 genes from human, mouse, chicken, pufferfish and zebrafish. Coding sequences and intron/exon organization are highly conserved. All ADAR2 genes show evidence of transcript editing with required sequences and predicted secondary structures very highly conserved. Patterns and levels of editing and alternative splicing vary among organisms, and include novel N-terminal exons and splicing events. PMID:12459255

  2. Stable transformation of Toxoplasma gondii based on a pyrimethamine resistant trifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-cytosine deaminase-thymidylate synthase gene that confers sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Fox, B A; Belperron, A A; Bzik, D J

    1999-01-01

    To improve genetic models available for the analysis of apicomplexan protozoan parasites, bacterial sequences encoding the 427 amino acid cytosine deaminase (CD) gene were fused, in-frame, to an engineered linker domain of the high level pyrimethamine resistant form of the parasite bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene. Toxoplasma gondii was transformed with the plasmid containing the fused pyrimethamine resistant dihydrofolate reductase-cytosine deaminase-thymidylate synthase (DHFRm2m3-CD-TS) gene and parasites were selected in a high level of pyrimethamine. Transfected parasites that acquired resistance to pyrimethamine were cloned and evaluated for expression of the CD genetic marker. CD transgenic parasites acquired a high sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine due to the intraparasitic conversion of this non-toxic prodrug to the cytotoxic compound 5-fluorouracil. Exogenously supplied cytosine or uracil rescued the growth of CD transgenic T. gondii parasites that were cultured in the presence of cytotoxic concentrations of 5-fluorouracil or 5-fluorocytosine. Bacterial CD fused to the pyrimethamine resistant DHFR-TS marker provides a novel genetic tool for new positive and negative genetic selection strategies in several protozoan parasites. An advantage of the CD genetic marker is that it is derived from a bacterial gene and can therefore be used in nearly any parasite genetic background for negative selection. This novel system should facilitate new approaches for the development of improved model genetic systems for the biological investigation of apicomplexan parasites. PMID:10029312

  3. High frequency of mutations in exon 10 of the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in patients with a CRIM-positive subtype of acute intermittent porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.F.; Rooij, F. de; Voortman, G.; Velde, K.T.; Nordmann, Y.; Grandchamp, B.

    1992-09-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase. Different subtypes of the disease have been defined, and more than 10 different mutations have been described. The authors focused their study on exon 10, since they previously found that three different mutations were located in this exon and that two of them seemed to be relatively common. They used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) after in vitro amplification to detect all possible mutations in exon 10 in 41 unrelated AIP patients. In about one-fourth of these patients they could distinguish three abnormal migration patterns, indicating the presence of various mutations. Additional sequencing demonstrated the presence of three different single-base substitutions. Two of these mutations had already been described. A third one consisted of a C-to-T transition located at position 499 of the PBG deaminase mRNA and resulted in an Arg-to-Trp substitution. All three mutations were found in patients with crossreacting immunological material (CRIM)-positive forms of AlP. The high frequency of these mutations make DGGE analysis of exon 10 a useful approach allowing the direct detection of the DNA abnormality in most of the families with the CRIM-positive subtype of AlP. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. dcd (dCTP deaminase) gene of Escherichia coli: mapping, cloning, sequencing, and identification as a locus of suppressors of lethal dut (dUTPase) mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Weiss, B

    1992-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, most of the dUMP that is used as a substrate for thymidylate synthetase is generated from dCTP through the sequential action of dCTP deaminase and dUTPase. Some mutations of the dut (dUTPase) gene are lethal even when the cells are grown in the presence of thymidine, but their lethality can be suppressed by extragenic mutations that can be produced by transposon insertion. Six suppressor mutations were tested, and all were found to belong to the same complementation group. The affected gene was cloned, it was mapped by hybridization with a library of recombinant DNA, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene is at 2,149 kb on the physical map. Its product, a 21.2-kDa polypeptide, was overproduced 1,000-fold via an expression vector and identified as dCTP deaminase, the enzyme affected in previously described dcd mutants. Null mutations in dcd probably suppress the lethality of dut mutations by reducing the accumulation of dUTP, which would otherwise lead to the excessive incorporation of uracil into DNA. Images PMID:1324907

  5. [AIDS: "We will win"].

