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Sample records for activator complex polymorphisms

  1. Chromosomal polymorphism in the Sporothrix schenckii complex.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Alexandre A; Fernandes, Geisa F; Rodrigues, Anderson M; Lima, Fábio M; Marini, Marjorie M; Dos S Feitosa, Luciano; de Melo Teixeira, Marcus; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares; da Silveira, José Franco; de Camargo, Zoilo P

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a polymorphic disease caused by a complex of thermodimorphic fungi including S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii sensu stricto (s. str.), S. globosa and S. luriei. Humans and animals can acquire the disease through traumatic inoculation of propagules into the subcutaneous tissue. Despite the importance of sporotrichosis as a disease that can take epidemic proportions there are just a few studies dealing with genetic polymorphisms and genomic architecture of these pathogens. The main objective of this study was to investigate chromosomal polymorphisms and genomic organization among different isolates in the S. schenckii complex. We used pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to separate chromosomal fragments of isolated DNA, followed by probe hybridization. Nine loci (β-tubulin, calmodulin, catalase, chitin synthase 1, Internal Transcribed Spacer, Pho85 cyclin-dependent kinase, protein kinase C Ss-2, G protein α subunit and topoisomerase II) were mapped onto chromosomal bands of Brazilian isolates of S. schenckii s. str. and S. brasiliensis. Our results revealed the presence of intra and interspecies polymorphisms in chromosome number and size. The gene hybridization analysis showed that closely related species in phylogenetic analysis had similar genetic organizations, mostly due to identification of synteny groups in chromosomal bands of similar sizes. Our results bring new insights into the genetic diversity and genome organization among pathogenic species in the Sporothrix schenckii complex.

  2. Chromosomal Polymorphism in the Sporothrix schenckii Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Alexandre A.; Fernandes, Geisa F.; Rodrigues, Anderson M.; Lima, Fábio M.; Marini, Marjorie M.; dos S. Feitosa, Luciano; de Melo Teixeira, Marcus; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares; da Silveira, José Franco; de Camargo, Zoilo P.

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a polymorphic disease caused by a complex of thermodimorphic fungi including S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii sensu stricto (s. str.), S. globosa and S. luriei. Humans and animals can acquire the disease through traumatic inoculation of propagules into the subcutaneous tissue. Despite the importance of sporotrichosis as a disease that can take epidemic proportions there are just a few studies dealing with genetic polymorphisms and genomic architecture of these pathogens. The main objective of this study was to investigate chromosomal polymorphisms and genomic organization among different isolates in the S. schenckii complex. We used pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to separate chromosomal fragments of isolated DNA, followed by probe hybridization. Nine loci (β-tubulin, calmodulin, catalase, chitin synthase 1, Internal Transcribed Spacer, Pho85 cyclin-dependent kinase, protein kinase C Ss-2, G protein α subunit and topoisomerase II) were mapped onto chromosomal bands of Brazilian isolates of S. schenckii s. str. and S. brasiliensis. Our results revealed the presence of intra and interspecies polymorphisms in chromosome number and size. The gene hybridization analysis showed that closely related species in phylogenetic analysis had similar genetic organizations, mostly due to identification of synteny groups in chromosomal bands of similar sizes. Our results bring new insights into the genetic diversity and genome organization among pathogenic species in the Sporothrix schenckii complex. PMID:24466257

  3. Purification of polymorphic components of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Stodolsky, M.

    1991-07-16

    A method is disclosed for processing related subject and reference macromolecule populations composed of complementary strands into their respective subject and reference populations of representative fragments and effectuating purification of unique polymorphic subject fragments. 1 figure.

  4. Purification of polymorphic components of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Stodolsky, M.

    1988-01-21

    A method for processing related subject and reference macromolecule composed of complementary strand into their respective subject and reference populations of representative fragments and effectuating purification of unique polymorphic subject fragments. 1 fig.

  5. Purification of polymorphic components of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Stodolsky, Marvin

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for processing related subject and reference macromolecule populations composed of complementary strands into their respective subject and reference populations of representative fragments and effectuating purification of unique polymorphic subject fragments.

  6. Essential Role of the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex in Lymphoma Revealed by Rare Germline Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yibin; Schmitz, Roland; Mitala, Joseph; Whiting, Amanda; Xiao, Wenming; Ceribelli, Michele; Wright, George W.; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yandan; Xu, Weihong; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, James. R.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chan, Wing C.; Wiestner, Adrian; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Bernal, Federico; Staudt, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Constitutive activation of NF-κB is a hallmark of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), owing to upstream signals from the B cell receptor (BCR) and MyD88 pathways. The linear polyubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) attaches linear polyubiquitin chains to IκB kinase γ, a necessary event in some pathways that engage NF-κB. Two germ line polymorphisms affecting the LUBAC subunit RNF31 are rare among healthy individuals (~1%) but enriched in ABC DLBCL (7.8%). These polymorphisms alter RNF31 α helices that mediate binding to the LUBAC subunit RBCK1, thereby increasing RNF31-RBCK1 association, LUBAC enzymatic activity, and NF-κB engagement. In the BCR pathway, LUBAC associates with the CARD11/MALT1/BCL10 adapter complex and is required for ABC DLBCL viability. A stapled RNF31 α-helical peptide based on the ABC DLBCL-associated Q622L polymorphism inhibited RFN31-RBCK1 binding, decreased NF-κB and killed ABC DLBCL cells, credentialing this protein-protein interface as a therapeutic target. PMID:24491438

  7. K153R polymorphism in myostatin gene increases the rate of promyostatin activation by furin.

    PubMed

    Szláma, György; Trexler, Mária; Buday, László; Patthy, László

    2015-01-30

    Recent studies demonstrated an association between the K153R polymorphism in the myostatin gene with extreme longevity, lower muscle strength and obesity but the molecular basis of these associations has not been clarified. Here, we show that the K153R mutation significantly increases the rate of proteolysis of promyostatin by furin, but has no effect on the activity of the latent complex or the cleavage of the latent complex by bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP-1). The increased rate of activation of K153R mutant promyostatin may explain why this polymorphism is associated with obesity, lower muscle strength and extension of lifespan.

  8. Mapping of complex traits by single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, L P; Aragaki, C; Hsu, L; Quiaoit, F

    1998-01-01

    Molecular geneticists are developing the third-generation human genome map with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which can be assayed via chip-based microarrays. One use of these SNP markers is the ability to locate loci that may be responsible for complex traits, via linkage/linkage-disequilibrium analysis. In this communication, we describe a semiparametric method for combined linkage/linkage-disequilibrium analysis using SNP markers. Asymptotic results are obtained for the estimated parameters, and the finite-sample properties are evaluated via a simulation study. We also applied this technique to a simulated genome-scan experiment for mapping a complex trait with two major genes. This experiment shows that separate linkage and linkage-disequilibrium analyses correctly detected the signals of both major genes; but the rates of false-positive signals seem high. When linkage and linkage-disequilibrium signals were combined, the analysis yielded much stronger and clearer signals for the presence of two major genes than did two separate analyses. PMID:9634510

  9. AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale genotyping methods are necessary in order to identify possible sources of human exposure to opportunistic pathogens belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was evaluated for fingerprintin...

  10. Neural Activation in Humans during a Simple Motor Task Differs between BDNF Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Morales, Lizbeth; Grön, Georg; Sim, Eun-Jin; Stingl, Julia C.; Kammer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism has been linked to decreased synaptic plasticity involved in motor learning tasks. We investigated whether individual differences in this polymorphism may promote differences in neural activity during a two-alternative forced-choice motor performance. In two separate sessions, the BOLD signal from 22 right-handed healthy men was measured during button presses with the left and right index finger upon visual presentation of an arrow. 11 men were Val66Val carriers (ValVal group), the other 11 men carried either the Val66Met or the Met66Met polymorphism (Non-ValVal group). Reaction times, resting and active motor thresholds did not differ between ValVal and Non-ValVal groups. Compared to the ValVal group the Non-ValVal group showed significantly higher BOLD signals in the right SMA and motor cingulate cortex during motor performance. This difference was highly consistent for both hands and across all four sessions. Our finding suggests that this BDNF polymorphism may not only influence complex performance during motor learning but is already associated with activation differences during rather simple motor tasks. The higher BOLD signal observed in Non-ValVal subjects suggests the presence of cumulative effects of the polymorphism on the motor system, and may reflect compensatory functional activation mediating equal behavioral performance between groups. PMID:24828051

  11. Polymorphism complexity and handedness inversion in serum albumin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Usov, Ivan; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-12-23

    Protein-based amyloid fibrils can show a great variety of polymorphic structures within the same protein precursor, although the origins of these structural homologues remain poorly understood. In this work we investigate the fibrillation of bovine serum albumin--a model globular protein--and we follow the polymorphic evolution by a statistical analysis of high-resolution atomic force microscopy images, complemented, at larger length scales, by concepts based on polymer physics formalism. We identify six distinct classes of coexisting amyloid fibrils, including flexible left-handed twisted ribbons, rigid right-handed helical ribbons and nanotubes. We show that the rigid fibrils originate from flexible fibrils through two diverse polymorphic transitions, first, via a single-fibril transformation when the flexible left-handed twisted ribbons turn into the helical left-handed ribbons, to finally evolve into nanotube-like structures, and second, via a double-fibril transformation when two flexible left-handed twisted ribbons wind together resulting in a right-handed twisted ribbon, followed by a rigid right-handed helical ribbon polymorphic conformation. Hence, the change in handedness occurs with an increase in the level of the fibril's structural organization. PMID:24171389

  12. Complex I polymorphisms, bigenomic heterogeneity, and family history in Virginians with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Russell H.; Weaver, Bradley; Grawey, Amy; Wenger, Connie; Freed, Eric; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2006-01-01

    The electron transport chain enzyme complex I may play a role in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. Association studies considering whether or not complex I-relevant gene polymorphisms contribute to PD risk are discordant. We evaluated four complex I-relevant gene polymorphisms alternatively reported to associate and not associate with PD (tRNAGln T4336C, ND1 T4216C, ND2 G5460A, and the NDUFV2 exon 2 C182T transition). Our study included 111 PD subjects and 106 controls in central Virginia. Individuals with at least one copy of the NDUFV2 182T allele were more likely to report a PD family history than non-carriers, but aside from this no positive associations were found. Indeed, the tRNAGln 4336C variant occurred more frequently in controls. We also observed that individuals in both groups often carried more than one of the assayed polymorphisms, and for the first time show bigenomic polymorphic variation (between nuclear and mtDNA complex I subunit genes) commonly occurs within individuals. In an exploratory sub-analysis, more control than case women had an ND1 4216C, NDUFV2 homozygous 182C compound genotype. Complex I compound genotype variation commonly occurs and may explain why particular complex I gene polymorphisms associate with PD in some populations but not others. PMID:16784756

  13. PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism reduces enzymatic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaogan; Wang Zhaoqi; Tong Weimin . E-mail: tong@iarc.fr; Shen Yan

    2007-03-02

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) modifies a variety of nuclear proteins by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, and plays diverse roles in molecular and cellular processes. A common PARP1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 762, resulting in the substitution of alanine (Ala) for valine (Val) in the catalytic domain has been implicated in susceptibility to cancer. To characterize the functional effect of this polymorphism on PARP1, we performed in vitro enzymatic analysis on PARP1-Ala762 and PARP1-Val762. We found that PARP1-Ala762 displayed 57.2% of the activity of PARP1-Val762 for auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and 61.9% of the activity of PARP1-Val762 for trans-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of histone H1. The kinetic characterization revealed that the K {sub m} of PARP1-Ala762 was increased to a 1.2-fold of the K {sub m} of PARP1-Val762 for trans-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Thus, the PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism reduces the enzymatic activity of PARP1 by increasing K {sub m}. This finding suggests that different levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP1 might aid in understanding Cancer risk of carriers of the PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism.

