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Sample records for activation-regulated chemokine tarc

  1. Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine as disease activity and response biomarker in alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Inui, Shigeki; Noguchi, Fumihito; Nakajima, Takeshi; Itami, Satoshi

    2013-11-01

    Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17 (sTARC) is known as a good indicator for atopic dermatitis severity. Herein, we investigate whether sTARC correlates with severity and therapeutic response for alopecia areata (AA) in our 121 patients. The sTARC mean of AA totalis and universalis was significantly higher than mild AA. Next, we compared sTARC of diffuse AA (n = 14) and severity-controlled patchy AA (n = 32) and found that sTARC in diffuse AA (564.2 ± 400.0 pg/mL) was significantly higher than that of the patchy type (344.0 ± 239.8 pg/mL), suggesting a potential role of TARC in active progression of diffuse AA. Ten patients with diffuse AA were treated with i.v. corticosteroid pulse therapy. Then, we tested whether sTARC can predict prognosis after the pulse therapy and found that baseline sTARC in the poor responders (1025.5 ± 484.8 pg/mL) was significantly higher than that in the good responders (complete remission at 24 months after the pulse therapy, 347.8 ± 135.7 pg/mL), indicating sTARC as a response biomarker in the corticosteroid pulse therapy for diffuse AA. Finally, to investigate TARC production in the affected hair follicles, we performed immunohistochemical double staining of TARC and CD68 using scalp skin specimens of diffuse AA with high titers of sTARC. The results showed their co-localization in the infiltrating cells around the AA hair follicles, suggesting that TARC is mainly produced from CD68(+) histiocytes. In conclusion, sTARC is a disease activity and response biomarker in AA, providing new insight beyond the T-helper 1/2 paradigm to solve the immunological pathogenesis of AA.

  2. Clinical significance of serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine in gastric cancer: Potential as a serum biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jong-Baeck; Kim, Do-Kyun; Chung, Hye Won

    2014-01-01

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) can stimulate cancer cell proliferation and migration. The present study evaluated the clinical significance of serum TARC in gastric cancer (GC). We measured serum TARC, macrophage-derived chemokine, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and stem cell factor (SCF) levels using a chemiluminescent immunoassay along the GC carcinogenesis (normal, high-risk, early GC [EGC] and advanced GC [AGC]) in both training (N = 25 per group) and independent validation datasets (90 normal, 30 high-risk, 50 EGC and 50 AGC). Serum levels were compared among groups using one-way analysis of variance. To evaluate the diagnostic potential of serum TARC for GC, receiver operating characteristic curve and logistic regression analyses were performed. Correlations between serum TARC and GC clinicopathological features were analyzed using Spearman's correlation. In the training dataset, serum TARC correlated with serum MDC, MCP-1 and SCF. However, only serum TARC and SCF were significantly higher in cancer groups than non-cancer groups (P < 0.001). In the validation dataset, serum TARC also increased along the GC carcinogenesis; the AGC group (167.2 ± 111.1 ng/mL) had significantly higher levels than the EGC (109.1 ± 67.7 ng/mL), the high-risk (66.2 ± 47.7 ng/mL) and the normal (67.5 ± 36.2 ng/mL) groups (Bonferroni, all P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves and logistic regression demonstrated the remarkable diagnostic potential of serum TARC as a single marker (72.0% sensitivity and 71.1% specificity; cutoff point, 0.37; logistic regression) and in a multiple-marker panel (72.6% sensitivity and 88.2% specificity; cutoff point, 0.54). Spearman's correlation showed that serum TARC was closely correlated with tumor size (γs = 0.227, P = 0.028), T-stage (γs = 0.340, P = 0.001), N-stage (γs = 0.318, P = 0.002) and M-stage (γs = 0.346, P = 0.001). Serum TARC is a promising serum biomarker for GC

  3. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLE COMPOSITION AND THE METHOD OF SONICATION INFLUENCE THE ADJUVANCY EFFECT AND TARC PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous reports have shown diesel exhaust particles (DEP) can act as an immunological adjuvant in asthma. Recent interest has focused on thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) as an important modulator of this effect. This study evaluated the adjuvancy effects of thr...

  4. Suppressive effects of Bifidobacterium longum on the production of Th2-attracting chemokines induced with T cell-antigen-presenting cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Noritoshi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Yonezawa, Sumiko; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2009-04-01

    In human trials, Bifidobacterium longum BB536 alleviates subjective symptoms of Japanese cedar pollinosis, an IgE-mediated type I allergy caused by exposure to Japanese cedar, and significantly suppresses the increase of plasma thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) associated with pollen dispersion. In the present study, we investigated the suppressive effects of BB536 on the production of T helper type 2 (Th2)-attracting chemokines, such as TARC and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), together with the mechanisms of their production. Murine splenocytes were cultured with heat-killed BB536, and the levels of Th2-attracting chemokines in the supernatants were measured. TARC and MDC were produced in cultures without stimulation, and the production was significantly suppressed by BB536. These chemokines were produced by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of splenocytes stimulated with an anti-CD40 antibody. Furthermore, TARC production was induced with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor that was produced by T cells and dendritic cells. BB536 suppressed MDC production induced with the anti-CD40 antibody by APCs from the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches, and it suppressed TARC production by APCs from the spleen and MLNs. These results indicate that BB536 suppresses the production of Th2-attracting chemokines induced by the T cell-APC interaction, suggesting a novel mechanism for alleviating symptoms of allergic disorders by probiotics.

  5. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-05-01

    Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD. PMID:24704449

  6. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression in HaCaT cells. • PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB mediate TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression. • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB. • (+)-Nootkatone suppresses chemokine expression by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 pathways. - Abstract: Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  7. Fas signal links innate and adaptive immunity by promoting dendritic-cell secretion of CC and CXC chemokines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenhong; Zhang, Minghui; Tang, Hua; Cao, Xuetao

    2005-09-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and chemokines are important in linking innate and adaptive immunity. We previously reported that Fas ligation induced interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta)-dependent maturation and IL-1beta-independent survival of DCs, with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling pathways involved, respectively. We describe here that Fas ligation induced DCs to rapidly produce both CXC and CC chemokines, including macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted), and TARC (thymus and activation-regulated chemokine), resulting in enhanced chemoattraction of neutrophils and T cells by Fas-ligated DCs in vivo or by its supernatant in vitro. These chemokines work synergistically in chemoattraction of neutrophils and T cells with MIP-2 more important for neutrophils, MIP-1alpha and TARC more important for T cells. Moreover, Fas-ligated DCs increased endocytosis by neutrophils and activation and proliferation of antigen-specific naive T cells. Fas ligation-induced DC secretion of chemokines involves Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK activation and is ERK, but not NF-kappaB, dependent. Activation of caspases, including caspase 1, but not IL-1 autocrine action, is involved in this process. These data indicate that Fas signaling provides a key link between innate response and adaptive immunity by promoting DC chemokine production.

  8. Serum concentration of macrophage-derived chemokine may be a useful inflammatory marker for assessing severity of atopic dermatitis in infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting Fan; Ma, Kwok Chiu; Hon, Kam Lun; Lam, Christopher W K; Wan, Helene; Li, Chung Yi; Chan, Iris H S

    2003-08-01

    Chemokines are responsible for the trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Serum chemokine levels were previously shown to be increased in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). We tested whether serum concentrations of chemokines, including macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), eotaxin (EOX), interferon gamma inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), are useful inflammatory markers for assessing AD severity in infants and young children. To investigate this, we assessed the severity of AD clinically using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index system. Serum chemokine concentrations were determined by sandwich enzyme immunoassay. Twenty AD patients with a median age of 2.1 years [interquartile range (IQR): 0.6-4.2] were recruited. Their SCORAD score was 23.5 (12.5-33.5). Serum concentrations of MDC, TARC, EOX, IP-10 and MCP-1 were 2551 (1978-3935), 1469 (1125-3070), 68 (57-85), 126 (101-226) and 518 (419-614) pg/ml, respectively. Serum MDC levels correlated with SCORAD (r = 0.608, p = 0.004) and its extent (r = 0.629, p = 0.003) and intensity (r = 0.557, p = 0.011) components. Serum TARC concentration showed weaker correlation with extent (r = 0.474, p = 0.035) and intensity (r = 0.465, p = 0.039) of skin involvement but not SCORAD. The median serum levels of MDC (3131 vs. 2394 pg/ml; p = 0.031) and EOX (80 vs. 61 pg/ml; p = 0.046) were also higher in children with moderate as compared with mild AD. The other chemokines did not correlate with AD severity. In conclusion, our results suggest that serum MDC concentration may be a useful inflammatory marker for assessing AD severity in infants and young children. PMID:12911508

  9. Surfactant protein D, Club cell protein 16, Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine, C-reactive protein, and Fibrinogen biomarker variation in chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Lock-Johansson, Sofie; Vestbo, Jørgen; Sorensen, Grith Lykke

    2014-11-25

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multifaceted condition that cannot be fully described by the severity of airway obstruction. The limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted researchers to investigate a multitude of surrogate biomarkers of disease for the assessment of patients, prediction of risk, and guidance of treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of observations for a selection of recently investigated pulmonary inflammatory biomarkers (Surfactant protein D (SP-D), Club cell protein 16 (CC-16), and Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC/CCL-18)) and systemic inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen) with COPD. The relevance of these biomarkers for COPD is discussed in terms of their biological plausibility, their independent association to disease and hard clinical outcomes, their modification by interventions, and whether changes in clinical outcomes are reflected by changes in the biomarker.

  10. Piercing tool, Transportation Accident Resistant Container (TARC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, P.

    1994-08-01

    Transportation Accident Resistant Containers (TARC)s are used for enhanced safety during movement of nuclear weapons. Its design features a tough stainless steel outer skin, redwood for impact mitigation and fire protection and a rugged aluminum inner container. Redwood absorbs impact energy by crushing, similar to the way foam crushes in other containers. Redwood also functions to insulate the weapon from heat and fire. When a TARC is involved in a fire, the redwood will slowly burn forming a good insulating char. The redwood can continue to smolder once the fire is out. To ensure the smolder is extinguished, water can be directed into any accident caused hole in the skin. If no hole exists, it may be necessary to create one. This document discusses tool selection, testing, and a simple but effective method of creating an access hole in the outer skin large enough to apply fire fighting techniques.

  11. Traditional herbal formula Jakyakgamcho-tang (Paeonia lactiflora and Glycyrrhiza uralensis) impairs inflammatory chemokine production by inhibiting activation of STAT1 and NF-κB in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Lim, Hye-Sun; Seo, Chang-Seob; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Jin, Seong-Eun; Yoo, Sae-Rom; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2015-02-15

    A traditional herbal formula Jakyakgamcho-tang (JYGCT; Paeonia lactiflora and Glycyrrhiza uralensis) has been used for treatment of backache, muscle pain, acute abdominal pain, neuralgia, bronchial asthma, and painful peripheral neuropathy in Oriental medicine. We report on our experiments using the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line showing that a traditional herbal formula JYGCT has inhibitory effects on inflammatory responses in skin. Stimulation with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) caused a significant increase in the production of the following chemokines: thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC)/CCL17; macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC)/CCL22; regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5; and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in HaCaT cells. By contrast, treatment with JYGCT extract significantly reduced the production of TARC, MDC, RANTES, and IL-8, but caused no cytotoxicity, compared with TNF-α and IFN-γ-treated control cells. Consistently, JYGCT extract downregulated the mRNA expression of TARC, MDC, RANTES, and IL-8 induced by TNF-α and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, TNF-α and IFN-γ markedly increased the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in HaCaT cells. By contrast, TNF-α and IFN-γ-induced activation of STAT1 and NF-κB activation was inhibited by JYGCT treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Our data indicate that JYGCT attenuates TNF-α and IFN-γ-mediated chemokine production by targeting the STAT1 and NF-κB signalling in keratinocytes. Our findings suggest that JYGCT has potential as a therapeutic drug candidate for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:25765840

  12. 24 CFR 902.75 - Referral to a Troubled Agency Recovery Center (TARC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Recovery Center (TARC). 902.75 Section 902.75 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... § 902.75 Referral to a Troubled Agency Recovery Center (TARC). (a) General. Upon a PHA's designation of... of the preliminary MOA. (d) Maximum recovery period—(1) Expiration of one-year recovery period....

  13. Alantolactone from Saussurea lappa Exerts Antiinflammatory Effects by Inhibiting Chemokine Production and STAT1 Phosphorylation in TNF-α and IFN-γ-induced in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hye-Sun; Jin, Sung-Eun; Kim, Ohn-Soon; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo; Jeong, Soo-Jin

    2015-07-01

    Skin inflammation is the most common condition seen in dermatology practice and can be caused by various allergic reactions and certain toxins or chemicals. In the present study, we investigated the antiinflammatory effects of Saussurea lappa, a medicinal herb, and its marker compounds alantolactone, caryophyllene, costic acid, costunolide, and dehydrocostuslactone in the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. HaCaT cells were stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and treated with S. lappa or each of five marker compounds. Chemokine production and expression were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 was determined by immunoblotting. Stimulation with TNF-α and IFN-γ significantly increased the production of the following chemokines: thymus-regulated and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC): regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES): macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC): and interleukin-8 (IL-8). By contrast, S. lappa and the five marker compounds significantly reduced the production of these chemokines by TNF-α and IFN-γ-treated cells. S. lappa and alantolactone suppressed the TNF-α and IFN-γ-stimulated increase in the phosphorylation of STAT1. Our results demonstrate that alantolactone from S. lappa suppresses TNF-α and IFN-γ-induced production of RANTES and IL-8 by blocking STAT1 phosphorylation in HaCaT cells. PMID:25881570

  14. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  15. Inhibition of lung metastasis by chemokine CCL17-mediated in vivo silencing of genes in CCR4+ Tregs.

    PubMed

    Biragyn, Arya; Bodogai, Monica; Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Denny-Brown, Sinan R; Puri, Nitin; Ayukawa, Koichi; Kanegasaki, Shiro; Hogaboam, Cory M; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Lee-Chang, Catalina

    2013-05-01

    Despite significant attractiveness of antisense oligonucleotide/RNAi technology, its clinical application has been precluded by a lack of methods for targeted delivery and transduction of primary immune cells in vivo. Here, we devised a chemokine CCL17-based strategy (TARC-arp) that transiently silences expression of genes in immune cells by delivering inhibitory oligonucleotides through their chemokine receptors. In modeling studies using mice with established 4T1.2 breast cancer, we show that IL10 produced by CCR4 cells, in particular FoxP3 regulatory T cells (Tregs), plays an important role in lung metastasis. As such, TARC-arp-mediated silencing of IL10 or FoxP3 in CCR4 Tregs is sufficient to block lung metastasis. Thus, we provide a simple solution that circumvents the problems of RNAi use in vivo, indicating that a disease outcome can be successfully controlled by delivering inhibitory oligonucleotides with chemokines to inactivate a selective subset of immune cells. PMID:23603860

  16. Chemokines and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Diana Carolina Torres; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines and generally have low molecular weight ranging from 7 to 15kDa. Chemokines and their receptors are able to control the migration and residence of all immune cells. Some chemokines are considered pro-inflammatory, and their release can be induced during an immune response at a site of infection, while others are considered homeostatic and are involved in controlling of cells migration during tissue development or maintenance. The physiologic importance of this family of mediators is resulting from their specificity − members of the chemokine family induce recruitment of well-defined leukocyte subsets. There are two major chemokine sub-families based upon cysteine residues position: CXC and CC. As a general rule, members of the CXC chemokines are chemotactic for neutrophils, and CC chemokines are chemotactic for monocytes and sub-set of lymphocytes, although there are some exceptions. This review discusses the potential role of chemokines in inflammation focusing on the two best-characterized chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a CC chemokine, and interleukin-8, a member of the CXC chemokine sub-family. PMID:26466066

  17. Intra-articular CD1c-expressing myeloid dendritic cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients express a unique set of T cell-attracting chemokines and spontaneously induce Th1, Th17 and Th2 cell activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) are potent T cell-activating antigen-presenting cells that have been suggested to play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses in many disease states, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Despite this, studies that have reported on the capacity of naturally occurring circulating mDCs to regulate T cell activation in RA are still lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the phenotypic and functional properties of naturally occurring CD1c (BDCA-1)+ mDCs from synovial fluid (SF) compared to those from peripheral blood (PB) of RA patients. Methods CD1c+ mDC numbers and expression of costimulatory molecules were assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis in SF and PB from RA patients. Ex vivo secretion of 45 inflammatory mediators by mDCs from SF and PB of RA patients was determined by multiplex immunoassay. The capacity of mDCs from SF to activate autologous CD4+ T cells was measured. Results CD1c+ mDC numbers were significantly increased in SF versus PB of RA patients (mean 4.7% vs. 0.6%). mDCs from SF showed increased expression of antigen-presenting (human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II, CD1c) and costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86 and CD40). Numerous cytokines were equally abundantly produced by mDCs from both PB and SF (including IL-12, IL-23, IL-13, IL-21). SF mDCs secreted higher levels of interferon γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), monokine induced by interferon γ (MIG) and, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), but lower macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels compared to mDCs from PB. mDCs from SF displayed a strongly increased capacity to induce proliferation of CD4+ T cells associated with a strongly augmented IFNγ, IL-17, and IL-4 production. Conclusions This study suggests that increased numbers of CD1c+ mDCs in SF are involved in the inflammatory cascade intra-articularly by the secretion of specific T cell-attracting chemokines and the activation of

  18. Chemokines, chemokine receptors and the gastrointestinal system

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Yeudall, W Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The biological properties of tumor cells are known to be regulated by a multitude of cytokines and growth factors, which include epidermal growth factor receptor agonists and members of the transforming growth factor β family. Furthermore, the recent explosion of research in the field of chemokine function as mediators of tumor progression has led to the possibility that these small, immunomodulatory proteins also play key roles in carcinogenesis and may, therefore, be potential targets for novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we will summarize recently reported findings in chemokine biology with a focus on the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23704819

  19. Chemokines and disease.

    PubMed

    Gerard, C; Rollins, B J

    2001-02-01

    We examine here several diseases that are associated with inappropriate activation of the chemokine network. Detailed comment has been restricted to pathological states for which there are compelling data either from clinical observations or animal models. These include cardiovascular disease, allergic inflammatory disease, transplantation, neuroinflammation, cancer and HIV-associated disease. Discussion focuses on therapeutic directions in which the rapidly evolving chemokine field appears to be headed. PMID:11175802

  20. Chemokines and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Aukrust, Pål; Halvorsen, Bente; Yndestad, Arne; Ueland, Thor; Øie, Erik; Otterdal, Kari; Gullestad, Lars; Damås, Jan K

    2008-11-01

    Based on the importance of inflammation in atherogenesis, recent work has focused on whether plasma markers of inflammation can noninvasively diagnose and prognosticate atherosclerotic disorders. Although several studies support an important pathogenic role of chemokines in atherosclerosis, potentially representing attractive therapeutic targets in atherosclerotic disorders, this does not necessarily mean that chemokines are suitable parameters for risk prediction. In fact, the ability to reflect upstream inflammatory activity, stable levels in individuals, and high stability of the actual protein (eg, long half-life and negligible circadian variation) are additional important criteria for an ideal biomarker in cardiovascular disease. Although plasma/serum levels of certain chemokines (eg, interleukin- 8/CXCL8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CCL2) have shown to be predictive for future cardiac events in some studies, their role as clinical biomarkers is unclear, and their ability to predict subclinical atherosclerosis has been disappointing. Further prospective studies, including a larger number of patients, are needed to make any firm conclusion. Based on the participation of several chemokines in atherogenesis, it is possible that in the future, combined measurements of multiple chemokines could reveal as a "signature of disease" that can serve as a highly accurate method to assess for the presence of atherosclerotic disease. PMID:18669888

  1. Chemokines and cytokines in patients with an occult Onchocerca volvulus infection.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Christian J; Gantin, Richard G; Seeger, Tanja; Sarnecka, Alicja; Portillo, Jennifer; Schulz-Key, Hartwig; Karabou, Potochoziou K; Helling-Giese, Gertrud; Heuschkel, Christoph; Banla, Meba; Soboslay, Peter T

    2012-05-01

    Repeated ivermectin treatment will clear microfilaria (Mf) of Onchocerca volvulus from skin and eyes of onchocerciasis patients while adult filaria remains alive and reproductive, and such occult O. volvulus infection may persist for years. To investigate the effect of residual adult filaria on the immune response profile, chemokines and cytokines were quantified 1) in onchocerciasis patients who developed an occult O. volvulus infection (Mf-negative) due to repeated ivermectin treatments, 2) patients who became Mf-negative without ivermectin treatments due to missing re-infection, and 3) endemic and non-endemic O. volvulus Mf-negative controls. With occult O. volvulus infection, serum levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MPIF-1/CCL23 and CXCL8/IL-8 enhanced and approached higher concentrations as determined in infection-free controls, whilst regulatory and Th2-type cytokines and chemokines MCP-4/CCL13, MIP-1δ/CCL15, TARC/CCL17 and IL-13 lessened. Levels of Eotaxin-2/CCL24, MCP-3/CCL7 and BCA-1/CXCL13 remained unchanged. At 3 days post-initial ivermectin treatment, MCP-1/CCL2, MCP-4/CCL13, MPIF-1/CCL23 and Eotaxin-2/CCL24 were strongly enhanced, suggesting that monocytes and eosinophil granulocytes have mediated Mf clearance. In summary, with occult and expiring O. volvulus infections the serum levels of inflammatory chemokines enhanced over time while regulatory and Th2-type-promoting cytokines and chemokines lessened; these changes may reflect a decreasing effector cell activation against Mf of O. volvulus, and in parallel, an enhancing inflammatory immune responsiveness. PMID:22202179

  2. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  3. Results from the TARC experiment: spallation neutron phenomenology in lead and neutron-driven nuclear transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abánades, A.; Aleixandre, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Arnould, H.; Belle, E.; Bompas, C. A.; Brozzi, D.; Bueno, J.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J. I.; Cerro, E.; Del Moral, R.; Díez, S.; Dumps, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid, M.; Fernández, R.; Gálvez, J.; García, J.; Gelès, C.; Giorni, A.; González, E.; González, O.; Goulas, I.; Heuer, D.; Hussonnois, M.; Kadi, Y.; Karaiskos, P.; Kitis, G.; Klapisch, R.; Kokkas, P.; Lacoste, V.; Le Naour, C.; López, C.; Loiseaux, J. M.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Méplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Oropesa, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Pérez-Enciso, E.; Pérez-Navarro, A.; Perlado, M.; Placci, A.; Poza, M.; Revol, J.-P.; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J. A.; Sakelliou, L.; Saldaña, F.; Savvidis, E.; Schussler, F.; Sirvent, C.; Tamarit, J.; Trubert, D.; Tzima, A.; Viano, J. B.; Vieira, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Zioutas, K.

    2002-02-01

    We summarize here the results of the TARC experiment whose main purpose is to demonstrate the possibility of using Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) to destroy efficiently Long-Lived Fission Fragments (LLFFs) in accelerator-driven systems and to validate a new simulation developed in the framework of the Energy Amplifier programme. An experimental set-up was installed in a CERN PS proton beam line to study how neutrons produced by spallation at relatively high energy ( E n⩾1 MeV) slow down quasi-adiabatically with almost flat isolethargic energy distribution and reach the capture resonance energy of an element to be transmuted where they will have a high probability of being captured. Precision measurements of energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (using 2.5 and 3.5 GeV/ c protons) slowing down in a 3.3 m×3.3 m×3 m lead volume and of neutron capture rates on LLFFs 99Tc, 129I, and several other elements were performed. An appropriate formalism and appropriate computational tools necessary for the analysis and understanding of the data were developed and validated in detail. Our direct experimental observation of ARC demonstrates the possibility to destroy, in a parasitic mode, outside the Energy Amplifier core, large amounts of 99Tc or 129I at a rate exceeding the production rate, thereby making it practical to reduce correspondingly the existing stockpile of LLFFs. In addition, TARC opens up new possibilities for radioactive isotope production as an alternative to nuclear reactors, in particular for medical applications, as well as new possibilities for neutron research and industrial applications.

  4. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Steve; Tafalla, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specifically zebrafish (Danio rerio), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly. PMID:26569324

  5. Novel antiviral activity of chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Takashi; Shirane, Jumi; Hieshima, Kunio; Shibano, Michiko; Watanabe, Masayasu; Jin, Zhe; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Saito, Takuya; Shimomura, Yoshikazu; Yoshie, Osamu . E-mail: o.yoshie@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2006-07-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse family of small, mostly cationic polypeptides that kill bacteria, fungi and even some enveloped viruses, while chemokines are a group of mostly cationic small proteins that induce directed migration of leukocytes through interactions with a group of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides and chemokines have substantially overlapping functions. Thus, while some antimicrobial peptides are chemotactic for leukocytes, some chemokines can kill a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Here, we examined a possible direct antiviral activity of chemokines against an enveloped virus HSV-1. Among 22 human chemokines examined, chemokines such as MIP-1{alpha}/CCL3, MIP-1{beta}/CCL4 and RANTES/CCL5 showed a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1. It is intriguing that these chemokines are mostly known to be highly expressed by effector CD8{sup +} T cells. The chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity commonly bound to HSV-1 virions via envelope glycoprotein gB. Electron microscopy revealed that the chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity were commonly capable of generating pores in the envelope of HSV-1. Thus, some chemokines have a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro and may have a potential role in host defense against HSV-1 as a direct antiviral agent.

  6. Chemokines in cancer related inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Allavena, Paola; Germano, Giovanni; Marchesi, Federica; Mantovani, Alberto

    2011-03-10

    Chemokines are key players of the cancer-related inflammation. Chemokine ligands and receptors are downstream of genetic events that cause neoplastic transformation and are abundantly expressed in chronic inflammatory conditions which predispose to cancer. Components of the chemokine system affect multiple pathways of tumor progression including: leukocyte recruitment, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation and survival, invasion and metastasis. Evidence in pre-clinical and clinical settings suggests that the chemokine system represents a valuable target for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  7. Chemokine binding proteins encoded by pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcami, Antonio; Saraiva, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    Chemokines are chemoattractant cytokines that play an important role in immunity. The role of chemokines against invading pathogens is emphasized by the expression of chemokine inhibitors by many pathogens. A mechanims employed by poxviruses and herpesviruses is the secretion of chemokine bindingproteins unrelated to host receptors that bind chemokines with high affinity and block their activity. Soluble chemokine binding proteins have also been identified in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and in ticks. The binding specificity of these inhibitors of cell migration point at chemokines that contribute to host defense mechanisms against various pathogens. Chemokine binding proteins modulate the immune response and may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat inflamatory diseases.

  8. Chemokine and Chemokine Receptor Polymorphisms in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tokac, Damla; Tuzun, Erdem; Gulec, Huseyin; Yılmaz, Vuslat; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating psychiatric disease with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown inflammation as a potential contributing factor of BD pathogenesis. However, potential associations between chemokine and chemokine receptor polymorphisms and BD have been fundamentally understudied. To identify participation of chemokines in BD pathogenesis, we examined genetic variants of several chemokine and chemokine receptor genes. Methods The study population comprised 200 patients with BD and 195 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Genotyping of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) A2518G, CCR2 V64I, CCR5 Δ32, CCR5 A55029G, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) 3'A, and CXCR4 C138T polymorphisms was performed using polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion. Results We found that CCR5-Δ32 II and CXCR4-C138T C+ genotype frequencies contributed to an increased risk for BD. However, no statistical significance could be obtained with these genotypes after Bonferroni correction. A significant asssociation was only found with MCP-1 GG and G+ genotypes, which were markedly more prevalent in patients with BD and these genotypes seemed to significantly increase the risk for BD even after Bonferroni correction. Conclusion Our findings indicate an association between genetic variants of certain chemokine and chemokine receptor (especially MCP-1) genes and BD. The exact mechanisms by which these variants contribute to BD pathogenesis and their clinical implications need to be further investigated. PMID:27757133

  9. Experimental verification of neutron phenomenology in lead and of transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing in accelerator driven systems. A summary of the TARC Project at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abánades, A.; Aleixandre, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Arnould, H.; Belle, E.; Bompas, C. A.; Brozzi, D.; Bueno, J.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J. I.; Cerro, E.; Del Moral, R.; Díez, S.; Dumps, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid, M.; Fernández, R.; Gálvez, J.; García, J.; Gelès, C.; Giorni, A.; González, E.; González, O.; Goulas, I.; Heuer, D.; Hussonnois, M.; Kadi, Y.; Karaiskos, P.; Kitis, G.; Klapisch, R.; Kokkas, P.; Lacoste, V.; Le Naour, C.; López, C.; Loiseaux, J. M.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Méplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Oropesa, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Pérez-Enciso, E.; Pérez-Navarro, A.; Perlado, M.; Placci, A.; Poza, M.; Revol, J.-P.; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J. A.; Sakelliou, L.; Saldaña, F.; Savvidis, E.; Schussler, F.; Sirvent, C.; Tamarit, J.; Trubert, D.; Tzima, A.; Viano, J. B.; Vieira, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Zioutas, K.

    2001-05-01

    The Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment was carried out as PS211 at the CERN PS from 1996 to 1999. Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (produced by 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/ c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3×3.3×3 m 3 lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragments 99Tc and 129I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation.

  10. Biased signaling at chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Corbisier, Jenny; Galès, Céline; Huszagh, Alexandre; Parmentier, Marc; Springael, Jean-Yves

    2015-04-10

    The ability of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to activate selective signaling pathways according to the conformation stabilized by bound ligands (signaling bias) is a challenging concept in the GPCR field. Signaling bias has been documented for several GPCRs, including chemokine receptors. However, most of these studies examined the global signaling bias between G protein- and arrestin-dependent pathways, leaving unaddressed the potential bias between particular G protein subtypes. Here, we investigated the coupling selectivity of chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5, and CCR7 in response to various ligands with G protein subtypes by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer biosensors monitoring directly the activation of G proteins. We also compared data obtained with the G protein biosensors with those obtained with other functional readouts, such as β-arrestin-2 recruitment, cAMP accumulation, and calcium mobilization assays. We showed that the binding of chemokines to CCR2, CCR5, and CCR7 activated the three Gαi subtypes (Gαi1, Gαi2, and Gαi3) and the two Gαo isoforms (Gαoa and Gαob) with potencies that generally correlate to their binding affinities. In addition, we showed that the binding of chemokines to CCR5 and CCR2 also activated Gα12, but not Gα13. For each receptor, we showed that the relative potency of various agonist chemokines was not identical in all assays, supporting the notion that signaling bias exists at chemokine receptors.

  11. Chemokines in tumor development and progression

    SciTech Connect

    Mukaida, Naofumi; Baba, Tomohisa

    2012-01-15

    Chemokines were originally identified as mediators of the inflammatory process and regulators of leukocyte trafficking. Subsequent studies revealed their essential roles in leukocyte physiology and pathology. Moreover, chemokines have profound effects on other types of cells associated with the inflammatory response, such as endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Thus, chemokines are crucial for cancer-related inflammation, which can promote tumor development and progression. Increasing evidence points to the vital effects of several chemokines on the proliferative and invasive properties of tumor cells. The wide range of activities of chemokines in tumorigenesis highlights their roles in tumor development and progression.

  12. ROLE OF CHEMOKINES IN TUMOR GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Baugher, Paige J.; Thu, Yee Mon; Richmond, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines play a paramount role in the tumor progression. Chronic inflammation promotes tumor formation. Both tumor cells and stromal cells elaborate chemokines and cytokines. These act either by autocrine or paracrine mechanisms to sustain tumor cell growth, induce angiogenesis and facilitate evasion of immune surveillance through immunoediting. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 and its ligands promote tumor angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration into the tumor microenvironment. In harsh acidic and hypoxic microenvironmental conditions tumor cells up-regulate their expression of CXCR4, which equips them to migrate up a gradient of CXCL12 elaborated by carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to a normoxic microenvironment. The CXCL12-CXCR4 axis facilitates metastasis to distant organs and the CCL21-CCR7 chemokine ligand-receptor pair favors metastasis to lymph nodes. These two chemokine ligand-receptor systems are common key mediators of tumor cell metastasis for several malignancies and as such provide key targets for chemotherapy. In this paper, the role of specific chemokines/chemokine receptor interactions in tumor progression, growth and metastasis and the role of chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions in the stromal compartment as related to angiogenesis, metastasis, and immune response to the tumor are reviewed. PMID:17629396

  13. Atypical chemokine receptors in cancer: friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Massara, Matteo; Bonavita, Ornella; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-06-01

    The chemokine system is a fundamental component of cancer-related inflammation involved in all stages of cancer development. It controls not only leukocyte infiltration in primary tumors but also angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and migration to metastatic sites. Atypical chemokine receptors are a new, emerging class of regulators of the chemokine system. They control chemokine bioavailability by scavenging, transporting, or storing chemokines. They can also regulate the activity of canonical chemokine receptors with which they share the ligands by forming heterodimers or by modulating their expression levels or signaling activity. Here, we summarize recent results about the role of these receptors (atypical chemokine receptor 1/Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine, atypical chemokine receptor 2/D6, atypical chemokine receptor 3/CXC-chemokine receptor 7, and atypical chemokine receptor 4/CC-chemokine receptor-like 1) on the tumorigenesis process, indicating that their effects are strictly dependent on the cell type on which they are expressed and on their coexpression with other chemokine receptors. Indeed, atypical chemokine receptors inhibit tumor growth and progression through their activity as negative regulators of chemokine bioavailability, whereas, on the contrary, they can promote tumorigenesis when they regulate the signaling of other chemokine receptors, such as CXC-chemokine receptor 4. Thus, atypical chemokine receptors are key components of the regulatory network of inflammation and immunity in cancer and may have a major effect on anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26908826

  14. Neuropeptide substance P upregulates chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in primary mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Ramnath, Raina Devi; Bhatia, Madhav

    2007-08-01

    Neuropeptides play an important role in the active communication between the nervous and immune systems. Substance P (SP) is a prominent neuropeptide involved in neurogenic inflammation and has been reported to exert various proinflammatory actions on inflammatory leukocytes including neutrophils. The present study further investigated the modulatory effect of SP (1 muM) on chemokine production and chemokine receptor expression in primary mouse neutrophils. Our results showed that SP primed neutrophils for chemotactic responses not only to the CXC chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2/CXCL2 but also to the CC chemokine MIP-1alpha/CCL3. The activating effect of SP on neutrophils was further evidenced by upregulation of the CD11b integrin, the activation marker of neutrophils. SP induced both the mRNA and protein expression of the chemokines MIP-1alpha/CCL3 and MIP-2/CXCL2 in neutrophils and upregulated the chemokine receptors CC chemokine receptor (CCR)-1 and CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)-2. This stimulatory effect on chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in neutrophils was further found to be neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) specific. Pretreatment with selective NK-1R antagonists inhibited SP-triggered activation of neutrophils and chemokine and chemokine receptor upregulation. Moreover, SP-induced chemokine upregulation was NF-kappaB dependent. SP time dependently induced NF-kappaB p65 binding activity, IkappaBalpha degradation, and NF-kappaB p65 nuclear translocation in neutrophils. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activation with its inhibitor Bay11-7082 (10 muM) abolished SP-induced NF-kappaB binding activity and upregulation of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 and MIP-2/CXCL2 in neutrophils. Together, these results suggest that SP exerts a direct stimulatory effect on the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors in mouse neutrophils. The effect is NK-1R mediated, involving NF-kappaB activation.

  15. Analysis of CC chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in solid ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Scotton, C; Milliken, D; Wilson, J; Raju, S; Balkwill, F

    2001-01-01

    To understand the chemokine network in a tissue, both chemokine and chemokine receptor expression should be studied. Human epithelial ovarian tumours express a range of chemokines but little is known about the expression and localisation of chemokine receptors. With the aim of understanding chemokine action in this cancer, we investigated receptors for CC–chemokines and their ligands in 25 biopsies of human ovarian cancer. CC–chemokine receptor mRNA was generally absent from solid tumours, the exception being CCR1 which was detected in samples from 75% of patients. CCR1 mRNA localised to macrophages and lymphocytes and there was a correlation between numbers of CD8+ and CCR1 expressing cells (P = 0.031). mRNA for 6 CC-chemokines was expressed in a majority of tumour samples. In a monocytic cell line in vitro, we found that CCR1 mRNA expression was increased 5-fold by hypoxia. We suggest that the CC-chemokine network in ovarian cancer is controlled at the level of CC-chemokine receptors and this may account for the phenotypes of infiltrating cells found in these tumours. The leukocyte infiltrate may contribute to tumour growth and spread by providing growth survival factors and matrix metalloproteases. Thus, CCR1 may be a novel therapeutic target in ovarian cancer. http://www.bjcancer.com © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11556842

  16. Stratigraphic and geochemical study of the organic-rich black shales in the Tarcău Nappe of the Moldavidian Domain (Carpathian Chain, Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belayouni, Habib; di Staso, Angelida; Guerrera, Francesco; Martín Martín, Manuel; Miclǎuş, Crina; Serrano, Francisco; Tramontana, Mario

    2009-02-01

    An integrated stratigraphic analysis has been made of the Tarcău Nappe (Moldavidian Domain, Eastern Romanian Carpathians), coupled with a geochemical study of organic-rich beds. Two Main Sequence Boundaries (Early Oligocene and near to the Oligocene-Aquitanian boundary, respectively) divide the sedimentary record into three depositional sequences. The sedimentation occurred in the central area of a basin supplied by different and opposite sources. The high amount of siliciclastics at the beginning of the Miocene marks the activation of the “foredeep stage”. The successions studied are younger than previously thought and they more accurately date the deformation of the different Miocene phases affecting the Moldavidian Basin. The intervals with black shales identified are related to two main separate anoxic episodes with an age not older than Late Rupelian and not before Late Chattian. The most important organic-rich beds correspond to the Lower Menilites, Bituminous Marls and Lower Dysodilic Shales Members (Interval 2). These constitute a good potential source rock for petroleum, with homogeneous Type II oil-prone organic matter, highly lipidic and thermally immature. The deposition of black shales has been interpreted as occurring within a deep, periodically isolated and tectonically controlled basin.

  17. The Anti-inflammatory Protein TSG-6 Regulates Chemokine Function by Inhibiting Chemokine/Glycosaminoglycan Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Douglas P.; Salanga, Catherina L.; Johns, Scott C.; Valdambrini, Elena; Fuster, Mark M.; Milner, Caroline M.; Day, Anthony J.; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is a multifunctional protein secreted in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli by a wide range of cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and endothelial cells. It has been shown to mediate anti-inflammatory and protective effects when administered in disease models, in part, by reducing neutrophil infiltration. Human TSG-6 inhibits neutrophil migration by binding CXCL8 through its Link module (Link_TSG6) and interfering with the presentation of CXCL8 on cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), an interaction that is vital for the function of many chemokines. TSG-6 was also found to interact with chemokines CXCL11 and CCL5, suggesting the possibility that it may function as a broad specificity chemokine-binding protein, functionally similar to those encoded by viruses. This study was therefore undertaken to explore the ability of TSG-6 to regulate the function of other chemokines. Herein, we demonstrate that Link_TSG6 binds chemokines from both the CXC and CC families, including CXCL4, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL5, CCL7, CCL19, CCL21, and CCL27. We also show that the Link_TSG6-binding sites on chemokines overlap with chemokine GAG-binding sites, and that the affinities of Link_TSG6 for these chemokines (KD values 1–85 nm) broadly correlate with chemokine-GAG affinities. Link_TSG6 also inhibits chemokine presentation on endothelial cells not only through a direct interaction with chemokines but also by binding and therefore masking the availability of GAGs. Along with previous work, these findings suggest that TSG-6 functions as a pluripotent regulator of chemokines by modulating chemokine/GAG interactions, which may be a major mechanism by which TSG-6 produces its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. PMID:27044744

  18. Chemokines in CNS injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Jaerve, Anne; Müller, Hans Werner

    2012-07-01

    Recruitment of inflammatory cells is known to drive the secondary damage cascades that are common to injuries of the central nervous system (CNS). Cell activation and infiltration to the injury site is orchestrated by changes in the expression of chemokines, the chemoattractive cytokines. Reducing the numbers of recruited inflammatory cells by the blocking of the action of chemokines has turned out be a promising approach to diminish neuroinflammation and to improve tissue preservation and neovascularization. In addition, several chemokines have been shown to be essential for stem/progenitor cell attraction, their survival, differentiation and cytokine production. Thus, chemokines might indirectly participate in remyelination, neovascularization and neuroprotection, which are important prerequisites for CNS repair after trauma. Moreover, CXCL12 promotes neurite outgrowth in the presence of growth inhibitory CNS myelin and enhances axonal sprouting after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we review current knowledge about the exciting functions of chemokines in CNS trauma, including SCI, traumatic brain injury and stroke. We identify common principles of chemokine action and discuss the potentials and challenges of therapeutic interventions with chemokines. PMID:22700007

  19. The role of chemokines in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Matsushima, Kouji; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2008-05-01

    Leukocyte infiltration to glomeruli plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis. Pathophysiological roles of chemokines and their cognate receptors have shed light on the detailed molecular mechanisms of leukocyte trafficking and activation both in clinical and experimental settings of glomerulonephritis. Infiltrating leukocytes and glomerular resident cells interact to promote and exacerbate glomerular injury, eventually leading to glomerulosclerosis. Further, recent studies on chemokines have expanded their universe beyond leukocyte migration to glomeruli, to include homeostasis, development and protection of resident cells in glomeruli. New insights into proteinuria have been uncovered by the regulation of chemokine system. The intervention of chemokines and their cognate receptors may have therapeutic potential to slow the progression of glomerulonephritis.

  20. [Examination of effectiveness of olopatadine hydrochloride in atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tadamichi; Mashiko, Maki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    Subjective/objective symptoms (itching, papula, erythema, lichenification, desquamation, scratching, erosion) and the levels of IgE, LDH, interleukin (IL) -6, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) were compared before and after administering olopatadine hydrochloride (ALLELOCK tablets) to 17 atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. Subject/objective symptoms improved significantly after administering the agent, and the total dosage of the combined topical steroids was also significantly decreased after administration (p<0.05), although IgE, IL-6 and LDH levels did not change, TARC was significantly decreased (p<0.05). The correlation between the levels of IgE, IL-6, LDH and TARC before and after the administration was examined. There was a positive correlation between IgE and TARC (r=0.62, p<0.01) and between IL-6 and TARC (r=0.78, p<0.01). Olopatadine hydrochloride is therefore useful in improving the symptoms in AD, and TARC may be used as an indicator of the symptom improvement.

  1. The Human Cutaneous Chemokine System

    PubMed Central

    McCully, Michelle L.; Moser, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Irrespective of the immune status, the vast majority of all lymphocytes reside in peripheral tissues whereas those present in blood only amount to a small fraction of the total. It has been estimated that T cells in healthy human skin outnumber those present in blood by at least a factor of two. How lymphocytes within these two compartments relate to each other is not well understood. However, mounting evidence suggest that the study of T cell subsets present in peripheral blood does not reflect the function of their counterparts at peripheral sites. This is especially true under steady-state conditions whereby long-lived memory T cells in healthy tissues, notably those in epithelial tissues at body surfaces, are thought to fulfill a critical immune surveillance function by contributing to the first line of defense against a series of local threats, including microbes, tumors, and toxins, and by participating in wound healing. The relative scarcity of information regarding peripheral T cells and the factors regulating their localization is primarily due to inherent difficulties in obtaining healthy tissue for the extraction and study of immune cells on a routine basis. This is most certainly true for humans. Here, we review our current understanding of T cell homing to human skin and compare it when possible with gut-selective homing. We also discuss candidate chemokines that may account for the tissue selectivity in this process and present a model whereby CCR8, and its ligand CCL1, selectively regulate the homeostatic migration of memory lymphocytes to skin tissue. PMID:22566823

  2. Microbial corruption of the chemokine system: an expanding paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pease, J E; Murphy, P M

    1998-06-01

    The chemokine signaling system includes more than 40 secreted pro-inflammatory peptides and 12 G protein-coupled receptors that together orchestrate specific leukocyte trafficking in the mammalian immune system, ideally for anti- microbial defense and tissue repair processes. Paradoxically and perversely, some chemokines and chemokine receptors are also promicrobial factors and facilitate infectious disease, the result of either exploitation or subversion by specific microbes. Two modes of exploitation are known: usage of cellular chemokine receptors for cell entry by intracellular pathogens, including HIV, and usage of virally-encoded chemokine receptors for host cell proliferation. Likewise, two modes of subversion are known: virally-encoded chemokine antagonists and virally-encoded chemokine scavengers. Understanding how microbes turn the tables on the chemokine system may point to new methods to prevent or treat infection, or, more generally, to treat inappropriate chemokine-mediated inflammation.

  3. Cysteine Cathepsins Activate ELR Chemokines and Inactivate Non-ELR Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Urska; Starr, Amanda E; Overall, Christopher M; Turk, Boris

    2015-05-29

    Cysteine cathepsins are primarily lysosomal proteases involved in general protein turnover, but they also have specific proteolytic functions in antigen presentation and bone remodeling. Cathepsins are most stable at acidic pH, although growing evidence indicates that they have physiologically relevant activity also at neutral pH. Post-translational proteolytic processing of mature chemokines is a key, yet underappreciated, level of chemokine regulation. Although the role of selected serine proteases and matrix metalloproteases in chemokine processing has long been known, little has been reported about the role of cysteine cathepsins. Here we evaluated cleavage of CXC ELR (CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8) and non-ELR (CXCL9-12) chemokines by cysteine cathepsins B, K, L, and S at neutral pH by high resolution Tris-Tricine SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Whereas cathepsin B cleaved chemokines especially in the C-terminal region, cathepsins K, L, and S cleaved chemokines at the N terminus with glycosaminoglycans modulating cathepsin processing of chemokines. The functional consequences of the cleavages were determined by Ca(2+) mobilization and chemotaxis assays. We show that cysteine cathepsins inactivate and in some cases degrade non-ELR CXC chemokines CXCL9-12. In contrast, cathepsins specifically process ELR CXC chemokines CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8 N-terminally to the ELR motif, thereby generating agonist forms. This study suggests that cysteine cathepsins regulate chemokine activity and thereby leukocyte recruitment during protective or pathological inflammation.

  4. Cysteine Cathepsins Activate ELR Chemokines and Inactivate Non-ELR Chemokines*

    PubMed Central

    Repnik, Urska; Starr, Amanda E.; Overall, Christopher M.; Turk, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are primarily lysosomal proteases involved in general protein turnover, but they also have specific proteolytic functions in antigen presentation and bone remodeling. Cathepsins are most stable at acidic pH, although growing evidence indicates that they have physiologically relevant activity also at neutral pH. Post-translational proteolytic processing of mature chemokines is a key, yet underappreciated, level of chemokine regulation. Although the role of selected serine proteases and matrix metalloproteases in chemokine processing has long been known, little has been reported about the role of cysteine cathepsins. Here we evaluated cleavage of CXC ELR (CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8) and non-ELR (CXCL9–12) chemokines by cysteine cathepsins B, K, L, and S at neutral pH by high resolution Tris-Tricine SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Whereas cathepsin B cleaved chemokines especially in the C-terminal region, cathepsins K, L, and S cleaved chemokines at the N terminus with glycosaminoglycans modulating cathepsin processing of chemokines. The functional consequences of the cleavages were determined by Ca2+ mobilization and chemotaxis assays. We show that cysteine cathepsins inactivate and in some cases degrade non-ELR CXC chemokines CXCL9–12. In contrast, cathepsins specifically process ELR CXC chemokines CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8 N-terminally to the ELR motif, thereby generating agonist forms. This study suggests that cysteine cathepsins regulate chemokine activity and thereby leukocyte recruitment during protective or pathological inflammation. PMID:25833952

  5. Development of operational models of receptor activation including constitutive receptor activity and their use to determine the efficacy of the chemokine CCL17 at the CC chemokine receptor CCR4.

    PubMed

    Slack, R J; Hall, D A

    2012-07-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The operational model provides a key conceptual framework for the analysis of pharmacological data. However, this model does not include constitutive receptor activity, a frequent phenomenon in modern pharmacology, particularly in recombinant systems. Here, we developed extensions of the operational model which include constitutive activity and applied them to effects of agonists at the chemokine receptor CCR4. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of agonists of CCR4 on [(35) S]GTPγS binding to recombinant cell membranes and on the filamentous (F-) actin content of human CD4(+) CCR4(+) T cells were determined. The basal [(35) S]GTPγS binding was changed by varying the GDP concentration whilst the basal F-actin contents of the higher expressing T cell populations were elevated, suggesting constitutive activity of CCR4. Both sets of data were analysed using the mathematical models. RESULTS The affinity of CCL17 (also known as TARC) derived from analysis of the T cell data (pK(a) = 9.61 ± 0.17) was consistent with radioligand binding experiments (9.50 ± 0.11) while that from the [(35) S]GTPγS binding experiments was lower (8.27 ± 0.09). Its intrinsic efficacy differed between the two systems (110 in T cells vs. 11). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The presence of constitutive receptor activity allows the absolute intrinsic efficacy of agonists to be determined without a contribution from the signal transduction system. Intrinsic efficacy estimated in this way is consistent with Furchgott's definition of this property. CCL17 may have a higher intrinsic efficacy at CCR4 in human T cells than that expressed recombinantly in CHO cells.

  6. Chemokines and chemokine receptors as novel therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis (RA): inhibitory effects of traditional Chinese medicinal components.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Oppenheim, Joost J; Howard, O M Zack

    2004-10-01

    Chemokines belong to a large family of inflammatory cytokines responsible for migration and accumulation of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence indicated a crucial role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the synovial tissue is heavily infiltrated by leukocytes. Chemokines play an important role in the infiltration, localization, retention of infiltrating leukocytes and generation of ectopic germinal centers in the inflamed synovium. Recent evidence also suggests that identification of inhibitors directly targeting chemokines or their receptors may provide a novel therapeutic strategy in RA. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have a long history in the treatment of inflammatory joint disease. The basis for the clinical benefits of TCM remains largely unclear. Our studies have led to the identification of numerous novel chemokine/chemokine receptor inhibitors present in anti-inflammatory TCMs. All of these inhibitors were previously reported by other researchers to have anti-arthritic effect, which may be attributable, at least in part, to their inhibitory effect on chemokine and/or chemokine receptor. Therefore, identification of agents capable of targeting chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions has suggested a mechanism of action for several TCM components and provided a means of identifying additional anti-RA TCM. Thus, this approach may lead to the discovery of new inhibitors of chemokines or chemokine receptors that can be used to treat diseases associated with inappropriately overactive chemokine mediated inflammatory reactions.

  7. Chemokines: established and novel targets in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Koenen, Rory R; Weber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In their role as small chemotactic cytokines, chemokines are crucial mediators and regulators of leukocyte trafficking during immune surveillance and inflammation. Their involvement in the development and progression of inflammatory diseases has been subject of intense investigation. Concordantly, the chemokine system has been explored in search for therapeutic targets to prevent or treat inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. Targeting the chemokine system offers various entry points for a causative treatment of this widespread and chronic illness. Although this approach has encountered some setbacks, several innovative compounds are currently in an advanced stage of development. In this review, the current standing of this dynamic field is highlighted and the potential advantages and drawbacks of particular strategies are discussed. PMID:22038924

  8. Dysregulation of Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Axes and NK Cell Tissue Localization during Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Bonanni, Valentina; Santoni, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic molecules that play key roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Upon signaling via their specific receptors, chemokines regulate tissue mobilization and trafficking of a wide array of immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Current research is focused on analyzing changes in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression during various diseases to interfere with pathological trafficking of cells or to recruit selected cell types to specific tissues. NK cells are a heterogeneous lymphocyte population comprising several subsets endowed with distinct functional properties and mainly representing distinct stages of a linear development process. Because of their different functional potential, the type of subset that accumulates in a tissue drives the final outcome of NK cell-regulated immune response, leading to either protection or pathology. Correspondingly, chemokine receptors, including CXCR4, CXCR3, and CX3CR1, are differentially expressed by NK cell subsets, and their expression levels can be modulated during NK cell activation. At first, this review will summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of chemokines to the localization and generation of NK cell subsets in homeostasis. How an inappropriate chemotactic response can lead to pathology and how chemokine targeting can therapeutically affect tissue recruitment/localization of distinct NK cell subsets will also be discussed. PMID:27766097

  9. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Davis, Paul J; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Lin, Hung-Yun; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  10. 'Reverse gear' cellular movement mediated by chemokines.

    PubMed

    Zlatopolskiy, A; Laurence, J

    2001-08-01

    We sought to model the mechanism by which leucocytes may be actively repulsed by a beta-chemokine signal. This model is used to interpret an apparent paradox in chemokine biology, whereby high levels of a T-cell chemoattractant, stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), are present in bone marrow and thymic tissues despite a paucity of mature T lymphocytes in these areas. We postulate the differential involvement in cell migration of the two binding sites on SDF-1 for its sole receptor, CXCR4, depending on whether high or low concentrations of SDF-1 are encountered by the cell. Site choice would be mediated by divergent affinities of the two binding interactions. We also propose differential signalling following SDF-1/CXCR4 interactions on the plasma membrane versus ligand/receptor complexes in endocytic vesicles. Preliminary data showing divergent susceptibility to kinase inhibitors depending on whether a cell is attracted to or repulsed by SDF-1, are consistent with this model. In terms of physical movement toward or away from a chemokine gradient, we compare the cycling of surface receptors during migration to the caterpillar drive of a tractor, which can change direction simply by altering the direction of rotation of its threads. Finally, the potential clinical implications of concentration-dependent, chemokine-based cell attraction and repulsion are discussed. PMID:11488980

  11. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  12. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection and Progression to AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Animesh; Rathore, Anurag; Vidyant, Sanjukta; Kakkar, Kavita; Dhole, Tapan N.

    2012-01-01

    A multitude of host genetic factors plays a crucial role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS, which is highly variable among individuals and populations. This review focuses on the chemokine-receptor and chemokine genes, which were extensively studied because of their role as HIV co-receptor or co-receptor competitor and influences the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:22377730

  13. CXC chemokines and chemokine receptors in gastric cancer: From basic findings towards therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Jin; Song, Ik-Chan; Yun, Hwan-Jung; Jo, Deog-Yeon; Kim, Samyong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer, and the second-highest cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite extensive research to identify novel diagnostic and therapeutic agents, patients with advanced gastric cancer suffer from a poor quality of life and poor prognosis, and treatment is dependent mainly on conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. To improve the quality of life and survival of gastric cancer patients, a better understanding of the underlying molecular pathologies, and their application towards the development of novel targeted therapies, is urgently needed. Chemokines are a group of small proteins associated with cytoskeletal rearrangements, the directional migration of several cell types during development and physiology, and the host immune response via interactions with G-protein coupled receptors. There is also growing evidence to suggest that chemokines not only play a role in the immune system, but are also involved in the development and progression of tumors. In gastric cancer, CXC chemokines and chemokine receptors regulate the trafficking of cells in and out of the tumor microenvironment. CXC chemokines and their receptors can also directly influence tumorigenesis by modulating tumor transformation, survival, growth, invasion and metastasis, as well as indirectly by regulating angiogenesis, and tumor-leukocyte interactions. In this review, we will focus on the roles of CXC chemokines and their receptors in the development, progression, and metastasis of gastric tumors, and discuss their therapeutic potential for gastric cancer. PMID:24587647

  14. Genetic variants in the chemokines and chemokine receptors in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Oscar; Martín, Javier; González, Clara Isabel

    2012-08-01

    Clinical symptoms of Chagas' disease occur in 30% of the individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and are characterised by heart inflammation and dysfunction. Chemokines and chemokine receptors control the migration of leukocytes during the inflammatory process and are involved in the modulation of Th1 or Th2 responses. To determine their influence, we investigated the possible role of CCL5/RANTES and CXCL8/IL8 chemokines, and CCR2 and CCR5 chemokines receptors cluster gene polymorphisms with the development of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Our study included 260 Chagas seropositive individuals (asymptomatic, n=130; cardiomyopathic, n=130) from an endemic area of Colombia. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. We found statistically significant differences in the distribution of the CCR5 human haplogroup (HH)-A (p=0.027; OR=3.78, 95% CI=1.04-13.72). Moreover, we found that the CCR5-2733 G and CCR5-2554 T alleles are associated, respectively, with a reduced risk of susceptibility and severity to develop chagasic cardiomyopathy. No other associations were found to be significant for the other polymorphisms analysed in the CCR5, CCR2, CCL5/RANTES and CXCL8/IL8 genes. Our data suggest that the analysed chemokines and chemokine receptor genetic variants have a weak but important association with the development of chagasic cardiomyopathy in the population under study.

  15. Chemokine/chemokine receptor pair CCL20/CCR6 in human colorectal malignancy: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Vilma Oliveira; Rubie, Claudia; Keilholz, Ulrich; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines belong to a superfamily of small, cytokine-like proteins, which induce multiple physiological functions, particularly cytoskeletal rearrangement and compartment-specific migration through their interaction with G-protein-coupled receptors. Chemokines and their receptors have been widely acknowledged as essential and selective mediators in leukocyte migration in inflammatory response. It is now established that the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is also used by cancer cells to direct lymphatic and haematogenous spreading and additionally has an impact on the site of metastatic growth of different tumours. In recent years an increasing number of studies have drawn attention to CC-chemokine cysteine motif chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) and its physiological sole receptor CCR6 to play a role in the onset, development and metastatic spread of various gastrointestinal cancer entities. Among various cancer types CCR6 was also demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) and stimulation by its physiological ligand CCL20 has been reported to promote CRC cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Further, the CCL20/CCR6 system apparently plays a role in the organ-selective liver metastasis of CRC. Here we review the literature on expression patterns of CCL20 and CCR6 and their physiological interactions as well as the currently presumed role of CCL20 and CCR6 in the formation of CRC and the development of liver metastasis, providing a potential basis for novel treatment strategies. PMID:26811629

  16. Pathophysiological roles of chemokines in human reproduction: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kitaya, Kotaro; Yamada, Hisao

    2011-05-01

    Chemokines are a group of small cytokines that have an ability to induce leukocyte migration. Chemokines exert their functions by binding and activating specific G protein-coupled receptors. Studies have unveiled pleiotropic bioactivities of chemokines in various phenomena ranging from immunomodulation, embryogenesis, and homeostasis to pathogenesis. In the mammalian reproductive system, chemokines unexceptionally serve in multimodal events that are closely associated with establishment, maintenance, and deterioration of fecundity. The aim of this review is to update the knowledge on chemokines in male and female genital organs, with a focus on their potential pathophysiological roles in human reproduction.

  17. Chemokine receptors in airway disease: which receptors to target?

    PubMed

    Owen, C

    2001-01-01

    Many disease states within the airway result in the co-ordinated infiltration of key inflammatory cells. The cellular influx is choreographed through the temporal and spatially-regulated expression of chemokines, which potentiate the migration of cells along gradients of chemotactic ligands. Chemokines act as ligands for the chemokine receptors; a distinct class of G-protein-coupled receptor. Over 40 chemokine ligands and 18 chemokine receptors have been identified on human cells. Chemokine receptors are divided into several classes; the two most prominent of which are the CC- and CXC-chemokine receptors, classified through the spatial arrangement of two conserved cysteine residues. The role of chemokine receptors such as CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR8 and the CXC chemokine receptors; CXCR1 and CXCR2 on cell types of relevance to respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic bronchitis will be explored in this review. Chemokines have proven to be amenable drug targets for the development of low molecular weight antagonists by the pharmaceutical industry. So far, no chemokine receptor antagonist has entered the clinic in trials for respiratory disease, but over the next few years it is expected that many will do so, at which time the potential of these exciting new targets will be fully realised.

  18. Cloning and characterization of exodus, a novel beta-chemokine.

    PubMed

    Hromas, R; Gray, P W; Chantry, D; Godiska, R; Krathwohl, M; Fife, K; Bell, G I; Takeda, J; Aronica, S; Gordon, M; Cooper, S; Broxmeyer, H E; Klemsz, M J

    1997-05-01

    Chemokines are a family of related proteins that regulate leukocyte infiltration into inflamed tissue. Some chemokines such as MIP-1 alpha also inhibit hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation. Recently, three chemokines, MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, and RANTES, have been found to significantly decrease human immunodeficiency virus production from infected T cells. We report here the cloning and characterization of a novel human chemokine termed Exodus for its chemotactic properties. This novel chemokine is distantly related to other chemokines (28% homology with MIP-1 alpha) and shares several biological activities. Exodus is expressed preferentially in lymphocytes and monocytes, and its expression is markedly upregulated by mediators of inflammation such as tumor necrosis factor or lipopolysaccharide. Purified synthetic Exodus was found to inhibit proliferation of myeloid progenitors in colony formation assays. Exodus also stimulated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The sequence homology, expression, and biological activity indicate that Exodus represents a novel divergent beta-chemokine.

  19. Haplotype structure and linkage disequilibrium in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    To dissect the haplotype structure of candidate genes for disease association studies, it is important to understand the nature of genetic variation at these loci in different populations. We present a survey of haplotype structure and linkage disequilibrium of chemokine and chemokine receptor genes in 11 geographically-distinct population samples (n = 728). Chemokine proteins are involved in intercellular signalling and the immune response. These molecules are important modulators of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and the progression of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome, tumour development and the metastatic process of cancer. To study the extent of genetic variation in this gene family, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 13 chemokine and chemokine receptor genes were genotyped using the 5' nuclease assay (TaqMan). SNP haplotypes, estimated from unphased genotypes using the Expectation-Maximization-algorithm, are described in a cluster of four CC-chemokine receptor genes (CCR3, CCR2, CCR5 and CCRL2) on chromosome 3p21, and a cluster of three CC-chemokine genes [MPIF-1 (CCL23) PARC (CCL18) and MIP- 1α (CCL3)] on chromosome 17q11-12. The 32 base pair (bp) deletion in exon 4 of CCR5 was also included in the haplotype analysis of 3p21. A total of 87.5 per cent of the variation of 14 biallelic loci scattered over 150 kilobases of 3p21 is explained by 11 haplotypes which have a frequency of at least 1 per cent in the total sample. An analysis of haplotype blocks in this region indicates recombination between CCR2 and CCR5, although long-range pairwise linkage disequilibrium across the region appears to remain intact on two common haplotypes. A reduced-median network demonstrates a clear relationship between 3p21 haplotypes, rooted by the putative ancestral haplotype determined by direct sequencing of four primate species. Analysis of six SNPs on 17q11-12 indicates that 97.5 per cent of the variation is explained by 15 haplotypes

  20. Mechanisms and implications of air pollution particle associations with chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Seagrave, JeanClare

    2008-11-01

    Inflammation induced by inhalation of air pollutant particles has been implicated as a mechanism for the adverse health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. The inflammatory response is associated with upregulation of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We have previously shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEP), a significant constituent of air pollution particulate matter in many urban areas, bind and concentrate IL-8, an important human neutrophil-attracting chemokine, and that the chemokine remains biologically active. In this report, we examine possible mechanisms of this association and the effects on clearance of the chemokine. The binding appears to be the result of ionic interactions between negatively charged particles and positively charged chemokine molecules, possibly combined with intercalation into small pores in the particles. The association is not limited to diesel exhaust particles and IL-8: several other particle types also adsorb the chemokine and several other cytokines are adsorbed onto the diesel particles. However, there are wide ranges in the effectiveness of various particle types and various cytokines. Finally, male Fisher 344 rats were intratracheally instilled with chemokine alone or combined with diesel exhaust or silica particles under isofluorane anesthesia. In contrast to silica particles, which do not bind the chemokine, the presence of diesel exhaust particles, which bind the chemokine, prolonged the retention of the chemokine.

  1. Mechanisms and Implications of Air Pollution Particle Associations with Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Seagrave, JeanClare

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation induced by inhalation of air pollutant particles has been implicated as a mechanism for the adverse health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. The inflammatory response is associated with upregulation of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We have previously shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEP), a significant constituent of air pollution particulate matter in many urban areas, bind and concentrate IL-8, an important human neutrophil-attracting chemokine, and that the chemokine remains biologically active. In this report, we examine possible mechanisms of this association and the effects on clearance of the chemokine. The binding appears to be the result of ionic interactions between negatively charged particles and positively charged chemokine molecules, possibly combined with intercalation into small pores in the particles. The association is not limited to diesel exhaust particles and IL-8: several other particle types also adsorb the chemokine and several other cytokines are adsorbed onto the diesel particles. However, there are wide ranges in the effectiveness of various particle types and various cytokines. Finally, male Fisher 344 rats were intratracheally instilled with chemokine alone or combined with diesel exhaust or silica particles under isofluorane anesthesia. In contrast to silica particles, which do not bind the chemokine, the presence of diesel exhaust particles, which bind the chemokine, prolonged the retention of the chemokine. PMID:18755206

  2. Profiling Heparin-Chemokine Interactions Using Synthetic Tools

    PubMed Central

    de Paz, Jose L.; Moseman, E. Ashley; Noti, Christian; Polito, Laura; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin or heparan sulfate, are required for the in vivo function of chemokines. Chemokines play a crucial role in the recruitment of leukocyte subsets to sites of inflammation and lymphocytes trafficking. GAG-chemokine interactions mediate cell migration and determine which leukocyte subsets enter tissues. Identifying the exact GAC sequences that bind to particular chemokines is key to understand chemokine function at the molecular level and develop strategies to interfere with chemokine-mediated processes. Here, we characterize the heparin binding profiles of eight chemokines (CCL21, IL-8, CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19, CCL25, CCL28, and CXCL16) by employing heparin microarrays containing a small library of synthetic heparin oligosaccharides. The chemokines differ significantly in their interactions with heparin oligosaccharides: While some chemokines, (e.g., CCL21) strongly bind to a hexasaccharide containing the GlcNSO3(6-OSO3)-IdoA(2-OSO3) repeating unit, CCL19 does not bind and CXCL12 binds only weakly. The carbohydrate microarray binding results were validated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. In vitro chemotaxis assays revealed that dendrimers coated with the fully sulfated heparin hexasaccharide inhibit lymphocyte migration toward CCL21. Migration toward CXCL12 or CCL19 was not affected. These in vitro homing assays indicate that multivalent synthetic heparin dendrimers inhibit the migration of lymphocytes toward certain chemokine gradients by blocking the formation of a chemokine concentration gradient on GAG endothelial chains. These findings are in agreement with preliminary in vivo measurements of circulating lymphocytes. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of GAG-chemokine interactions, a first step toward the design of novel drugs that modulate chemokine activity. PMID:18030990

  3. Expression of chemokine receptors in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Asrar, A.; Struyf, S.; Al-Mosallam, A.; Missotten, L.; Van Damme, J.; Geboes, K.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Chemokines are small peptides which are potent activators and chemoattractants for leucocyte subpopulations. Their action is mediated by a family of seven transmembrane spanning G-protein coupled receptors. The aims of this study were to examine the expression of the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR3, and CXCR4 in the conjunctiva of patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) and to investigate the phenotype of inflammatory cells expressing these chemokine receptors.
METHODS—Conjunctival biopsy specimens from 16 patients with active VKC, and eight control subjects were studied by immunohistochemical techniques using a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against human CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR3, and CXCR4. The phenotype of inflammatory cells expressing chemokine receptors was examined by double immunohistochemistry.
RESULTS—In the normal conjunctiva, few inflammatory cells expressed CXCR3 in five of eight specimens. There was no immunoreactivity for CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4. In VKC specimens, membranous immunoreactivity for CXCR3 was noted on inflammatory cells in all specimens. Compared with control specimens, VKC specimens showed significantly more inflammatory cells expressing CXCR3 (54.3 (SD 34.3) v 3.3 (5.0); p<0.001). Few CCR1+, CCR3+, CCR5+, and CXCR4+ inflammatory cells were observed in only three of 16 specimens. Double immunohistochemistry revealed that all CXCR3 positive inflammatory cells were CD3 positive T lymphocytes and that 61.7% (3.7%) of the infiltrating T lymphocytes were reactive for CXCR3.
CONCLUSIONS—CXCR3 is the predominant chemokine receptor and is expressed abundantly on T lymphocytes in the conjunctiva of patients with active VKC. These data suggest a potential role for CXCR3 receptors in the regulation of lymphocyte recruitment within conjunctiva of VKC patients. New therapeutic strategies that block CXCR3 may inhibit T lymphocyte recruitment and suppress adverse inflammatory reactions

  4. CXC and CC chemokines as angiogenic modulators in nonhaematological tumors.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Matteo; Bracarda, Sergio; Nabissi, Massimo; Massari, Francesco; Conti, Alessandro; Bria, Emilio; Tortora, Giampaolo; Santoni, Giorgio; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally homologous heparin-binding proteins that includes potent inducers and inhibitors of angiogenesis. The imbalance between angiogenic and angiostatic chemokine activities can lead to abnormalities, such as chronic inflammation, dysplastic transformation, and even tumor development and spreading. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in patients with nonhaematological tumors.