    PubMed

    Chabrier, H

    1989-11-13

    An international colloquium on AIDS held near Paris from October 26-28, 1989, unlike the World Conference on AIDS in Montreal the year before, was able to find reasons for optimism. Significant progress was reported in immunotherapy and in chemotherapy. Successful experiments in vaccinating monkeys against the AIDS virus were reported from the US, France, and Zaire. Time is needed to prove the efficacy of the vaccines because of the slow development in AIDS. A vaccine is being tested by Jonas Salk and collaborators in 75 seropositive volunteers who do not yet show full blown disease but who have very low levels of T4 lymphocytes. Plans are underway for a larger test on 500 seropositive patients at different stages of infection. According to Salk, the new chemical and logical approach toward AIDS will allow combinations of immunotherapy and chemotherapy to destroy the virus. R. Gallo of France listed as accomplishments of the past year a better understanding of the virus, improved case management techniques, increased ability to control Kaposi's sarcoma, considerable progress in the search for a vaccine, and detection of immune proteins that affect the virus. New biological markers permit establishment of correlations between cellular modifications and the progress of the disease as well as the precise effects of treatment. The new immune system drugs immuthiol and DDI are expected to reach the market soon. Patients very soon will be able to receive less toxic alternative treatments, which can be combined for greater efficacy once their toxic interactions are understood. PMID:12342689

  6. FFCD-1004 Clinical Trial: Impact of Cytidine Deaminase Activity on Clinical Outcome in Gemcitabine-Monotherapy Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Serdjebi, Cindy; Gagnière, Johan; Desramé, Jérôme; Fein, Francine; Guimbaud, Rosine; François, Eric; André, Thierry; Seitz, Jean-François; Montérymard, Carole; Arsene, Dominique; Volet, Julien; Abakar-Mahamat, Abakar; Lecomte, Thierry; Guerin-Meyer, Véronique; Legoux, Jean-Louis; Deplanque, Gaël; Guillet, Pierre; Ciccolini, Joseph; Lepage, Côme; Dahan, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Because cytidine deaminase (CDA) is the key enzyme in gemcitabine metabolism, numerous studies have attempted to investigate impact of CDA status (i.e. genotype or phenotype) on clinical outcome. To date, data are still controversial because none of these studies has fully investigated genotype-phenotype CDA status, pharmacokinetics and clinical outcome relationships in gemcitabine-treated patients. Besides, most patients were treated with gemcitabine associated with other drugs, thus adding a confounding factor. We performed a multicenter prospective clinical trial in gemcitabine-treated patients which aimed at investigating the link between CDA deficiency on the occurrence of severe toxicities and on pharmacokinetics, and studying CDA genotype-phenotype relationships. Experimental design One hundred twenty patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma eligible for adjuvant gemcitabine monotherapy were enrolled in this study promoted and managed by the Fédération Francophone de Cancérologie Digestive. Toxicities were graded according to National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4. They were considered severe for grade ≥ 3, and early when occurring during the first eight weeks of treatment. CDA status was evaluated using a double approach: genotyping for 79A>C and functional testing. Therapeutic drug monitoring of gemcitabine and its metabolite were performed on the first course of gemcitabine. Results Five patients out of 120 (i.e., 4.6%) were found to be CDA deficient (i.e., CDA activity <1.3 U/mg), and only one among them experienced early severe hematological toxicity. There was no statistically significant difference in CDA activity between patients experiencing hematological severe toxicities (28.44%) and patients who tolerated the treatment (71.56%). CDA genetic analysis failed in evidencing an impact in terms of toxicities or in CDA activity. Regarding pharmacokinetics, a wide inter

  7. Correction: AIDS commission.

    PubMed

    1987-11-01

    A recent article by William Booth on the President's AIDS commission (News & Comment, 16 Oct., p. 262) incorrectly states that commission member Cory SerVaas, publisher of the Saturday Evening Post, drives her AIDS Mobile around the country. SerVaas does not drive the traveling van that offers free AIDS testing. Rather, she often flies to meet it as it travels around the country, stopping at shopping malls and churches by prearrangement with local civic and religious groups. SerVaas denies saying that homosexuals are "deviants." "We have helped homosexuals for many years," she says, pointing out that although her group primarily tests people who have a low risk of being infected, such as recipients of blood transfusions and women who may become pregnant, members of high-risk groups such as homosexuals and drug addicts are not excluded. PMID:17814691

  8. Women and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Edemikpong, N B

    1990-01-01

    While the origin of the AIDS virus remains controversial, it is indisputable that AIDS is spreading worldwide. By June 1987, the World Health Organization estimated that 50 million Africans were infected with HIV and that the disease was epidemic in many parts of the continent. However, African governments chose to deny the threat of the disease. The AIDS crisis has diverted resources from other vital areas of disease prevention, health promotion, and research. Whereas AIDS is spread in developed nations by sexual promiscuity, by drug addicts sharing unclean hypodermic needles, and by homosexual behavior, in Africa cultural factors contribute to the transmission of AIDS. Female genital mutilation leads to extensive laceration of the female genitals upon initiation of sexual intercourse and/or to substitution of anal sex during the weeks and months before vaginal penetration can be achieved. In addition, the reuse of the same knives during the mutilation can spread HIV infection. Other factors that contribute to the spread of HIV in Africa include the patriarchal practice of polygamy, the subordinate position of women that makes them unable to insist on protection during intercourse, and a failure to screen blood used in transfusions. With all of these risk factors at play, women at the grassroots level must be equipped with the health education that is the only available tool to fight AIDS. Women's organizations can provide information and education to people at risk of acquiring HIV, counsel infected persons, ensure the safety of the blood supply, and work to overcome harmful traditional practices. PMID:12317073