  14. A Case Report of Renal Sympathetic Denervation for the Treatment of Polymorphic Ventricular Premature Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Márcio Galindo; Vitorio, Frederico Puppim; da Silva, Gustavo Ramalho; Paz, Luis Marcelo Rodrigues; Souto, Gladyston Luiz Lima

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Premature ventricular complexes are very common, appearing most frequently in patients with hypertension, obesity, sleep apnea, and structural heart disease. Sympathetic hyperactivity plays a critical role in the development, maintenance, and aggravation of ventricular arrhythmias. Recently, Armaganijan et al reported the relevance of sympathetic activation in patients with ventricular arrhythmias and suggested a potential role for catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation in reducing the arrhythmic burden. In this report, we describe a 32-year-old hypertensive male patient presenting with a high incidence of polymorphic premature ventricular complexes on a 24 hour Holter monitor. Beginning 1 year prior, the patient experienced episodes of presyncope, syncope, and tachycardia palpitations. The patient was taking losartan 100 mg/day, which kept his blood pressure (BP) under control, and sotalol 160 mg twice daily. Bisoprolol 10 mg/day was used previously but was not successful for controlling the episodes. The 24 hour Holter performed after the onset of sotalol 160 mg twice daily showed a heart rate ranging between 48 (minimum)–78 (average)–119 (maximum) bpm; 14,286 polymorphic premature ventricular complexes; 3 episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, the largest composed of 4 beats at a rate of 197 bpm; and 14 isolated atrial ectopic beats. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium perfusion performed at rest and under pharmacological stress with dipyridamole showed increased left atrial internal volume, preserved systolic global biventricular function, and an absence of infarcted or ischemic areas. The patient underwent bilateral renal sympathetic denervation. The only drug used postprocedure was losartan 25 mg/day. Three months after the patient underwent renal sympathetic denervation, the mean BP value dropped to 132/86 mmHg, the mean systolic/diastolic 24 hour ambulatory BP measurement was reduced to 128/83

  15. Polymorphism in the spin-crossover ferric complexes [(TPA)Fe(III)(TCC)]PF6.

    PubMed

    Collet, Eric; Boillot, Marie Laure; Hebert, Johan; Moisan, Nicolas; Servol, Marina; Lorenc, Maciej; Toupet, Loïc; Buron-Le Cointe, Marylise; Tissot, Antoine; Sainton, Joelle

    2009-08-01

    We have identified two polymorphs of the molecular complex [(TPA)Fe((III))(TCC)]PF(6) [TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine and TCC = 3,4,5,6-tetrachlorocatecholate dianion]: one is monoclinic and the other is orthorhombic. By lowering the temperature both undergo a thermal spin-crossover between a high-spin (S = 5/2) and a low-spin (S = 1/2) state, which we detected by magnetic, optical and X-ray diffraction measurements. The thermal crossover is only slightly shifted between the polymorphs. Their crystalline structures consist of similar cation layers alternating with PF(6) anion layers, packed differently in the two polymorphs. The magnetic and optical properties of the polymorphs are presented.

  16. Polymorphism and selection in the major histocompatibility complex DRA and DQA genes in the family Equidae.

    PubMed

    Janova, Eva; Matiasovic, Jan; Vahala, Jiri; Vodicka, Roman; Van Dyk, Enette; Horin, Petr

    2009-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex genes coding for antigen binding and presenting molecules are the most polymorphic genes in the vertebrate genome. We studied the DRA and DQA gene polymorphism of the family Equidae. In addition to 11 previously reported DRA and 24 DQA alleles, six new DRA sequences and 13 new DQA alleles were identified in the genus Equus. Phylogenetic analysis of both DRA and DQA sequences provided evidence for trans-species polymorphism in the family Equidae. The phylogenetic trees differed from species relationships defined by standard taxonomy of Equidae and from trees based on mitochondrial or neutral gene sequence data. Analysis of selection showed differences between the less variable DRA and more variable DQA genes. DRA alleles were more often shared by more species. The DQA sequences analysed showed strong amongst-species positive selection; the selected amino acid positions mostly corresponded to selected positions in rodent and human DQA genes.

  17. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties. PMID:27516309

  18. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties.

  19. Genetics of complex traits: prediction of phenotype, identification of causal polymorphisms and genetic architecture.

    PubMed

    Goddard, M E; Kemper, K E; MacLeod, I M; Chamberlain, A J; Hayes, B J

    2016-07-27

    Complex or quantitative traits are important in medicine, agriculture and evolution, yet, until recently, few of the polymorphisms that cause variation in these traits were known. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS), based on the ability to assay thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), have revolutionized our understanding of the genetics of complex traits. We advocate the analysis of GWAS data by a statistical method that fits all SNP effects simultaneously, assuming that these effects are drawn from a prior distribution. We illustrate how this method can be used to predict future phenotypes, to map and identify the causal mutations, and to study the genetic architecture of complex traits. The genetic architecture of complex traits is even more complex than previously thought: in almost every trait studied there are thousands of polymorphisms that explain genetic variation. Methods of predicting future phenotypes, collectively known as genomic selection or genomic prediction, have been widely adopted in livestock and crop breeding, leading to increased rates of genetic improvement. PMID:27440663

  20. Genetics of complex traits: prediction of phenotype, identification of causal polymorphisms and genetic architecture

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, M. E.; Kemper, K. E.; MacLeod, I. M.; Chamberlain, A. J.; Hayes, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    Complex or quantitative traits are important in medicine, agriculture and evolution, yet, until recently, few of the polymorphisms that cause variation in these traits were known. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS), based on the ability to assay thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), have revolutionized our understanding of the genetics of complex traits. We advocate the analysis of GWAS data by a statistical method that fits all SNP effects simultaneously, assuming that these effects are drawn from a prior distribution. We illustrate how this method can be used to predict future phenotypes, to map and identify the causal mutations, and to study the genetic architecture of complex traits. The genetic architecture of complex traits is even more complex than previously thought: in almost every trait studied there are thousands of polymorphisms that explain genetic variation. Methods of predicting future phenotypes, collectively known as genomic selection or genomic prediction, have been widely adopted in livestock and crop breeding, leading to increased rates of genetic improvement. PMID:27440663

  1. Analysis of Complex Allozyme Polymorphisms in a Barley Population

    PubMed Central

    Weir, B. S.; Allard, R. W.; Kahler, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Genotypes of 68,230 individuals taken from 10 generations (F4–F6, F14–F17, F24–F26) of an experimental population of barley were determined for four esterase loci. The results show that frequencies of gametic ditypes changed significantly over generations and that striking gametic phase disequilibrium developed within a few generations for each of the six pairwise combinations of loci which were monitored. The complex behavior of these four enzyme loci in the population is attributed to interactions between selection and restriction of recombination resulting from the effects of linkage and/or inbreeding. PMID:17248585

  2. Ancestral polymorphism at the major histocompatibility complex (MHCIIß) in the Nesospiza bunting species complex and its sister species (Rowettia goughensis)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an important component of the vertebrate immune system and is frequently used to characterise adaptive variation in wild populations due to its co-evolution with pathogens. Passerine birds have an exceptionally diverse MHC with multiple gene copies and large numbers of alleles compared to other avian taxa. The Nesospiza bunting species complex (two species on Nightingale Island; one species with three sub-species on Inaccessible Island) represents a rapid adaptive radiation at a small, isolated archipelago, and is thus an excellent model for the study of adaptation and speciation. In this first study of MHC in Nesospiza buntings, we aim to characterize MHCIIß variation, determine the strength of selection acting at this gene region and assess the level of shared polymorphism between the Nesospiza species complex and its putative sister taxon, Rowettia goughensis, from Gough Island. Results In total, 23 unique alleles were found in 14 Nesospiza and 2 R. goughensis individuals encoding at least four presumably functional loci and two pseudogenes. There was no evidence of ongoing selection on the peptide binding region (PBR). Of the 23 alleles, 15 were found on both the islands inhabited by Nesospiza species, and seven in both Nesospiza and Rowettia; indications of shared, ancestral polymorphism. A gene tree of Nesospiza MHCIIß alleles with several other passerine birds shows three highly supported Nesospiza-specific groups. All R. goughensis alleles were shared with Nesospiza, and these alleles were found in all three Nesospiza sequence groups in the gene tree, suggesting that most of the observed variation predates their phylogenetic split. Conclusions Lack of evidence of selection on the PBR, together with shared polymorphism across the gene tree, suggests that population variation of MHCIIß among Nesospiza and Rowettia is due to ancestral polymorphism rather than local selective forces. Weak or no

  3. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in Anthoxanthum (Poaceae) and cross-amplification in the Eurasian complex of the genus1

    PubMed Central

    Lema-Suárez, Irene; Sahuquillo, Elvira; Marí-Mena, Neus; Pimentel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Nonplastid microsatellite primers were developed for the first time in the Euro-Siberian complex of Anthoxanthum (Poaceae), a genus of temperate grasses in which reticulate evolution is common. Methods and Results: A microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library allowed the detection of 500 fragments containing a microsatellite motif. Fifteen primer pairs were selected for an extended primer test. A preliminary analysis was conducted on the Eurasian diploid lineages of Anthoxanthum, with special emphasis on three populations of the Mediterranean A. aristatum–A. ovatum complex. Thirteen out of 15 markers tested were polymorphic in the complex, with successful cross-amplification in A. odoratum (93% polymorphic loci), A. amarum (73% polymorphic), A. alpinum (73% polymorphic), and A. maderense (60% polymorphic). Conclusions: These microsatellite markers will enable the analysis of evolution and phylogeography in diploid and polyploid lineages of this important genus. PMID:27785386

  4. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  5. Effects of Lead Exposure and Genetic Polymorphisms on ALAD and GPx Activities in Brazilian Battery Workers.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Martins, Airton; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Jacob Ferreira, Anna Laura Bechara; de Souza, Marilesia Ferreira; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Bastos Paoliello, Monica Maria; Adeyemi, Joseph A; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic metal that is widely used by metallurgical industries such as car battery recycling. Exposure to the metal may modify the redox status of the cells and consequently result in changes in activities of important enzymes such as delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Similarly, genetic polymorphisms may modulate the activities of enzymes related to detoxification processes of the metal and may modify Pb body burden. Therefore, the aims of the present study were (i) to evaluate the correlation between blood lead levels (BLL) and activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx, and (ii) to determine whether activities of these enzymes may be influenced by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx genes in Brazilian automotive battery workers chronically exposed to Pb, as well as the effects of these polymorphisms on BLL. Our study included 257 participants; BLL were determined by inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx were quantified spectrophotometrically; and genotyping of ALAD (rs1800435) and GPx-1 (rs1800668) polymorphisms was performed by TaqMan assays (real-time polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR). Significant negative correlations were found between BLL and ALAD activity. Subjects who carried at least one polymorphic allele for ALAD gene displayed markedly lower ALAD activities, while no significant effect was observed regarding GPx-1 polymorphism and activity of the same enzyme. Further, ALAD and GPx-1 polymorphisms exerted no marked influence on BLL. Taken together, our results showed that BLL affected ALAD but not GPx activities, and these were not modulated by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx gene. Further, the rs1800435 SNP showed a tendency to modulate ALAD activity, while the rs1800668 SNP did not modulate GPx activity in Brazilian automotive battery workers exposed to Pb.