  5. CXC and CC Chemokines as Angiogenic Modulators in Nonhaematological Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bracarda, Sergio; Nabissi, Massimo; Massari, Francesco; Bria, Emilio; Tortora, Giampaolo; Santoni, Giorgio; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally homologous heparin-binding proteins that includes potent inducers and inhibitors of angiogenesis. The imbalance between angiogenic and angiostatic chemokine activities can lead to abnormalities, such as chronic inflammation, dysplastic transformation, and even tumor development and spreading. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in patients with nonhaematological tumors. PMID:24971349

  6. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies. PMID:25790431

  7. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies.

  8. Pouncing on the chemokine receptor Chimera.

    PubMed

    Mascolini, M

    1997-08-01

    Scientists are seeking to unravel the mystery of chemokine receptors in an attempt to develop treatments for HIV infection; however, receptor experts are realizing that the picture is more complicated than they first imagined. Scientists want to know, among other things, what parts of each coreceptor are essential for viral fusion with target cells, what makes macrophage-tropic viruses switch their preference to T-lymphocytes, why HIV goes after chemokine receptors in the first place, and how fusion and entry occur. Other issues discussed include whether blocking coreceptors for HIV will actually curb this disease, virus turnover in monkey studies showing that SIV may go through the cycle as many as 100 times per day, and studies showing that the first days of infection may predict the course of disease. Final comments concern the use of ritonavir plus indinavir in treatment combinations for children with HIV and the latest progress toward vaccine development. Understanding these and other puzzles might help scientists to develop drugs to block receptors active in HIV infection and perhaps curb HIV. More than 14 biotechnology and pharmaceutical firms are working to design coreceptor blockers, despite the opinions of several leading researchers that the drugs are not terribly promising. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID), notes that a famous attempt to block HIV's primary receptor failed, and David Ho, the man who demonstrated why CD4 would not work as therapy, is similarly cautious. According to Ho, drug makers will have no trouble developing compounds that keep HIV off chemokine receptors, such as CCR5 or CXCR4, but whether those compounds will slow disease progression is another question. PMID:11364629

  9. Characterization of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression during Pneumocystis infection in healthy and immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Lisa R.; Lionakis, Michail S.; Sassi, Monica; Murphy, Philip M.; Hu, Xiaojun; Huang, Da Wei; Sherman, Brad; Qiu, Ju; Yang, Jun; Lempicki, Richard A.; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined gene expression levels of multiple chemokines and chemokine receptors during Pneumocystis murina infection in wild-type and immunosuppressed mice, using microarrays and qPCR. In wild-type mice, expression of chemokines that are ligands for Ccr2, Cxcr3, Cxcr6, and Cxcr2 increased at days 32 to 41 post-infection, with a return to baseline by day 75 to 150. Concomitant increases were seen in Ccr2 ,Cxcr3, and Cxcr6, but not in Cxcr2 expression. Induction of these same factors also occurred in CD40-ligand and CD40 knockout mice but only at a much later time-point, during uncontrolled Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). Expression of CD4 Th1 markers was increased in wild-type mice during clearance of infection. Ccr2 and Cx3cr1 knockout mice cleared Pneumocystis infection with kinetics similar to wild-type mice, and all animals developed anti-Pneumocystis antibodies. Upregulation of Ccr2, Cxcr3, and Cxcr6 and their ligands supports an important role for T helper cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the clearance of Pneumocystis infection. However, based on the current and prior studies, no single chemokine receptor appears to be critical to the clearance of Pneumocystis. PMID:26052064

  10. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2008-06-01

    The structure of mouse IP-10 shows a novel tetrameric association. Interferon-γ-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated β-sheet of ∼90 Å in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two β-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance.

  11. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/ chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer. PMID:26062132

  12. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer. PMID:26062132

  13. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A

    2015-06-08

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/ chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer.

  14. Chemokine-guided cell migration and motility in zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Jeroen; Raz, Erez

    2015-05-12

    Chemokines are vertebrate-specific, structurally related proteins that function primarily in controlling cell movements by activating specific 7-transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play critical roles in a large number of biological processes and are also involved in a range of pathological conditions. For these reasons, chemokines are at the focus of studies in developmental biology and of clinically oriented research aimed at controlling cancer, inflammation, and immunological diseases. The small size of the zebrafish embryos, their rapid external development, and optical properties as well as the large number of eggs and the fast expansion in genetic tools available make this model an extremely useful one for studying the function of chemokines and chemokine receptors in an in vivo setting. Here, we review the findings relevant to the role that chemokines play in the context of directed single-cell migration, primarily in neutrophils and germ cells, and compare it to the collective cell migration of the zebrafish lateral line. We present the current knowledge concerning the formation of the chemokine gradient, its interpretation within the cell, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to chemokine signals during directed migration.

  15. MicroRNA-155 regulates monocyte chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Elmesmari, Aziza; Fraser, Alasdair R.; Wood, Claire; Gilchrist, Derek; Vaughan, Diane; Stewart, Lynn; McSharry, Charles; McInnes, Iain B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To test the hypothesis that miR-155 regulates monocyte migratory potential via modulation of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in RA, and thereby is associated with disease activity. Methods. The miR-155 copy-numbers in monocytes from peripheral blood (PB) of healthy (n = 22), RA (n = 24) and RA SF (n = 11) were assessed by real time-PCR using synthetic miR-155 as a quantitative standard. To evaluate the functional impact of miR-155, human monocytes were transfected with control or miR-155 mimic, and the effect on transcript levels, and production of chemokines was evaluated by Taqman low-density arrays and multiplex assays. A comparative study evaluated constitutive chemokine receptor expression in miR-155−/− and wild-type murine (CD115 + Ly6C + Ly6G−) monocytes. Results. Compared with healthy monocytes, the miR-155 copy-number was higher in RA, peripheral blood (PB) and SF monocytes (PB P < 0.01, and SF P < 0.0001). The miR-155 copy-number in RA PB monocytes was higher in ACPA-positive compared with ACPA-negative patients (P = 0.033) and correlated (95% CI) with DAS28 (ESR), R = 0.728 (0.460, 0.874), and with tender, R = 0.631 (0.306, 0.824) and swollen, R = 0.503 (0.125, 0.753) joint counts. Enforced-expression of miR-155 in RA monocytes stimulated the production of CCL3, CCL4, CCL5 and CCL8; upregulated CCR7 expression; and downregulated CCR2. Conversely, miR155−/− monocytes showed downregulated CCR7 and upregulated CCR2 expression. Conclusion. Given the observed correlations with disease activity, these data provide strong evidence that miR-155 can contribute to RA pathogenesis by regulating chemokine production and pro-inflammatory chemokine receptor expression, thereby promoting inflammatory cell recruitment and retention in the RA synovium. PMID:27411480

  16. Production of Recombinant Chemokines and Validation of Refolding.

    PubMed

    Veldkamp, Christopher T; Koplinski, Chad A; Jensen, Davin R; Peterson, Francis C; Smits, Kaitlin M; Smith, Brittney L; Johnson, Scott K; Lettieri, Christina; Buchholz, Wallace G; Solheim, Joyce C; Volkman, Brian F

    2016-01-01

    The diverse roles of chemokines in normal immune function and many human diseases have motivated numerous investigations into the structure and function of this family of proteins. Recombinant chemokines are often used to study how chemokines coordinate the trafficking of immune cells in various biological contexts. A reliable source of biologically active protein is vital for any in vitro or in vivo functional analysis. In this chapter, we describe a general method for the production of recombinant chemokines and robust techniques for efficient refolding that ensure consistently high biological activity. Considerations for initiating development of protocols consistent with Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) to produce biologically active chemokines suitable for use in clinical trials are also discussed. PMID:26921961

  17. Differential Chemokine Signature between Human Preadipocytes and Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica C.; Gibbs, Carla R.; Lee, Eun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is characterized as an accumulation of adipose tissue mass represented by chronic, low-grade inflammation. Obesity-derived inflammation involves chemokines as important regulators contributing to the pathophysiology of obesity-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some cancers. The obesity-driven chemokine network is poorly understood. Here, we identified the profiles of chemokine signature between human preadipocytes and adipocytes, using PCR arrays and qRT-PCR. Both preadipocytes and adipocytes showed absent or low levels in chemokine receptors in spite of some changes. On the other hand, the chemokine levels of CCL2, CCL7-8, CCL11, CXCL1-3, CXCL6 and CXCL10-11 were dominantly expressed in preadipocytes compared to adipocytes. Interestingly, CXCL14 was the most dominant chemokine expressed in adipocytes compared to preadipocytes. Moreover, there is significantly higher protein level of CXCL14 in conditioned media from adipocytes. In addition, we analyzed the data of the chemokine signatures in adipocytes obtained from healthy lean and obese postmenopausal women based on Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) dataset. Adipocytes from obese individuals had significantly higher levels in chemokine signature as follows: CCL2, CCL13, CCL18-19, CCL23, CCL26, CXCL1, CXCL3 and CXCL14, as compared to those from lean ones. Also, among the chemokine networks, CXCL14 appeared to be the highest levels in adipocytes from both lean and obese women. Taken together, these results identify CXCL14 as an important chemokine induced during adipogenesis, requiring further research elucidating its potential therapeutic benefits in obesity. PMID:27340388

  18. Differential expression of chemokines, chemokine receptors and proteinases by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman A; Hashimi, Saeed M; Khan, Shershah; Quan, Jingjing; Bakr, Mahmoud M; Forwood, Mark R; Morrison, Nigel M

    2014-07-01

    Osteoclasts and foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) are both derived from the fusion of macropahges. These cells are seen in close proximity during foreign body reactions, therefore it was assumed that they might interact with each other. The aim was to identify important genes that are expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs which can be used to understand peri-implantitis and predict the relationship of these cells during foreign body reactions. Bone marrow macrophages (BMM) were treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) to produce osteoclasts. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to identify the genes that were expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs compared to macrophage controls. TRAP staining was used to visualise the cells while gelatine zymography and western blots were used for protein expression. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), matrix metallo proteinase 9 (MMP9), nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K (CTSK) and RANK were significantly lower in FBGCs compared to osteoclasts. Inflammation specific chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP1 also called CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1α), MIP1β and MIP1γ, and their receptors CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5, were highly expressed by FBGCs. FBGCs were negative for osteoclast specific markers (RANK, NFATc1, CTSK). FBGCs expressed chemokines such as CCL2, 3, 5 and 9 while osteoclasts expressed the receptors for these chemokines i.e. CCR1, 2 and 3. Our findings show that osteoclast specific genes are not expressed by FBGCs and that FBGCs interact with osteoclasts during foreign body reaction through chemokines.

  19. Altered responsiveness to chemokines due to targeted disruption of SHIP

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang H.; Hangoc, Giao; Cooper, Scott; Helgason, Cheryl D.; Yew, Sandie; Humphries, R. Keith; Krystal, Gerald; Broxmeyer, Hal E.

    1999-01-01

    SHIP has been implicated in negative signaling in a number of hematopoietic cell types and is postulated to downregulate phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase– (PI-3K–) initiated events in diverse receptor signaling pathways. Because PI-3K is implicated in chemokine signaling, we investigated whether SHIP plays any role in cellular responses to chemokines. We found that a number of immature and mature hematopoietic cells from SHIP-deficient mice manifested enhanced directional migration (chemotaxis) in response to the chemokines stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and B-lymphocyte chemoattractant (BLC). SHIP–/– cells were also more active in calcium influx and actin polymerization in response to SDF-1. However, colony formation by SHIP-deficient hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPCs) was not inhibited by 13 myelosuppressive chemokines that normally inhibit proliferation of HPCs. These altered biologic activities of chemokines on SHIP-deficient cells are not caused by simple modulation of chemokine receptor expression in SHIP-deficient mice, implicating SHIP in the modulation of chemokine-induced signaling and downstream effects. J. Clin. Invest. 104:1751–1759 (1999). PMID:10606629

  20. Dual-Color Luciferase Complementation for Chemokine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors may share common ligands, setting up potential competition for ligand binding, and association of activated receptors with downstream signaling molecules such as β-arrestin. Determining the "winner" of competition for shared effector molecules is essential for understanding integrated functions of chemokine receptor signaling in normal physiology, disease, and response to therapy. We describe a dual-color click beetle luciferase complementation assay for cell-based analysis of interactions of two different chemokine receptors, CXCR4 and ACKR3, with the intracellular scaffolding protein β-arrestin 2. This assay provides real-time quantification of receptor activation and signaling in response to chemokine CXCL12. More broadly, this general imaging strategy can be applied to quantify interactions of any set of two proteins that interact with a common binding partner.

  1. Structure of human MIP-3α chemokine

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, Zulfiqar A.; Tack, Brian F.

    2006-07-01

    Human macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α) has been crystallized in a new space group I4. Crystals diffract to 1.81 Å. The structure of the human macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α) has been determined at 1.81 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The dimer crystallized in the tetragonal space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.99, c = 57.20 Å. The crystals exhibit two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method and the model was refined to a conventional R value of 20.6% (R{sub free} = 25.7%). MIP-3α possesses the same monomeric structure as previously described for other chemokines. However, in addition to limited structural changes in the β1–β2 hairpin of monomer B, the electron density is fully defined for a few extra residues at the N- and C-termini of monomer A and the C-terminus of monomer B compared with MIP-3α in space group P6{sub 1}. As the N-terminal and loop regions have been shown to be critical for receptor binding and signaling, this additional structural information may help in determining the basis of the CCR6 selectivity of MIP-3α.

  2. Emerging Concepts and Approaches for Chemokine-Receptor Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Salanga, Catherina L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Hamel, Damon J.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemokine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) most noted for their role in cell migration. However, inappropriate utilization or regulation of these receptors is implicated in many inflammatory diseases, cancer and HIV, making them important drug targets. Areas covered in this review Allostery, oligomerization, and ligand bias are presented as they pertain to chemokine receptors and their associated pathologies. Specific examples of each are described from the recent literature and their implications are discussed in terms of drug discovery efforts targeting chemokine receptors. What the reader will gain Insight into the expanding view of the multitude of pharmacological variables that need to be considered or that may be exploited in chemokine receptor drug discovery. Take home message Since 2007, two drugs targeting chemokine receptors have been approved by the FDA, Maraviroc for preventing HIV infection and Mozobil™ for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. While these successes permit optimism for chemokine receptors as drug targets, only recently has the complexity of this system begun to be appreciated. The concepts of allosteric inhibitors, biased ligands and functional selectivity raise the possibility that drugs with precisely-defined properties can be developed. Other complexities such as receptor oligomerization and tissue-specific functional states of receptors also offer opportunities for increased target and response specificity, although it will be more challenging to translate these ideas into approved therapeutics compared to traditional approaches. PMID:21132095

  3. Structures of Orf Virus Chemokine Binding Protein in Complex with Host Chemokines Reveal Clues to Broad Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Couñago, Rafael M; Knapp, Karen M; Nakatani, Yoshio; Fleming, Stephen B; Corbett, Michael; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Krause, Kurt L

    2015-07-01

    The chemokine binding protein (CKBP) from orf virus (ORFV) binds with high affinity to chemokines from three classes, C, CC, and CXC, making it unique among poxvirus CKBPs described to date. We present its crystal structure alone and in complex with three CC chemokines, CCL2, CCL3, and CCL7. ORFV CKBP possesses a β-sandwich fold that is electrostatically and sterically complementary to its binding partners. Chemokines bind primarily through interactions involving the N-terminal loop and a hydrophobic recess on the ORFV CKBP β-sheet II surface, and largely polar interactions between the chemokine 20s loop and a negatively charged surface groove located at one end of the CKBP β-sheet II surface. ORFV CKBP interacts with leukocyte receptor and glycosaminoglycan binding sites found on the surface of bound chemokines. SEC-MALLS and chromatographic evidence is presented supporting that ORFV CKBP is a dimer in solution over a broad range of protein concentrations. PMID:26095031

  4. Selected CC and CXC chemokines in children with atopic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Machura, Edyta; Mazur, Bogdan; Chrobak, Ewelina; Ziora, Katarzyna; Ziora, Dariusz; Kasperska-Zajac, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are only limited data on CC and CXC chemokines regulation in children with asthma. Aim We compared the serum profile of selected CC and CXC chemokines in patients with atopic asthma and healthy children. Material and methods Serum concentration of CC chemokines RANTES, MCP-1, and CXC chemokines IP-10, MIG, IL-8, RANTES was measured using cytometric bead array in 44 children with atopic asthma and 17 healthy subjects. Results The concentration of RANTES was significantly higher and the MIG level was lower in all children with asthma as compared to their control counterparts. We observed increased RANTES and decreased MIG levels also in patients with stable asthma when compared with children in the control group. The IP-10 concentration was similar between the whole asthma group and healthy controls, while significantly increased levels of this chemokine in acute asthma have been observed when compared to stable asthma. For MCP-1 and IL-8, the serum concentration was similar in all compared groups. The MIG concentration correlated positively with IP-10, IL-8, and CRP levels and negatively with the eosinophil count. A negative correlation between the IP-10 and eosinophil count and a negative correlation between FEV1 and IP-10 were found. Conclusions An increased serum RANTES level in children with asthma may result in enhancement of Th2 lymphocyte recruitment into the airway. A decreased expression of Th1 chemokine MIG in children with stable asthma may contribute to a diminished antagonizing effect on Th2 cytokine production and hence intensify Th2 predominance. An increased IP-10 level in children during an asthma attack suggest that this chemokine is a serological marker of disease exacerbation. PMID:27279817

  5. Biased and G Protein-Independent Signaling of Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2014-01-01

    Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM-receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand–receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of “classic” redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor-, or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the solution

  6. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications. PMID:26727165

  7. The chemokine system in experimental and clinical hematology.

    PubMed

    Bruserud, Øystein; Kittang, Astrid Olsnes

    2010-01-01

    The chemokine family consists of approximately 50 small (8-14 kDa), basic proteins that are expressed and released by a wide range of normal and malignant cells. Based on their molecular structure, these cytokines are divided into the two major subgroups CCL and CXCL chemokines that bind to CCR or CXCR receptors, respectively. These mediators are important for regulation of cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Chemokines are important for cell migration during embryogenesis; they are involved in the regulation of complex processes like local recruitment of inflammatory cells, angiogenesis, and regulation of normal as well as leukemic hematopoiesis. Chemokines can be constitutively released by malignant hematopoietic cells as well as by bone marrow stromal cells. This bidirectional crosstalk between malignant hematopoietic cells and neighboring stromal cells may therefore be important for the development and clinical presentation of malignant diseases, and the chemokines or their receptors may also represent a target for specific anticancer therapy at the molecular level. PMID:20369318

  8. Chemokine response in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Cooper, A M; Orme, I M

    1995-01-01

    We show here that infection of murine macrophages with various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the rapid in vitro expression of genes encoding chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, which recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, and macrophage-recruiting chemokines 10-kDa, interferon-inducible protein (IP-10) and macrophage chemotactic protein 1. Three strains of M. tuberculosis, Erdman and the clinical isolates CSU 22 and CSU 46, induced similar levels of secretion of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 from infected macrophage monolayers; however, the Erdman strain failed to induce levels of secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha similar to those induced by either CSU 22 or CSU 46. Using a low-dose aerosol infection model, we also found that while the Erdman strain induced negligible increases in chemokine mRNA levels in the lungs, infection with either CSU 22 or CSU 46 resulted in greater levels of mRNA production for all four chemokines tested. The growth of these strains in the lungs was, however, equally well contained by acquired host immunity. These data allow us to hypothesize that the chemokine response in the lungs probably does not control the protective granulomatous response and that perhaps other T-cell- or macrophage-associated cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin 12 may be involved in this process. PMID:7558294

  9. Cytokines, Chemokines, and Chemokine Receptors Quantitative Expressions in Patients with Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeifard, Somayeh; Razmkhah, Mahboobeh; Robati, Minoo; Momtahan, Mozhdeh; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background Cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors regulate the proliferation and survival of tumor cells, angiogenesis, and metastasis to other organs. This network of ligands and receptors has been used in molecular targeting of cancer. Methods We compared the mRNA expression of CXCR3, CXCL-10, CXCR4, CXCL-12, IL-4, and IL-10 in tissues of benign and malignant ovarian tumors by qRT-PCR method and evaluated serum IL-10 and CA-125 content of these patients by ELISA during one year. Results Our result showed a trend toward a higher expression of CXCR4 in malignant ovarian tissues compared with the benign ovarian cysts (P>0.05). However, SDF-1, IP-10, IL-4, CXCR3, and IL-10 had a lower trend in mRNA expression in malignant ovarian tissues compared to the benign cyst tissues. Except for IL-4 (P=0.01) and SDF-1 (P=0.02), the data for other factors were not statistically significant. A trend toward higher concentration of IL-10 was observed in the serum of ovarian cancer patients compared to those with benign cysts; however, the difference was not significant. CA-125 concentration in the serum of ovarian cancer patients was higher than that of benign cyst patients (P=0.05). Conclusion According to results obtained, we hypothesize that the lower expression of SDF-1 in malignant tissues may have an important role in ovarian tumor growth. However, this hypothesis requires more investigation. Higher levels of CA125 and IL-10 in the serum of patients might indicate that the combination of these biomarkers could be used for distinguishing patients with ovarian cancer from those with benign cysts.   PMID:25999622

  10. Cytokines and chemokines in neuromyelitis optica: pathogenetic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Akiyuki; Mori, Masahiro; Masahiro, Mori; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is characterized by severe optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. The discovery of an NMO-specific autoantibody to the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel has improved knowledge of NMO pathogenesis. Many studies have focused on inflammatory and pathological biomarkers of NMO, including cytokines and chemokines. Increased concentrations of T helper (Th)17- and Th2-related cytokines and chemokines may be essential factors for developing NMO inflammatory lesions. For example, interleukin-6 could play important roles in NMO pathogenesis, as it is involved in the survival of plasmablasts that produce anti-AQP4 antibody in peripheral circulation and in the enhancement of inflammation in the central nervous system. Therefore, assessment of these useful biomarkers may become a supportive criterion for diagnosing NMO. Significant advances in the understanding of NMO pathogenesis will lead to the development of novel treatment strategies. This review focuses on the current advances in NMO immunological research, particularly that of cytokines and chemokines.

  11. Chemokines in the limbal form of vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Asrar, A.; Struyf, S.; Al-Kharashi, S.; Missotten, L.; Van Damme, J.; Geboes, K.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Chemokines are a family of low molecular weight cytokines that attract and activate leucocytes. The CC chemokines act on eosinophils, basophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes, suggesting that they play an important part in allergic diseases. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of the CC chemokines, RANTES, eotaxin, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP) 1, MCP-2, and MCP-3 in the conjunctiva of patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) and to determine the cellular source of these chemokines.
METHODS—Conjunctival biopsy specimens from nine subjects with active VKC, and six control subjects were studied by immunohistochemical techniques using a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against RANTES, eotaxin, MCP-1, MCP-2, and MCP-3. The phenotype of inflammatory cells expressing chemokines was examined by sequential double immunohistochemistry.
RESULTS—In the normal conjunctiva, superficial epithelial cells showed a constitutive, weak cytoplasmic expression of eotaxin. Few inflammatory cells in the perivascular areas expressed RANTES, MCP-1, MCP-2, and MCP-3. In VKC specimens, the epithelium showed intense cytoplasmic eotaxin staining in all cells, and cytoplasmic RANTES staining mainly in the superficial layers. Furthermore, RANTES and eotaxin were expressed on the vascular endothelium mainly in the upper substantia propria. Compared with normal controls, VKC specimens showed significantly more inflammatory cells expressing RANTES, eotaxin, MCP-1, and MCP-3 (p<0.001, 0.0028, 0.0092, and <0.001, respectively). In VKC specimens, the numbers of inflammatory cells expressing RANTES were significantly higher than the numbers of inflammatory cells expressing eotaxin, MCP-1, and MCP-2 (all p values <0.001). Colocalisation studies revealed that the majority of inflammatory cells expressing chemokines were CD68 positive monocytes/macrophages.
CONCLUSIONS—These results demonstrate an increase in the

  12. Simian cytomegalovirus encodes five rapidly evolving chemokine receptor homologues.

    PubMed

    Sahagun-Ruiz, Alfredo; Sierra-Honigmann, Ana Maria; Krause, Philip; Murphy, Philip M

    2004-01-01

    Many herpesviruses, poxviruses and retroviruses encode proteins related to chemokines and chemokine receptors. The first one discovered, US28 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), is a 7-transmembrane domain G protein-coupled chemokine receptor able to activate diverse cellular responses, including cell migration and gene expression. A related ORF named US27 is adjacent to US28, but no functions have been defined yet. Recently ORFs 3-7, a cluster of five concatenated ORFs with highest homology to US28 and mammalian chemokine receptors, were sequenced from a prototype "stealth virus", an African green monkey simian CMV (SCMV)-related entity with unusual fungal, bacterial and mammalian gene homologues. Stealth viruses have not yet been independently replicated in tissue culture, and therefore their biological significance remains unclear. ORF3, ORF4, ORF5 and ORF6 are complete ORFs whereas the sequence of ORF7 is incomplete. In the present study, we identified five corresponding ORFs in the genome of a clinical isolate of bonafide simian CMV (SCMV), strain 9610. We found substantial differences between the SCMV and "stealth virus" ORFs, especially for ORF5 where there are 31% non-identities at the amino acid level. Four conserved genes unrelated to chemokines (64K/CAP, DNBI, UL32, and IE2) in SCMV and HCMV had on average 52% identity at the deduced amino acid level, whereas the corresponding values for the SCMV ORFs versus US28 ranged from 21% to 30%, suggesting rapid gene diversification in this cluster. Consistent with this, the amino acid identity for any pairwise comparison among the SCMV ORFs is only 21-52%. The chemokine receptor homologues are estimated to comprise approximately 2-3% of the SCMV genome. HCMV US27 and US28 homologues have also been identified in the chimpanzee CMV genome, whereas mouse and rat CMV lack chemokine receptor homologues. This genomic analysis indicates that SCMV has an unusually high concentration of US28-related chemokine receptor

  13. Dual GPCR and GAG mimicry by the M3 chemokine decoy receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2008-09-23

    Viruses have evolved a myriad of evasion strategies focused on undermining chemokine-mediated immune surveillance, exemplified by the mouse {gamma}-herpesvirus 68 M3 decoy receptor. Crystal structures of M3 in complex with C chemokine ligand 1/lymphotactin and CC chemokine ligand 2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 reveal that invariant chemokine features associated with G protein-coupled receptor binding are primarily recognized by the decoy C-terminal domain, whereas the N-terminal domain (NTD) reconfigures to engage divergent basic residue clusters on the surface of chemokines. Favorable electrostatic forces dramatically enhance the association kinetics of chemokine binding by M3, with a primary role ascribed to acidic NTD regions that effectively mimic glycosaminoglycan interactions. Thus, M3 employs two distinct mechanisms of chemical imitation to potently sequester chemokines, thereby inhibiting chemokine receptor binding events as well as the formation of chemotactic gradients necessary for directed leukocyte trafficking.

  14. Chemokine receptors - the new frontier for AIDS research.

    PubMed

    Wells, T N; Proudfoot, A E; Power, C A; Marsh, M

    1996-08-01

    CD4 is widely known as the HIV receptor, but is insufficient to allow viral infection. Recently, members of the family of chemokine receptors have been identified as the missing co-receptors, which act with CD4 to allow the virus to enter cells. These discoveries open up the possibilities of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV infection and AIDS.

  15. Schistosoma mansoni secretes a chemokine binding protein with antiinflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip; Fallon, Rosie E; Mangan, Niamh E; Walsh, Caitriona M; Saraiva, Margarida; Sayers, Jon R; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Alcami, Antonio; Fallon, Padraic G

    2005-11-21

    The coevolution of humans and infectious agents has exerted selective pressure on the immune system to control potentially lethal infections. Correspondingly, pathogens have evolved with various strategies to modulate and circumvent the host's innate and adaptive immune response. Schistosoma species are helminth parasites with genes that have been selected to modulate the host to tolerate chronic worm infections, often for decades, without overt morbidity. The modulation of immunity by schistosomes has been shown to prevent a range of immune-mediated diseases, including allergies and autoimmunity. Individual immune-modulating schistosome molecules have, therefore, therapeutic potential as selective manipulators of the immune system to prevent unrelated diseases. Here we show that S. mansoni eggs secrete a protein into host tissues that binds certain chemokines and inhibits their interaction with host chemokine receptors and their biological activity. The purified recombinant S. mansoni chemokine binding protein (smCKBP) suppressed inflammation in several disease models. smCKBP is unrelated to host proteins and is the first described chemokine binding protein encoded by a pathogenic human parasite and may have potential as an antiinflammatory agent.

  16. Characterization of the "CCR5" Chemokine Receptor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of retroviruses is an essential topic of modern cell biology instruction. Furthermore, the process of HIV viral entry into the cell is a question of great interest in basic and clinical biology. This paper describes how students can easily recover their own DNA, amplify a portion of the "CCR5" chemokine receptor gene, characterize…

  17. Chemokine interaction with synergy-inducing molecules: fine tuning modulation of cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Cecchinato, Valentina; D’Agostino, Gianluca; Raeli, Lorenzo; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia

    2016-01-01

    Directed migration and arrest of leukocytes during homeostasis, inflammation, and tumor development is mediated by the chemokine system, which governs leukocyte migration and activities. Although we understand well the effects of different chemokines one by one, much less was known about the potential consequences of the concomitant expression of multiple chemokines or of their interaction with inflammatory molecules on leukocyte migration and functions. In the past 10 yr, several studies revealed the existence of additional features of chemokines: they can antagonize chemokine receptors or synergize with other chemokines, also by forming heterocomplexes. Moreover, recent data show that not only chemokines but also the alarmin high-mobility group box 1 can for a complex with CXCL12, enhancing its potency on CXCR4. The molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the heterocomplex has been partially elucidated, whereas its structure is a matter of current investigations. The present review discusses the current knowledge and relevance of the functions of heterocomplexes formed between chemokines or between the chemokine CXCL12 and the alarmin high-mobility group box 1. These studies highlight the importance of taking into account, when approaching innovative therapies targeting the chemokine system, also the fact that some chemokines and molecules released in inflammation, can considerably affect the activity of chemokine receptor agonists. PMID:26715684

  18. Ischemia-induced neuronal expression of the microglia attracting chemokine Secondary Lymphoid-tissue Chemokine (SLC).

    PubMed

    Biber, K; Sauter, A; Brouwer, N; Copray, S C; Boddeke, H W

    2001-04-15

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that Secondary Lymphoid-tissue Chemokine (SLC) is constitutively expressed in secondary lymphoid organs and controls the homing of naive T-cells and mature dendritic cells. By screening cDNA isolated from ischemic mouse brain, we found expression of SLC mRNA 6 h up to 4 days after the onset of ischemia. In situ hybridization combined with immunohistochemistry showed neurons expressing SLC mRNA in the ischemic area of the cortex. SLC mRNA expression was also found in cultured neurones after various treatments known to induce neuronal death, but not in cultured glial cells. Stimulation with SLC induced intracellular calcium transients and chemotaxis in cultured microglia. Since mRNA encoding CXCR3, an alternative receptor for SLC, but no CCR7 mRNA was found in microglia, we suggest that the effects of SLC on microglia are mediated by CXCR3. This assumption was corroborated by cross-desensitization experiments using IP-10 as a ligand for CXCR3. The inducible expression of SLC in neurones acting on microglia suggests a new and important role of SLC in the neuroimmune system. We propose that SLC is part of a neurone-microglia signaling system which is related to pathological conditions of the brain like ischemia.

  19. Dual Targeting of the Chemokine Receptors CXCR4 and ACKR3 with Novel Engineered Chemokines*

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Melinda S.; Salanga, Catherina L.; Chowdry, Arnab B.; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its G protein-coupled receptors CXCR4 and ACKR3 are implicated in cancer and inflammatory and autoimmune disorders and are targets of numerous antagonist discovery efforts. Here, we describe a series of novel, high affinity CXCL12-based modulators of CXCR4 and ACKR3 generated by selection of N-terminal CXCL12 phage libraries on live cells expressing the receptors. Twelve of 13 characterized CXCL12 variants are full CXCR4 antagonists, and four have Kd values <5 nm. The new variants also showed high affinity for ACKR3. The variant with the highest affinity for CXCR4, LGGG-CXCL12, showed efficacy in a murine model for multiple sclerosis, demonstrating translational potential. Molecular modeling was used to elucidate the structural basis of binding and antagonism of selected variants and to guide future designs. Together, this work represents an important step toward the development of therapeutics targeting CXCR4 and ACKR3. PMID:26216880

  20. Regulation of inflammatory chemokine receptors on blood T cells associated to the circulating versus liver chemokines in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; Marinho, Cíntia Ferreira; Povoa, Tiago Fajardo; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; de Souza, Luiza Assed; Barbosa, Luiza Damian Ribeiro; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Alves, Ada M B; Ávila, Carlos André Lins; de Souza, Luiz José; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Damasco, Paulo Vieira; Paes, Marciano Viana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chemokines/chemokines receptors on T cells in natural DENV infection. Patients from DENV-2 and -3- outbreaks were studied prospectively during the acute or convalescent phases. Expression of chemokine receptor and activation markers on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry analysis, plasma chemokine ligands concentrations were measured by ELISA and quantification of CCL5/RANTES(+) cells in liver tissues from fatal dengue cases was performed by immunochemistry. In the acute DENV-infection, T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1)-related CCR5 is significantly higher expressed on both CD4 and CD8 T cells. The Th1-related CXCR3 is up-regulated among CD4 T cells and Tc2-related CCR4 is up-regulated among CD8 T cells. In the convalescent phase, all chemokine receptor or chemokine ligand expression tends to reestablish control healthy levels. Increased CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β but decreased CCL5/RANTES levels were observed in DENV-patients during acute infection. Moreover, we showed an increased CD107a expression on CCR5 or CXCR3-expressing T cells and higher expression of CD29, CD44(HIGH) and CD127(LOW) markers on CCR4-expressing CD8 T cells in DENV-patients when compared to controls. Finally, liver from dengue fatal patients showed increased number of cells expressing CCL5/RANTES in three out of four cases compared to three death from a non-dengue patient. In conclusion, both Th1-related CCR5 and CXCR3 among CD4 T cells have a potential ability to exert cytotoxicity function. Moreover, Tc1-related CCR5 and Tc2-related CCR4 among CD8 T cells have a potential ability to exert effector function and migration based on cell markers evaluated. The CCR5 expression would be promoting an enhanced T cell recruitment into liver, a hypothesis that is corroborated by the CCL5/RANTES increase detected in hepatic tissue from dengue fatal cases. The balance between protective and pathogenic immune response mediated by

  1. Regulation of Inflammatory Chemokine Receptors on Blood T Cells Associated to the Circulating Versus Liver Chemokines in Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Povoa, Tiago Fajardo; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; de Souza, Luiza Assed; Barbosa, Luiza Damian Ribeiro; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C.; Alves, Ada M. B.; Ávila, Carlos André Lins; de Souza, Luiz José; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Damasco, Paulo Vieira; Paes, Marciano Viana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chemokines/chemokines receptors on T cells in natural DENV infection. Patients from DENV-2 and -3- outbreaks were studied prospectively during the acute or convalescent phases. Expression of chemokine receptor and activation markers on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry analysis, plasma chemokine ligands concentrations were measured by ELISA and quantification of CCL5/RANTES+ cells in liver tissues from fatal dengue cases was performed by immunochemistry. In the acute DENV-infection, T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1)-related CCR5 is significantly higher expressed on both CD4 and CD8 T cells. The Th1-related CXCR3 is up-regulated among CD4 T cells and Tc2-related CCR4 is up-regulated among CD8 T cells. In the convalescent phase, all chemokine receptor or chemokine ligand expression tends to reestablish control healthy levels. Increased CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β but decreased CCL5/RANTES levels were observed in DENV-patients during acute infection. Moreover, we showed an increased CD107a expression on CCR5 or CXCR3-expressing T cells and higher expression of CD29, CD44HIGH and CD127LOW markers on CCR4-expressing CD8 T cells in DENV-patients when compared to controls. Finally, liver from dengue fatal patients showed increased number of cells expressing CCL5/RANTES in three out of four cases compared to three death from a non-dengue patient. In conclusion, both Th1-related CCR5 and CXCR3 among CD4 T cells have a potential ability to exert cytotoxicity function. Moreover, Tc1-related CCR5 and Tc2-related CCR4 among CD8 T cells have a potential ability to exert effector function and migration based on cell markers evaluated. The CCR5 expression would be promoting an enhanced T cell recruitment into liver, a hypothesis that is corroborated by the CCL5/RANTES increase detected in hepatic tissue from dengue fatal cases. The balance between protective and pathogenic immune response mediated by chemokines

  2. Src-Mediated EGF Receptor Activation Regulates Ozone-Induced Interleukin 8 Expression in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wages, Phillip A.; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human exposure to ozone (O3) results in pulmonary function decrements and airway inflammation. The mechanisms underlying these adverse effects remain unclear. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation. Objective We examined the role of EGFR activation in O3-induced expression of the chemokine interleukin 8 (IL-8) in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC). Methods We detected phosphorylated EGFR using immunoblotting. EGFR dimerization was examined through cross-linking reaction and immunoblotting, and levels of IL-8 protein were measured using ELISA. Results Exposure to O3 (0.25–1.0 ppm) induced rapid and marked increase in EGFR phosphorylation at the autophosphorylation site Y1068 and the transphosphorylation site Y845, implicating the involvement of Src kinase. Further investigation showed that O3 stimulation induced phosphorylation of Src at Y416, indicative of Src activation. Pharmacological inhibition of Src kinase activity abrogated O3-induced EGFR phosphorylation at tyrosines 1068 and 845. Moreover, pretreatment of BEAS-2B cells with inhibitor of either EGFR or Src kinase activities significantly blocked O3-induced IL-8 expression. Conclusion Conclusion: O3 exposure increased IL-8 expression through Src-mediated EGFR transactivation in HBEC. Citation> Wu W, Wages PA, Devlin RB, Diaz-Sanchez D, Peden DB, Samet JM. 2015. Src-mediated EGF receptor activation regulates ozone-induced interleukin 8 expression in human bronchial epithelial cells. Environ Health Perspect 123:231–236; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307379 PMID:25303742

  3. Chemokines derived from soluble fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are biologically active

    SciTech Connect

    Magistrelli, Giovanni; Gueneau, Franck; Muslmani, Machadiya; Ravn, Ulla; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas . E-mail: nfischer@novimmune.com

    2005-08-26

    Chemokines are a class of low molecular weight proteins that are involved in leukocytes trafficking. Due to their involvement in recruiting immune cells to sites of inflammation, chemokines, and chemokine receptors have become an attractive class of therapeutic targets. However, when expressed in Escherichia coli chemokines are poorly soluble and accumulate in inclusion bodies. Several purification methods have been described but involve time-consuming refolding, buffer exchange, and purification steps that complicate expression of these proteins. Here, we describe a simple and reliable method to express chemokines as fusions to the protein NusA. The fusion proteins were largely found in the soluble fraction and could be readily purified in a single step. Proteolytic cleavage was used to obtain soluble recombinant chemokines that were found to be very active in a novel in vitro chemotaxis assays. This method could be applied to several {alpha} and {beta} human chemokines, suggesting that it is generally applicable to this class of proteins.

  4. Polysialylation controls dendritic cell trafficking by regulating chemokine recognition.

    PubMed

    Kiermaier, Eva; Moussion, Christine; Veldkamp, Christopher T; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; de Vries, Ingrid; Williams, Larry G; Chaffee, Gary R; Phillips, Andrew J; Freiberger, Friedrich; Imre, Richard; Taleski, Deni; Payne, Richard J; Braun, Asolina; Förster, Reinhold; Mechtler, Karl; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Volkman, Brian F; Sixt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The addition of polysialic acid to N- and/or O-linked glycans, referred to as polysialylation, is a rare posttranslational modification that is mainly known to control the developmental plasticity of the nervous system. Here we show that CCR7, the central chemokine receptor controlling immune cell trafficking to secondary lymphatic organs, carries polysialic acid. This modification is essential for the recognition of the CCR7 ligand CCL21. As a consequence, dendritic cell trafficking is abrogated in polysialyltransferase-deficient mice, manifesting as disturbed lymph node homeostasis and unresponsiveness to inflammatory stimuli. Structure-function analysis of chemokine-receptor interactions reveals that CCL21 adopts an autoinhibited conformation, which is released upon interaction with polysialic acid. Thus, we describe a glycosylation-mediated immune cell trafficking disorder and its mechanistic basis. PMID:26657283

  5. Epithelial Anion Transport as Modulator of Chemokine Signaling.

    PubMed

    Schnúr, Andrea; Hegyi, Péter; Rousseau, Simon; Lukacs, Gergely L; Veit, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of epithelial cells is to secrete and absorb ions and water in order to allow the formation of a luminal fluid compartment that is fundamental for the epithelial function as a barrier against environmental factors. Importantly, epithelial cells also take part in the innate immune system. As a first line of defense they detect pathogens and react by secreting and responding to chemokines and cytokines, thus aggravating immune responses or resolving inflammatory states. Loss of epithelial anion transport is well documented in a variety of diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pancreatitis, and cholestatic liver disease. Here we review the effect of aberrant anion secretion with focus on the release of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells and discuss putative mechanisms linking these transport defects to the augmented epithelial release of chemokines and cytokines. These mechanisms may contribute to the excessive and persistent inflammation in many respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27382190

  6. Tropoelastin regulates chemokine expression in fibroblasts in Costello syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tatano, Yutaka; Fujinawa, Reiko; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Naohiro; Tsuta, Kohji; Takada, Goro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Itoh, Kohji

    2008-08-08

    Costello syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly associated with growth and mental retardation, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and a predisposition to develop neoplasia. Comprehensive expression analysis revealed remarkable up-regulation of several cytokines and chemokines including Gro family proteins, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-8 and MCP-1 but down-regulation of extracellular matrix components including collagens and proteoglycans of skin fibroblasts derived from a Japanese Costello syndrome patient characterized by significantly reduced tropoelastin mRNA, impaired elastogenesis and enhanced cell proliferation. In contrast, decreases in these chemokines and IL-1{beta} expression were observed in Costello fibroblastic cell lines stably expressing the bovine tropoelastin (btEln) gene and in restored elastic fibers. These results strongly suggest that the human TE gene (ELN) transfer could be applicable for the gene therapy of a group of Costello syndrome patients with reduced ELN gene expression.

  7. Epithelial Anion Transport as Modulator of Chemokine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schnúr, Andrea; Hegyi, Péter; Rousseau, Simon; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Veit, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of epithelial cells is to secrete and absorb ions and water in order to allow the formation of a luminal fluid compartment that is fundamental for the epithelial function as a barrier against environmental factors. Importantly, epithelial cells also take part in the innate immune system. As a first line of defense they detect pathogens and react by secreting and responding to chemokines and cytokines, thus aggravating immune responses or resolving inflammatory states. Loss of epithelial anion transport is well documented in a variety of diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pancreatitis, and cholestatic liver disease. Here we review the effect of aberrant anion secretion with focus on the release of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells and discuss putative mechanisms linking these transport defects to the augmented epithelial release of chemokines and cytokines. These mechanisms may contribute to the excessive and persistent inflammation in many respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27382190

  8. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of nine CC chemokines in half-smooth tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lian-xu; Li, Mo-fei

    2015-12-01

    Chemokines are a large, diverse group of small cytokines that can be classified into several families, including the CC chemokine family, which plays a pivotal role in host defense by inducing leukocyte chemotaxis under physiological and inflammatory conditions. Here we studied 9 CC chemokines from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). Phylogenetic analysis divided these chemokines into four groups. The tissue specific expression patterns of the 9 chemokines under normal physiological conditions varied much, with most chemokines highly expressed in immune organs, while some other chemokines showing high expression levels in non-immune organs. In addition, the 9 chemokines exhibited similar or distinctly different expression profiles in response to the challenge of virus and intracellular and extracellular bacterial pathogens. These results indicate that in tongue sole, CC chemokines may be involved in different immune responses as homeostatic or inflammatory chemokines.

  9. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of nine CC chemokines in half-smooth tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lian-xu; Li, Mo-fei

    2015-12-01

    Chemokines are a large, diverse group of small cytokines that can be classified into several families, including the CC chemokine family, which plays a pivotal role in host defense by inducing leukocyte chemotaxis under physiological and inflammatory conditions. Here we studied 9 CC chemokines from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). Phylogenetic analysis divided these chemokines into four groups. The tissue specific expression patterns of the 9 chemokines under normal physiological conditions varied much, with most chemokines highly expressed in immune organs, while some other chemokines showing high expression levels in non-immune organs. In addition, the 9 chemokines exhibited similar or distinctly different expression profiles in response to the challenge of virus and intracellular and extracellular bacterial pathogens. These results indicate that in tongue sole, CC chemokines may be involved in different immune responses as homeostatic or inflammatory chemokines. PMID:26470888

  10. Molecular Basis of Chemokine CXCL5-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Nagarajan, Balaji; Desai, Umesh R; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-09-23

    Chemokines, a large family of highly versatile small soluble proteins, play crucial roles in defining innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating the trafficking of leukocytes, and also play a key role in various aspects of human physiology. Chemokines share the characteristic feature of reversibly existing as monomers and dimers, and their functional response is intimately coupled to interaction with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis or molecular mechanisms underlying CXCL5-GAG interactions. To address this missing knowledge, we characterized the interaction of a panel of heparin oligosaccharides to CXCL5 using solution NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry, and molecular dynamics simulations. NMR studies indicated that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG binding ligand and that lysine residues from the N-loop, 40s turn, β3 strand, and C-terminal helix mediate binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated a stoichiometry of two oligosaccharides per CXCL5 dimer. NMR-based structural models reveal that these residues form a contiguous surface within a monomer and, interestingly, that the GAG-binding domain overlaps with the receptor-binding domain, indicating that a GAG-bound chemokine cannot activate the receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the roles of the individual lysines are not equivalent and that helical lysines play a more prominent role in determining binding geometry and affinity. Further, binding interactions and GAG geometry in CXCL5 are novel and distinctly different compared with the related chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8. We conclude that a finely tuned balance between the GAG-bound dimer and free soluble monomer regulates CXCL5-mediated receptor signaling and function.

  11. Elevated CXC chemokines in urine noninvasively discriminate OAB from UTI.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas; Qu, Xianggui; Chuang, Yao Chi; Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Chancellor, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Overlapping symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) and urinary tract infection (UTI) often complicate the diagnosis and contribute to overprescription of antibiotics. Inflammatory response is a shared characteristic of both UTI and OAB and here we hypothesized that molecular differences in inflammatory response seen in urine can help discriminate OAB from UTI. Subjects in the age range of (20-88 yr) of either sex were recruited for this urine analysis study. Urine specimens were available from 62 UTI patients with positive dipstick test before antibiotic treatment. Six of these patients also provided urine after completion of antibiotic treatment. Subjects in cohorts of OAB (n = 59) and asymptomatic controls (n = 26) were negative for dipstick test. Urinary chemokines were measured by MILLIPLEX MAP Human Cytokine/Chemokine Immunoassay and their association with UTI and OAB was determined by univariate and multivariate statistics. Significant elevation of CXCL-1, CXCL-8 (IL-8), and CXCL-10 together with reduced levels for a receptor antagonist of IL-1A (sIL-1RA) were seen in UTI relative to OAB and asymptomatic controls. Elevated CXCL-1 urine levels predicted UTI with odds ratio of 1.018 and showed a specificity of 80.77% and sensitivity of 59.68%. Postantibiotic treatment, reduction was seen in all CXC chemokines with a significant reduction for CXCL-10. Strong association of CXCL-1 and CXCL-10 for UTI over OAB indicates mechanistic differences in signaling pathways driving inflammation secondary of infection in UTI compared with a lack of infection in OAB. Urinary chemokines highlight molecular differences in the paracrine signaling driving the overlapping symptoms of UTI and OAB.

  12. Elevated CXC chemokines in urine noninvasively discriminate OAB from UTI.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas; Qu, Xianggui; Chuang, Yao Chi; Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Chancellor, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Overlapping symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) and urinary tract infection (UTI) often complicate the diagnosis and contribute to overprescription of antibiotics. Inflammatory response is a shared characteristic of both UTI and OAB and here we hypothesized that molecular differences in inflammatory response seen in urine can help discriminate OAB from UTI. Subjects in the age range of (20-88 yr) of either sex were recruited for this urine analysis study. Urine specimens were available from 62 UTI patients with positive dipstick test before antibiotic treatment. Six of these patients also provided urine after completion of antibiotic treatment. Subjects in cohorts of OAB (n = 59) and asymptomatic controls (n = 26) were negative for dipstick test. Urinary chemokines were measured by MILLIPLEX MAP Human Cytokine/Chemokine Immunoassay and their association with UTI and OAB was determined by univariate and multivariate statistics. Significant elevation of CXCL-1, CXCL-8 (IL-8), and CXCL-10 together with reduced levels for a receptor antagonist of IL-1A (sIL-1RA) were seen in UTI relative to OAB and asymptomatic controls. Elevated CXCL-1 urine levels predicted UTI with odds ratio of 1.018 and showed a specificity of 80.77% and sensitivity of 59.68%. Postantibiotic treatment, reduction was seen in all CXC chemokines with a significant reduction for CXCL-10. Strong association of CXCL-1 and CXCL-10 for UTI over OAB indicates mechanistic differences in signaling pathways driving inflammation secondary of infection in UTI compared with a lack of infection in OAB. Urinary chemokines highlight molecular differences in the paracrine signaling driving the overlapping symptoms of UTI and OAB. PMID:27335375

  13. Molecular Basis of Chemokine CXCL5-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Nagarajan, Balaji; Desai, Umesh R; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-09-23

    Chemokines, a large family of highly versatile small soluble proteins, play crucial roles in defining innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating the trafficking of leukocytes, and also play a key role in various aspects of human physiology. Chemokines share the characteristic feature of reversibly existing as monomers and dimers, and their functional response is intimately coupled to interaction with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis or molecular mechanisms underlying CXCL5-GAG interactions. To address this missing knowledge, we characterized the interaction of a panel of heparin oligosaccharides to CXCL5 using solution NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry, and molecular dynamics simulations. NMR studies indicated that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG binding ligand and that lysine residues from the N-loop, 40s turn, β3 strand, and C-terminal helix mediate binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated a stoichiometry of two oligosaccharides per CXCL5 dimer. NMR-based structural models reveal that these residues form a contiguous surface within a monomer and, interestingly, that the GAG-binding domain overlaps with the receptor-binding domain, indicating that a GAG-bound chemokine cannot activate the receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the roles of the individual lysines are not equivalent and that helical lysines play a more prominent role in determining binding geometry and affinity. Further, binding interactions and GAG geometry in CXCL5 are novel and distinctly different compared with the related chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8. We conclude that a finely tuned balance between the GAG-bound dimer and free soluble monomer regulates CXCL5-mediated receptor signaling and function. PMID:27471273

  14. Systemic chemokine levels, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke events

    PubMed Central

    Canouï-Poitrine, F.; Luc, G.; Mallat, Z.; Machez, E.; Bingham, A.; Ferrieres, J.; Ruidavets, J.-B.; Montaye, M.; Yarnell, J.; Haas, B.; Arveiler, D.; Morange, P.; Kee, F.; Evans, A.; Amouyel, P.; Ducimetiere, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the association between systemic levels of the chemokine regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and eotaxin-1 (CCL11) with future coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke events and to assess their usefulness for CHD and ischemic stroke risk prediction in the PRIME Study. Methods: After 10 years of follow-up of 9,771 men, 2 nested case-control studies were built including 621 first CHD events and 1,242 matched controls and 95 first ischemic stroke events and 190 matched controls. Standardized hazard ratios (HRs) for each log-transformed chemokine were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Results: None of the 4 chemokines were independent predictors of CHD, either with respect to stable angina or to acute coronary syndrome. Conversely, RANTES (HR = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.74), IP-10 (HR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.06–2.20), and eotaxin-1 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI 1.02–2.46), but not MCP-1 (HR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.68–1.46), were associated with ischemic stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. When the first 3 chemokines were included in the same multivariate model, RANTES and IP-10 remained predictive of ischemic stroke. Their addition to a traditional risk factor model predicting ischemic stroke substantially improved the C-statistic from 0.6756 to 0.7425 (p = 0.004). Conclusions: In asymptomatic men, higher systemic levels of RANTES and IP-10 are independent predictors of ischemic stroke but not of CHD events. RANTES and IP-10 may improve the accuracy of ischemic stroke risk prediction over traditional risk factors. PMID:21849651

  15. Dynamics and thermodynamic properties of CXCL7 chemokine.

    PubMed

    Herring, Charles A; Singer, Christopher M; Ermakova, Elena A; Khairutdinov, Bulat I; Zuev, Yuriy F; Jacobs, Donald J; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2015-11-01

    Chemokines form a family of signaling proteins mainly responsible for directing the traffic of leukocytes, where their biological activity can be modulated by their oligomerization state. We characterize the dynamics and thermodynamic stability of monomer and homodimer structures of CXCL7, one of the most abundant platelet chemokines, using experimental methods that include circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and computational methods that include the anisotropic network model (ANM), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the distance constraint model (DCM). A consistent picture emerges for the effects of dimerization and Cys5-Cys31 and Cys7-Cys47 disulfide bonds formation. The presence of disulfide bonds is not critical for maintaining structural stability in the monomer or dimer, but the monomer is destabilized more than the dimer upon removal of disulfide bonds. Disulfide bonds play a key role in shaping the characteristics of native state dynamics. The combined analysis shows that upon dimerization flexibly correlated motions are induced between the 30s and 50s loop within each monomer and across the dimer interface. Interestingly, the greatest gain in flexibility upon dimerization occurs when both disulfide bonds are present, and the homodimer is least stable relative to its two monomers. These results suggest that the highly conserved disulfide bonds in chemokines facilitate a structural mechanism that is tuned to optimally distinguish functional characteristics between monomer and dimer. PMID:26297927

  16. Genomic identification of chemokines and cytokines in opossum.

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily S W; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Belov, Katherine

    2011-03-01

    The cytokine repertoire of marsupials is largely unknown. The sequencing of the opossum genome has expedited the identification of many immune genes. However, many genes have not been identified using automated annotation pipelines because of high levels of sequence divergence. To fill gaps in our knowledge of the cytokine gene complement in marsupials, we searched the genome assembly of the gray short-tailed opossum for chemokine, interleukin, colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor, and transforming growth factor genes. In particular, we focused on genes that were not previously identified through Ensembl's automatic annotations. We report that the vast majority of cytokines are conserved, with direct orthologs between therian species. The major exceptions are chemokine genes, which show lineage-specific duplication/loss. Thirty-six chemokines were identified in opossum, including a lineage-specific expansion of macrophage inflammatory protein family genes. Divergent cytokines IL7, IL9, IL31, IL33, and CSF2 were identified. This is the first time IL31 and IL33 have been described outside of eutherian species. The high levels of similarities between the cytokine gene repertoires of therians suggest that the marsupial immune response is highly similar to eutherians.

  17. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  18. Involvement of chemokine receptors in breast cancer metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Anja; Homey, Bernhard; Soto, Hortensia; Ge, Nianfeng; Catron, Daniel; Buchanan, Matthew E.; McClanahan, Terri; Murphy, Erin; Yuan, Wei; Wagner, Stephan N.; Barrera, Jose Luis; Mohar, Alejandro; Verástegui, Emma; Zlotnik, Albert

    2001-03-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by a distinct metastatic pattern involving the regional lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and liver. Tumour cell migration and metastasis share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Here we report that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 are highly expressed in human breast cancer cells, malignant breast tumours and metastases. Their respective ligands CXCL12/SDF-1α and CCL21/6Ckine exhibit peak levels of expression in organs representing the first destinations of breast cancer metastasis. In breast cancer cells, signalling through CXCR4 or CCR7 mediates actin polymerization and pseudopodia formation, and subsequently induces chemotactic and invasive responses. In vivo, neutralizing the interactions of CXCL12/CXCR4 significantly impairs metastasis of breast cancer cells to regional lymph nodes and lung. Malignant melanoma, which has a similar metastatic pattern as breast cancer but also a high incidence of skin metastases, shows high expression levels of CCR10 in addition to CXCR4 and CCR7. Our findings indicate that chemokines and their receptors have a critical role in determining the metastatic destination of tumour cells.

  19. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. [corrected]. LXXXIX. Update on the extended family of chemokine receptors and introducing a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M; Graham, Gerard J; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Murphy, Philip M; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145-176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human Genome

  20. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  1. Transmembrane chemokines act as receptors in a novel mechanism termed inverse signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Gebhardt, Henrike; Krossa, Sebastian; Ludwig, Andreas; Lucius, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1/fractalkine and CXCL16 are widely expressed in different types of tumors, often without an appropriate expression of their classical receptors. We observed that receptor-negative cancer cells could be stimulated by the soluble chemokines. Searching for alternative receptors we detected that all cells expressing or transfected with transmembrane chemokine ligands bound the soluble chemokines with high affinity and responded by phosphorylation of intracellular kinases, enhanced proliferation and anti-apoptosis. This activity requires the intracellular domain and apparently the dimerization of the transmembrane chemokine ligand. Thus, shed soluble chemokines can generate auto- or paracrine signals by binding and activating their transmembrane forms. We term this novel mechanism “inverse signaling”. We suppose that inverse signaling is an autocrine feedback and fine-tuning system in the communication between cells that in tumors supports stabilization and proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10820.001 PMID:26796342

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of Chemokine Genes: A Link to Pancreatic Islet Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Susan J.; Collier, J. Jason

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced expression of chemotactic cytokines (aka chemokines) within pancreatic islets likely contributes to islet inflammation by regulating the recruitment and activation of various leukocyte populations, including macrophages, neutrophils, and T-lymphocytes. Because of the powerful actions of these chemokines, precise transcriptional control is required. In this review, we highlight what is known about the signals and mechanisms that govern the transcription of genes encoding specific chemokine proteins in pancreatic islet β-cells, which include contributions from the NF-κB and STAT1 pathways. We further discuss increased chemokine expression in pancreatic islets during autoimmune-mediated and obesity-related development of diabetes. PMID:26018641

  3. Early up-regulation of chemokine expression in fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Leifeld, Ludger; Dumoulin, Franz-Ludwig; Purr, Ingvill; Janberg, Katrin; Trautwein, Christian; Wolff, Martin; Manns, Michael Peter; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Spengler, Ulrich

    2003-03-01

    CC-chemokines recruit and activate macrophages and T lymphocytes, the major components of inflammatory infiltrates in fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). To analyse the role of CC-chemokines in the pathogenesis of FHF, this study examined serum levels and intrahepatic expression of MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES in the livers and sera of patients with FHF and controls by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and competitive RT-PCR. Serum levels and intrahepatic expression of all chemokines studied in FHF exceeded the levels in chronic liver diseases and normal controls. Distinct patterns of expression of each chemokine were noted on Kupffer cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes, lymphocytes, and bile ducts. Intrahepatic chemokine expression correlated closely with the extent of infiltration by macrophages and T lymphocytes (r = 0.65-0.95, p < 0.001). The functional relationship between intrahepatic chemokine release and infiltration was confirmed in chemotaxis assays by inhibiting chemotaxis induced by homogenates of liver tissue obtained from FHF patients with neutralizing MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES antibodies. The time course of CC-chemokine release was studied in the concanavalin A and the galactosamine/LPS mouse models of FHF. In both models, intrahepatic chemokine up-regulation occurred as an early event prior to hepatic infiltration and liver damage. The data indicate that an abundant intrahepatic release of CC-chemokines is an early and pivotal step in the pathogenesis of FHF.

  4. New paradigms in chemokine receptor signal transduction: Moving beyond the two-site model.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Andrew B; Getschman, Anthony E; Ziarek, Joshua J; Nevins, Amanda M; Gauthier, Pierre-Arnaud; Chevigné, Andy; Szpakowska, Martyna; Volkman, Brian F

    2016-08-15

    Chemokine receptor (CKR) signaling forms the basis of essential immune cellular functions, and dysregulated CKR signaling underpins numerous disease processes of the immune system and beyond. CKRs, which belong to the seven transmembrane domain receptor (7TMR) superfamily, initiate signaling upon binding of endogenous, secreted chemokine ligands. Chemokine-CKR interactions are traditionally described by a two-step/two-site mechanism, in which the CKR N-terminus recognizes the chemokine globular core (i.e. site 1 interaction), followed by activation when the unstructured chemokine N-terminus is inserted into the receptor TM bundle (i.e. site 2 interaction). Several recent studies challenge the structural independence of sites 1 and 2 by demonstrating physical and allosteric links between these supposedly separate sites. Others contest the functional independence of these sites, identifying nuanced roles for site 1 and other interactions in CKR activation. These developments emerge within a rapidly changing landscape in which CKR signaling is influenced by receptor PTMs, chemokine and CKR dimerization, and endogenous non-chemokine ligands. Simultaneous advances in the structural and functional characterization of 7TMR biased signaling have altered how we understand promiscuous chemokine-CKR interactions. In this review, we explore new paradigms in CKR signal transduction by considering studies that depict a more intricate architecture governing the consequences of chemokine-CKR interactions. PMID:27106080

  5. New paradigms in chemokine receptor signal transduction: Moving beyond the two-site model.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Andrew B; Getschman, Anthony E; Ziarek, Joshua J; Nevins, Amanda M; Gauthier, Pierre-Arnaud; Chevigné, Andy; Szpakowska, Martyna; Volkman, Brian F

    2016-08-15

    Chemokine receptor (CKR) signaling forms the basis of essential immune cellular functions, and dysregulated CKR signaling underpins numerous disease processes of the immune system and beyond. CKRs, which belong to the seven transmembrane domain receptor (7TMR) superfamily, initiate signaling upon binding of endogenous, secreted chemokine ligands. Chemokine-CKR interactions are traditionally described by a two-step/two-site mechanism, in which the CKR N-terminus recognizes the chemokine globular core (i.e. site 1 interaction), followed by activation when the unstructured chemokine N-terminus is inserted into the receptor TM bundle (i.e. site 2 interaction). Several recent studies challenge the structural independence of sites 1 and 2 by demonstrating physical and allosteric links between these supposedly separate sites. Others contest the functional independence of these sites, identifying nuanced roles for site 1 and other interactions in CKR activation. These developments emerge within a rapidly changing landscape in which CKR signaling is influenced by receptor PTMs, chemokine and CKR dimerization, and endogenous non-chemokine ligands. Simultaneous advances in the structural and functional characterization of 7TMR biased signaling have altered how we understand promiscuous chemokine-CKR interactions. In this review, we explore new paradigms in CKR signal transduction by considering studies that depict a more intricate architecture governing the consequences of chemokine-CKR interactions.

  6. Chemokines accentuating protumoral activities in oral cancer microenvironment possess an imperious stratagem for therapeutic resolutions.

    PubMed

    Panda, Swagatika; Padhiary, Subrat Kumar; Routray, Samapika

    2016-09-01

    Chemokines, the chemotactic cytokines have established their role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Studies, which explored their role in oral cancer for protumoral activity, point towards targeting chemokines for oral squamous cell carcinoma therapy. The need of the hour is to emphasize/divulge in the activities of chemokine ligands and their receptors in the tumor microenvironment for augmentation of such stratagems. This progressing sentience of chemokines and their receptors has inspired this review which is an endeavour to comprehend their role as an aid in accentuating hallmarks of cancer and targeted therapy. PMID:27531867

  7. Therapeutic implications of chemokine-mediated pathways in atherosclerosis: realistic perspectives and utopias.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Stavros; Amanatidou, Virginia; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2010-09-01

    Current perspectives on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis strongly support the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the establishment and progression of atherosclerostic lesions. Chemokine-mediated mechanisms are potent regulators of such processes by orchestrating the interactions of inflammatory cellular components of the peripheral blood with cellular components of the arterial wall. The increasing evidence supporting the role of chemokine pathways in atherosclerosis renders chemokine ligands and their receptors potential therapeutic targets. In the following review, we aim to highlight the special structural and functional features of chemokines and their receptors in respect to their roles in atherosclerosis, and examine to what extent available data can be applied in disease management practices.

  8. CXC-type chemokines promote myofibroblast phenoconversion and prostatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gharaee-Kermani, Mehrnaz; Kasina, Sathish; Moore, Bethany B; Thomas, Dafydd; Mehra, Rohit; Macoska, Jill A

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies from our group suggest that extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and fibrosis characterize the peri-urethral prostate tissues of some men suffering from Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) and that fibrosis may be a contributing factor to the etiology of LUTS. Fibrosis can generally be regarded as an errant wound-healing process in response to chronic inflammation, and several studies have shown that the aging prostate tissue microenvironment is rich with inflammatory cells and proteins. However, it is unclear whether these same inflammatory proteins, particularly CXC-type chemokines, can mediate myofibroblast phenoconversion and the ECM deposition necessary for the development of prostatic tissue fibrosis. To examine this, immortalized and primary prostate stromal fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1, CXCL5, CXCL8, or CXCL12 were evaluated morphologically by microscopy, by immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR for αSMA, collagen 1, vimentin, calponin, and tenascin protein and transcript expression, and by gel contraction assays for functional myofibroblast phenoconversion. The results of these studies showed that that immortalized and primary prostate stromal fibroblasts are induced to express collagen 1 and 3 and αSMA gene transcripts and proteins and to undergo complete and functional myofibroblast phenoconversion in response to CXC-type chemokines, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-β1. Moreover, CXCL12-mediated myofibroblast phenoconversion can be completely abrogated by inhibition of the CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4. These findings suggest that CXC-type chemokines, which comprise inflammatory proteins known to be highly expressed in the aging prostate, can efficiently and completely mediate myofibroblast phenoconversion and may thereby promote fibrotic changes in prostate tissue architecture associated with the development and progression of male lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:23173053

  9. Inflammatory microenvironment and expression of chemokines in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ke-Qi; He, Xue-Qun; Ma, Meng-Yu; Guo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xue-Min; Chen, Jie; Han, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Quan-Gang; Nian, Hua; Ma, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the inflammatory microenvironment and expression of chemokines in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in nude mice. METHODS: CBRH-7919 HCC cells were injected into the subcutaneous region of nude mice. Beginning two weeks after the challenge, tumor growth was measured every week for six weeks. The stromal microenvironment and inflammatory cell infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired tumor and adjacent peritumoral samples, and macrophage phenotype was assessed using double-stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme. A chemokine PCR array, comprised of 98 genes, was used to screen differential gene expressions, which were validated by Western blotting. Additionally, expression of identified chemokines was knocked-down by RNA interference, and the effect on tumor growth was assessed. RESULTS: Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of adjacent peritumoral tissues with increased macrophage, neutrophil, and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets) infiltration. Macrophages within adjacent peritumoral tissues express inducible nitric oxide synthase, suggestive of a proinflammatory phenotype. Fifty-one genes were identified in tumor tissues during the progression period, including 50 that were overexpressed (including CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL3) and three that were underexpressed (CXCR1, Ifg and Actb). RNA interference of CXCL1 in the CBRH-7919 cells decreased the growth of tumors in nude mice and inhibited expression of CXCL2, CXCL3 and interleukin-1β protein. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that CXCL1 plays a critical role in tumor growth and may serve as a potential molecular target for use in HCC therapy. PMID:25944999

  10. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding.