  9. A constitution for AIDS.

    PubMed

    Koshy, L M

    1996-01-15

    The Indian Health Organization projected the number of deaths per day due to AIDS by the year 2000 at 10,000. An interdisciplinary international conference was held in New Delhi to draft an international law governing the issues related to AIDS. Human freedom and public health policies are the most affected by this disease. In the absence of an international AIDS law, judicial verdicts set precedents and could have serious ramifications. A participant from the John Marshall Law School, Chicago, suggested that instead of making new laws, the existing ones from the colonial past should be repealed. This includes Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, which provides criminal sanctions against those who indulge in unnatural relations with man, woman, or animal. Penalizing homosexuality will only perpetuate clandestine relations and spread the virus into their families. Another participant seconded this motion stating that even a sex worker must be protected from abuse and indignity. The National AIDS Control Organization responded to the criticism that the government had not utilized all the World Bank funds allocated for anti-AIDS projects. The trends of the epidemic were the most important indicators not just the numbers. In Manipur and Mizoram, infection was almost entirely due to injecting drug use. The Saheli project undertaken in the red-light areas of Bombay encompassed brothel owners and prostitutes, which could be replicated in other areas. Because existing government policies were focusing on prevention, there was no protection of an HIV-infected individual's privacy, one participant from Madras stated. The confidentiality issue was also echoed by a US participant. The New Delhi Declaration and Action Plan on HIV/AIDS was also discussed. It forbids discrimination in employment, education, housing, health care, social security, travel, and marital and reproductive rights. Providing sterile needles and ensuring the safety of the blood supply were other concerns

  10. AIDS--legal issues.

    PubMed

    Kirby, M

    1988-01-01

    Legal issues worldwide prompted by the AIDS epidemic are discussed, in a general way, since legal systems vary widely in different countries and localities. WHO publishes a tabulation of legal instruments dealing with AIDS and HIV infection. Criminal laws intended to protect people from harm from HIV infection have been enacted, such as a penalty for unprotected sexual intercourse by infected persons, in some Australian states. Knowing spread of HIV already amounts to a crime in many systems. The U.S. Supreme Court has already ruled that states do not violate the constitution for punishing homosexuals for consensual sodomy, nor the Army for discharging homosexuals. Quarantine law is a civil matter, but may provide penalties stricter than criminal penalties, without as much protection. No quarantines against AIDS have been enacted, although some countries require screening of immigrants. Legal issues regarding screening, liability of suppliers of blood products, and tracing of sexual partners are much discussed. Stigmatization of minority and alienated groups such as homosexuals, prostitutes, migrants, drug users and prisoners is a tricky legal problem. The apparent failure of the criminalization of drug users and how to contain the spread of AIDS into the drug free population may prompt drastic new solutions. Other legal issues drawing attention include regulation of health insurance, changes in family law, pre-marriage HIV tests, screening for HIV ostensibly to detect HIV-associated dementia, liability protection for developers and testers of vaccines, and euthanasia and the treatment of the deceased. The legal system tends to lag behind medicine. In the case of AIDS, it cannot afford to delay, therefore effective legal strategies will include effective media presentation of AIDS information to the general public; ready and cheap supply of condoms; and a new approach to illegal drugs. PMID:3147672

  11. Software aids plant management

    SciTech Connect

    Winiger, T. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports that for most utilities, computer aided engineering (CAE) systems are currently used for operating plant support rather than new plant design particularly for nuclear plant maintenance. For nuclear power generating utilities, switching to a modern, integrated CAE information system can offer significant benefits. During the last decade, however, most engineering automation in the power generation industry focused on computer-aided drafting and stand-alone engineering applications. An integrated CAE system can be a useful too, assisting engineers with many engineering and operational activities. It also can be used to manage the massive amount of information created throughout the life of a plant.

  12. Revolutionising the AIDS response.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Jessica; Gupta, Geeta Rao; Warner, Ann; Fisher, William F

    2011-01-01

    Individual behaviour change interventions and technological approaches to HIV prevention can only be effective over time if the broader social environment in which health-related decisions are made facilitate their uptake. People need to be not only willing but also able to take up and maintain preventive behaviours, seek testing, treatment and care for HIV. This paper presents findings and recommendations of the Social Drivers Working Group of the aids2031 initiative, which focus on how to ensure that efforts to address the root causes of HIV vulnerability are integrated into AIDS responses at the national level. Specific guidance is given on how to operationalise a structural approach. PMID:21970296