  6. Effects of Lead Exposure and Genetic Polymorphisms on ALAD and GPx Activities in Brazilian Battery Workers.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Martins, Airton; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Jacob Ferreira, Anna Laura Bechara; de Souza, Marilesia Ferreira; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Bastos Paoliello, Monica Maria; Adeyemi, Joseph A; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic metal that is widely used by metallurgical industries such as car battery recycling. Exposure to the metal may modify the redox status of the cells and consequently result in changes in activities of important enzymes such as delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Similarly, genetic polymorphisms may modulate the activities of enzymes related to detoxification processes of the metal and may modify Pb body burden. Therefore, the aims of the present study were (i) to evaluate the correlation between blood lead levels (BLL) and activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx, and (ii) to determine whether activities of these enzymes may be influenced by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx genes in Brazilian automotive battery workers chronically exposed to Pb, as well as the effects of these polymorphisms on BLL. Our study included 257 participants; BLL were determined by inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx were quantified spectrophotometrically; and genotyping of ALAD (rs1800435) and GPx-1 (rs1800668) polymorphisms was performed by TaqMan assays (real-time polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR). Significant negative correlations were found between BLL and ALAD activity. Subjects who carried at least one polymorphic allele for ALAD gene displayed markedly lower ALAD activities, while no significant effect was observed regarding GPx-1 polymorphism and activity of the same enzyme. Further, ALAD and GPx-1 polymorphisms exerted no marked influence on BLL. Taken together, our results showed that BLL affected ALAD but not GPx activities, and these were not modulated by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx gene. Further, the rs1800435 SNP showed a tendency to modulate ALAD activity, while the rs1800668 SNP did not modulate GPx activity in Brazilian automotive battery workers exposed to Pb. PMID:26275098

  7. Novel genetic polymorphisms that further delineate the phylogeny of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Huard, Richard C; Fabre, Michel; de Haas, Petra; Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio Oliveira; van Soolingen, Dick; Cousins, Debby; Ho, John L

    2006-06-01

    In a previous report, we described a PCR protocol for the differentiation of the various species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) on the basis of genomic deletions (R. C. Huard, L. C. de Oliveira Lazzarini, W. R. Butler, D. van Soolingen, and J. L. Ho, J. Clin. Microbiol. 41:1637-1650, 2003). That report also provided a broad cross-comparison of several previously identified, phylogenetically relevant, long-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (LSPs and SNPs, respectively). In the present companion report, we expand upon the previous work (i) by continuing the evaluation of known MTC phylogenetic markers in a larger collection of tubercle bacilli (n = 125), (ii) by evaluating additional recently reported MTC species-specific and interspecific polymorphisms, and (iii) by describing the identification and distribution of a number of novel LSPs and SNPs. Notably, new genomic deletions were found in various Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, new species-specific SNPs were identified for "Mycobacterium canettii," Mycobacterium microti, and Mycobacterium pinnipedii, and, for the first time, intraspecific single-nucleotide DNA differences were discovered for the dassie bacillus, the oryx bacillus, and the two Mycobacterium africanum subtype I variants. Surprisingly, coincident polymorphisms linked one M. africanum subtype I genotype with the dassie bacillus and M. microti with M. pinnipedii, thereby suggesting closer evolutionary ties within each pair of species than had been previously thought. Overall, the presented data add to the genetic definitions of several MTC organisms as well as fine-tune current models for the evolutionary history of the MTC. PMID:16740934

  8. Ancient, highly polymorphic human major histocompatibility complex DQA1 intron sequence

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, M.D.; Quinn, D.L.; Lebo, R.V.; Simons, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    A 438 basepair intron 1 sequence adjacent to exon 2 in the human major histocompatibility complex DQA1 gene defined 16 allelic variants in 69 individuals from wide ethnic backgrounds. In contrast, the most variable coding region spanned by the 247 basepair exon 2 defined 11 allelic variants. Our phylogenetic human intron 1 tree derived by the Bootstrap algorithm reflects the same relative allelic relationships as the reported DQA1 exon 2 have cosegregated since divergence of the human races. Comparison of human alleles to a Rhesus monkey DQA1 first intron sequence found only 10 nucleotide substitutions unique to Rhesus, with the other 428 positions (98%) found in at least one human allele. This high degree of homology reflects the evolutionary stability of intron sequences since these two species diverged over 20 million years ago. Because more intron 1 alleles exist than exon 2 alleles, these polymorphic introns can be used to improve tissue typing for transplantation, paternity testing, and forensics and to derive more complete phylogenetic trees. These results suggest that introns represent a previously underutilized polymorphic resource. 42 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Major histocompatibility complex class II A gene polymorphism in the striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, J.J.; Godwin, U.; Benedetto, R.; McConnell, T.J.

    1995-02-01

    Adaptions of the polymerase chain reaction were used to isolate cDNA sequences encoding the Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II A gene(s) of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Four complete Mhc class II A genes were cloned and sequenced from a specimen originating on the Roanoke River, North Carolina, and another three A genes from a specimen originating from the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina, identifying a total of seven unique sequences. The sequence suggests the presence of at least two Mhc class II A loci. The extensive sequence variability observed between the seven different Mhc class II clones was concentrated in the {alpha}1 encoding domain. The encoded {alpha}2, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic regions of all seven striped bass genes correlated well with those of known vertebrate Mhc class II proteins. Overall, the striped bass sequences showed greatest similarity to the Mhc class II A genes of the zebrafish. Southern blot analysis demonstrated extensive polymorphism in the Mhc class II A genes in members of a Roanoke river-caught population of striped bass versus a lesser degree of polymorphism in an aquacultured Santee-Cooper population of striped bass. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Major histocompatibility complex class II A gene polymorphism in the striped bass.

    PubMed

    Hardee, J J; Godwin, U; Benedetto, R; McConnell, T J

    1995-01-01

    Adaptions of the polymerase chain reaction were used to isolate cDNA sequences encoding the Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II A gene(s) of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Four complete Mhc class II A genes were cloned and sequenced from a specimen originating in the Roanoke River, North Carolina, and another three A genes from a specimen originating from the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina, identifying a total of seven unique sequences. The sequence suggests the presence of at least two Mhc class II A loci. The extensive sequence variability observed between the seven different Mhc class II clones was concentrated in the alpha 1 encoding domain. The encoded alpha 2, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic regions of all seven striped bass genes correlated well with those of known vertebrate Mhc class II proteins. Overall, the striped bass sequences showed greatest similarity to the Mhc class II A genes of the zebrafish. Southern blot analysis demonstrated extensive polymorphism in the Mhc class II A genes in members of a Roanoke river-caught population of striped bass versus a lesser degree of polymorphism in an aquacultured Santee-Cooper population of striped bass.

  11. Ancestral major histocompatibility complex DRB genes beget conserved patterns of localized polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, L K; Nepom, G T

    1996-01-01

    Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are characterized by extensive polymorphism within species and also by a remarkable conservation of contemporary human allelic sequences in evolutionarily distant primates. Mechanisms proposed to account for strict nucleotide conservation in the context of highly variable genes include the suggestion that intergenic exchange generates repeated sets of MHC DRB polymorphisms [Gyllensten, U. B., Sundvall, M. & Erlich, H. A. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 3686-3690; Lundberg, A. S. & McDevitt, H. 0. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 6545-6549]. We analyzed over 50 primate MHC DRB sequences, and identified nucleotide elements within macaque and baboon DRB6-like sequences with deletions corresponding to specific exon 2 hypervariable regions, which encode a discrete alpha helical segment of the MHC antigen combining site. This precisely localized deletion provides direct evidence implicating segmental exchange of MHC-encoded DRB gene fragments as one of the evolutionary mechanisms both generating and maintaining MHC diversity. Intergenic exchange at this site may be fundamental to the diversification of immune protection in populations by permitting alteration in the specificity of the MHC that determines the repertoire of antigens bound. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8643583

  12. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Lauren E; Santella, Regina M; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Millikan, Robert C; Olshan, Andrew F; North, Kari E; Bradshaw, Patrick T; Eng, Sybil M; Terry, Mary Beth; Shen, Jing; Crew, Katherine D; Rossner, Pavel; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Neugut, Alfred I; Gammon, Marilie D

    2014-02-01

    The mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single-strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes (MSH3, MLH1 and MSH2) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions (p < 0.05) between MSH2 and MLH1, as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (XPC-Ala499Val, XPF-Arg415Gln, XPG-Asp1104His and MLH1-lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for XPC (OR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.36-0.81) and XPF (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44-0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in XPG (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29-0.77) and MLH1 (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30-0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both MSH2 and MLH1 could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation.

  13. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes, Recreational Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Lauren E.; Santella, Regina M.; Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Millikan, Robert C.; Olshan, Andrew F.; North, Kari E.; Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Eng, Sybil M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Shen, Jing; Crew, Katherine D.; Rossner, Pavel; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single-strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes (MSH3, MLH1 and MSH2) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions (p<0.05) between MSH2 and MLH1, as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (XPC-Ala499Val, XPF-Arg415Gln, XPG-Asp1104His and MLH1-lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for XPC (OR=0.54; 95% CI, 0.36–0.81) and XPF (OR=0.62; 95% CI, 0.44–0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in XPG (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.77) and MLH1 (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.30–0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both MSH2 and MLH1 could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation. PMID:23852586

  14. Bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex and the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Venkat Shankar; Bajpai, Minu; Ali, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Bladder Exstrophy-Epispadias Complex (BEEC) is the most serious form of midline abdominal malformation. The etiology of BEEC is unknown and is thought to be multifactorial. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism C677T is strongly associated with other midline abnormalities such as neural tube defects. No proper case-control study existed comparing MTHFR polymorphism with BEEC. We sought to find an association with MTHFR polymorphism and patients with bladder exstrophy (BE). Materials and Methods: The design of the study was a case-control study, involving 50 children with BEEC and 50 normal healthy school children. Genetic analysis for MTHFR 677 polymorphism was carried out after DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction amplification. Epidemiological analysis was done by using the birth defect questionnaire on parents of BEEC. Results: Forty-two classical BE, two cloacal exstrophies (CE), four epispadias, and two exstrophy variant patients were a part of this study. Severe variety of BE had a significant association with C667T MTHFR polymorphism as compared to the normal control population (P = 0.01). Conclusion: C677T MTHFR polymorphism has a strong association with severe variety (CE) of BEEC occurrence. PMID:26862292

  15. Mineralogical characteristics of the silica polymorphs in relation to their biological activities

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Heaney, P.J.