    PubMed

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael; Pihl, Heidi; Larsen, Olav; Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Johnsen, Anders H; Frimurer, Thomas M; Karlshøj, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-07-29

    Chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune system and are linked to several human diseases. The initial contact of chemokines with their receptors depends on highly specified extracellular receptor features. Here we investigate the importance of conserved extracellular disulfide bridges and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL-2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action in CCR8. We find that the seven-transmembrane (TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix III (TMIII) and ECL-2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only for chemokines. Furthermore, we find that two distinct aromatic residues in ECL-2, Tyr(184) (Cys + 1) and Tyr(187) (Cys + 4), are crucial for binding of the CC chemokines CCL1 (agonist) and MC148 (antagonist), respectively, but not for small molecule binding. Finally, using in silico modeling, we predict an aromatic cluster of interaction partners for Tyr(187) in TMIV (Phe(171)) and TMV (Trp(194)). We show in vitro that these residues are crucial for the binding and action of MC148, thus supporting their participation in an aromatic cluster with Tyr(187) This aromatic cluster appears to be present in a large number of CC chemokine receptors and thereby could play a more general role to be exploited in future drug development targeting these receptors. PMID:27226537

  11. Chemokine receptor CXCR2: physiology regulator and neuroinflammation controller?

    PubMed Central

    Veenstra, Mike; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is a crucial component of inflammatory reactions, while the central nervous system (CNS) is the most vulnerable site of the body to inflammatory tissue injury. Neuroinflammatory brain pathologies are disorders in which the CNS is threatened by its own immune system. Chemokine receptor CXCR2 and its ligands have been implicated in several neuroinflammatory brain pathologies, as well as in neutrophil recruitment and in the developmental positioning of neural cells. This review focuses on the basics of CXCR2, its regulating role in bone marrow neutrophil recruitment, oligodendrocyte progenitor cell positioning and neural repair mechanisms, as well as its diverse roles in neuroinflammatory brain pathologies. PMID:22445294

  12. Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 and Atypical Chemokine Receptor 3 Regulate Vascular α1-Adrenergic Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Harold H; Wong, Yee M; Tripathi, Abhishek; Nevins, Amanda M; Gamelli, Richard L; Volkman, Brian F; Byron, Kenneth L; Majetschak, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR) 4 and atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) 3 ligands have been reported to modulate cardiovascular function in various disease models. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to determine how pharmacological modulation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 regulate cardiovascular function. In vivo administration of TC14012, a CXCR4 antagonist and ACKR3 agonist, caused cardiovascular collapse in normal animals. During the cardiovascular stress response to hemorrhagic shock, ubiquitin, a CXCR4 agonist, stabilized blood pressure, whereas coactivation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 with CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), or blockade of CXCR4 with AMD3100 showed opposite effects. While CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect myocardial function, they selectively altered vascular reactivity upon α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation in pressure myography experiments. CXCR4 activation with ubiquitin enhanced α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction, whereas ACKR3 activation with various natural and synthetic ligands antagonized α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction. The opposing effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 activation by CXCL12 could be dissected pharmacologically. CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect vasoconstriction upon activation of voltage-operated Ca2+ channels or endothelin receptors. Effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 agonists on vascular α1-AR responsiveness were independent of the endothelium. These findings suggest that CXCR4 and ACKR3 modulate α1-AR reactivity in vascular smooth muscle and regulate hemodynamics in normal and pathological conditions. Our observations point toward CXCR4 and ACKR3 as new pharmacological targets to control vasoreactivity and blood pressure. PMID:25032954

  13. Chemokine guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Michael R.M.; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C. Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E.; Sucov, Henry M.; Siekmann, Arndt F.; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Interruption of coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often-fatal consequences for heart disease patients. However the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine-signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults. PMID:26017769

  14. Chemokine-guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Michael R M; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E; Sucov, Henry M; Siekmann, Arndt F; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-05-26

    Interruption of the coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often fatal consequences for patients. However, the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults.

  15. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Site-Specific Biotinylation.

    PubMed

    Liebick, Marcel; Schläger, Christian; Oppermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors undergo internalization and desensitization in response to ligand activation. Internalized receptors are either preferentially directed towards recycling pathways (e.g. CCR5) or sorted for proteasomal degradation (e.g. CXCR4). Here we describe a method for the analysis of receptor internalization and recycling based on specific Bir A-mediated biotinylation of an acceptor peptide coupled to the receptor, which allows a more detailed analysis of receptor trafficking compared to classical antibody-based detection methods. Studies on constitutive internalization of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 (12.1% ± 0.99% receptor internalization/h) and CCR5 (13.7% ± 0.68%/h) reveals modulation of these processes by inverse (TAK779; 10.9% ± 0.95%/h) or partial agonists (Met-CCL5; 15.6% ± 0.5%/h). These results suggest an actively driven internalization process. We also demonstrate the advantages of specific biotinylation compared to classical antibody detection during agonist-induced receptor internalization, which may be used for immunofluorescence analysis as well. Site-specific biotinylation may be applicable to studies on trafficking of transmembrane proteins, in general.

  16. Mig and IP-10: CXC chemokines that target lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Farber, J M

    1997-03-01

    Mig and IP-10 are related members of the CXC subfamily of the chemokine family of cytokines. The murine Mig (MuMig), human IP-10, and the mouse homologue of IP-10, Crg-2, were all identified due to the dramatic inductions of their genes in monocytic cells treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Studies using recombinant (r) human proteins show that, unlike most other CXC chemokines, rHuMig and rIP-10 have no activity on neutrophils but appear to target lymphocytes specifically. rHuMig and rIP-10 are active as chemotactic factors for stimulated, but not for resting, T cells. Studies done in vitro and in vivo have shown that rHuMig and rIP-10 share additional activities, including inhibition of neovascularization, inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cells, and anti-tumor effects. rHuMig and rIP-10 show reciprocal desensitization on activated T cells and have been demonstrated to share a receptor, CXCR3. The genes for both MuMig and Crg-2 are highly expressed in multiple tissues during experimental viral and protozoan infections in mice, but their patterns of expression differ. This suggests that the Migs and IP-10/Crg-2 may play roles in host defense and that, despite their similar activities assayed in vitro, Mig and IP-10/Crg-2 may serve non-redundant functions in vivo.

  17. Regulation of pulmonary fibrosis by chemokine receptor CXCR3

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dianhua; Liang, Jiurong; Hodge, Jennifer; Lu, Bao; Zhu, Zhou; Yu, Shuang; Fan, Juan; Gao, Yunfei; Yin, Zhinan; Homer, Robert; Gerard, Craig; Noble, Paul W.

    2004-01-01

    CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is the receptor for the IFN-γ–inducible C-X-C chemokines MIG/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11. CXCR3 is expressed on activated immune cells and proliferating endothelial cells. The role of CXCR3 in fibroproliferation has not been investigated. We examined the role of CXCR3 in pulmonary injury and repair in vivo. CXCR3-deficient mice demonstrated increased mortality with progressive interstitial fibrosis relative to WT mice. Increased fibrosis occurred without increased inflammatory cell recruitment. CXCR3 deficiency resulted in both a reduced early burst of IFN-γ production and decreased expression of CXCL10 after lung injury. We identified a relative deficiency in lung NK cells in the unchallenged CXCR3-deficient lung and demonstrated production of IFN-γ by WT lung NK cells in vivo following lung injury. The fibrotic phenotype in the CXCR3-deficient mice was significantly reversed following administration of exogenous IFN-γ or restoration of endogenous IFN-γ production by adoptive transfer of WT lymph node and spleen cells. Finally, pretreatment of WT mice with IFN-γ–neutralizing Ab’s enhanced fibrosis following lung injury. These data demonstrate a nonredundant role for CXCR3 in limiting tissue fibroproliferation and suggest that this effect may be mediated, in part, by the innate production of IFN-γ following lung injury. PMID:15254596

  18. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Site-Specific Biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Liebick, Marcel; Schläger, Christian; Oppermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors undergo internalization and desensitization in response to ligand activation. Internalized receptors are either preferentially directed towards recycling pathways (e.g. CCR5) or sorted for proteasomal degradation (e.g. CXCR4). Here we describe a method for the analysis of receptor internalization and recycling based on specific Bir A-mediated biotinylation of an acceptor peptide coupled to the receptor, which allows a more detailed analysis of receptor trafficking compared to classical antibody-based detection methods. Studies on constitutive internalization of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 (12.1% ± 0.99% receptor internalization/h) and CCR5 (13.7% ± 0.68%/h) reveals modulation of these processes by inverse (TAK779; 10.9% ± 0.95%/h) or partial agonists (Met-CCL5; 15.6% ± 0.5%/h). These results suggest an actively driven internalization process. We also demonstrate the advantages of specific biotinylation compared to classical antibody detection during agonist-induced receptor internalization, which may be used for immunofluorescence analysis as well. Site-specific biotinylation may be applicable to studies on trafficking of transmembrane proteins, in general. PMID:27310579

  19. Heparanase augments inflammatory chemokine production from colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tsunekawa, Naoki; Higashi, Nobuaki; Kogane, Yusuke; Waki, Michihiko; Shida, Hiroaki; Nishimura, Yoshio; Adachi, Hayamitsu; Nakajima, Motowo; Irimura, Tatsuro

    2016-01-22

    To explore possible roles of heparanase in cancer-host crosstalk, we examined whether heparanase influences expression of inflammatory chemokines in colorectal cancer cells. Murine colorectal carcinoma cells incubated with heparanase upregulated MCP-1, KC, and RANTES genes and released MCP-1 and KC proteins. Heparanase-dependent production of IL-8 was detected in two human colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Addition of a heparanase inhibitor Heparastatin (SF4) did not influence MCP-1 production, while both latent and mature forms of heparanase augmented MCP-1 release, suggesting that heparanase catalytic activity was dispensable for MCP-1 production. In contrast, addition of heparin to the medium suppressed MCP-1 release in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, targeted suppression of Ext1 by RNAi significantly suppressed cell surface expression of heparan sulfate and MCP-1 production in colon 26 cells. Taken together, it is concluded that colon 26 cells transduce the heparanase-mediated signal through heparan sulfate binding. We propose a novel function for heparanase independent of its endoglycosidase activity, namely as a stimulant for chemokine production. PMID:26713365

  20. Structural insights into the interaction between a potent anti-inflammatory protein, viral CC chemokine inhibitor (vCCI), and the human CC chemokine, Eotaxin-1.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Nai-Wei; Gao, Yong-Guang; Schill, Megan S; Isern, Nancy; Dupureur, Cynthia M; Liwang, Patricia J

    2014-03-01

    Chemokines play important roles in the immune system, not only recruiting leukocytes to the site of infection and inflammation but also guiding cell homing and cell development. The soluble poxvirus-encoded protein viral CC chemokine inhibitor (vCCI), a CC chemokine inhibitor, can bind to human CC chemokines tightly to impair the host immune defense. This protein has no known homologs in eukaryotes and may represent a potent method to stop inflammation. Previously, our structure of the vCCI·MIP-1β (macrophage inflammatory protein-1β) complex indicated that vCCI uses negatively charged residues in β-sheet II to interact with positively charged residues in the MIP-1β N terminus, 20s region and 40s loop. However, the interactions between vCCI and other CC chemokines have not yet been fully explored. Here, we used NMR and fluorescence anisotropy to study the interaction between vCCI and eotaxin-1 (CCL11), a CC chemokine that is an important factor in the asthma response. NMR results reveal that the binding pattern is very similar to the vCCI·MIP-1β complex and suggest that electrostatic interactions provide a major contribution to binding. Fluorescence anisotropy results on variants of eotaxin-1 further confirm the critical roles of the charged residues in eotaxin-1. In addition, the binding affinity between vCCI and other wild type CC chemokines, MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), MIP-1β, and RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted), were determined as 1.1, 1.2, and 0.22 nm, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first work quantitatively measuring the binding affinity between vCCI and multiple CC chemokines.

  1. A silent chemokine receptor regulates steady-state leukocyte homing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Heinzel, Kornelia; Benz, Claudia; Bleul, Conrad C.

    2007-01-01

    The location of leukocytes in different microenvironments is intimately connected to their function and, in the case of leukocyte precursors, to the executed differentiation and maturation program. Leukocyte migration within lymphoid organs has been shown to be mediated by constitutively expressed chemokines, but how the bioavailability of these homeostatic chemokines is regulated remains unknown. Here, we report in vivo evidence for the role of a nonsignaling chemokine receptor in the migration of leukocytes under physiological, i.e., noninflammatory, conditions. We have studied the in vivo role of the silent chemokine receptor CCX-CKR1 by both loss- and gain-of-function approaches. CCX-CKR1 binds the constitutively expressed chemokines CC chemokine ligand (CCL)19, CCL21, and CCL25. We find that CCX-CKR1 is involved in the steady-state homing of CD11c+MHCIIhigh dendritic cells to skin-draining lymph nodes, and it affects the homing of embryonic thymic precursors to the thymic anlage. These observations indicate that the silent chemokine receptor CCX-CKR1, which is exclusively expressed by stroma cells, but not hematopoietic cells themselves, regulates homeostatic leukocyte migration by controlling the availability of chemokines in the extracellular space. This finding adds another level of complexity to our understanding of leukocyte homeostatic migration. PMID:17485674

  2. Identification of a novel CXCL1-like chemokine gene in macaques and its inactivation in hominids.

    PubMed

    Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Otsuka-Ono, Kaori; Miura, Retsu; Osada, Naoki; Terao, Keiji; Yoshie, Osamu; Kusuda, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are a rapidly evolving cytokine gene family. Because of various genome rearrangements after divergence of primates and rodents, humans and mice have different sets of chemokine genes, with humans having members outnumbering those of mice. Here, we report the occurrence of lineage-specific chemokine gene generation or inactivation events within primates. By using human chemokine sequences as queries, we isolated a novel cynomolgus macaque CXC chemokine cDNA. The encoded chemokine, termed CXCL1L (from CXCL1-like) showed the highest similarity to human CXCL1. A highly homologous gene was also found in the rhesus macaque genome. By comparing the genome organization of the major CXC chemokine clusters among the primates, we found that one copy of the duplicated CXCL1 genes turned into a pseudogene in the hominids, whereas the gene in macaques has been maintained as a functionally active CXCL1L. In addition, cynomolgus macaque was found to contain an additional CXC chemokine highly homologous to CXCL3, termed CXCL3L (from CXCL3-like). These results demonstrate the birth-and-death process of a new gene in association with gene duplication within the primates.

  3. Chemokines in Wound Healing and as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Reducing Cutaneous Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Peter Adam; Greaves, Nicholas Stuart; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous scarring is an almost inevitable end point of adult human wound healing. It is associated with significant morbidity, both physical and psychological. Pathological scarring, including hypertrophic and keloid scars, can be particularly debilitating. Manipulation of the chemokine system may lead to effective therapies for problematic lesions. Recent Advances: Rapid advancement in the understanding of chemokines and their receptors has led to exciting developments in the world of therapeutics. Modulation of their function has led to clinically effective treatments for conditions as diverse as human immunodeficiency virus and inflammatory bowel disease. Potential methods of targeting chemokines include monoclonal antibodies, small-molecule antagonists, interference with glycosaminoglycan binding and the use of synthetic truncated chemokines. Early work has shown promising results on scar development and appearance when the chemokine system is manipulated. Critical Issues: Chemokines are implicated in all stages of wound healing leading to the development of a cutaneous scar. An understanding of entirely regenerative wound healing in the developing fetus and how the expression of chemokines and their receptors change during the transition to the adult phenotype is central to addressing pathological scarring in adults. Future Directions: As our understanding of chemokine/receptor interactions and scar formation evolves it has become apparent that effective therapies will need to mirror the complexities in these diverse biological processes. It is likely that sophisticated treatments that sequentially influence multiple ligand/receptor interactions throughout all stages of wound healing will be required to deliver viable treatment options. PMID:26543682

  4. The exodus subfamily of CC chemokines inhibits the proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia progenitors.

    PubMed

    Hromas, R; Cripe, L; Hangoc, G; Cooper, S; Broxmeyer, H E

    2000-02-15

    Chemokines are a family of related proteins that regulate leukocyte infiltration into inflamed tissue and play important roles in disease processes. Among the biologic activities of chemokines is inhibition of proliferation of normal hematopoietic progenitors. However, chemokines that inhibit normal progenitors rarely inhibit proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We and others recently cloned a subfamily of CC chemokines that share similar amino-terminal peptide sequences and a remarkable ability to chemoattract T cells. These chemokines, Exodus-1/LARC/MIP-3alpha, Exodus-2/SLC/6Ckine/TCA4, and Exodus-3/CKbeta11/MIP-3beta, were found to inhibit proliferation of normal human marrow progenitors. The study described here found that these chemokines also inhibited the proliferation of progenitors in every sample of marrow from patients with CML that was tested. This demonstration of consistent inhibition of CML progenitor proliferation makes the 3 Exodus chemokines unique among chemokines. (Blood. 2000;95:1506-1508)

  5. Evolution and function of chemokine receptors in the immune system of lower vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bajoghli, Baubak

    2013-07-01

    Chemokine receptors and their counterpart ligands are one of the evolutionary innovations of vertebrates. They play a guiding role in the coordination of cell trafficking in many biological processes. Comparative syntenic and phylogenetic analyses provide insight into the evolution of chemokine receptors and suggest that the repertoire of chemokine receptors varies in each species, regardless of the evolutionary position of the species. Despite the rapid evolution of chemokine receptors, the expression and function of orthologous chemokine receptors in lower and higher vertebrates are very similar. This is also true for the chemokine ligands that have been examined so far, such as CXCL8, CXCL12, and CCL25. As examples, this review will discuss how the evolution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 is coincident with the emergence of lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates (lamprey); and that, in jawed vertebrates, CXCR4 and CCR9 are involved in thymus colonization. In myeloid cells, the function of CXCR1 in neutrophils and the expression of CXCR3 in macrophages and DCs are evolutionarily conserved between fish and mammals. In this context, medaka and zebrafish are outstanding models for studying the function of chemokines and their receptors. PMID:23719857

  6. Defective Chemokine Production in T-Leukemia Cell Lines and its Possible Functional Role

    PubMed Central

    Ivanoff, Jyrki; Ivanoff, Anna

    2000-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes and T-cell clones produced nanogram quantities of the chemokines RANTES, MIP-lα, MIP-lβ, MCP-l, IL-8 and GRO-α as well as the motogenic cytokine HGF. In contrast, various T-leukemia cell lines at different stages of differentiation did not produce the same chemokines/cytokines. In order to study the possible functional importance of the poor chemokine production different T-cell lines were compared with respect to development of motile forms and migration on extracellular matrix components in the absence and presence of various chemokines. RANTES, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-8, GRO-α and lymphotactin did not augment the development of motile forms including the size and appearance of the pseudopodia activity of the T-leukemia cell lines. The T-cell lines migrated spontaneously on/to fibronectin in a Boyden chamber assay system. Chemokines augmented the migration of the T-leukemia cell lines on fibronectin in the Boyden system in a chemotactic fashion with peak responses at 10 to 50 ng/ml. Thus, the production of chemokines is defective, in neoplastic T-lymphocytes. The defective chemokine production does not seem to play any major role for the basic locomotor capacity of the cells but may modulate the responsiveness to exogenous chemokines. PMID:11097202

  7. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  8. Atypical Chemokine Receptors and Their Roles in the Resolution of the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Bonecchi, Raffaella; Graham, Gerard J.

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are key mediators of the inflammatory process regulating leukocyte extravasation and directional migration into inflamed and infected tissues. The control of chemokine availability within inflamed tissues is necessary to attain a resolving environment and when this fails chronic inflammation ensues. Accordingly, vertebrates have adopted a number of mechanisms for removing chemokines from inflamed sites to help precipitate resolution. Over the past 15 years, it has become apparent that essential players in this process are the members of the atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) family. Broadly speaking, this family is expressed on stromal cell types and scavenges chemokines to either limit their spatial availability or to remove them from in vivo sites. Here, we provide a brief review of these ACKRs and discuss their involvement in the resolution of inflammatory responses and the therapeutic implications of our current knowledge. PMID:27375622

  9. Immunological assays for chemokine detection in in-vitro culture of CNS cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Supriya D.; Schwartz, Stanley A.

    2003-01-01

    Herein we review the various methods currently in use for determining the expression of chemokines by CNS cells in vitro. Chemokine detection assays are used in conjuction with one another to provide a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines which is necessary for correct data interpretation of a specific observed biological effect. The methods described include bioassays for soluble chemokine receptors, RNA extraction, RT-PCR, Real - time quantitative PCR, gene array analysis, northern blot analysis, Ribonuclease Protection assay, Flow cytometry, ELISPOT, western blot analysis, and ELISA. No single method of analysis meets the criteria for a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines, therefore more than one assay might be necessary for correct data interpretation, a choice that is based on development of a scientific rationale for the method with emphasis on the reliability and relevance of the method. PMID:12734551

  10. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein–coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state–like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state. PMID:25745166

  11. Enhancement of Chemokine Function as an Immunomodulatory Strategy Employed by Human Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Martinez-Martín, Nadia; Nel, Hendrik J.; Rueda, Patricia; Martín, Rocío; Blanco, Soledad; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Thelen, Marcus; Fallon, Padraic G.; Alcamí, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogens that cause a variety of diseases, including lethal encephalitis. The relationship between HSV and the host immune system is one of the main determinants of the infection outcome. Chemokines play relevant roles in antiviral response and immunopathology, but the modulation of chemokine function by HSV is not well understood. We have addressed the modulation of chemokine function mediated by HSV. By using surface plasmon resonance and crosslinking assays we show that secreted glycoprotein G (SgG) from both HSV-1 and HSV-2 binds chemokines with high affinity. Chemokine binding activity was also observed in the supernatant of HSV-2 infected cells and in the plasma membrane of cells infected with HSV-1 wild type but not with a gG deficient HSV-1 mutant. Cell-binding and competition experiments indicate that the interaction takes place through the glycosaminoglycan-binding domain of the chemokine. The functional relevance of the interaction was determined both in vitro, by performing transwell assays, time-lapse microscopy, and signal transduction experiments; and in vivo, using the air pouch model of inflammation. Interestingly, and in contrast to what has been observed for previously described viral chemokine binding proteins, HSV SgGs do not inhibit chemokine function. On the contrary, HSV SgGs enhance chemotaxis both in vitro and in vivo through increasing directionality, potency and receptor signaling. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a viral chemokine binding protein from a human pathogen that increases chemokine function and points towards a previously undescribed strategy of immune modulation mediated by viruses. PMID:22319442

  12. Chemokine gene expression in the brains of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Asensio, V C; Campbell, I L

    1997-01-01

    Chemokines are pivotal in the trafficking of leukocytes. In the present study, we examined the expression of multiple chemokine genes during the course of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) in mice. In noninfected mice, no detectable chemokine gene expression was found in the brain; however, by day 3 postinfection, the induction of a number of chemokine mRNAs was observed as follows (in order from the greatest to the least): cytokine responsive gene-2 or interferon-inducible 10-kDa protein (Crg-2/IP-10), RANTES, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1beta), and MCP-3. At day 6 postinfection, the expression of these chemokine mRNAs was increased, and low expression of lymphotactin, C10, MIP-2, and MIP-1alpha mRNAs was detectable. Transcript for T-cell activation-3 was not detectable in the brain at any time following LCM virus (LCMV) infection. With some exceptions, a pattern of chemokine gene expression similar to that in the brain was observed in the peripheral organs of LCMV-infected mice. Mice that lacked expression of gamma interferon developed LCM and had a qualitatively similar but quantitatively reduced cerebral chemokine gene expression profile. In contrast, little or no chemokine gene expression was detectable in the brains of LCMV-infected athymic mice which did not develop LCM. Expression of Crg-2/IP-10 RNA was localized to predominantly resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and overlapped with sites of viral infection and immune cell infiltration. These findings demonstrate the expression of a number of chemokine genes in the brains of mice infected with LCMV. The pattern of chemokine gene expression in LCM may profoundly influence the characteristic phenotype and response of leukocytes in the brain and contribute to the immunopathogenesis of this fatal CNS infection. PMID:9311871

  13. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE.

    PubMed

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4(+) T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4(+) T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6(+) and CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8(+) T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4(+) T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6(+) cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  14. CC Chemokine Ligand 18 in ANCA-Associated Crescentic GN.

    PubMed

    Brix, Silke R; Stege, Gesa; Disteldorf, Erik; Hoxha, Elion; Krebs, Christian; Krohn, Sonja; Otto, Benjamin; Klätschke, Kristin; Herden, Elisabeth; Heymann, Felix; Lira, Sergio A; Tacke, Frank; Wolf, Gunter; Busch, Martin; Jabs, Wolfram J; Özcan, Fedai; Keller, Frieder; Beige, Joachim; Wagner, Karl; Helmchen, Udo; Noriega, Mercedes; Wiech, Thorsten; Panzer, Ulf; Stahl, Rolf A K

    2015-09-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitis is the most frequent cause of crescentic GN. To define new molecular and/or cellular biomarkers of this disease in the kidney, we performed microarray analyses of renal biopsy samples from patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN. Expression profiles were correlated with clinical data in a prospective study of patients with renal ANCA disease. CC chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18), acting through CC chemokine receptor 8 (CCR8) on mononuclear cells, was identified as the most upregulated chemotactic cytokine in patients with newly diagnosed ANCA-associated crescentic GN. Macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells in the kidney were detected as CCL18-producing cells. The density of CCL18(+) cells correlated with crescent formation, interstitial inflammation, and impairment of renal function. CCL18 protein levels were higher in sera of patients with renal ANCA disease compared with those in sera of patients with other forms of crescentic GN. CCL18 serum levels were higher in patients who suffered from ANCA-associated renal relapses compared with those in patients who remained in remission. Using a murine model of crescentic GN, we explored the effects of the CCL18 murine functional analog CCL8 and its receptor CCR8 on kidney function and morphology. Compared with wild-type mice, Ccr8(-/-) mice had significantly less infiltration of pathogenic mononuclear phagocytes. Furthermore, Ccr8(-/-) mice maintained renal function better and had reduced renal tissue injury. In summary, our data indicate that CCL18 drives renal inflammation through CCR8-expressing cells and could serve as a biomarker for disease activity and renal relapse in ANCA-associated crescentic GN.

  15. Platelets and their chemokines in atherosclerosis—clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    von Hundelshausen, Philipp; Schmitt, Martin M. N.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of platelets as important players in the process of atherogenesis has become increasingly accepted due to accumulating experimental and clinical evidence. Despite the progress in understanding the molecular details of atherosclerosis, particularly by using animal models, the inflammatory and thrombotic roles of activated platelet s especially in the human system remain difficult to dissect, as often only the complications of atherosclerosis, i.e., stroke and myocardial infarction are definable but not the plaque burden. Platelet indices including platelet count and mean platelet volume (MPV) and soluble mediators released by activated platelets are associated with atherosclerosis. The chemokine CXCL4 has multiple atherogenic activities, e.g., altering the differentiation of T cells and macrophages by inhibiting neutrophil and monocyte apoptosis and by increasing the uptake of oxLDL and synergizing with CCL5. CCL5 is released and deposited on endothelium by activated platelets thereby triggering atherogenic monocyte recruitment, which can be attenuated by blocking the corresponding chemokine receptor CCR5. Atheroprotective and plaque stabilizing properties are attributed to CXCL12, which plays an important role in regenerative processes by attracting progenitor cells. Its release from luminal attached platelets accelerates endothelial healing after injury. Platelet surface molecules GPIIb/IIIa, GP1bα, P-selectin, JAM-A and the CD40/CD40L dyade are crucially involved in the interaction with endothelial cells, leukocytes and matrix molecules affecting atherogenesis. Beyond the effects on the arterial inflammatory infiltrate, platelets affect cholesterol metabolism by binding, modifying and endocytosing LDL particles via their scavenger receptors and contribute to the formation of lipid laden macrophages. Current medical therapies for the prevention of atherosclerotic therapies enable the elucidation of mechanisms linking platelets to inflammation and

  16. Cytokine and Chemokine Profile in Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, Angelo V.; Tavecchio, Simona; Berti, Emilio; Gelmetti, Carlo; Cugno, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoinflammation has recently been suggested in the pathogenesis of neutrophilic dermatoses but systematic studies on their cytokine profile are lacking. Notably, amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (APF), classified among neutrophilic dermatoses, has been studied only in small case series. In our University Hospital, we conducted an observational study on 15 APF patients, analyzing their clinical and laboratory features with a follow-up of 9 months to 20 years. Skin cytokine pattern of 9 of them was compared to that of 6 normal controls. In all patients, primary lesions were pustules symmetrically involving the skin folds and anogenital region with a chronic-relapsing course and responding to corticosteroids. Dapsone, cyclosporine, and tumor necrosis factor blockers were effective in refractory cases. In skin samples, the expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β, pivotal cytokine in autoinflammation, and its receptors I and II were significantly higher in APF (P = 0.005, 0.018, and 0.034, respectively) than in controls. Chemokines responsible for neutrophil recruitment such as IL-8 (P = 0.003), CXCL 1/2/3 (C-X-C motif ligand 1/2/3) (P = 0.010), CXCL 16 (P = 0.045), and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) (P = 0.034) were overexpressed. Molecules involved in tissue damage like matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) (P = 0.010) and MMP-9 (P = 0.003) were increased. APF is a pustular neutrophilic dermatosis with a typical distribution in all patients. The disorder may coexist with an underlying autoimmune/dysimmune disease but is often associated only with a few autoantibodies without a clear autoimmunity. The overexpression of cytokines/chemokines and molecules amplifying the inflammatory network supports the view that APF has an important autoinflammatory component. PMID:26683967

  17. Repertoire of Chemokine Receptor Expression in the Female Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Bruce K.; Landay, Alan; Andersson, Jan; Brown, Clark; Behbahani, Homira; Jiyamapa, Dan; Burki, Zareefa; Stanislawski, Donna; Czerniewski, Mary Ann; Garcia, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone therapy increase susceptibility to lentivirus transmission. Infection of cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is dependent on expression of specific chemokine receptors known to function as HIV co-receptors. Quantitative kinetic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was developed to determine the in vivo expression levels of CCR5, CXCR4, CCR3, CCR2b, and the cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cervical biopsies from 12 women with and without sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone-predominant conditions. Our data indicate that CCR5 is the major HIV co-receptor expressed in the female genital tract, and CXCR4 is the predominantly expressed HIV co-receptor in peripheral blood. CCR5 mRNA expression in the ectocervix was 10-fold greater than CXCR4, 20-fold greater than CCR2b, and 100-fold greater than CCR3. In peripheral blood, CXCR4 expression was 1.5-fold greater than CCR5, 10-fold greater than CCR2b, and 15-fold greater than CCR3. US28 was not expressed in cervical tissue despite expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five individuals. CCR5 was significantly increased (p < 0.02) in biopsies from women with sexually transmitted diseases and others who were progesterone predominant. In vitro studies demonstrate that progesterone increases CCR5, CXCR4, and CCR3 expression and decreases CCR2b expression in lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Characterization of chemokine receptors at the tissue level provides important information in identifying host determinants of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:9708808

  18. Structural Insights into the Interaction Between a Potent Anti-Inflammatory Protein, Viral CC Chemokine Inhibitor (vCCI), and the Human CC Chemokine, Eotaxin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Nai-Wei; Gao, Yong; Schill, Megan S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2014-01-30

    Chemokines play important roles in the immune system, not only recruiting leukocytes to the site of infection and inflammation but also guiding cell homing and cell development. The soluble poxvirusencoded protein vCCI, a CC chemokine inhibitor, can bind to human CC chemokines tightly to impair the host immune defense. This protein has no known homologs in eukaryotes, and may represent a potent method to stop inflammation. Previously, our structure of the vCCI:MIP-1β complex indicated that vCCI uses negatively charged residues in β-sheet II to interact with positively charged residues in the MIP-1βN-terminus, 20’s region and 40’s loop. However, the interactions between vCCI and other CC chemokines have not yet been fully explored. Here, we used NMR and fluorescence anisotropy to study the interaction between vCCI and eotaxin-1 (CCL11), another CC chemokine that is an important factor in the asthma response. NMR results reveal that the binding pattern is very similar to the vCCI:MIP-1βcomplex, and suggest that electrostatic interactions provide a major contribution to binding. Fluorescence anisotropy results on variants of eotaxin-1 further confirm the critical roles of the charged residues in eotaxin. Compared to wild-type eotaxin, single, double, or triple mutations at these critical charged residues weaken the binding. One exception is the K47A mutation that exhibits increased affinity for vCCI, which can be explained structurally. In addition, the binding affinity between vCCI and other wild type CC chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β and RANTES, were determined as 1.09 nM, 1.16 nM, and 0.22 nM, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first work quantitatively measuring the binding affinity between vCCI and different CC chemokines.

  19. Cxc Chemokine Receptor 5 Expression Defines Follicular Homing T Cells with B Cell Helper Function

    PubMed Central

    Schaerli, Patrick; Willimann, Katharina; Lang, Alois B.; Lipp, Martin; Loetscher, Pius; Moser, Bernhard

    2000-01-01

    Leukocyte traffic through secondary lymphoid tissues is finely tuned by chemokines. We have studied the functional properties of a human T cell subset marked by the expression of CXC chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5). Memory but not naive T cells from tonsils are CXCR5+ and migrate in response to the B cell–attracting chemokine 1 (BCA-1), which is selectively expressed by reticular cells and blood vessels within B cell follicles. Tonsillar CXCR5+ T cells do not respond to other chemokines present in secondary lymphoid tissues, including secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC), EBV-induced molecule 1 ligand chemokine (ELC), and stromal cell–derived factor 1 (SDF-1). The involvement of tonsillar CXCR5+ T cells in humoral immune responses is suggested by their localization in the mantle and light zone germinal centers of B cell follicles and by the concomitant expression of activation and costimulatory markers, including CD69, HLA-DR, and inducible costimulator (ICOS). Peripheral blood CXCR5+ T cells also belong to the CD4+ memory T cell subset but, in contrast to tonsillar cells, are in a resting state and migrate weakly to chemokines. CXCR5+ T cells are very inefficient in the production of cytokines but potently induce antibody production during coculture with B cells. These properties portray CXCR5+ T cells as a distinct memory T cell subset with B cell helper function, designated here as follicular B helper T cells (TFH). PMID:11104798

  20. Chemokines in the balance: maintenance of homeostasis and protection at CNS barriers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica L.; Holman, David W.; Klein, Robyn S.

    2014-01-01

    In the adult central nervous system (CNS), chemokines and their receptors are involved in developmental, physiological and pathological processes. Although most lines of investigation focus on their ability to induce the migration of cells, recent studies indicate that chemokines also promote cellular interactions and activate signaling pathways that maintain CNS homeostatic functions. Many homeostatic chemokines are expressed on the vasculature of the blood brain barrier (BBB) including CXCL12, CCL19, CCL20, and CCL21. While endothelial cell expression of these chemokines is known to regulate the entry of leukocytes into the CNS during immunosurveillance, new data indicate that CXCL12 is also involved in diverse cellular activities including adult neurogenesis and neuronal survival, having an opposing role to the homeostatic chemokine, CXCL14, which appears to regulate synaptic inputs to neural precursors. Neuronal expression of CX3CL1, yet another homeostatic chemokine that promotes neuronal survival and communication with microglia, is partly regulated by CXCL12. Regulation of CXCL12 is unique in that it may regulate its own expression levels via binding to its scavenger receptor CXCR7/ACKR3. In this review, we explore the diverse roles of these and other homeostatic chemokines expressed within the CNS, including the possible implications of their dysfunction as a cause of neurologic disease. PMID:24920943

  1. Role of chemokines in the enhancement of BBB permeability and inflammatory infiltration after rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yi; Lackay, Sarah N; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2009-09-01

    Induction of innate immunity, particularly through the induction of interferon and chemokines, by rabies virus (RABV) infection has been reported to be inversely correlated with pathogenicity. To further investigate the association between the expression of chemokines and RABV infection, laboratory-attenuated RABV (B2C) and wild-type (wt) RABV (DRV) were administered to Balb/c mice intramuscularly. Chemokine expression, inflammatory cell infiltration, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were evaluated at various time points after infection. At day 3 post-infection (p.i.) there was very little inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) and BBB permeability did not change in mice infected with either virus when compared with mock-infected mice. At 6 day p.i., infection with B2C induced the expression of inflammatory chemokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the CNS, while these changes were minimal in DRV-infected mice. Furthermore, infection with B2C significantly enhanced BBB permeability comparing to infection with DRV. Among the upregulated chemokines, the expression of IP-10 was best correlated with infiltration of inflammatory cells into the CNS and enhancement of BBB permeability. These data indicate that laboratory-attenuated RABV induces expression of chemokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the CNS. Upregulation of chemokines by B2C may have triggered the change in BBB permeability, which helps infiltration of inflammatory cells into the CNS, and thus attenuation of RABV.

  2. Expression patterns of chemokine receptors on circulating T cells from myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Sand, Kristoffer Evebø; Rye, Kristin Paulsen; Mannsåker, Bård; Bruserud, Oystein; Kittang, Astrid Olsnes

    2013-02-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are involved in the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Recently, chemokine expression signatures have been reported to convey a prognostic value in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. In the present study, we investigated the chemokine receptor repertoire on fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes from 31 (22 low-risk and 9 high-risk) patients affected by MDS. Chemokine receptor expression was studied in defined T-cell subsets using eight-color flow cytometry. MDS patients exhibited quantitative differences in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations. In addition, T cells obtained from MDS patients expressed a chemokine receptor pattern suggesting a dominance of mature and activated T cells. This is illustrated by increased levels of CCR3, CCR5, CX3CR1 and/or by a decreased abundance of CCR7 in defined T-cell subsets. The T-cell subset distribution appears to differ between the peripheral blood and the bone marrow of MDS patients, suggesting a preferential recruitment of specific T-cell subsets to the latter compartment. Alteration in chemokine receptor expression can develop over time even in patients that are considered clinically stable. Elevated expression levels of CXCR4 by CD8(+) cells were associated with prolonged patient survival and reduced numbers of bone marrow blasts. We conclude that immunological abnormalities in MDS also involve chemokine receptors on different subsets of T cells, and that these changes may have a prognostic value.

  3. Inflammatory Cytokines Induce Expression of Chemokines by Human Retinal Cells: Role in Chemokine Receptor Mediated Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N.; Kommineni, Vijay K.; Ganjbaksh, Nader; Nagineni, Krishnasai K.; Hooks, John J.; Detrick, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine reeptor-3 (CCR-3) was shown to be associated with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a vision threatening retinal disease that affects the aging population world-wide. Retinal pigment epithelium and choroid in the posterior part of the retina are the key tissues targeted in the pathogenesis of CNV in AMD. We used human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) and choroidal fibroblast (HCHF) cells, prepared from aged adult human donor eyes, to evaluate the expression of major CCR-3 ligands, CCL-5, CCL -7, CCL-11,CCL-24 and CCL-26. Microarray analysis of gene expression in HRPE cells treated with inflammatory cytokine mix (ICM= IFN-γ+TNF-α+IL-1β) revealed 75 and 23-fold increase in CCL-5 and CCL-7 respectively, but not CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. Chemokine secretion studies of the production of CCL5 and CCL7 by HRPE corroborated with the gene expression analysis data. When the HRPE cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent manner. Similar to the gene expression data, the ICM did not enhance HRPE production of CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. CCL-11 and CCL-26 were increased with IL-4 treatment and this HRPE production was augmented in the presence of TNF-α and IL1β. When HCHF cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent fashion. IL-4 induced low levels of CCL-11 and CCL-26 in HCHF and this production was significantly enhanced by TNF-α. Under these conditions, neither HRPE nor HCHF were demonstrated to produce CCL-24. These data demonstrate that chronic inflammation triggers CCL-5 and CCL-7 release by HRPE and HCHF and the subsequent interactions with CCR3 may participate in pathologic processes in AMD. PMID:26618046

  4. Increased type 1 chemokine expression in experimental Chagas disease correlates with cardiac pathology in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Paulo M M; Veloso, Vanja M; Talvani, André; Diniz, Livia F; Caldas, Ivo S; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria A; Santiago-Silva, Juliana; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lucia M C; Silva, João S; Bahia, Maria T

    2010-11-15

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors interaction have presented important role in leukocyte migration to specific immune reaction sites. Recently, it has been reported that chemokine receptors CXC (CXCR3) and CC (CCR5) were preferentially expressed on Th1 cells while CCR3 and CCR4 were preferentially expressed on Th2 cells. This study evaluated the mRNA expression of type 1 and type 2 chemokine and chemokine receptors in the cardiac tissue of Beagle dogs infected with distinct genetic groups of Trypanosoma cruzi (Y, Berenice-78 and ABC strains) during acute and chronic phases. To analyze the correlation between chemokine and chemokine receptors expression and the development of heart pathology, the chronic infected animals were divided into groups, according to the parasite strain and based on the degree of heart damage: cardiac and indeterminate form of Chagas disease. Our results indicated that cardiac type1/2 chemokines and their receptors were partially dependent on the genetic diversity of parasites as well as the polarization of clinical forms. Also, dogs presenting cardiac form showed lower heart tissue mRNA expression of CCL24 (type 2) and higher expression of CCL5, CCL4 and CXCR3 (type 1) when compared with those with indeterminate form of disease. Together, these data reinforce a close-relation between T. cruzi genetic population and the host specific type 1 immune response and, for the first time, we show the distribution of type 1/2 chemokines associated with the development of cardiac pathology using dogs, a well similar model to study human Chagas disease.

  5. Expression patterns of cytokines and chemokines genes in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eui-Cheol; Choi, Youn-Hee; Kim, Ji Su; Kim, Se Jong; Park, Jeon Han

    2002-10-01

    Various cytokines and chemokines play a role in carcinogenesis. However, no study has previously been undertaken to investigate comprehensively the expressions of cytokines and chemokines in hepatoma cells. In this study, we determined which cytokines and chemokines are expressed in hepatoma cells. Recently, it was reported that the expressions of several chemokines could be increased by Fas stimulus in many normal and cancer cells. Therefore, we also investigated whether chemokines expression is regulated by Fas ligation. To address this issue, we performed RNase protection assays upon 13 cytokines and 8 chemokines genes in 10 human hepatoma cell lines, comprising 8 hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated hepatoma cell lines. Transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) was found to be expressed in 8 HBV-associated hepatoma cell lines, and to be potently expressed in 5 cell lines; however, the mRNA expressions of interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12, interferon-gamma(IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-alpha) were not detected in any cell lines examined. Among the chemokines investigated in this study, IL-8 was expressed by 8 HBV- associated hepatoma cell lines, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by 7 HBV-associated hepatoma cell lines. However, the mRNA expressions of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha(MIP-1alpha), MIP-1beta, interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), RANTES, lymphotactin and I-309 were either very weak or undetectable. Fas ligation did not increase chemokines expression in hepatoma cells. Conclusively, TGF-beta2, IL-8 and MCP-1 were overexpressed in HBV-associated hepatoma cells, and the expressions of chemokines were not increased by Fas ligation in human hepatoma cells.

  6. Chemokines as Therapeutic Targets to Improve Healing Efficiency of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Satish, Latha

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Impaired wound healing leading to chronic wounds is an important clinical problem that needs immediate attention to develop new effective therapies. Members of the chemokine family seem to be attractive and amenable to stimulate the healing process in chronic wounds. Targeting specific chemokines and/or their receptors has the potential to modify chronic inflammation to acute inflammation, which will hasten the healing process. Recent Advances: Over the years, expression levels of various chemokines and their receptors have been identified as key players in the inflammatory phase of wound healing. In addition, they contribute to regulating other phases of wound healing making them key targets for novel therapies. Understanding the signaling pathways of these chemokines will provide valuable clues for modulating their function to enhance the wound healing process. Critical Issues: Inflammation, an important first-stage process in wound healing, is dysregulated in chronic wounds; emerging studies show that chemokines play a crucial role in regulating inflammation. The knowledge gained so far is still limited in understanding the enormous complexity of the chemokine network during inflammation not just in chronic wounds but also in acute (normal) wounds. A much better understanding of the individual chemokines will pave the way for better targets and therapies to improve the healing efficiency of chronic wounds. Future Directions: Effective understanding of the interaction of chemokines and their receptors during chronic wound healing would facilitate the design of novel therapeutic drugs. Development of chemokine-based drugs targeting specific inflammatory cells will be invaluable in the treatment of chronic wounds, in which inflammation plays a major role. PMID:26543679

  7. CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV-chemokine interactions: double-edged regulation of inflammation and tumor biology.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Anneleen; Gouwy, Mieke; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul; Struyf, Sofie

    2016-06-01

    Post-translational modification of chemokines is an essential regulatory mechanism to enhance or dampen the inflammatory response. CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV, ubiquitously expressed in tissues and blood, removes NH2-terminal dipeptides from proteins with a penultimate Pro or Ala. A large number of human chemokines, including CXCL2, CXCL6, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CXCL12, CCL3L1, CCL4, CCL5, CCL11, CCL14, and CCL22, are cleaved by CD26; however, the efficiency is clearly influenced by the amino acids surrounding the cleavage site and although not yet proven, potentially affected by the chemokine concentration and interactions with third molecules. NH2-terminal cleavage of chemokines by CD26 has prominent effects on their receptor binding, signaling, and hence, in vitro and in vivo biologic activities. However, rather than having a similar result, the outcome of NH2-terminal truncation is highly diverse. Either no difference in activity or drastic alterations in receptor recognition/specificity and hence, chemotactic activity are observed. Analogously, chemokine-dependent inhibition of HIV infection is enhanced (for CCL3L1 and CCL5) or decreased (for CXCL12) by CD26 cleavage. The occurrence of CD26-processed chemokine isoforms in plasma underscores the importance of the in vitro-observed CD26 cleavages. Through modulation of chemokine activity, CD26 regulates leukocyte/tumor cell migration and progenitor cell release from the bone marrow, as shown by use of mice treated with CD26 inhibitors or CD26 knockout mice. As chemokine processing by CD26 has a significant impact on physiologic and pathologic processes, application of CD26 inhibitors to affect chemokine function is currently explored, e.g., as add-on therapy in viral infection and cancer. PMID:26744452

  8. 76 FR 10384 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Regulation on Agency Protests

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Regulation on Agency Protests AGENCY: Office of Chief... comments; Extension without Change, 1600-0004. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security, Office of... published this information collection request (ICR) in the Federal Register on November 15, 2010 at 75...

  9. Synthesis of some CC chemokines and their receptors in the synovium in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhebrun, D A; Totolyan, Areg A; Maslyanskii, A L; Titov, A G; Patrukhin, A P; Kostareva, A A; Gol'tseva, I S

    2014-12-01

    We studied the expression of some CC chemokines and their receptors in the synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis, and a history of joint injury. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, the levels mRNA for some angiogenic and proinflammatory chemokines (CCL5/RANTES, CCL11/eotaxin, CCL24/eotaxin-2, and CCL26/eotaxin-3) and their receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, and CCR5) was elevated. mRNA expression correlated with activity, stage, and serological status of rheumatoid arthritis. Obtained data confirm the importance of CC chemokines as mediators of angiogenesis and inflammation in the synovium in rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. The Duffy protein: a malarial and chemokine receptor.

    PubMed

    Pogo, A O; Chaudhuri, A

    2000-04-01

    A major advance towards understanding the Duffy blood group system has been achieved with the cloning of FY, a single-copy gene located in the 1q22->q23 region of chromosome 1. The product of FY Is an acidic glycoprotein (gp-Fy), which spans the plasma membrane seven times and has an exocellular N-terminal domain and an endocellular C-terminal domain. The system consists of four alleles, five phenotypes, and five antigens. FYA, FYB, FYB(ES), and FYB(WK) are the alleles; Fy(a+b-), Fy(a-b+), Fy(a+b+), Fy(a-b+(wK)), and Fy(a-b-), are the phenotypes, and Fy(a), Fy(b), Fy3, Fy5, and Fy6 are the antigens. Fy(a-b-), or Duffy-negative individuals, lack the Duffy protein on erythrocytes and are predominantly African and American blacks. They have the FYB(Es) allele with a mutation in the promoter region, which abolishes the expression of the protein in erythrocytes only. In the few cases of non-black Fy(a-b-) individuals, a nonsense mutation prevents the synthesis of gp-Fy. In Fy(a-b+(wk)) erythrocytes, the Fy(b) antigen is weakly expressed due to a reduced amount of the protein. The Fy5 antigen includes the Rh protein, and the Fy6 antigen is defined by a murine monoclonal antibody. Gp-Fy is produced in several cell types, including endothellal cells of capillary and postcapillary venules, epithelial cells of kidney collecting ducts, and lung alveoli, as well as PurkinJe cells of the cerebellum. The Duffy protein plays a role in inflammation and in malaria Infection. The protein is a member of the superfamily of chemokine receptors and is the receptor to which certain malarial parasites bind to invade red blood cells. The parasite-specific binding site, the binding site of chemokines, and the major antigenic domains are located in overlapping regions at the exocellular N terminus of the Duffy protein.

  11. A Requirement for Metamorphic Interconversion in the Antimicrobial Activity of Chemokine XCL1.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Amanda M; Subramanian, Akshay; Tapia, Jazma L; Delgado, David P; Tyler, Robert C; Jensen, Davin R; Ouellette, André J; Volkman, Brian F

    2016-07-12

    Chemokines make up a superfamily of ∼50 small secreted proteins (8-12 kDa) involved in a host of physiological processes and disease states, with several previously shown to have direct antimicrobial activity comparable to that of defensins in efficacy. XCL1 is a unique metamorphic protein that interconverts between the canonical chemokine fold and a novel all-β-sheet dimer. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that, within the chemokine family, XCL1 is most closely related to CCL20, which exhibits antibacterial activity. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of WT-XCL1 and structural variants was quantified using a radial diffusion assay (RDA) and in solution bactericidal assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative species of bacteria. Comparisons of WT-XCL1 with variants that limit metamorphic interconversion showed a loss of antimicrobial activity when restricted to the conserved chemokine fold. These results suggest that metamorphic folding of XCL1 is required for potent antimicrobial activity.

  12. Anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 augments monocyte chemotaxis towards CCR5 chemokines.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-08-28

    Innate defense regulator (IDR) peptides are a class of immunomodulators which enhance and modulate host innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. While IDR-mediated protection against a range of bacterial pathogens is dependent on enhanced monocyte recruitment to the site of infection, the mechanisms through which they increase monocyte trafficking remain unclear. In this study, anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 was shown to enhance monocyte chemotaxis towards chemokines CCL3 and CCL5. This enhancement correlated with the selective upregulation of CCR5 surface expression by peptide-treated monocytes. It was found that IDR-1002 enhancement of monocyte chemotaxis was fully dependent on CCR5 function. Furthermore, IDR-1002 enhanced chemokine-induced monocyte p38 MAPK phosphorylation in a CCR5-dependent fashion. Overall, these results indicate that peptide IDR-1002 can selectively influence monocyte recruitment by host chemokines through the regulation of chemokine receptors. PMID:26168734

  13. RGS1 regulates myeloid cell accumulation in atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm rupture through altered chemokine signalling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jyoti; McNeill, Eileen; Douglas, Gillian; Hale, Ashley B.; de Bono, Joseph; Lee, Regent; Iqbal, Asif J.; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Stylianou, Elena; Greaves, David R.; Channon, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine signalling drives monocyte recruitment in atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms. The mechanisms that lead to retention and accumulation of macrophages in the vascular wall remain unclear. Regulator of G-Protein Signalling-1 (RGS1) deactivates G-protein signalling, reducing the response to sustained chemokine stimulation. Here we show that Rgs1 is upregulated in atherosclerotic plaque and aortic aneurysms. Rgs1 reduces macrophage chemotaxis and desensitizes chemokine receptor signalling. In early atherosclerotic lesions, Rgs1 regulates macrophage accumulation and is required for the formation and rupture of Angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysms, through effects on leukocyte retention. Collectively, these data reveal a role for Rgs1 in leukocyte trafficking and vascular inflammation and identify Rgs1, and inhibition of chemokine receptor signalling as potential therapeutic targets in vascular disease. PMID:25782711

  14. Synthesis of polymers and nanoparticles bearing polystyrene sulfonate brushes for chemokine binding.

    PubMed

    Isahak, Naatasha; Sanchez, Julie; Perrier, Sébastien; Stone, Martin J; Payne, Richard J

    2016-06-15

    The movement of leukocytes to the site of inflammation in response to injury or infection is orchestrated by chemokines binding and signaling through cognate receptors. The interaction between sulfated tyrosine residues on the flexible N-terminal tail of the receptor with positively charged regions of the chemokine is one of the key recognition features that facilitates binding. In this manuscript we describe the synthesis of polymers and silica nanoparticles bearing polystyrene sulfonate brushes to mimic the sulfated tyrosine residues. We show that both the polymers and nanoparticles possess high binding affinity for the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in monomeric and dimeric form. We also demonstrate key differences in the relative affinity for the chemokine for the free polymer versus the polymer-derived nanoparticle system.

  15. CXC chemokine signaling in the liver: Impact on repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Van Sweringen, Heather L.; Sakai, Nozomu; Tevar, Amit D.; Burns, Justin M.; Edwards, Michael J.; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2011-01-01

    The process of liver repair and regeneration following hepatic injury is complex and relies on a temporally coordinated integration of several key signaling pathways. Pathways activated by members of the CXC family of chemokines play important roles in the mechanisms of liver repair and regeneration through their effects on hepatocytes. However, little is known about the signaling pathways utilized by CXC chemokine receptors in hepatocytes. Here we review our current understanding of the pathways involved in both CXC chemokine receptor signaling in other cell types, most notably neutrophils, and similar pathways operant during hepatocyte proliferation/liver regeneration in order to formulate a basis for the function of CXC chemokine receptor signaling in hepatocytes. PMID:21626524

  16. Chemokines and Heart Disease: A Network Connecting Cardiovascular Biology to Immune and Autonomic Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dusi, Veronica; Ghidoni, Alice; Ravera, Alice; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Calvillo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Among the chemokines discovered to date, nineteen are presently considered to be relevant in heart disease and are involved in all stages of cardiovascular response to injury. Chemokines are interesting as biomarkers to predict risk of cardiovascular events in apparently healthy people and as possible therapeutic targets. Moreover, they could have a role as mediators of crosstalk between immune and cardiovascular system, since they seem to act as a “working-network” in deep linkage with the autonomic nervous system. In this paper we will describe the single chemokines more involved in heart diseases; then we will present a comprehensive perspective of them as a complex network connecting the cardiovascular system to both the immune and the autonomic nervous systems. Finally, some recent evidences indicating chemokines as a possible new tool to predict cardiovascular risk will be described. PMID:27242392

  17. CC-chemokine receptors: a potential therapeutic target for Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Marino, A P M P; Silva, A A; Santos, P V A; Pinto, L M O; Gazinelli, R T; Teixeira, M M; Lannes-Vieira, J

    2005-03-01

    The comprehension of the pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis is crucial to delineate new therapeutic strategies aiming to ameliorate the inflammation that leads to heart dysfunction, without hampering parasite control. The augmented expression of CCL5/RANTES and CCL3/MIP-1alpha, and their receptor CCR5, in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice suggests a role for CC-chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis of T. cruzi-elicited myocarditis. Herein, we discuss our recent results using a CC-chemokine receptor inhibitor (Met-RANTES), showing the participation of CC-chemokines in T. cruzi infection and unraveling CC-chemokine receptors as an attractive therapeutic target for further evaluation in Chagas disease.

  18. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domains of the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines: characterization of antibody and chemokine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Tournamille, Christophe; Filipe, Anne; Wasniowska, Kazimiera; Gane, Pierre; Lisowska, Elwira; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2003-09-01

    The Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC), a seven-transmembrane glycoprotein carrying the Duffy (Fy) blood group, acts as a widely expressed promiscuous chemokine receptor. In a structure-function study, we analysed the binding of chemokines and anti-Fy monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to K562 cells expressing 39 mutant forms of DARC with alanine substitutions spread out on the four extracellular domains (ECDs). Using synthetic peptides, we defined previously the Fy6 epitope (22-FEDVW-26), and we characterized the Fya epitope as the linear sequence 41-YGANLE-46. In agreement with these results, mutations of F22-E23, V25 and Y41, G42, N44, L45 on ECD1 abolished the binding of anti-Fy6 and anti-Fya mAbs to K562 cells respectively, Anti-Fy3 binding was abolished by D58-D59 (ECD1), R124 (ECD2), D263 and D283 (ECD4) substitutions. Mutations of C51 (ECD1), C129 (ECD2), C195 (ECD3) and C276 (ECD4 severely reduced anti-Fy3 and CXC-chemokine ligand 8 (CXCL-8) binding. CXCL-8 binding was also abrogated by mutations of F22-E23, P50 (ECD1) and D263, R267, D283 (ECD4). These results defined the Fya epitope and suggested that (1) two disulphide bridges are involved in the creation of an active chemokine binding pocket; (2) a limited number of amino acids in ECDs 1-4 participate in CXCL-8 binding; and (3) Fy3 is a conformation-dependent epitope involving all ECDs. We also showed that N-glycosylation of DARC occurred on N16SS and did not influence antibody and chemokine binding.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 and chemokines: beyond competition for common cellular receptors.

    PubMed

    Stantchev, T S; Broder, C C

    2001-01-01

    The chemokines and their receptors have been receiving exceptional attention in recent years following the discoveries that some chemokines could specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and that certain chemokine receptors were the long-sought coreceptors which, along with CD4, are required for the productive entry of HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates. Several chemokine receptors or orphan chemokine receptor-like molecules can support the entry of various viral strains, but the clinical significance of the CXCR4 and CCR5 coreceptors appear to overshadow a critical role for any of the other coreceptors and all HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains best employ one or both of these coreceptors. Binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 subunit to CD4 and/or an appropriate chemokine receptor triggers conformational changes in the envelope glycoprotein oligomer that allow it to facilitate the fusion of the viral and host cell membranes. During these interactions, gp120 appears to be capable of inducing a variety of signaling events, all of which are still not defined in detail. In addition, the more recently observed dichotomous effects, of both inhibition and enhancement, that chemokines and their receptor signaling events elicit on the HIV-1 entry and replication processes has once again highlighted the intricate and complex balance of factors that govern the pathogenic process. Here, we will review and discuss these new observations summarizing the potential significance these processes may have in HIV-1 infection. Understanding the complexities and significance of the signaling processes that the chemokines and viral products induce may substantially enhance our understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis, and perhaps facilitate the discovery of new ways for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 disease.

  20. Interferons Induce CXCR3-cognate Chemokine Production by Human Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dengel, Lynn T.; Norrod, Allison G.; Gregory, Briana L.; Clancy-Thompson, Eleanor; Burdick, Marie D.; Strieter, Robert M.; Slingluff, Craig L.; Mullins, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Immune-mediated cancer regression requires tumor infiltration by Ag-specific effector T cells, but lymphocytes are commonly sparse in melanoma metastases. Activated T cells express CXCR3, whose cognate chemokines are CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL11/I-TAC. Little is known about expression of these chemokines in lymph node (LN) metastases of melanoma. We evaluated whether metastatic melanoma induces these CXCR3-cognate chemokines in human LN-derived tissues. Also, because these chemokines can be induced by interferon (IFN), we evaluated whether type I or II IFNs (IFN-α or IFN-γ, respectively) can modulate chemokine expression in an in vitro model of the human tumor microenvironment. Production of CXCL9-11 by melanoma-infiltrated nodes (MIN) was no different than tumor-free nodes (TFN); both produced less chemokine than activated LN (sentinel immunized nodes, SIN). These data suggest melanoma infiltration into LN neither induces nor reduces CXCL9-11. Stimulation with IFN-α or IFN-γ increased production of CXCL10-11 from MIN, but not TFN or SIN. IFN-γ also increased production of CXCL9 in MIN. In IFN-treated SIN, CD14+ cells were the primary source of CXCL9-11, whereas melanoma cells were the source of chemokine in MIN. Melanoma cells in MIN express IFN receptors. Consistent with these observations, multiple human melanoma lines expressed IFN receptors and produced CXCL9-11 in response to IFN treatment. Thus, melanoma infiltration of LN is insufficient to induce the production of CXCL9-11, but melanoma may be a significant source of IFN-induced chemokines. Collectively, these data suggest that IFN-α or IFN-γ may act in the tumor microenvironment to increase the chemotactic gradient for CXCR3+ T cells. PMID:20948440

  1. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of zebrafish (Danio rerio) chemokine genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Chen; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Hour, Ai-Ling; Shiau, Chyuan-Yuan; Hui, Cho-Fat; Wu, Jen-Leih

    2008-12-01

    Chemokines control leukocyte trafficking which plays important roles in resistance to pathogenic infection. Five CXC chemokines have been reported in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) in GenBank, and herein we named them CXC-46, -56, -64, -66, and scyba. Through RT-PCR for cloning and sequencing these chemokines, the cDNA sequences of CXC-46, -56, -64, and -66 of zebrafish were determined, and it was found that the cDNA sequences were the same as those published in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that zebrafish scyba is closest to the CXCL14 subgroup, CXC-46 is closest to the human CCL25 and catfish CXCL-2-like gene, and CXC-56, -64, and -66 are closest to the catfish CXCL10 subgroup. Further study of the tissue-specific, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation-specific, and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) stimulation-specific expressions of these five zebrafish CXC chemokine messenger (m)RNAs were determined by a comparative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The RT-PCR revealed a high level of constitutive expression of CXC-56 in many tissues including the eyes, fins, heart, liver, muscles, and skin. Starvation had significant effects on the gene expressions of several zebrafish CXC chemokines including CXC-56, -64, -66, and scyba compared to the control group. Zebrafish CXC chemokines showed a concave pattern of expression after stimulation with LPS. Following poly I:C treatment of between 0.1 and 10 g/fish, dose-dependent effects were revealed. Temperature and acid-base conditions affected these zebrafish chemokines by increasing their induction compared to the control group, except for CXC-64 which exhibited no significant differences in either condition. Furthermore, these novel research results indicate that chemokines can be markers of different experimental conditions. PMID:18778789

  2. Feasibility of the Use of Combinatorial Chemokine Arrays to Study Blood and CSF in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Plavina, Tatiana; Czerkowicz, Julie; Goelz, Susan; Ranger, Ann; Cadavid, Diego; Browning, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Meningeal inflammation, including the presence of semi-organized tertiary lymphoid tissue, has been associated with cortical pathology at autopsy in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS).  Accessible and robust biochemical markers of cortical inflammation for use in SPMS clinical trials are needed.  Increased levels of chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can report on inflammatory processes occurring in the cerebral cortex of MS patients.  A multiplexed chemokine array that included BAFF, a high sensitivity CXCL13 assay and composite chemokine scores were developed to explore differences in lymphoid (CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19 and CCL21) and inflammatory (CCL2, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11) chemokines in a small pilot study.  Paired CSF and serum samples were obtained from healthy controls (n=12), relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) (n=21) and SPMS (N=12). A subset of the RRMS patients (n = 9) was assessed upon disease exacerbation and 1 month later following iv methylprednisone. SPMS patients were sampled twice to ascertain stability. Both lymphoid and inflammatory chemokines were elevated in RRMS and SPMS with the highest levels found in the active RRMS group. Inflammatory and lymphoid chemokine signatures were defined and generally correlated with each other. This small exploratory clinical study shows the feasibility of measuring complex and potentially more robust chemokine signatures in the CSF of MS patients during clinical trials. No differences were found between stable RRMS and SPMS. Future trials with larger patient cohorts with this chemokine array are needed to further characterize the differences, or the lack thereof, between stable RRMS and SPMS.    PMID:24278364

  3. Chemokine receptor patterns in lymphocytes mirror metastatic spreading in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P.; Flament, Caroline; Vimond, Nadège; Blattner, Carolin; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Roberti, María Paula; Daillère, Romain; Vétizou, Marie; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Semeraro, Michaëla; Caignard, Anne; Slingluff, Craig L.; Sallusto, Federica; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Weide, Benjamin; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook; Dalle, Stéphane; Cavalcanti, Andréa; Kroemer, Guido; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Maio, Michele; Wong, Phillip; Yuan, Jianda; Wolchok, Jedd; Umansky, Viktor; Eggermont, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma prognosis is dictated by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, the migratory and functional behavior of which is guided by chemokine or cytokine gradients. Here, we retrospectively analyzed the expression patterns of 9 homing receptors (CCR/CXCR) in naive and memory CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in 57 patients with metastatic melanoma (MMel) with various sites of metastases to evaluate whether T cell CCR/CXCR expression correlates with intratumoral accumulation, metastatic progression, and/or overall survival (OS). Homing receptor expression on lymphocytes strongly correlated with MMel dissemination. Loss of CCR6 or CXCR3, but not cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA), on circulating T cell subsets was associated with skin or lymph node metastases, loss of CXCR4, CXCR5, and CCR9 corresponded with lung involvement, and a rise in CCR10 or CD103 was associated with widespread dissemination. High frequencies of CD8+CCR9+ naive T cells correlated with prolonged OS, while neutralizing the CCR9/CCL25 axis in mice stimulated tumor progression. The expansion of CLA-expressing effector memory CD8+ T cells in response to a single administration of CTLA4 blockade predicted disease control at 3 months in 47 patients with MMel. Thus, specific CCR/CXCR expression patterns on circulating T lymphocytes may guide potential diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:26854930

  4. Chemokine-Mediated Migration of Mesencephalic Neural Crest Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rezzoug, Francine; Seelan, Ratnam S.; Bhattacherjee, Vasker; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2011-01-01

    Clefts of the lip and/or palate are among the most prevalent birth defects affecting approximately 7000 newborns in the United States annually. Disruption of the developmentally programmed migration of neural crest cells (NCCs) into the orofacial region is thought to be one of the major causes of orofacial clefting. Signaling of the chemokine SDF-1 (Stromal Derived Factor-1) through its specific receptor, CXCR4, is required for the migration of many stem cell and progenitor cell populations from their respective sites of emergence to the regions where they differentiate into complex cell types, tissues and organs. In the present study, “transwell” assays of chick embryo mesencephalic (cranial) NCC migration and ex ovo whole embryo “bead implantation” assays were utilized to determine whether SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling mediates mesencephalic NCC migration. Results from this study demonstrate that attenuation of SDF-1 signaling, through the use of specific CXCR4 antagonists (AMD3100 and TN14003), disrupts the migration of mesencephalic NCCs into the orofacial region, suggesting a novel role for SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in the directed migration of mesencephalic NCCs in the early stage embryo. PMID:22015108

  5. Chemokine CXCL1 mediated neutrophil recruitment: Role of glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Kirti V; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Dutta, Amit K; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Troshkina, Anna; Garofalo, Roberto P; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL1/MGSA plays a pivotal role in the host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. CXCL1 exists reversibly as monomers and dimers, and mediates its function by binding glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and CXCR2 receptor. We recently showed that both monomers and dimers are potent CXCR2 agonists, the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand, lysine and arginine residues located in two non-overlapping domains mediate GAG interactions, and there is extensive overlap between GAG and receptor-binding domains. To understand how these structural properties influence in vivo function, we characterized peritoneal neutrophil recruitment of a trapped monomer and trapped dimer and a panel of WT lysine/arginine to alanine mutants. Monomers and dimers were active, but WT was more active indicating synergistic interactions promote recruitment. Mutants from both domains showed reduced GAG heparin binding affinities and reduced neutrophil recruitment, providing compelling evidence that both GAG-binding domains mediate in vivo trafficking. Further, mutant of a residue that is involved in both GAG binding and receptor signaling showed the highest reduction in recruitment. We conclude that GAG interactions and receptor activity of CXCL1 monomers and dimers are fine-tuned to regulate neutrophil trafficking for successful resolution of tissue injury. PMID:27625115

  6. Chemokine receptor CCR2 involvement in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Warren, Gordon L; Hulderman, Tracy; Mishra, Dawn; Gao, Xin; Millecchia, Lyndell; O'Farrell, Laura; Kuziel, William A; Simeonova, Petia P

    2005-03-01

    Chemokines, signaling through the CCR2 receptor, are highly expressed in injured skeletal muscle. Their target specificity depends on the cellular expression of the specific receptors. Here we demonstrate that, in freeze-injured muscle, CCR2 co-localized with Mac-3, a marker of activated macrophages as well as with myogenin, a marker of activated muscle precursor cells. The degeneration/regeneration process in skeletal muscle of CCR2-/- and wild-type mice was not significantly different at day 3. However in contrast to the regenerated muscle of the wild-type mice, the muscle from CCR2-/- mice was characterized by impaired regeneration, inflammation, and fibrotic response at day 14, increased fat infiltration, fibrosis, and calcification at day 21, and impaired strength recovery until at least 28 days post-injury. Consistently, the increased expression of Mac-1 and TNF-alpha was prolonged in the injured muscle of CCR2-/- mice. The expression pattern of the myogenic factors MyoD and myogenin was similar for both types of mice, while NCAM, which is associated with the initiation of fusion of muscle precursor cells, was more increased in the injured muscle of CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, the study delineates that signaling through CCR2 is involved in muscle precursor cell activities necessary for complete and rapid regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. PMID:15601671

  7. Chemokine CXCL1 mediated neutrophil recruitment: Role of glycosaminoglycan interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Kirti V.; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Dutta, Amit K.; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Troshkina, Anna; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL1/MGSA plays a pivotal role in the host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. CXCL1 exists reversibly as monomers and dimers, and mediates its function by binding glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and CXCR2 receptor. We recently showed that both monomers and dimers are potent CXCR2 agonists, the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand, lysine and arginine residues located in two non-overlapping domains mediate GAG interactions, and there is extensive overlap between GAG and receptor-binding domains. To understand how these structural properties influence in vivo function, we characterized peritoneal neutrophil recruitment of a trapped monomer and trapped dimer and a panel of WT lysine/arginine to alanine mutants. Monomers and dimers were active, but WT was more active indicating synergistic interactions promote recruitment. Mutants from both domains showed reduced GAG heparin binding affinities and reduced neutrophil recruitment, providing compelling evidence that both GAG-binding domains mediate in vivo trafficking. Further, mutant of a residue that is involved in both GAG binding and receptor signaling showed the highest reduction in recruitment. We conclude that GAG interactions and receptor activity of CXCL1 monomers and dimers are fine-tuned to regulate neutrophil trafficking for successful resolution of tissue injury. PMID:27625115

  8. [Chemokine Receptor-5 and Graft-versus-Host Disease].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Liu, Wei; Ren, Han-Yun

    2015-06-01

    Chemokine receptor-5 (CCR5) belongs to a G-protein coupled receptors superfamily. It is mainly expressed on a wide variety of immune cells. CCR5 can bind with its specific ligands, which plays very important roles in inflammatory cell growth, differentiation, activation, adhesion and migration. CCR5 was identified as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) to infect CD4+ T cells. In addition, CCR5 not only participates in the pathogenic mechanisms of many inflammation disease such as AIDS, auto-immune disease, and atherosclerosis, but also plays important roles in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recent studies using murine models have demonstrated the critical role of CCR5 and its ligands which direct T-cell infiltration and recruitment into target tissues during acute GVHD. CCR5 has become the focus of intense interest and discussion, and this review will attempt to describe what is understood about the structure and function, internalization, signal transduction of CCR5, in order to investigate the relationship between CCR5 and acute GVHD. PMID:26117055

  9. Solubilization, stabilization, and purification of chemokine receptors using biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Iva; Sodroski, Joseph; Myszka, David G

    2005-04-15

    Establishing solubilization conditions for membrane-associated receptors is often a tedious empirical process. Here we describe a novel application of SPR biosensor technology to screen solubilization conditions automatically and to assess receptor activity directly. We focus on two chemokine receptors, CXCR4 and CCR5, which are important in HIV cell invasion. The autosampler in Biacore 3000 permitted whole cells expressing C-terminally tagged receptors to be automatically lysed under a given solubilization condition and the lysates to be injected over an antibody surface. The total amount of solubilized receptor could be quantitated from the antibody capture level, whereas the amount of active receptor could be quantitated using a subsequent injection of conformationally sensitive antibody or protein. Using this approach, we identified detergent/lipid/buffer combinations that enhanced and maintained receptor activity. We also used the biosensor to demonstrate CD4-dependent binding of gp120 to solubilized CCR5 and to develop affinity chromatography-based purification methods that increased receptor activity more than 300%. Together, these results illustrate the benefits of using the biosensor as a tool for isolating functional membrane receptors and for analyzing ligand/receptor interactions.