  13. AIDS: the frightening facts.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M

    1986-01-01

    Aquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has succeeded in creating an unprecedented wave of panic among the Western public and some sections of the medical profession. Research clearly shows that the AIDS virus is transmissible in a number of ways: from man to woman and vice versa during sexual intercourse, through semen and possibly vaginal fluids; from mothers to their children through breast milk; through exchange of saliva (but not through just a casual kiss); and through blood and blood products. Far from being exclusive to homosexuals, studies in Europe have shown that female virus carriers can transmit AIDS to healthy men through sexual intercourse--the predominant means by which transmission appears to occur in Central Africa. Although cases of AIDS began being diagnosed in a few Central African countries at the beginning of the 1980s, at the same time as they were first being observed in Europe and North America, many commentators assumed that the virus originated in Africa. Yet, it is safe to say that the nature of the virus, let alone its origins, remains controversial among scientists and virologists. 1 supporter of the theory that the AIDS virus has African origins is Robert Gall of the US National Institute of Health (NIH). He is one of the co-discoverers of the virus, which he named HTLV3 (Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus 3). The virus also was discovered at France's Pasteur Institute by Luc Montaigner, who called it LAV (Lymphadenpathy Associated Virus). Gallo named the virus as he did because he believes it to be related to a pair of other viruses, HTLV1 and HTLV2, which like the AIDS virus attack the body's immunity system. Unlike AIDS, these 2 viruses, do not destroy the T-cells but cause them to replicate into cancer tumors. In Gallo's view, HTLV1 has long been endemic to some parts of Africa, from where he believes it spread via the slave trade to other parts of the world. Montaigner does not agree. He denies that the AIDS virus is related to

  14. PrimPol prevents APOBEC/AID family mediated DNA mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pilzecker, Bas; Buoninfante, Olimpia Alessandra; Pritchard, Colin; Blomberg, Olga S; Huijbers, Ivo J; van den Berk, Paul C M; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-06-01

    PrimPol is a DNA damage tolerant polymerase displaying both translesion synthesis (TLS) and (re)-priming properties. This led us to study the consequences of a PrimPol deficiency in tolerating mutagenic lesions induced by members of the APOBEC/AID family of cytosine deaminases. Interestingly, during somatic hypermutation, PrimPol counteracts the generation of C>G transversions on the leading strand. Independently, mutation analyses in human invasive breast cancer confirmed a pro-mutagenic activity of APOBEC3B and revealed a genome-wide anti-mutagenic activity of PRIMPOL as well as most Y-family TLS polymerases. PRIMPOL especially prevents APOBEC3B targeted cytosine mutations within TpC dinucleotides. As C transversions induced by APOBEC/AID family members depend on the formation of AP-sites, we propose that PrimPol reprimes preferentially downstream of AP-sites on the leading strand, to prohibit error-prone TLS and simultaneously stimulate error-free homology directed repair. These in vivo studies are the first demonstrating a critical anti-mutagenic activity of PrimPol in genome maintenance. PMID:26926109

  15. PrimPol prevents APOBEC/AID family mediated DNA mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pilzecker, Bas; Buoninfante, Olimpia Alessandra; Pritchard, Colin; Blomberg, Olga S.; Huijbers, Ivo J.; van den Berk, Paul C.M.; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    PrimPol is a DNA damage tolerant polymerase displaying both translesion synthesis (TLS) and (re)-priming properties. This led us to study the consequences of a PrimPol deficiency in tolerating mutagenic lesions induced by members of the APOBEC/AID family of cytosine deaminases. Interestingly, during somatic hypermutation, PrimPol counteracts the generation of C>G transversions on the leading strand. Independently, mutation analyses in human invasive breast cancer confirmed a pro-mutagenic activity of APOBEC3B and revealed a genome-wide anti-mutagenic activity of PRIMPOL as well as most Y-family TLS polymerases. PRIMPOL especially prevents APOBEC3B targeted cytosine mutations within TpC dinucleotides. As C transversions induced by APOBEC/AID family members depend on the formation of AP-sites, we propose that PrimPol reprimes preferentially downstream of AP-sites on the leading strand, to prohibit error-prone TLS and simultaneously stimulate error-free homology directed repair. These in vivo studies are the first demonstrating a critical anti-mutagenic activity of PrimPol in genome maintenance. PMID:26926109

  16. Apartheid and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, A T

    1989-11-25

    To persuade South Africa to abolish its apartheid policy several measures have been taken by the international community, including economic sanctions. The harm done by sanctions to the South African economy is obvious. As economic activity has slowed down, unemployment, especially in the black community, has risen. For the unemployed poverty and hunger are harsh realities while for those lucky enough to have jobs income remains quite high. Prostitution has become a way of redistributing income and for many families it is the only way to avoid starvation. With prostitution, however, has come AIDS: it is estimated that HIV infection is doubling every 5-8 months. On 1 calculation 85% of sexually active blacks could be infected with HIV by 1996; most would proceed to AIDS and die, leaving millions of children without parents. Although economic sanctions have speeded up some measure of reform in South Africa they are now harming the very people they were intended to help. Furthermore insidious voices are already being heard saying the government should stop all reform processes and anti-AIDS campaigns and just "sit it out" for the next few years. A further consequence of an ailing economy is the unavailability of funding for those who wish to curb the spread of AIDS via educational and other programs. [Full text] PMID:2573792