    1993-10-01

    Numerous aspects of minerals (including the silica polymorphs) can effect their biological activities. These include periodic structures, compositional variations, dissolution characteristics, surface properties, and particle size/shape. In order to understand mineral-induced pathogenesis in a mechanistic way, the links between these properties and biochemical processes must be elucidated. This paper presents some of the basic properties of the silica polymorphs that may relate to pathogenicity and mineralogical strategies for designing biological assays to evaluate these properties.

  16. Complex Selection on Human Polyadenylation Signals Revealed by Polymorphism and Divergence Data

    PubMed Central

    Kainov, Yaroslav A.; Aushev, Vasily N.; Naumenko, Sergey A.; Tchevkina, Elena M.; Bazykin, Georgii A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation is a step of mRNA processing which is crucial for its expression and stability. The major polyadenylation signal (PAS) represents a nucleotide hexamer that adheres to the AATAAA consensus sequence. Over a half of human genes have multiple cleavage and polyadenylation sites, resulting in a great diversity of transcripts differing in function, stability, and translational activity. Here, we use available whole-genome human polymorphism data together with data on interspecies divergence to study the patterns of selection acting on PAS hexamers. Common variants of PAS hexamers are depleted of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and SNPs within PAS hexamers have a reduced derived allele frequency (DAF) and increased conservation, indicating prevalent negative selection; at the same time, the SNPs that “improve” the PAS (i.e., those leading to higher cleavage efficiency) have increased DAF, compared to those that “impair” it. SNPs are rarer at PAS of “unique” polyadenylation sites (one site per gene); among alternative polyadenylation sites, at the distal PAS and at exonic PAS. Similar trends were observed in DAFs and divergence between species of placental mammals. Thus, selection permits PAS mutations mainly at redundant and/or weakly functional PAS. Nevertheless, a fraction of the SNPs at PAS hexamers likely affect gene functions; in particular, some of the observed SNPs are associated with disease. PMID:27324920

  17. Genomic polymorphism, recombination, and linkage disequilibrium in human major histocompatibility complex-encoded antigen-processing genes

    SciTech Connect

    van Endert, P.M.; Lopez, M.T.; Patel, S.D.; McDevitt, H.O. ); Monaco, J.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Recently, two subunits of a large cytosolic protease and two putative peptide transporter proteins were found to be encoded by genes within the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). These genes have been suggested to be involved in the processing of antigenic proteins for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Because of the high degree of polymorphism in MHC genes, and previous evidence for both functional and polypeptide sequence polymorphism in the proteins encoded by the antigen-processing genes, we tested DNA from 27 consanguineous human cell lines for genomic polymorphism by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. These studies demonstrate a strong linkage disequilibrium between TAP1 and LMP2 RFLPs. Moreover, RFLPs, as well as a polymorphic stop codon in the telomeric TAP2 gene, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DR alleles and RFLPs in the HLA-DO gene. A high rate of recombination, however, seems to occur in the center of the complex, between the TAP1 and TAP2 genes.

  18. Associations between Restriction Site Polymorphism and Enzyme Activity Variation for Esterase 6 in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Game, A. Y.; Oakeshott, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-five nucleotide polymorphisms were found in a 21.5-kbp region including the Est6 locus among 42 isoallelic lines extracted from a single natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. The heterozygosity per nucleotide pair was estimated to be 0.010 overall, but was lower in sequences hybridizing to transcripts than in those not hybridizing to transcripts. Eleven of 36 pairwise comparisons among the nine most common polymorphisms showed significant gametic disequilibrium. Four of these polymorphisms were also significantly associated with the major EST6-F/EST6-S allozyme polymorphism. Significant disequilibrium was generally restricted to polymorphisms less than 1-2 kbp apart. Previously reported measures of EST6 activity in virgin adult females proved not to be significantly associated with any of the six most common nucleotide polymorphisms located in the Est6 coding region or the 1.5 kbp immediately 5'. However, the 11 haplotypes for five of these polymorphisms that lie in the 1.5-kbp 5' region could explain about half of the previously reported variation among the lines for both EST6 activity and the amount of EST6 protein in virgin adult males. One particular polymorphism, for a RsaI site 530 bp 5' of the initiation codon, could explain 21% of the male activity variation among lines. This site is embedded in a large palindrome and we suggest that sequences including or close to this site may be involved in the regulation of EST6 synthesis in the ejaculatory duct of the adult male. PMID:1981760

  19. Surface character and membranolytic activity of rutile and anatase: two titanium dioxide polymorphs.

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, R P; Langer, A M; Weisman, I; Herson, G B

    1987-01-01

    Biological studies of two titanium dioxide polymorphs, rutile and anatase, have produced conflicting results. Generally, the in vivo and in vitro methods used to evaluate pneumoconiotic dusts have shown the polymorphs to be inert, but occasionally both minerals have been reported to produce effects consistent with biologically active minerals. Many of these reports failed to specify which polymorph was used experimentally. While this limited the value of the data, the problem was further compounded by the variation in the surface properties of each polymorph depending on whether the specimen was a naturally occurring mineral or was made synthetically. Five naturally occurring and 11 synthetically produced titanium dioxide specimens were studied. The physical characterisation of each specimen entailed the determination of the polymorph type(s) by continuous scan x ray diffraction and the size distribution by transmission electron microscopy. The ability of each specimen to lyse erythrocytes was determined and compared with quartz. Only two, both synthetic rutiles, were found to be active. The hydrogen bonding ability of the surfaces of these rutiles were compared with inert rutile and quartz. The binding properties of the active rutile have been found to be consistent with those properties associated with biologically active quartz. The surface properties of rutile are the determinants of its activity. Because natural and synthetic rutiles possess different surface properties, they display different activities. Images PMID:3676122

  20. A molecular perspective on a complex polymorphic inversion system with cytological evidence of multiply reused breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Orengo, D J; Puerma, E; Papaceit, M; Segarra, C; Aguadé, M

    2015-06-01

    Genome sequence comparison across the Drosophila genus revealed that some fixed inversion breakpoints had been multiply reused at this long timescale. Cytological studies of Drosophila inversion polymorphism had previously shown that, also at this shorter timescale, some breakpoints had been multiply reused. The paucity of molecularly characterized polymorphic inversion breakpoints has so far precluded contrasting whether cytologically shared breakpoints of these relatively young inversions are actually reused at the molecular level. The E chromosome of Drosophila subobscura stands out because it presents several inversion complexes. This is the case of the E1+2+9+3 arrangement that originated from the ancestral Est arrangement through the sequential accumulation of four inversions (E1, E2, E9 and E3) sharing some breakpoints. We recently identified the breakpoints of inversions E1 and E2, which allowed establishing reuse at the molecular level of the cytologically shared breakpoint of these inversions. Here, we identified and sequenced the breakpoints of inversions E9 and E3, because they share breakpoints at sections 58D and 64C with those of inversions E1 and E2. This has allowed establishing that E9 and E3 originated through the staggered-break mechanism. Most importantly, sequence comparison has revealed the multiple reuse at the molecular level of the proximal breakpoint (section 58D), which would have been used at least by inversions E2, E9 and E3. In contrast, the distal breakpoint (section 64C) might have been only reused once by inversions E1 and E2, because the distal E3 breakpoint is displaced >70 kb from the other breakpoint limits.

  1. A molecular perspective on a complex polymorphic inversion system with cytological evidence of multiply reused breakpoints

    PubMed Central

    Orengo, D J; Puerma, E; Papaceit, M; Segarra, C; Aguadé, M

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequence comparison across the Drosophila genus revealed that some fixed inversion breakpoints had been multiply reused at this long timescale. Cytological studies of Drosophila inversion polymorphism had previously shown that, also at this shorter timescale, some breakpoints had been multiply reused. The paucity of molecularly characterized polymorphic inversion breakpoints has so far precluded contrasting whether cytologically shared breakpoints of these relatively young inversions are actually reused at the molecular level. The E chromosome of Drosophila subobscura stands out because it presents several inversion complexes. This is the case of the E1+2+9+3 arrangement that originated from the ancestral Est arrangement through the sequential accumulation of four inversions (E1, E2, E9 and E3) sharing some breakpoints. We recently identified the breakpoints of inversions E1 and E2, which allowed establishing reuse at the molecular level of the cytologically shared breakpoint of these inversions. Here, we identified and sequenced the breakpoints of inversions E9 and E3, because they share breakpoints at sections 58D and 64C with those of inversions E1 and E2. This has allowed establishing that E9 and E3 originated through the staggered-break mechanism. Most importantly, sequence comparison has revealed the multiple reuse at the molecular level of the proximal breakpoint (section 58D), which would have been used at least by inversions E2, E9 and E3. In contrast, the distal breakpoint (section 64C) might have been only reused once by inversions E1 and E2, because the distal E3 breakpoint is displaced >70 kb from the other breakpoint limits. PMID:25712227

  2. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  3. Tuning oxide activity through modification of the crystal and electronic structure: from strain to potential polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongnan; Kitchin, John R

    2015-11-21

    Discovering new materials with tailored chemical properties is vital for advancing key technologies in catalysis and energy conversion. One strategy is the modification of a material's crystal structure, and new methods allow for the synthesis and stabilization of potential materials in a range of crystal polymorph structures. We assess the potential reactivity of four metastable oxide polymorphs of MO2 (M = Ru, Rh, Pt, Ir) transition metal oxides. In spite of the similar local geometry and coordination between atoms in the metastable polymorphic and stable rutile structure, we find that polymorph reactivities cannot be explained by strain alone and offer tunable reactivity and increased stability. Atom-projected density of states reveals that the unique reactivity of polymorphs are caused by a redistribution of energy levels of the t2g-states. This structure-activity relationship is induced by slight distortions to the M-O bonds in polymorphic structures and is unattainable by strain. We predict columbite IrO2 to be more active than rutile IrO2 for oxygen evolution.

  4. Major Histocompatibility Complex class IIB polymorphism in an ancient Spanish breed.

    PubMed

    Atlija, Marina; Gutíerrez-Gil, Beatriz; Arranz, Juan-Jose; Semmer, Jördis; Stear, Michael J; Buitkamp, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    Genes from the Major Histocompatibility Complex class II region are involved in the presentation of antigens. Therefore, they have the key role in regulating the immune response and in the resistance to infections. We investigated the Major Histocompatibility Complex class IIB genes, DRB and DQB, in Churra sheep, one of the most important indigenous breeds of Spain. These genes are among the most polymorphic in the mammalian genome. Furthermore, often different numbers of class IIB genes per haplotype exist, complicating the genotyping and sequencing of these genes. Especially the DQB region is only partially characterized in sheep and the repertoire of DRB and DQB alleles in Churra sheep, an ancient breed, is unknown. Here, we sequenced the class IIB genes for 15 rams that are the pedigree heads of a selection Nucleus herd. In total, we found 12 DRB and 25 DQB alleles. From these, 3 and 15 were new, respectively. Fourteen haplotypes carrying one or two DQB alleles could be deduced and the evolutionary relationship of these was investigated by phylogenetic trees. Based on the sequences of these most common class II alleles, a more efficient genotyping system for larger numbers of Churra sheep will be developed. PMID:26184839

  5. Extensive polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex DRA gene in Balkan donkeys: perspectives on selection and genealogy.