  10. Glutamine deprivation stimulates mTOR-JNK-dependent chemokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shanware, Naval P.; Bray, Kevin; Eng, Christina H.; Wang, Fang; Follettie, Maximillian; Myers, Jeremy; Fantin, Valeria R.; Abraham, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    The non-essential amino acid, glutamine, exerts pleiotropic effects on cell metabolism, signalling and stress resistance. Here we demonstrate that short-term glutamine restriction triggers an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response that leads to production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine, interleukin-8 (IL-8). Glutamine deprivation-induced ER stress triggers colocalization of autophagosomes, lysosomes and the Golgi into a subcellular structure whose integrity is essential for IL-8 secretion. The stimulatory effect of glutamine restriction on IL-8 production is attributable to depletion of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. The protein kinase, mTOR, is also colocalized with the lysosomal membrane clusters induced by glutamine deprivation, and inhibition of mTORC1 activity abolishes both endomembrane reorganization and IL-8 secretion. Activated mTORC1 elicits IL8 gene expression via the activation of an IRE1-JNK signalling cascade. Treatment of cells with a glutaminase inhibitor phenocopies glutamine restriction, suggesting that these results will be relevant to the clinical development of glutamine metabolism inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:25254627

  11. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses

    PubMed Central

    Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Li, Jian; Wu, Jian; Qi, Yanwei; Eastman, Richard T.; Zilversmit, Martine; Nair, Sethu C.; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Quinones, Mariam; Jiang, Hongying; Li, Na; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Keji; Kaneko, Osamu; Long, Carole A.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CC) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12, and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosome 7 and 13 had significant (p < 0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5, and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (p = 0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection. PMID:24452266

  12. Molecular characterization of miiuy croaker CC chemokine gene and its expression following Vibrio anguillarum injection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-zhi; Wang, Ri-xin; Sun, Yue-na; Xu, Tian-jun

    2011-07-01

    A CC chemokine gene was isolated from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) by expressed sequence tag analysis. The Mimi-CC cDNA contains an open reading frame of 429 nucleotides encoding 142 amino acid residues. The deduced Mimi-CC possesses the typical arrangement of four cysteines as found in other known CC chemokines (C³¹, C³², C⁵⁶, and C⁷⁰). It shares 15.3%-37.4% identity to CC chemokines of mammal and teleost. Phylogenetic analysis showed that miiuy croaker was most closely related to Atlantic cod. Genomic analysis revealed that Mimi-CC gene consists of four exons and three introns, which is not typical of CC chemokines but resembles that of CXC chemokines. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that Mimi-CC is constitutively expressed in most tissues including lymphoid organs, and the highest expression of Mimi-CC transcripts in normal tissues was observed in muscle. Challenge of miiuy croaker with Vibrio anguillarum resulted in significant changes in the expression of CC chemokine transcripts in four tissues, especially in kidney and spleen.

  13. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    PubMed

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  14. The cyclophilin-binding agent Sanglifehrin A is a dendritic cell chemokine and migration inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Immecke, Sabrina N; Baal, Nelli; Wilhelm, Jochen; Bechtel, Juliane; Knoche, Angela; Bein, Gregor; Hackstein, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Sanglifehrin A (SFA) is a cyclophilin-binding immunosuppressant but the immunobiology of action is poorly understood. We and others have reported that SFA inhibits IL-12 production and antigen uptake in dendritic cells (DC) and exhibits lower activity against lymphocytes. Here we show that SFA suppresses DC chemokine production and migration. Gene expression analysis and subsequent protein level confirmation revealed that SFA suppressed CCL5, CCL17, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression in human monocyte-derived DC (moDC). A systems biology analysis, Onto Express, confirmed that SFA interferes with chemokine-chemokine receptor gene expression with the highest impact. Direct comparison with the related agent cyclosporine A (CsA) and dexamethasone indicated that SFA uniquely suppresses moDC chemokine expression. Competitive experiments with a 100-fold molar excess of CsA and with N-Methyl-Val-4-cyclosporin, representing a nonimmunosuppressive derivative of CsA indicated chemokine suppression through a cyclophilin-A independent pathway. Functional assays confirmed reduced migration of CD4+ Tcells and moDCs to supernatant of SFA-exposed moDCs. Vice versa, SFA-exposed moDC exhibited reduced migration against CCL19. Moreover, SFA suppressed expression of the ectoenzyme CD38 that was reported to regulate DC migration and cytokine production. These results identify SFA as a DC chemokine and migration inhibitor and provide novel insight into the immunobiology of SFA. PMID:21483789

  15. The Cyclophilin-Binding Agent Sanglifehrin A Is a Dendritic Cell Chemokine and Migration Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Immecke, Sabrina N.; Baal, Nelli; Wilhelm, Jochen; Bechtel, Juliane; Knoche, Angela; Bein, Gregor; Hackstein, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Sanglifehrin A (SFA) is a cyclophilin-binding immunosuppressant but the immunobiology of action is poorly understood. We and others have reported that SFA inhibits IL-12 production and antigen uptake in dendritic cells (DC) and exhibits lower activity against lymphocytes. Here we show that SFA suppresses DC chemokine production and migration. Gene expression analysis and subsequent protein level confirmation revealed that SFA suppressed CCL5, CCL17, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression in human monocyte-derived DC (moDC). A systems biology analysis, Onto Express, confirmed that SFA interferes with chemokine-chemokine receptor gene expression with the highest impact. Direct comparison with the related agent cyclosporine A (CsA) and dexamethasone indicated that SFA uniquely suppresses moDC chemokine expression. Competitive experiments with a 100-fold molar excess of CsA and with N-Methyl-Val-4-cyclosporin, representing a nonimmunosuppressive derivative of CsA indicated chemokine suppression through a cyclophilin-A independent pathway. Functional assays confirmed reduced migration of CD4+ Tcells and moDCs to supernatant of SFA-exposed moDCs. Vice versa, SFA-exposed moDC exhibited reduced migration against CCL19. Moreover, SFA suppressed expression of the ectoenzyme CD38 that was reported to regulate DC migration and cytokine production. These results identify SFA as a DC chemokine and migration inhibitor and provide novel insight into the immunobiology of SFA. PMID:21483789

  16. Altered plasma levels of chemokines in autism and their association with social behaviors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yidong; Ou, JInajun; Liu, Mengmeng; Shi, Lijuan; Li, Yamin; Xiao, Lu; Dong, Huixi; Zhang, Fengyu; Xia, Kun; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-10-30

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a group of neurodevelopment disorders with an unclear etiology. Chemokines have been implicated in the etiology and pathogenesis of ASD. The current study investigated the plasma levels of seven chemokines (RANTES, Eotaxin, MIP-1 α, MIP-1 β, MCP-1, IP-10, and MIG) in 42 young autistic patients and 35 age-matched typically developing (TD) children. The study also tested the association between these chemokine levels and social behaviors, as measured by the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Compared to the TD children, RANTES, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β were higher, while IP-10 and MIG were lower in the autistic patients, after correcting for multiple comparisons. Among these seven chemokines, MIP-1α, MIP-1β and IP-10 levels were found to be associated with social behaviors in all the participants. Moreover, MIP-1α and IP-10 were found to be independent predictors of social behaviors. The results of our study support the hypothesis that altered chemokine levels are involved in the pathophysiology of ASD and they indicate that chemokines plasma levels could be potential biomarkers for ASD.

  17. CC and CXC chemokines are pivotal mediators of cerebral injury in ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Dallegri, Franco; Quercioli, Alessandra; Veneselli, Edvige; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2011-03-01

    The definition of ischaemic stroke has been recently updated as an acute episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischaemia in the presence of a cerebral infarction. This "tissular" definition has highlighted the importance of pathophysiological processes underlying cerebral damage. In particular, post- ischaemic inflammation in the brain and in the blood stream could influence crucial steps of the tissue injury/repair cascade. CC and CXC chemokines orchestrate the inflammatory response in atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability and cerebral infarction. These molecules exert their activities through the binding to selective transmembrane receptors. CC and CXC chemokines modulate crucial processes (such as inflammatory cell recruitment and activation, neuronal survival, neoangiogenesis). On the other hand, CXC chemokines could also modulate stem cell homing, thus favouring tissue repair. Given this evidence, both CC and CXC chemokines could represent promising therapeutic targets in primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke. Only preliminary studies have been performed investigating treatments with selective chemokine agonists/antagonists. In this review, we will update evidence on the role and the potential therapeutic strategies targeting CC and CXC chemokines in the pathophysiology of ischaemic stroke. PMID:21174009

  18. Rat coronaviruses infect rat alveolar type I epithelial cells and induce expression of CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Tanya A.; Wang, Jieru; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Mason, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the ability of two rat coronavirus (RCoV) strains, sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV) and Parker’s RCoV (RCoV-P), to infect rat alveolar type I cells and induce chemokine expression. Primary rat alveolar type II cells were transdifferentiated into the type I cell phenotype. Type I cells were productively infected with SDAV and RCoV-P, and both live virus and UV-inactivated virus induced mRNA and protein expression of three CXC chemokines: CINC-2, CINC-3, and LIX, which are neutrophil chemoattractants. Dual immunolabeling of type I cells for viral antigen and CXC chemokines showed that chemokines were expressed primarily by uninfected cells. Virus-induced chemokine expression was reduced by the IL-1 receptor antagonist, suggesting that IL-1 produced by infected cells induces uninfected cells to express chemokines. Primary cultures of alveolar epithelial cells are an important model for the early events in viral infection that lead to pulmonary inflammation. PMID:17804032

  19. Heterologous Quaternary Structure of CXCL12 and its Relationship to the CC Chemokine Family

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.; Yuan, H; Kong, Y; Xiong, Y; Lolis, E

    2010-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic studies reveal that CXCL12 is able to form multiple dimer types, a traditional CXC dimer and a 'CC-like' form. Phylogenetic analysis of all known human chemokines demonstrates CXCL12 is more closely related to the CC chemokine class than other CXC chemokines. These observations indicate that CXCL12 contains genomic and structural elements characteristic of both CXC and CC chemokines.Chemokines are members of a superfamily of proteins involved in the migration of cells to the proper anatomical position during embryonic development or in response to infection or stress during an immune response. There are two major (CC and CXC) and two minor (CX3C and XC) families based on the sequence around the first conserved cysteine. The topology of all structures is essentially identical with a flexible N-terminal region of 3-8 amino acids, a 10-20 residue N-terminal loop, a short 3{sub 10}-helix, three {beta}-strands, and a {alpha}-helix. The major consequence of the subtle difference between the families occurs at the oligomeric level. Monomers of the CC, CXC, and CX3C families form dimers in a family-specific manner. The XCL1 chemokine is a monomer that can interconvert between two folded states. All chemokines activate GPCRs according to family-specificity, however there are a few examples of chemokines crossing the family boundary to function as antagonists. A two-stage mechanism for chemokine activation of GPCRs has been proposed. The N-terminal region of the receptor interacts with the chemokine, followed by receptor activation by the chemokine N-terminal region. Monomeric chemokines have been demonstrated to be the active form for receptor function. There are numerous examples of both chemokines and their receptors forming dimers. While family-specific dimerization may be an attractive explanation for why specific chemokines only activate GPCRs within their own family, the role of dimers in the function of chemokines has not been resolved. Given

  20. A lymphocyte-specific CC chemokine, secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC), is a highly efficient chemoattractant for B cells and activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Nagira, M; Imai, T; Yoshida, R; Takagi, S; Iwasaki, M; Baba, M; Tabira, Y; Akagi, J; Nomiyama, H; Yoshie, O

    1998-05-01

    Secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC) is a CC chemokine expressed mainly in lymph nodes, appendix and spleen, and specifically chemotactic for lymphocytes (Nagira et al., J. Biol. Chem. 1997. 272: 19518-19524). Here, we carried out transendothelial migration assays to determine the classes and subsets of lymphocytes migrating toward SLC. SLC attracted freshly isolated B cells with high efficiency and T cells modestly. Thus, SLC is the first CC chemokine with a strong chemotactic activity on fresh B cells. Among T cell types and subsets, SLC broadly attracted CD4+ and CD8+ cells, CD45RO- (naive) and CD45RO+ (memory) cells, and CD26high (activated) and CD26low- (resting) cells. SLC also attracted both L-selectin+ and L-selectin- subpopulations of various T cell subsets and B cells. Furthermore, mitogenic stimulation strongly enhanced migratory responses of T cells and B cells toward SLC. By in situ hybridization, SLC mRNA was detected in the cortical parafollicular regions (the T cell areas) of a lymph node and an appendix. Collectively, SLC may be a basic chemokine supporting homeostatic migration of a broad spectrum of lymphocytes into the secondary lymphoid tissues. SLC may also be involved in immune responses by inducing highly efficient migration of T and B cells following antigenic stimulation.

  1. CCR2 chemokine receptor signaling mediates pain in experimental osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachel E.; Tran, Phuong B.; Das, Rosalina; Ghoreishi-Haack, Nayereh; Ren, Dongjun; Miller, Richard J.; Malfait, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of chronic pain, but almost nothing is known about the mechanisms and molecules that mediate osteoarthritis-associated joint pain. Consequently, treatment options remain inadequate and joint replacement is often inevitable. Here, we use a surgical mouse model that captures the long-term progression of knee osteoarthritis to longitudinally assess pain-related behaviors and concomitant changes in the innervating dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We demonstrate that monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (CCL2) and its high-affinity receptor, chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2), are central to the development of pain associated with knee osteoarthritis. After destabilization of the medial meniscus, mice developed early-onset secondary mechanical allodynia that was maintained for 16 wk. MCP-1 and CCR2 mRNA, protein, and signaling activity were temporarily up-regulated in the innervating DRG at 8 wk after surgery. This result correlated with the presentation of movement-provoked pain behaviors, which were maintained up to 16 wk. Mice that lack Ccr2 also developed mechanical allodynia, but this started to resolve from 8 wk onwards. Despite severe allodynia and structural knee joint damage equal to wild-type mice, Ccr2-null mice did not develop movement-provoked pain behaviors at 8 wk. In wild-type mice, macrophages infiltrated the DRG by 8 wk and this was maintained through 16 wk after surgery. In contrast, macrophage infiltration was not observed in Ccr2-null mice. These observations suggest a key role for the MCP-1/CCR2 pathway in establishing osteoarthritis pain. PMID:23185004

  2. VCC-1, a novel chemokine, promotes tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Edward J.; Head, Richard; Griggs, David W.; Sun Duo; Evans, Robert J.; Swearingen, Michelle L.; Westlin, Marisa M.; Mazzarella, Richard . E-mail: richard.a.mazzarella@pfizer.com

    2006-11-10

    We have identified a novel human gene by transcriptional microarray analysis, which is co-regulated in tumors and angiogenesis model systems with VEGF expression. Isolation of cDNA clones containing the full-length VCC-1 transcript from both human and mouse shows a 119 amino acid protein with a 22 amino acid cleavable signal sequence in both species. Comparison of the protein product of this gene with hidden Markov models of all known proteins shows weak but significant homology with two known chemokines, SCYA17 and SCYA16. Northern analysis of human tissues detects a 1 kb band in lung and skeletal muscle. Murine VCC-1 expression can also be detected in lung as well as thyroid, submaxillary gland, epididymis, and uterus tissues by slot blot analysis. By quantitative real time RT-PCR 71% of breast tumors showed 3- to 24-fold up-regulation of VCC-1. In situ hybridization of breast carcinomas showed strong expression of the gene in both normal and transformed mammary gland ductal epithelial cells. In vitro, human microvascular endothelial cells grown on fibronectin increase VCC-1 expression by almost 100-fold. In addition, in the mouse angioma endothelial cell line PY4.1 the gene was over-expressed by 28-fold 6 h after induction of tube formation while quiescent and proliferating cells showed no change. VCC-1 expression is also increased by VEGF and FGF treatment, about 6- and 5-fold, respectively. Finally, 100% of mice injected with NIH3T3 cells over-expressing VCC-1 develop rapidly progressing tumors within 21 days while no growth is seen in any control mice injected with NIH3T3 cells containing the vector alone. These results strongly suggest that VCC-1 plays a role in angiogenesis and possibly in the development of tumors in some tissue types.

  3. Stress-induced production of chemokines by hair follicles regulates the trafficking of dendritic cells in skin

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Moro, Kazuyo; Ohyama, Manabu; Adachi, Takeya; Kitashima, Daniela Y; Ueha, Satoshi; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Kabashima, Kenji; Kubo, Akiharu; Cho, Young-hun; Clausen, Björn E; Matsushima, Kouji; Suematsu, Makoto; Furtado, Glaucia C; Lira, Sergio A; Farber, Joshua M; Udey, Mark C; Amagai, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are epidermal dendritic cells with incompletely understood origins that associate with hair follicles for unknown reasons. Here we show that in response to external stress, mouse hair follicles recruited Gr-1hi monocyte-derived precursors of LCs whose epidermal entry was dependent on the chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR6, whereas the chemokine receptor CCR8 inhibited the recruitment of LCs. Distinct hair-follicle regions had differences in their expression of ligands for CCR2 and CCR6. The isthmus expressed the chemokine CCL2; the infundibulum expressed the chemokine CCL20; and keratinocytes in the bulge produced the chemokine CCL8, which is the ligand for CCR8. Thus, distinct hair-follicle keratinocyte subpopulations promoted or inhibited repopulation with LCs via differences in chemokine production, a feature also noted in humans. Pre-LCs failed to enter hairless skin in mice or humans, which establishes hair follicles as portals for LCs. PMID:22729248

  4. Comparative study of CXC chemokines modulation in brown trout (Salmo trutta) following infection with a bacterial or viral pathogen.

    PubMed

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Zahran, Eman; Taylor, Nick G H; Feist, Stephen W; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    Chemokine modulation in response to pathogens still needs to be fully characterised in fish, in view of the recently described novel chemokines present. This paper reports the first comparative study of CXC chemokine genes transcription in salmonids (brown trout), with a particular focus on the fish specific CXC chemokines (CXCL_F). Adopting new primer sets, optimised to specifically target mRNA, a RT-qPCR gene screening was carried out. Constitutive gene expression was assessed first in six tissues from SPF brown trout. Transcription modulation was next investigated in kidney and spleen during septicaemic infection induced by a RNA virus (Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia virus, genotype Ia) or by a Gram negative bacterium (Yersinia ruckeri, ser. O1/biot. 2). From each target organ specific pathogen burden, measured detecting VHSV-glycoprotein or Y. ruckeri 16S rRNA, and IFN-γ gene expression were analysed for their correlation to chemokine transcription. Both pathogens modulated CXC chemokine gene transcript levels, with marked up-regulation seen in some cases, and with both temporal and tissue specific effects apparent. For example, Y. ruckeri strongly induced chemokine transcription in spleen within 24h, whilst VHS generally induced the largest increases at 3d.p.i. in both tissues. This study gives clues to the role of the novel CXC chemokines, in comparison to the other known CXC chemokines in salmonids. PMID:26866873

  5. Comparative study of CXC chemokines modulation in brown trout (Salmo trutta) following infection with a bacterial or viral pathogen.

    PubMed

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Zahran, Eman; Taylor, Nick G H; Feist, Stephen W; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    Chemokine modulation in response to pathogens still needs to be fully characterised in fish, in view of the recently described novel chemokines present. This paper reports the first comparative study of CXC chemokine genes transcription in salmonids (brown trout), with a particular focus on the fish specific CXC chemokines (CXCL_F). Adopting new primer sets, optimised to specifically target mRNA, a RT-qPCR gene screening was carried out. Constitutive gene expression was assessed first in six tissues from SPF brown trout. Transcription modulation was next investigated in kidney and spleen during septicaemic infection induced by a RNA virus (Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia virus, genotype Ia) or by a Gram negative bacterium (Yersinia ruckeri, ser. O1/biot. 2). From each target organ specific pathogen burden, measured detecting VHSV-glycoprotein or Y. ruckeri 16S rRNA, and IFN-γ gene expression were analysed for their correlation to chemokine transcription. Both pathogens modulated CXC chemokine gene transcript levels, with marked up-regulation seen in some cases, and with both temporal and tissue specific effects apparent. For example, Y. ruckeri strongly induced chemokine transcription in spleen within 24h, whilst VHS generally induced the largest increases at 3d.p.i. in both tissues. This study gives clues to the role of the novel CXC chemokines, in comparison to the other known CXC chemokines in salmonids.

  6. Berberine suppresses migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through down-regulation of chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh; Moghaddam, Hamid Kalalian; Mishan, Mohammad Amir; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Moghaddam, Maryam; Mirfeyzi, Seyed Jamal Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Berberine is one of the main alkaloids and it has been proven to have different pharmacological effects including inhibition of cell cycle and progression of apoptosis in various cancerous cells; however, its effects on cancer metastasis are not well known. Cancer cells obtain the ability to change their chemokine system and convert into metastatic cells. In this study, we examined the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration and its probable interaction with the chemokine system in cancer cells. Materials and Methods: The MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was cultured, and then, treated with berberine (10, 20, 40 and 80 μg/ml) for 24 hr. MTT assay was used in order to determine the cytotoxic effect of berberine on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Wound healing assay was applied to determine the inhibitory effect of berberine on cell migration. Moreover, real-time quantitative PCR analysis of selected chemokine receptors was performed to determine the probable molecular mechanism underlying the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration. Results: The results of wound healing assay revealed that berberine decreases cell migration. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of some chemokine receptors were reduced after berberine treatment, and this may be the underlying mechanism for decreased cell migration. Conclusion: Our results indicate that berberine might be a potential preventive biofactor for human breast cancer metastasis by targeting chemokine receptor genes. PMID:27081456

  7. Inhibition of dengue virus production and cytokine/chemokine expression by ribavirin and compound A.

    PubMed

    Rattanaburee, Thidarath; Junking, Mutita; Panya, Aussara; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Suttitheptumrong, Aroonroong; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Haegeman, Guy; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2015-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a worldwide public health problem with an increasing magnitude. The severity of disease in the patients with DENV infection correlates with high viral load and massive cytokine production - the condition referred to as "cytokine storm". Thus, concurrent inhibition of DENV and cytokine production should be more effective for treatment of DENV infection. In this study, we investigated the effects of the antiviral agent - ribavirin (RV), and the anti-inflammatory compound - compound A (CpdA), individually or in combination, on DENV production and cytokine/chemokine transcription in human lung epithelial carcinoma (A549) cells infected with DENV. Initially, the cells infected with DENV serotype 2 (DENV2) was studied. The results showed that treatment of DENV-infected cells with RV could significantly reduce both DENV production and cytokine (IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokine (IP-10 and RANTES) transcription while treatment of DENV-infected cells with CpdA could significantly reduce cytokine (IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokine (RANTES) transcription. Combined RV and CpdA treatment of the infected cells showed greater reduction of DENV production and cytokine/chemokine transcription. Similar results of this combined treatment were observed for infection with any one of the four DENV (DENV1, 2, 3, and 4) serotypes. These results indicate that combination of the antiviral agent and the anti-inflammatory compound offers a greater efficiency in reduction of DENV and cytokine/chemokine production, providing a new therapeutic approach for DENV infection.

  8. Functional inactivation of CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated responses through SOCS3 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Silvia F; Hernanz-Falcón, Patricia; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; De Ana, Ana Martín; Garzón, Ruth; Carvalho-Pinto, Carla; Vila-Coro, Antonio J; Zaballos, Angel; Balomenos, Dimitrios; Martínez-A, Carlos; Mellado, Mario

    2002-08-01

    Hematopoietic cell growth, differentiation, and chemotactic responses require coordinated action between cytokines and chemokines. Cytokines promote receptor oligomerization, followed by Janus kinase (JAK) kinase activation, signal transducers and transactivators of transcription (STAT) nuclear translocation, and transcription of cytokine-responsive genes. These include genes that encode a family of negative regulators of cytokine signaling, the suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins. After binding their specific receptors, chemokines trigger receptor dimerization and activate the JAK/STAT pathway. We show that SOCS3 overexpression or up-regulation, stimulated by a cytokine such as growth hormone, impairs the response to CXCL12, measured by Ca(2+) flux and chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo. This effect is mediated by SOCS3 binding to the CXC chemokine receptor 4 receptor, blocking JAK/STAT and Galpha(i) pathways, without interfering with cell surface chemokine receptor expression. The data provide clear evidence for signaling cross-talk between cytokine and chemokine responses in building a functional immune system.

  9. Requirement of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR3 for Acute Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Wayne W.; Lu, Bao; Gao, Wei; Csizmadia, Vilmos; Faia, Kerrie; King, Jennifer A.; Smiley, Stephen T.; Ling, Mai; Gerard, Norma P.; Gerard, Craig

    2000-01-01

    Chemokines provide signals for activation and recruitment of effector cells into sites of inflammation, acting via specific G protein–coupled receptors. However, in vitro data demonstrating the presence of multiple ligands for a given chemokine receptor, and often multiple receptors for a given chemokine, have led to concerns of biologic redundancy. Here we show that acute cardiac allograft rejection is accompanied by progressive intragraft production of the chemokines interferon (IFN)-γ–inducible protein of 10 kD (IP-10), monokine induced by IFN-γ (Mig), and IFN-inducible T cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC), and by infiltration of activated T cells bearing the corresponding chemokine receptor, CXCR3. We used three in vivo models to demonstrate a role for CXCR3 in the development of transplant rejection. First, CXCR3-deficient (CXCR3−/−) mice showed profound resistance to development of acute allograft rejection. Second, CXCR3−/− allograft recipients treated with a brief, subtherapeutic course of cyclosporin A maintained their allografts permanently and without evidence of chronic rejection. Third, CXCR+/+ mice treated with an anti-CXCR3 monoclonal antibody showed prolongation of allograft survival, even if begun after the onset of rejection. Taken in conjunction with our findings of CXCR3 expression in rejecting human cardiac allografts, we conclude that CXCR3 plays a key role in T cell activation, recruitment, and allograft destruction. PMID:11085753

  10. Emerging importance of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Altara, Raffaele; Manca, Marco; Brandão, Rita D; Zeidan, Asad; Booz, George W; Zouein, Fouad A

    2016-04-01

    The CXC chemokines, CXCL4, -9, -10, -11, CXCL4L1, and the CC chemokine CCL21, activate CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3), a cell-surface G protein-coupled receptor expressed mainly by Th1 cells, cytotoxic T (Tc) cells and NK cells that have a key role in immunity and inflammation. However, CXCR3 is also expressed by vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and appears to be important in controlling physiological vascular function. In the last decade, evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies has revealed the participation of CXCR3 and its ligands in multiple cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) of different aetiologies including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as in heart transplant rejection and transplant coronary artery disease (CAD). CXCR3 ligands have also proven to be valid biomarkers for the development of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, suggesting an underlining pathophysiological relation between levels of these chemokines and the development of adverse cardiac remodelling. The observation that several of the above-mentioned chemokines exert biological actions independent of CXCR3 provides both opportunities and challenges for developing effective drug strategies. In this review, we provide evidence to support our contention that CXCR3 and its ligands actively participate in the development and progression of CVDs, and may additionally have utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

  11. Emerging importance of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Altara, Raffaele; Manca, Marco; Brandão, Rita D; Zeidan, Asad; Booz, George W; Zouein, Fouad A

    2016-04-01

    The CXC chemokines, CXCL4, -9, -10, -11, CXCL4L1, and the CC chemokine CCL21, activate CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3), a cell-surface G protein-coupled receptor expressed mainly by Th1 cells, cytotoxic T (Tc) cells and NK cells that have a key role in immunity and inflammation. However, CXCR3 is also expressed by vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and appears to be important in controlling physiological vascular function. In the last decade, evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies has revealed the participation of CXCR3 and its ligands in multiple cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) of different aetiologies including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as in heart transplant rejection and transplant coronary artery disease (CAD). CXCR3 ligands have also proven to be valid biomarkers for the development of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, suggesting an underlining pathophysiological relation between levels of these chemokines and the development of adverse cardiac remodelling. The observation that several of the above-mentioned chemokines exert biological actions independent of CXCR3 provides both opportunities and challenges for developing effective drug strategies. In this review, we provide evidence to support our contention that CXCR3 and its ligands actively participate in the development and progression of CVDs, and may additionally have utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:26888559

  12. Chemokine Receptor-Specific Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy: Achievements and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Maria; Aris, Mariana; Llorente, Mercedes; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A.; Kremer, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    The 1990s brought a burst of information regarding the structure, expression pattern, and role in leukocyte migration and adhesion of chemokines and their receptors. At that time, the FDA approved the first therapeutic antibodies for cancer treatment. A few years later, it was reported that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 were involved on directing metastases to liver, lung, bone marrow, or lymph nodes, and the over-expression of CCR4, CCR6, and CCR9 by certain tumors. The possibility of inhibiting the interaction of chemokine receptors present on the surface of tumor cells with their ligands emerged as a new therapeutic approach. Therefore, many research groups and companies began to develop small molecule antagonists and specific antibodies, aiming to neutralize signaling from these receptors. Despite great expectations, so far, only one anti-chemokine receptor antibody has been approved for its clinical use, mogamulizumab, an anti-CCR4 antibody, granted in Japan to treat refractory adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma. Here, we review the main achievements obtained with anti-chemokine receptor antibodies for cancer immunotherapy, including discovery and clinical studies, proposed mechanisms of action, and therapeutic applications. PMID:25688243

  13. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Paraoxonases and Chemokines in Arteries of Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sepúlveda, Julio; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Guirro, Maria; García-Heredia, Anabel; Cabré, Noemí; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative damage to lipids and lipoproteins is implicated in the development of atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including peripheral artery disease (PAD). The paraoxonases (PON) are a group of antioxidant enzymes, termed PON1, PON2, and PON3 that protect lipoproteins and cells from peroxidation and, as such, may be involved in protection against the atherosclerosis process. PON1 inhibits the production of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in endothelial cells incubated with oxidized lipoproteins. PON1 and CCL2 are ubiquitously distributed in tissues, and this suggests a joint localization and combined systemic effect. The aim of the present study has been to analyze the quantitative immunohistochemical localization of PON1, PON3, CCL2 and CCL2 receptors in a series of patients with severe PAD. Portions of femoral and/or popliteal arteries from 66 patients with PAD were obtained during surgical procedures for infra-inguinal limb revascularization. We used eight normal arteries from donors as controls. PON1 and PON3, CCL2 and the chemokine-binding protein 2, and Duffy antigen/chemokine receptor, were increased in PAD patients. There were no significant changes in C–C chemokine receptor type 2. Our findings suggest that paraoxonases and chemokines play an important role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in peripheral artery disease. PMID:25993297

  14. A strategy to discover decoy chemokine ligands with an anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Dayana; Daubeuf, François; Do, Quoc Tuan; Utard, Valérie; Villa, Pascal; Haiech, Jacques; Bonnet, Dominique; Hibert, Marcel; Bernard, Philippe; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Excessive signaling by chemokines has been associated with chronic inflammation or cancer, thus attracting substantial attention as promising therapeutic targets. Inspired by chemokine-clearing molecules shaped by pathogens to escape the immune system, we designed a generic screening assay to discover chemokine neutralizing molecules (neutraligands) and unambiguously distinguish them from molecules that block the receptor (receptor antagonists). This assay, called TRIC-r, combines time-resolved intracellular calcium recordings with pre-incubation of bioactive compounds either with the chemokine or the receptor-expressing cells. We describe here the identification of high affinity neutraligands of CCL17 and CCL22, two chemokines involved in the Th2-type of lung inflammation. The decoy molecules inhibit in vitro CCL17- or CCL22-induced intracellular calcium responses, CCR4 endocytosis and human T cell migration. In vivo, they inhibit inflammation in a murine model of asthma, in particular the recruitment of eosinophils, dendritic cells and CD4+T cells. Altogether, we developed a successful strategy to discover as new class of pharmacological tools to potently control cell chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26442456

  15. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  16. C-C chemokine receptor type 4 antagonist Compound 22 ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Kota; Miyamoto, Katsuichi; Tanaka, Noriko; Ueno, Rino; Nakayama, Takashi; Yoshie, Osamu; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2016-02-15

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune response. We previously reported the pathogenic role of C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here, we examined whether CCR4 antagonism modulates the disease course of EAE. Wild-type and CCR4-knockout mice were induced EAE and were administered Compound 22, an antagonist of CCR4. Compound 22 significantly ameliorated the severity of EAE in wild-type mice, but not in the CCR4-knockout mice. Compound 22 inhibited Th1 and Th17 polarization of antigen-induced T-cell responses. Therefore, CCR4 antagonists might be potential therapeutic agents for multiple sclerosis. PMID:26857495

  17. Chemokine-dependent T cell migration requires aquaporin-3–mediated hydrogen peroxide uptake

    PubMed Central

    Chikuma, Shunsuke; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Kabashima, Kenji; Verkman, Alan S.; Inoue, Shintaro; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine-dependent trafficking is indispensable for the effector function of antigen-experienced T cells during immune responses. In this study, we report that the water/glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is expressed on T cells and regulates their trafficking in cutaneous immune reactions. T cell migration toward chemokines is dependent on AQP3-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) uptake but not the canonical water/glycerol transport. AQP3-mediated H2O2 transport is essential for the activation of the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 and the subsequent actin dynamics. Coincidentally, AQP3-deficient mice are defective in the development of hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity, which is attributed to the impaired trafficking of antigen-primed T cells to the hapten-challenged skin. We therefore suggest that AQP3-mediated H2O2 uptake is required for chemokine-dependent T cell migration in sufficient immune response. PMID:22927550

  18. [Gene expression and activity regulation of two calmodulin binding protein kinases in tobacco seedling].

    PubMed

    Hua, Wei; Li, Rong-Jun; Liang, Shu-Ping; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2005-06-01

    Two different calmodulin-binding protein kinase cDNAs (NtCBK1/2) have been isolated from tobacco. To understand the CBK protein activity regulation, we compared the activity regulation of NtCBK1 and NtCBK2 by pH, Mg(2+) concentration and Na(+) concentration. We found the autophosphorylation of NtCBK1/2 reached the maximum in pH 7.5 and 8 respectively; Mg(2+) and Na(+) shown different effects on the activity of NtCBKs, high and low Mg(2+) concentrations both inhibited the activity of NtCBKs, but Na+ had little effect on the kinase activity. In addition, to obtain further insight about the physiological roles of individual NtCBKs, we detected the expression profiles of CBKs. The results revealed different patterns of expression of NtCBK1 and NtCBK2. Both are largely expressed in leaf and flower; but in stem and root, NtCBK1 gene had stronger expression than NtCBK2. NtCBK2 expression was induced by GA treatment, while NtCBK1 expression remained unchanged under GA treatment. Expression of both NtCBK1 and NtCBK2 increased in response to salt stress, the former to a greater extent, and both expressions did not change under high/low temperature, drought, NAA and ABA treatments.

  19. An inflammatory CC chemokine of Cynoglossus semilaevis is involved in immune defense against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-xin; Sun, Jin-sheng; Sun, Li

    2011-09-01

    Chemokines are a family of small cytokines that regulate leukocyte migration. Based on the arrangement of the first two cysteine residues, chemokines are classified into four groups called CXC(α), CC(β), C, and CX(3)C. In this study, we identified a CC chemokine, CsCCK1, from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) and analyzed its biological activity. The deduced amino acid sequence of CsCCK1 contains 111 amino acid residues and is phylogenetically belonging to the CCL19/21/25 group of CC chemokines. CsCCK1 possesses a DCCL motif that is highly conserved among CC chemokines. Quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of CsCCK1 was relatively abundant in immune organs under normal physiological conditions and was upregulated by experimental infection of a bacterial pathogen. Purified recombinant CsCCK1 (rCsCCK1) induced chemotaxis in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of both tongue sole and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) in a dose-dependent manner. Mutation of the CC residues in the DCCL motif by serine substitution completely abolished the biological activity of rCsCCK1. When rCsCCK1, but not the mutant protein, was added to the cell culture of PBL, it enhanced cellular resistance against intracellular bacterial infection. Taken together, these results indicate that CsCCK1 is a functional CC chemokine whose biological activity depends on the DCCL motif and that CsCCK1 plays a role in host immune defense against bacterial infection.

  20. Molecular Basis of Glycosaminoglycan Heparin Binding to the Chemokine CXCL1 Dimer*

    PubMed Central

    Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Joseph, Prem Raj B.; Sawant, Kirti V.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-bound and soluble chemokine gradients in the vasculature and extracellular matrix mediate neutrophil recruitment to the site of microbial infection and sterile injury in the host tissue. However, the molecular principles by which chemokine-GAG interactions orchestrate these gradients are poorly understood. This, in part, can be directly attributed to the complex interrelationship between the chemokine monomer-dimer equilibrium and binding geometry and affinities that are also intimately linked to GAG length. To address some of this missing knowledge, we have characterized the structural basis of heparin binding to the murine CXCL1 dimer. CXCL1 is a neutrophil-activating chemokine and exists as both monomers and dimers (Kd = 36 μm). To avoid interference from monomer-GAG interactions, we designed a trapped dimer (dCXCL1) by introducing a disulfide bridge across the dimer interface. We characterized the binding of GAG heparin octasaccharide to dCXCL1 using solution NMR spectroscopy. Our studies show that octasaccharide binds orthogonally to the interhelical axis and spans the dimer interface and that heparin binding enhances the structural integrity of the C-terminal helical residues and stability of the dimer. We generated a quadruple mutant (H20A/K22A/K62A/K66A) on the basis of the binding data and observed that this mutant failed to bind heparin octasaccharide, validating our structural model. We propose that the stability enhancement of dimers upon GAG binding regulates in vivo neutrophil trafficking by increasing the lifetime of “active” chemokines, and that this structural knowledge could be exploited for designing inhibitors that disrupt chemokine-GAG interactions and neutrophil homing to the target tissue. PMID:23864653

  1. Dual effects of noradrenaline on astroglial production of chemokines and pro-inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Noradrenaline (NA) is known to limit neuroinflammation. However, the previously described induction by NA of a chemokine involved in the progression of immune/inflammatory processes, such as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), apparently contradicts NA anti-inflammatory actions. In the current study we analyzed NA regulation of astroglial chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1 (CX3CL1), also known as fractalkine, another chemokine to which both neuroprotective and neurodegenerative actions have been attributed. In addition, NA effects on other chemokines and pro-inflammatory mediators were also analyzed. Methods Primary astrocyte-enriched cultures were obtained from neonatal Wistar rats. These cells were incubated for different time durations with combinations of NA and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The expression and synthesis of different proteins was measured by RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or enzyme immunoassays. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Newman-Keuls multiple comparison tests. Results The data presented here show that in control conditions, NA induces the production of CX3CL1 in rat cultured astrocytes, but in the presence of an inflammatory stimulus, such as LPS, NA has the opposite effect inhibiting CX3CL1 production. This inversion of NA effect was also observed for MCP-1. Based on the observation of this dual action, NA regulation of different chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines was also analyzed, observing that in most cases NA exerts an inhibitory effect in the presence of LPS. One characteristic exception was the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), where a summative effect was detected for both LPS and NA. Conclusion These data suggest that NA effects on astrocytes can adapt to the presence of an inflammatory agent reducing the production of certain cytokines, while in basal conditions NA may have the opposite effect and help to

  2. Cytokines and Chemokines as Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Inflammation: Presenting the Case of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    De Bleecker, Jan L.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe inherited muscle disease that affects 1 in 3500 boys worldwide. Infiltration of skeletal muscle by inflammatory cells is an important facet of disease pathophysiology and is strongly associated with disease severity in the individual patient. In the chronic inflammation that characterizes Duchenne muscle, cytokines and chemokines are considered essential activators and recruiters of inflammatory cells. In addition, they provide potential beneficiary effects on muscle fiber damage control and tissue regeneration. In this review, current knowledge of cytokine and chemokine expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its relevant animal disease models is listed, and implications for future therapeutic avenues are discussed. PMID:24302815

  3. Immunopathological roles of cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, and pattern-recognition receptors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shui-Lian; Kuan, Woon-Pang; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with unknown etiology affecting more than one million individuals each year. It is characterized by B- and T-cell hyperactivity and by defects in the clearance of apoptotic cells and immune complexes. Understanding the complex process involved and the interaction between various cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, and pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in the immune pathways will provide valuable information on the development of novel therapeutic targets for treating SLE. In this paper, we review the immunopathological roles of novel cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, PRRs, and their interactions in immunoregulatory networks and suggest how their disturbances may implicate pathological conditions in SLE.

  4. Interference with glycosaminoglycan-chemokine interactions with a probe to alter leukocyte recruitment and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Sandra; Pettersson, Ulrika S; Hoorelbeke, Bart; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Schelfhout, Katrien; Martens, Erik; Kubes, Paul; Van Damme, Jo; Phillipson, Mia; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2014-01-01

    In vivo leukocyte recruitment is not fully understood and may result from interactions of chemokines with glycosaminoglycans/GAGs. We previously showed that chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose/COAM binds the neutrophil chemokine GCP-2/CXCL6. Here, mouse chemokine binding by COAM was studied systematically and binding affinities of chemokines to COAM versus GAGs were compared. COAM and heparan sulphate bound the mouse CXC chemokines KC/CXCL1, MIP-2/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10 and I-TAC/CXCL11 and the CC chemokine RANTES/CCL5 with affinities in the nanomolar range, whereas no binding interactions were observed for mouse MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and MIP-1β/CCL4. The affinities of COAM-interacting chemokines were similar to or higher than those observed for heparan sulphate. Although COAM did not display chemotactic activity by itself, its co-administration with mouse GCP-2/CXCL6 and MIP-2/CXCL2 or its binding of endogenous chemokines resulted in fast and cooperative peritoneal neutrophil recruitment and in extravasation into the cremaster muscle in vivo. These local GAG mimetic features by COAM within tissues superseded systemic effects and were sufficient and applicable to reduce LPS-induced liver-specific neutrophil recruitment and activation. COAM mimics glycosaminoglycans and is a nontoxic probe for the study of leukocyte recruitment and inflammation in vivo. PMID:25093679

  5. Molecular cloning of porcine chemokine CXC motif ligand 2 (CXCL2) and mapping to the SSC8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal recognition of pregnancy is accompanied by inflammatory responses with leukocytosis and increased levels of cytokines and chemokines. Human trophoblast cells secrete chemokine CXC motif ligand 1 (CXCL1)/Gro-a and other chemotactic proteins, while monocytes co-cultured with trophoblast cells...

  6. CX3CL1/CX3CR1 and CCL2/CCR2 Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Complex in Patients with AMD

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Hviid, Thomas; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The chemokine receptors CX3CR1 and CCR2 have been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The evidence is mainly derived from experimental cell studies and murine models of AMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between expression of CX3CR1 and CCR2 on different leukocyte subsets and AMD. Furthermore we measured the plasma levels of ligands CX3CL1 and CCL2. Methods Patients attending our department were asked to participate in the study. The diagnosis of AMD was based on clinical examination and multimodal imaging techniques. Chemokine plasma level and chemokine receptor expression were measured by flow-cytometry. Results A total of 150 participants were included. We found a significantly lower expression of CX3CR1 on CD8+ T cells in the neovascular AMD group compared to the control group (p = 0.04). We found a significant positive correlation between CCR2 and CX3CR1 expression on CD8+ cells (r = 0.727, p = 0.0001). We found no difference in plasma levels of CX3CL1 and CCL2 among the groups. Conclusions Our results show a down regulation of CX3CR1 on CD8+ cells; this correlated to a low expression of CCR2 on CD8+ cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the possible role of this cell type in AMD development. PMID:25503251

  7. Performance Status in Elderly Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Exploring Gene Expression Signatures of Cytokines and Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Nipp, Ryan D.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive disease that predominantly affects elderly patients. Cytokines and chemokines are major players in the pathogenesis of AML. They regulate the disease course and play a deleterious role in the progression of AML. The geriatric population is particularly vulnerable to these mediators as these cytokines and chemokines are also implicated in the development of frailty, fatigue, and declining cognitive function. It is the combination of these adverse effects of cytokines and chemokines that affect performance status and, in turn, the poor prognosis in this age group. Cytokines and chemokines are emerging as therapeutic targets in AML. Future endeavors to treat AML will likely involve cytokines and chemokines as attempts are made to disrupt the bone marrow environment. By modulating the bone marrow stroma, the goal is to create an environment less favorable to AML cells and more favorable to the effects of chemotherapy against AML. PMID:23783402

  8. Structural biology. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Burg, John S; Ingram, Jessica R; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Jude, Kevin M; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O; Ploegh, Hidde L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor's inactive state. PMID:25745166

  9. Constitutive and inflammatory induction of alpha and beta chemokines in human first trimester forebrain astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Bakhiet, Moiz; Mousa, Alyaa; Seiger, Ake; Andersson, Jan

    2002-05-01

    Chemokine effects on leukocyte infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS) are key events in the inflammatory processes of neuroimmunologic and neuroinfectious diseases. Because, chemokines may play important roles in proliferation and differentiation of brain cells and in the initiation and progression of CNS inflammatory disorders, we analyzed constitutive and inflammatory-induced expression of alpha and beta chemokines in human first trimester forebrain cells. Constitutive induction of IL-8, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, MCP-1 and regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted (Rantes) was detected in cryostat sections of embryonic forebrains in an age-dependent manner. Dissociated cell cultures were studied for spontaneous chemokine induction and after stimulation with the trypanosome lymphocyte triggering factor (TLTF), a novel trypanokine secreted by African trypanosomes that triggers a complex of immune responses. LPS and variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) were used as controls. In cultures, unstimulated cells expressed minimal chemokine levels except for Rantes. In response to TLTF and LPS, but not VSG, all chemokines were highly induced at the mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and age-dependent manner. Combined assays (in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry) revealed that astrocytes and neurons are major sources for chemokines. These results illustrate the ability of resident brain cells to constitutively express chemokine genes, which may suggest an important role for chemokines during brain development. Furthermore, TLTF-induced chemokine expression in astrocytes and neurons indicate the capacity of TLTF to provoke neuroinflammation in the brain, which may have important therapeutic implications for the neurological manifestations of African trypanosomiasis. PMID:12009570

  10. Signal transmission through the CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Melanie P; Kufareva, Irina; Paes, Cheryl; Goodman, Jason R; Thaker, Yana; Puffer, Bridget A; Berdougo, Eli; Rucker, Joseph B; Handel, Tracy M; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2016-08-30

    The atomic-level mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular ligand binding events through their transmembrane helices to activate intracellular G proteins remain unclear. Using a comprehensive library of mutations covering all 352 residues of the GPCR CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), we identified 41 amino acids that are required for signaling induced by the chemokine ligand CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1). CXCR4 variants with each of these mutations do not signal properly but remain folded, based on receptor surface trafficking, reactivity to conformationally sensitive monoclonal antibodies, and ligand binding. When visualized on the structure of CXCR4, the majority of these residues form a continuous intramolecular signaling chain through the transmembrane helices; this chain connects chemokine binding residues on the extracellular side of CXCR4 to G protein-coupling residues on its intracellular side. Integrated into a cohesive model of signal transmission, these CXCR4 residues cluster into five functional groups that mediate (i) chemokine engagement, (ii) signal initiation, (iii) signal propagation, (iv) microswitch activation, and (v) G protein coupling. Propagation of the signal passes through a "hydrophobic bridge" on helix VI that coordinates with nearly every known GPCR signaling motif. Our results agree with known conserved mechanisms of GPCR activation and significantly expand on understanding the structural principles of CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27543332

  11. Platelet-Derived CCL5 Regulates CXC Chemokine Formation and Neutrophil Recruitment in Acute Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Zhang, Songen; Wang, Yongzhi; Zhang, Su; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating data suggest that platelets not only regulate thrombosis and haemostasis but also inflammatory processes. Platelets contain numerous potent pro-inflammatory compounds, including the chemokines CCL5 and CXCL4, although their role in acute colitis remains elusive. The aim of this study is to examine the role of platelets and platelet-derived chemokines in acute colitis. Acute colitis is induced in female Balb/c mice by administration of 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 5 days. Animals receive a platelet-depleting, anti-CCL5, anti-CXCL4, or a control antibody prior to DSS challenge. Colonic tissue is collected for quantification of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, CXCL5, CXCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and CCL5 levels as well as morphological analyses. Platelet depletion reduce tissue damage and clinical disease activity index in DSS-exposed animals. Platelet depletion not only reduces levels of CXCL2 and CXCL5 but also levels of CCL5 in the inflamed colon. Immunoneutralization of CCL5 but not CXCL4 reduces tissue damage, CXC chemokine expression, and neutrophil recruitment in DSS-treated animals. These findings show that platelets play a key role in acute colitis by regulating CXC chemokine generation, neutrophil infiltration, and tissue damage in the colon. Moreover, our results suggest that platelet-derived CCL5 is an important link between platelet activation and neutrophil recruitment in acute colitis.

  12. Chemokine receptor 5 △32 allele in patients with severe pandemic (H1N1) 2009.

    PubMed

    Keynan, Yoav; Juno, Jennifer; Meyers, Adrienne; Ball, T Blake; Kumar, Anand; Rubinstein, Ethan; Fowke, Keith R

    2010-10-01

    Because chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) may have a role in pulmonary immune response, we explored whether patients with severe pandemic (H1N1) 2009 were more likely to carry the CCR5Δ32 allele than were members of the general population. We found a large proportion of heterozygosity for the CCR5Δ32 allele among white patients with severe disease.

  13. Chemokines responses to Plasmodium falciparum malaria and co-infections among rural Cameroonians.

    PubMed

    Che, Jane Nchangnwi; Nmorsi, Onyebiguwa Patrick Goddey; Nkot, Baleguel Pierre; Isaac, Clement; Okonkwo, Browne Chukwudi

    2015-04-01

    Malaria remains the major cause of disease morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa with complex immune responses associated with disease outcomes. Symptoms associated with severe malaria have generally shown chemokine upregulation but little is known of responses to uncomplicated malaria. Eight villages in central Cameroon of 1045 volunteers were screened. Among these, malaria-positive individuals with some healthy controls were selected for chemokine analysis using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kits. Depressed serum levels of CXCL5 and raised CCL28 were observed in malarial positives when compared with healthy controls. The mean concentration of CXCL11 was higher in symptomatic than asymptomatic group, while CCL28 was lower in symptomatic individuals. Lower chemokine levels were associated with symptoms of uncomplicated malaria except for CXCL11 which was upregulated among fever-positive group. The mean CXCL5 level was higher in malaria sole infection than co-infections with HIV and Loa loa. Also, there was a raised mean level of malaria+HIV co-infection for CXCL9. This study hypothesises a situation where depressed chemokines in the face of clinical presentations could indicate an attempt by the immune system in preventing a progression process from uncomplicated to complicated outcomes with CXCL11 being identified as possible biomarker for malarial fever. PMID:25462711

  14. Effect of a topical steroid on gene expressions for chemokines in mice with contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Gaku; Hirano, Takeo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Mitsui, Kazutaka; Ohara, Osamu; Yanagihara, Satoshi; Kato, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    Effects of a topical corticosteroid drug, diflucortolone valerate, on the mRNA expressions for four CC- and four CXC-chemokines, which have been reported to be associated with recruitment of different kinds of proinflammatory and inflammatory cells, were investigated by RT-PCR in mice with 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB)-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response. All of the eight gene expressions were clearly up-regulated in the lesion site of the CHS response up to 24 h post-challenge of TNCB at which ear swelling response reached a peak, so that heavy infiltration of inflammatory cells consisting mainly of mononuclear cells and neutrophils was likely induced by these chemokines. Topical treatment with diflucortolone valerate suppressed completely the infiltrates as well as the ear swelling response. In addition, the up-regulation of gene expressions for these eight chemokines were suppressed by the treatment, indicating that the corticosteroid drug attenuates the expression of chemokine genes essential for orientating nonspecific skin response to hapten-specific CHS response through the recruitment of inflammatory cells from the circulation into the tissue site. PMID:14975360

  15. Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, chemokine receptor CXCR4 cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, binds selectively CXCL12. This protein plays many important roles in immunological as well as pathophysiological functions. In this communication, we identified and characterized the channel catfish CXCR4 transcript....

  16. Smoothing T cell roads to the tumor: Chemokine post-translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Molon, Barbara; Viola, Antonella; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-05-01

    We described a novel tumor-associated immunosuppressive mechanism based on post-translational modifications of chemokines by reactive nitrogen species (RNS). To overcome tumor immunosuppressive hindrances, we designed and developed a new drug, AT38, that inhibits RNS generation at the tumor site. Combinatorial approaches with AT38 boost the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy protocols.

  17. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5(-/-) mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5.

  18. The chemokine CXCL16 modulates neurotransmitter release in hippocampal CA1 area

    PubMed Central

    Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Trettel, Flavia; Milior, Giampaolo; Maggi, Laura; Ragozzino, Davide; Limatola, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines have several physio-pathological roles in the brain. Among them, the modulation of synaptic contacts and neurotransmission recently emerged as crucial activities during brain development, in adulthood, upon neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. CXCL16 is a chemokine normally expressed in the brain, where it exerts neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced damages through cross communication with astrocytes and the involvement of the adenosine receptor type 3 (A3R) and the chemokine CCL2. Here we demonstrated for the first time that CXCL16 exerts a modulatory activity on inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in CA1 area. We found that CXCL16 increases the frequency of the miniature inhibitory synaptic currents (mIPSCs) and the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs), suggesting a presynaptic modulation of the probability of GABA release. In addition, CXCL16 increases the frequency of the miniature excitatory synaptic currents (mEPSCs) and reduces the PPR of evoked excitatory transmission, indicating that the chemokine also modulates and enhances the release of glutamate. These effects were not present in the A3RKO mice and in WT slices treated with minocycline, confirming the involvement of A3 receptors and introducing microglial cells as key mediators of the modulatory activity of CXCL16 on neurons. PMID:27721466

  19. Analysis of Arrestin Recruitment to Chemokine Receptors by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bonneterre, J; Montpas, N; Boularan, C; Galés, C; Heveker, N

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors recruit the multifunctional scaffolding protein beta arrestin in response to binding of their chemokine ligands. Given that arrestin recruitment represents a signaling axis that is in part independent from G-protein signaling, it has become a hallmark of G protein-coupled receptor functional selectivity. Therefore, quantification of arrestin recruitment has become a requirement for the delineation of chemokine and drug candidate activity along different signaling axes. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) techniques provide methodology for such quantification that can reveal differences between nonredundant chemokines binding the same receptor, and that can be upscaled for high-throughput testing. We here provide protocols for the careful setup of BRET-based arrestin recruitment assays, and examples for the application of such systems in dose-response or time-course experiments. Suggestions are given for troubleshooting, optimizing test systems, and the interpretation of results obtained with BRET-based assays, which indeed yield an intricate blend of quantitative and qualitative information.

  20. Cytokines and Chemokines at the Crossroads of Neuroinflammation, Neurodegeneration, and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Andrew G.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines and chemokines are proteins that coordinate the immune response throughout the body. The dysregulation of cytokines and chemokines is a central feature in the development of neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and demyelination both in the central and peripheral nervous systems and in conditions of neuropathic pain. Pathological states within the nervous system can lead to activation of microglia. The latter may mediate neuronal and glial cell injury and death through production of proinflammatory factors such as cytokines and chemokines. These then help to mobilize the adaptive immune response. Although inflammation may induce beneficial effects such as pathogen clearance and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, uncontrolled inflammation can result in detrimental outcomes via the production of neurotoxic factors that exacerbate neurodegenerative pathology. In states of prolonged inflammation, continual activation and recruitment of effector cells can establish a feedback loop that perpetuates inflammation and ultimately results in neuronal injury. A critical balance between repair and proinflammatory factors determines the outcome of a neurodegenerative process. This review will focus on how cytokines and chemokines affect neuroinflammation and disease pathogenesis in bacterial meningitis and brain abscesses, Lyme neuroborreliosis, human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis, and neuropathic pain. PMID:23997430

  1. Early Cytokine and Chemokine Gene Expression during Pseudomonas aeruginosa Corneal Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kernacki, Karen A.; Goebel, Dennis J.; Poosch, Michael S.; Hazlett, Linda D.

    1998-01-01

    Using a multiprobe RNase protection assay, we examined cytokine and chemokine mRNAs that were expressed after corneal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice. Cytokines that were upregulated included interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and -1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-11, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, stem cell factor, lymphotoxin β, transforming growth factor β1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Chemokine transcripts that were upregulated included Eotaxin; gamma-interferon-inducible protein 10; monocyte chemoattractant protein 1; macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α, 1β, and 2; and RANTES. Peak expression of these cytokines and chemokines was observed between 1 and 3 days after infection. These responses returned to or approached baseline preinfection levels by 7 days after ocular challenge. Identification of the various cytokines and chemokines upregulated during corneal infection provides important information relevant to unraveling the pathogenesis induced by this bacterium and provides hope that specific molecules can be targeted for therapy. PMID:9423885

  2. Chemokines responses to Plasmodium falciparum malaria and co-infections among rural Cameroonians.

    PubMed

    Che, Jane Nchangnwi; Nmorsi, Onyebiguwa Patrick Goddey; Nkot, Baleguel Pierre; Isaac, Clement; Okonkwo, Browne Chukwudi

    2015-04-01

    Malaria remains the major cause of disease morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa with complex immune responses associated with disease outcomes. Symptoms associated with severe malaria have generally shown chemokine upregulation but little is known of responses to uncomplicated malaria. Eight villages in central Cameroon of 1045 volunteers were screened. Among these, malaria-positive individuals with some healthy controls were selected for chemokine analysis using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kits. Depressed serum levels of CXCL5 and raised CCL28 were observed in malarial positives when compared with healthy controls. The mean concentration of CXCL11 was higher in symptomatic than asymptomatic group, while CCL28 was lower in symptomatic individuals. Lower chemokine levels were associated with symptoms of uncomplicated malaria except for CXCL11 which was upregulated among fever-positive group. The mean CXCL5 level was higher in malaria sole infection than co-infections with HIV and Loa loa. Also, there was a raised mean level of malaria+HIV co-infection for CXCL9. This study hypothesises a situation where depressed chemokines in the face of clinical presentations could indicate an attempt by the immune system in preventing a progression process from uncomplicated to complicated outcomes with CXCL11 being identified as possible biomarker for malarial fever.

  3. Chemokines, costimulatory molecules and fusion proteins for the immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Russell, Sarah M; Bass, Rikki S; Epstein, Alan L

    2011-11-01

    In this article, the role of chemokines and costimulatory molecules in the immunotherapy of experimental murine solid tumors and immunotherapy used in ongoing clinical trials are presented. Chemokine networks regulate physiologic cell migration that may be disrupted to inhibit antitumor immune responses or co-opted to promote tumor growth and metastasis in cancer. Recent studies highlight the potential use of chemokines in cancer immunotherapy to improve innate and adaptive cell interactions and to recruit immune effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Another critical component of antitumor immune responses is antigen priming and activation of effector cells. Reciprocal expression and binding of costimulatory molecules and their ligands by antigen-presenting cells and naive lymphocytes ensures robust expansion, activity and survival of tumor-specific effector cells in vivo. Immunotherapy approaches using agonist antibodies or fusion proteins of immunomodulatory molecules significantly inhibit tumor growth and boost cell-mediated immunity. To localize immune stimulation to the tumor site, a series of fusion proteins consisting of a tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis and chemokines or costimulatory molecules were generated and tested in tumor-bearing mice. While several of these reagents were initially shown to have therapeutic value, combination therapies with methods to delete suppressor cells had the greatest effect on tumor growth. In conclusion, a key conclusion that has emerged from these studies is that successful immunotherapy will require both advanced methods of immunostimulation and the removal of immunosuppression in the host.

  4. Role of the platelet chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) in hemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M Anna; Rauova, Lubica; Poncz, Mortimer

    2010-04-01

    Chemokines are a family of small proteins that have significant roles in inflammation, angiogenesis and cellular homing. Since inflammation and hemostasis/thrombosis have multiple overlapping roles and pathways, one could expect that some chemokines would also have biologically significant roles in hemostasis/thrombosis as well. This would especially be true for chemokines that are localized solely or predominantly within platelets and released in large amounts at sites of platelet activation such as platelet factor 4 (PF4, CXCL4) and its closely related chemokine, platelet basic protein (PBP, CXCL7). Our group and others have clearly demonstrated an in vivo role for PF4 in hemostasis/thrombosis, but not for PBP, which in contrast has clear proinflammatory properties. This review will focus on PF4 and its potential roles in hemostasis/thrombosis and the underlying pathways by which PF4 may be especially important in such pathologic thrombotic states as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and septic shock. PMID:20004006

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists modulate neuropathic pain: a link to chemokines?

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Caroline M.; Miller, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain presents a widespread and intractable medical problem. While numerous pharmaceuticals are used to treat chronic pain, drugs that are safe for extended use and highly effective at treating the most severe pain do not yet exist. Chronic pain resulting from nervous system injury (neuropathic pain) is common in conditions ranging from multiple sclerosis to HIV-1 infection to type II diabetes. Inflammation caused by neuropathy is believed to contribute to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines are key inflammatory mediators, several of which (MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, fractalkine, SDF-1 among others) have been linked to chronic, neuropathic pain in both human conditions and animal models. The important roles chemokines play in inflammation and pain make them an attractive therapeutic target. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a family of nuclear receptors known for their roles in metabolism. Recent research has revealed that PPARs also play a role in inflammatory gene repression. PPAR agonists have wide-ranging effects including inhibition of chemokine expression and pain behavior reduction in animal models. Experimental evidence suggests a connection between the pain ameliorating effects of PPAR agonists and suppression of inflammatory gene expression, including chemokines. In early clinical research, one PPARα agonist, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), shows promise in relieving chronic pain. If this link can be better established, PPAR agonists may represent a new drug therapy for neuropathic pain. PMID:25191225

  6. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  7. 77 FR 10598 - BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera Corp., Chemokine Therapeutics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera Corp., Chemokine Therapeutics... concerning the securities of BIOTECH Holdings Ltd. because it has not filed any annual reports since...

  8. Identification of a cobia (Rachycentron canadum) CC chemokine gene and its involvement in the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Su, Youlu; Guo, Zhixun; Xu, Liwen; Jiang, Jingzhe; Wang, Jiangyong; Feng, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The chemokines regulate immune cell migration under inflammatory and physiological conditions. We investigated a CC chemokine gene (RcCC1) from cobia (Rachycentron canadum). The full-length RcCC1 cDNA is comprised 673 nucleotides and encodes a four-cysteine arrangement 99-amino-acid protein typical of known CC chemokines. The genomic DNA of RcCC1 consists of three exons and two introns. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RcCC1 was closest to the MIP group of CC chemokines. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed RcCC1 was constitutively expressed in all tissues examined, with relative strong expression in gill, blood, kidney, spleen, and head kidney. The RcCC1 transcripts in the head kidney, spleen, and liver were quickly up-regulated after stimulation with formalin-inactivated Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine) or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C). These results indicate RcCC1 not only plays a role in homeostasis, but also may be involved in inflammatory responses to bacterial and viral infection.

  9. Solution structure of the complex between poxvirus-encoded CC chemokine inhibitor vCCI and human MIP-1β

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li; DeRider, Michele; McCornack, Milissa A.; Jao, Chris; Isern, Nancy G.; Ness, Traci; Moyer, Richard; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2006-09-19

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) comprise a large family of proteins that recruit and activate leukocytes, giving chemokines a major role in both the immune response and inflammation-related diseases. The poxvirus-encoded viral CC chemokine inhibitor (vCCI) binds to many CC chemokines with high affinity, acting as a potent inhibitor of chemokine action. We have used heteronuclear multidimensional NMR to determine the first structure of an orthopoxvirus vCCI in complex with a human CC chemokine MIP-1β. vCCI binds to the chemokine with 1:1 stoichiometry, using residues from its β-sheet II to interact with the a surface of MIP-1β that includes the N-terminus, the following residues in the so-called N-loop20’s region, and the 40’s loop. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding, as vCCI appears to interact most stronglyinteracts most directly with residues that are conserved among a subset of CC chemokines, but are not conservednot among the other chemokine subfamilies. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding. Chemokines play critical roles in the immune system, causing chemotaxis of a variety of cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as mediating cell homing and immune system development 1(Baggiolini 2001). To date, about 50 chemokines have been identified, and these small proteins (7-14 kDa) are believed to function by binding with endothelial or matrix glycosaminoglycans to form a concentration gradient that is then sensed by high affinity, 7-transmembrane domain G-protein coupled chemokine receptors on the surface of immune cells surface. The chemokine system is critical for host defense in healthy individuals, butand can also lead to diseases including asthma, arthritis, and atherosclerosis in the case of malfunction, often due to inappropriate inflammation and subsequent tissue damage 2(Gerard and Rollins 2001). There are four subfamilies of chemokines, CC

  10. Environmental Mold and Mycotoxin Exposures Elicit Specific Cytokine and Chemokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum Lichtenstein, Jamie H.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Gavin, Igor M.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Molina, Ramon M.; Thompson, Khristy J.; Chi, Chih-Lin; Gillis, Bruce S.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Molds can cause respiratory symptoms and asthma. We sought to use isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to understand changes in cytokine and chemokine levels in response to mold and mycotoxin exposures and to link these levels with respiratory symptoms in humans. We did this by utilizing an ex vivo assay approach to differentiate mold-exposed patients and unexposed controls. While circulating plasma chemokine and cytokine levels from these two groups might be similar, we hypothesized that by challenging their isolated white blood cells with mold or mold extracts, we would see a differential chemokine and cytokine release. Methods and Findings Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from blood from 33 patients with a history of mold exposures and from 17 controls. Cultured PBMCs were incubated with the most prominent Stachybotrys chartarum mycotoxin, satratoxin G, or with aqueous mold extract, ionomycin, or media, each with or without PMA. Additional PBMCs were exposed to spores of Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium herbarum and Penicillium chrysogenum. After 18 hours, cytokines and chemokines released into the culture medium were measured by multiplex assay. Clinical histories, physical examinations and pulmonary function tests were also conducted. After ex vivo PBMC exposures to molds or mycotoxins, the chemokine and cytokine profiles from patients with a history of mold exposure were significantly different from those of unexposed controls. In contrast, biomarker profiles from cells exposed to media alone showed no difference between the patients and controls. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that chronic mold exposures induced changes in inflammatory and immune system responses to specific mold and mycotoxin challenges. These responses can differentiate mold-exposed patients from unexposed controls. This strategy may be a powerful approach to document immune system responsiveness to molds and other inflammation

  11. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of a CC chemokine gene from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanzhi; Sun, Yuena; Shi, Ge; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2012-12-01

    Chemokines are a family of structurally related chemotactic cytokines that regulate the migration of leukocytes, under both physiological and inflammatory conditions. A partial cDNA of CC chemokine gene designed as Mimi-CC3 was isolated from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) spleen cDNA library. Unknown 3' part of the cDNA was amplified by 3'-RACE. The complete cDNA of Mimi-CC3 contains an 89-nt 5'-UTR, a 303-nt open reading frame and a 441-nt 3'-UTR. Three exons and two introns were identified in Mimi-CC3. The deduced Mimi-CC3 protein sequences contain a 22 amino acids signal peptide and a 78 amino acids mature polypeptide, which possesses the typical arrangement of four cysteines as found in other known CC chemokines. It shares low amino acid sequence identities with most other fish and mammalian CC chemokines (less than 54.1 %), but shares very high identities with large yellow croaker CC chemokine (94.6 %). Phylogenetic analysis showed that Mimi-CC3 gene may have an orthologous relationship with mammalian/amphibian CCL25 gene. Tissue expression distributed analysis showed that Mimi-CC3 gene was constitutively expressed in all nine tissues examined, although at different levels. Upon stimulated with Vibrio anguillarum, the time-course analysis using a real-time PCR showed that Mimi-CC3 transcript in kidney and liver was obviously up-regulated and reached the peak levels, followed by a recovery. Mimi-CC3 expression in kidney was more strongly increased than in liver. However, down-regulation was observed in spleen. These results indicated that Mimi-CC3 plays important roles in miiuy croaker immune response as well as in homeostatic mechanisms.