  17. Good Teaching Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of 14 Audubon Nature Bulletins with these titles: Schoolyard Laboratories, How to Lead a Field Trip, Natural Resources in the City, Mysteries of Bird Migration, Rock Stories and How to Read Them, The Ground Water Table, The Terrarium, Some Adventures With Wild Plants Outdoors and Indoors, Plant Propagation in the…

  18. Management of Student Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, Jeanne, Ed.

    The principles, practices, responsibilities, and controls in student financial aid are described in this manual. It traces the flow of funds, management activities, and legal issues as they occur in the process. The emphasis is on sound management principles of a general and permanent nature rather than on specific government requirements that may…

  19. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  20. Computer Aided Art Major.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jim

    The Computer Aided Art program offered at Northern State State University (Aberdeen, South Dakota), is coordinated with the traditional art major. The program is designed to familiarize students with a wide range of art-related computer hardware and software and their applications and to prepare students for problem-solving with unfamiliar…

  1. Kool-Aid Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Christie L.

    1986-01-01

    Offers guidelines and suggests activities that can introduce middle school students to the process and principles of chromatography in an inexpensive and safe manner. Proposes that experiences with Kool-aid and food coloring chromatography can provide insights into how scientists think, work, and communicate. (ML)

  2. Coil Welding Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  3. AIDS: The Second Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Heather G., Ed.; And Others

    This report reviews the course of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic and its current status, examining changing patterns of sexual behavior and intravenous drug use, the distribution of cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the results of intervention efforts under way. It also discusses prevention…

  4. AIDS.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sites Podcasts QR Codes RSS Feeds Social Bookmarking Social Network Sites Text Messaging Twitter Video Games Video Sharing ... here Read related blog here Get updates via Facebook Live interviews Join the conversation: #RyanWhite2016​ International AIDS ...

  5. AIDS: Implications for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macklin, Eleanor D.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews facts about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and its epidemiology. Discusses implications for families (social stigma and isolation, fears of contagion, infection and abandonment, guilt, anger, grief, and economic hardship) and for human service professionals (public education, voluntary, anonymous testing with counseling, and…

  6. Newspaper Lesson Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Communication: Journalism Education Today (C:JET), 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides photocopy-ready lesson aids on story ideas, interviewing, inverted pyramid writing style, newswriting, sports/scavenger hunt, finding feature material, identifying feature leads, feature lead selection, evaluating feature leads, compiling survey material, cutlines, headlines, paste-up rules, advertising, final semester project, newspaper…

  7. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  8. AIDS Researcher Gives Retrospective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, renowned immunologist James E.K. Hildreth, M.D., Ph.D., was compelled to start researching the virus that causes AIDS. He marveled at its enigma and was pressed into action by its ability to cut lives short and devastate communities. The disease set him on a course of medical inquiry that has included biomedical breakthroughs…

  9. More than First Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoessler, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The school nurse is an important member of the school team since school health services keep students in school, in the classroom, and ready to learn. Although school nurses are often seen as the people who deliver first aid at school, their role is much deeper and has such breadth that only a registered, professional nurse has the skill set to…

  10. First Aid Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a challenge wherein students will be asked to design a portable first aid kit that is normally carried in a recreational vehicle (RV), but can also be hand-carried or backpacked off road for distances of approximately 1-2 miles. This can be a very practical challenge for the students because it touches everyone. Everybody…

  11. AIDS and Native Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, G. Cajetan

    Native Americans throughout North America suffer from a greater prevalence of health problems than the population as a whole. One might believe that the problem of AIDS is insignificant for Native youth, but such a belief is inaccurate and shortsighted. As of March 1989, the Centers for Disease Control reported 1,792 cases of childhood and…

  12. Street Youth & AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Joyce L.; And Others

    Interviews were conducted with 712 Canadian street youth (ages 15-20 years) to assess their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors with regard to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Youth were interviewed in 10 cities across Canada on the basis of 5 street culture lifestyles: prostitution, drug…

  13. First aid advisor

    SciTech Connect

    Saffer, S.I.; Weng, Wen-Chang

    1996-12-31

    A knowledge-based system (KBS), First Aid Advisor (FAA), is developed to provide a guidance for either a trained or untrained person to take some emergent actions to rescue the victim from life-threatening hazard or to prevent from causing serious problem before the Emergency Medical Service System (EMS) personnels arrive the scene. The First Aid Advisor will collect victim`s information by interacting with the user through a sequence of questions, analyze the victim`s problem, and give instructions step by step before offering a final advice. Since all the possible conditions are taken into consideration, it will guide the user to perform first aid from the most to the least urgent step for the victim. Furthermore, it will offer a suitable first aid advice for victim and eliminate the possibility of wrong actions done by trained person due to carelessness or nervousness. Offering advice to handle problems involving life-threatening conditions is the main objective of this system. In this paper, we will describe six major components of FAA and their respective tasks. Decision tables and dependency diagrams used in FAA implementation will also be described. System performance issues will conclude the paper.