    PubMed

    Arbanasić, Haidi; Galov, Ana; Ambriović-Ristov, Andreja; Grizelj, Juraj; Arsenos, Georgios; Marković, Božidarka; Dovenski, Toni; Vince, Silvijo; Curik, Ino

    2013-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) contains genes important for immune response in mammals, and these genes exhibit high polymorphism and diversity. The DRA gene, a member of the MHC class II family, is highly conserved across a large number of mammalian species, but it displays exceptionally rich sequence variations in Equidae members. We analyzed allelic polymorphism of the DRA locus in 248 donkeys sampled across the Balkan Peninsula (Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Macedonia, Greece and Montenegro). Five known alleles and two new alleles were identified. The new allele Eqas-DRA*0601 was found to carry a synonymous mutation, and new allele Eqas-DRA*0701, a non-synonymous mutation. We further analyzed the historical selection and allele genealogy at the DRA locus in equids. Signals of positive selection obtained by various tests were ambiguous. A conservative conclusion is that DRA polymorphism occurred relatively recently and that positive selection has been acting on the DRA locus for a relatively brief period.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms and activity of PON1 in a Mexican population

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas-Garcia, A.E.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Pina-Guzman, B.; Vega, L.; Lopez-Carrillo, L.; Quintanilla-Vega, B. . E-mail: mquintan@cinvestav.mx

    2005-06-15

    Human paraoxonase (PON1) plays a role in detoxification of organophosphorus (OP) compounds by hydrolyzing the bioactive oxons, and in reducing oxidative low-density lipoproteins, which may protect against atherosclerosis. Some PON1 polymorphisms have been found to be responsible for variations in catalytic activity and expression and have been associated with susceptibility to OP poisoning and vascular diseases. Both situations are of public health relevance in Mexico. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate PON1 phenotype and the frequencies of polymorphisms PON1 -162, -108, 55, and 192 in a Mexican population. The studied population consisted of unrelated individuals (n = 214) of either gender, 18-52 years old. Serum PON1 activity was assayed using phenylacetate and paraoxon as substrates. PON1 variants, -162, 55, and 192, were determined by real-time PCR using the TaqMan System, and PON1 -108 genotype by PCR-RFLP. We found a wide interindividual variability of PON1 activity with a unimodal distribution; the range of enzymatic activity toward phenylacetate was 84.72 to 422.0 U/mL, and 88.37 to 1645.6 U/L toward paraoxon. All four PON1 polymorphisms showed strong linkage disequilibrium (D% >90). PON1 polymorphisms -108, 55, and 192 were independently associated with arylesterase activity; whereas the activity toward paraoxon was related only with PON1 192 polymorphism, suggesting that this polymorphism is determinant to infer PON1 activity. A better understanding of the phenotype and genotypes of PON1 in Mexican populations will facilitate further epidemiological studies involving PON1 variability in OP poisoning and in the development of atherosclerosis.

  7. Amino Acid Polymorphisms in Hepatitis C Virus Core Affect Infectious Virus Production and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka-Fujita, Megumi; Sugiyama, Nao; Kang, Wonseok; Masaski, Takahiro; Murayama, Asako; Yamada, Norie; Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Tsukuda, Senko; Watashi, Koichi; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Wakita, Takaji; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Kato, Takanobu

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid (aa) polymorphisms in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core protein have been reported to be a potent predictor for poor response to interferon (IFN)-based therapy and a risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the effects of these polymorphisms with genotype 1b/2a chimeric viruses that contained polymorphisms of Arg/Gln at aa 70 and Leu/Met at aa 91. We found that infectious virus production was reduced in cells transfected with chimeric virus RNA that had Gln at aa 70 (aa70Q) compared with RNA with Arg at aa 70 (aa70R). Using flow cytometry analysis, we confirmed that HCV core protein accumulated in aa70Q clone transfected cells, and it caused a reduction in cell-surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules induced by IFN treatment through enhanced protein kinase R phosphorylation. We could not detect any effects due to the polymorphism at aa 91. In conclusion, the polymorphism at aa 70 was associated with efficiency of infectious virus production, and this deteriorated virus production in strains with aa70Q resulted in the intracellular accumulation of HCV proteins and attenuation of MHC class I molecule expression. These observations may explain the strain-associated resistance to IFN-based therapy and hepatocarcinogenesis of HCV. PMID:26365522

  8. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) susceptibility to currently approved antiviral drugs does not impact on CMV terminase complex polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Pilorgé, Léa; Burrel, Sonia; Aït-Arkoub, Zaïna; Agut, Henri; Boutolleau, David

    2014-11-01

    Currently approved anti-human cytomegalovirus (CMV) drugs, all targeting the viral DNA polymerase, are associated with significant toxicities and emergence of drug resistance. In this context, CMV terminase complex constitutes a promising target for novel antiviral compounds. In this study, we describe the low natural polymorphism (interstrain identity >97.7% at both nucleotide and amino acid levels) of the terminase subunits pUL56 and pUL89, and the portal protein pUL104, among 63 CMV clinical strains, and we show that the CMV resistance profile to current DNA polymerase inhibitors has no impact on the natural polymorphism of CMV terminase complex. These results support the idea that both CMV clinical strains exhibiting either susceptibility or resistance to current CMV DNA polymerase inhibitors are comparably sensitive to novel inhibitors of CMV terminase complex, such as letermovir.

  9. Antischistosomal Activity of Oxindolimine-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dario, Bruno S.; Couto, Ricardo A. A.; Pinto, Pedro L. S.; da Costa Ferreira, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a class of oxindole-copper and -zinc complex derivatives have been reported as compounds with efficient proapoptotic activity toward different tumor cells (e.g., neuroblastomas, melanomas, monocytes). Here we assessed the efficacy of synthesized oxindole-copper(II), -zinc(II), and -vanadyl (VO2+) complexes against adult Schistosoma mansoni worms. The copper(II) complexes (50% inhibitory concentrations of 30 to 45 μM) demonstrated greater antischistosomal properties than the analogous zinc and vanadyl complexes regarding lethality, reduction of motor activity, and oviposition. PMID:26239976

  10. Epistasis between polymorphisms in COMT, ESR1, and GCH1 influences COMT enzyme activity and pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shad B; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T; Slade, Gary D; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Nackley, Andrea G

    2014-11-01

    Abnormalities in the enzymatic activity of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) contribute to chronic pain conditions, such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Thus, we sought to determine the effects of polymorphisms in COMT and functionally related pain genes in the COMT pathway (estrogen receptor 1 [ESR1], guanosine-5-triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 [GCH1], methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase [MTHFR]) on COMT enzymatic activity, musculoskeletal pain, and pain-related intermediate phenotypes among TMD cases and healthy control subjects. Results show that the COMT rs4680 (val(158)met) polymorphism is most strongly associated with outcome measures, such that individuals with the minor A allele (met) exhibit reduced COMT activity, increased TMD risk, and increased musculoskeletal pain. Epistatic interactions were observed between the COMT rs4680 polymorphism and polymorphisms in GCH1 and ESR1. Among individuals with the COMT met allele, those with 2 copies of the GCH1 rs10483639 minor G allele exhibit normalized COMT activity and increased mechanical pain thresholds. Among individuals with the COMT val allele, those with 2 copies of the ESR1 rs3020377 minor A allele exhibit reduced COMT activity, increased bodily pain, and poorer self-reported health. These data reveal that the GCH1 minor G allele confers a protective advantage among met carriers, whereas the ESR1 minor A allele is disadvantageous among val carriers. Furthermore, these data suggest that the ability to predict the downstream effects of genetic variation on COMT activity is critically important to understanding the molecular basis of chronic pain conditions.

  11. Epistasis Between Polymorphisms in COMT, ESR1, and GCH1 Influences COMT Enzyme Activity and Pain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shad B.; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T.; Slade, Gary D.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Nackley, Andrea G.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in the enzymatic activity of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) contribute to chronic pain conditions, such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Thus, we sought to determine the effects of polymorphisms in COMT and functionally-related pain genes in the COMT pathway (estrogen receptor 1: ESR1, guanosine-5-triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1: GCH1, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: MTHFR) on COMT enzymatic activity, musculoskeletal pain, and pain-related intermediate phenotypes among TMD cases and healthy controls. Results demonstrate that the COMT rs4680 (val158met) polymorphism is most strongly associated with outcome measures, such that individuals with the minor A allele (met) exhibit reduced COMT activity, increased TMD risk, and increased musculoskeletal pain. Epistatic interactions were observed between the COMT rs4680 polymorphism and polymorphisms in GCH1 and ESR1. Among individuals with the COMT met allele, those with two copies of the GCH1 rs10483639 minor G allele exhibit normalized COMT activity and increased mechanical pain thresholds. Among individuals with the COMT val allele, those with two copies of the ESR1 rs3020377 minor A allele exhibit reduced COMT activity, increased bodily pain, and poorer self-reported health. These data reveal that the GCH1 minor G allele confers a protective advantage among met carriers, while the ESR1 minor A allele is disadvantageous among val carriers. Furthermore, these data suggest that the ability to predict the downstream effects of genetic variation on COMT activity is critically important to understanding the molecular basis of chronic pain conditions. PMID:25218601

  12. Molecular differentiation of the Old World Culicoides imicola species complex (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae), inferred using random amplified polymorphic DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, F; Meiswinkel, R; Gomulski, L M; Guglielmino, C R; Mellor, P S; Malacrida, A R; Gasperi, G

    2001-07-01

    Samples of seven of the 10 morphological species of midges of the Culicoides imicola complex were considered. The importance of this species complex is connected to its vectorial capacity for African horse sickness virus (AHSV) and bluetongue virus (BTV). Consequently, the risk of transmission may vary dramatically, depending upon the particular cryptic species present in a given area. The species complex is confined to the Old World and our samples were collected in Southern Africa, Madagascar and the Ivory Coast. Genomic DNA of 350 randomly sampled individual midges from 19 populations was amplified using four 20-mer primers by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. One hundred and ninety-six interpretable polymorphic bands were obtained. Species-specific RAPD profiles were defined and for five species diagnostic RAPD fragments were identified. A high degree of polymorphism was detected in the species complex, most of which was observed within populations (from 64 to 76%). Principal coordinate analysis (PCO) and cluster analysis provided an estimate of the degree of variation between and within populations and species. There was substantial concordance between the taxonomies derived from morphological and molecular data. The amount and the different distributions of genetic (RAPD) variation among the taxa can be associated to their life histories, i.e. the abundance and distribution of the larval breeding sites and their seasonality.