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CC chemokine binding protein 35K-Fc reveals residues essential for activity and mutations that increase the potency of CC chemokine blockade.

    PubMed

    White, Gemma E; McNeill, Eileen; Christou, Ivy; Channon, Keith M; Greaves, David R

    2011-08-01

    Chemokines of the CC class are key mediators of monocyte recruitment and macrophage differentiation and have a well documented role in many inflammatory diseases. Blockade of chemokine activity is therefore an attractive target for anti-inflammatory therapy. 35K (vCCI) is a high-affinity chemokine binding protein expressed by poxviruses, which binds all human and murine CC chemokines, preventing their interaction with chemokine receptors. We developed an Fc-fusion protein of 35K with a modified human IgG1 Fc domain and expressed this construct in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Purified 35K-Fc is capable of inhibiting CC chemokine-induced calcium flux, chemotaxis, and β-arrestin recruitment in primary macrophages and transfected cells. To elucidate the residues involved in chemokine neutralization, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of six key amino acids in 35K and expressed the mutant Fc-fusion proteins in vitro. We screened the mutants for their ability to block chemokine-induced β-arrestin recruitment in transfected cells and to inhibit primary macrophage signaling in an electric cell substrate impedance sensing assay. Using a sterile model of acute inflammation, zymosan-induced peritonitis, we confirmed that wild-type 35K-Fc can reduce monocyte recruitment, whereas one mutant (R89A) showed a more pronounced blockade of monocyte influx and another mutant (E143K) showed total loss of function. We believe that 35K-Fc will be a useful tool for exploring the role of CC chemokines in chronic inflammatory pathologies, and we have identified a higher potency form of the molecule that may have potential therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory disease.

  13. A Subset of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Has Leukemia Cells Characterized by Chemokine Responsiveness and Altered Expression of Transcriptional as well as Angiogenic Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Annette K.; Reikvam, Håkon; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive and heterogeneous bone marrow malignancy, the only curative treatment being intensive chemotherapy eventually in combination with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Both the AML and their neighboring stromal cells show constitutive chemokine release, but chemokines seem to function as regulators of AML cell proliferation only for a subset of patients. Chemokine targeting is therefore considered not only for immunosuppression in allotransplanted patients but also as a possible antileukemic strategy in combination with intensive chemotherapy or as part of disease-stabilizing treatment at least for the subset of patients with chemokine-responsive AML cells. In this study, we characterized more in detail the leukemia cell phenotype of the chemokine-responsive patients. We investigated primary AML cells derived from 79 unselected patients. Standardized in vitro suspension cultures were used to investigate AML cell proliferation, and global gene expression profiles were compared for chemokine responders and non-responders identified through the proliferation assays. CCL28-induced growth modulation was used as marker of chemokine responsiveness, and 38 patients were then classified as chemokine-responsive. The effects of exogenous CCL28 (growth inhibition/enhancement/no effect) thus differed among patients and was also dependent on the presence of exogenous hematopoietic growth factors as well as constitutive AML cell cytokine release. The effect of CCR1 inhibition in the presence of chemokine-secreting mesenchymal stem cells also differed among patients. Chemokine-responsive AML cells showed altered expression of genes important for (i) epigenetic transcriptional regulation, particularly lysine acetylation; (ii) helicase activity, especially DExD/H RNA helicases; and (iii) angioregulatory proteins important for integrin binding. Thus, chemokine responsiveness is part of a complex AML cell phenotype with regard to

  14. Recent advances in understanding the roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Tetsuo; Futamura, Kyoko; Orihara, Kanami; Emi-Sugie, Maiko; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsuda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic disorders commonly involve both chronic tissue inflammation and remodeling caused by immunological reactions to various antigens on tissue surfaces. Due to their anatomical location, vascular endothelial cells are the final responders to interact with various exogenous factors that come into contact with the epithelial surface, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and antigens. Recent studies have shed light on the important roles of endothelial cells in the development and exacerbation of allergic disorders. For instance, endothelial cells have the greatest potential to produce several key molecules that are deeply involved in allergic inflammation, such as periostin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17). Additionally, endothelial cells were recently shown to be important functional targets for IL-33--an essential regulator of allergic inflammation. Notably, almost all endothelial cell responses and functions involved in allergic inflammation are not suppressed by corticosteroids. These corticosteroid-refractory endothelial cell responses and functions include TNF-α-associated angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, IL-33-mediated responses and periostin and TARC production. Therefore, these unique responses and functions of endothelial cells may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of various allergic disorders, especially their refractory processes. Here, we review recent studies, including ours, which have elucidated previously unknown pathophysiological roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation and discuss the possibility of endothelium-targeted therapy for allergic disorders.

  15. Classification of distinct subtypes of peripheral T-cell lymphoma unspecified, identified by chemokine and chemokine receptor expression: Analysis of prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Koichi; Karube, Kennosuke; Kawano, Riko; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Suzumiya, Junji; Kikuchii, Masahiro

    2004-09-01

    WHO classification for malignant lymphoma was recently proposed. However, PTCL is heterogeneous. Chemokines and its receptors are closely associated with the T-cell subtypes. To clarify the T-cell subtype in PTCL, we conducted DNA chips of chemokine, its receptor (R) and cytokines. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AILD, n=4), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, n=4), adult T-cell leukemia lymphoma (ATLL, n=7), NK-cell lymphoma (NKL, n=2) and PTCL, unspecified (PTCL-U, n=6) were analyzed using DNA chips. In addition, immunological stainings were performed in 280 cases. In DNA chip, AILD, ALCL, NKL and ATLL showed a tendency for respective clusters, otherwise, PTCL-U clustered with AILD, ALCL and ATLL. From the gene expression profiling, CCR4, CCR3, MIG, CXCR3 and BLC were selected for immunohistochemistry. ATLL (n=48) expressed CCR4. ALCL (n=26) expressed CCR3, NKL (n=20) expressed MIG, and AILD (n=29) expressed CXCR3 and/or BLC. From the expression patterns, PTCL-U (n=134) were classified into three groups; CCR4 type (CCR4(+), n=42), CCR3 type (CCR3(+), n=31) and CXCR3 type (CXCR3(+) BLC(+/-), n=54). The prognosis was poor for ATLL, intermediate for AILD and favorable for ALCL (P=0.0014). Among PTCL-U, CCR4 type, CXCR3 type and CCR3 type had prognoses equivalent to ATLL, AILD and ALCL, respectively (P<0.0001).

  16. Chemokine receptor expression on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Talvani, Andre; Rocha, Manoel O C; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2004-01-15

    We evaluated the expression of chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4) on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) and noninfected individuals. Only CCR5 and CXCR4 expression was different on the surface of the subsets (CD4, CD8, and CD14) evaluated. Patients with mild CCC had elevated leukocyte expression of CCR5, compared with noninfected individuals or those with severe disease. CXCR4 expression was lower on leukocytes from patients with severe CCC. The differential expression of both receptors on leukocytes of patients with CCC was consistent and clearly correlated with the degree of heart function such that the lower the heart function, the lower the expression of either CCR5 or CXCR4. These results highlight the possible participation of the chemokine system in early forms of chagasic cardiomyopathy and the relevance of heart failure-induced remodeling in modifying immune parameters in infected individuals.

  17. Analysis of the antimicrobial activities of a chemokine-derived peptide (CDAP-4) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Becerra, Francisco; Dominguez-Ramirez, Lenin; Mendoza-Hernandez, Guillermo; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Soldevila, Gloria . E-mail: garciaze@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-04-06

    Chemokines are key molecules involved in the control of leukocyte trafficking. Recently, a novel function as antimicrobial proteins has been described. CCL13 is the only member of the MCP chemokine subfamily displaying antimicrobial activity. To determine Key residues involved in its antimicrobial activity, CCL13 derived peptides were synthesized and tested against several bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these peptides, corresponding to the C-terminal region of CCL13 (CDAP-4) displayed good antimicrobial activity. Electron microscopy studies revealed remarkable morphological changes after CDAP-4 treatment. By computer modeling, CDAP-4 in {alpha} helical configuration generated a positive electrostatic potential that extended beyond the surface of the molecule. This feature is similar to other antimicrobial peptides. Altogether, these findings indicate that the antimicrobial activity was displayed by CCL13 resides to some extent at the C-terminal region. Furthermore, CDAP-4 could be considered a good antimicrobial candidate with a potential use against pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  18. Targeting chemokine receptors in disease – a case study of CCR4

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Roberto; Pease, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Since their early 1990s, the chemokine receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been the source of much pharmacological endeavour. Best known for their key roles in recruiting leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, the receptors present themselves as plausible drug targets for therapeutic intervention. In this article, we will focus our attention upon CC Chemokine Receptor Four (CCR4) which has been implicated in diseases as diverse as allergic asthma and lymphoma. We will review the discovery of the receptors and their ligands, their perceived roles in disease and the successful targeting of CCR4 by both small molecule antagonists and monoclonal antibodies. We will also discuss future directions and strategies for drug discovery in this field. PMID:25981299

  19. Evasins: Therapeutic Potential of a New Family of Chemokine-Binding Proteins from Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Bonvin, Pauline; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-sucking parasites, such as ticks, remain attached to their hosts for relatively long periods of time in order to obtain their blood meal without eliciting an immune response. One mechanism used to avoid rejection is the inhibition of the recruitment of immune cells, which can be achieved by a class of chemokine-binding proteins (CKBPs) known as Evasins. We have identified three distinct Evasins produced by the salivary glands of the common brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. They display different selectivities for chemokines, the first two identified show a narrow selectivity profile, while the third has a broader binding spectrum. The Evasins showed efficacy in animal models of inflammatory disease. Here, we will discuss the potential of their development for therapeutic use, addressing both the advantages and disadvantages that this entails. PMID:27375615

  20. Upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 is essential for glioma proliferation, invasion and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingchao; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Du, Wenzong; Qin, Zhiyong; Yao, Yu; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2014-01-01

    Human gliomas are characterized by their invasion of normal brain structures irrespective of their grade of malignancy. Tumor cell invasion share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Here we report that the chemokine receptor CCR10 is highly expressed in human glioblastoma compared with control brain tissue. In vitro, signaling through CCL27-CCR10 mediates activation of p-Akt, and subsequently induces proliferation and invasive responses. Cell proliferation and invasion promoted by CCL27 were blocked by inhibition of p-Akt or CCR10. In vivo, down-regulation of CCR10 significantly impairs growth of glioma. Clinically, High CCR10 expression in GBM correlated with p-Akt, shorter overall survival and progression-free survival (P < 0.05). Together, these findings suggest that elevated CCR10 is a critical molecular event associated with gliomagenesis. PMID:25149529

  1. Transferring the C-terminus of the chemokine CCL21 to CCL19 confers enhanced heparin binding.

    PubMed

    Barmore, Austin J; Castex, Sally M; Gouletas, Brittany A; Griffith, Alex J; Metz, Slater W; Muelder, Nicolas G; Populin, Michael J; Sackett, David M; Schuster, Abigail M; Veldkamp, Christopher T

    2016-09-01

    Chemokines direct the migration of cells during various immune processes and are involved in many disease states. For example, CCL19 and CCL21, through activation of the CCR7 receptor, recruit dendritic cells and naïve T-cells to the secondary lymphoid organs aiding in balancing immune response and tolerance. However, CCL19 and CCL21 can also direct the metastasis of CCR7 expressing cancers. Chemokine binding to glycosaminoglycans, such as heparin, is as important to chemokine function as receptor activation. CCL21 is unique in that it contains an extended C-terminus not found in other chemokines like CCL19. Deletion of this extended C-terminus reduces CCL21's affinity for heparin and transferring the CCL21 C-terminus to CCL19 enhances heparin binding mainly through non-specific, electrostatic interactions. PMID:27338641

  2. Monocyte Selectivity and Tissue Localization Suggests a Role for Breast and Kidney–Expressed Chemokine (Brak) in Macrophage Development

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Isabel; Willimann, Katharina; Schaerli, Patrick; Hunziker, Thomas; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Moser, Bernhard

    2001-01-01

    Although numerous chemokines act on monocytes, none of them is specific for these cells. Here, we show that breast and kidney–expressed chemokine (BRAK) is a highly selective monocyte chemoattractant. Migration efficacy and Bordetella pertussis toxin–sensitive Ca2+ mobilization responses to BRAK were strongly enhanced after treatment of monocytes with the cyclic AMP–elevating agents prostaglandin E2 and forskolin. BRAK is the first monocyte-selective chemokine, as other types of blood leukocytes or monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages did not respond. Expression in normal skin keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts as well as lamina propria cells in normal intestinal tissues suggests a homeostatic rather than an inflammatory function for this chemokine. In addition, macrophages were frequently found to colocalize with BRAK-producing fibroblasts. We propose that BRAK is involved in the generation of tissue macrophages by recruiting extravasated precursors to fibroblasts, which are known to secrete essential cytokines for macrophage development. PMID:11561000

  3. CXC Chemokine Receptor 3 Alternative Splice Variants Selectively Activate Different Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Berchiche, Yamina A; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2016-10-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) C-X-C chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is a potential drug target that mediates signaling involved in cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. The CXCR3 primary transcript has three potential alternative splice variants and cell-type specific expression results in receptor variants that are believed to have different functional characteristics. However, the molecular pharmacology of ligand binding to CXCR3 alternative splice variants and their downstream signaling pathways remain poorly explored. To better understand the role of the functional consequences of alternative splicing of CXCR3, we measured signaling in response to four different chemokine ligands (CXCL4, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11) with agonist activity at CXCR3. Both CXCL10 and CXCL11 activated splice variant CXCR3A. Whereas CXCL10 displayed full agonistic activity for Gαi activation and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and partial agonist activity for β-arrestin recruitment, CXCL9 triggered only modest ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CXCL11 induced CXCR3B-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and little ERK phosphorylation. CXCR3Alt signaling was limited to modest ligand-induced receptor internalization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to chemokines CXCL11, CXCL10, and CXCL9. These results show that CXCR3 splice variants activate different signaling pathways and that CXCR3 variant function is not redundant, suggesting a mechanism for tissue specific biased agonism. Our data show an additional layer of complexity for chemokine receptor signaling that might be exploited to target specific CXCR3 splice variants. PMID:27512119

  4. Association of haemolytic uraemic syndrome with dysregulation of chemokine receptor expression in circulating monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Maria Victoria; Ruggieri, Matias; Panek, Analia Cecilia; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Fernandez-Brando, Romina Jimena; Abrey-Recalde, Maria Jimena; Exeni, Andrea; Barilari, Catalina; Exeni, Ramon; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Escherichia coli gastrointestinal infections that are Shiga toxin (Stx) producing. Monocytes contribute to HUS evolution by producing cytokines that sensitize endothelial cells to Stx action and migration to the injured kidney. As CC chemokine receptors (CCRs) are involved in monocyte recruitment to injured tissue, we analysed the contribution of these receptors to the pathogenesis of HUS. We analysed CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 expression in peripheral monocytes from HUS patients during the acute period, with healthy children as controls. We observed an increased expression of CCRs per cell in monocytes from HUS patients, accompanied by an increase in the absolute number of monocytes CCR1+, CCR2+ and CCR5+. It is interesting that prospective analysis confirmed that CCR1 expression positively correlated with HUS severity. The evaluation of chemokine levels in plasma showed that regulated on activation of normal T-cell-expressed and -secreted (RANTES) protein was reduced in plasma from patients with severe HUS, and this decrease correlated with thrombocytopenia. Finally, the expression of the higher CCRs was accompanied by a loss of functionality which could be due to a mechanism for desensitization to compensate for altered receptor expression. The increase in CCR expression correlates with HUS severity, suggesting that the dysregulation of these receptors might contribute to an increased risk of renal damage. Activated monocytes could be recruited by chemokines and then receptors could be dysregulated. The dysregulation of CCRs and their ligands observed during the acute period suggests that a chemokine pathway would participate in HUS development.

  5. Single-Cell Analysis of Mast Cell Degranulation Induced by Airway Smooth Muscle-Secreted Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Gruba, Sarah M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by narrowed airways, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, mucus hyper-secretion, and airway remodeling. Mast cell (MC) infiltration into airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a defining feature of asthma, and ASM regulates the inflammatory response by secreting chemokines, including CXCL10 and CCL5. Single cell analysis offers a unique approach to study specific cellular signaling interactions within large and complex signaling networks such as the inflammatory microenvironment in asthma. Methods Carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry was used to study the effects of ASM–secreted chemokines on mouse peritoneal MC degranulation. Results MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 was monitored at the single cell level. Relative to IgE-mediated degranulation, CXCL10- and CCL5-stimulated MCs released a decreased amount of serotonin per granule with fewer release events per cell. Decreased serotonin released per granule was correlated with increased spike half-width and rise-time values. Conclusions MCs are directly activated with ASM-associated chemokines. CXCL10 and CCL5 induce less robust MC degranulation compared to IgE- and A23187-stimulation. The kinetics of MC degranulation are signaling pathway-dependent, suggesting a biophysical mechanism of regulated degranulation that incorporates control over granule trafficking, transport, and docking machinery. General Significance The biophysical mechanisms, including variations in number of exocytotic release events, serotonin released per granule, and the membrane kinetics of exocytosis that underlie MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 were characterized at the single cell level. These findings clarify the function of ASM-derived chemokines as instigators of MC degranulation relative to classical mechanisms of MC stimulation. PMID:25986989

  6. Female gender attenuates cytokine and chemokine expression and leukocyte recruitment in experimental rodent abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Indranil; Cho, Brenda S; Roelofs, Karen J; Stanley, James C; Henke, Peter K; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2006-11-01

    Female gender appears to be protective in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). This study sought to identify gender differences in cytokine and chemokine expression in an experimental rodent AAA model. Male and female rodent aortas were perfused with either saline (control) or elastase to induce AAA formation. Aortic diameter was determined and aortic tissue was harvested on postperfusion days 4 and 7. Cytokine and chemokine gene expression was examined using focused gene arrays. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify aortic leukocyte infiltration. Data were analyzed by Student's t-tests and ANOVA. Elastase-perfused female rodents developed significantly smaller aneurysms compared to males by day 7 (93 +/- 10% vs. 201 +/- 25%, P = 0.003). Elastase-perfused female aortas exhibited a fivefold decrease in expression of the BMP family and ligands of the TNF superfamily compared to males. In addition, the expression of members of the TGF beta and VEGF families were three to fourfold lower in female elastase-perfused aortas compared to males. Multiple members of the interleukin, CC chemokine receptor, and CC ligand families were detectable in only the male elastase-perfused aortas. Female elastase-perfused aortas demonstrated a corollary twofold lower neutrophil count (females: 17.5 +/- 1.1 PMN/HPF; males: 41 +/- 5.2 neutrophils/HPF, P = 0.01) and a 1.5-fold lower macrophage count (females: 12 +/- 1.1 macrophages/HPF; males: 17.5 +/- 1.1 macrophages/HPF, P = 0.003) compared to male elastase-perfused aortas. This study documents decreased expression of multiple cytokines and chemokines and diminished leukocyte trafficking in female rat aortas compared to male aortas following elastase perfusion. These genes may contribute to the gender disparity seen in AAA formation. PMID:17182958

  7. A Role for the Chemokine Receptor CCR6 in Mammalian Sperm Motility and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Campo, Pedro; Buffone, Mariano G.; Benencia, Fabian; Conejo-García, José R.; Rinaudo, Paolo F.; Gerton, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Although recent evidence indicates that several chemokines and defensins, well-known as inflammatory mediators, are expressed in the male and female reproductive tracts, the location and functional significance of chemokine networks in sperm physiology and sperm reproductive tract interactions are poorly understood. To address this deficiency in our knowledge, we examined the expression and function in sperm of CCR6, a receptor common to several chemoattractant peptides, and screened several reproductive tract fluids for the presence of specific ligands. CCR6 protein is present in mouse and human sperm and mainly localized in the sperm tail with other minor patterns in sperm from mice (neck and acrosomal region) and men (neck and midpiece regions). As expected from the protein immunoblotting and immunofluorescence results, mouse Ccr6 mRNA is expressed in the testis. Furthermore, the Defb29 mRNA encoding the CCR6 ligand, β-defensin DEFB29, is expressed at high levels in the epididymis. As determined by protein chip analysis, several chemokines (including some that act through CCR6, such as CCL20/MIP-3α (formerly Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 3α) and protein hormones were present in human follicular fluid, endometrial secretions, and seminal plasma. In functional chemotaxis assays, capacitated human sperm exhibited a directional movement towards CCL20, and displayed modifications in motility parameters. Our data indicate that chemokine ligand/receptor interactions in the male and female genital tracts promote sperm motility and chemotaxis under non-inflammatory conditions. Therefore, some of the physiological reactions mediated by CCR6 ligands in male reproduction extend beyond a pro-inflammatory response and might find application in clinical reproduction and/or contraception. PMID:23765988

  8. Reduced locomotor activity and exploratory behavior in CC chemokine receptor 4 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ambrée, Oliver; Klassen, Irene; Förster, Irmgard; Arolt, Volker; Scheu, Stefanie; Alferink, Judith

    2016-11-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are key regulators of immune cell trafficking and activation. Recent findings suggest that they may also play pathophysiological roles in psychiatric diseases like depression and anxiety disorders. The CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) and its two ligands, CCL17 and CCL22, are functionally involved in neuroinflammation as well as anti-infectious and autoimmune responses. However, their influence on behavior remains unknown. Here we characterized the functional role of the CCR4-CCL17 chemokine-receptor axis in the modulation of anxiety-related behavior, locomotor activity, and object exploration and recognition. Additionally, we investigated social exploration of CCR4 and CCL17 knockout mice and wild type (WT) controls. CCR4 knockout (CCR4(-/-)) mice exhibited fewer anxiety-related behaviors in the elevated plus-maze, diminished locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, and social exploration, while their recognition memory was not affected. In contrast, CCL17 deficient mice did not show an altered behavior compared to WT mice regarding locomotor activity, anxiety-related behavior, social exploration, and object recognition memory. In the dark-light and object recognition tests, CCL17(-/-) mice even covered longer distances than WT mice. These data demonstrate a mechanistic or developmental role of CCR4 in the regulation of locomotor and exploratory behaviors, whereas the ligand CCL17 appears not to be involved in the behaviors measured here. Thus, either CCL17 and the alternative ligand CCL22 may be redundant, or CCL22 is the main activator of CCR4 in these processes. Taken together, these findings contribute to the growing evidence regarding the involvement of chemokines and their receptors in the regulation of behavior.

  9. CsCCL17, a CC chemokine of Cynoglossus semilaevis, induces leukocyte trafficking and promotes immune defense against viral infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    CC chemokines are the largest subfamily of chemokines, which are important components of the innate immune system. To date, sequences of several CC chemokines have been identified in half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis); however, the activities and functions of these putative chemokines remain unknown. Herein, we characterized a CC chemokine, CsCCL17, from tongue sole, and examined its activity. CsCCL17 contains a 303 bp open reading frame, which encodes a polypeptide of 100 amino acids with a molecular mass of 12 kDa CsCCL17 is phylogenetically related to the CCL17/22 group of CC chemokines and possesses the typical arrangement of four cysteines and an SCCR motif found in known CC chemokines. Under normal physiological conditions, CsCCL17 expression was detected in spleen, liver, heart, gill, head kidney, muscle, brain, and intestine. When the fish were infected by bacterial and viral pathogens, CsCCL17 expression was significantly up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. Chemotactic analysis showed that recombinant CsCCL17 (rCsCCL17) induced migration of peripheral blood leukocytes. A mutagenesis study showed that when the two cysteine residues in the SCCR motif were replaced by serine, no apparent chemotactic activity was observed in the mutant protein rCsCCL17M. rCsCCL17 enhanced the resistance of tongue sole against viral infection, but rCsCCL17M lacked this antiviral effect. Taken together, these findings indicate that CsCCL17 is a functional CC chemokine with the ability to recruit leukocytes and enhance host immune defense in a manner that requires the conserved SCCR motif.

  10. Modulation of chemokine gradients by apheresis redirects leukocyte trafficking to different compartments during sepsis, studies in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prior work suggests that leukocyte trafficking is determined by local chemokine gradients between the nidus of infection and the plasma. We recently demonstrated that therapeutic apheresis can alter immune mediator concentrations in the plasma, protect against organ injury, and improve survival. Here we aimed to determine whether the removal of chemokines from the plasma by apheresis in experimental peritonitis changes chemokine gradients and subsequently enhances leukocyte localization into the infected compartment, and away from healthy tissues. Methods In total, 76 male adult Sprague–Dawley rats weighing 400 g to 600 g were included in this study. Eighteen hours after inducing sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture, we randomized these rats to apheresis or sham treatment for 4 hours. Cytokines, chemokines, and leukocyte counts from blood, peritoneal cavity, and lung were measured. In a separate experiment, we labeled neutrophils from septic donor animals and injected them into either apheresis or sham-treated animals. All numeric data with normal distributions were compared with one-way analysis of variance, and numeric data not normally distributed were compared with the Mann–Whitney U test. Results Apheresis significantly removed plasma cytokines and chemokines, increased peritoneal fluid-to-blood chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1, ligand 2, and C-C motif ligand 2) ratios, and decreased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid-to-blood chemokine ratios, resulting in enhanced leukocyte recruitment into the peritoneal cavity and improved bacterial clearance, but decreased recruitment into the lung. Apheresis also reduced myeloperoxidase activity and histologic injury in the lung, liver, and kidney. These Labeled donor neutrophils exhibited decreased localization in the lung when infused into apheresis-treated animals. Conclusions Our results support the concept of chemokine gradient control of leukocyte trafficking and demonstrate the efficacy of apheresis

  11. Comprehensive analysis of serum cytokines/chemokines in febrile children with primary human herpes virus-6B infection.

    PubMed

    Nagasaka, Miwako; Morioka, Ichiro; Kawabata, Akiko; Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Iwatani, Sota; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Ishida, Akihito; Iijima, Kazumoto; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-09-01

    Cytokines and chemokines induced by primary human herpes virus (HHV)-6B infection may play a critical role in the clinical manifestations of infection. In this study, we analyzed 40 cytokines/chemokines in febrile children with primary HHV-6B infection. Blood samples from 233 febrile and 36 afebrile patients 0-3 years of age were used for this study. In febrile patients, primary HHV-6B infection was determined by detection of HHV-6B DNA without anti-HHV-6 immunoglobulin G in the blood (HHV-6B group). Infection by other pathogens was assumed when HHV-6B DNA was not detected in the blood (non-HHV-6B group). Of the 233 febrile patients, 30 patients (13%) were diagnosed with primary HHV-6B infection. To analyze serum cytokines/chemokines, patients were randomly chosen from the HHV-6B (n = 25) and non-HHV-6B groups (n = 8). Sera from 25 afebrile patients were used as a control. When comparing the levels of 40 cytokines/chemokines between the HHV-6B and control groups, we found that four chemokines (chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand [CXCL] 11, CXCL10, CXCL16, and chemokine [C-C motif] ligand [CCL] 2) were significantly upregulated in the HHV-6B group compared with those in the control. Of these, only CXCL11 levels were significantly higher in the HHV-6B group than in the non-HHV-6B group. Because the induction of CCL2 was already reported in an early study, we found, for the first time, the induction of three new chemokines, i.e., CXCL11, CXCL10, and CXCL16 in patients with primary HHV-6B infection. Importantly, we demonstrated that serum CXCL11 levels increased specifically in patients with HHV-6B infection. PMID:27346377

  12. Interferon-Inducible CXC Chemokines Directly Contribute to Host Defense against Inhalational Anthrax in a Murine Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Burdick, Marie D.; Glomski, Ian J.; Boyer, Anne E.; Barr, John R.; Mehrad, Borna; Strieter, Robert M.; Hughes, Molly A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines have been found to exert direct, defensin-like antimicrobial activity in vitro, suggesting that, in addition to orchestrating cellular accumulation and activation, chemokines may contribute directly to the innate host response against infection. No observations have been made, however, demonstrating direct chemokine-mediated promotion of host defense in vivo. Here, we show that the murine interferon-inducible CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 each exert direct antimicrobial effects in vitro against Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain spores and bacilli including disruptions in spore germination and marked reductions in spore and bacilli viability as assessed using CFU determination and a fluorometric assay of metabolic activity. Similar chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity was also observed against fully virulent Ames strain spores and encapsulated bacilli. Moreover, antibody-mediated neutralization of these CXC chemokines in vivo was found to significantly increase host susceptibility to pulmonary B. anthracis infection in a murine model of inhalational anthrax with disease progression characterized by systemic bacterial dissemination, toxemia, and host death. Neutralization of the shared chemokine receptor CXCR3, responsible for mediating cellular recruitment in response to CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, was not found to increase host susceptibility to inhalational anthrax. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel, receptor-independent antimicrobial role for the interferon-inducible CXC chemokines in pulmonary innate immunity in vivo. These data also support an immunomodulatory approach for effectively treating and/or preventing pulmonary B. anthracis infection, as well as infections caused by pathogenic and potentially, multi-drug resistant bacteria including other spore-forming organisms. PMID:21124994

  13. B Cell, Th17, and Neutrophil Related Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine/Chemokines Are Elevated in MOG Antibody Associated Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kothur, Kavitha; Wienholt, Louise; Tantsis, Esther M; Earl, John; Bandodkar, Sushil; Prelog, Kristina; Tea, Fiona; Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Brilot, Fabienne; Dale, Russell C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG Ab) associated demyelination represents a subgroup of autoimmune demyelination that is separate from multiple sclerosis and aquaporin 4 IgG-positive NMO, and can have a relapsing course. Unlike NMO and MS, there is a paucity of literature on immunopathology and CSF cytokine/chemokines in MOG Ab associated demyelination. Aim To study the differences in immunopathogenesis based on cytokine/chemokine profile in MOG Ab-positive (POS) and -negative (NEG) groups. Methods We measured 34 cytokines/chemokines using multiplex immunoassay in CSF collected from paediatric patients with serum MOG Ab POS [acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM = 8), transverse myelitis (TM = 2) n = 10] and serum MOG Ab NEG (ADEM = 5, TM = 4, n = 9) demyelination. We generated normative data using CSF from 20 non-inflammatory neurological controls. Results The CSF cytokine and chemokine levels were higher in both MOG Ab POS and MOG Ab NEG demyelination groups compared to controls. The CSF in MOG Ab POS patients showed predominant elevation of B cell related cytokines/chemokines (CXCL13, APRIL, BAFF and CCL19) as well as some of Th17 related cytokines (IL-6 AND G-CSF) compared to MOG Ab NEG group (all p<0.01). In addition, patients with elevated CSF MOG antibodies had higher CSF CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, IL-17A and G-CSF than patients without CSF MOG antibodies. Conclusion Our findings suggest that MOG Ab POS patients have a more pronounced CNS inflammatory response with elevation of predominant humoral associated cytokines/chemokines, as well as some Th 17 and neutrophil related cytokines/chemokines suggesting a differential inflammatory pathogenesis associated with MOG antibody seropositivity. This cytokine/chemokine profiling provides new insight into disease pathogenesis, and improves our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment. In addition, some of these molecules may represent potential immunomodulatory targets

  14. Bassoon and piccolo regulate ubiquitination and link presynaptic molecular dynamics with activity-regulated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Daniela; Dirks, Anika; Fejtova, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Release of neurotransmitter is executed by complex multiprotein machinery, which is assembled around the presynaptic cytomatrix at the active zone. One well-established function of this proteinaceous scaffold is the spatial organization of synaptic vesicle cluster, the protein complexes that execute membrane fusion and compensatory endocytosis, and the transmembrane molecules important for alignment of pre- and postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic cytomatrix proteins function also in processes other than the formation of a static frame for assembly of the release apparatus and synaptic vesicle cycling. They actively contribute to the regulation of multiple steps in this process and are themselves an important subject of regulation during neuronal plasticity. We are only beginning to understand the mechanisms and signalling pathways controlling these regulations. They are mainly dependent on posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation and small-molecules conjugation, such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of presynaptic proteins might lead to their degradation by proteasomes, but evidence is growing that this modification also affects their function independently of their degradation. Signalling from presynapse to nucleus, which works on a much slower time scale and more globally, emerged as an important mechanism for persistent usage-dependent and homeostatic neuronal plasticity. Recently, two new functions for the largest presynaptic scaffolding proteins bassoon and piccolo emerged. They were implied (1) in the regulation of specific protein ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated proteolysis that potentially contributes to short-term plasticity at the presynapse and (2) in the coupling of activity-induced molecular rearrangements at the presynapse with reprogramming of expression of neuronal activity-regulated genes.

  15. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Luke A; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s⁻¹ and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s⁻¹ on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle-tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission.

  16. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Luke A.; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s−1 and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s−1 on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle–tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission. PMID:25551151

  17. Analysis of Chemokines and Receptors Expression Profile in the Myelin Mutant Taiep Rat

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rodriguez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Barrios, Juan-Antonio; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Blanco-Alvarez, Victor-Manuel; Eguibar, Jose R.; Ugarte, Araceli; Martinez-Perez, Francisco; Millán-Perez Peña, Lourdes; Pazos-Salazar, Nidia-Gary; Torres-Soto, Maricela; Garcia-Robles, Guadalupe; Tomas-Sanchez, Constantino

    2015-01-01

    Taiep rat has a failure in myelination and remyelination processes leading to a state of hypomyelination throughout its life. Chemokines, which are known to play a role in inflammation, are also involved in the remyelination process. We aimed to demonstrate that remyelination-stimulating factors are altered in the brainstem of 1- and 6-month-old taiep rats. We used a Rat RT2 Profiler PCR Array to assess mRNA expression of 84 genes coding for cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors. We also evaluated protein levels of CCL2, CCR1, CCR2, CCL5, CCR5, CCR8, CXCL1, CXCR2, CXCR4, FGF2, and VEGFA by ELISA. Sprague-Dawley rats were used as a control. PCR Array procedure showed that proinflammatory cytokines were not upregulated in the taiep rat. In contrast, some mRNA levels of beta and alpha chemokines were upregulated in 1-month-old rats, but CXCR4 was downregulated at their 6 months of age. ELISA results showed that CXCL1, CCL2, CCR2, CCR5, CCR8, and CXCR4 protein levels were decreased in brainstem at the age of 6 months. These results suggest the presence of a chronic neuroinflammation process with deficiency of remyelination-stimulating factors (CXCL1, CXCR2, and CXCR4), which might account for the demyelination in the taiep rat. PMID:25883747

  18. Atorvastatin Reduces Plasma Levels of Chemokine (CXCL10) in Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grip, Olof; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2009-01-01

    Background In Crohn's disease high tissue expression and serum levels of chemokines and their receptors are known to correlate with disease activity. Because statins can reduce chemokine expression in patients with coronary diseases, we wanted to test whether this can be achieved in patients with Crohn's disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated plasma levels of chemokines (CCL2, CCL4, CCL11, CCL13, CCL17, CCL22, CCL26, CXCL8, CXCL10) and endothelial cytokines (sP-selectin, sE-selectin, sICAM-3, thrombomodulin) in ten Crohn's disease patients before and after thirteen weeks' daily treatment with 80 mg atorvastatin. Of the 13 substances investigated, only CXCL10 was found to be significantly reduced (by 34%, p = 0.026) in all of the treated patients. Levels of CXCL10 correlated with C-reactive protein (r = 0.82, p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance CXCL10 is a ligand for the CXCR3 receptor, the activation of which results in the recruitment of T lymphocytes and the perpetuation of mucosal inflammation. Hence the reduction of plasma CXCL10 levels by atorvastatin may represent a candidate for an approach to the treatment of Crohns disease in the future. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00454545 PMID:19421322

  19. [The role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Saika, Fumihiro; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kishioka, Shiroh

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is described as a chronic neurological disorder associated with plasticity in the mesolimbic system. Recently, it has been suggested that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the induction of neuronal plasticity and the formation of pathogenesis in chronic neurological disorders. Therefore, we examined the role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), a proinflammatory chemokine, in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine. In mice treated with methamphetamine, CCL2 mRNA was significantly increased in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Moreover, phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase serine40 (pTH Ser40) levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were increased by methamphetamine. Similarly, pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA were also increased by the intracerebroventricular administration of recombinant CCL2. The increment of pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA by methamphetamine was attenuated by RS504393, a selective CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist, indicating that the increased CCL2 activates the brain reward system via CCR2 activation. In the conditioned place preference test, methamphetamine produced place preference in a dose-dependent manner, which was attenuated by RS504393. These results suggest that the activation of the brain reward system via CCL2-CCR2 pathway plays an important role in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine. PMID:26946780

  20. Ionizing radiation increases adhesiveness of human aortic endothelial cells via a chemokine-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran B; Kucik, Dennis F

    2012-05-01

    Exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Since radiation also induces inflammation, a possible mechanism is a change in the adhesiveness of vascular endothelial cells, triggering pro-atherogenic accumulation of leukocytes. To investigate this mechanism at the cellular level, the effect of X rays on adhesiveness of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) was determined. HAECs were grown as monolayers and exposed to 0 to 30 Gy X rays, followed by measurement of adhesiveness under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, HAEC adhesiveness was increased, with a peak effect at 15 Gy. Radiation had no significant effect on surface expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Antibody blockade of the leukocyte integrin receptors for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, however, abolished the radiation-induced adhesiveness. Since these leukocyte integrins can be activated by chemokines presented on the endothelial cell surface, the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of chemokine-mediated integrin activation, was tested. PTX specifically inhibited radiation-induced adhesiveness, with no significant effect on nonirradiated cells. Therefore, radiation induces increased adhesiveness of aortic endothelial cells through chemokine-dependent signaling from endothelial cells to leukocytes, even in the absence of increased expression of the adhesion molecules involved.

  1. Cloning and expression analysis of three novel CC chemokine genes from Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Zou, Gang-gang; Nozaki, Reiko; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2014-10-01

    Chemokines are small cytokines secreted by various cell types. They not only function in cell activation, differentiation and trafficking, but they also have influences on many biological processes. In this study, three novel CC chemokine genes Paol-SCYA105, 106 and 107 in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) were cloned and characterized. Paol-SCYA105 was mainly detected in gill, kidney and spleen, Paol-SCYA106 was detected in all tissues examined and Paol-SCYA107 was mainly detected in the spleen and kidney. Paol-SCYA105 and Paol-SCYA106 gene expressions peaked in kidney at day 3 after viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus infection and decreased at day 6, but Paol-SCYA106 still remained at a high level at day 6. Paol-SCYA107 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in kidney at day 6 after viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus infection. In response to infection by Gram-negative Edwardsiella tarda and Gram-positive Streptococcus iniae in kidney, only Paol-SCYA106 gene expression significantly increased. Together, these results indicate that these three novel CC chemokines are involved in the immune response against pathogen infections.

  2. Effect of interleukin-17 on the expression of chemokines in gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Okui, Takafumi; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2011-10-01

    The role of interleukin (IL)-17 in cellular communication in inflammation has been well described, and a positive correlation between the severity of periodontitis and the level of IL-17 was reported. Although epithelial cells are a major target of IL-17, little is known about the effect of IL-17 on the production of chemokines by human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs). We evaluated the effects of IL-17 on the expression of CXCL8 and CCL2 by HGECs using quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA. In addition, the role of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signalling pathway in the IL-17-mediated expression of chemokines was assessed using a specific inhibitor. Stimulation with IL-17 up-regulated the expression of CXCL8 mRNA but not of CCL2 mRNA in HGECs, whereas tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) elevated the expression of mRNA for both chemokines. Stimulation with IL-17 up-regulated the secretion of CXCL8 protein, but not the secretion of CCL2 protein. The effect of IL-17 on CXCL8 production was suppressed using an anti-IL-17R Ig, suggesting a role for a specific receptor-ligand interaction. Inhibition of the NF-κB signalling pathway demonstrated that NF-κB activation is required for the CXCL8 expression in HGECs. In conclusion, IL-17 is involved in the regulation of the innate immune response in HGECs by inducing CXCL8 production.

  3. Opioid-induced chemokine expression requires NF-κB activity: the role of PKCζ.

    PubMed

    Happel, Christine; Kutzler, Michele; Rogers, Thomas J

    2011-02-01

    Opioid receptor agonists induce broad immunomodulatory activity, which substantially alters host defense and the inflammatory response. Previous studies have shown that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO has the capacity to increase the expression of the proinflammatory chemokines CCL2, CCL5, and CXCL10 in human PBMCs. NF-κB is a transcription factor that plays a pivotal role in innate and adaptive immune responses. We report that NF-κB is a vital player in the DAMGO-induced, MOR-mediated regulation of chemokine expression. Results show that NF-κB inhibitors prevent the induction of CCL2 expression in response to DAMGO administration and that the NF-κB subunit, p65, is phosphorylated at serine residues 311 and 536 in response to MOR activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PKCζ is phosphorylated following DAMGO-induced MOR activation, and this kinase is essential for NF-κB activation as well as CCL2 expression and transcriptional activity. Finally, ChIP analysis shows that DAMGO administration induces binding of p65 to the enhancer region of the CCL2 promoter. These data are consistent with the notion that MOR activation promotes a proinflammatory response, which involves NF-κB activation. Our results also suggest a significant and novel role for PKCζ as an essential participant in the MOR-mediated regulation of proinflammatory chemokine expression.

  4. Application of chemokine receptor antagonist with stents reduces local inflammation and suppresses cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ai-Wu; Jiang, Ting-Hui; Sun, Xian-Jun; Peng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Severe pain and obstructive jaundice resulting from invasive cholangiocarcinoma or pancreatic carcinoma can be alleviated by implantation of biliary and duodenal stents. However, stents may cause local inflammation to have an adverse effect on the patients' condition and survival. So far, no efficient approaches have been applied to prevent the occurrence of stents-related inflammation. Here, we reported significantly higher levels of serum stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) in the patients that developed stents-associated inflammation. A higher number of inflammatory cells have been detected in the cancer close to stent in the patients with high serum SDF-1. Since chemokine plays a pivotal role in the development of inflammation, we implanted an Alzet osmotic pump with the stents to gradually release AMD3100, a specific inhibitor binding of SDF-1 and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), at the site of stents in mice that had developed pancreatic cancer. We found that AMD3100 significantly reduced local inflammation and significantly inhibited cancer cell growth, resulting in improved survival of the mice that bore cancer. Moreover, the suppression of cancer growth may be conducted through modulation of CyclinD1, p21, and p27 in the cancer cells. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of chemokine signaling at the site of stents may substantially improve survival through suppression of stent-related inflammation and tumor growth.

  5. Disulfide Trapping for Modeling and Structure Determination of Receptor:Chemokine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zheng, Yi; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent breakthrough advances in GPCR crystallography, structure determination of protein-protein complexes involving chemokine receptors and their endogenous chemokine ligands remains challenging. Here we describe disulfide trapping, a methodology for generating irreversible covalent binary protein complexes from unbound protein partners by introducing two cysteine residues, one per interaction partner, at selected positions within their interaction interface. Disulfide trapping can serve at least two distinct purposes: (i) stabilization of the complex to assist structural studies, and/or (ii) determination of pairwise residue proximities to guide molecular modeling. Methods for characterization of disulfide-trapped complexes are described and evaluated in terms of throughput, sensitivity, and specificity towards the most energetically favorable cross-links. Due to abundance of native disulfide bonds at receptor:chemokine interfaces, disulfide trapping of their complexes can be associated with intramolecular disulfide shuffling and result in misfolding of the component proteins; because of this, evidence from several experiments is typically needed to firmly establish a positive disulfide crosslink. An optimal pipeline that maximizes throughput and minimizes time and costs by early triage of unsuccessful candidate constructs is proposed. PMID:26921956

  6. Effector CD8^+ T cells migrate via chemokine-enhanced generalized L'evy walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward; Harris, Tajie; Christian, David; Liu, Andrea; Hunter, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Chemokines play a central role in regulating processes essential to the immune function of T cells, such as their migration within lymphoid tissues and targeting of pathogens in sites of inflammation. In order to understand the role of the chemokine CXCL10 during chronic infection by the parasite T. gondii, we analyze tracks of migrating CD8^+ T cells in brain tissue. Surprisingly, we find that T cell motility is not described by a Brownian walk, but instead is consistent with a generalized L'evy walk consisting of L'evy-distributed runs alternating with pauses of L'evy-distributed durations. According to our model, this enables T cells to find rare targets more than an order of magnitude more efficiently than Brownian random walkers. The chemokine CXCL10 increases the migration speed without changing the character of the walk statistics. Thus, CD8^+ T cells use an efficient search strategy to facilitate an effective immune response, and CXCL10 aids them in shortening the average time to find rare targets.

  7. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection. PMID:26711511

  8. Critical roles of chemokine receptor CCR5 in regulating glioblastoma proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lanfu; Wang, Yuan; Xue, Yafei; Lv, Wenhai; Zhang, Yufu; He, Shiming

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor in adults and exhibits a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Tumor cell proliferation and invasion are critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Recent studies have shown that the chemokine CCL5 and its receptor CCR5 play important roles in tumor invasion and metastasis. Nonetheless, the roles of the CCR5 in GBM still remain unclear. The present study provides the evidence that the chemokine receptor CCR5 is highly expressed and associated with poor prognosis in human GBM. Mechanistically, CCL5-CCR5 mediates activation of Akt, and subsequently induces proliferation and invasive responses in U87 and U251 cells. Moreover, down-regulation of CCR5 significantly inhibited the growth of glioma in U87 tumor xenograft mouse model. Finally, high CCR5 expression in GBM is correlated with increased p-Akt expression in patient samples. Together, these findings suggest that the CCR5 is a critical molecular event associated with gliomagenesis.

  9. Methemoglobin-induced signaling and chemokine responses in human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mumby, Sharon; Ramakrishnan, Latha; Evans, Timothy W.; Griffiths, Mark J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is characterized by the presence of red blood cells and free hemoglobin in the alveoli and complicates a number of serious medical and surgical lung conditions including the pulmonary vasculitides and acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this study we investigated the hypothesis that exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells to hemoglobin and its breakdown products regulates chemokine release via iron- and oxidant-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Methemoglobin alone stimulated the release of IL-8 and MCP-1 from A549 cells via activation of the NF-κB pathway; additionally, IL-8 required ERK activation and MCP-1 required JNK activation. Neither antioxidants nor iron chelators and knockdown of ferritin heavy and light chains affected these responses, indicating that iron and reactive oxygen species are not involved in the response of alveolar epithelial cells to methemoglobin. Incubation of primary cultures of human alveolar type 2 cells with methemoglobin resulted in a similar pattern of chemokine release and signaling pathway activation. In summary, we have shown for the first time that methemoglobin induced chemokine release from human lung epithelial cells independent of iron- and redox-mediated signaling involving the activation of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Decompartmentalization of hemoglobin may be a significant proinflammatory stimulus in a variety of lung diseases. PMID:24142518

  10. The Chemokine MIP-1α/CCL3 impairs mouse hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and memory

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Elodie; Faivre, Emilie; Dutar, Patrick; Alves Pires, Claire; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Laloux, Charlotte; Buée, Luc; Blum, David; Humez, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are signaling molecules playing an important role in immune regulations. They are also thought to regulate brain development, neurogenesis and neuroendocrine functions. While chemokine upsurge has been associated with conditions characterized with cognitive impairments, their ability to modulate synaptic plasticity remains ill-defined. In the present study, we specifically evaluated the effects of MIP1-α/CCL3 towards hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and spatial memory. We found that CCL3 (50 ng/ml) significantly reduced basal synaptic transmission at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse without affecting NMDAR-mediated field potentials. This effect was ascribed to post-synaptic regulations, as CCL3 did not impact paired-pulse facilitation. While CCL3 did not modulate long-term depression (LTD), it significantly impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), an effect abolished by Maraviroc, a CCR5 specific antagonist. In addition, sub-chronic intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of CCL3 also impair LTP. In accordance with these electrophysiological findings, we demonstrated that the icv injection of CCL3 in mouse significantly impaired spatial memory abilities and long-term memory measured using the two-step Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks. These effects of CCL3 on memory were inhibited by Maraviroc. Altogether, these data suggest that the chemokine CCL3 is an hippocampal neuromodulator able to regulate synaptic plasticity mechanisms involved in learning and memory functions. PMID:26511387

  11. Maternal hematopoietic TNF, via milk chemokines, programs hippocampal development and memory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingfang; Zupan, Bojana; Laird, Emma; Klein, Shifra; Gleason, Georgia; Bozinoski, Marjan; Gal Toth, Judit; Toth, Miklos

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine with established roles in host defense and immune system organogenesis. We studied TNF function and found a previously unidentified physiological function that extends its effect beyond the host into the developing offspring. A partial or complete maternal TNF deficit, specifically in hematopoietic cells, resulted in reduced milk levels of the chemokines IP-10, MCP-1, MCP-3, MCP-5 and MIP-1β, which in turn augmented offspring postnatal hippocampal proliferation, leading to improved adult spatial memory in mice. These effects were reproduced by the postpartum administration of a clinically used anti-TNF agent. Chemokines, fed to suckling pups of TNF-deficient mothers, restored both postnatal proliferation and spatial memory to normal levels. Our results identify a TNF-dependent 'lactrocrine' pathway that programs offspring hippocampal development and memory. The level of ambient TNF is known to be downregulated by physical activity, exercise and adaptive stress. We propose that the maternal TNF-milk chemokine pathway evolved to promote offspring adaptation to post-weaning environmental challenges and competition.

  12. Regulation of Motor Function and Behavior by Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Erich H.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Lionakis, Michail S.; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Holmes, Gibran; Diaz, Vivian; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Peiper, Stephen C.; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1), previously known as the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines, stands out among chemokine receptors for its high selective expression on Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, consistent with the ability of ACKR1 ligands to activate Purkinje cells in vitro. Nevertheless, evidence for ACKR1 regulation of brain function in vivo has been lacking. Here we demonstrate that Ackr1−/− mice have markedly impaired balance and ataxia when placed on a rotating rod and increased tremor when injected with harmaline, a drug that induces whole-body tremor by activating Purkinje cells. Ackr1−/− mice also exhibited impaired exploratory behavior, increased anxiety-like behavior and frequent episodes of marked hypoactivity under low-stress conditions. The behavioral phenotype of Ackr1−/− mice was the opposite of the phenotype occurring in mice with cerebellar degeneration and the defects persisted when Ackr1 was deficient only on non-hematopoietic cells. We conclude that normal motor function and behavior depend in part on negative regulation of Purkinje cell activity by Ackr1. PMID:24997773

  13. T regulatory cell chemokine production mediates pathogenic T cell attraction and suppression.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Scott J; Pesenacker, Anne M; Wang, Adele Y; Gillies, Jana; Mojibian, Majid; Morishita, Kim; Tan, Rusung; Kieffer, Timothy J; Verchere, C Bruce; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Levings, Megan K

    2016-03-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) control immune homeostasis by preventing inappropriate responses to self and nonharmful foreign antigens. Tregs use multiple mechanisms to control immune responses, all of which require these cells to be near their targets of suppression; however, it is not known how Treg-to-target proximity is controlled. Here, we found that Tregs attract CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by producing chemokines. Specifically, Tregs produced both CCL3 and CCL4 in response to stimulation, and production of these chemokines was critical for migration of target T cells, as Tregs from Ccl3-/- mice, which are also deficient for CCL4 production, did not promote migration. Moreover, CCR5 expression by target T cells was required for migration of these cells to supernatants conditioned by Tregs. Tregs deficient for expression of CCL3 and CCL4 were impaired in their ability to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or islet allograft rejection in murine models. Moreover, Tregs from subjects with established type 1 diabetes were impaired in their ability to produce CCL3 and CCL4. Together, these results demonstrate a previously unappreciated facet of Treg function and suggest that chemokine secretion by Tregs is a fundamental aspect of their therapeutic effect in autoimmunity and transplantation. PMID:26854929

  14. [The role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Saika, Fumihiro; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kishioka, Shiroh

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is described as a chronic neurological disorder associated with plasticity in the mesolimbic system. Recently, it has been suggested that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the induction of neuronal plasticity and the formation of pathogenesis in chronic neurological disorders. Therefore, we examined the role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), a proinflammatory chemokine, in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine. In mice treated with methamphetamine, CCL2 mRNA was significantly increased in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Moreover, phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase serine40 (pTH Ser40) levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were increased by methamphetamine. Similarly, pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA were also increased by the intracerebroventricular administration of recombinant CCL2. The increment of pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA by methamphetamine was attenuated by RS504393, a selective CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist, indicating that the increased CCL2 activates the brain reward system via CCR2 activation. In the conditioned place preference test, methamphetamine produced place preference in a dose-dependent manner, which was attenuated by RS504393. These results suggest that the activation of the brain reward system via CCL2-CCR2 pathway plays an important role in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine.

  15. Angiogenic CXC chemokine expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, D S; Zhu, J H; Makhijani, N S; Kumar, A; Yamaguchi, D T

    2008-02-15

    The potential role of ELR(+) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Inflammation, which occurs in the initial phase of tissue healing in general, is critical to bone repair. Release of cytokines from infiltrating immune cells and injured bone can lead to recruitment of MSCs to the region of repair. CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif are also released by inflammatory cells and serve as angiogenic factors stimulating chemotaxis and proliferation of endothelial cells. hMSCs, induced to differentiate with osteogenic medium (OGM) containing ascorbate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), and dexamethasone (DEX), showed an increase in mRNA and protein secretion of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL1. CXCL8 mRNA half-life studies reveal an increase in mRNA stability upon OGM stimulation. Increased expression and secretion is a result of DEX in OGM and is dose-dependent. Inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone only partially inhibits DEX-stimulated CXCL8 expression indicating both glucocorticoid receptor dependent and independent pathways. Treatment with signal transduction inhibitors demonstrate that this expression is due to activation of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and is mediated through the G(alphai)-coupled receptors. Angiogenesis assays demonstrate that OGM-stimulated conditioned media containing secreted CXCL8 and CXCL1 can induce angiogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells in an in vitro Matrigel assay.

  16. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection.

  17. Protective antibody therapy is associated with reduced chemokine transcripts in herpes simplex virus type 1 corneal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Su, Y H; Yan, X T; Oakes, J E; Lausch, R N

    1996-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection on the murine cornea induces an intense inflammatory response which can lead to blindness. This disease, known as herpes stromal keratitis, can be prevented by the timely passive transfer of monoclonal antibody specific for viral glycoprotein D (gD). Precisely how antibody treatment prevents excessive corneal inflammation is not known. In this study we investigated whether chemokine mRNA expression is inhibited by antibody treatment. Total cellular RNAs isolated from normal corneas and at various times after virus infection were analyzed via reverse transcription-PCR for mRNA coding for seven different chemokines. Constitutive levels of IP-10, KC, MIP-2, MCP-1, MIP-1 beta, and RANTES mRNA were detected in uninfected corneas of BALB/c mice. When the cornea was mechanically traumatized, message for all six chemokines was transiently elevated above constitutive levels. In contrast, HSV-1 infection resulted in prolonged enhanced chemokine message expression. The kinetics of mRNA accumulation was distinctive for each chemokine analyzed. MIP-1 alpha message, not detected constitutively, was not evident until day 7 postinfection. Administration of anti-HSV gD monoclonal antibody 1 day after infection was associated with reduced message for MIP-2, MCP-1, MIP-1 alpha, and MIP-1 beta. IP-10, KC, and RANTES messages were not altered. Collectively, our results suggest that anti-gD treatment may protect, at least in part, by inhibiting production of chemokines believed to promote inflammation. PMID:8551595

  18. The {beta}-chemokines CCL2 and CCL7 are two novel differentiation factors for midbrain dopaminergic precursors and neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Edman, Linda C.; Mira, Helena; Arenas, Ernest

    2008-06-10

    {beta}-chemokines are secreted factors that regulate diverse functions in the adult brain, such as neuro-immune responses and neurotransmission, but their function in the developing brain is largely unknown. We recently found that the orphan nuclear receptor, Nurr1, up regulates CCL2 and CCL7 in neural stem cells, suggesting a possible function of {beta}-chemokines in midbrain development. Here we report that two {beta}-chemokines, CCL2 and CCL7, and two of their receptors, CCR1 and CCR2, are expressed and developmentally regulated in the ventral midbrain (VM). Moreover, we found that the expression of CCL7 was down regulated in the Nurr1 knockout mice, linking CCL7 to dopamine (DA) neuron development. When the function of CCL2 and CCL7 was examined, we found that they selectively enhanced the differentiation of Nurr1+ precursors into DA neurons, but not their survival or progenitor proliferation in primary precursor cultures. Moreover, both CCL2 and CCL7 promoted neuritogenesis in midbrain DA neuron cultures. Thus, our results show for the first time a function of {beta}-chemokines in the developing brain and identify {beta}-chemokines as novel class of pro-differentiation factors for midbrain DA neurons. These data also suggest that {beta}-chemokines may become useful tools to enhance the differentiation of DA cell preparations for cell replacement therapy and drug discovery in Parkinson's disease (PD)

  19. Increased expression of the inflammatory chemokine CXC chemokine ligand 9/monokine induced by interferon-gamma in lymphoid tissues of rhesus macaques during simian immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Todd A; Fallert, Beth A; Pfeifer, Melanie E; Sanghavi, Sonali; Capuano, Saverio; Rajakumar, Premeela; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Day, Richard; Fuller, Craig L; Schaefer, Todd M

    2002-05-01

    Chemokines are important mediators of cell trafficking during immune inductive and effector activities, and dysregulation of their expression might contribute to the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and the related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). To understand better the effects of SIV infection on lymphoid tissues in rhesus macaques, we examined chemokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns by using DNA filter array hybridization. Of the 34 chemokines examined, the interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducible chemokine CXC chemokine ligand 9/monokine induced by interferon-gamma (CXCL9/Mig) was one of the most highly up-regulated chemokines in rhesus macaque spleen tissue early after infection with pathogenic SIV. The relative levels of expression of CXCL9/Mig mRNA in spleen and lymph nodes were significantly increased after infection with SIV in both quantitative image capture and analysis and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays. In addition, in situ hybridization for CXCL9/Mig mRNA revealed that the patterns of expression were altered after SIV infection. Associated with the increased expression of CXCL9/Mig were increased numbers of IFN-gamma mRNA-positive cells in tissues and reduced percentages of CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR) 3(+)/CD3(+) and CXCR3(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes in peripheral blood. We propose that SIV replication in vivo initiates IFN-gamma-driven positive-feedback loops in lymphoid tissues that disrupt the trafficking of effector T lymphocytes and lead to chronic local inflammation, thereby contributing to immunopathogenesis.

  20. Isolation and characterization of Exodus-2, a novel C-C chemokine with a unique 37-amino acid carboxyl-terminal extension.

    PubMed

    Hromas, R; Kim, C H; Klemsz, M; Krathwohl, M; Fife, K; Cooper, S; Schnizlein-Bick, C; Broxmeyer, H E

    1997-09-15

    Chemokines are a group of small, homologous proteins that regulate leukocyte migration, hemopoiesis, and HIV-1 absorption. We report here the cloning and characterization of a novel murine and human C-C chemokine termed Exodus-2 for its similarity to Exodus-1/MIP-3alpha/LARC, and its chemotactic ability. This novel chemokine has a unique 36 or 37 (murine and human, respectively) amino acid carboxyl-terminal extension not seen in any other chemokine family member. Purified recombinant Exodus-2 was found to have two activities classically associated with chemokines: inhibiting hemopoiesis and stimulating chemotaxis. However, Exodus-2 also had unusual characteristics for C-C chemokines. It selectively stimulated the chemotaxis of T-lymphocytes and was preferentially expressed in lymph node tissue. The combination of these characteristics may be a functional correlate for the unique carboxyl-terminal structure of Exodus-2.

  1. Doxycycline and Benznidazole Reduce the Profile of Th1, Th2, and Th17 Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Cardiac Tissue from Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Dogs

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Costa, Guilherme; Lopes, Laís Roquete; Horta, Aline Luciano; Pontes, Washington Martins; Milanezi, Cristiane M.; Guedes, Paulo Marcos da Mata; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Schulz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines (CKs) and chemokine receptors (CKR) promote leukocyte recruitment into cardiac tissue infected by the Trypanosoma cruzi. This study investigated the long-term treatment with subantimicrobial doses of doxycycline (Dox) in association, or not, with benznidazole (Bz) on the expression of CK and CKR in cardiac tissue. Thirty mongrel dogs were infected, or not, with the Berenice-78 strain of T. cruzi and grouped according their treatments: (i) two months after infection, Dox (50 mg/kg) 2x/day for 12 months; (ii) nine months after infection, Bz (3,5 mg/kg) 2x/day for 60 days; (iii) Dox + Bz; and (iv) vehicle. After 14 months of infection, hearts were excised and processed for qPCR analysis of Th1 (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL11), Th2 (CCL1, CCL17, CCL24, and CCL26), Th17 (CCL20) CKs, Th1 (CCR5, CCR6, and CXCR3), and Th2/Th17 (CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8) CKR, as well as IL-17. T. cruzi infection increases CCL1, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CCL17, CXCL10, and CCR5 expression in the heart. Dox, Bz, or Dox + Bz treatments cause a reversal of CK and CKR and reduce the expression of CCL20, IL-17, CCR6, and CXCR3. Our data reveal an immune modulatory effect of Dox with Bz, during the chronic phase of infection suggesting a promising therapy for cardiac protection. PMID:27688600

  2. Doxycycline and Benznidazole Reduce the Profile of Th1, Th2, and Th17 Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Cardiac Tissue from Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Dogs

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Costa, Guilherme; Lopes, Laís Roquete; Horta, Aline Luciano; Pontes, Washington Martins; Milanezi, Cristiane M.; Guedes, Paulo Marcos da Mata; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Schulz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines (CKs) and chemokine receptors (CKR) promote leukocyte recruitment into cardiac tissue infected by the Trypanosoma cruzi. This study investigated the long-term treatment with subantimicrobial doses of doxycycline (Dox) in association, or not, with benznidazole (Bz) on the expression of CK and CKR in cardiac tissue. Thirty mongrel dogs were infected, or not, with the Berenice-78 strain of T. cruzi and grouped according their treatments: (i) two months after infection, Dox (50 mg/kg) 2x/day for 12 months; (ii) nine months after infection, Bz (3,5 mg/kg) 2x/day for 60 days; (iii) Dox + Bz; and (iv) vehicle. After 14 months of infection, hearts were excised and processed for qPCR analysis of Th1 (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL11), Th2 (CCL1, CCL17, CCL24, and CCL26), Th17 (CCL20) CKs, Th1 (CCR5, CCR6, and CXCR3), and Th2/Th17 (CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8) CKR, as well as IL-17. T. cruzi infection increases CCL1, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CCL17, CXCL10, and CCR5 expression in the heart. Dox, Bz, or Dox + Bz treatments cause a reversal of CK and CKR and reduce the expression of CCL20, IL-17, CCR6, and CXCR3. Our data reveal an immune modulatory effect of Dox with Bz, during the chronic phase of infection suggesting a promising therapy for cardiac protection.

  3. Serum amyloid A chemoattracts immature dendritic cells and indirectly provokes monocyte chemotaxis by induction of cooperating CC and CXC chemokines.

    PubMed

    Gouwy, Mieke; De Buck, Mieke; Pörtner, Noëmie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Proost, Paul; Struyf, Sofie; Van Damme, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase protein that is upregulated in inflammatory diseases and chemoattracts monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes via its G protein-coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor like 1/formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPRL1/FPR2). Here, we demonstrated that the SAA1α isoform also chemoattracts monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (DCs) in the Boyden and μ-slide chemotaxis assay and that its chemotactic activity for monocytes and DCs was indirectly mediated via rapid chemokine induction. Indeed, SAA1 induced significant amounts (≥5 ng/mL) of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/CC chemokine ligand 3 (MIP-1α/CCL3) and interleukin-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 (IL-8/CXCL8) in monocytes and DCs in a dose-dependent manner within 3 h. However, SAA1 also directly activated monocytes and DCs for signaling and chemotaxis without chemokine interference. SAA1-induced monocyte migration was nevertheless significantly prevented (60-80% inhibition) in the constant presence of desensitizing exogenous MIP-1α/CCL3, neutralizing anti-MIP-1α/CCL3 antibody, or a combination of CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) and CCR5 antagonists, indicating that this endogenously produced CC chemokine was indirectly contributing to SAA1-mediated chemotaxis. Further, anti-IL-8/CXCL8 antibody neutralized SAA1-induced monocyte migration, suggesting that endogenous IL-8/CXCL8 acted in concert with MIP-1α/CCL3. This explained why SAA1 failed to synergize with exogenously added MIP-1α/CCL3 or stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)/CXCL12 in monocyte and DC chemotaxis. In addition to direct leukocyte activation, SAA1 induces a chemotactic cascade mediated by expression of cooperating chemokines to prolong leukocyte recruitment to the inflammatory site.