  14. Circulation Aide Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeson, Alan O.

    This training manual provides instruction on shelving and other duties for student assistants in the learning resources center at the College of Dupage, located in Illinois. It is noted that prospective student circulation aides are required to read the manual and pass a written test on policies and procedures before they are allowed to shelve…

  15. Living with AIDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graubard, Stephen R., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Because events move swiftly in the contemporary world, it is easy to forget that acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a phenomenon of the 1980s. It is generally agreed that this is only the very beginning of a scientific investigation that will go on well into the 21st century. This issue attempts to provide some of the basic information…

  16. First Aid: Chickenpox

    MedlinePlus

    ... Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Chickenpox ... Chickenpox (varicella) is an illness that has become much less common in the U.S. due to the chickenpox vaccine . The infection and rash will go away without ...

  17. The War against AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, L. Thompson

    1987-01-01

    Efforts of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to combat AIDS are reported. Health implications of the viral disease are summarized, along with economic costs, research achievements, the importance of education, and appropriate and workable solutions. (LB)

  18. Computer Aided Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insolia, Gerard

    This document contains course outlines in computer-aided manufacturing developed for a business-industry technology resource center for firms in eastern Pennsylvania by Northampton Community College. The four units of the course cover the following: (1) introduction to computer-assisted design (CAD)/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAM); (2) CAM…

  19. Computer-Aided Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Graham

    This report discusses the impact of and presents guidelines for developing a computer-aided instructional (CAI) system. The first section discusses CAI in terms of the need for the countries of Asia to increase their economic self-sufficiency. The second section examines various theories on the nature of learning with special attention to the role…

  20. [AIDS in Tanzania].

    PubMed

    Barstad, S

    1993-04-20

    The World Health Organization has announced that within 3 years 10% of Tanzania's population of 26 million will be infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). But there is some faint hope in the research of Tanzanian traditional medicine. An almost 90-year-man, Waziri Mrisho, is credited with having treated AIDS patients successfully with herbs that strengthen the immune system. Margaret Nakamya was stricken by the symptoms of AIDs in March 1990. She was referred to Waziri and started using his herbs. 3 years later she weighs 49 kg compared to 40 kg before. The old man's son set up a little factory where he pulverizes herbs and sells them at the price he can command The 3 types of trees that the herbal medicine is taken from grow in the wild, but some have also been planted around the factory. Even if these herbs are effective, it will take years before the AIDS epidemic is over, when people have changed their lifestyles. The means of communication (TV, cinema, radio, telephone) are missing or inadequate. In the Kagera region, with 1.2 million inhabitants, 25% of pregnant women are HIV-infected and 65,000 children lost their parents to AIDS. There are 2000 children in Dar Es Salaam living in the streets. The Anglican St. Albans Church runs a center for street kids where they get meals 3 times a week. The nurse Ruth Nesje enlisted a Norwegian physician and homeopath in a research project involving 30 AIDS patients in Norway. The University in Bergen will do in vitro testing. One group of patients will receive both AZT and the herbs, another group will get only AZT, and the 3rd group will obtain only the herbs. The Norwegian Nursing Association, NORAD, and DANIDA also plan various projects in the Tanga region. PMID:8499187

  1. [Will AIDS overtake them?].

    PubMed

    Boukhari, S

    UNICEF estimates that the streets are now the home of some 5 million African children aged 7-15 who are victims of rapid population growth and urbanization as well as the disintegration of traditional family structure. These children, deprived of a home and of all parental control, are potentially very vulnerable to the threat of AIDS. Prostitution, which is almost institutionalized in the most impoverished urban areas, represents for young girls the most immediate means of survival and occasionally even of helping their families. Male prostitution is highly tabu and marginal in sub-Saharan Africa, and is only slightly developed around the tourist hotels. Homeless children are somewhat protected against contamination through the blood by their lack of access to health care. Intravenous drugs are rare in Africa, and drug use is at most an indirect risk factor for AIDS to the extent that in increases the need for money and weakens the immune system. The frequency of sexually transmitted diseases, deplorable hygienic conditions, and poor general health of homeless children increase their risk of contracting the virus. Many homeless children do not even know of the existence of condoms and in any event condoms are usually inaccessible or too costly for them. Homeless children, like the general population, have false ideas about AIDS that discourage self-protective behaviors. In addition they are cut off from the activities of existing prevention programs. In a context of permanent daily insecurity, AIDS appears as just 1 more menace among others. According to an anthropologist working with the UNESCO program to help homeless children, the only way of making such children aware of the threat of AIDS in the large African cities will be to increase the number of prevention programs targeted at them. At the same time, the children need to be educated and taught an income-generating skill; in short, they need to be given a reason to believe in the future. PMID:12316939