  13. Comparison of significant single nucleotide polymorphisms selections in GWAS for complex traits.

    PubMed

    Frąszczak, M; Szyda, J

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this study was to compare significant SNP selection approaches in the context of complex traits based on SNP estimates obtained by models: a model fitting a single SNP (M1), a model fitting a single SNP and a random polygenic effect (M2), the nonparametric CAR score (M3), a SNP-BLUP model with random effects of all SNPs fitted simultaneously (M4). There were 46,267 SNPs tested in a population of 2601 Holstein Friesian bulls, four traits (milk and fat yields, somatic cell score, non-return rate for heifers) were considered. The numbers of SNPs selected as significant differed among models. M1 selected a very large number of SNPs, except for a NRH in which no SNPs were significant. M2 and M3 both selected similar and low number of SNPs for each trait. M4 selected more SNPs than M2 and M3. Considering linkage disequilibrium between SNPs, for MY M2 and M3 selected SNPs more highly correlated with each other than in the case of M4, while for FY M3 selection contained more correlated SNPs than M2 and M4. In conclusion, if the research interest is to identify SNPs not only with strong, but also with moderate effects on a complex trait a multiple-SNP model is recommended. Such models are capable of accounting for at least a part of linkage disequilibrium between SNPs through the design matrix of SNP effects. Functional annotation of SNPs significant in M4 reveals good correspondence between selected polymorphisms and functional information as well as with QTL mapping results. PMID:26294278

  14. Insertion/Deletion Polymorphisms in the ΔNp63 Promoter Are a Risk Factor for Bladder Exstrophy Epispadias Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Simon; Zhang, Ke Wei; Mahfuz, Istiak; Quantin, Renaud; D'Cruz, Nancy; Hutson, John; Ee, Michael; Bagli, Darius; Aitken, Karen; Fong, Fion Nga-Yin; Ng, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Fung, Wendy Yin-Wan; Banu, Tahmina; Thakre, Atul; Johar, Kaid; Jaureguizar, Enrique; Li, Long; Cheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Bladder exstrophy epispadias complex (BEEC) is a severe congenital anomaly; however, the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of BEEC remain unclear. TP63, a member of TP53 tumor suppressor gene family, is expressed in bladder urothelium and skin over the external genitalia during mammalian development. It plays a role in bladder development. We have previously shown that p63−/− mouse embryos developed a bladder exstrophy phenotype identical to human BEEC. We hypothesised that TP63 is involved in human BEEC pathogenesis. RNA was extracted from BEEC foreskin specimens and, as in mice, ΔNp63 was the predominant p63 isoform. ΔNp63 expression in the foreskin and bladder epithelium of BEEC patients was reduced. DNA was sequenced from 163 BEEC patients and 285 ethnicity-matched controls. No exon mutations were detected. Sequencing of the ΔNp63 promoter showed 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 4 insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphisms. Indel polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of BEEC. Significantly the sites of indel polymorphisms differed between Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. A 12-base-pair deletion was associated with an increased risk with only Caucasian patients (p = 0.0052 Odds Ratio (OR) = 18.33), whereas a 4-base-pair insertion was only associated with non-Caucasian patients (p = 0.0259 OR = 4.583). We found a consistent and statistically significant reduction in transcriptional efficiencies of the promoter sequences containing indel polymorphisms in luciferase assays. These findings suggest that indel polymorphisms of the ΔNp63 promoter lead to a reduction in p63 expression, which could lead to BEEC. PMID:23284286

  15. Insertion/deletion polymorphisms in the ΔNp63 promoter are a risk factor for bladder exstrophy epispadias complex.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Simon; Zhang, Ke Wei; Mahfuz, Istiak; Quantin, Renaud; D'Cruz, Nancy; Hutson, John; Ee, Michael; Bagli, Darius; Aitken, Karen; Fong, Fion Nga-Yin; Ng, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Fung, Wendy Yin-Wan; Banu, Tahmina; Thakre, Atul; Johar, Kaid; Jaureguizar, Enrique; Li, Long; Cheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Bladder exstrophy epispadias complex (BEEC) is a severe congenital anomaly; however, the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of BEEC remain unclear. TP63, a member of TP53 tumor suppressor gene family, is expressed in bladder urothelium and skin over the external genitalia during mammalian development. It plays a role in bladder development. We have previously shown that p63(-/-) mouse embryos developed a bladder exstrophy phenotype identical to human BEEC. We hypothesised that TP63 is involved in human BEEC pathogenesis. RNA was extracted from BEEC foreskin specimens and, as in mice, ΔNp63 was the predominant p63 isoform. ΔNp63 expression in the foreskin and bladder epithelium of BEEC patients was reduced. DNA was sequenced from 163 BEEC patients and 285 ethnicity-matched controls. No exon mutations were detected. Sequencing of the ΔNp63 promoter showed 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 4 insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphisms. Indel polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of BEEC. Significantly the sites of indel polymorphisms differed between Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. A 12-base-pair deletion was associated with an increased risk with only Caucasian patients (p = 0.0052 Odds Ratio (OR) = 18.33), whereas a 4-base-pair insertion was only associated with non-Caucasian patients (p = 0.0259 OR = 4.583). We found a consistent and statistically significant reduction in transcriptional efficiencies of the promoter sequences containing indel polymorphisms in luciferase assays. These findings suggest that indel polymorphisms of the ΔNp63 promoter lead to a reduction in p63 expression, which could lead to BEEC.

  16. Polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and apolipoprotein E in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Al-Mueilo, Samir; Al-Ali, Amein; Larbi, Emmanuel; Rubaish, Abdullah; Abdulmohsen, Mohammed Fakhry; Al-Zahrani, Alhussain; Al-Ateeq, Suad

    2008-11-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism, apolipoprotein E (apo epsilon4) gene polymorphism and polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been shown to be associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). To determine the prevalence of these mutations in Saudi patients with ESRD on hemodialysis, we studied the allelic frequency and genotype distribution in patients receiving hemodialysis and in a control group, all residing in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. The genotypes were determined using allele specific hybridization procedures and were confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The T allele frequency and homozygous genotype of MTHFR in ESRD patients were 14% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13.4% and 0%, respectively in the control group. The allele frequency and homozygous genotype of 4G/4G PAI-1 gene polymorphism were 46.4% and 4.8% respectively in ESRD patients compared to 57.1% and 32% respectively in the control group. The apo s4 allele frequency and homozygous genotype distribution in hemodialysis patients were 7% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13% and 2% in the control group. Although allele frequency of C677T of MTHFR was statistically similar in the hemodialysis patients and in the control group, the homozygotes T allele genotype was over represented in the hemodialysis group compared to normal. The prevalence of PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism in ESRD patients was lower when compared to the control group. The prevalence of apo s4 allele did not differ significantly between the two groups. The present results demonstrate that all three studied polymorphic mutations are present in our population and that they may contribute to the etiology of the disease in our area. PMID:18974580

  17. Catheter ablation of a polymorphic ventricular tachycardia inducing monofocal premature ventricular complex.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takashi; Yamabe, Hiroshige; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Morihisa, Kenji; Kawano, Hiroaki; Kaikita, Koichi; Sumida, Hitoshi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Ogawa, Hisao

    2008-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia originating from the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) is considered benign, but sometimes it causes polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, resulting in sudden cardiac death. A 58-year-old woman without structural heart disease was admitted for evaluation of recurrent episodes of syncope. Surface ECG showed frequent repetitive premature ventricular contraction (PVC) of RVOT origin. Polymorphic ventricular tachycardia triggered by the same PVC was documented by Holter ECG during an episode of syncope. Radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed to eradicate this PVC. No polymorphic ventricular tachycardia has developed after the procedure, and the patient has had no recurrence of syncope.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human corticosteroid-binding globulin promoter alter transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Wu, Liang; Lei, JingHui; Zhu, Cheng; Wang, HongMei; Yu, XiaoGuang; Lin, HaiYan

    2012-08-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a high-affinity plasma protein that transports glucocorticoids and progesterone. Others and we have reported non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that influence CBG production or steroid-binding activity. However, no promoter polymorphisms affecting the transcription of human CBG gene (Cbg) have been reported. In the present study we investigated function implications of six promoter SNPs, including -26 C/G, -54 C/T, -144 G/C, -161 A/G, -205 C/A, and -443/-444 AG/-, five of which are located within the first 205 base pairs of 5'-flanking region and close to the highly conserved footprinted elements, TATA-box, or CCAAT-box. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that basal activity of the promoter carrying -54 T or -161 G was significantly enhanced. The first three polymorphisms, -26 C/G, -54 C/T, and -144 G/C located close to the putative hepatic nuclear factor (HNF) 1 binding elements, altered the transactivation effect of HNF1β. We also found a negative promoter response to dexamethasone-activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) α, although none of the SNPs affected its transrepression function. Our results suggest that human Cbg -26 C/G, -54 C/T, -144 G/C, and -161 A/G promoter polymorphisms alter transcriptional activity, and further studies are awaited to explore their association with physiological and pathological conditions.

  19. Prion Protein M129V Polymorphism Affects Retrieval-Related Brain Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchmann, Andreas; Mondadori, Christian R. A.; Hanggi, Jurgen; Aerni, Amanda; Vrticka, Pascal; Luechinger, Roger; Boesiger, Peter; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M.; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Henke, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The prion protein Met129Val polymorphism has recently been related to human long-term memory with carriers of either the 129[superscript MM] or the 129[superscript MV] genotype recalling 17% more words than 129[superscript VV] carriers at 24 h following learning. Here, we sampled genotype differences in retrieval-related brain activity at 30 min…

  20. Hotspot activating PRKD1 somatic mutations in polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Ilan; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Martelotto, Luciano G; Waggott, Daryl; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Harding, Nicholas J; Alfaro, Javier; Chu, Kenneth C; Viale, Agnes; Fusco, Nicola; da Cruz Paula, Arnaud; Marchio, Caterina; Sakr, Rita A; Lim, Raymond; Thompson, Lester D R; Chiosea, Simion I; Seethala, Raja R; Skalova, Alena; Stelow, Edward B; Fonseca, Isabel; Assaad, Adel; How, Christine; Wang, Jianxin; de Borja, Richard; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; Howlett, Christopher J; Nichols, Anthony C; Wen, Y Hannah; Katabi, Nora; Buchner, Nicholas; Mullen, Laura; Kislinger, Thomas; Wouters, Bradly G; Liu, Fei-Fei; Norton, Larry; McPherson, John D; Rubin, Brian P; Clarke, Blaise A; Weigelt, Britta; Boutros, Paul C; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2014-11-01

    Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA) is the second most frequent type of malignant tumor of the minor salivary glands. We identified PRKD1 hotspot mutations encoding p.Glu710Asp in 72.9% of PLGAs but not in other salivary gland tumors. Functional studies demonstrated that this kinase-activating alteration likely constitutes a driver of PLGA.

  1. Complex patterns of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in ebony underlie standing pigmentation variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Ryutaro; Akiyama, Noriyoshi; Osada, Naoki; Takahashi, Aya

    2015-12-01

    Pigmentation traits in adult Drosophila melanogaster were used in this study to investigate how phenotypic variations in continuous ecological traits can be maintained in a natural population. First, pigmentation variation in the adult female was measured at seven different body positions in 20 strains from the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) originating from a natural population in North Carolina. Next, to assess the contributions of cis-regulatory polymorphisms of the genes involved in the melanin biosynthesis pathway, allele-specific expression levels of four genes were quantified by amplicon sequencing using a 454 GS Junior. Among those genes, ebony was significantly associated with pigmentation intensity of the thoracic segment. Detailed sequence analysis of the gene regulatory regions of this gene indicated that many different functional cis-regulatory alleles are segregating in the population and that variations outside the core enhancer element could potentially play important roles in the regulation of gene expression. In addition, a slight enrichment of distantly associated SNP pairs was observed in the ~10 kb cis-regulatory region of ebony, which suggested the presence of interacting elements scattered across the region. In contrast, sequence analysis in the core cis-regulatory region of tan indicated that SNPs within the region are significantly associated with allele-specific expression level of this gene. Collectively, the data suggest that the underlying genetic differences in the cis-regulatory regions that control intraspecific pigmentation variation can be more complex than those of interspecific pigmentation trait differences, where causal genetic changes are typically confined to modular enhancer elements.