  4. Activating Transcription Factor 3-mediated Chemo-intervention with Cancer Chemokines in a Noncanonical Pathway under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun; Park, Jiyeon; Oh, Chang Gyu; Choi, Hye Jin; Song, Bo Gyoung; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yong Sik; Moon, Yuseok

    2014-01-01

    The cell-protective features of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response are chronically activated in vigorously growing malignant tumor cells, which provide cellular growth advantages over the adverse microenvironment including chemotherapy. As an intervention with ER stress responses in the intestinal cancer cells, preventive exposure to flavone apigenin potentiated superinduction of a regulatory transcription factor, activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), which is also known to be an integral player coordinating ER stress response-related gene expression. ATF3 superinduction was due to increased turnover of ATF3 transcript via stabilization with HuR protein in the cancer cells under ER stress. Moreover, enhanced ATF3 caused inhibitory action against ER stress-induced cancer chemokines that are potent mediators determining the survival and metastatic potential of epithelial cancer cells. Although enhanced ATF3 was a negative regulator of the well known proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB, blocking of NF-κB signaling did not affect ER stress-induced chemokine expression. Instead, immediately expressed transcription factor early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1) was positively involved in cancer chemokine induction by ER stressors. ER stress-induced EGR-1 and subsequent chemokine production were repressed by ATF3. Mechanistically, ATF3 directly interacted with and recruited HDAC1 protein, which led to epigenetic suppression of EGR-1 expression and subsequent chemokine production. Conclusively, superinduced ATF3 attenuated ER stress-induced cancer chemokine expression by epigenetically interfering with induction of EGR-1, a transcriptional modulator crucial to cancer chemokine production. Thus, these results suggest a potent therapeutic intervention of ER stress response-related cancer-favoring events by ATF3. PMID:25122760

  5. Activating transcription factor 3-mediated chemo-intervention with cancer chemokines in a noncanonical pathway under endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun; Park, Jiyeon; Oh, Chang Gyu; Choi, Hye Jin; Song, Bo Gyoung; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yong Sik; Moon, Yuseok

    2014-09-26

    The cell-protective features of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response are chronically activated in vigorously growing malignant tumor cells, which provide cellular growth advantages over the adverse microenvironment including chemotherapy. As an intervention with ER stress responses in the intestinal cancer cells, preventive exposure to flavone apigenin potentiated superinduction of a regulatory transcription factor, activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), which is also known to be an integral player coordinating ER stress response-related gene expression. ATF3 superinduction was due to increased turnover of ATF3 transcript via stabilization with HuR protein in the cancer cells under ER stress. Moreover, enhanced ATF3 caused inhibitory action against ER stress-induced cancer chemokines that are potent mediators determining the survival and metastatic potential of epithelial cancer cells. Although enhanced ATF3 was a negative regulator of the well known proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB, blocking of NF-κB signaling did not affect ER stress-induced chemokine expression. Instead, immediately expressed transcription factor early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1) was positively involved in cancer chemokine induction by ER stressors. ER stress-induced EGR-1 and subsequent chemokine production were repressed by ATF3. Mechanistically, ATF3 directly interacted with and recruited HDAC1 protein, which led to epigenetic suppression of EGR-1 expression and subsequent chemokine production. Conclusively, superinduced ATF3 attenuated ER stress-induced cancer chemokine expression by epigenetically interfering with induction of EGR-1, a transcriptional modulator crucial to cancer chemokine production. Thus, these results suggest a potent therapeutic intervention of ER stress response-related cancer-favoring events by ATF3.

  6. Soluble M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 expressed in Escherichia coli: analysis of chemokine-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Matúšková, R; Pančík, P; Štibrániová, I; Belvončíková, P; Režuchová, I; Kúdelová, M

    2015-12-01

    M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) was identified as a viral chemokine-binding protein 3 (vCKBP-3) capable to bind a broad spectrum of chemokines and their receptors. During both acute and latent infection MHV-68 M3 protein provides a selective advantage for the virus by inhibiting the antiviral and inflammatory response. A unique mutation Asp307Gly was identified in the M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 72 (MHV-72), localized near chemokine-binding domain. Study on chemokine-binding properties of MHV-72 M3 protein purified from medium of infected cells implied reduced binding to some chemokines when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. It was suggested that the mutation in the M3 protein might be involved in the attenuation of immune response to infection with MHV-72. Recently, Escherichia coli cells were used to prepare native recombinant M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 (Pančík et al., 2013). In this study, we assessed the chemokine-binding properties of three M3 proteins prepared in E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 (DE3) cells, the full length M3 protein of both MHV-68 and MHV-72 and MHV-68 M3 protein truncated in the signal sequence (the first 24 aa). They all displayed binding activity to human chemokines CCL5 (RANTES), CXCL8 (IL-8), and CCL3 (MIP-1α). The truncated MHV-68 M3 protein had more than twenty times reduced binding activity to CCL5, but only about five and three times reduced binding to CXCL8 and CCL3 when compared to its full length counterpart. Binding of the full length MHV-72 M3 protein to all chemokines was reduced when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. Its binding to CCL5 and CCL3 was reduced over ten and seven times. However, its binding to CXCL8 was only slightly reduced (64.8 vs 91.8%). These data implied the significance of the signal sequence and also of a single mutation (at aa 307) for efficient M3 protein binding to some chemokines.

  7. Activation of prostaglandin E2-EP4 signaling reduces chemokine production in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Tang, Eva H C; Cai, Yin; Wong, Chi Kin; Rocha, Viviane Z; Sukhova, Galina K; Shimizu, Koichi; Xuan, Ge; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Libby, Peter; Xu, Aimin

    2015-02-01

    Inflammation of adipose tissue induces metabolic derangements associated with obesity. Thus, determining ways to control or inhibit inflammation in adipose tissue is of clinical interest. The present study tested the hypothesis that in mouse adipose tissue, endogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) negatively regulates inflammation via activation of prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4). PGE2 (5-500 nM) attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced mRNA and protein expression of chemokines, including interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 and macrophage-inflammatory protein-1α in mouse adipose tissue. A selective EP4 antagonist (L161,982) reversed, and two structurally different selective EP4 agonists [CAY10580 and CAY10598] mimicked these actions of PGE2. Adipose tissue derived from EP4-deficient mice did not display this response. These findings establish the involvement of EP4 receptors in this anti-inflammatory response. Experiments performed on adipose tissue from high-fat-fed mice demonstrated EP4-dependent attenuation of chemokine production during diet-induced obesity. The anti-inflammatory actions of EP4 became more important on a high-fat diet, in that EP4 activation suppressed a greater variety of chemokines. Furthermore, adipose tissue and systemic inflammation was enhanced in high-fat-fed EP4-deficient mice compared with wild-type littermates, and in high-fat-fed untreated C57BL/6 mice compared with mice treated with EP4 agonist. These findings provide in vivo evidence that PGE2-EP4 signaling limits inflammation. In conclusion, PGE2, via activation of EP4 receptors, functions as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator in mouse adipose tissue, and targeting EP4 may mitigate adipose tissue inflammation.

  8. Antimycotics suppress the Malassezia extract-induced production of CXC chemokine ligand 10 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hau, Carren S; Kanda, Naoko; Makimura, Koichi; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2014-02-01

    Malassezia, a lipophilic yeast, exacerbates atopic dermatitis. Malassezia products can penetrate the disintegrated stratum corneum and encounter subcorneal keratinocytes in the skin of atopic dermatitis patients. Type 1 helper T (Th1) cells infiltrate chronic lesions with atopic dermatitis, and antimycotic agents improve its symptoms. We aimed to identify Malassezia-induced chemokines in keratinocytes and examine whether antimycotics suppressed this induction. Normal human keratinocytes were incubated with a Malassezia restricta extract and antimycotics. Chemokine expression was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 activity was examined by luciferase assays. The tyrosine-phosphorylation of STAT1 was analyzed by western blotting. The M. restricta extract increased the mRNA and protein expression of Th1-attracting CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)10 and STAT1 activity and phosphorylation in keratinocytes, which was suppressed by a Janus kinase inhibitor. The antimycotics itraconazole, ketoconazole, luliconazole, terbinafine, butenafine and amorolfine suppressed M. restricta extract-induced CXCL10 mRNA and protein expression and STAT1 activity and phosphorylation. These effects were similarly induced by 15-deoxy-Δ-(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ), a prostaglandin D2 metabolite. Antimycotics increased the release of 15d-PGJ2 from keratinocytes. The antimycotic-induced suppression of CXCL10 production and STAT1 activity was counteracted by a lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase inhibitor. The antimycotics itraconazole, ketoconazole, luliconazole, terbinafine, butenafine and amorolfine may suppress the M. restricta-induced production of CXCL10 by inhibiting STAT1 through an increase in 15d-PGJ2 production in keratinocytes. These antimycotics may block the Th1-mediated inflammation triggered by Malassezia in the chronic phase of atopic dermatitis. PMID

  9. Modulation of chemokines in the tumor microenvironment enhances oncolytic virotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuqiang; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Urban, Julie A.; Sathaiah, Magesh; Magge, Deepa; Kalinski, Pawel; Bartlett, David L.

    2016-01-01

    An oncolytic poxvirus such as vvDD-CXCL11 can generate potent systemic antitumor immunity as well as targeted oncolysis, yet the antitumor effect is limited probably due to limited homing to and suppressed activity of tumor-specific adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME). We reasoned that a chemokine modulating (CKM) drug cocktail, consisting of IFN-α, poly I:C, and a COX-2 inhibitor, may skew the chemokine (CK) and cytokine profile into a favorable one in the TME, and this pharmaceutical modulation would enhance both the trafficking into and function of antitumor immune cells in the TME, thus increasing therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic virus. In this study we show for the first time in vivo that the CKM modulates the CK microenvironment but it does not modulate antitumor immunity by itself in a MC38 colon cancer model. Sequential treatment with the virus and then CKM results in the upregulation of Th1-attracting CKs and reduction of Treg-attracting CKs (CCL22 and CXCL12), concurrent with enhanced trafficking of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells and NK cells into the TME, thus resulting in the most significant antitumor activity and long term survival of tumor-bearing mice. This novel combined regimen, with the oncolytic virus (vvDD-CXCL11) inducing direct oncolysis and eliciting potent antitumor immunity, and the CKM inducing a favorable chemokine profile in the TME that promotes the trafficking and function of antitumor Tc1/Th1 and NK cells, may have great utility for oncolytic immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:26956047

  10. Pancreatic cancer cell migration and metastasis is regulated by chemokine-biased agonism and bioenergetic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ishan; McAllister, Donna M.; Gorse, Egal; Dixon, Kate; Piper, Clinton T.; Zimmerman, Noah P.; Getschman, Anthony E.; Tsai, Susan; Engle, Dannielle D.; Evans, Douglas B.; Volkman, Brian F.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Dwinell, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) invariably succumb to metastatic disease, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate PDAC cell movement and metastasis remain little understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of the chemokine gene CXCL12, which is silenced in PDAC tumors yet is sufficient to suppress growth and metastasis when re-expressed. Chemokines like CXCL12 regulate cell movement in a biphasic pattern, with peak migration typically in the low nanomolar concentration range. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the biphasic cell migration pattern induced by CXCL12 reflected a bias of agonist bioenergetic signaling that might be exploited to interfere with PDAC metastasis. In human and murine PDAC cell models, we observed that non-migratory doses of CXCL12 were sufficient to decrease oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic capacity and to increase levels of phosphorylated forms of the master metabolic kinase AMPK. Those same doses of CXCL12 locked myosin light chain into a phosphorylated state, thereby decreasing F-actin polymerization and preventing cell migration in a manner dependent upon AMPK and the calcium-dependent kinase CAMKII. Notably, at elevated concentrations of CXCL12 that were insufficient to trigger chemotaxis of PDAC cells, AMPK blockade resulted in increased cell movement. In two preclinical mouse models of PDAC, administration of CXCL12 decreased tumor dissemination, supporting our hypothesis that chemokine-biased agonist signaling may offer a useful therapeutic strategy. Our results offer a mechanistic rationale for further investigation of CXCL12 as a potential therapy to prevent or treat PDAC metastasis. PMID:26330165

  11. Adaptive Gene Loss? Tracing Back the Pseudogenization of the Rabbit CCL8 Chemokine.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, Wessel; Magalhaes, Maria João; de Matos, Ana Lemos; Abrantes, Joana; Yamada, Fumio; Esteves, Pedro J

    2016-08-01

    Studies of the process of pseudogenization have widened our understanding of adaptive evolutionary change. In Rabbit, an alteration at the second extra-cellular loop of the CCR5 chemokine receptor was found to be associated with the pseudogenization of one of its prime ligands, the chemokine CCL8. This relationship has raised questions about the existence of a causal link between both events, which would imply adaptive gene loss. This hypothesis is evaluated here by tracing back the history of the genetic modifications underlying the chemokine pseudogenization. The obtained data indicate that mutations at receptor and ligand genes occurred after the lineage split of New World Leporids versus Old World Leporids and prior to the generic split of the of Old World species studied, which occurred an estimated 8-9 million years ago. More important, they revealed the emergence, before this zoographical split, of a "slippery" nucleotide motif (CCCCGGG) at the 3' region of CCL8-exon2. Such motives are liable of generating +1G or -1G frameshifts, which could, however, be overcome by "translesion" synthesis or somatic reversion. The CCL8 pseudogenization in the Old World lineage was apparently initiated by three synapomorphic point mutations at the exon2-intron2 boundary which provide at short range premature terminating codons, independently of the reading frame imposed by the slippery motif. The presence of this motif in New World Leporids might allow verifying this scenario. The importance of CCL8-CCR5 signaling in parasite-host interaction would suggest that the CCL8 knock-out in Old World populations might be related to changes in pathogenic environment.

  12. Metal complexes of pyridine-fused macrocyclic polyamines targeting the chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Hamal, Sunil; D'huys, Thomas; Rowley, William F; Vermeire, Kurt; Aquaro, Stefano; Frost, Brian J; Schols, Dominique; Bell, Thomas W

    2015-11-14

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 acts as a key cell surface receptor in HIV infections, multiple forms of cancer, and various other pathologies, such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Macrocyclic polyamines and their metal complexes are known to exert anti-HIV activity, many acting as HIV entry inhibitors by specifically binding to CXCR4. Three series of pyridopentaazacylopentadecanes, in which the pyridine ring is fused to zero, one, or two saturated six-membered rings, were synthesized by manganese(ii)-templated Schiff-base cyclization of triethylenetetramine with various dicarbonyl compounds. By evaluating these macrocyclic polyamines and their complexes with Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and Zn(2+), we have discovered novel CXCR4-binding compounds. The MnCl2 complex of a new pentaazacyclopentadecane with one fused carbocyclic ring (11) was found to have the greatest potency as an antagonist of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (IC50: 0.014 μM), as evidenced by inhibiting binding of CXCL12 to PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells). Consequently, this compound inhibits replication of the CXCR4-using (X4) HIV-1 strain NL4-3 in the TZM-bl cell line with an IC50 value of 0.52 μM and low cytotoxicity (CC50: >100 μM). In addition, 18 other compounds were evaluated for their interaction with CXCR4 via their ability to interfere with ligand chemokine binding and HIV entry and infection. Of these, the metal complexes of the two more hydrophobic series with one or two fused carbocyclic rings exhibited the greatest potency. The Zn(2+) complex 21 was among the most potent, showing that redox activity of the metal center is not associated with CXCR4 antagonist activity. PMID:26338723

  13. Adaptive Gene Loss? Tracing Back the Pseudogenization of the Rabbit CCL8 Chemokine.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, Wessel; Magalhaes, Maria João; de Matos, Ana Lemos; Abrantes, Joana; Yamada, Fumio; Esteves, Pedro J

    2016-08-01

    Studies of the process of pseudogenization have widened our understanding of adaptive evolutionary change. In Rabbit, an alteration at the second extra-cellular loop of the CCR5 chemokine receptor was found to be associated with the pseudogenization of one of its prime ligands, the chemokine CCL8. This relationship has raised questions about the existence of a causal link between both events, which would imply adaptive gene loss. This hypothesis is evaluated here by tracing back the history of the genetic modifications underlying the chemokine pseudogenization. The obtained data indicate that mutations at receptor and ligand genes occurred after the lineage split of New World Leporids versus Old World Leporids and prior to the generic split of the of Old World species studied, which occurred an estimated 8-9 million years ago. More important, they revealed the emergence, before this zoographical split, of a "slippery" nucleotide motif (CCCCGGG) at the 3' region of CCL8-exon2. Such motives are liable of generating +1G or -1G frameshifts, which could, however, be overcome by "translesion" synthesis or somatic reversion. The CCL8 pseudogenization in the Old World lineage was apparently initiated by three synapomorphic point mutations at the exon2-intron2 boundary which provide at short range premature terminating codons, independently of the reading frame imposed by the slippery motif. The presence of this motif in New World Leporids might allow verifying this scenario. The importance of CCL8-CCR5 signaling in parasite-host interaction would suggest that the CCL8 knock-out in Old World populations might be related to changes in pathogenic environment. PMID:27306379

  14. Synovial chemokine expression and relationship with knee symptoms in patients with meniscal tears

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anjali; Gan, Justin; Bush-Joseph, Charles; Verma, Nikhil; Tetreault, Matthew W.; Saha, Kanta; Margulis, Arkady; Fogg, Louis; Scanzello, Carla R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with knee OA, synovitis is associated with knee pain and symptoms. We previously identified synovial mRNA expression of a set of chemokines (CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL-1, CCR7) associated with synovitis in patients with meniscal tears but without radiographic OA. CCL19 and CCR7 were also associated with knee symptoms. This study sought to validate expression of these chemokines and association with knee symptoms in more typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, many who have pre-existing OA. Design Synovial biopsies and fluid (SF) were collected from patients undergoing meniscal arthroscopy. Synovial mRNA expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was administered preoperatively. Regression analyses determined if associations between chemokine mRNA levels and KOOS scores were independent of other factors including radiographic OA. CCL19 in SF was measured by ELISA, and compared to patients with advanced knee OA and asymptomatic organ donors. Results 90% of patients had intra-operative evidence of early cartilage degeneration. CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL1, CCR7 transcripts were detected in all patients. Synovial CCL19 mRNA levels independently correlated with KOOS Activities of Daily Living scores (95% CI [-8.071, -0.331], p= 0.036), indicating higher expression was associated with more knee-related dysfunction. SF CCL19 was detected in 7 of 10 patients, compared to 4 of 10 asymptomatic donors. Conclusion In typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, synovial CCL19 mRNA expression was associated with knee-related difficulty with activities of daily living, independent of other factors including presence of radiographic knee OA. PMID:25724256

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines in Naturally Occurring Canine Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Amanda R.; Welsh, C. Jane; Young, Colin; Spoor, Erich; Kerwin, Sharon C.; Griffin, John F.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Cohen, Noah D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Canine intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH) is a common, naturally occurring form of spinal cord injury (SCI) that is increasingly being used in pre-clinical evaluation of therapies. Although IVDH bears critical similarities to human SCI with respect to lesion morphology, imaging features, and post-SCI treatment, limited data are available concerning secondary injury mechanisms. Here, we characterized cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytokines, and chemokines in dogs with acute, surgically treated, thoracolumbar IVDH (n=39) and healthy control dogs (n=21) to investigate early inflammatory events after SCI. A bioplex system was used to measure interleukin (IL)-2, -6, -7, -8, -10, -15, and -18, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC)-like protein, IFN-γ-inducible protein-10, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Cytokine and chemokine concentrations in the CSF of healthy and SCI dogs were compared and, in SCI dogs, were correlated to the duration of SCI, behavioral measures of injury severity at the time of sampling, and neurological outcome 42 days post-SCI as determined by a validated ordinal score. IL-8 concentration was significantly higher in SCI cases than healthy controls (p=0.0013) and was negatively correlated with the duration of SCI (p=0.042). CSF MCP-1 and KC-like protein were positively correlated with CSF microprotein concentration in dogs with SCI (p<0.0001 and p=0.004). CSF MCP-1 concentration was negatively associated with 42-day postinjury outcome (p<0.0001). Taken together, these data indicate that cytokines and chemokines present after SCI in humans and rodent models are associated with SCI pathogenesis in canine IVDH. PMID:24786364

  16. Identification and expression analysis of a CC chemokine from cobia (Rachycentron canadum).

    PubMed

    Feng, Juan; Su, Youlu; Guo, Zhixun; Xu, Liwen; Sun, Xiuxiu; Wang, Yunxin

    2013-06-01

    Chemokines are small, secreted cytokine peptides known principally for their ability to induce migration and activation of leukocyte populations and regulate the immune response mechanisms. The cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a marine finfish species, has a great potential for net cage aquaculture in the South China Sea. We isolated and characterized a CC chemokine cDNA from cobia-designated RcCC2. Its cDNA is 783 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 110 amino acids. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the RcCC2 gene, which contains four conserved cysteine residues, shares a high degree of similarity with other known CC chemokine sequences and is closest to the CCL19/21 clade. The mRNA of RcCC2 is expressed constitutively in all tested tissues, including gill, liver, muscle, spleen, kidney, head kidney, skin, brain, stomach, intestine and heart, but not blood, with the highest level of expression in gill and liver. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the expression of the RcCC2 gene in immune-related tissues, including head kidney, spleen and liver, following intraperitoneal injection of the viral mimic polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid, formalin-killed Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine) and phosphate-buffered saline as a control. RcCC2 gene expression was up-regulated differentially in head kidney, spleen and liver during 12 h after challenge. These results indicate that the RcCC2 gene is inducible and is involved in immune responses, suggesting RcCC2 has an important role in the early stage of viral and bacterial infections.

  17. Rofecoxib has different effects on chemokine production in colorectal cancer cells and tumor immune splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Walmesley, Alice J; Zweiri, Jehad; Christmas, Stephen E; Watson, Alastair J M

    2007-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in colon tumors. Its main product is the immunosuppressive prostaglandin PGE2 that aids tumor immune escape. In this study, we analyzed mechanisms of action of the COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib on the immune response to colorectal cancer in an animal model. The murine colorectal cancer cell line MC26, and splenocytes from BALB/c mice immune to irradiated MC26 cells, were incubated with rofecoxib or PGE2. In MC26 cells, 100 nM rofecoxib caused a complete abrogation of PGE2 production and inhibited cell proliferation. Splenocytes from tumor immune mice showed a 300% (P<0.01) increase in proliferation in response to irradiated MC26 cells, amplified to 450% (P<0.01) by 1 microM rofecoxib (n=3). MC26 cells incubated with 1 microM rofecoxib showed increased gene expression of CCL3, CCL5, and CCL20 (P<0.01). enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests also showed increased production of CCL5 and CCL20 (P<0.01). PGE2 reversed this effect causing a 40% reduction in chemokine gene expression (n=3). In contrast, splenocytes from naive BALB/c mice stimulated with irradiated MC26 cells had only a marginal chemokine response to rofecoxib. PGE2 caused a 50% down-regulation of CCL5 and CCL20 at the gene level (n=2) and 30% and 40% reduction of CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, and CCL20 at the protein level (n=2). Hence rofecoxib has a 2-fold effect upon the immune response to MC26 cells, by enhancing production of chemokines chemotactic for dendritic cells and also reducing PGE2-mediated inhibition of lymphoproliferation. Together, these may be sufficient for an effective TH1-mediated antitumor response. Rofecoxib may have potential as an addition to existing immunotherapy strategies.

  18. Chemokine biomarkers in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in the Theiler's virus model mirror those in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pachner, Andrew R; Li, Libin; Gilli, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Chemokines have increasingly been implicated in inflammatory and infectious disease of the central nervous system, both as biomarkers and as molecules important in pathogenesis. Multiple sclerosis is a disabling disease of unknown etiology, and recently chemokines have been identified as being upregulated molecules in the disease. We were interested in how the chemokine expression patterns in the central nervous system of a viral model of multiple sclerosis, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD), compared to that in humans with multiple sclerosis. Cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord tissue were analyzed for expression of a range of cytokines and chemokines. Three chemokines, CXCL10, CXCL9, and CCL5 were strongly and specifically upregulated in both the cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord in chronic disease, a pattern identical to that in multiple sclerosis. These data, the first study of cytokines in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in TMEV-IDD, support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is caused by chronic infection with an as-yet unidentified pathogen, possibly a picornavirus.

  19. A Chemokine Expressed in Lymphoid High Endothelial Venules Promotes the Adhesion and Chemotaxis of Naive T Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Michael D.; Tangemann, Kirsten; Tam, Carmen; Cyster, Jason G.; Rosen, Steven D.; Williams, Lewis T.

    1998-01-01

    Preferential homing of naive lymphocytes to secondary lymphoid organs is thought to involve the action of chemokines, yet no chemokine has been shown to have either the expression pattern or the activities required to mediate this process. Here we show that a chemokine represented in the EST database, secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine (SLC), is expressed in the high endothelial venules of lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, in the T cell areas of spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches, and in the lymphatic endothelium of multiple organs. SLC is a highly efficacious chemoattractant for lymphocytes with preferential activity toward naive T cells. Moreover, SLC induces firm adhesion of naive T lymphocytes via β 2 integrin binding to the counter receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, a necessary step for lymphocyte recruitment. SLC is the first chemokine demonstrated to have the characteristics required to mediate homing of lymphocytes to secondary lymphoid organs. In addition, the expression of SLC in lymphatic endothelium suggests that the migration of lymphocytes from tissues into efferent lymphatics may be an active process mediated by this molecule.

  20. IL-1β reciprocally regulates chemokine and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells via NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Burke, Susan J; Stadler, Krisztian; Lu, Danhong; Gleason, Evanna; Han, Anna; Donohoe, Dallas R; Rogers, Richard C; Hermann, Gerlinda E; Karlstad, Michael D; Collier, J Jason

    2015-10-15

    Proinflammatory cytokines impact islet β-cell mass and function by altering the transcriptional activity within pancreatic β-cells, producing increases in intracellular nitric oxide abundance and the synthesis and secretion of immunomodulatory proteins such as chemokines. Herein, we report that IL-1β, a major mediator of inflammatory responses associated with diabetes development, coordinately and reciprocally regulates chemokine and insulin secretion. We discovered that NF-κB controls the increase in chemokine transcription and secretion as well as the decrease in both insulin secretion and proliferation in response to IL-1β. Nitric oxide production, which is markedly elevated in pancreatic β-cells exposed to IL-1β, is a negative regulator of both glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and glucose-induced increases in intracellular calcium levels. By contrast, the IL-1β-mediated production of the chemokines CCL2 and CCL20 was not influenced by either nitric oxide levels or glucose concentration. Instead, the synthesis and secretion of CCL2 and CCL20 in response to IL-1β were dependent on NF-κB transcriptional activity. We conclude that IL-1β-induced transcriptional reprogramming via NF-κB reciprocally regulates chemokine and insulin secretion while also negatively regulating β-cell proliferation. These findings are consistent with NF-κB as a major regulatory node controlling inflammation-associated alterations in islet β-cell function and mass. PMID:26306596

  1. 12-Chemokine Gene Signature Identifies Lymph Node-like Structures in Melanoma: Potential for Patient Selection for Immunotherapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Jane L.; Fenstermacher, David A.; Eschrich, Steven; Qu, Xiaotao; Berglund, Anders E.; Lloyd, Mark C.; Schell, Michael J.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Mulé, James J.

    2012-10-01

    We have interrogated a 12-chemokine gene expression signature (GES) on genomic arrays of 14,492 distinct solid tumors and show broad distribution across different histologies. We hypothesized that this 12-chemokine GES might accurately predict a unique intratumoral immune reaction in stage IV (non-locoregional) melanoma metastases. The 12-chemokine GES predicted the presence of unique, lymph node-like structures, containing CD20+ B cell follicles with prominent areas of CD3+ T cells (both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets). CD86+, but not FoxP3+, cells were present within these unique structures as well. The direct correlation between the 12-chemokine GES score and the presence of unique, lymph nodal structures was also associated with better overall survival of the subset of melanoma patients. The use of this novel 12-chemokine GES may reveal basic information on in situ mechanisms of the anti-tumor immune response, potentially leading to improvements in the identification and selection of melanoma patients most suitable for immunotherapy.

  2. Differential modulation of retinal degeneration by Ccl2 and Cx3cr1 chemokine signalling.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Lange, Clemens A; Robbie, Scott; Munro, Peter M G; Cowing, Jill A; Armer, Hannah E J; Luong, Vy; Carvalho, Livia S; MacLaren, Robert E; Fitzke, Frederick W; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R

    2012-01-01

    Microglia and macrophages are recruited to sites of retinal degeneration where local cytokines and chemokines determine protective or neurotoxic microglia responses. Defining the role of Ccl2-Ccr2 and Cx3cl1-Cx3cr1 signalling for retinal pathology is of particular interest because of its potential role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Ccl2, Ccr2, and Cx3cr1 signalling defects impair macrophage trafficking, but have, in several conflicting studies, been reported to show different degrees of age-related retinal degeneration. Ccl2/Cx3cr1 double knockout (CCDKO) mice show an early onset retinal degeneration and have been suggested as a model for AMD. In order to understand phenotypic discrepancies in different chemokine knockout lines and to study how defects in Ccl2 and/or Cx3cr1 signalling contribute to the described early onset retinal degeneration, we defined primary and secondary pathological events in CCDKO mice. To control for genetic background variability, we compared the original phenotype with that of single Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 double knockout mice obtained from backcrosses of CCDKO with C57Bl/6 mice. We found that the primary pathological event in CCDKO mice develops in the inferior outer nuclear layer independently of light around postnatal day P14. RPE and vascular lesions develop secondarily with increasing penetrance with age and are clinically similar to retinal telangiectasia not to choroidal neovascularisation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that a third autosomal recessive gene causes the degeneration in CCDKO mice and in all affected re-derived lines and subsequently demonstrated co-segregation of the naturally occurring RD8 mutation in the Crb1 gene. By comparing CCDKO mice with re-derived CCl2(-/-)/Crb1(Rd8/RD8), Cx3cr1(-/-)/Crb1(Rd8/RD8) and CCl2(-/-)/Cx3cr1(-/-)/Crb1(Rd8/RD8) mice, we observed a differential modulation of the retinal phenotype by genetic background and both chemokine signalling pathways. These findings

  3. Monocyte chemotactic protein 3 is a most effective basophil- and eosinophil-activating chemokine

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    CC chemokines constitute a novel class of cytokines that attract and activate monocytes and lymphocytes, as well as basophil and eosinophil leukocytes, with distinct target cell profiles, and are believed to be involved in the regulation of different types of inflammation. The action of the recently identified monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP- 3) on human basophil and eosinophil function was studied and compared with that of other CC chemokines. In basophils, MCP-3, MCP-1, RANTES, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha all induced cytosolic- free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) changes and, with different efficacies, chemotaxis (RANTES = MCP-3 >> MCP-1 > MIP-1 alpha), histamine release (MCP-1 = MCP-3 >> RANTES > MIP-1 alpha), and leukotriene C4 formation, after IL-3 pretreatment (MCP-1 = MCP-3 >> RANTES > MIP-1 alpha). Thus, MCP-3 was as effective as MCP-1 as an inducer of mediator release, and as effective as RANTES as a stimulus of basophil migration. In contrast to MCP-1, MCP-3 was also a stimulus for eosinophils, and induced [Ca2+]i changes and chemotaxis as effectively as RANTES, which is the most potent chemotactic cytokine for these cells. Desensitization of the transient changes in [Ca2+]i was used to assess receptor usage. In basophils, stimulation with MCP-3 prevented responsiveness to MCP-1 and RANTES, but not to MIP-1 alpha. No single CC chemokine (except for MCP-3 itself) affected the response to MCP-3, however, which was prevented only when the cells were prestimulated with both MCP-1 and RANTES. In eosinophils, by contrast, cross-desensitization between RANTES and MCP-3 was obtained. RANTES and to a lesser extent MCP-3 also desensitized eosinophils toward MIP-1 alpha. The desensitization data suggest the existence of three chemokine receptors: (a) a MCP-1 receptor expressed on basophils but not eosinophils that is activated by MCP-1 and MCP-3; (b) a RANTES receptor in basophils and eosinophils that is activated by RANTES and MCP-3; and

  4. Role of Chemokines and Trafficking of Immune Cells in Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Kathryn E.; Wilson, Emma H.

    2014-01-01

    Parasites are diverse eukaryotic pathogens that can have complex life cycles. Their clearance, or control within a mammalian host requires the coordinated effort of the immune system. The cell types recruited to areas of infection can combat the disease, promote parasite replication and survival, or contribute to disease pathology. Location and timing of cell recruitment can be crucial. In this review, we explore the role chemokines play in orchestrating and balancing the immune response to achieve optimal control of parasite replication without promoting pathology. PMID:25383073

  5. Diversity and Inter-Connections in the CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor/Ligand Family: Molecular Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pawig, Lukas; Klasen, Christina; Weber, Christian; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Noels, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 mediate the homing of progenitor cells in the bone marrow and their recruitment to sites of injury, as well as affect processes such as cell arrest, survival, and angiogenesis. CXCL12 was long thought to be the sole CXCR4 ligand, but more recently the atypical chemokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was identified as an alternative, non-cognate ligand for CXCR4 and shown to mediate chemotaxis and arrest of CXCR4-expressing T-cells. This has complicated the understanding of CXCR4-mediated signaling and associated biological processes. Compared to CXCL12/CXCR4-induced signaling, only few details are known on MIF/CXCR4-mediated signaling and it remains unclear to which extent MIF and CXCL12 reciprocally influence CXCR4 binding and signaling. Furthermore, the atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) (previously CXCR7) has added to the complexity of CXCR4 signaling due to its ability to bind CXCL12 and MIF, and to evoke CXCL12- and MIF-triggered signaling independently of CXCR4. Also, extracellular ubiquitin (eUb) and the viral protein gp120 (HIV) have been reported as CXCR4 ligands, whereas viral chemokine vMIP-II (Herpesvirus) and human β3-defensin (HBD-3) have been identified as CXCR4 antagonists. This review will provide insight into the diversity and inter-connections in the CXCR4 receptor/ligand family. We will discuss signaling pathways initiated by binding of CXCL12 vs. MIF to CXCR4, elaborate on how ACKR3 affects CXCR4 signaling, and summarize biological functions of CXCR4 signaling mediated by CXCL12 or MIF. Also, we will discuss eUb and gp120 as alternative ligands for CXCR4, and describe vMIP-II and HBD-3 as antagonists for CXCR4. Detailed insight into biological effects of CXCR4 signaling und underlying mechanisms, including diversity of CXCR4 ligands and inter-connections with other (chemokine) receptors, is clinically important, as the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 has been approved as stem cell mobilizer in specific

  6. Relationship between plasma resistin concentrations, inflammatory chemokines, and components of the metabolic syndrome in adults.

    PubMed

    Aquilante, Christina L; Kosmiski, Lisa A; Knutsen, Shannon D; Zineh, Issam

    2008-04-01

    Recent data suggest that resistin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine, has a putative role in inflammatory processes and metabolic derangements. In vitro data suggest that resistin stimulates the production of inflammatory chemokines, yet the relationship in vivo is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between plasma resistin concentrations, plasma inflammatory chemokine aged concentrations (ie, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1] and epithelial neutrophil activator 78 [ENA-78]), and components of the metabolic syndrome in nondiabetic subjects without known cardiovascular disease (CVD). Plasma samples were obtained from nondiabetic subjects (N = 123) aged 18 to 55 years without known CVD or CVD risk equivalents. The presence of the metabolic syndrome was assessed using consensus guidelines. Fasting plasma resistin, MCP-1, ENA-78, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations were analyzed. The study population consisted of 67.5% women and 68.3% Caucasians (mean age = 44 +/- 7 years and mean body mass index = 33.3 +/- 6 kg/m(2)). The metabolic syndrome was present in 46.3% of study participants. Resistin concentrations were significantly correlated with white blood cell count (r = 0.326, P < .001), hs-CRP concentrations (r = 0.293, P = .005), MCP-1 concentrations (r = 0.251, P = .005), body mass index (r = 0.193, P = .033), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.182, P = .044). Resistin concentrations were 1.21 times higher in subjects with the metabolic syndrome compared with those without the metabolic syndrome (P = .003). In stepwise regression analysis, white blood cell count (P < .001) and MCP-1 concentrations (P = .002) were significantly associated with resistin concentrations, independent of hs-CRP, sex, body mass index, presence of the metabolic syndrome, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Data from our cross-sectional study demonstrate that plasma resistin concentrations

  7. Vascular Stem/Progenitor Cell Migration Induced by Smooth Muscle Cell-Derived Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 2 and Chemokine (C-X-C motif) Ligand 1 Contributes to Neointima Formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baoqi; Wong, Mei Mei; Potter, Claire M F; Simpson, Russell M L; Karamariti, Eirini; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zeng, Lingfang; Warren, Derek; Hu, Yanhua; Wang, Wen; Xu, Qingbo

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that Sca-1(+) (stem cell antigen-1) stem/progenitor cells within blood vessel walls may contribute to neointima formation, but the mechanism behind their recruitment has not been explored. In this work Sca-1(+) progenitor cells were cultivated from mouse vein graft tissue and found to exhibit increased migration when cocultured with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or when treated with SMC-derived conditioned medium. This migration was associated with elevated levels of chemokines, CCL2 (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2) and CXCL1 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1), and their corresponding receptors on Sca-1(+) progenitors, CCR2 (chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2) and CXCR2 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2), which were also upregulated following SMC conditioned medium treatment. Knockdown of either receptor in Sca-1(+) progenitors significantly inhibited cell migration. The GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 were activated by both CCL2 and CXCL1 stimulation and p38 phosphorylation was increased. However, only Rac1 inhibition significantly reduced migration and p38 phosphorylation. After Sca-1(+) progenitors labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were applied to the adventitial side of wire-injured mouse femoral arteries, a large proportion of GFP-Sca-1(+) -cells were observed in neointimal lesions, and a marked increase in neointimal lesion formation was seen 1 week post-operation. Interestingly, Sca-1(+) progenitor migration from the adventitia to the neointima was abrogated and neointima formation diminished in a wire injury model using CCL2(-/-) mice. These findings suggest vascular stem/progenitor cell migration from the adventitia to the neointima can be induced by SMC release of chemokines which act via CCR2/Rac1/p38 and CXCR2/Rac1/p38 signaling pathways. Stem Cells 2016;34:2368-2380. PMID:27300479

  8. Vascular Stem/Progenitor Cell Migration Induced by Smooth Muscle Cell-Derived Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 2 and Chemokine (C-X-C motif) Ligand 1 Contributes to Neointima Formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baoqi; Wong, Mei Mei; Potter, Claire M F; Simpson, Russell M L; Karamariti, Eirini; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zeng, Lingfang; Warren, Derek; Hu, Yanhua; Wang, Wen; Xu, Qingbo

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that Sca-1(+) (stem cell antigen-1) stem/progenitor cells within blood vessel walls may contribute to neointima formation, but the mechanism behind their recruitment has not been explored. In this work Sca-1(+) progenitor cells were cultivated from mouse vein graft tissue and found to exhibit increased migration when cocultured with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or when treated with SMC-derived conditioned medium. This migration was associated with elevated levels of chemokines, CCL2 (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2) and CXCL1 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1), and their corresponding receptors on Sca-1(+) progenitors, CCR2 (chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2) and CXCR2 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2), which were also upregulated following SMC conditioned medium treatment. Knockdown of either receptor in Sca-1(+) progenitors significantly inhibited cell migration. The GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 were activated by both CCL2 and CXCL1 stimulation and p38 phosphorylation was increased. However, only Rac1 inhibition significantly reduced migration and p38 phosphorylation. After Sca-1(+) progenitors labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were applied to the adventitial side of wire-injured mouse femoral arteries, a large proportion of GFP-Sca-1(+) -cells were observed in neointimal lesions, and a marked increase in neointimal lesion formation was seen 1 week post-operation. Interestingly, Sca-1(+) progenitor migration from the adventitia to the neointima was abrogated and neointima formation diminished in a wire injury model using CCL2(-/-) mice. These findings suggest vascular stem/progenitor cell migration from the adventitia to the neointima can be induced by SMC release of chemokines which act via CCR2/Rac1/p38 and CXCR2/Rac1/p38 signaling pathways. Stem Cells 2016;34:2368-2380.

  9. Vascular Stem/Progenitor Cell Migration Induced by Smooth Muscle Cell‐Derived Chemokine (C‐C Motif) Ligand 2 and Chemokine (C‐X‐C motif) Ligand 1 Contributes to Neointima Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Baoqi; Wong, Mei Mei; Potter, Claire M. F.; Simpson, Russell M. L.; Karamariti, Eirini; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zeng, Lingfang; Warren, Derek; Hu, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have shown that Sca‐1+ (stem cell antigen‐1) stem/progenitor cells within blood vessel walls may contribute to neointima formation, but the mechanism behind their recruitment has not been explored. In this work Sca‐1+ progenitor cells were cultivated from mouse vein graft tissue and found to exhibit increased migration when cocultured with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or when treated with SMC‐derived conditioned medium. This migration was associated with elevated levels of chemokines, CCL2 (chemokine (C‐C motif) ligand 2) and CXCL1 (chemokine (C‐X‐C motif) ligand 1), and their corresponding receptors on Sca‐1+ progenitors, CCR2 (chemokine (C‐C motif) receptor 2) and CXCR2 (chemokine (C‐X‐C motif) receptor 2), which were also upregulated following SMC conditioned medium treatment. Knockdown of either receptor in Sca‐1+ progenitors significantly inhibited cell migration. The GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 were activated by both CCL2 and CXCL1 stimulation and p38 phosphorylation was increased. However, only Rac1 inhibition significantly reduced migration and p38 phosphorylation. After Sca‐1+ progenitors labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were applied to the adventitial side of wire‐injured mouse femoral arteries, a large proportion of GFP‐Sca‐1+‐cells were observed in neointimal lesions, and a marked increase in neointimal lesion formation was seen 1 week post‐operation. Interestingly, Sca‐1+ progenitor migration from the adventitia to the neointima was abrogated and neointima formation diminished in a wire injury model using CCL2−/− mice. These findings suggest vascular stem/progenitor cell migration from the adventitia to the neointima can be induced by SMC release of chemokines which act via CCR2/Rac1/p38 and CXCR2/Rac1/p38 signaling pathways. Stem Cells 2016;34:2368–2380 PMID:27300479

  10. The role of cytokines and chemokines in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune process in alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taisuke; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-11-01

    The aetiology of alopecia areata (AA) is still not fully understood. However, recent clinical and experimental studies have provided insights into the pathomechanisms of AA and revealed that it is an organ-specific and cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Some triggers, such as viral infections, trauma, hormones and emotional/physical stressors, may cause activation of autoreactive T cells that target hair follicle (HF) autoantigens. In these immunological responses, cytokines and chemokines are regarded as key players that mediate the autoimmune inflammation. This results in the collapse of HF immune privilege, which is central to the pathogenesis of AA. This essay will focus on how cytokines and chemokines contribute to the immunological aspects of AA. The management of AA often remains difficult in a number of cases. Our review suggests that novel therapies for AA may involve targeting cytokines and chemokines. PMID:25040075

  11. Emerging role of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 related mechanisms in diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease: friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2016-08-24

    Chemokines are critical components in pathology. The roles of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 (CCL4) and its receptor are associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) and atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases. However, due to the complexity of these diseases, the specific effects of CCL4 remain unclear, although recent reports have suggested that multiple pathways are related to CCL4. In this review, we provide an overview of the role and potential mechanisms of CCL4 and one of its major receptors, fifth CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), in DM and cardiovascular diseases. CCL4-related mechanisms, including CCL4 and CCR5, might provide potential therapeutic targets in DM and/or atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases.

  12. The role of cytokines and chemokines in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune process in alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taisuke; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-11-01

    The aetiology of alopecia areata (AA) is still not fully understood. However, recent clinical and experimental studies have provided insights into the pathomechanisms of AA and revealed that it is an organ-specific and cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Some triggers, such as viral infections, trauma, hormones and emotional/physical stressors, may cause activation of autoreactive T cells that target hair follicle (HF) autoantigens. In these immunological responses, cytokines and chemokines are regarded as key players that mediate the autoimmune inflammation. This results in the collapse of HF immune privilege, which is central to the pathogenesis of AA. This essay will focus on how cytokines and chemokines contribute to the immunological aspects of AA. The management of AA often remains difficult in a number of cases. Our review suggests that novel therapies for AA may involve targeting cytokines and chemokines.

  13. Role of CC chemokine CCL6/C10 as a monocyte chemoattractant in a murine acute peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    LaFleur, Andrew M; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Kunkel, Steven L; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of CC chemokine CCL6/C10 in acute inflammation. Intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate increased peritoneal CCL6, which peaked at 4 h and remained elevated at 48 h. Neutralization of CCL6 significantly inhibited the macrophage infiltration (34-48% reduction), but not other cell types, without decreasing the other CC chemokines known to attract monocytes/macrophages. CCL6 was expressed in peripheral eosinophils and elicited macrophages, but not in elicited neutrophils. Peritoneal CCL6 level was not decreased in granulocyte-depleted mice where eosinophil influx was significantly impaired. Thus, CCL6 appears to contribute to the macrophage infiltration that is independent of other CC chemokines. Eosinophils pre-store CCL6, but do not release CCL6 in the peritoneum in this model of inflammation. PMID:15770051

  14. Inflammatory cytokines regulate secretion of VEGF and chemokines by human conjunctival fibroblasts: Role in dysfunctional tear syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; William, Abitha; Cherukuri, Aswini; Samuel, William; Hooks, John J; Detrick, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Ocular surface inflammation is one of the primary mechanisms associated with dysfunctional tear syndrome (DTS), also known as dry eye disease. DTS, more prevalent in older populations, causes ocular discomfort and visual disturbance due to dryness on the surface layer in the eye. We used human conjunctival fibroblast cultures (HCJVF) to investigate the effects of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β (ITI) on the secretions of VEGF and chemokines. Our results demonstrate the elevated secretion of angiogenic VEGF molecules by ITI without affecting anti-angiogenic molecules, PEDF, endostatin, thrombospondin and sVEGF-R1. The secretion of interferon-γ inducible chemokines, CXCL9, -10, -11 by HCJVF were significantly enhanced by ITI. Our in vitro study supports previously reported observations of elevated VEGF and chemokines in tear fluids of DTS patients, reiterating the role of inflammatory reactions in DTS. PMID:26615568

  15. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Seo, Sang Gwon; Han, Jae Gab; Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV) is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE). CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD. PMID:26404252

  16. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Seo, Sang Gwon; Han, Jae Gab; Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV) is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE). CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD. PMID:26404252

  17. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Seo, Sang Gwon; Han, Jae Gab; Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-09-02

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV) is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE). CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD.

  18. Evidence for an antagonist form of the chemokine CXCL10 in patients chronically infected with HCV

    PubMed Central

    Casrouge, Armanda; Decalf, Jérémie; Ahloulay, Mina; Lababidi, Cyril; Mansour, Hala; Vallet-Pichard, Anaïs; Mallet, Vincent; Mottez, Estelle; Mapes, James; Fontanet, Arnaud; Pol, Stanislas; Albert, Matthew L.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem, with nearly 170 million infected individuals worldwide. Current treatment for chronic infection is a combination of pegylated IFN-α2 and ribavirin (RBV); however, this treatment is effective in fewer than 50% of patients infected with HCV genotype 1 or 4. Recent studies identified the chemokine CXCL10 (also known as IP-10) as an important negative prognostic biomarker. Given that CXCL10 mediates chemoattraction of activated lymphocytes, it is counterintuitive that this chemokine correlates with therapeutic nonresponsiveness. Herein, we offer new insight into this paradox and provide evidence that CXCL10 in the plasma of patients chronically infected with HCV exists in an antagonist form, due to in situ amino-terminal truncation of the protein. We further demonstrated that dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP4; also known as CD26), possibly in combination with other proteases, mediates the generation of the antagonist form(s) of CXCL10. These data offer what we believe to be the first evidence for CXCL10 antagonism in human disease and identify a possible factor contributing to the inability of patients to clear HCV. PMID:21183794

  19. Abrogation of CC chemokine receptor 9 ameliorates ventricular remodeling in mice after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yijie; Liu, Tao; Chen, Yuting; Tang, Yanhong; Wang, Teng; Hu, Dan; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    CC chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9), which is a unique receptor for CC chemokine ligand (CCL25), is mainly expressed on lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes/macrophages. CCR9 mediates the chemotaxis of inflammatory cells and participates in the pathological progression of inflammatory diseases. However, the role of CCR9 in the pathological process of myocardial infarction (MI) remains unexplored; inflammation plays a key role in this process. Here, we used CCR9 knockout mice to determine the functional significance of CCR9 in regulating post-MI cardiac remodeling and its underlying mechanism. MI was induced by surgical ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in CCR9 knockout mice and their CCR9+/+ littermates. Our results showed that the CCR9 expression levels were up-regulated in the hearts of the MI mice. Abrogation of CCR9 improved the post-MI survival rate and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and decreased the infarct size. In addition, the CCR9 knockout mice exhibited attenuated inflammation, apoptosis, structural and electrical remodeling compared with the CCR9+/+ MI mice. Mechanistically, CCR9 mainly regulated the pathological response by interfering with the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. In conclusion, the data reveal that CCR9 serves as a novel modulator of pathological progression following MI through NF-κB and MAPK signaling.

  20. The relevance of chemokine signalling in modulating inherited and age-related retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Ulrich Fo; Robbie, Scott J; Bainbridge, James Wb; Ali, Robin R

    2014-01-01

    Systemic monocytes, tissue resident macrophages, dendritic cells and microglia have specific roles in immune surveillance and maintenance of tissue homeostasis and are key regulator and effector cells of the local immune response to acute and chronic tissue injury.Two major signalling pathways that differentially define trafficking behaviour and activation of systemic and local myeloid cell populations in response to exogenous and endogenous inflammatory stimuli are the Ccl2-Ccr2 and the Cx3cl1-Cx3cr1 chemokine pathways.Alterations in these pathways have been implicated in controlling myeloid cell activation during normal ageing and in age-related retinal degenerations, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD).We review the evidence for how altered chemokine signalling in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions regulate local and systemic myeloid cell responses in the retina and how this may contribute to or attenuate pathology in inherited and age-related retinal diseases. We discuss the role of environmental factors (e.g. light exposure) and the influence of genetic factors on the manifestation of pathology in experimental models and in human patients and how we envisage harnessing this knowledge for the development of targeted, more broadly applicable anti-inflammatory treatment strategies for a wide range of retinal degenerations.

  1. Endothelial Cells Enhance Tumor Cell Invasion through a Crosstalk Mediated by CXC Chemokine Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Kristy A; Miyazawa, Marta; Cordeiro, Mabel M R; Love, William J; Pinsky, Matthew S; Neiva, Kathleen G; Spalding, Aaron C; Nör, Jacques E

    2008-01-01

    Field cancerization involves the lateral spread of premalignant or malignant disease and contributes to the recurrence of head and neck tumors. The overall hypothesis underlying this work is that endothelial cells actively participate in tumor cell invasion by secreting chemokines and creating a chemotactic gradient for tumor cells. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from head and neck tumor cells enhance Bcl-2 expression in neovascular endothelial cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma-3 (OSCC3) and Kaposi's sarcoma (SLK) show enhanced invasiveness when cocultured with pools of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells stably expressing Bcl-2 (HDMEC-Bcl-2), compared to cocultures with empty vector controls (HDMEC-LXSN). Xenografted OSCC3 tumors vascularized with HDMEC-Bcl-2 presented higher local invasion than OSCC3 tumors vascularized with control HDMEC-LXSN. CXCL1 and CXCL8 were upregulated in primary endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as in HDMEC-Bcl-2. Notably, blockade of CXCR2 signaling, but not CXCR1, inhibited OSCC3 and SLK invasion toward endothelial cells. These data demonstrate that CXC chemokines secreted by endothelial cells induce tumor cell invasion and suggest that the process of lateral spread of tumor cells observed in field cancerization is guided by chemotactic signals that originated from endothelial cells. PMID:18283335

  2. Ligustrazine attenuates inflammation and the associated chemokines and receptors in ovalbumine-induced mouse asthma model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ying; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Hongying; Du, Xin; Luo, Qingli; Sun, Jing; Liu, Feng; Li, Mihui; Xu, Fei; Wei, Kai; Dong, Jingcheng

    2016-09-01

    Ligustrazine which is isolated from Chinese herb ligusticum chuanxiong hort, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for asthma treatment. In this study, we aim to observe the effect of ligustrazine on inflammation and the associated chemokines and receptors in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse asthma model. Our data demonstrates that ligustrazine suppresses airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and lung inflammation in OVA-induced mouse asthma model. Ligustrazine also induces inhibition of inflammatory cells including neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils. In addition, ligustrazine significantly reduces IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A, CCL3, CCL19 and CCL21 level in BALF of asthma mice. Furthermore, ligustrazine induces down-regulation of CCL19 receptor CCR7, STAT3 and p38 MAPK protein expression. Collectively, these results suggest that ligustrazine is effective in attenuation of allergic airway inflammatory changes and related chemokines and receptors in OVA-induced asthma model, and this action might be associated with inhibition of STAT3 and p38 MAPK pathway, which indicates that ligustrazine may be used as a potential therapeutic method to treat asthma. PMID:27438894

  3. Serum levels of the homeostatic B cell chemokine, CXCL13, are elevated during HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Widney, Daniel P; Breen, Elizabeth C; Boscardin, W John; Kitchen, Scott G; Alcantar, Juan M; Smith, Jeffrey B; Zack, Jerome A; Detels, Roger; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2005-11-01

    HIV infection is associated with B cell dysfunction, which includes B cell hyperactivation, hypergammaglobulinemia, impaired production of antibodies against specific antigens, and a loss of B cell memory. Because lymph node architecture is progressively destroyed during HIV infection, it is possible that normal B cell trafficking is impaired as well, which could be a cause or a result of these abnormalities. Because the homeostatic chemokine, CXCL13 (BLC, BCA-1), is a major regulator of B cell trafficking, we assessed circulating levels of this molecule in HIV infection. Serum levels of CXCL13 were seen to be progressively elevated in HIV disease. Serum levels of CXCL13 correlated strongly with those of the inflammation-associated chemokine, inducible protein-10 (IP-10), in subjects who had advanced HIV disease, and more moderately with levels of soluble CD30 (sCD30), sCD27, and sCD23. CXCL13 levels also correlated moderately with viral load and showed a significant decline after use of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Elevated levels of CXCL13 could cause impaired or altered trafficking of B cells during HIV infection and could contribute to the previously reported loss of CXCR5, the receptor for CXCL13, from the surface of circulating B cells in HIV infection. PMID:16318584

  4. The transcriptional repressor BLIMP1 curbs host defenses by suppressing expression of the chemokine CCL8.

    PubMed

    Severa, Martina; Islam, Sabina A; Waggoner, Stephen N; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Kim, Nancy D; Ryan, Glennice; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn; Charo, Israel; Caffrey, Daniel R; Boyartchuk, Victor L; Luster, Andrew D; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2014-03-01

    The transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (BLIMP1) is a master regulator of B and T cell differentiation. To examine the role of BLIMP1 in innate immunity, we used a conditional knockout (CKO) of Blimp1 in myeloid cells and found that Blimp1 CKO mice were protected from lethal infection induced by Listeria monocytogenes. Transcriptome analysis of Blimp1 CKO macrophages identified the murine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 8, CCL8, as a direct target of Blimp1-mediated transcriptional repression in these cells. BLIMP1-deficient macrophages expressed elevated levels of Ccl8, and consequently Blimp1 CKO mice had higher levels of circulating CCL8, resulting in increased neutrophils in the peripheral blood, promoting a more aggressive antibacterial response. Mice lacking the Ccl8 gene were more susceptible to L. monocytogenes infection than were wild-type mice. Although CCL8 failed to recruit neutrophils directly, it was chemotactic for γ/δ T cells, and CCL8-responsive γ/δ T cells were enriched for IL-17F. Finally, CCL8-mediated enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes was dependent on γ/δ T cells. Collectively, these data reveal an important role for BLIMP1 in modulating host defenses by suppressing expression of the chemokine CCL8.

  5. Neolignans from the Arils of Myristica fragrans as Potent Antagonists of CC Chemokine Receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Toshio; Hachiman, Ikuko; Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Nishida, Eriko; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Hayakawa, Takao; Yoshie, Osamu; Muraoka, Osamu; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-08-26

    CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) is expressed selectively in eosinophils, basophils, and some Th2 cells and plays a major role in allergic diseases. A methanol extract from the arils of Myristica fragrans inhibited CC chemokine ligand 11-induced chemotaxis in CCR3-expressing L1.2 cells at 100 μg/mL. From this extract, eight new neolignans, maceneolignans A-H (1-8), were isolated, and their stereostructures were elucidated from their spectroscopic values and chemical properties. Of those constituents, compounds 1, 4, 6, and 8 and (+)-erythro-(7S,8R)-Δ(8')-7-hydroxy-3,4-methylenedioxy-3',5'-dimethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (11), (-)-(8R)-Δ(8')-3,4-methylenedioxy-3',5'-dimethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (17), (+)-licarin A (20), nectandrin B (25), verrucosin (26), and myristicin (27) inhibited CCR3-mediated chemotaxis at a concentration of 1 μM. Among them, 1 (EC50 1.6 μM), 6 (1.5 μM), and 8 (1.4 μM) showed relatively strong activities, which were comparable to that of a synthetic CCR3 selective antagonist, SB328437 (0.78 μM).

  6. Oligomeric structure of the chemokine CCL5/RANTES from NMR, MS, and SAXS data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Watson, Caroline; Sharp, Joshua S; Handel, Tracy M; Prestegard, James H

    2011-08-10

    CCL5 (RANTES) is a proinflammatory chemokine known to activate leukocytes through its receptor, CCR5. Although the monomeric form of CCL5 is sufficient to cause cell migration in vitro, CCL5's propensity for aggregation is essential for migration in vivo, T cell activation and apoptosis, and HIV entry into cells. However, there is currently no structural information on CCL5 oligomers larger than the canonical CC chemokine dimer. In this study the solution structure of a CCL5 oligomer was investigated using an integrated approach, including NMR residual dipolar couplings to determine allowed relative orientations of the component monomers, SAXS to restrict overall shape, and hydroxyl radical footprinting and NMR cross-saturation experiments to identify interface residues. The resulting model of the CCL5 oligomer provides a basis for explaining the disaggregating effect of E66 and E26 mutations and suggests mechanisms by which glycosaminoglycan binding may promote oligomer formation and facilitate cell migration in vivo.

  7. A novel role for β2-microglobulin: a precursor of antibacterial chemokine in respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shean-Jaw; Wang, Chan-Chi; Tseng, Yan-Shen; Lee, Yen-Jung; Chen, Shih-Chieh; Chou, Chi-Hsien; Chuang, Lea-Yea; Hong, Yi-Ren; Lu, Chi-Yu; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chignard, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a panel of cationic molecules secreted in the culture medium of human respiratory epithelial cells (REC) upon activation by IL-1β and different pathogen-associated molecular patterns. A 9 kDa fragment derived from β2-microglobulin (B2M) was identified and named shed 9 kDa B2M (sB2M-9). The primary structure of sB2M-9 was revealed to increase its pI value that potentially could play an important role in innate defense. sB2M-9 exhibits antibacterial activity against Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (SA) but not against Gram negative Klebsiella pneumonia (KP). Upon its binding to SA, sB2M-9 induces clumps, a phenomenon not observed with B2M. Migration of THP-1 monocytes exposed to SA clumps was significantly greater than that to SA without clumps. sB2M-9 binds to SA, more likely as a chemokine, to facilitate THP-1 migration. As a whole, we demonstrated that REC release a novel chemokine with antibacterial activity that is shed from B2M to facilitate THP-1 migration. PMID:27503241

  8. The CXCL12/CXCR4 chemokine ligand/receptor axis in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Döring, Yvonne; Pawig, Lukas; Weber, Christian; Noels, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 play an important homeostatic function by mediating the homing of progenitor cells in the bone marrow and regulating their mobilization into peripheral tissues upon injury or stress. Although the CXCL12/CXCR4 interaction has long been regarded as a monogamous relation, the identification of the pro-inflammatory chemokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as an important second ligand for CXCR4, and of CXCR7 as an alternative receptor for CXCL12, has undermined this interpretation and has considerably complicated the understanding of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling and associated biological functions. This review aims to provide insight into the current concept of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in myocardial infarction (MI) and its underlying pathologies such as atherosclerosis and injury-induced vascular restenosis. It will discuss main findings from in vitro studies, animal experiments and large-scale genome-wide association studies. The importance of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in progenitor cell homing and mobilization will be addressed, as will be the function of CXCR4 in different cell types involved in atherosclerosis. Finally, a potential translation of current knowledge on CXCR4 into future therapeutical application will be discussed. PMID:24966838

  9. Abrogation of CC chemokine receptor 9 ameliorates ventricular remodeling in mice after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yijie; Liu, Tao; Chen, Yuting; Tang, Yanhong; Wang, Teng; Hu, Dan; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    CC chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9), which is a unique receptor for CC chemokine ligand (CCL25), is mainly expressed on lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes/macrophages. CCR9 mediates the chemotaxis of inflammatory cells and participates in the pathological progression of inflammatory diseases. However, the role of CCR9 in the pathological process of myocardial infarction (MI) remains unexplored; inflammation plays a key role in this process. Here, we used CCR9 knockout mice to determine the functional significance of CCR9 in regulating post-MI cardiac remodeling and its underlying mechanism. MI was induced by surgical ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in CCR9 knockout mice and their CCR9+/+ littermates. Our results showed that the CCR9 expression levels were up-regulated in the hearts of the MI mice. Abrogation of CCR9 improved the post-MI survival rate and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and decreased the infarct size. In addition, the CCR9 knockout mice exhibited attenuated inflammation, apoptosis, structural and electrical remodeling compared with the CCR9+/+ MI mice. Mechanistically, CCR9 mainly regulated the pathological response by interfering with the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. In conclusion, the data reveal that CCR9 serves as a novel modulator of pathological progression following MI through NF-κB and MAPK signaling. PMID:27585634

  10. Up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Tao-Sheng; Soyama, Akihiko; Tanaka, Takayuki; Yan, Chen; Sakai, Yusuke; Hidaka, Masaaki; Kinoshita, Ayaka; Natsuda, Koji; Fujii, Mio; Kugiyama, Tota; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Gu, Weili; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Although the healthy liver is known to have high regenerative potential, poor liver regeneration under pathological conditions remains a substantial problem. We investigated the key molecules that impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver. C57BL/6 mice were randomly subjected to partial hepatectomy and bile duct ligation (PH+BDL group, n = 16), partial hepatectomy only (PH group, n = 16), or sham operation (Sham group, n = 16). The liver sizes and histological findings were similar in the PH and sham groups 14 days after operation. However, compared with those in the sham group, the livers in mice in the PH+BDL group had a smaller size, a lower cell proliferative activity, and more fibrotic tissue 14 days after the operation, suggesting the insufficient regeneration of the cholestatic liver. Pathway-focused array analysis showed that many genes were up- or down-regulated over 1.5-fold in both PH+BDL and PH groups at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment. Interestingly, more genes that were functionally related to the extracellular matrix and inflammatory chemokines were found in the PH+BDL group than in the PH group at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Our data suggest that up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver. PMID:27226149

  11. Extracellular Histones Induce Chemokine Production in Whole Blood Ex Vivo and Leukocyte Recruitment In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Johannes; Papareddy, Praveen; Dahlgren, Madelene W.; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Smeds, Emanuel; Linder, Adam; Mörgelin, Matthias; Johansson-Lindbom, Bengt; Egesten, Arne; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system relies to a great deal on the interaction of pattern recognition receptors with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular pattern molecules. Extracellular histones belong to the latter group and their release has been described to contribute to the induction of systemic inflammatory reactions. However, little is known about their functions in the early immune response to an invading pathogen. Here we show that extracellular histones specifically target monocytes in human blood and this evokes the mobilization of the chemotactic chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 from these cells. The chemokine induction involves the toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex on monocytes, and is under the control of interferon-γ. Consequently, subcutaneous challenge with extracellular histones results in elevated levels of CXCL10 in a murine air pouch model and an influx of leukocytes to the site of injection in a TLR4 dependent manner. When analyzing tissue biopsies from patients with necrotizing fasciitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, extracellular histone H4 and CXCL10 are immunostained in necrotic, but not healthy tissue. Collectively, these results show for the first time that extracellular histones have an important function as chemoattractants as their local release triggers the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection. PMID:26646682

  12. Elevation of CXCR3-binding chemokines in urine indicates acute renal-allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huaizhong; Aizenstein, Brian D; Puchalski, Alice; Burmania, Jeanine A; Hamawy, Majed M; Knechtle, Stuart J

    2004-03-01

    A noninvasive urinary test that diagnoses acute renal allograft dysfunction would benefit renal transplant patients. We aimed to develop a rapid urinary diagnostic test by detecting chemokines. Seventy-three patients with renal allograft dysfunction prompting biopsy and 26 patients with stable graft function were recruited. Urinary levels of CXCR3-binding chemokines, monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig/CXCL9), IFN-gamma-induced protein of 10 kDa (IP-10/CXCL10), and IFN-inducible T-cell chemoattractant (I-TAC/CXCL11), were determined by a particle-based triplex assay. IP-10, Mig and I-TAC were significantly elevated in renal graft recipients with acute rejection, acute tubular injury and BK virus nephritis. Using 100 pg/mL as the threshold level, both IP-10 and Mig had diagnostic value (sensitivity 86.4%; specificity 91.3%) in differentiating acute graft dysfunction from other clinical conditions. In terms of monitoring the response to antirejection therapy, this urinary test is more sensitive and predictive than serum creatinine. These results indicate that this rapid test is clinically useful.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum proteins involved in cytoadherence of infected erythrocytes to chemokine CX3CL1

    PubMed Central

    Hermand, Patricia; Cicéron, Liliane; Pionneau, Cédric; Vaquero, Catherine; Combadière, Christophe; Deterre, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is associated with cytoadherence of infected red blood cells (iRBC) to endothelial cells. Numerous host molecules have been involved in cytoadherence, including the adhesive chemokine CX3CL1. Most of the identified parasite ligands are from the multigenic and hypervariable Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) family which makes them poor targets for the development of a broadly protective vaccine. Using proteomics, we have identified two 25-kDa parasite proteins with adhesive properties for CX3CL1, called CBP for CX3CL1 Binding Proteins. CBPs are coded by single-copy genes with little polymorphic variation and no homology with other P. falciparum gene products. Specific antibodies raised against epitopes from the predicted extracellular domains of each CBP efficiently stain the surface of RBC infected with trophozoites or schizonts, which is a strong indication of CBP expression at the surface of iRBC. These anti-CBP antibodies partially neutralize iRBC adherence to CX3CL1. This adherence is similarly inhibited in the presence of peptides from the CBP extracellular domains, while irrelevant peptides had no such effect. CBP1 and CBP2 are new P. falciparum ligands for the human chemokine CX3CL1. The identification of this non-polymorphic P. falciparum factors provides a new avenue for innovative vaccination approaches. PMID:27653778

  14. Role of cytokines and chemokines in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Braunersreuther, Vincent; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a variety of histological conditions (ranging from liver steatosis and steatohepatitis, to fibrosis and hepatocarcinoma) that are characterized by an increased fat content within the liver. The accumulation/deposition of fat within the liver is essential for diagnosis of NAFLD and might be associated with alterations in the hepatic and systemic inflammatory state. Although it is still unclear if each histological entity represents a different disease or rather steps of the same disease, inflammatory processes in NAFLD might influence its pathophysiology and prognosis. In particular, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (the most inflamed condition in NAFLDs, which more frequently evolves towards chronic and serious liver diseases) is characterized by a marked activation of inflammatory cells and the upregulation of several soluble inflammatory mediators. Among several mediators, cytokines and chemokines might play a pivotal active role in NAFLD and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we will update evidence from both basic research and clinical studies on the potential role of cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of NAFLD. PMID:22371632

  15. The chemokine receptor CCR7 promotes mammary tumorigenesis through amplification of stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Boyle, S T; Ingman, W V; Poltavets, V; Faulkner, J W; Whitfield, R J; McColl, S R; Kochetkova, M

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is widely implicated in breast cancer pathobiology. Although recent reports correlated high CCR7 levels with more advanced tumor grade and poor prognosis, limited in vivo data are available regarding its specific function in mammary gland neoplasia and the underlying mechanisms involved. To address these questions we generated a bigenic mouse model of breast cancer combined with CCR7 deletion, which revealed that CCR7 ablation results in a considerable delay in tumor onset as well as significantly reduced tumor burden. Importantly, CCR7 was found to exert its function by regulating mammary cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumors. In vivo experiments showed that loss of CCR7 activity either through deletion or pharmacological antagonism significantly decreased functional pools of stem-like cells in mouse primary mammary tumors, providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor-promoting role of this chemokine receptor. These data characterize the oncogenic properties of CCR7 in mammary epithelial neoplasia and point to a new route for therapeutic intervention to target evasive cancer stem cells.

  16. Chemokine Secretion of Human Cells in Response to Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denney, Carolyn F.; Eckmann, Lars; Reed, Sharon L.