  2. AIDS: there's hope.

    PubMed

    1993-06-01

    In 1993, 10 years after realizing that AIDS posed a threat to the future of mankind, social mobilization will improve the odds against AIDS. The objective is to create awareness about the virus, and to affect positive behavioral change through advocacy, communication, and grass-roots actions. The first goal is to change the societal attitude about the status of youth and women in order to understand that gender inequality fuels the pandemic. They are the most vulnerable groups, therefore their economic and social power must be improved. The Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women constitute a platform for broader action by governmental, nongovernmental, and religious institutions. In addition, these organizations need strong allies in society: 1) the media, which can communicate the importance of youth, women, and attitudes in the epidemic; 2) religious leaders, who can be powerful sources of advocacy for change in attitudes as well as support and care for AIDS-affected individuals and families; 3) policy makers, who can be crucial in changing existing policies and altering the allocation of government resources to youth and women; 4) human rights organizations, which play an important role in promoting the concept of health as a human right and for enhancing the understanding of AIDS in the context of discrimination and poverty; 5) the private sector, including commerce and industry, which can promote changes in attitude within the work force and AIDS prevention initiatives; and 6) parent-teacher groups and models for youth, who can educate them about socially acceptable and unacceptable behavior and can empower them to make responsible behavior choices. PMID:12179231

  3. HIV/AIDS and Pediatric AIDS. The Arc Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Jo Anne T.

    This fact sheet uses a question-and-answer format to summarize what is known about HIV/AIDS (Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) and pediatric AIDS and applies this information to children in school settings. Questions and answers address the following topics: what the AIDS disease and HIV infection are; estimates…

  4. Epicatechin and Catechin Modulate Endothelial Activation Induced by Platelets of Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, R.; Loffredo, L.; Nocella, C.; Bartimoccia, S.; Bucci, T.; De Falco, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Chimenti, I.; Biondi-Zoccai, G.; Pignatelli, P.; Violi, F.; Frati, G.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. PMID:25180068

  5. Palmitoylation of δ-catenin by DHHC5 Mediates Activity-Induced Synapse Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Brigidi, G. Stefano; Sun, Yu; Beccano-Kelly, Dayne; Pitman, Kimberley; Mobasser, Mahsan; Borgland, Stephanie L.; Milnerwood, Austen J.; Bamji, Shernaz X.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic cadherin adhesion complexes are known to be key regulators of synapse plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that coordinate activity-induced modifications in cadherin localization and adhesion and subsequent changes in synapse morphology and efficacy, remain unanswered. We demonstrate that the intracellular cadherin binding protein, δ-catenin, is transiently palmitoylated by DHHC5 following enhanced synaptic activity, and that palmitoylation increases δ-catenin/cadherin interactions at synapses. Both the palmitoylation of δ-catenin and its binding to cadherin are required for activity-induced stabilization of N-cadherin at synapses, the enlargement of postsynaptic spines, as well as insertion of GluA1 and GluA2 subunits into the synaptic membrane and the concomitant increase in mEPSC amplitude. Importantly, context-dependent fear conditioning in mice results in increased δ-catenin palmitoylation as well as increased δ-catenin/cadherin associations at hippocampal synapses. Together, this suggests a role for palmitoylated δ-catenin in coordinating activity-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion molecules, synapse structure, and receptor localization that are involved in memory formation. PMID:24562000

  6. Epicatechin and catechin modulate endothelial activation induced by platelets of patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, R; Loffredo, L; Nocella, C; Bartimoccia, S; Bucci, T; De Falco, E; Peruzzi, M; Chimenti, I; Biondi-Zoccai, G; Pignatelli, P; Violi, F; Frati, G

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. PMID:25180068

  7. Transcription factor NFAT1 controls allergic contact hypersensitivity through regulation of activation induced cell death program

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Gi-Cheon; Hwang, Ji Sun; Kim, Young; Chae, Chang-Suk; Nam, Jong Hee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Rudra, Dipayan; Surh, Charles D.; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is an inflammatory skin disease mediated by allergen specific T cells. In this study, we investigated the role of transcription factor NFAT1 in the pathogenesis of contact hypersensitivity. NFAT1 knock out (KO) mice spontaneously developed CHS-like skin inflammation in old age. Healthy young NFAT1 KO mice displayed enhanced susceptibility to hapten-induced CHS. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from NFAT1 KO mice displayed hyper-activated properties and produced significantly enhanced levels of inflammatory T helper 1(Th1)/Th17 type cytokines. NFAT1 KO T cells were more resistant to activation induced cell death (AICD), and regulatory T cells derived from these mice showed a partial defect in their suppressor activity. NFAT1 KO T cells displayed a reduced expression of apoptosis associated BCL-2/BH3 family members. Ectopic expression of NFAT1 restored the AICD defect in NFAT1 KO T cells and increased AICD in normal T cells. Recipient Rag2−/− mice transferred with NFAT1 KO T cells showed more severe CHS sensitivity due to a defect in activation induced hapten-reactive T cell apoptosis. Collectively, our results suggest the NFAT1 plays a pivotal role as a genetic switch in CD4+/CD8+ T cell tolerance by regulating AICD process in the T cell mediated skin inflammation. PMID:26777750

  8. AIDS Education for the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Jeffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    Sun Life in Wellesley, Massachusetts, has an ongoing education program about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) that provides employees with facts and works to change attitudes about the implications of AIDS for the workplace. (SK)

  9. Different Styles of Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... aids available and offer some cosmetic and listening advantages. Photo courtesy of Phonak Click for larger image ... in place. These aids offer cosmetic and listening advantages and are used typically for adults. Photo courtesy ...