  2. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gene polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chen; Zhou, Hui; Shen, Chong; Yu, Lu-Gang; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Guo, Zhi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are the serious public health problems worldwide. Moreover, it is estimated that MetS patients have about five-fold greater risk of the T2DM development compared with people without the syndrome. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are a subgroup of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors which play an important role in the pathogenesis of MetS and T2DM. All three members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) nuclear receptor subfamily, PPARα, PPARβ/δ and PPARγ are critical in regulating insulin sensitivity, adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, and blood pressure. Recently, more and more studies indicated that the gene polymorphism of PPARs, such as Leu162Val and Val227Ala of PPARα, +294T > C of PPARβ/δ, Pro12Ala and C1431T of PPARγ, are significantly associated with the onset and progressing of MetS and T2DM in different population worldwide. Furthermore, a large body of evidence demonstrated that the glucose metabolism and lipid metabolism were influenced by gene-gene interaction among PPARs genes. However, given the complexity pathogenesis of metabolic disease, it is unlikely that genetic variation of a single locus would provide an adequate explanation of inter-individual differences which results in diverse clinical syndromes. Thus, gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions associated with T2DM and MetS need future comprehensive studies. PMID:25987964

  3. Cyclic motor activity; migrating motor complex: 1985.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K

    1985-10-01

    Most of the gastrointestinal tract and the biliary tract have a cyclic motor activity. The electric counterpart of this motor activity is called cyclic myoelectric activity. A typical motor cycle in the LES, stomach, and small intestine is composed of a quiescent state, followed by progressively increasing amplitude and frequency of contractions culminating in a state of maximal contractile activity. The colonic motor cycle has only the quiescent and the contractile states. In the small intestine, these motor complexes migrate in an aborad direction, and in the colon in both orad and aborad directions. The mechanisms of initiation and migration of these complexes are best understood in the small intestine. Both the initiation and migration of these complexes seem to be controlled by enteric neural mechanisms. The functions of the enteric mechanisms may be modulated by the central nervous system and by circulating endogenous substances. The mechanisms of initiation of these complexes are not completely understood in the rest of the gastrointestinal tract and in the biliary tract. The physiologic function of these motor complexes that occur only after several hours of fast in the upper gastrointestinal tract of nonruminants may be to clean the digestive tract of residual food, secretions, and cellular debris. This function is aided by a coordinated secretion of enzymes, acid, and bicarbonate. In ruminants, phase III activity is associated with the distal propulsion of ingested food. The function of colonic motor complexes that are not coordinated with the cyclic motor activities of the rest of the gastrointestinal tract may be only to move contents back and forth for optimal absorption. PMID:3896912

  4. A rare polymorphic variant of NBS1 reduces DNA repair activity and elevates chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Miyamoto, Mamiko; Tatsuda, Daisuke; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Satoh, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Ohta, Tsutomu

    2014-07-15

    Failure to expeditiously repair DNA at sites of double-strand breaks (DSB) ultimately is an important etiologic factor in cancer development. NBS1 plays an important role in the cellular response to DSB damage. A rare polymorphic variant of NBS1 that resulted in an isoleucine to valine substitution at amino acid position 171 (I171V) was first identified in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This polymorphic variant is located in the N-terminal region that interacts with other DNA repair factors. In earlier work, we had identified a remarkable number of structural chromosomal aberrations in a patient with pediatric aplastic anemia with a homozygous polymorphic variant of NBS1-I171V; however, it was unclear whether this variant affected DSB repair activity or chromosomal instability. In this report, we demonstrate that NBS1-I171V reduces DSB repair activity through a loss of association with the DNA repair factor MDC1. Furthermore, we found that heterozygosity in this polymorphic variant was associated with breast cancer risk. Finally, we showed that this variant exerted a dominant-negative effect on wild-type NBS1, attenuating DSB repair efficiency and elevating chromosomal instability. Our findings offer evidence that the failure of DNA repair leading to chromosomal instability has a causal impact on the risk of breast cancer development.

  5. Luminescence color-tuning through polymorph doping: preparation of a white-emitting solid from a single gold(I)-isocyanide complex by simple precipitation.

    PubMed

    Seki, Tomohiro; Kurenuma, Sayaka; Ito, Hajime

    2013-11-25

    We report the luminescent color tuning of a new complex, 2-benzothiophenyl(4-methoxyphenyl isocyanide)gold(I) (1), by using a new "polymorph doping" approach. The slow crystallization of the complex 1 afforded three different pure polymorphic crystals with blue, green, and orange emission under UV-light irradiation. The crystal structures of pure polymorphs of 1 were investigated in detail by means of single-crystal X-ray analyses. Theoretical calculations based on the single-crystal structures provided qualitative explanation of the difference in the excited energy-levels of the three polymorphs of 1. In sharp contrast, the rapid precipitation of 1, with the optimized conditions reproducibly afforded homogeneous powder materials showing solid-state white-emission with Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) 1931 chromaticity coordinates of (0.33, 0.35), which is similar to pure white. New "polymorphic doping" has been revealed to be critical to this white emission through spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction analyses. The coexistence of the multiple polymorphs of 1 within the homogeneous powder materials and the ideal mixing of multiple luminescent colors gave its white emission accompanied with energy transfer from the predominant green-emitting polymorph to the minor orange-emitting polymorph. PMID:24249690

  6. Collective dynamics of active filament complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogucci, Hironobu; Ishihara, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Networks of biofilaments are essential for the formation of cellular structures that support various biological functions. For the most part, previous studies have investigated the collective dynamics of rodlike biofilaments; however, the shapes of the actual subcellular components are often more elaborate. In this study, we considered an active object composed of two active filaments, which represents the progression from rodlike biofilaments to complex-shaped biofilaments. Specifically, we numerically assessed the collective behaviors of these active objects in two dimensions and observed several types of dynamics, depending on the density and the angle of the two filaments as shape parameters of the object. Among the observed collective dynamics, a moving density band that we named a "moving smectic" is introduced here for the first time. By analyzing the trajectories of individual objects and the interactions among them, this study demonstrated how interactions among active biofilaments with complex shapes could produce collective dynamics in a nontrivial manner.

  7. Characterization, Polymorphism and Selection of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DAB Genes in Vulnerable Chinese Egret (Egretta eulophotes)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zeng; Zhou, Xiaoping; Lin, Qingxian

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an excellent molecular marker for the studies of evolutionary ecology and conservation genetics because it is a family of highly polymorphic genes that play a key role in vertebrate immune response. In this study, the functional genes of MHC Class II B (DAB) were isolated for the first time in a vulnerable species, the Chinese egret (Egrettaeulophotes). Using a full length DNA and cDNA produced by PCR and RACE methods, four potential MHC DAB loci were characterized in the genome of this egret and all four were expressed in liver and blood. At least four copies of the MHC gene complex were similar to two copies of the minimal essential MHC complex of chicken, but are less complex than the multiple copies expressed in passerine species. In MHC polymorphism, 19 alleles of exon 2 were isolated from 48 individuals using PCR. No stop codons or frameshift mutations were found in any of the coding regions. The signatures of positive selection detected in potential peptide-binding regions by Bayesian analysis, suggesting that all of these genes were functional. These data will provide the fundamental basis for further studies to elucidate the mechanisms and significance of MHC molecular adaptation in vulnerable Chinese egret and other ardeids. PMID:24019955

  8. A Natural Polymorphism in rDNA Replication Origins Links Origin Activation with Calorie Restriction and Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Elizabeth X.; Foss, Eric J.; Tsuchiyama, Scott; Alvino, Gina M.; Kruglyak, Leonid; Kaeberlein, Matt; Raghuraman, M. K.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Bedalov, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aging and longevity are complex traits influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control replicative lifespan, we employed an outbred Saccharomyces cerevisiae model, generated by crossing a vineyard and a laboratory strain. The predominant QTL mapped to the rDNA, with the vineyard rDNA conferring a lifespan increase of 41%. The lifespan extension was independent of Sir2 and Fob1, but depended on a polymorphism in the rDNA origin of replication from the vineyard strain that reduced origin activation relative to the laboratory origin. Strains carrying vineyard rDNA origins have increased capacity for replication initiation at weak plasmid and genomic origins, suggesting that inability to complete genome replication presents a major impediment to replicative lifespan. Calorie restriction, a conserved mediator of lifespan extension that is also independent of Sir2 and Fob1, reduces rDNA origin firing in both laboratory and vineyard rDNA. Our results are consistent with the possibility that calorie restriction, similarly to the vineyard rDNA polymorphism, modulates replicative lifespan through control of rDNA origin activation, which in turn affects genome replication dynamics. PMID:23505383

  9. SHG-Active Polymorphism of p-Nitroaniline Mixed with Its N-Alkyl Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Shigeru; Abe, Takashi; Matsushima, Ryoka; Suzuki, Morio; Chen, Ding Yu; Okamoto, Naomichi

    1991-02-01

    The second-harmonic generation (SHG) in each mixture of p-nitroaniline (p-NA) and its derivatives (n-methyl, n-ethyl, n-propyl, i-propyl, n-butyl, n-hexyl, dimethyl, phenyl, and diethyl-4-nitroaniline) was measured by the powder method with a Nd:YAG laser. Most of the mixtures having a typical eutectic phase diagram exhibited a high SHG intensity; in particular, the SHG activity of the p-NA/isopropyl-NA mixture was 1670 times higher than that of urea. This may be due to the crystal growth of noncentrosymmetrical polymorphism of p-NA on the surface of the isopropyl-NA. The crystal growth of the SHG-active polymorphism was accomplished by vacuum deposition on the isopropyl-NA substrate.

  10. Antitubercular activity of Ru (II) isoniazid complexes.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Inara de; Tavares, Aline; Roveda, Antonio C; da Silva, Augusto C H; Marino, Leonardo B; Lopes, Érica O; Pavan, Fernando R; Lopes, Luiz G F; Franco, Douglas W

    2015-04-01

    Despite the resistance developed by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) strains, isoniazid (INH) has been recognized as one of the best drug for treatment of Tuberculosis (Tb). The coordination of INH to ruthenium metal centers was investigated as a strategy to enhance the activity of this drug against the sensitive and resistant strains of MTb. The complexes trans-[Ru(NH3)4(L)(INH)](2+) (L=SO2 or NH3) were isolated and their chemical and antituberculosis properties studied. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) data show that [Ru(NH3)5(INH)](2+) was active in both resistant and sensitive strains, whereas free INH (non-coordinated) showed to be active only against the sensitive strain. The coordination of INH to the metal center in both [Ru(NH3)5(INH)](2+) and trans-[Ru(NH3)4(SO2)(INH)](2+) complexes led to a shift in the INH oxidation potential to less positive values compared to free INH. Despite, the ease of oxidation of INH did not lead to an increase in the in vitro INH activity against MTb, it might have provided sensitivity toward resistant strains. Furthermore, ruthenium complexes with chemical structures analogous to those described above were synthesized using the oxidation products of INH as ligands (namely, isonicotinic acid and isonicotinamide). These last compounds were not active against any strains of MTb. Moreover, according to DFT calculations the formation of the acyl radical, a proposed intermediate in the INH oxidation, is favored in the [Ru(NH3)5(INH)](2+) complex by 50.7kcalmol(-1) with respect to the free INH. This result suggests that the stabilization of the acyl radical promoted by the metal center would be a more important feature than the oxidation potential of the INH for the antituberculosis activity against resistant strains.