    1999-01-01

    The ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates and immunocompromised hosts. Both acute invasion and reactivation of latent infection result in an inflammatory reaction with lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils. The mechanisms responsible for triggering the local host response to toxoplasmosis are not fully understood. Infection of monolayers of human HeLa epithelial cells and fibroblasts with T. gondii resulted in a marked increase in the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8)-specific mRNA and secretion of the proinflammatory and chemoattractant cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), GROα, and MCP-1. Host cell invasion and lysis were required for this response, as tachyzoite lysates alone had no effect on IL-8 secretion. IL-8 release was dependent on the release of soluble host cell factors: IL-1α in HeLa cells and an additional mediator in fibroblasts. HT-29 epithelial cells, which lack IL-1α or another IL-8-inducing activity, did not release IL-8 after infection, although they were efficiently infected with T. gondii and increased IL-8 secretion in response to added IL-1α. These data suggest that proinflammatory chemokine secretion is an important host cell response to toxoplasmosis and that the release of IL-1α and other mediators from lysed host cells is critical for this chemokine response. PMID:10084985

  17. A streptococcal protease that degrades CXC chemokines and impairs bacterial clearance from infected tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Grass, Carlos; Mishalian, Inbal; Dan-Goor, Mary; Belotserkovsky, Ilia; Eran, Yoni; Nizet, Victor; Peled, Amnon; Hanski, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes the life-threatening infection in humans known as necrotizing fasciitis (NF). Infected subcutaneous tissues from an NF patient and mice challenged with the same GAS strain possessed high bacterial loads but a striking paucity of infiltrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). Impaired PMN recruitment was attributed to degradation of the chemokine IL-8 by a GAS serine peptidase. Here, we use bioinformatics approach coupled with target mutagenesis to identify this peptidase as ScpC. We show that SilCR pheromone downregulates scpC transcription via the two-component system—SilA/B. In addition, we demonstrate that in vitro, ScpC degrades the CXC chemokines: IL-8 (human), KC, and MIP-2 (both murine). Furthermore, using a murine model of human NF, we demonstrate that ScpC, but not the C5a peptidase ScpA, is an essential virulence factor. An ScpC-deficient mutant is innocuous for untreated mice but lethal for PMN-depleted mice. ScpC degrades KC and MIP-2 locally in the infected skin tissues, inhibiting PMN recruitment. In conclusion, ScpC represents a novel GAS virulence factor functioning to directly inactivate a key element of the host innate immune response. PMID:16977314

  18. Dynamic switching mechanisms of a CC chemokine, CCL5 (RANTES). A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Emanuel; Pivkin, Igor

    CCL5 (RANTES) belongs to the class of pro-inflammatory chemokines which are part of the human immune-response. It is known to activate leukocytes through its associated chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and plays a key role in several malignancies, including HIV-1 infections and cancer. In this talk, we present our results from enhanced sampling simulations of the CCL5 (RANTES) monomer. We find that this protein can adopt 2 different conformations : a globular form, with an orthogonal alignment of the N-terminal part, and a 'cis' form, in which the N-terminus is aligned parallel to the β-strand interface. A detailed analysis of the structure reveals that each of these states is stabilized by salt-bridges along the sequence, and corresponds to a defined dihedral-geometry of the 2 disulfide bridges Cys10-34 and Cys11-50. We derive a uniform distribution of transitions from the globular form of CCL5 (RANTES), and find that each of the main conformers adopts different electrostatic patterns.

  19. Tumor stroma and chemokines control T-cell migration into melanoma following Temozolomide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kar Wai; Evrard, Maximilien; Tham, Muly; Hong, Michelle; Huang, Caleb; Kato, Masashi; Prevost-Blondel, Armelle; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Ng, Lai Guan; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The infiltration of T lymphocytes within tumors is associated with better outcomes in cancer patients, yet current understanding of factors that influence T-lymphocyte infiltration into tumors remains incomplete. In our study, Temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapeutic drug used to treat metastatic melanoma, induced T-cell infiltration into transplanted melanoma and into genitourinary (GU) tumors in mice developing spontaneous melanoma. In contrast, TMZ treatment did not increase T-cell infiltration into cutaneous tumors, despite similar increases in the expression of the (C-X-C) chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in all sites after TMZ exposure. Our findings reveal that the matrix architecture of the GU tumor stroma, and its ability to present CXCL9 and CXCL10 after TMZ treatment played a key role in favouring T-cell infiltration. We subsequently demonstrate that modifications of these key elements by combined collagenase and TMZ treatment induced T-cell infiltration into skin tumors. T cells accumulating within GU tumors after TMZ treatment exhibited T helper type-1 effector and cytolytic functional phenotypes, which are important for control of tumor growth. Our findings highlight the importance of the interaction between tumor stroma and chemokines in influencing T-cell migration into tumors, thereby impacting immune control of tumor growth. This knowledge will aid the development of strategies to promote T-cell infiltration into cancerous lesions and has the potential to markedly improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25949877

  20. Chemokine-mediated B cell trafficking during early rabbit GALT development

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shi-Kang; Volgina, Veronica V.; Sethupathi, Periannan; Knight, Katherine L.; Lanning, Dennis K.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial and host cell interactions stimulate rabbit B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). B cells at the base of appendix follicles begin proliferating and diversifying their V-(D)-J genes around 1 week of age, ∼5 days after B cells first begin entering appendix follicles, To gain insight into the microbial and host cell interactions that stimulate B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire, we analyzed B cell trafficking within follicles during the first week of life. We visualized B cells, as well as chemokines that mediate B cell homing in lymphoid tissues, by in situ hybridization, and examined B cell chemokine receptor expression by flow cytometry. We found that B cells were activated, and began downregulating their BCRs, well before a detectable B cell proliferative region appeared at the follicle base. The proliferative region was similar to germinal center dark zones, in that it exhibited elevated CXCL12 mRNA expression, and B cells that upregulated CXCR4 mRNA in response to signals acquired from select intestinal commensals localized in this region. Our results suggest that, after entering appendix follicles, B cells home sequentially to the FAE, the FDC network, the B cell:T cell boundary and, ultimately, the base of the follicle, where they enter a proliferative program and diversify the primary antibody repertoire. PMID:25385821

  1. Antagonism of the chemokine Ccl5 ameliorates experimental liver fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Berres, Marie-Luise; Koenen, Rory R.; Rueland, Anna; Zaldivar, Mirko Moreno; Heinrichs, Daniel; Sahin, Hacer; Schmitz, Petra; Streetz, Konrad L.; Berg, Thomas; Gassler, Nikolaus; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Proudfoot, Amanda; Weber, Christian; Trautwein, Christian; Wasmuth, Hermann E.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells in response to chronic inflammation represents a crucial step in the development of liver fibrosis. However, the molecules involved in the interaction between immune cells and stellate cells remain obscure. Herein, we identify the chemokine CCL5 (also known as RANTES), which is induced in murine and human liver after injury, as a central mediator of this interaction. First, we showed in patients with liver fibrosis that CCL5 haplotypes and intrahepatic CCL5 mRNA expression were associated with severe liver fibrosis. Consistent with this, we detected Ccl5 mRNA and CCL5 protein in 2 mouse models of liver fibrosis, induced by either injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) or feeding on a methionine and choline–deficient (MCD) diet. In these models, Ccl5–/– mice exhibited decreased hepatic fibrosis, with reduced stellate cell activation and immune cell infiltration. Transplantation of Ccl5-deficient bone marrow into WT recipients attenuated liver fibrosis, identifying infiltrating hematopoietic cells as the main source of Ccl5. We then showed that treatment with the CCL5 receptor antagonist Met-CCL5 inhibited cultured stellate cell migration, proliferation, and chemokine and collagen secretion. Importantly, in vivo administration of Met-CCL5 greatly ameliorated liver fibrosis in mice and was able to accelerate fibrosis regression. Our results define a successful therapeutic approach to reduce experimental liver fibrosis by antagonizing Ccl5 receptors. PMID:20978355

  2. Abrogation of CC chemokine receptor 9 ameliorates ventricular remodeling in mice after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yijie; Liu, Tao; Chen, Yuting; Tang, Yanhong; Wang, Teng; Hu, Dan; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    CC chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9), which is a unique receptor for CC chemokine ligand (CCL25), is mainly expressed on lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes/macrophages. CCR9 mediates the chemotaxis of inflammatory cells and participates in the pathological progression of inflammatory diseases. However, the role of CCR9 in the pathological process of myocardial infarction (MI) remains unexplored; inflammation plays a key role in this process. Here, we used CCR9 knockout mice to determine the functional significance of CCR9 in regulating post-MI cardiac remodeling and its underlying mechanism. MI was induced by surgical ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in CCR9 knockout mice and their CCR9+/+ littermates. Our results showed that the CCR9 expression levels were up-regulated in the hearts of the MI mice. Abrogation of CCR9 improved the post-MI survival rate and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and decreased the infarct size. In addition, the CCR9 knockout mice exhibited attenuated inflammation, apoptosis, structural and electrical remodeling compared with the CCR9+/+ MI mice. Mechanistically, CCR9 mainly regulated the pathological response by interfering with the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. In conclusion, the data reveal that CCR9 serves as a novel modulator of pathological progression following MI through NF-κB and MAPK signaling. PMID:27585634

  3. Inhibition of infection-mediated preterm birth by administration of broad spectrum chemokine inhibitor in mice.

    PubMed

    Shynlova, Oksana; Dorogin, Anna; Li, Yunqing; Lye, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the single most important cause of perinatal and infant mortality worldwide. Maternal infection can result in PTB. We investigated the ability of a Broad Spectrum Chemokine Inhibitor (BSCI) to prevent infection-induced PTB in mice. PTB was initiated in pregnant mice by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 μg). Half the mice received BSCI (10 mg/kg) 24 hrs prior to and immediately before LPS administration. The impact of LPS alone or LPS plus BSCI was assessed on (i) injection-to-delivery interval, foetal survival rate, placental and neonates' weight; (ii) amniotic fluid and maternal plasma cytokine levels (by Luminex assay); foetal and maternal tissue cytokine gene expression levels (by Real-Time RT-PCR); (iii) immune cells infiltration into the uterine tissue (by stereological immunohistochemistry). Pre-treatment with BSCI (i) decreased LPS-induced PTB (64% versus 100%, P < 0.05); (ii) significantly attenuated cytokine/chemokine expression in maternal tissues (plasma, liver, myometrium, decidua); (iii) significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration in the mouse myometrium. BSCI-treated mice in which PTB was delayed till term had live foetuses with normal placental and foetal weight. BSCI represents a promising new class of therapeutics for PTB. In a mouse model of preterm labour, BCSI suppresses systemic inflammation in maternal tissues which resulted in the reduced incidence of LPS-mediated PTB. These data provide support for efforts to target inflammatory responses as a means of preventing PTB. PMID:24894878

  4. Chemokine-Targeted Mouse Models of Human Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J.; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired sub-cutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening. PMID:26006007

  5. Disruption of mTORC1 in Macrophages Decreases Chemokine Gene Expression and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Ding; Jiang, Hongfeng; Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Ganda, Anjali; Abramowicz, Sandra; Welch, Carrie; Almazan, Felicidad; Zhu, Yi; Miller, Yury I; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor, rapamycin, has been shown to decrease atherosclerosis, even while increasing plasma LDL levels. This suggests an anti-atherogenic effect possibly mediated by modulation of inflammatory responses in atherosclerotic plaques. Objective To assess the role of macrophage mTORC1 in atherogenesis. Methods and Results We transplanted bone marrow from mice in which a key mTORC1 adaptor, Raptor, was deleted in macrophages by Cre/loxP recombination (Mac-RapKO mice) into Ldlr-/- mice and then fed them the Western-type diet (WTD). Atherosclerotic lesions from Mac-RapKO mice showed decreased infiltration of macrophages, lesion size and chemokine gene expression compared with control mice. Treatment of macrophages with minimally modified LDL (mmLDL) resulted in increased levels of chemokine mRNAs and STAT3 phosphorylation; these effects were reduced in Mac-RapKO macrophages. While wild-type and Mac-RapKO macrophages showed similar STAT3 phosphorylation on Tyr705, Mac-RapKO macrophages showed decreased STAT3 Ser727 phosphorylation in response to mmLDL treatment and decreased Ccl2 promoter binding of STAT3. Conclusions The results demonstrate cross-talk between nutritionally-induced mTORC1 signaling and mmLDL-mediated inflammatory signaling via combinatorial phosphorylation of STAT3 in macrophages, leading to increased STAT3 activity on the CCL2 (MCP-1)promoter with pro-atherogenic consequences. PMID:24687132

  6. Adipose tissue in obesity-related inflammation and insulin resistance: cells, cytokines, and chemokines.

    PubMed

    Makki, Kassem; Froguel, Philippe; Wolowczuk, Isabelle

    2013-12-22

    Adipose tissue is a complex organ that comprises a wide range of cell types with diverse energy storage, metabolic regulation, and neuroendocrine and immune functions. Because it contains various immune cells, either adaptive (B and T lymphocytes; such as regulatory T cells) or innate (mostly macrophages and, more recently identified, myeloid-derived suppressor cells), the adipose tissue is now considered as a bona fide immune organ, at the cross-road between metabolism and immunity. Adipose tissue disorders, such as those encountered in obesity and lipodystrophy, cause alterations to adipose tissue distribution and function with broad effects on cytokine, chemokine, and hormone expression, on lipid storage, and on the composition of adipose-resident immune cell populations. The resulting changes appear to induce profound consequences for basal systemic inflammation and insulin sensitivity. The purpose of this review is to synthesize the current literature on adipose cell composition remodeling in obesity, which shows how adipose-resident immune cells regulate inflammation and insulin resistance-notably through cytokine and chemokine secretion-and highlights major research questions in the field.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David L; Lew, Cynthia S; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T; McDaniel, S Wade; Jones, Nathan M; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface.

  8. Respiratory syncytical virus-induced chemokine expression in the lower airways: eosinophil recruitment and degranulation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A M; Bonville, C A; Rosenberg, H F; Domachowske, J B

    1999-06-01

    Characterization of chemokine expression patterns in virus-infected epithelial cells provides important clues to the pathophysiology of such infections. The aim of this study was to determine the chemokine response pattern of respiratory epithelium when infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Macrophage inflammatory protein-1-alpha (MIP-1-alpha), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and RANTES concentrations were measured from RSV-infected HEp-2, MRC-5, and WI-38 cell culture supernatants daily following infection. Additionally, MIP-1-alpha, IL-8, and RANTES concentrations were measured from lower respiratory secretions obtained from 10 intubated infants (0-24 mo) with RSV bronchiolitis, and from 10 control subjects. Our results indicate that respiratory epithelial cells respond to RSV infection by producing MIP-1-alpha, IL-8, and RANTES. Production of MIP-1-alpha required ongoing viral replication, whereas RANTES and IL-8 could be elicited by inactivated forms of the virus. MIP-1-alpha, RANTES, and IL-8 were also present in lower airway secretions obtained from patients with RSV bronchiolitis. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), the eosinophil secretory ribonucleases, were detected in lower airway secretions from RSV-infected patients; ECP concentrations correlated with MIP-1-alpha concentrations (r = 0.93). We conclude that MIP-1-alpha is present in the lower airways during severe RSV disease. The correlation between MIP-1-alpha and ECP concentrations suggests a role for eosinophil degranulation products in the pathogenesis of RSV bronchiolitis. PMID:10351940

  9. A novel role for β2-microglobulin: a precursor of antibacterial chemokine in respiratory epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Shean-Jaw; Wang, Chan-Chi; Tseng, Yan-Shen; Lee, Yen-Jung; Chen, Shih-Chieh; Chou, Chi-Hsien; Chuang, Lea-Yea; Hong, Yi-Ren; Lu, Chi-Yu; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chignard, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a panel of cationic molecules secreted in the culture medium of human respiratory epithelial cells (REC) upon activation by IL-1β and different pathogen-associated molecular patterns. A 9 kDa fragment derived from β2-microglobulin (B2M) was identified and named shed 9 kDa B2M (sB2M-9). The primary structure of sB2M-9 was revealed to increase its pI value that potentially could play an important role in innate defense. sB2M-9 exhibits antibacterial activity against Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (SA) but not against Gram negative Klebsiella pneumonia (KP). Upon its binding to SA, sB2M-9 induces clumps, a phenomenon not observed with B2M. Migration of THP-1 monocytes exposed to SA clumps was significantly greater than that to SA without clumps. sB2M-9 binds to SA, more likely as a chemokine, to facilitate THP-1 migration. As a whole, we demonstrated that REC release a novel chemokine with antibacterial activity that is shed from B2M to facilitate THP-1 migration. PMID:27503241

  10. Humoral Immune Pressure Selects for HIV-1 CXC-chemokine Receptor 4-using Variants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nina; Gonzalez, Oscar A; Registre, Ludy; Becerril, Carlos; Etemad, Behzad; Lu, Hong; Wu, Xueling; Lockman, Shahin; Essex, Myron; Moyo, Sikhulile; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Sagar, Manish

    2016-06-01

    Although both C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)- and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)-using HIV-1 strains cause AIDS, the emergence of CXCR4-utilizing variants is associated with an accelerated decline in CD4+ T cells. It remains uncertain if CXCR4-using viruses hasten disease or if these variants only emerge after profound immunological damage. We show that exclusively CXCR4- as compared to cocirculating CCR5-utilizing variants are less sensitive to neutralization by both contemporaneous autologous plasma and plasma pools from individuals that harbor only CCR5-using HIV-1. The CXCR4-utilizing variants, however, do not have a global antigenic change because they remain equivalently susceptible to antibodies that do not target coreceptor binding domains. Studies with envelope V3 loop directed antibodies and chimeric envelopes suggest that the neutralization susceptibility differences are potentially influenced by the V3 loop. In vitro passage of a neutralization sensitive CCR5-using virus in the presence of autologous plasma and activated CD4+ T cells led to the emergence of a CXCR4-utilizing virus in 1 of 3 cases. These results suggest that in some but not necessarily all HIV-1 infected individuals humoral immune pressure against the autologous virus selects for CXCR4-using variants, which potentially accelerates disease progression. Our observations have implications for using antibodies for HIV-1 immune therapy. PMID:27428434

  11. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, David L.; Lew, Cynthia S.; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T.; McDaniel, S. Wade; Jones, Nathan M.; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface. PMID:27275606

  12. Up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Tao-Sheng; Soyama, Akihiko; Tanaka, Takayuki; Yan, Chen; Sakai, Yusuke; Hidaka, Masaaki; Kinoshita, Ayaka; Natsuda, Koji; Fujii, Mio; Kugiyama, Tota; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Gu, Weili; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Although the healthy liver is known to have high regenerative potential, poor liver regeneration under pathological conditions remains a substantial problem. We investigated the key molecules that impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver. C57BL/6 mice were randomly subjected to partial hepatectomy and bile duct ligation (PH+BDL group, n = 16), partial hepatectomy only (PH group, n = 16), or sham operation (Sham group, n = 16). The liver sizes and histological findings were similar in the PH and sham groups 14 days after operation. However, compared with those in the sham group, the livers in mice in the PH+BDL group had a smaller size, a lower cell proliferative activity, and more fibrotic tissue 14 days after the operation, suggesting the insufficient regeneration of the cholestatic liver. Pathway-focused array analysis showed that many genes were up- or down-regulated over 1.5-fold in both PH+BDL and PH groups at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment. Interestingly, more genes that were functionally related to the extracellular matrix and inflammatory chemokines were found in the PH+BDL group than in the PH group at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Our data suggest that up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver. PMID:27226149

  13. KLF2 deficiency in T cells results in unrestrained cytokine production and bystander chemokine receptor upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Michael A.; Takada, Kensuke; Skon, Cara; Reiner, Steven L.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcription factor KLF2 regulates T cell trafficking by promoting expression of the lipid binding receptor, S1P1, and the selectin, CD62L. Recently, it was proposed that KLF2 also represses the expression of chemokine receptors. We confirm the upregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 on KLF2 deficient T cells. However, we show that this is a cell nonautonomous effect, as revealed by CXCR3 upregulation on WT bystander cells in mixed bone marrow chimeras with KLF2 deficient cells. Furthermore, we show that KLF2 deficient T cells overproduce IL-4, leading to the upregulation of CXCR3 through an IL-4 receptor and eomesodermin dependent pathway. Consistent with the increased IL-4 production, we find high levels of serum IgE in mice with T cell specific KLF2 deficiency. Our findings support a model where KLF2 regulates T cell trafficking by direct regulation of S1P1 and CD62L, and restrains spontaneous cytokine production in naive T cells. PMID:19592277

  14. Airway Epithelium Interactions with Aeroallergens: Role of Secreted Cytokines and Chemokines in Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Vivek D.; Vliagoftis, Harissios

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense against the constituents of the inhaled air, which include allergens, pathogens, pollutants, and toxic compounds. The epithelium not only prevents the penetration of these foreign substances into the interstitium, but also senses their presence and informs the organism’s immune system of the impending assault. The epithelium accomplishes the latter through the release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that recruit and activate innate immune cells at the site of assault. These epithelial responses aim to eliminate the inhaled foreign substances and minimize their detrimental effects to the organism. Quite frequently, however, the innate immune responses of the epithelium to inhaled substances lead to chronic and high level release of pro-inflammatory mediators that may mediate the lung pathology seen in asthma. The interactions of airway epithelial cells with allergens will be discussed with particular focus on interactions-mediated epithelial release of cytokines and chemokines and their role in the immune response. As pollutants are other major constituents of inhaled air, we will also discuss how pollutants may alter the responses of airway epithelial cells to allergens. PMID:25883597

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) CXC chemokine ligand 12.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Shiou; Wang, Ting-Yu; Liu, Chin-Feng; Lin, Hao-Ping; Chen, Young-Mao; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2015-12-01

    Chemokines are a family of soluble peptides that can recruit a wide range of immune cells to sites of infection and disease. The CXCL12 is a chemokine that binds to its cognate receptor CXCR4 and thus involved in multiple physiological and pathophysiological processes. In this study, we cloned and characterized CXCL12 from Epinephelus coioides (osgCXCL12). We found that the open reading frame of osgCXCL12 consists of 98 amino acid residues with the small cytokine C-X-C domain located between residues 29 and 87. Higher expression levels for osgCXCL12 were detected at the kitting stage, compared with the prolarva and larva shape stages. The expression patterns revealed that osgCXCL12 may play a key role in early grouper development. We detected mRNA transcripts for osgCXCL12 in healthy tissues and found the highest osgCXCL12 expression in the head kidney. Furthermore, a time-course analysis revealed significantly increased osgCXCL12 and osgCXCR4 expression levels after the nervous necrosis virus (NNV) challenge. In addition, expression of osgCXCL12 was affected by injection with microbial mimics [LPS and poly(I:C)]. These results suggest that osgCXCL12 is associated with inflammatory and developmental processes in the grouper.

  16. Monocyte Subsets and Related Chemokines in Carotid Artery Stenosis and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Gerrit M; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Teebken, Omke E; Schuppner, Ramona; Dirks, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Maye, Gerrit; Limbourg, Florian P; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenosis (CS) is an important cause of ischemic stroke. However, reliable markers for the purpose of identification of high-risk, so-called vulnerable carotid plaques, are still lacking. Monocyte subsets are crucial players in atherosclerosis and might also contribute to plaque rupture. In this study we, therefore, aimed to investigate the potential role of monocyte subsets and associated chemokines as clinical biomarkers for vulnerability of CS. Patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CS (n = 21), patients with cardioembolic ischemic strokes (n = 11), and controls without any cardiovascular disorder (n = 11) were examined. Cardiovascular risk was quantified using the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS). Monocyte subsets in peripheral blood were measured by quantitative flow cytometry. Plaque specimens were histologically analyzed. Furthermore, plasma levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and fractalkine were measured. Intermediate monocytes (Mon2) were significantly elevated in symptomatic and asymptomatic CS-patients compared to controls. Mon2 counts positively correlated with the ESRS. Moreover, stroke patients showed an elevation of Mon2 compared to controls, independent of the ESRS. MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic than in those with asymptomatic CS. Several histological criteria significantly differed between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. However, there was no association of monocyte subsets or chemokines with histological features of plaque vulnerability. Due to the multifactorial influence on monocyte subsets, the usability as clinical markers for plaque vulnerability seems to be limited. However, monocyte subsets may be critically involved in the pathology of CS. PMID:27023515

  17. Up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Tao-Sheng; Soyama, Akihiko; Tanaka, Takayuki; Yan, Chen; Sakai, Yusuke; Hidaka, Masaaki; Kinoshita, Ayaka; Natsuda, Koji; Fujii, Mio; Kugiyama, Tota; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Gu, Weili; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Although the healthy liver is known to have high regenerative potential, poor liver regeneration under pathological conditions remains a substantial problem. We investigated the key molecules that impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver. C57BL/6 mice were randomly subjected to partial hepatectomy and bile duct ligation (PH+BDL group, n = 16), partial hepatectomy only (PH group, n = 16), or sham operation (Sham group, n = 16). The liver sizes and histological findings were similar in the PH and sham groups 14 days after operation. However, compared with those in the sham group, the livers in mice in the PH+BDL group had a smaller size, a lower cell proliferative activity, and more fibrotic tissue 14 days after the operation, suggesting the insufficient regeneration of the cholestatic liver. Pathway-focused array analysis showed that many genes were up- or down-regulated over 1.5-fold in both PH+BDL and PH groups at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment. Interestingly, more genes that were functionally related to the extracellular matrix and inflammatory chemokines were found in the PH+BDL group than in the PH group at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Our data suggest that up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver.

  18. Tobacco smoke induces production of chemokine CCL20 to promote lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Zhen; Cheng, Xin; Li, Xin-Chun; Liu, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Xian-Quan; Shi, Xu; Wang, Zai-Yong; Guo, Yong-Qing; Wen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Yun-Chao; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2015-07-10

    Tobacco kills nearly 6 million people each year, and 90% of the annual 1.59 million lung cancer deaths worldwide are caused by cigarette smoke. Clinically, a long latency is required for individuals to develop lung cancer since they were first exposed to smoking. In this study, we aimed to identify clinical relevant inflammatory factors that are critical for carcinogenesis by treating normal human lung epithelial cells with tobacco carcinogen nicotine-derived nitrosaminoketone (NNK) for a long period (60 days) and systematic screening in 84 cytokines/chemokines. We found that a chemokine CCL20 was significantly up-regulated by NNK, and in 78/173 (45.1%) patients the expression of CCL20 was higher in tumor samples than their adjacent normal lung tissues. Interestingly, CCL20 was up-regulated in 48/92 (52.2%) smoker and 29/78 (37.2%) nonsmoker patients (p = 0.05), and high CCL20 was associated with poor prognosis. NNK induced the production of CCL20, which promoted lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. In addition, an anti-inflammation drug, dexamethasone, inhibited NNK-induced CCL20 production and suppressed lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that CCL20 is crucial for tobacco smoke-caused lung cancer, and anti-CCL20 could be a rational approach to fight against this deadly disease.

  19. Cooperation between interleukin-5 and the chemokine eotaxin to induce eosinophil accumulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were designed to study the effect of systemically administered IL-5 on local eosinophil accumulation induced by the intradermal injection of the chemokine eotaxin in the guinea pig. Intravenous interleukin-5 (IL-5) stimulated a rapid and dramatic increase in the numbers of accumulating eosinophils induced by i.d.- injected eotaxin and, for comparison, leukotriene B4. The numbers of locally accumulating eosinophils correlated directly with a rapid increase in circulating eosinophils: circulating eosinophil numbers were 13-fold higher 1 h after intravenous IL-5 (18.3 pmol/kg). This increase in circulating cells corresponded with a reduction in the number of displaceable eosinophils recovered after flushing out the femur bone marrow cavity. Intradermal IL-5, at the doses tested, did not induce significant eosinophil accumulation. We propose that these experiments simulate important early features of the tissue response to local allergen exposure in a sensitized individual, with eosinophil chemoattractant chemokines having an important local role in eosinophil recruitment from blood microvessels, and IL-5 facilitating this process by acting remotely as a hormone to stimulate the release into the circulation of a rapidly mobilizable pool of bone marrow eosinophils. This action of IL-5 would be complementary to the other established activities of IL-5 that operate over a longer time course. PMID:7561691

  20. Host chemokine and cytokine response in the endocervix within the first developmental cycle of Chlamydia muridarum.

    PubMed

    Rank, Roger G; Lacy, H Marie; Goodwin, Anna; Sikes, James; Whittimore, Judy; Wyrick, Priscilla B; Nagarajan, Uma M

    2010-01-01

    The initial host response in a primary chlamydial infection is the onset of acute inflammation. However, we still know very little about the early temporal events in the induction of the acute inflammatory response and how these events relate to the initial chlamydial developmental cycle in an actual genital infection. Because it was critical to initiate a synchronous infection in the endocervix in the first 24 h to evaluate the sequential expression of the host response, we developed the surgical methodology of depositing Chlamydia muridarum directly on the endocervix. Cervical tissue was collected at 3, 12, and 24 h after inoculation and the expression array of chemokines, cytokines, and receptors was assessed to characterize the response during the initial developmental cycle. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration was first observed at 12 h after inoculation, and a few PMNs could be seen in the epithelium at 24 h. Electron microscopic analysis at 24 h showed that virtually all inclusions were at the same stage of development, indicating a synchronous infection. Several chemokine and cytokine genes were expressed as early as 3 h after infection, but by 12 h, 41 genes were expressed. Thus, activation of the host response occurs both with the introduction of elementary bodies into the host and early replication of reticulate bodies. No significant response was observed when UV-inactivated organisms were inoculated into the cervix at any time interval. This model provides an ideal opportunity to investigate the mechanisms by which the early inflammatory response is induced in vivo.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David L; Lew, Cynthia S; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T; McDaniel, S Wade; Jones, Nathan M; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface. PMID:27275606

  2. Neolignans from the Arils of Myristica fragrans as Potent Antagonists of CC Chemokine Receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Toshio; Hachiman, Ikuko; Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Nishida, Eriko; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Hayakawa, Takao; Yoshie, Osamu; Muraoka, Osamu; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-08-26

    CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) is expressed selectively in eosinophils, basophils, and some Th2 cells and plays a major role in allergic diseases. A methanol extract from the arils of Myristica fragrans inhibited CC chemokine ligand 11-induced chemotaxis in CCR3-expressing L1.2 cells at 100 μg/mL. From this extract, eight new neolignans, maceneolignans A-H (1-8), were isolated, and their stereostructures were elucidated from their spectroscopic values and chemical properties. Of those constituents, compounds 1, 4, 6, and 8 and (+)-erythro-(7S,8R)-Δ(8')-7-hydroxy-3,4-methylenedioxy-3',5'-dimethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (11), (-)-(8R)-Δ(8')-3,4-methylenedioxy-3',5'-dimethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (17), (+)-licarin A (20), nectandrin B (25), verrucosin (26), and myristicin (27) inhibited CCR3-mediated chemotaxis at a concentration of 1 μM. Among them, 1 (EC50 1.6 μM), 6 (1.5 μM), and 8 (1.4 μM) showed relatively strong activities, which were comparable to that of a synthetic CCR3 selective antagonist, SB328437 (0.78 μM). PMID:27419473

  3. The chemokine receptors ACKR2 and CCR2 reciprocally regulate lymphatic vessel density

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kit M; Danuser, Renzo; Stein, Jens V; Graham, Delyth; Nibbs, Robert JB; Graham, Gerard J

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages regulate lymphatic vasculature development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating their recruitment to developing, and adult, lymphatic vascular sites are not known. Here, we report that resting mice deficient for the inflammatory chemokine-scavenging receptor, ACKR2, display increased lymphatic vessel density in a range of tissues under resting and regenerating conditions. This appears not to alter dendritic cell migration to draining lymph nodes but is associated with enhanced fluid drainage from peripheral tissues and thus with a hypotensive phenotype. Examination of embryonic skin revealed that this lymphatic vessel density phenotype is developmentally established. Further studies indicated that macrophages and the inflammatory CC-chemokine CCL2, which is scavenged by ACKR2, are associated with this phenotype. Accordingly, mice deficient for the CCL2 signalling receptor, CCR2, displayed a reciprocal phenotype of reduced lymphatic vessel density. Further examination revealed that proximity of pro-lymphangiogenic macrophages to developing lymphatic vessel surfaces is increased in ACKR2-deficient mice and reduced in CCR2-deficient mice. Therefore, these receptors regulate vessel density by reciprocally modulating pro-lymphangiogenic macrophage recruitment, and proximity, to developing, resting and regenerating lymphatic vessels. PMID:25271254

  4. The Role of Chemokines in Hepatitis C Virus-Mediated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Anette; Brenndörfer, Erwin Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem affecting more than 170 million people. A chronic HCV infection is associated with liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. To enable viral persistence, HCV has developed mechanisms to modulate both innate and adaptive immunity. The recruitment of antiviral immune cells in the liver is mainly dependent on the release of specific chemokines. Thus, the modulation of their expression could represent an efficient viral escape mechanism to hamper specific immune cell migration to the liver during the acute phase of the infection. HCV-mediated changes in hepatic immune cell chemotaxis during the chronic phase of the infection are significantly affecting antiviral immunity and tissue damage and thus influence survival of both the host and the virus. This review summarizes our current understanding of the HCV-mediated modulation of chemokine expression and of its impact on the development of liver disease. A profound knowledge of the strategies used by HCV to interfere with the host’s immune response and the pro-fibrotic and pro-carcinogenic activities of HCV is essential to be able to design effective immunotherapies against HCV and HCV-mediated liver diseases. PMID:24646914

  5. Vesicular Trafficking and Signaling for Cytokine and Chemokine Secretion in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Ulrich; Madera-Salcedo, Iris Karina; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Tiwari, Neeraj; Sánchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Ramírez-Valadez, Karla Alina; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Espinosa, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation mast cells (MCs) secrete numerous inflammatory compounds stored in their cytoplasmic secretory granules by a process called anaphylactic degranulation, which is responsible for type I hypersensitivity responses. Prestored mediators include histamine and MC proteases but also some cytokines and growth factors making them available within minutes for a maximal biological effect. Degranulation is followed by the de novo synthesis of lipid mediators such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes as well as a vast array of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, which are responsible for late phase inflammatory responses. While lipid mediators diffuse freely out of the cell through lipid bilayers, both anaphylactic degranulation and secretion of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors depends on highly regulated vesicular trafficking steps that occur along the secretory pathway starting with the translocation of proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. Vesicular trafficking in MCs also intersects with endocytic routes, notably to form specialized cytoplasmic granules called secretory lysosomes. Some of the mediators like histamine reach granules via specific vesicular monoamine transporters directly from the cytoplasm. In this review, we try to summarize the available data on granule biogenesis and signaling events that coordinate the complex steps that lead to the release of the inflammatory mediators from the various vesicular carriers in MCs. PMID:25295038

  6. Pathway-selective suppression of chemokine receptor signaling in B cells by LPS through downregulation of PLC-β2.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Aiko-Konno; Liao, Fang; Zhang, Hongwei H; Hedrick, Michael N; Singh, Satya P; Wu, Dianqing; Farber, Joshua M

    2010-11-01

    Lymphocyte activation leads to changes in chemokine receptor expression. There are limited data, however, on how lymphocyte activators can alter chemokine signaling by affecting downstream pathways. We hypothesized that B cell-activating agents might alter chemokine responses by affecting downstream signal transducers, and that such effects might differ depending on the activator. We found that activating mouse B cells using either anti-IgM or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the surface expression of CCR6 and CCR7 with large increases in chemotaxis to their cognate ligands. By contrast, while anti-IgM also led to enhanced calcium responses, LPS-treated cells showed only small changes in calcium signaling as compared with cells that were freshly isolated. Of particular interest, we found that LPS caused a reduction in the level of B-cell phospholipase C (PLC)-β2 mRNA and protein. Data obtained using PLC-β2(-/-) mice showed that the β2 isoform mediates close to one-half the chemokine-induced calcium signal in resting and anti-IgM-activated B cells, and we found that calcium signals in the LPS-treated cells were boosted by increasing the level of PLC-β2 using transfection, consistent with a functional effect of downregulating PLC-β2. Together, our results show activator-specific effects on responses through B-cell chemokine receptors that are mediated by quantitative changes in a downstream signal-transducing protein, revealing an activity for LPS as a downregulator of PLC-β2, and a novel mechanism for controlling chemokine-induced signals in lymphocytes.

  7. β-Arrestin recruitment and G protein signaling by the atypical human chemokine decoy receptor CCX-CKR.

    PubMed

    Watts, Anne O; Verkaar, Folkert; van der Lee, Miranda M C; Timmerman, Claudia A W; Kuijer, Martien; van Offenbeek, Jody; van Lith, Lambertus H C J; Smit, Martine J; Leurs, Rob; Zaman, Guido J R; Vischer, Henry F

    2013-03-01

    Chemokine receptors form a large subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors that predominantly activate heterotrimeric Gi proteins and are involved in immune cell migration. CCX-CKR is an atypical chemokine receptor with high affinity for CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 chemokines, but is not known to activate intracellular signaling pathways. However, CCX-CKR acts as decoy receptor and efficiently internalizes these chemokines, thereby preventing their interaction with other chemokine receptors, like CCR7 and CCR9. Internalization of fluorescently labeled CCL19 correlated with β-arrestin2-GFP translocation. Moreover, recruitment of β-arrestins to CCX-CKR in response to CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 was demonstrated using enzyme-fragment complementation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer methods. To unravel why CCX-CKR is unable to activate Gi signaling, CCX-CKR chimeras were constructed by substituting its intracellular loops with the corresponding CCR7 or CCR9 domains. The signaling properties of chimeric CCX-CKR receptors were characterized using a cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-driven reporter gene assay. Unexpectedly, wild type CCX-CKR and a subset of the chimeras induced an increase in CRE activity in response to CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 in the presence of the Gi inhibitor pertussis toxin. CCX-CKR signaling to CRE required an intact DRY motif. These data suggest that inactive Gi proteins impair CCX-CKR signaling most likely by hindering the interaction of this receptor with pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins that transduce signaling to CRE. On the other hand, recruitment of the putative signaling scaffold β-arrestin to CCX-CKR in response to chemokines might allow activation of yet to be identified signal transduction pathways.

  8. Inducible Expression of Inflammatory Chemokines in Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Mice: Role of MIP-1α in Lung Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Haeberle, Helene A.; Kuziel, William A.; Dieterich, Hans-Juergen; Casola, Antonella; Gatalica, Zoran; Garofalo, Roberto P.

    2001-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is characterized by profound airway mucosa inflammation, both in infants with naturally acquired infection and in experimentally inoculated animal models. Chemokines are central regulatory molecules in inflammatory, immune, and infectious processes of the lung. In this study, we demonstrate that intranasal infection of BALB/c mice with RSV A results in inducible expression of lung chemokines belonging to the CXC (MIP-2 and IP-10), CC (RANTES, eotaxin, MIP-1β, MIP-1α, MCP-1, TCA-3) and C (lymphotactin) families. Chemokine mRNA expression occurred as early as 24 h following inoculation and persisted for at least 5 days in mice inoculated with the highest dose of virus (107 PFU). In general, levels of chemokine mRNA and protein were dependent on the dose of RSV inoculum and paralleled the intensity of lung cellular inflammation. Immunohisthochemical studies indicated that RSV-induced expression of MIP-1α, one of the most abundantly expressed chemokines, was primarily localized in epithelial cells of the alveoli and bronchioles, as well as in adjoining capillary endothelium. Genetically altered mice with a selective deletion of the MIP-1α gene (−/− mice) demonstrated a significant reduction in lung inflammation following RSV infection, compared to control littermates (+/+ mice). Despite the paucity of infiltrating cells, the peak RSV titer in the lung of −/− mice was not significantly different from that observed in +/+ mice. These results provide the first direct evidence that RSV infection may induce lung inflammation via the early production of inflammatory chemokines. PMID:11134301

  9. Targeting Rac1 signaling inhibits streptococcal M1 protein-induced CXC chemokine formation, neutrophil infiltration and lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songen; Rahman, Milladur; Zhang, Su; Song, Lei; Herwald, Heiko; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Infections with Streptococcus pyogenes exhibit a wide spectrum of infections ranging from mild pharyngitis to severe Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). The M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is most commonly associated with STSS. In the present study, we hypothesized that Rac1 signaling might regulate M1 protein-induced lung injury. We studied the effect of a Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766) on M1 protein-provoked pulmonary injury. Male C57BL/6 mice received NSC23766 prior to M1 protein challenge. Bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue were harvested for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, edema and CXC chemokine formation. Neutrophil expression of Mac-1 was quantified by use of flow cytometry. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Treatment with NSC23766 decreased M1 protein-induced neutrophil infiltration, edema formation and tissue injury in the lung. M1 protein challenge markedly enhanced Mac-1 expression on neutrophils and CXC chemokine levels in the lung. Inhibition of Rac1 activity had no effect on M1 protein-induced expression of Mac-1 on neutrophils. However, Rac1 inhibition markedly decreased M1 protein-evoked formation of CXC chemokines in the lung. Moreover, NSC23766 completely inhibited M1 protein-provoked gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. We conclude that these novel results suggest that Rac1 signaling is a significant regulator of neutrophil infiltration and CXC chemokine production in the lung. Thus, targeting Rac1 activity might be a potent strategy to attenuate streptococcal M1 protein-triggered acute lung damage.

  10. Mitochondrial metabolism during daily torpor in the dwarf Siberian hamster: role of active regulated changes and passive thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jason C L; Gerson, Alexander R; Staples, James F

    2007-11-01

    During daily torpor in the dwarf Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus, metabolic rate is reduced by 65% compared with the basal rate, but the mechanisms involved are contentious. We examined liver mitochondrial respiration to determine the possible role of active regulated changes and passive thermal effects in the reduction of metabolic rate. When assayed at 37 degrees C, state 3 (phosphorylating) respiration, but not state 4 (nonphosphorylating) respiration, was significantly lower during torpor compared with normothermia, suggesting that active regulated changes occur during daily torpor. Using top-down elasticity analysis, we determined that these active changes in torpor included a reduced substrate oxidation capacity and an increased proton conductance of the inner mitochondrial membrane. At 15 degrees C, mitochondrial respiration was at least 75% lower than at 37 degrees C, but there was no difference between normothermia and torpor. This implies that the active regulated changes are likely more important for reducing respiration at high temperatures (i.e., during entrance) and/or have effects other than reducing respiration at low temperatures. The decrease in respiration from 37 degrees C to 15 degrees C resulted predominantly from a considerable reduction of substrate oxidation capacity in both torpid and normothermic animals. Temperature-dependent changes in proton leak and phosphorylation kinetics depended on metabolic state; proton leakiness increased in torpid animals but decreased in normothermic animals, whereas phosphorylation activity decreased in torpid animals but increased in normothermic animals. Overall, we have shown that both active and passive changes to oxidative phosphorylation occur during daily torpor in this species, contributing to reduced metabolic rate.

  11. Placental Chemokine Receptor D6 Is Functionally Impaired in Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Rolfo, Alessandro; Giuffrida, Domenica; Veglia, Manuela; De Spirito, Marco; Scambia, Giovanni; Todros, Tullia; Di Simone, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is defined by new onset of hypertension and proteinuria after the 20th week of gestation and characterized by systemic exaggerated inflammatory response. D6 is a chemokines scavenger receptor that binds with high affinity CC chemokines, internalizes and targets the ligands for degradation. It is expressed in trophoblast-derived tissues and prevents excessive placenta leukocyte infiltration.The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and function of D6 in human placentae from pre-eclamptic and healthy pregnant women. Methods and Results Plasma levels of D6-binding CC chemokines (CCL-2, CCL-3, CCL-4, CCL-7, CCL-11) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, CRP) were analyzed in 37 healthy pregnant women and 38 patients with PE by multiplex bead assay. Higher circulating levels of CCL7, CCL11, IL-6, (p<0.0001) and CRP (p<0.05) were observed in PE women compared to controls. Levels of circulating CCL4 were decreased in PE (p<0.001), while no significant differences of CCL2, CCL3 or TNF-α levels were detected. Immunofluorescent staining of placental sections showed higher expression of D6 receptor in the PE syncytiotrophoblast. Confocal and Western blot (WB) analyses revealed a prevalent distribution of D6 in trophoblast cells membranes in PE. Increased activation of D6 intracellular pathway was observed by Western blot analyses of p-LIMK and p-cofilin in trophoblast cell lysates. D6 functional assays showed reduced scavenging of CCL2 in PE cells compared to controls. Since actin filaments spatial assembling is essential for D6 intracellular trafficking and scavenging activity, we investigated by confocal microscopy trophoblast cytoskeleton organization and we observed a dramatic disarrangement in PE compared to controls. Conclusions our results suggest membrane distribution of D6 receptor on trophoblast cell membranes in PE, together with

  12. Borrelia burgdorferi stimulation of chemokine secretion by cells of monocyte lineage in patients with Lyme arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Joint fluid in patients with Lyme arthritis often contains high levels of CCL4 and CCL2, which are chemoattractants for monocytes and some T cells, and CXCL9 and CXCL10, which are chemoattractants for CD4+ and CD8+ T effector cells. These chemokines are produced primarily by cells of monocyte lineage in TH1-type immune responses. Our goal was to begin to learn how infection with Borrelia burgdorferi leads to the secretion of these chemokines, using patient cell samples. We hypothesized that B. burgdorferi stimulates chemokine secretion from monocytes/macrophages in multiple ways, thereby linking innate and adaptive immune responses. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 24 Lyme arthritis patients were stimulated with B. burgdorferi, interferon (IFN)-γ, or both, and the levels of CCL4, CCL2, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were measured in culture supernatants. CD14+ monocytes/macrophages from PBMC and synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) were stimulated in the same way, using available samples. CXCR3, the receptor for CXCL9 and CXCL10, and CCR5, the receptor for CCL4, were assessed on T cells from PBMC and SFMC. Results In patients with Lyme arthritis, B. burgdorferi but not IFN-γ induced PBMC to secrete CCL4 and CCL2, and B. burgdorferi and IFN-γ each stimulated the production of CXCL9 and CXCL10. However, with the CD14+ cell fraction, B. burgdorferi alone stimulated the secretion of CCL4; B. burgdorferi and IFN-γ together induced CCL2 secretion, and IFN-γ alone stimulated the secretion of CXCL9 and CXCL10. The percentage of T cells expressing CXCR3 or CCR5 was significantly greater in SFMC than PBMC, confirming that TH1 effector cells were recruited to inflamed joints. However, when stimulated with B. burgdorferi or IFN-γ, SFMC and PBMC responded similarly. Conclusions B. burgdorferi stimulates PBMC or CD14+ monocytes/macrophages directly to secrete CCL4, but spirochetal stimulation of other intermediate cells, which are present in PBMC

  13. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1)/Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melissa B; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  14. Chemokine receptor expression by leukemic T cells of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: clinical and histopathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Elisabetta; Vonderheid, Eric C; Thoburn, Christopher J; Bright, Emilie C; Hess, Allan D

    2007-12-01

    Chemokine receptors expressed by normal and neoplastic lymphocytes provide an important mechanism for cells to traffic into the skin and skin-associated lymph nodes. The goal of this study was to correlate chemokine receptor and CD62L expression by circulating neoplastic T cells with the clinical and pathological findings of the leukemic phase of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, primarily Sézary syndrome (SS). Chemokine receptor mRNA transcripts were found in the majority of leukemic cells for CCR1, CCR4, CCR7, CCR10, CXCR3, and CD62L and in 20-50% of the samples for CXCR5. In patients with SS, relatively high expression levels of CCR7 and CCR10 by circulating neoplastic T cells correlated with epidermotropism, CXCR5 expression correlated with density of the dermal infiltrate, and CD62L correlated with extent of lymphadenopathy. Of note, CXCR5 expression and a dense dermal infiltrate correlated with a poor prognosis. The chemokine receptor profile supports the concept that neoplastic T cells are central memory T cells, and that CCR10 and CD62L play a fundamental role respectively in epidermotropism and lymphadenopathy that is observed in SS.

  15. Tumor-derived chemokine MCP-1/CCL2 is sufficient for mediating tumor tropism of adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christine E; Vishwanath, Reena P; Aguilar, Brenda; Starr, Renate; Najbauer, Joseph; Aboody, Karen S; Jensen, Michael C

    2007-09-01

    To exert a therapeutic effect, adoptively transferred tumor-specific CTLs must traffic to sites of tumor burden, exit the circulation, and infiltrate the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examine the ability of adoptively transferred human CTL to traffic to tumors with disparate chemokine secretion profiles independent of tumor Ag recognition. Using a combination of in vivo tumor tropism studies and in vitro biophotonic chemotaxis assays, we observed that cell lines derived from glioma, medulloblastoma, and renal cell carcinoma efficiently chemoattracted ex vivo-expanded primary human T cells. We compared the chemokines secreted by tumor cell lines with high chemotactic activity with those that failed to elicit T cell chemotaxis (Daudi lymphoma, 10HTB neuroblastoma, and A2058 melanoma cells) and found a correlation between tumor-derived production of MCP-1/CCL2 (> or =10 ng/ml) and T cell chemotaxis. Chemokine immunodepletion studies confirmed that tumor-derived MCP-1 elicits effector T cell chemotaxis. Moreover, MCP-1 is sufficient for in vivo T cell tumor tropism as evidenced by the selective accumulation of i.v. administered firefly luciferase-expressing T cells in intracerebral xenografts of tumor transfectants secreting MCP-1. These studies suggest that the capacity of adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumors may be, in part, dictated by the species and amounts of tumor-derived chemokines, in particular MCP-1.

  16. Enhanced tumor trafficking of GD2 chimeric antigen receptor T cells by expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b.

    PubMed

    Craddock, John A; Lu, An; Bear, Adham; Pule, Martin; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Foster, Aaron E

    2010-10-01

    For adoptive T-cell therapy to be effective against solid tumors, tumor-specific T cells must be able to migrate to the tumor site. One requirement for efficient migration is that the effector cells express chemokine receptors that match the chemokines produced either by tumor or tumor-associated cells. In this study, we investigated whether the tumor trafficking of activated T cells (ATCs) bearing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2-CAR) could be enhanced by forced coexpression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b, as this receptor directs migration toward CCL2, a chemokine produced by many tumors, including neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-AS) and primary tumor cells isolated from 6 patients all secreted high levels of CCL2, but GD2-CAR transduced ATCs lacked expression of CCR2 (<5%) and migrated poorly to recombinant CCL2 or tumor supernatants. After retroviral transduction, however, ATCs expressed high levels of CCR2b (>60%) and migrated well in vitro. We expressed firefly luciferase in CCR2b-expressing ATCs and observed improved homing (>10-fold) to CCL2-secreting neuroblastoma compared with CCR2-negative ATCs. As a result, ATCs co-modified with both CCR2b and GD2-CAR had greater antitumor activity in vivo.

  17. Chemical synthesis of a two-photon-activatable chemokine and photon-guided lymphocyte migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Tang, Shan; Zheng, Ji-Shen; Zhao, Ruozhu; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Shao, Wen; Chang, Hao-Nan; Cheng, Jing-Yuan; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Lei; Qi, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine-guided lymphocyte positioning in tissues is crucial for normal operation of the immune system. Direct, real-time manipulation and measurement of single-cell responses to chemokines is highly desired for investigating the cell biology of lymphocyte migration in vivo. Here we report the development of the first two-photon-activatable chemokine CCL5 through efficient one-pot total chemical synthesis in milligram scale. By spatiotemporally controlled photoactivation, we show at the single-cell level that T cells perceive the directional cue without relying on PI3K activities, which are nonetheless required for persistent migration over an extended period of time. By intravital imaging, we demonstrate artificial T-cell positioning in cutaneous tissues and lymph nodes. This work establishes a general strategy to develop high-quality photo-activatable protein agents through tailor-designed caging of multiple residues and highlights the potential of photo-activatable chemokines for understanding and potential therapeutic manipulation of cell positioning and position-controlled cell behaviours in vivo. PMID:26008852

  18. Enhanced Tumor Trafficking of GD2 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells by Expression of the Chemokine Receptor CCR2b

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, John A; Lu, An; Bear, Adham; Pule, Martin; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Foster, Aaron E

    2010-01-01

    For adoptive T cell therapy to be effective against solid tumors, tumor-specific T cells must be able to migrate to the tumor site. One requirement for efficient migration is that the effector cells express chemokine receptors that match the chemokines produced either by tumor or tumor-associated cells. In this study, we investigated whether the tumor trafficking of activated T cells (ATCs) bearing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2-CAR) could be enhanced by forced co-expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b, since this receptor directs migration towards CCL2, a chemokine produced by many tumors, including neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-AS) and primary tumor cells isolated from six patients all secreted high levels of CCL2, but GD2-CAR transduced ATCs lacked expression of CCR2 (<5%) and migrated poorly to recombinant CCL2 or tumor supernatants. Following retroviral transduction, however, ATCs expressed high levels of CCR2b (>60%) and migrated well in vitro. We expressed firefly luciferase in CCR2b-expressing ATCs and observed improved homing (>10-fold) to CCL2-secreting neuroblastoma compared to CCR2 negative ATCs. As a result, ATCs co-modified with both CCR2b and GD2-CAR had greater anti-tumor activity in vivo. PMID:20842059

  19. Regulation of naïve fetal T-cell migration by the chemokines Exodus-2 and Exodus-3.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, K; Brahmi, Z; Hromas, R

    1999-08-01

    We and other workers have recently isolated three novel CC chemokines termed Exodus-1/LARC/Mip-3alpha, Exodus-2/6Ckine/SLC/TCA4, and Exodus-3/Mip-3beta/CKbeta11/ELC. These chemokines share an amino terminal Asp-Cys-Cys-Leu sequence, unique among all chemokines. They also selectively regulate migration of adult T cells. Indeed, there is evidence that Exodus-2 and -3 are critical for adult T-cell adhesion to high endothelial venules in lymph nodes, a rate-limiting step for T-cell trafficking through nodal tissue. Less is known of the factors controlling migration of naïve human fetal T cells. We tested whether these chemokines could regulate chemotaxis in cord blood T-cell populations, and compared that efficacy with normal peripheral blood adult T cells. The findings indicated that naive CD45RA+ cord blood T-cell migration is stimulated by Exodus-2 and -3, and CD4+ cord blood T cells are attracted preferentially by Exodus-2 or -3 as compared with CD8+. Exodus-2 and -3 are likely to be critical in regulating the flux of naive CD4 + fetal T-cell population of secondary lymphoid tissue.

  20. Expressed gene sequence and bioactivity of the IFN-gamma-response chemokine CXCL11 of swine and cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the cloning and characterization of expressed gene sequences of the swine and bovine interferon-gamma inducible chemokine CXCL11, or I-TAC, associated with T helper 1-type immune responses, and affirmation of bioactivity of their yeast expressed protein products. The coding reg...

  1. Distinct expression and function of the novel mouse chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-5 in lung allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse CC chemokine cDNA from the lung during an allergic inflammatory reaction. The protein encoded by this cDNA is chemotactic for eosinophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. Based on its similarities in sequence and function with other CC chemokines, we have named it mouse monocyte chemotactic protein-5 (mMCP- 5). Under noninflammatory conditions, expression of mMCP-5 in the lymph nodes and thymus is constitutive and is generally restricted to stromal cells. Neutralization of mMCP-5 protein with specific antibodies during an allergic inflammatory reaction in vivo resulted in a reduction in the number of eosinophils that accumulated in the lung. Moreover, mMCP- 5 mRNA expression in vivo is regulated differently from that of other major CC chemokines in the lung during the allergic reaction, including Eotaxin. The presence of lymphocytes is essential for expression of mMCP-5 by alveolar macrophages and smooth muscle cells in the lung, and the induction of mMCP-5 RNA occurs earlier than that of the eosinophil chemokine Eotaxin during allergic inflammation. In contrast to Eotaxin, mRNA for mMCP-5 can be produced by mast cells. From these results, we postulate that mMCP-5 plays a pivotal role during the early stages of allergic lung inflammation. PMID:8920881

  2. Alpha-quartz-induced chemokine expression by rat lung epithelial cells: effects of in vivo and in vitro particle exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, K. E.; Howard, B. W.; Carter, J. M.; Asquith, T.; Johnston, C.; Detilleux, P.; Kunkel, S. L.; Isfort, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that can play a key role in leukocyte recruitment to sites of tissue injury or infection. Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to alpha-quartz as well as other noxious particles increases chemokine gene expression in rat lung, although the cells responsible for chemokine expression and the mechanisms underlying this response have remained unclear. The present studies demonstrate that exposure of rats to alpha-quartz induced expression of mRNA for the chemokine macrophage-inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 in epithelial cells lining the terminal bronchioles and alveolar ducts as well as macrophages and alveolar type II cells in the more distal lung. Treatment of rats with an anti-MIP-2 antiserum before alpha-quartz exposure markedly attenuated neutrophilic infiltration of the lungs demonstrating an important role for MIP-2 in alpha-quartz-induced pulmonary inflammation. In vitro exposure of primary cultures of rat alveolar type II cells or the rat alveolar type II cell line RLE-6TN to tumor necrosis factor-alpha, endotoxin, or alpha-quartz increased mRNA for MIP-2 as well as the structurally and functionally similar chemokine cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant but not the chemokine MIP-1 alpha. The alpha-quartz-induced increase in epithelial MIP-2 mRNA resulted, at least in part, from increased gene transcription and was associated with the release of active MIP-2 protein. Induction of RLE-6TN MIP-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant mRNA expression was not unique to alpha-quartz, being also increased by crocidolite asbestus fibers but not by titanium dioxide or MMVF-10 glass fibers. These findings indicate that epithelial cells contribute to chemokine expression in rat lung after exposure to alpha-quartz and potentially other noxious particles and suggest that alpha-quartz-activated MIP-2 expression in vivo results, at least in part, from a direct action of the particles on the lung epithelium. Images

  3. Chemokine receptor CCR7 required for T lymphocyte exit from peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Debes, Gudrun F; Arnold, Carrie N; Young, Alan J; Krautwald, Stefan; Lipp, Martin; Hay, John B; Butcher, Eugene C

    2005-09-01

    Lymphocytes travel throughout the body to carry out immune surveillance and participate in inflammatory reactions. Their path takes them from blood through tissues into lymph and back to blood. Molecules that control lymphocyte recruitment into extralymphoid tissues are well characterized, but exit is assumed to be random. Here, we showed that lymphocyte emigration from the skin was regulated and was sensitive to pertussis toxin. CD4(+) lymphocytes emigrated more efficiently than CD8(+) or B lymphocytes. T lymphocytes in the afferent lymph expressed functional chemokine receptor CCR7, and CCR7 was required for T lymphocyte exit from the skin. The regulated expression of CCR7 by tissue T lymphocytes may control their exit, acting with recruitment mechanisms to regulate lymphocyte transit and accumulation during immune surveillance and inflammation. PMID:16116468

  4. Immune evasion by murine melanoma mediated through CC chemokine receptor-10.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Cardones, Adela R; Finkelstein, Steven E; Restifo, Nicholas P; Klaunberg, Brenda A; Nestle, Frank O; Castillo, S Sianna; Dennis, Phillip A; Hwang, Sam T

    2003-11-01

    Human melanoma cells frequently express CC chemokine receptor (CCR)10, a receptor whose ligand (CCL27) is constitutively produced by keratinocytes. Compared with B16 murine melanoma, cells rendered more immunogenic via overexpression of luciferase, B16 cells that overexpressed both luciferase and CCR10 resisted host immune responses and readily formed tumors. In vitro, exposure of tumor cells to CCL27 led to rapid activation of Akt, resistance to cell death induced by melanoma antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent protection from apoptosis induced by Fas cross-linking. In vivo, cutaneous injection of neutralizing antibodies to endogenous CCL27 blocked growth of CCR10-expressing melanoma cells. We propose that CCR10 engagement by locally produced CCL27 allows melanoma cells to escape host immune antitumor killing mechanisms (possibly through activation of PI3K/Akt), thereby providing a means for tumor progression. PMID:14581607

  5. Altered cytokine and chemokine profiles in multiple myeloma and precursor disease

    PubMed Central

    Zingone, Adriana; Wang, Weixin; Corrigan-Cummins, Meghan; Wu, Shengyang P.; Plyler, Ryan; Korde, Neha; Kwok, Mary; Manasanch, Elisabet E.; Tageja, Nishant; Bhutani, Manisha; Mulquin, Marcia; Zuchlinski, Diamond; Yancey, Mary Ann; Roschewski, Mark; Zhang, Yong; Roccaro, Aldo M.; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Calvo, Katherine R.; Landgren, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no reliable biomarkers are available to predict transformation from smoldering myeloma (SMM) to multiple myeloma (MM). Using an ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) we assessed the levels of a broad range of cytokines and chemokines in the peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) supernatant collected from 14 SMM and 38 MM patients and compared to healthy donors. We found significantly increased levels of key cytokines, in particular CXCL8 (IL-8), associated with progressive disease state (controls→SMM→MM). Cytokine profiles were found similar in PB and BM. Five of fourteen SMM patients (36%) progressed to MM. Our findings, although based on a limited number of patients, suggest that serum-based cytokines may have a future role as biomarkers for disease progression and could potentially be assessed as novel targets for treatment. PMID:25043675

  6. Retinoid X receptor alpha controls innate inflammatory responses through the up-regulation of chemokine expression.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Vanessa; Alameda, Daniel; Rico, Daniel; Mota, Rubén; Gonzalo, Pilar; Cedenilla, Marta; Fischer, Thierry; Boscá, Lisardo; Glass, Christopher K; Arroyo, Alicia G; Ricote, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    The retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha) plays a central role in the regulation of many intracellular receptor signaling pathways and can mediate ligand-dependent transcription by forming homodimers or heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Although several members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily have emerged as important regulators of macrophage gene expression, the existence in vivo of an RXR signaling pathway in macrophages has not been established. Here, we provide evidence that RXRalpha regulates the transcription of the chemokines Ccl6 and Ccl9 in macrophages independently of heterodimeric partners. Mice lacking RXRalpha in myeloid cells exhibit reduced levels of CCL6 and CCL9, impaired recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation, and lower susceptibility to sepsis. These studies demonstrate that macrophage RXRalpha plays key roles in the regulation of innate immunity and represents a potential target for immunotherapy of sepsis.

  7. MiRNA-101 inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis by targeting CX chemokine receptor 7.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Tang; Jia, Lin-Tao; Liu, Ning-Ning; Zhu, Xiao-Shan; Liu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xiu-Li; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yan-Li; Yang, An-Gang; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2015-10-13

    Whereas miR-101 is involved in the development and progression of breast cancer, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that miR-101 expression is inversely correlated with the clinical stage, lymph node metastasis and prognosis in breast cancers. Introduction of miR-101 inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of in vivo. CX chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) is a direct target of miR-101, positively correlating with the histological grade and the incidence of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. The effects of miR-101 were mimicked and counteracted by CXCR7 depletion and overexpression, respectively. STAT3 signaling downstream of CXCR7 is involved in miR-101 regulation of breast cancer cell behaviors. These findings have implications for the potential application of miR-101 in breast cancer treatment. PMID:26360780

  8. Binding optimization through coordination chemistry: CXCR4 chemokine receptor antagonists from ultra rigid metal complexes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abid; Nicholson, Gary; Greenman, John; Madden, Leigh; McRobbie, Graeme; Pannecouque, Christophe; De Clercq, Erik; Ullom, Robert; Maples, Danny L.; Maples, Randall L.; Silversides, Jon D.; Hubin, Timothy J.; Archibald, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    A new copper(II) containing bis-macrocyclic CXCR4 chemokine receptor antagonist is shown to have improved binding properties to the receptor protein in comparison to the drug AMD3100 (Plerixafor, Mozobil™). The interaction of the metallodrug has been optimized by using ultra rigid chelator units that offer an equatorial site for coordination to the amino acid side chains of the protein. Binding competition assays with anti-CXCR4 antibodies show that the new compound stays bound longer and it has improved anti-HIV potency in vitro (EC50 = 4.3 nM). X-ray structural studies using acetate as a model for carboxylate amino acid side chains indicate the nature of the coordination interaction. PMID:19231846

  9. Dendrite-selective redistribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 following agonist stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Stéphane J; Pujol, Fabien; Nicot, Arnaud; Kitabgi, Patrick; Boudin, Hélène

    2006-10-01

    The chemokine SDF-1 is a secreted protein that plays a critical role in several aspects of neuron development through interaction with its unique receptor CXCR4. A key mechanism that controls neuron responsiveness to extracellular signals during neuronal growth is receptor endocytosis. Since we previously reported that SDF-1 regulates axon development without affecting the other neurites, we asked whether this could correlate with a compartment-selective trafficking of CXCR4. We thus studied CXCR4 behavior upon SDF-1 exposure in rat hippocampus slices and in transfected neuron cultures. A massive agonist-induced redistribution of CXCR4 in endosomes was observed in dendrites whereas no modification was evidenced in axons. Our data suggest that CXCR4 trafficking may play a role in mediating selective effects of SDF-1 on distinct neuronal membrane subdomains.

  10. Circulating cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia determined by multiplex suspension array

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia is a severe complication of pregnancy characterized by an excessive maternal systemic inflammatory response with activation of both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules are central to innate and adaptive immune processes. The purpose of this study was to determine circulating levels of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia in a comprehensive manner, and to investigate their relationship to the clinical features and laboratory parameters of the study participants, including markers of overall inflammation (C-reactive protein), endothelial activation (von Willebrand factor antigen) and endothelial injury (fibronectin), oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) and trophoblast debris (cell-free fetal DNA). Results Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-18, interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, interferon-gamma-inducible protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 were measured in 60 preeclamptic patients, 60 healthy pregnant women and 59 healthy non-pregnant women by multiplex suspension array and ELISA. In normal pregnancy, the relative abundance of circulating IL-18 over IL-12p70 and the relative deficiency of the bioactive IL-12p70 in relation to IL-12p40 might favour Th2-type immunity. Although decreased IL-1ra, TNF-alpha and MCP-1 concentrations of healthy pregnant relative to non-pregnant women reflect anti-inflammatory changes in circulating cytokine profile, their decreased serum IL-10 and increased IP-10 levels might drive pro-inflammatory responses. In addition to a shift towards Th1-type immunity (expressed by the increased IL-2/IL-4 and IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratios), circulating levels of the pro

  11. MiRNA-101 inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis by targeting CX chemokine receptor 7

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Shan; Liu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xiu-Li; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yan-Li; Yang, An-Gang; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Whereas miR-101 is involved in the development and progression of breast cancer, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that miR-101 expression is inversely correlated with the clinical stage, lymph node metastasis and prognosis in breast cancers. Introduction of miR-101 inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of in vivo. CX chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) is a direct target of miR-101, positively correlating with the histological grade and the incidence of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. The effects of miR-101 were mimicked and counteracted by CXCR7 depletion and overexpression, respectively. STAT3 signaling downstream of CXCR7 is involved in miR-101 regulation of breast cancer cell behaviors. These findings have implications for the potential application of miR-101 in breast cancer treatment. PMID:26360780

  12. Allosteric Model of Maraviroc Binding to CC Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5)*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Perez, Javier; Rueda, Patricia; Alcami, Jose; Rognan, Didier; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard; Kellenberger, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Maraviroc is a nonpeptidic small molecule human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry inhibitor that has just entered the therapeutic arsenal for the treatment of patients. We recently demonstrated that maraviroc binding to the HIV-1 coreceptor, CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), prevents it from binding the chemokine CCL3 and the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 by an allosteric mechanism. However, incomplete knowledge of ligand-binding sites and the lack of CCR5 crystal structures have hampered an in-depth molecular understanding of how the inhibitor works. Here, we addressed these issues by combining site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) with homology modeling and docking. Six crystal structures of G-protein-coupled receptors were compared for their suitability for CCR5 modeling. All CCR5 models had equally good geometry, but that built from the recently reported dimeric structure of the other HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4 bound to the peptide CVX15 (Protein Data Bank code 3OE0) best agreed with the SDM data and discriminated CCR5 from non-CCR5 binders in a virtual screening approach. SDM and automated docking predicted that maraviroc inserts deeply in CCR5 transmembrane cavity where it can occupy three different binding sites, whereas CCL3 and gp120 lie on distinct yet overlapped regions of the CCR5 extracellular loop 2. Data suggesting that the transmembrane cavity remains accessible for maraviroc in CCL3-bound and gp120-bound CCR5 help explain our previous observation that the inhibitor enhances dissociation of preformed ligand-CCR5 complexes. Finally, we identified residues in the predicted CCR5 dimer interface that are mandatory for gp120 binding, suggesting that receptor dimerization might represent a target for new CCR5 entry inhibitors. PMID:21775441

  13. Efficient Interaction of HIV-1 with Purified Dendritic Cells via Multiple Chemokine Coreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Moser, Bernhard; Pope, Melissa; Chen, Dongling; Wei, Yang; Isdell, Frank; O'Doherty, Una; Paxton, William; Koup, Richard; Mojsov, Svetlana; Bhardwaj, Nina; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Baggiolini, Marco; Steinman, Ralph M.