  10. Women and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... action on HIV/AIDS National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day – March 10 Programs Share your story Anonymous from Illinois says... Although I am HIV negative, I would like to share my story. ...

  11. An Insight into the Environmental Effects of the Pocket of the Active Site of the Enzyme. Ab initio ONIOM-Molecular Dynamics (MD) Study on Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2008-02-01

    We applied the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method to cytosine deaminase to examine the environmental effects of the amino acid residues in the pocket of the active site on the substrate taking account of their thermal motion. The ab initio ONIOM-MD simulations show that the substrate uracil is strongly perturbed by the amino acid residue Ile33, which sandwiches the uracil with His62, through the steric contact due to the thermal motion. As a result, the magnitude of the thermal oscillation of the potential energy and structure of the substrate uracil significantly increases. TM and MA were partly supported by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  12. The AIDS epidemic.

    PubMed

    Conant, M A

    1994-09-01

    The nature of the clinical presentation of HIV infection continues to evolve over time. New cutaneous (e.g., seborrheic dermatitis, onychomycosis, and tinea pedis) and systemic (e.g., Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium marneffei) opportunistic fungal infections can now be added to the classic clinical markers for progressive HIV infection, such as Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, Mycobacterium avium intercellulare infections, and cryptococcal meningitis. The fact that the appearance of many of these fungal diseases is directly correlated with the patient's CD4 cell count is a valuable tool for ongoing clinical evaluation. Although systemic manifestations characterize a progression from asymptomatic HIV infection to AIDS, many of the signs of disease progression are cutaneous. Prophylaxis against many of the potentially life-threatening systemic opportunistic infections associated with HIV positivity has had a positive impact on the life expectancy of patients with AIDS. PMID:7915731

  13. Living with AIDS: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A series of articles concerning various aspects of AIDS and the dilemmas it poses for U.S. society, culture, and government are presented, in this theme issue, e.g., "Introduction to the Issue" (K. Keniston); "Prospects for the Medical Control of the AIDS Epidemic" (W. Haseltine); "Social Policy: AIDS and Intravenous Drug Use" (N. Zinberg);…

  14. Pharmacotherapeutics for the AIDS Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fife, Kenneth H.

    1991-01-01

    Anticipated shifts in the demographics of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic are examined, current state-of-the-art AIDS patient management is summarized, and some unique facets of drug therapy in the AIDS patient are discussed, including adverse reactions, complex drug interactions, use of investigational drugs, and…

  15. Educational Aids for Visually Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY.

    Listings specifying source and cost are provided of tactile aids and materials designed for the visually handicapped. Items are presented in the following categories: supply sources and catalogs for aids; braille devices, including duplicators, reading and writing aids, reading readiness materials, and writing machines, slates, and styluses; deaf…

  16. How Do People Get AIDS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Friend Who Cuts? How Do People Get AIDS? KidsHealth > For Teens > How Do People Get AIDS? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Cómo contrae alguien el SIDA? AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome , a disease that ...

  17. Teachers' Aides: Tasks and Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balderson, James H.; Nixon, Mary

    1976-01-01

    Addresses three questions: (1) What tasks do aides perform? (2) Does training make a difference in the type of tasks aides perform? (3) What are the concerns of aides? (Available from the Department of Educational Administration, The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G5; $0.50, single copy.) (Author/IRT)

  18. In Support of Student Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devitt, James

    1995-01-01

    Concerns about cuts in federal student loan and grant programs are outlined, and ways in which institutions can act to influence policy are examined. Basic facts about potential cuts, their effects, federal spending on student aid, aid recipients, public opinion, and aid policy's effects on tuition are discussed. (MSE)

  19. AIDS Awareness in Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundy, Lyndall L.

    1994-01-01

    Survey responses from 88 of 293 industrial technology education department heads found that 68% could not identify courses in which acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is covered; 52% were not aware of AIDS-related activities on their campuses; and 48% had AIDS education programs at their institutions. (SK)

  20. Directional Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M.; Lin, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing-aid device indicates visually whether sound is coming from left, right, back, or front. Device intended to assist individuals who are deaf in at least one ear and unable to discern naturally directions to sources of sound. Device promotes safety in street traffic, on loading docks, and in presence of sirens, alarms, and other warning sounds. Quadraphonic version of device built into pair of eyeglasses and binaural version built into visor.