    1996-01-01

    HIV-1 actively replicates in dendritic cell (DC)-T cell cocultures, but it has been difficult to demonstrate substantial infection of purified mature DCs. We now find that HIV-1 begins reverse transcription much more efficiently in DCs than T cells, even though T cells have higher levels of CD4 and gp120 binding. DCs isolated from skin or from blood precursors behave similarly. Several M-tropic strains and the T-tropic strain IIIB enter DCs efficiently, as assessed by the progressive formation of the early products of reverse transcription after a 90-min virus pulse at 37°C. However, few late gag-containing sequences are detected, so that active viral replication does not occur. The formation of these early transcripts seems to follow entry of HIV-1, rather than binding of virions that contain viral DNA. Early transcripts are scarce if DCs are exposed to virus on ice for 4 h, or for 90 min at 37°C, conditions which allow virus binding. Also the early transcripts once formed are insensitive to trypsin. The entry of a M-tropic isolates is blocked by the chemokine RANTES, and the entry of IIIB by SDF-1. RANTES interacts with CCR5 and SDF-1 with CXCR4 receptors. Entry of M-tropic but not T-tropic virus is ablated in DCs from individuals who lack a functional CCR5 receptor. DCs express more CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA than T cells. Therefore, while HIV-1 does not replicate efficiently in mature DCs, viral entry can be active and can be blocked by chemokines that act on known receptors for M- and T-tropic virus. PMID:8976200

  14. Omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the up-regulation of endothelial chemokines in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Adriana M.; Booker, Cindy; Ellis, Charles D.; Siew, Edward D.; Graves, Amy J.; Shintani, Ayumi; Abumrad, Naji N.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Ikizler, Talat Alp

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic systemic inflammation is common in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis (CKD5D) and has been considered a key mediator of the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient population. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that supplementation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) will attenuate the systemic inflammatory process in CKD5D patients. Methods The design was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled pilot trial (NCT00655525). Thirty-eight patients were randomly assigned in a 1 : 1 fashion to receive 2.9 g of eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5, n-3) plus docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6, n-3) versus placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in pro-inflammatory chemokines measured by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Secondary outcomes were changes in systemic inflammatory markers. Analysis of covariance was used to compare percent change from baseline to 12 weeks. Results Thirty-one patients completed 12 weeks and three patients completed 6 weeks of the study. Median age was 52 (interquartile range 45, 60) years, 74% were African-American and 79% were male. Supplementation of ω-3 PUFAs effectively decreased the LPS-induced PBMC expression of RANTES (Regulated upon Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted) and MCP-1 (Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1; unadjusted P = 0.04 and 0.06; adjusted for demographics P = 0.02 and 0.05, respectively). There was no significant effect of the intervention on serum inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and procalcitonin). Conclusions The results of this pilot study suggest that supplementation of ω-3 PUFAs is beneficial in decreasing the levels of endothelial chemokines, RANTES and MCP-1. Studies of larger sample size and longer duration are required to further evaluate effects of ω-3 PUFAs on systemic markers of inflammation, other metabolic parameters and clinical outcomes, particularly

  15. Ligustilide attenuates inflammatory pain via inhibition of NFκB-mediated chemokines production in spinal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin-Xia; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Wu, Xiao-Bo; Cao, De-Li; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2014-04-01

    Ligustilide (LIG) is a major component of Radix Angelica Sinensis, and reportedly has neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies have demonstrated that spinal astrocyte-mediated neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic pain. Here we investigated the anti-nociceptive effect of systemic treatment with LIG on chronic inflammatory pain and explored possible mechanisms. Unilateral hindpaw injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced persistent pain hypersensitivity. Repeated daily intravenous treatment with LIG, either before or after CFA injection, attenuated CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The same treatment also inhibited CFA-induced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA and protein increases in astrocytes of the spinal cord. In vitro study showed LIG dose-dependently reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of KC and MCP-1 mRNA in astrocyte cultures. Interestingly, LIG treatment did not affect CFA- or LPS-induced glial fibrillary acidic protein upregulation, but did inhibit CFA-induced phosphorylated nuclear factor-κB (p-NFκB) upregulation in spinal astrocytes. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of NFκB inhibitor attenuated CFA-induced pain hypersensitivity and upregulation of KC and MCP-1 in the spinal cord. Finally, single intravenous injection of LIG attenuated intrathecal injection of LPS-induced mechanical allodynia. The same treatment also decreased LPS-induced NFκB activation and KC and MCP-1 upregulation in the spinal cord. These data indicate that LIG attenuates chronic inflammatory pain potentially via inhibiting NFκB-mediated chemokines production in spinal astrocytes. These results provide direct evidence of the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of LIG, suggesting a new application of LIG for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain.

  16. Effects of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 on microglial function

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, Nozomi; Ifuku, Masataka; Mori, Yuki; Noda, Mami

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •CCR8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia. •Expression of CCR-8 in microglia was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. •CCL-1 increased motility, proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. •CCL-1promoted BDNF and IL-6 mRNA, and the release of NO from microglia. •CCL-1 activates microglia and may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. -- Abstract: Microglia, which constitute the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS), are generally considered as the primary immune cells in the brain and spinal cord. Microglial cells respond to various factors which are produced following nerve injury of multiple aetiologies and contribute to the development of neuronal disease. Chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 (CCL-1), a well-characterized chemokine secreted by activated T cells, has been shown to play an important role in neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and is also produced in various cell types in the CNS, especially in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, the role of CCL-1 in the CNS and the effects on microglia remains unclear. Here we showed the multiple effects of CCL-1 on microglia. We first showed that CCR-8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia, as well as on astrocytes and neurons, and was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. CCL-1 at concentration of 1 ng/ml induced chemotaxis, increased motility at a higher concentration (100 ng/ml), and increased proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. CCL-1 also activated microglia morphologically, promoted mRNA levels for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and IL-6, and increased the release of nitrite from microglia. These indicate that CCL-1 has a role as a mediator in neuron-glia interaction, which may contribute to the development of neurological diseases, especially in neuropathic pain.

  17. Human mesenchymal stem cells exploit the immune response mediating chemokines to impact the phenotype of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Motaln, Helena; Gruden, Kristina; Hren, Matjaz; Schichor, Christian; Primon, Monika; Rotter, Ana; Lah, Tamara T

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the application of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in regenerative medicine, only a limited number of studies are addressing their use in anticancer therapy. As the latter may represent a new hope to improve the survival of patients with glioblastoma multiformae (GBM), the most common and malignant form of the brain tumors, we aimed to investigate the interactions of hMSCs and GBM cells under in vitro conditions. Four hMSC clones and three different GBM cell lines were used to study their mutual paracrine interactions in cocultures compared to their monocultures, where cells were grown under the same experimental conditions. The effects on cell growth, proliferation, and invasion in Matrigel were quantified. Further, bioinformatics tools were used to relate these results to the data obtained from cytokine macroarrays and cDNA microarrays that revealed proteins and genes significantly involved in cellular cross-talk. We showed that hMSCs are responsible for the impairment of GBM cell invasion and growth, possibly via induction of their senescence. On the other hand, GBM cells inversely affected some of these characteristics in hMSCs. We found CCL2/MCP-1 to be the most significantly regulated chemokine during hMSC and U87-MG paracrine signaling in addition to several chemokines that may account for changed cocultured cells' phenotype by affecting genes associated with proliferation (Pmepa-1, NF-κB, IL-6, IL-1b), invasion (EphB2, Sod2, Pcdh18, Col7A1, Gja1, Mmp1/2), and senescence (Kiaa1199, SerpinB2). As we functionally confirmed the role of CCL2/MCP-1 in GBM cell invasion we thereby propose a novel mechanism of CCL2/MCP-1 antimigratory effects on GBM cells, distinct from its immunomodulatory role. Significant alterations of GBM phenotype in the presence of hMSCs should encourage the studies on the naive hMSC use for GBM treatment.

  18. Cytokine and Chemokine Profile in Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds: Evidence for Autoinflammation.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Angelo V; Tavecchio, Simona; Berti, Emilio; Gelmetti, Carlo; Cugno, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Autoinflammation has recently been suggested in the pathogenesis of neutrophilic dermatoses but systematic studies on their cytokine profile are lacking. Notably, amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (APF), classified among neutrophilic dermatoses, has been studied only in small case series. In our University Hospital, we conducted an observational study on 15 APF patients, analyzing their clinical and laboratory features with a follow-up of 9 months to 20 years. Skin cytokine pattern of 9 of them was compared to that of 6 normal controls. In all patients, primary lesions were pustules symmetrically involving the skin folds and anogenital region with a chronic-relapsing course and responding to corticosteroids. Dapsone, cyclosporine, and tumor necrosis factor blockers were effective in refractory cases. In skin samples, the expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β, pivotal cytokine in autoinflammation, and its receptors I and II were significantly higher in APF (P = 0.005, 0.018, and 0.034, respectively) than in controls. Chemokines responsible for neutrophil recruitment such as IL-8 (P = 0.003), CXCL 1/2/3 (C-X-C motif ligand 1/2/3) (P = 0.010), CXCL 16 (P = 0.045), and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) (P = 0.034) were overexpressed. Molecules involved in tissue damage like matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) (P = 0.010) and MMP-9 (P = 0.003) were increased. APF is a pustular neutrophilic dermatosis with a typical distribution in all patients. The disorder may coexist with an underlying autoimmune/dysimmune disease but is often associated only with a few autoantibodies without a clear autoimmunity. The overexpression of cytokines/chemokines and molecules amplifying the inflammatory network supports the view that APF has an important autoinflammatory component. PMID:26683967

  19. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  20. Stromal ETS2 Regulates Chemokine Production and Immune Cell Recruitment during Acinar-to-Ductal Metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Pitarresi, Jason R; Liu, Xin; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Cuitiño, Maria C; Kladney, Raleigh D; Mace, Thomas A; Donohue, Sydney; Nayak, Sunayana G; Qu, Chunjing; Lee, James; Woelke, Sarah A; Trela, Stefan; LaPak, Kyle; Yu, Lianbo; McElroy, Joseph; Rosol, Thomas J; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Lesinski, Gregory B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that the pancreatic tumor microenvironment both inhibits and promotes tumor development and growth. Here we establish the role of stromal fibroblasts during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), an initiating event in pancreatic cancer formation. The transcription factor V-Ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) was elevated in smooth muscle actin-positive fibroblasts in the stroma of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patient tissue samples relative to normal pancreatic controls. LSL-Kras(G12D/+); LSL-Trp53(R172H/+); Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice showed that ETS2 expression initially increased in fibroblasts during ADM and remained elevated through progression to PDAC. Conditional ablation of Ets-2 in pancreatic fibroblasts in a Kras(G12D)-driven mouse ADM model decreased the amount of ADM events. ADMs from fibroblast Ets-2-deleted animals had reduced epithelial cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Surprisingly, fibroblast Ets-2 deletion significantly altered immune cell infiltration into the stroma, with an increased CD8+ T-cell population, and decreased presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and mature macrophages. The mechanism involved ETS2-dependent chemokine ligand production in fibroblasts. ETS2 directly bound to regulatory sequences for Ccl3, Ccl4, Cxcl4, Cxcl5, and Cxcl10, a group of chemokines that act as potent mediators of immune cell recruitment. These results suggest an unappreciated role for ETS2 in fibroblasts in establishing an immune-suppressive microenvironment in response to oncogenic Kras(G12D) signaling during the initial stages of tumor development. PMID:27659014

  1. Elevated Urinary T Helper 1 Chemokine Levels in Newly Diagnosed Hypertensive Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Övünç Hacıhamdioğlu, Duygu; Zeybek, Cengiz; Gök, Faysal; Pekel, Aysel; Muşabak, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Increasing evidence suggests that T helper (Th) cells play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of obesity and anti-hypertensive treatment on urinary Th1 chemokines. Methods: The study groups consisted of three types of patients: hypertensive obese, healthy, and non-hypertensive obese. Pre-treatment and post-treatment samples of the hypertensive obese group and one sample from the other two groups were evaluated for urinary chemokine: regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP10), and monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG). In the hypertensive obese group, urine microalbumin: creatinine ratio was examined before and after treatment. We recommended lifestyle changes to all patients. Captopril was started in those who could not be controlled with lifestyle changes and those who had stage 2 hypertension. Results: Twenty-four hypertensive obese (mean age 13.1), 27 healthy (mean age 11.2) and 22 non-hypertensive obese (mean age 11.5) children were investigated. The pre-treatment urine albumin: creatinine ratio was positively correlated with pre-treatment MIG levels (r=0.41, p<0.05). RANTES was significantly higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive and non-hypertensive obese group than in the controls. The urinary IP10 and MIG levels were higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive obese group than in the non-hypertensive obese. Comparison of the pre- and post-treatment values indicated significant decreases in RANTES, IP10, and MIG levels in the hypertensive obese group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Th1 cells could be activated in obese hypertensive children before the onset of clinical indicators of target organ damage. Urinary RANTES seemed to be affected by both hypertension and obesity, and urinary IP10 and MIG seemed to be affected predominantly by hypertension. PMID:26831550

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases and chemokines in the gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Jonas; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Haffajee, Anne; Teles, Ricardo Palmier; Fidel, Rivail; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo

    2011-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and monocyte chemoattractants are key modulators of the biological mechanisms triggered in the periodontium by mechanical forces. The gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) provides a non-invasive method to assess longitudinally the release of inflammatory mediators during orthodontic tooth movement. The goal of this study was to examine the GCF levels of MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-13 and of the chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and regulated on activation normal T cells expressed and secreted (RANTES) at different time points during orthodontic tooth movement. Fourteen subjects (three males and 11 females, 18.8 ± 4.8 years of age; range from 12 to 28 years) had their maxillary canines retracted. Thirty-second GCF samples were collected from the tension and pressure sides 7 days prior to the activation of the orthodontic appliance, on the day of activation, and after 1 and 24 hours, and 14, 21, and 80 days of constant force application. The volume of GCF was measured and samples analysed using a multiplexed bead immunoassay for the content of the six target molecules. Differences in the mean GFC volumes and mean level for each analyte over time were assessed using the Friedman test, and differences between the tension and pressure sides at each time point with the Mann-Whitney test. The mean levels of the three MMPs changed significantly over time but only at the compression side (P < 0.05, Friedman test). The GCF levels of the three chemokines were not affected by the application of mechanical stress. The levels of MMPs in GCF at the pressure side are modulated by the application of orthodontic force. PMID:21389074

  3. Type 1 chemokine receptor expression in Chagas' disease correlates with morbidity in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Juliana A S; Bahia-Oliveira, Lilian M G; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C; Busek, Solange C U; Teixeira, Mauro M; Silva, João Santana; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2005-12-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors (CKRs) control the migration of leukocytes during the inflammatory process and are important immunological markers of type 1 (CCR5 and CXCR3) and type 2 (CCR3 and CCR4) responses. The coexpression of CKRs (CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR3, and CXCR4) and intracellular cytokines (interleukin-10 [IL-10], IL-4, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha], and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) on T CD4+ and CD8+ peripheral cells from individuals with indeterminate (IND) or cardiac (CARD) clinical forms of Chagas' disease after in vitro stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, were evaluated in this study. The percentage of T CD4+ and CD8+ cells coexpressing CCR5 and IFN-gamma, CXCR3 and IFN-gamma, and CXCR3 and TNF-alpha were higher in CARD than in IND individuals; on the other hand, the percentage of T CD4+ or CD8+ cells coexpressing CCR3 and IL-10 or coexpressing CCR3 and IL-4 were lower in CARD individuals than in IND individuals. In addition, a significant positive correlation between the expression of CCR5 or CXCR3 and IFN-gamma was observed in CARD individuals contrasting with a significant positive correlation between the expression of CCR3 and IL-4 and of CCR3 and IL-10 in IND patients. These results reinforce the hypothesis that a T. cruzi-exacerbated specific type 1 immune response developed by CARD chagasic patients is associated with the development of heart pathology.

  4. Chorioamnionitis stimulates angiogenesis in saccular stage fetal lungs via CC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J. Davin; Benjamin, John T.; Kelly, David R.; Frank, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The fetal lung vasculature forms in tandem with developing airways. Whereas saccular airway morphogenesis is arrested in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the potential vascular phenotype in BPD at this stage of development is less well-understood. As inflammation increases the risk of BPD and induces arrest of saccular airway morphogenesis, we tested the effects of Escherichia coli LPS on fetal mouse lung vascular development. Injecting LPS into the amniotic fluid of Tie2-lacZ endothelial reporter mice at embryonic day 15 stimulated angiogenesis in the saccular stage fetal lung mesenchyme. LPS also increased the number of endothelial cells in saccular stage fetal mouse lung explants. Inflammation appeared to directly promote vascular development, as LPS stimulated pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell angiogenesis, cell migration, and proliferation in vitro. Whereas LPS did not increase expression of VEGF, angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), Tie2, fetal liver kinase-1 (Flk-1), fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (Flt-1), PDGFA, PDGFB, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), LPS did stimulate the production of the angiogenic CC chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Both MIP-1α and MCP-1 increased angiogenesis in fetal mouse lung explants. In addition, inhibitory antibodies against MIP-1α and MCP-1 blocked the effects of LPS on fetal lung vascular development, suggesting these chemokines are downstream mediators of LPS-induced angiogenesis. We speculate that an inflammation-mediated surge in angiogenesis could lead to formation of aberrant alveolar capillaries in the lungs of patients developing BPD. PMID:20172951

  5. Estrogen, SNP-Dependent Chemokine Expression and Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Bongartz, Tim; Liu, Mohan; Kalari, Krishna R; Goss, Paul E; Shepherd, Lois E; Goetz, Matthew P; Kubo, Michiaki; Ingle, James N; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported, on the basis of a genome-wide association study for aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms, that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near the T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1A (TCL1A) gene were associated with aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal pain and with estradiol (E2)-induced TCL1A expression. Furthermore, variation in TCL1A expression influenced the downstream expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors. Specifically, the top hit genome-wide association study SNP, rs11849538, created a functional estrogen response element (ERE) that displayed estrogen receptor (ER) binding and increased E2 induction of TCL1A expression only for the variant SNP genotype. In the present study, we pursued mechanisms underlying the E2-SNP-dependent regulation of TCL1A expression and, in parallel, our subsequent observations that SNPs at a distance from EREs can regulate ERα binding and that ER antagonists can reverse phenotypes associated with those SNPs. Specifically, we performed a series of functional genomic studies using a large panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines with dense genomic data that demonstrated that TCL1A SNPs at a distance from EREs can modulate ERα binding and expression of TCL1A as well as the expression of downstream immune mediators. Furthermore, 4-hydroxytamoxifen or fulvestrant could reverse these SNP-genotype effects. Similar results were found for SNPs in the IL17A cytokine and CCR6 chemokine receptor genes. These observations greatly expand our previous results and support the existence of a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the complex interplay between estrogens and immune systems. They also raise the possibility of the pharmacological manipulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a SNP genotype-dependent fashion. PMID:26866883

  6. Regulation of human natural killer cell migration and proliferation by the exodus subfamily of CC chemokines.

    PubMed

    Robertson, M J; Williams, B T; Christopherson, K; Brahmi, Z; Hromas, R

    2000-01-10

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses to obligate intracellular pathogens. Nevertheless, the regulation of NK cell trafficking and migration to inflammatory sites is poorly understood. Exodus-1/MIP-3alpha/LARC, Exodus-2/6Ckine/SLC, and Exodus-3/MIP-3beta/ELC/CKbeta-11 are CC chemokines that share a unique aspartate-cysteine-cysteine-leucine motif near their amino terminus and preferentially stimulate the migration of T lymphocytes. The effects of Exodus chemokines on human NK cells were examined. Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not induce detectable chemotaxis of resting peripheral blood NK cells. In contrast, Exodus-2 and -3 stimulated migration of polyclonal activated peripheral blood NK cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Exodus-2 and -3 also induced dose-dependent chemotaxis of NKL, an IL-2-dependent human NK cell line. Results of modified checkerboard assays indicate that migration of NKL cells in response to Exodus-2 and -3 represents true chemotaxis and not simply chemokinesis. Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not induce NK cell proliferation in the absence of other stimuli. Nevertheless, Exodus-2 and -3 significantly augmented IL-2-induced proliferation of normal human CD56(dim) NK cells. In contrast, Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not affect the cytolytic activity of resting or activated peripheral blood NK cells. Expression of message for CCR7, a shared receptor for Exodus-2 and -3, was detected in activated polyclonal NK cells and NKL cells but not resting NK cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Exodus-2 and -3 can participate in the recruitment and proliferation of activated NK cells. Exodus-2 and -3 may regulate interactions between T cells and NK cells that are crucial for the generation of optimal immune responses.

  7. Chemokine receptor CXCR3 in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus): cloning, characterization and its responses to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yadong; Zhou, Shuhong; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiuli; Liu, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3, a member of the G protein-coupled receptors superfamily, regulates the responses of many immune responses. In this experiment, we cloned and characterized the cDNA of CXCR3 in Scophthalmus maximus (turbot). A 5'-UTR of 216-bp, a 259-bp 3'-UTR with a poly (A) tail and a 1089-bp CDS encoding 362 amino acids form the cDNA of CXCR3, which is 1564-bp long. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that turbot CXCR3 shared a high similarity with other CXCR3s and shared more similarity with CXCR5 than the other subfamilies of chemokines. The CXCR3 protein in turbot showed the highest similarity with the CXCR3b from rainbow trout (44.5%), which indicated that this CXCR3 gene/protein may be a CXCR3b isoform. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that CXCR3 transcripts were constitutively expressed in all the tissues of the non-injected turbot used in this study, with the highest expression occurring in blood. Several immune-related tissues of fish, such as the spleen, head kidney, liver and blood, tissues, which were abundant of lymphocyte, were investigated in this study. CXCR3 gene was expressed at the highest level in blood than the other tested tissues. The injection experiment suggested that the CXCR3 expression level after LPS injection was significantly up-regulated in all immune-related tissues in turbot. These results improve our understanding of the functions of CXCR3 in the turbot immune response. PMID:26585996

  8. Plasmid Transduction Using Bacteriophage Φadh for Expression of CC Chemokines by Lactobacillus gasseri ADH▿

    PubMed Central

    Damelin, Leonard H.; Mavri-Damelin, Demetra; Klaenhammer, Todd R.; Tiemessen, Caroline T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaginal mucosal microfloras are typically dominated by Gram-positive Lactobacillus species, and colonization of vaginal mucosa by exogenous microbicide-secreting Lactobacillus strains has been proposed as a means of enhancing this natural mucosal barrier against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We asked whether an alternative strategy could be utilized whereby anti-HIV molecules are expressed within the cervicovaginal milieu by endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus populations which have been engineered in situ via transduction. In this study, we therefore investigated the feasibility of utilizing transduction for the expression of two HIV coreceptor antagonists, the CC chemokines CCL5 and CCL3, in a predominant vaginal Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus gasseri. Modifying a previously established transduction model, which utilizes L. gasseri ADH and its prophage Φadh, we show that mitomycin C induction of L. gasseri ADH transformants containing pGK12-based plasmids with CCL5 and CCL3 expression and secretion cassettes (under the control of promoters P6 and P59, respectively) and a 232-bp Φadh cos site fragment results in the production of transducing particles which contain 8 to 9 copies of concatemeric plasmid DNA. High-frequency transduction for these particles (almost 6 orders of magnitude greater than that for pGK12 alone) was observed, and transductants were found to contain recircularized expression plasmids upon subsequent culture. Importantly, transductants produced CC chemokines at levels comparable to those produced by electroporation-derived transformants. Our findings therefore lend support to the potential use of transduction in vaginal Lactobacillus species as a novel strategy for the prevention of HIV infection across mucosal membranes. PMID:20418431

  9. Plasmid transduction using bacteriophage Phi(adh) for expression of CC chemokines by Lactobacillus gasseri ADH.

    PubMed

    Damelin, Leonard H; Mavri-Damelin, Demetra; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2010-06-01

    Vaginal mucosal microfloras are typically dominated by Gram-positive Lactobacillus species, and colonization of vaginal mucosa by exogenous microbicide-secreting Lactobacillus strains has been proposed as a means of enhancing this natural mucosal barrier against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We asked whether an alternative strategy could be utilized whereby anti-HIV molecules are expressed within the cervicovaginal milieu by endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus populations which have been engineered in situ via transduction. In this study, we therefore investigated the feasibility of utilizing transduction for the expression of two HIV coreceptor antagonists, the CC chemokines CCL5 and CCL3, in a predominant vaginal Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus gasseri. Modifying a previously established transduction model, which utilizes L. gasseri ADH and its prophage Phiadh, we show that mitomycin C induction of L. gasseri ADH transformants containing pGK12-based plasmids with CCL5 and CCL3 expression and secretion cassettes (under the control of promoters P6 and P59, respectively) and a 232-bp Phiadh cos site fragment results in the production of transducing particles which contain 8 to 9 copies of concatemeric plasmid DNA. High-frequency transduction for these particles (almost 6 orders of magnitude greater than that for pGK12 alone) was observed, and transductants were found to contain recircularized expression plasmids upon subsequent culture. Importantly, transductants produced CC chemokines at levels comparable to those produced by electroporation-derived transformants. Our findings therefore lend support to the potential use of transduction in vaginal Lactobacillus species as a novel strategy for the prevention of HIV infection across mucosal membranes.

  10. Changes in B and T lymphocytes and chemokines with rituximab treatment in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Piccio, Laura; Naismith, Robert T.; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Klein, Robyn S.; Parks, Becky J.; Lyons, Jeri A.; Cross, Anne H.

    2010-01-01

    Background B cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). A beneficial effect of B cell depletion using rituximab has been shown, but the complete mechanism of action for this drug is unclear. Objective To determine the relationship between T cells, B cells, and changes in CSF chemokines with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody that targets CD20. Design Phase II trial of rituximab as an add-on therapy. Setting The John L. Multiple Sclerosis Center, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. Patients Thirty relapsing-remitting MS subjects with clinical and MRI activity despite treatment with an immunomodulatory drug received four weekly doses of 375mg/m2 rituximab. Main Outcome Measures Lumbar puncture was performed before and after rituximab infusions in 26 subjects. CSF B and T lymphocytes were enumerated by flow cytometry, and chemoattractants were measured by ELISA. Results After rituximab administration, CSF B cells were decreased or undetectable in all subjects and CSF T cells were reduced in 81% of subjects. The mean reduction in CSF cellularity was 95% for B cells and 50% for T cells. After rituximab infusion, CSF CXCL13 and CCL19 decreased (P= 0.002, P=0.03, respectively). The proportional decline in CSF T cells correlated with the proportional decrease in CXCL13 (r=0.45;P=0.03), suggesting a possible relationship. CSF IgG index, IgG concentration, and oligoclonal band number were unchanged following treatment. Conclusions B cells are critical for T cell trafficking into the CNS in MS patients, and may alter T cell trafficking by influencing chemokine production within the CNS. PMID:20558389

  11. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  12. Localization of Distinct Peyer's Patch Dendritic Cell Subsets and Their Recruitment by Chemokines Macrophage Inflammatory Protein (Mip)-3α, Mip-3β, and Secondary Lymphoid Organ Chemokine

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Akiko; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the anatomical localization of three distinct dendritic cell (DC) subsets in the murine Peyer's patch (PP) and explore the role of chemokines in their recruitment. By two-color in situ immunofluorescence, CD11b+ myeloid DCs were determined to be present in the subepithelial dome (SED) region, whereas CD8α+ lymphoid DCs are present in the T cell–rich interfollicular region (IFR). DCs that lack expression of CD8α or CD11b (double negative) are present in both the SED and IFR. By in situ hybridization, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α mRNA was dramatically expressed only by the follicle-associated epithelium overlying the SED, while its receptor, CCR6, was concentrated in the SED. In contrast, CCR7 was expressed predominantly in the IFR. Consistent with these findings, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and in vitro chemotaxis assays using freshly isolated DCs revealed that CCR6 was functionally expressed only by DC subsets present in the SED, while all subsets expressed functional CCR7. Moreover, none of the splenic DC subsets migrated toward MIP-3α. These data support a distinct role for MIP-3α/CCR6 in recruitment of CD11b+ DCs toward the mucosal surfaces and for MIP-3β/CCR7 in attraction of CD8α+ DCs to the T cell regions. Finally, we demonstrated that all DC subsets expressed an immature phenotype when freshly isolated and maintained expression of subset markers upon maturation in vitro. In contrast, CCR7 expression by myeloid PP DCs was enhanced with maturation in vitro. In addition, this subset disappeared from the SED and appeared in the IFR after microbial stimulation in vivo, suggesting that immature myeloid SED DCs capture antigens and migrate to IFR to initiate T cell responses after mucosal microbial infections. PMID:10770804

  13. Stoichiometry and geometry of the CXC chemokine receptor 4 complex with CXC ligand 12: Molecular modeling and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Stephens, Bryan S.; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zhao, Chunxia; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Abagyan, Ruben; Handel, Tracy M.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors regulate cell migration during development, immune system function, and in inflammatory diseases, making them important therapeutic targets. Nevertheless, the structural basis of receptor:chemokine interaction is poorly understood. Adding to the complexity of the problem is the persistently dimeric behavior of receptors observed in cell-based studies, which in combination with structural and mutagenesis data, suggest several possibilities for receptor:chemokine complex stoichiometry. In this study, a combination of computational, functional, and biophysical approaches was used to elucidate the stoichiometry and geometry of the interaction between the CXC-type chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand CXCL12. First, relevance and feasibility of a 2:1 stoichiometry hypothesis was probed using functional complementation experiments with multiple pairs of complementary nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. Next, the importance of dimers of WT CXCR4 was explored using the strategy of dimer dilution, where WT receptor dimerization is disrupted by increasing expression of nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. The results of these experiments were supportive of a 1:1 stoichiometry, although the latter could not simultaneously reconcile existing structural and mutagenesis data. To resolve the contradiction, cysteine trapping experiments were used to derive residue proximity constraints that enabled construction of a validated 1:1 receptor:chemokine model, consistent with the paradigmatic two-site hypothesis of receptor activation. The observation of a 1:1 stoichiometry is in line with accumulating evidence supporting monomers as minimal functional units of G protein-coupled receptors, and suggests transmission of conformational changes across the dimer interface as the most probable mechanism of altered signaling by receptor heterodimers. PMID:25468967

  14. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism.

  15. Stoichiometry and geometry of the CXC chemokine receptor 4 complex with CXC ligand 12: molecular modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Kufareva, Irina; Stephens, Bryan S; Holden, Lauren G; Qin, Ling; Zhao, Chunxia; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Abagyan, Ruben; Handel, Tracy M

    2014-12-16

    Chemokines and their receptors regulate cell migration during development, immune system function, and in inflammatory diseases, making them important therapeutic targets. Nevertheless, the structural basis of receptor:chemokine interaction is poorly understood. Adding to the complexity of the problem is the persistently dimeric behavior of receptors observed in cell-based studies, which in combination with structural and mutagenesis data, suggest several possibilities for receptor:chemokine complex stoichiometry. In this study, a combination of computational, functional, and biophysical approaches was used to elucidate the stoichiometry and geometry of the interaction between the CXC-type chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand CXCL12. First, relevance and feasibility of a 2:1 stoichiometry hypothesis was probed using functional complementation experiments with multiple pairs of complementary nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. Next, the importance of dimers of WT CXCR4 was explored using the strategy of dimer dilution, where WT receptor dimerization is disrupted by increasing expression of nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. The results of these experiments were supportive of a 1:1 stoichiometry, although the latter could not simultaneously reconcile existing structural and mutagenesis data. To resolve the contradiction, cysteine trapping experiments were used to derive residue proximity constraints that enabled construction of a validated 1:1 receptor:chemokine model, consistent with the paradigmatic two-site hypothesis of receptor activation. The observation of a 1:1 stoichiometry is in line with accumulating evidence supporting monomers as minimal functional units of G protein-coupled receptors, and suggests transmission of conformational changes across the dimer interface as the most probable mechanism of altered signaling by receptor heterodimers.

  16. The role of adenosine receptors in regulating production of tumour necrosis factor-α and chemokines by human lung macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Buenestado, A; Delyle, S Grassin; Arnould, I; Besnard, F; Naline, E; Blouquit-Laye, S; Chapelier, A; Bellamy, JF; Devillier, P

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adenosine is a major endogenous regulator of macrophage function, and activates four specific adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B and A3). Here, we have assessed in human lung macrophages the modulation of the expression of adenosine receptor mRNA by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the relative contributions of the different adenosine receptors to LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and chemokines. Experimental approach: Lung macrophages isolated from resected lungs were stimulated with LPS and treated with adenosine receptor agonists or/and antagonists. Adenosine receptor expression was assessed with qRT-PCR. Cytokines were measured in lung macrophage supernatants with elisa. Key results: LPS increased (about 400-fold) mRNA for A2A adenosine receptors, decreased mRNA for A1 and A2B, but had no effect on A3 adenosine receptor mRNA. The adenosine receptor agonist NECA inhibited TNF-α production concentration dependently, whereas the A1 receptor agonist, CCPA, and the A3 receptor agonist, AB-MECA, inhibited TNF-α production only at concentrations affecting A2A receptors. NECA also inhibited the production of CCL chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5) and CXCL chemokines (CXCL9 and CXCL10), but not that of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CXCL5. Reversal of NECA-induced inhibition of TNF-α and chemokine production by the selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist ZM 241385, but not the A2B receptor antagonist, MRS 1754, or the A3 receptor antagonist, MRS 1220, indicated involvement of A2A receptors. Conclusions and implications: LPS up-regulated A2A adenosine receptor gene transcription, and this receptor subtype mediated inhibition of the LPS-induced production of TNF-α and of a subset of chemokines in human lung macrophages. PMID:20136829

  17. Identification of the Pharmacophore of the CC Chemokine-binding Proteins Evasin-1 and -4 Using Phage Display*

    PubMed Central

    Bonvin, Pauline; Dunn, Steven M.; Rousseau, François; Dyer, Douglas P.; Shaw, Jeffrey; Power, Christine A.; Handel, Tracy M.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the ligand-binding surface of the CC chemokine-binding proteins Evasin-1 and Evasin-4, produced by the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus, we sought to identify the key determinants responsible for their different chemokine selectivities by expressing Evasin mutants using phage display. We first designed alanine mutants based on the Evasin-1·CCL3 complex structure and an in silico model of Evasin-4 bound to CCL3. The mutants were displayed on M13 phage particles, and binding to chemokine was assessed by ELISA. Selected variants were then produced as purified proteins and characterized by surface plasmon resonance analysis and inhibition of chemotaxis. The method was validated by confirming the importance of Phe-14 and Trp-89 to the inhibitory properties of Evasin-1 and led to the identification of a third crucial residue, Asn-88. Two amino acids, Glu-16 and Tyr-19, were identified as key residues for binding and inhibition of Evasin-4. In a parallel approach, we identified one clone (Y28Q/N60D) that showed a clear reduction in binding to CCL3, CCL5, and CCL8. It therefore appears that Evasin-1 and -4 use different pharmacophores to bind CC chemokines, with the principal binding occurring through the C terminus of Evasin-1, but through the N-terminal region of Evasin-4. However, both proteins appear to target chemokine N termini, presumably because these domains are key to receptor signaling. The results also suggest that phage display may offer a useful approach for rapid investigation of the pharmacophores of small inhibitory binding proteins. PMID:25266725

  18. Backbone dynamics of the human CC chemokine eotaxin: fast motions, slow motions, and implications for receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Crump, M. P.; Spyracopoulos, L.; Lavigne, P.; Kim, K. S.; Clark-lewis, I.; Sykes, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    Eotaxin is a member of the chemokine family of about 40 proteins that induce cell migration. Eotaxin binds the CC chemokine receptor CCR3 that is highly expressed by eosinophils, and it is considered important in the pathology of chronic respiratory disorders such as asthma. The high resolution structure of eotaxin is known. The 74 amino acid protein has two disulfide bridges and shows a typical chemokine fold comprised of a core of three antiparallel beta-strands and an overlying alpha-helix. In this paper, we report the backbone dynamics of eotaxin determined through 15N-T1, T2, and [1H]-15N nuclear Overhauser effect heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments. This is the first extensive study of the dynamics of a chemokine derived from 600, 500, and 300 MHz NMR field strengths. From the T1, T2, and NOE relaxation data, parameters that describe the internal motions of eotaxin were derived using the Lipari-Szabo model free analysis. The most ordered regions of the protein correspond to the known secondary structure elements. However, surrounding the core, the regions known to be functionally important in chemokines show a range of motions on varying timescales. These include extensive subnanosecond to picosecond motions in the N-terminus, C-terminus, and the N-loop succeeding the disulfides. Analysis of rotational diffusion anisotropy of eotaxin and chemical exchange terms at multiple fields also allowed the confident identification of slow conformational exchange through the "30s" loop, disulfides, and adjacent residues. In addition, we show that these motions may be attenuated in the dimeric form of a synthetic eotaxin. The structure and dynamical basis for eotaxin receptor binding is discussed in light of the dynamics data. PMID:10548050

  19. Chemokine signatures in the skin disorders of Lyme borreliosis in Europe: predominance of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis and CXCL13 in lymphocytoma.

    PubMed

    Müllegger, Robert R; Means, Terry K; Shin, Junghee J; Lee, Marshall; Jones, Kathryn L; Glickstein, Lisa J; Luster, Andrew D; Steere, Allen C

    2007-09-01

    The three skin disorders of Lyme borreliosis in Europe include erythema migrans, an acute, self-limited lesion; borrelial lymphocytoma, a subacute lesion; and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, a chronic lesion. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we determined mRNA expression of selected chemokines, cytokines, and leukocyte markers in skin samples from 100 patients with erythema migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma, or acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and from 25 control subjects. Chemokine patterns in lesional skin in each of the three skin disorders included low but significant mRNA levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 and the dendritic cell chemoattractant CCL20 and intermediate levels of the macrophage chemoattractant CCL2. Erythema migrans and particularly acrodermatitis lesions had high mRNA expression of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 and low levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13, whereas lymphocytoma lesions had high levels of CXCL13 and lower levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10. This pattern of chemokine expression was consistent with leukocyte marker mRNA in lesional skin. Moreover, using immunohistologic methods, CD3(+) T cells and CXCL9 were visualized in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis lesions, and CD20(+) B cells and CXCL13 were seen in lymphocytoma lesions. Thus, erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans have high levels of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, whereas borrelial lymphocytoma has high levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13.

  20. Chemokine Signatures in the Skin Disorders of Lyme Borreliosis in Europe: Predominance of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in Erythema Migrans and Acrodermatitis and CXCL13 in Lymphocytoma▿

    PubMed Central

    Müllegger, Robert R.; Means, Terry K.; Shin, Junghee J.; Lee, Marshall; Jones, Kathryn L.; Glickstein, Lisa J.; Luster, Andrew D.; Steere, Allen C.

    2007-01-01

    The three skin disorders of Lyme borreliosis in Europe include erythema migrans, an acute, self-limited lesion; borrelial lymphocytoma, a subacute lesion; and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, a chronic lesion. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we determined mRNA expression of selected chemokines, cytokines, and leukocyte markers in skin samples from 100 patients with erythema migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma, or acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and from 25 control subjects. Chemokine patterns in lesional skin in each of the three skin disorders included low but significant mRNA levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 and the dendritic cell chemoattractant CCL20 and intermediate levels of the macrophage chemoattractant CCL2. Erythema migrans and particularly acrodermatitis lesions had high mRNA expression of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 and low levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13, whereas lymphocytoma lesions had high levels of CXCL13 and lower levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10. This pattern of chemokine expression was consistent with leukocyte marker mRNA in lesional skin. Moreover, using immunohistologic methods, CD3+ T cells and CXCL9 were visualized in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis lesions, and CD20+ B cells and CXCL13 were seen in lymphocytoma lesions. Thus, erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans have high levels of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, whereas borrelial lymphocytoma has high levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13. PMID:17606602

  1. Characterization and expression analysis of an interferon-γ2 induced chemokine receptor CXCR3 in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Chadzinska, M; Golbach, L; Pijanowski, L; Scheer, M; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M L

    2014-11-01

    Chemokine and chemokine receptor signalling pairs play a crucial role in regulation of cell migration, morphogenesis, and cell activation. Expressed in mammals on activated T and NK cells, chemokine receptor CXCR3 binds interferon-γ inducible chemokines CXCL9-11 and CCL21. Here we sequenced the carp CXCR3 chemokine receptor and showed its relationship to CXCR3a receptors found in other teleosts. We found high expression of the CXCR3 gene in most of the organs and tissues of the immune system and in immune-related tissues such as gills and gut, corroborating a predominantly immune-related function. The very high expression in gill and gut moreover indicates a role for CXCR3 in cell recruitment during infection. High in vivo expression of CXCR3 at later stages of inflammation, as well as its in vitro sensitivity to IFN-γ2 stimulation indicate that in carp, CXCR3 is involved in macrophage-mediated responses. Moreover, as expression of the CXCR3 and CXCb genes coincides in the focus of inflammation and as both the CXCb chemokines and the CXCR3 receptor are significantly up-regulated upon IFN-γ stimulation it is hypothesized that CXCb chemokines may be putative ligands for CXCR3. PMID:25036761

  2. The role of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 genotype and cerebrospinal fluid chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 in neurocognition among HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Thames, April D.; Briones, Marisa S.; Magpantay, Larry I.; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Singer, Elyse J.; Hinkin, Charles H.; Morgello, Susan; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Moore, David J.; Heizerling, Keith; Levine, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined interrelationships between chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) genotype and expression of inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma viral load, CD4+ cell count and neurocognitive functioning among HIV-infected adults. We hypothesized that HIV-positive carriers of the ‘risk’ CCL2 −2578G allele, caused by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at rs1024611, would have a higher concentration of CCL2 in CSF, and that CSF CCL2 would be associated with both higher concentrations of other proinflammatory markers in CSF and worse neurocognitive functioning. Design A cross-sectional study of 145 HIV-infected individuals enrolled in the National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium cohort for whom genotyping, CSF and neurocognitive data were available. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or frozen tissue specimens. CSF levels of CCL2, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2, sIL-6Rα, sIL-2, sCD14 and B-cell activating factor were quantified. Neurocognitive functioning was measured using a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. Results Carriers of the CCL2 −2578G allele had a significantly higher concentration of CCL2 in CSF. CSF CCL2 level was positively and significantly associated with other CSF neuroinflammatory markers and worse cognitive functioning. There was a significant association between genotype and plasma viral load, such that carriers of the CCL2 −2578G allele with high viral load expressed greater levels of CCL2 and had higher neurocognitive deficit scores than other genotype/viral load groups. Conclusion Individuals with the CCL2 −2578G allele had higher levels of CCL2 in CSF, which was associated with increased pro-inflammatory markers in CSF and worse neurocognitive functioning. The results highlight the potential role of intermediate phenotypes in studies of

  3. Role of chemokine RANTES in the regulation of perivascular inflammation, T-cell accumulation, and vascular dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Nosalski, Ryszard; Szczepaniak, Piotr; Budzyn, Klaudia; Osmenda, Grzegorz; Skiba, Dominik; Sagan, Agnieszka; Wu, Jing; Vinh, Antony; Marvar, Paul J; Guzik, Bartlomiej; Podolec, Jakub; Drummond, Grant; Lob, Heinrich E; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the role of perivascular inflammation in cardiovascular disease. We studied mechanisms of perivascular leukocyte infiltration in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension and their links to vascular dysfunction. Chronic Ang II infusion in mice increased immune cell content of T cells (255 ± 130 to 1664 ± 349 cells/mg; P < 0.01), M1 and M2 macrophages, and dendritic cells in perivascular adipose tissue. In particular, the content of T lymphocytes bearing CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 1, CCR3, and CCR5 receptors for RANTES chemokine was increased by Ang II (CCR1, 15.6 ± 1.5% vs. 31 ± 5%; P < 0.01). Hypertension was associated with an increase in perivascular adipose tissue expression of the chemokine RANTES (relative quantification, 1.2 ± 0.2 vs. 3.5 ± 1.1; P < 0.05), which induced T-cell chemotaxis and vascular accumulation of T cells expressing the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5. Mechanistically, RANTES(-/-) knockout protected against vascular leukocyte, and in particular T lymphocyte infiltration (26 ± 5% in wild type Ang II vs. 15 ± 4% in RANTES(-/-)), which was associated with protection from endothelial dysfunction induced by Ang II. This effect was linked with diminished infiltration of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) and double-negative CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells in perivascular space and reduced vascular oxidative stress while FoxP3(+) T-regulatory cells were unaltered. IFN-γ ex vivo caused significant endothelial dysfunction, which was reduced by superoxide anion scavenging. In a human cohort, a significant inverse correlation was observed between circulating RANTES levels as a biomarker and vascular function measured as flow-mediated dilatation (R = -0.3, P < 0.01) or endothelial injury marker von Willebrand factor (R = +0.3; P < 0.01). Thus, chemokine RANTES is important in the regulation of vascular dysfunction through modulation of perivascular inflammation.-Mikolajczyk, T. P., Nosalski, R., Szczepaniak, P

  4. Role of chemokine RANTES in the regulation of perivascular inflammation, T-cell accumulation, and vascular dysfunction in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P.; Nosalski, Ryszard; Szczepaniak, Piotr; Budzyn, Klaudia; Osmenda, Grzegorz; Skiba, Dominik; Sagan, Agnieszka; Wu, Jing; Vinh, Antony; Marvar, Paul J.; Guzik, Bartlomiej; Podolec, Jakub; Drummond, Grant; Lob, Heinrich E.; Harrison, David G.; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the role of perivascular inflammation in cardiovascular disease. We studied mechanisms of perivascular leukocyte infiltration in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension and their links to vascular dysfunction. Chronic Ang II infusion in mice increased immune cell content of T cells (255 ± 130 to 1664 ± 349 cells/mg; P < 0.01), M1 and M2 macrophages, and dendritic cells in perivascular adipose tissue. In particular, the content of T lymphocytes bearing CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 1, CCR3, and CCR5 receptors for RANTES chemokine was increased by Ang II (CCR1, 15.6 ± 1.5% vs. 31 ± 5%; P < 0.01). Hypertension was associated with an increase in perivascular adipose tissue expression of the chemokine RANTES (relative quantification, 1.2 ± 0.2 vs. 3.5 ± 1.1; P < 0.05), which induced T-cell chemotaxis and vascular accumulation of T cells expressing the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5. Mechanistically, RANTES−/− knockout protected against vascular leukocyte, and in particular T lymphocyte infiltration (26 ± 5% in wild type Ang II vs. 15 ± 4% in RANTES−/−), which was associated with protection from endothelial dysfunction induced by Ang II. This effect was linked with diminished infiltration of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ and double-negative CD3+CD4−CD8− T cells in perivascular space and reduced vascular oxidative stress while FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells were unaltered. IFN-γ ex vivo caused significant endothelial dysfunction, which was reduced by superoxide anion scavenging. In a human cohort, a significant inverse correlation was observed between circulating RANTES levels as a biomarker and vascular function measured as flow-mediated dilatation (R = −0.3, P < 0.01) or endothelial injury marker von Willebrand factor (R = +0.3; P < 0.01). Thus, chemokine RANTES is important in the regulation of vascular dysfunction through modulation of perivascular inflammation.—Mikolajczyk, T. P., Nosalski, R., Szczepaniak, P

  5. Myocardial Chemokine Expression and Intensity of Myocarditis in Chagas Cardiomyopathy Are Controlled by Polymorphisms in CXCL9 and CXCL10

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; Santos, Ronaldo Honorato Barros; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Mairena, Eliane Conti; Benvenuti, Luiz Alberto; Frade, Amanda; Donadi, Eduardo; Dias, Fabrício; Saba, Bruno; Wang, Hui-Tzu Lin; Fragata, Abilio; Sampaio, Marcelo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Buck, Paula; Mady, Charles; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Stolf, Noedir Antonio; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), a life-threatening inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy, affects 30% of the approximately 8 million patients infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. Even though the Th1 T cell-rich myocarditis plays a pivotal role in CCC pathogenesis, little is known about the factors controlling inflammatory cell migration to CCC myocardium. Methods and Results Using confocal immunofluorescence and quantitative PCR, we studied cell surface staining and gene expression of the CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CCR8 receptors and their chemokine ligands in myocardial samples from end-stage CCC patients. CCR5+, CXCR3+, CCR4+, CCL5+ and CXCL9+ mononuclear cells were observed in CCC myocardium. mRNA expression of the chemokines CCL5, CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL17, CCL19 and their receptors was upregulated in CCC myocardium. CXCL9 mRNA expression directly correlated with the intensity of myocarditis, as well as with mRNA expression of CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CCR8 and their ligands. We also analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms for genes encoding the most highly expressed chemokines and receptors in a cohort of Chagas disease patients. CCC patients with ventricular dysfunction displayed reduced genotypic frequencies of CXCL9 rs10336 CC, CXCL10 rs3921 GG, and increased CCR5 rs1799988CC as compared to those without dysfunction. Significantly, myocardial samples from CCC patients carrying the CXCL9/CXCL10 genotypes associated to a lower risk displayed a 2–6 fold reduction in mRNA expression of CXCL9, CXCL10, and other chemokines and receptors, along with reduced intensity of myocarditis, as compared to those with other CXCL9/CXCL10 genotypes. Conclusions Results may indicate that genotypes associated to reduced risk in closely linked CXCL9 and CXCL10 genes may modulate local expression of the chemokines themselves, and simultaneously affect myocardial expression of other key chemokines as well as intensity of myocarditis. Taken together our results may suggest that

  6. The chemokine CXCL13 is a key regulator of B cell recruitment to the cerebrospinal fluid in acute Lyme neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The chemokine CXCL13 is known to dictate homing and motility of B cells in lymphoid tissue and has been implicated in the formation of ectopic lymphoid tissue in chronic inflammation. Whether it influences B cell trafficking during acute infection, is largely unclear. In previous studies, we showed that (I) CXCL13 levels are markedly increased in the B cell-rich cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with acute Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB), and (II) CXCL13 is released by monocytes upon recognition of borrelial outer surface proteins by Toll-like receptor 2. Here, we assessed the role of CXCL13 - in comparison to other chemokines - in the recruitment of B cells to the CSF of patients with acute LNB. Methods Measurement of chemokines was done by ELISA. B cells were isolated from whole blood using magnetic cell separation (MACS). For migration experiments, a modified Boyden chamber assay was used and the migrated B cells were further analysed by FACS. The migration was inhibited either by preincubation of the CSF samples with neutralizing antibodies, heating to 60°C, removal of proteins >3 kDa, or by pre-treatment of the B cells with pertussis toxin. The principal statistical tests used were one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test (chemokine measurements) as well as paired Student's t-test (migration experiments). Results Measurements of chemokine levels revealed an increase in three of the four known major B cell chemoattractants CXCL13, CCL19 and CXCL12 in LNB CSF. The CXCL13 CSF:serum ratio, as a measure of the chemotactic gradient, was substantially higher than that of CCL19 and CXCL12. Moreover, the chemotactic activity of LNB CSF was reduced up to 56% after preincubation with a neutralizing CXCL13 antibody, while combined preincubation with antibodies against CXCL13, CCL19, and CXCL12 did not lead to further reduction. Since treatment with pertussis toxin, heating to 60°C, and removal of proteins >3 kDa abrogated the chemotactic activity

  7. Chemokine Transfer by Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Contributes to the Recruitment of CD4+ T Cells into the Murine Liver.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Katrin; Erben, Ulrike; Kruse, Nils; Wechsung, Katja; Schumann, Michael; Klugewitz, Katja; Scheffold, Alexander; Kühl, Anja A

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion and transmigration are central features governing immune surveillance and inflammatory reactions in body tissues. Within the liver sinusoids, chemokines initiate the first crucial step of T-cell migration into the hepatic tissue. We studied molecular mechanisms involved in endothelial chemokine supply during hepatic immune surveillance and liver inflammation and their impact on the recruitment of CD4(+) T cells into the liver. In the murine model of Concanavalin A-induced T cell-mediated hepatitis, we showed that hepatic expression of the inflammatory CXC chemokine ligands (CXCL)9 and CXCL10 strongly increased whereas homeostatic CXCL12 significantly decreased. Consistently, CD4(+) T cells expressing the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)3 accumulated within the inflamed liver tissue. In histology, CXCL9 was associated with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) which represent the first contact site for T-cell immigration into the liver. LSEC actively transferred basolaterally internalized CXCL12, CXCL9 and CXCL10 via clathrin-coated vesicles to CD4(+) T cells leading to enhanced transmigration of CXCR4(+) total CD4(+) T cells and CXCR3(+) effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, respectively in vitro. LSEC-expressed CXCR4 mediated CXCL12 transport and blockage of endothelial CXCR4 inhibited CXCL12-dependent CD4(+) T-cell transmigration. In contrast, CXCR3 was not involved in the endothelial transport of its ligands CXCL9 and CXCL10. The clathrin-specific inhibitor chlorpromazine blocked endothelial chemokine internalization and CD4(+) T-cell transmigration in vitro as well as migration of CD4(+) T cells into the inflamed liver in vivo. Moreover, hepatic accumulation of CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells during T cell-mediated hepatitis was strongly reduced after administration of chlorpromazine. These data demonstrate that LSEC actively provide perivascularly expressed homeostatic and inflammatory chemokines by CXCR4- and clathrin-dependent intracellular transport

  8. Immunological role of C4 CC chemokine-1 from snakehead murrel Channa striatus.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Prasanth; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Gnanam, Annie J; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we have reported a cDNA sequence of C4 CC chemokine identified from snakehead murrel (also known as striped murrel) Channa striatus (named as CsCC-Chem-1) normalized cDNA library constructed by Genome Sequencing FLX™ Technology (GS-FLX™). CsCC-Chem-1 is 641 base pairs (bp) long that contain 438 bp open reading frame (ORF). The ORF encodes a polypeptide of 146 amino acids with a molecular mass of 15 kDa. The polypeptide contains a small cytokine domain at 30-88. The domain carries the CC motif at Cys(33)-Cys(34). In addition, CsCC-Chem-1 consists of another two cysteine residues at C(59) and C(73), which, together with C(33) and C(34), make CsCC-Chem-1 as a C4-CC chemokine. CsCC-Chem-1 also contains a 'TCCT' motif at 32-35 as CC signature motif; this new motif may represent new characteristic features, which may lead to some unknown function that needs to be further focused on. Phylogenitically, CsCC-Chem-1 clustered together with CC-Chem-1 from rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus and European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax. Significantly (P<0.05) highest gene expression was noticed in spleen and is up-regulated upon fungus (Aphanomyces invadans), bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila) and virus (poly I:C) infection at various time points. The gene expression results indicate the influence of CsCC-Chem-1 in the immune system of murrel. Overall, the gene expression study showed that the CsCC-Chem-1 is a capable gene to increase the cellular response against various microbial infections. Further, we cloned the coding sequence of CsCC-Chem-1 in pMAL vector and purified the recombinant protein to study the functional properties. The cell proliferation activity of recombinant CsCC-Chem-1 protein showed a significant metabolic activity in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, the chemotaxis assay showed the capability of recombinant CsCC-Chem-1 protein which can induce the migration of spleen leukocytes in C. striatus. However, this remains to be verified

  9. Immunological role of C4 CC chemokine-1 from snakehead murrel Channa striatus.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Prasanth; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Gnanam, Annie J; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we have reported a cDNA sequence of C4 CC chemokine identified from snakehead murrel (also known as striped murrel) Channa striatus (named as CsCC-Chem-1) normalized cDNA library constructed by Genome Sequencing FLX™ Technology (GS-FLX™). CsCC-Chem-1 is 641 base pairs (bp) long that contain 438 bp open reading frame (ORF). The ORF encodes a polypeptide of 146 amino acids with a molecular mass of 15 kDa. The polypeptide contains a small cytokine domain at 30-88. The domain carries the CC motif at Cys(33)-Cys(34). In addition, CsCC-Chem-1 consists of another two cysteine residues at C(59) and C(73), which, together with C(33) and C(34), make CsCC-Chem-1 as a C4-CC chemokine. CsCC-Chem-1 also contains a 'TCCT' motif at 32-35 as CC signature motif; this new motif may represent new characteristic features, which may lead to some unknown function that needs to be further focused on. Phylogenitically, CsCC-Chem-1 clustered together with CC-Chem-1 from rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus and European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax. Significantly (P<0.05) highest gene expression was noticed in spleen and is up-regulated upon fungus (Aphanomyces invadans), bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila) and virus (poly I:C) infection at various time points. The gene expression results indicate the influence of CsCC-Chem-1 in the immune system of murrel. Overall, the gene expression study showed that the CsCC-Chem-1 is a capable gene to increase the cellular response against various microbial infections. Further, we cloned the coding sequence of CsCC-Chem-1 in pMAL vector and purified the recombinant protein to study the functional properties. The cell proliferation activity of recombinant CsCC-Chem-1 protein showed a significant metabolic activity in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, the chemotaxis assay showed the capability of recombinant CsCC-Chem-1 protein which can induce the migration of spleen leukocytes in C. striatus. However, this remains to be verified

  10. Functional inhibition of chemokine receptor CCR2 by dicer-substrate-siRNA prevents pain development

    PubMed Central

    Midavaine, Élora; Dansereau, Marc-André; Tétreault, Pascal; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Jacobi, Ashley M; Rose, Scott D; Behlke, Mark A; Beaudet, Nicolas; Sarret, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that the C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2, or monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) acts as a neuromodulator in the central nervous system through its binding to the C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Notably, it is well established that the CCL2/CCR2 axis plays a key role in neuron-glia communication as well as in spinal nociceptive transmission. Gene silencing through RNA interference has recently emerged as a promising avenue in research and drug development, including therapeutic management of chronic pain. In the present study, we used 27-mer Dicer-substrate small interfering RNA (DsiRNA) targeting CCR2 and assessed their ability to reverse the nociceptive behaviors induced by spinal CCL2 injection or following intraplantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant. Results To this end, we first developed high-potency DsiRNAs designed to target different sequences distributed across the rat CCR2 (rCCR2) messenger RNA. For optimization, methyl groups were added to the two most potent DsiRNA candidates (Evader and M7 2′-O-methyl modified duplexes) in order to improve in vivo duplex stability and to reduce potential immunostimulatory activity. Our results demonstrated that all modified candidates formulated with the cell-penetrating peptide reagent Transductin showed strong RNAi activity following intrathecal delivery, exhibiting >50% rCCR2 knockdown in lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Accordingly, we found that these DsiRNA duplexes were able to reduce spinal microglia activation and were effective at blocking CCL2-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Along with similar reductions of rCCR2 messenger RNA, both sequences and methylation patterns were similarly effective in inhibiting the CCL2 nociceptive action for the whole seven days testing period, compared to mismatch DsiRNA. DsiRNAs against CCR2 also reversed the hypernociceptive responses observed in the complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced inflammatory chronic pain model

  11. Heparins modulate the IFN-γ-induced production of chemokines in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fluhr, Herbert; Seitz, Tina; Zygmunt, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Heparins seem to improve survival in patients with advanced malignancies independently of their anticoagulatory function. As the treatment options in advanced and metastatic breast cancer are still very limited, heparins might be an interesting addition to the existing systemic therapies. The interferon (IFN)-γ-inducible chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 play an essential role in the regulation of the immune milieu in malignant tumours, thereby being interesting targets for an immunological intervention. We therefore wanted to test whether heparins have an impact on the chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 as well as the IFN-γ signalling in human breast cancer cells in vitro. The well-established cell lines BT-474, MCF-7, SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-231 were incubated with IFN-γ, unfractionated heparin (UFH), different low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) and the heparin-related polyanions danaparoid and dextran sulphate. The production of CXCL9 and CXCL10 was measured by ELISA and real-time RT-PCR, the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 was detected by an in-cell western assay and the amount of cellular bound IFN-γ was analysed by a high sensitivity ELISA. We observed that IFN-γ induced CXCL9 and CXCL10 production in MCF-7, SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells but not in BT-474. UFH dose dependently inhibited the effect of IFN-γ on the secretion and expression of CXCL9 and CXCL10. LMWHs and heparin-related compounds differentially modulated IFN-γ-effects-the results depended on their molecular size and charge, but were independent of their anticoagulatory properties. As a reason for these heparin effects, we could show that the IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 was modulated by heparins, caused by an interaction with the cellular binding of IFN-γ. In conclusion, these results support the significance of the immunomodulatory properties of heparins independently of their classical anticoagulatory function. Heparin-derived sulphated

  12. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F.; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K.; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand 68Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (18F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for 18F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for 68Ga-Pentixafor than for 18F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high 68Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent 68Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, 68Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy. PMID:26909116

  13. Macrophages migrate in an activation-dependent manner to chemokines involved in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In neuroinflammatory diseases, macrophages can play a dual role in the process of tissue damage, depending on their activation status (M1 / M2). M1 macrophages are considered to exert damaging effects to neurons, whereas M2 macrophages are reported to aid regeneration and repair of neurons. Their migration within the central nervous system may be of critical importance in the final outcome of neurodegeneration in neuroinflammatory diseases e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). To provide insight into this process, we examined the migratory capacity of human monocyte-derived M1 and M2 polarised macrophages towards chemoattractants, relevant for neuroinflammatory diseases like MS. Methods Primary cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages were exposed to interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evoke proinflammatory (M1) activation or IL-4 to evoke anti-inflammatory (M2) activation. In a TAXIScan assay, migration of M0, M1 and M2 towards chemoattractants was measured and quantified. Furthermore the adhesion capacity and the expression levels of integrins as well as chemokine receptors of M0, M1 and M2 were assessed. Alterations in cell morphology were analysed using fluorescent labelling of the cytoskeleton. Results Significant differences were observed between M1 and M2 macrophages in the migration towards chemoattractants. We show that M2 macrophages migrated over longer distances towards CCL2, CCL5, CXCL10, CXCL12 and C1q compared to non-activated (M0) and M1 macrophages. No differences were observed in the adhesion of M0, M1 and M2 macrophages to multiple matrix components, nor in the expression of integrins and chemokine receptors. Significant changes were observed in the cytoskeleton organization upon stimulation with CCL2, M0, M1 and M2 macrophages adopt a spherical morphology and the cytoskeleton is rapidly rearranged. M0 and M2 macrophages are able to form filopodia, whereas M1 macrophages only adapt a spherical morphology. Conclusions

  14. Rubratoxin-B-induced secretion of chemokine ligands of cysteine-cysteine motif chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and its dependence on heat shock protein 90 in HL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying rubratoxin B toxicity, the effects of rubratoxin B on the secretion of CCR5 chemokines, CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5, in a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL60, were investigated. In addition, to examine whether the molecular chaperone 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) contributes to rubratoxin B toxicity, the effects of Hsp90-specific inhibitors, radicicol and geldanamycin, were investigated. Exposure to rubratoxin B for 24h induced secretion of each CCR5 chemokine, although the effect on CCL5 secretion was modest, and it enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, CXCL8, and CCL2. Concomitant treatment with radicicol abolished the rubratoxin-induced secretion of all cytokines investigated. Geldanamycin antagonized the rubratoxin B-induced effects on CCL3 and CCL5, but not CCL4; the effects of geldanamycin were less than that of radicicol. Taken together, the results suggest that rubratoxin B, with the contribution of Hsp90, induces secretion of CCR5 chemokines.

  15. Comprehensive models of human primary and metastatic colorectal tumors in immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice by chemokine targeting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired subcutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening.

  16. CC chemokine receptor 10 cell surface presentation in melanocytes is regulated by the novel interaction partner S100A10

    PubMed Central

    Hessner, F.; Dlugos, C. P.; Chehab, T.; Schaefer, C.; Homey, B.; Gerke, V.; Weide, T.; Pavenstädt, H.; Rescher, U.

    2016-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) conveys signals in response to various endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Consequently, GPCRs are the most important drug targets. CCR10, the receptor for the chemokines CCL27/CTACK and CCL28/MEC, belongs to the chemokine receptor subfamily of GPCRs and is thought to function in immune responses and tumour progression. However, there is only limited information on the intracellular regulation of CCR10. We find that S100A10, a member of the S100 family of Ca2+ binding proteins, binds directly to the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of CCR10 and that this interaction regulates the CCR10 cell surface presentation. This identifies S100A10 as a novel interaction partner and regulator of CCR10 that might serve as a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26941067

  17. Pathological Role of Fractalkine/CX3CL1 in Rheumatic Diseases: A Unique Chemokine with Multiple Functions

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brian; Koch, Alisa E.; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2012-01-01

    Understanding rheumatic diseases from the perspective of chemokine biology has shaped and will continue to shape our approach for targeted drug design. Among different kinds of chemokines, fractalkine/CX3CL1 has been found to play an important role in inflammation, portraying unique functional, and structural characteristics. This review summarizes the emerging role of fractalkine/CX3CL1 from a functional and clinical perspective and provides evidence to validate it as a potential therapeutic target in rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, as well as diseases related to vascular inflammation. From this, recent studies investigating potential therapeutic agents against fractalkine/CX3CL1’s role in pathology have shown promise. PMID:22566871

  18. The cell wall component lipoteichoic acid of Staphylococcus aureus induces chemokine gene expression in bovine mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    KIKU, Yoshio; NAGASAWA, Yuya; TANABE, Fuyuko; SUGAWARA, Kazue; WATANABE, Atsushi; HATA, Eiji; OZAWA, Tomomi; NAKAJIMA, Kei-ichi; ARAI, Toshiro; HAYASHI, Tomohito

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is a major cause of bovine mastitis, but its pathogenic mechanism remains poorly understood. To evaluate the role of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in the immune or inflammatory response of SA mastitis, we investigated the gene expression profile in bovine mammary epithelial cells stimulated with LTA alone or with formalin-killed SA (FKSA) using cap analysis of gene expression. Seven common differentially expressed genes related to immune or inflammatory mediators were up-regulated under both LTA and FKSA stimulations. Three of these genes encode chemokines (IL-8, CXCL6 and CCL2) functioning as chemoattractant molecules for neutrophils and macrophages. These results suggest that the initial inflammatory response of SA infection in mammary gland may be related with LTA induced chemokine genes. PMID:27211287

  19. The chemokine CCL2 activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in cultured rat hippocampal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jungsook; Gruol, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that chemokines can regulate both the physiology and biochemistry of CNS neurons and glia. In the current study, Western blot analysis showed that in rat hippocampal neuronal/glial cultures the signal transduction pathway activated by CCL2, a chemokine expressed in the normal brain and at elevated levels during neuroinflammation, involves a G-protein coupled receptor, p38 MAPK as well as its immediate upstream kinase MKK3/6, and the downstream transcription factor CREB. ERK 1/2 and the transcription factors STAT1 and STAT3 do not play a prominent role. CCL2 also altered Ca2+ influx and synaptic network activity in the hippocampal neurons. These results suggest an important role for p38 MAPK and CREB in hippocampal actions of CCL2. PMID:18584881

  20. Intravenous infusion of erythromycin inhibits CXC chemokine production, but augments neutrophil degranulation in whole blood stimulated with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Schultz, M J; Speelman, P; Hack, C E; Buurman, W A; van Deventer, S J; van Der Poll, T

    2000-08-01

    Macrolides may influence the inflammatory response to an infection by mechanisms that are unrelated to their antimicrobial effect. Indeed, erythromycin and other macrolides inhibit cytokine production and induce degranulation of neutrophils in vitro. CXC chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that specifically influence neutrophil functions. To determine the effect of a clinically relevant dose of erythromycin on the production of CXC chemokines and neutrophil degranulation, six healthy humans received a 30 min iv infusion of erythromycin (1000 mg). Whole blood obtained before and at various times after the infusion was stimulated ex vivo with heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae. Ex vivo production of the CXC chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8) and epithelial cell-derived neutrophil attractant 78 (ENA-78), in whole blood obtained after erythromycin infusion, was lower than that in blood drawn before erythromycin infusion (maximum inhibition post-infusion: 32.9 +/- 6.5% and 35.2 +/- 12.6% decrease in production, respectively, expressed as percentage change relative to production before infusion of erythromycin, both P < 0.05). In contrast, infusion of erythromycin was associated with an enhanced capacity of whole blood to release the neutrophil degranulation products bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI), human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and human lactoferrin (HLF) upon stimulation with S. pneumoniae. Effects of erythromycin were greatest 4 h after infusion was stopped, when BPI, HNE and HLF concentrations were increased by +107.6 +/- 33.5%, +134.7 +/- 34.8% and +205.9 +/- 55.9 %, respectively (expressed as percentage change relative to production before infusion of erythromycin) (all P < 0. 05). These results indicate the ability of erythromycin to reduce CXC chemokine production and to enhance neutrophil degranulation in human blood.