  11. Activation of immobilized plasminogen by tissue activator. Multimolecular complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, R.L.; Nachman, R.L.; Leung, L.L.; Harpel, P.C.

    1985-08-25

    Ternary complex formation of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) and plasminogen (Plg) with thrombospondin (TSP) or histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) has been demonstrated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, an affinity bead assay, and a rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay. The formation of these complexes was specific, concentration dependent, saturable, lysine binding site-dependent, and inhibitable by fluid phase plasminogen. Apparent Kd values were approximately 12-36 nM for the interaction of TPA with TSP-Plg complexes and 15-31 nM with HRGP-Plg complexes. At saturation the relative molar stoichiometry of Plg:TPA was 3:1 within the TSP-containing complexes and 1:1 within HRGP-containing complexes. The activation of Plg to plasmin by TPA on TSP- and HRGP-coated surfaces was studied using a synthetic fluorometric plasmin substrate (D-Val-Leu-Lys-7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin). Kinetic analysis demonstrated a marked increase in the affinity of TPA for plasminogen in the presence of surface-associated TSP or HRGP. Complex formation of locally released tissue plasminogen activator with Plg immobilized on TSP or HRGP surfaces may thus play an important role in effecting proteolytic events in nonfibrin-containing microenvironments.

  12. Polymorphisms of the eNOS gene are associated with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bunjevacki, Vera; Maksimovic, Nela; Jekic, Biljana; Milic, Vera; Lukovic, Ljiljana; Novakovic, Ivana; Damjanov, Nemanja; Radunovic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Tatjana

    2016-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a mediator in autoimmune responses and thus involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of rheumatic diseases. Genetic factors that influence the expression of the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) that catalyzes NO synthesis are important for the control of NO level and consequently its activity. We have analyzed three functionally relevant polymorphisms of eNOS gene: T-786C, G894T and VNTR (4a/b), to investigate whether they are predisposing factors in pathogenesis of RA in Serbian population and to evaluate their role in clinical manifestations of RA. We performed genotyping of 196 patients with RA and the control group of 132 healthy individuals from Serbian population, using PCR and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. Disease activity was prospectively assessed using number of tender joints, number of swollen joints and 28-joints disease activity score (DAS28). There were no differences between the patients and control groups in the genotypes and alleles frequencies of the three analyzed SNPs. Our results showed statistically significant differences in all three analyzed parameters of disease severity between 786TT/786CT and 786CC genotypes and between 894GG/894GT and 894TT genotypes. In the case of 4a/b polymorphism, carriers of minor allele had significantly lower DAS28 values. In conclusion, our results do not support the implication of analyzed eNOS gene polymorphisms in susceptibility to RA but associate them with the disease activity and give assumption that minor alleles are indicators of better clinical course. PMID:26612436

  13. Polymorphisms in the ITS rDNA regions for differentiating strains of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex in Sfax-Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Drira, I; Neji, S; Hadrich, I; Trabelsi, H; Sellami, H; Cheikhrouhou, F; Guidara, R; Makni, F; Ayadi, A

    2014-08-01

    The Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex is the main cause of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Molecular research has provided useful insights into the taxonomy of this complex to overcome the challenges with conventional diagnostics. The aim of this study was to identify, type and differentiate anthropophilic and zoophilic species of the T. mentagrophytes complex. Sixty clinical samples identified as T. mentagrophytes by morphological characteristics were isolated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The identification of our strains by conventional methods was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing in 93.34% of the cases. The strains under investigation were recategorised as T. rubrum (Tr2711). In addition, PCR products were independently digested with the restriction endonucleases, MvaI and HinfI, to produce a single dominant profile for T. interdigitale. ITS sequence analysis revealed a polymorphism in the ITS1 and 5.8S regions. Analysis of the consensus sequences distinguished four types of genotypes among our T. interdigitale species. Moreover, ITS type I was the dominant genotype characterising the anthropophilic variant of T. interdigitale. The phylogenetic study showed that only 5% of our strains were zoophilic. PCR sequencing was useful for distinguishing anthropophilic and zoophilic species of T. interdigitale, in which the differentiation is relevant because it helps to prescribe the correct treatment and to identify the surrounding source of infection. PMID:24621449

  14. Haplotyping the human T-cell receptor. beta. -chain gene complex by use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Charmley, P.; Chao, A.; Gatti, R.A. ); Concannon, P. ); Hood, L. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have studied the genetic segregation of human T-cell receptor {beta}-chain (TCR{beta}) genes on chromosome 7q in 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) families by using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). They constructed haplotypes from eight RFLPs by using variable- and constant-region cDNA probes, which detect polymorphisms that span more than 600 kilobases of the TCR{beta} gene complex. Analysis of allele distributions between TCR{beta} genes revealed significant linkage disequilibrium between only 6 of the 28 different pairs of RFLPs. This linkage disequilibrium strongly influences the most efficient order to proceed for typing of these RFLPs in order to achieve maximum genetic informativeness, which in this study revealed a 97.3% level of heterozygosity within the TCR{beta} gene complex. The results should provide new insight into recent reports of disease associations with the TCR{beta} gene complex and should assist in designing future experiments to detect or confirm the existence of disease-susceptibility loci in this region of the human genome.

  15. Selection and Trans-Species Polymorphism of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes in the Order Crocodylia

    PubMed Central

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R.; Higgins, Damien P.; Miles, Lee G.; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes encode for molecules that aid in the presentation of antigens to helper T cells. MHC characterisation within and between major vertebrate taxa has shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the diversity within this genomic region, though little characterisation has been performed within the Order Crocodylia. Here we investigate the extent and effect of selective pressures and trans-species polymorphism on MHC class II α and β evolution among 20 extant species of Crocodylia. Selection detection analyses showed that diversifying selection influenced MHC class II β diversity, whilst diversity within MHC class II α is the result of strong purifying selection. Comparison of translated sequences between species revealed the presence of twelve trans-species polymorphisms, some of which appear to be specific to the genera Crocodylus and Caiman. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered MHC class II α sequences into two major clades representing the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae. However, no further subdivision within these clades was evident and, based on the observation that most MHC class II α sequences shared the same trans-species polymorphisms, it is possible that they correspond to the same gene lineage across species. In contrast, phylogenetic analyses of MHC class II β sequences showed a mixture of subclades containing sequences from Crocodilidae and/or Alligatoridae, illustrating orthologous relationships among those genes. Interestingly, two of the subclades containing sequences from both Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae shared specific trans-species polymorphisms, suggesting that they may belong to ancient lineages pre-dating the divergence of these two families from the common ancestor 85–90 million years ago. The results presented herein provide an immunogenetic resource that may be used to further assess MHC diversity and functionality in Crocodylia. PMID:24503938

  16. ITS polymorphisms shed light on hybrid evolution in apomictic plants: a case study on the Ranunculus auricomus complex.

    PubMed

    Hodač, Ladislav; Scheben, Armin Patrick; Hojsgaard, Diego; Paun, Ovidiu; Hörandl, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of reticulate evolutionary histories in plants is still a major methodological challenge. Sequences of the ITS nrDNA are a popular marker to analyze hybrid relationships, but variation of this multicopy spacer region is affected by concerted evolution, high intraindividual polymorphism, and shifts in mode of reproduction. The relevance of changes in secondary structure is still under dispute. We aim to shed light on the extent of polymorphism within and between sexual species and their putative natural as well as synthetic hybrid derivatives in the Ranunculus auricomus complex to test morphology-based hypotheses of hybrid origin and parentage of taxa. We employed direct sequencing of ITS nrDNA from 68 individuals representing three sexuals, their synthetic hybrids and one sympatric natural apomict, as well as cloning of ITS copies in four representative individuals, RNA secondary structure analysis, and landmark geometric morphometric analysis on leaves. Phylogenetic network analyses indicate additivity of parental ITS variants in both synthetic and natural hybrids. The triploid synthetic hybrids are genetically much closer to their maternal progenitors, probably due to ploidy dosage effects, although exhibiting a paternal-like leaf morphology. The natural hybrids are genetically and morphologically closer to the putative paternal progenitor species. Secondary structures of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 were rather conserved in all taxa. The observed similarities in ITS polymorphisms suggest that the natural apomict R. variabilis is an ancient hybrid of the diploid sexual species R. notabilis and the sexual species R. cassubicifolius. The additivity pattern shared by R. variabilis and the synthetic hybrids supports an evolutionary and biogeographical scenario that R. variabilis originated from ancient hybridization. Concerted evolution of ITS copies in R. variabilis is incomplete, probably due to a shift to asexual reproduction. Under the condition of

  17. Cancer Activation and Polymorphisms of Human Cytochrome P450 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young-Jin; Kim, Donghak

    2016-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s, CYPs) are major oxidative catalysts that metabolize various xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Many carcinogens induce cancer only after metabolic activation and P450 enzymes play an important role in this phenomenon. P450 1B1 mediates bioactivation of many procarcinogenic chemicals and carcinogenic estrogen. It catalyzes the oxidation reaction of polycyclic aromatic carbons, heterocyclic and aromatic amines, and the 4-hydroxylation reaction of 17β-estradiol. Enhanced expression of P450 1B1 promotes cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. There are at least 25 polymorphic variants of P450 1B1 and some of these have been reported to be associated with eye diseases. In addition, P450 1B1 polymorphisms can greatly affect the metabolic activation of many procarcinogenic compounds. It is necessary to understand the relationship between metabolic activation of such substances and P450 1B1 polymorphisms in order to develop rational strategies for the prevention of its toxic effect on human health. PMID:27123158

  18. Cancer Activation and Polymorphisms of Human Cytochrome P450 1B1.

    PubMed

    Chun, Young-Jin; Kim, Donghak

    2016-04-01

    Human cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s, CYPs) are major oxidative catalysts that metabolize various xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Many carcinogens induce cancer only after metabolic activation and P450 enzymes play an important role in this phenomenon. P450 1B1 mediates bioactivation of many procarcinogenic chemicals and carcinogenic estrogen. It catalyzes the oxidation reaction of polycyclic aromatic carbons, heterocyclic and aromatic amines, and the 4-hydroxylation reaction of 17β-estradiol. Enhanced expression of P450 1B1 promotes cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. There are at least 25 polymorphic variants of P450 1B1 and some of these have been reported to be associated with eye diseases. In addition, P450 1B1 polymorphisms can greatly affect the metabolic activation of many procarcinogenic compounds. It is necessary to understand the relationship between metabolic activation of such substances and P450 1B1 polymorphisms in order to develop rational strategies for the prevention of its toxic effect on human health. PMID:27123158

  19. Genetic polymorphisms in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyoung Doo; Park, Byung Lae; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Jung, Hye Seung; Cho, Young Min; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Young Joo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Park, Kyong Soo

    2004-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors regulating the expression of genes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. Three different PPARs, PPAR-alpha, -gamma, and -delta, have been characterized, and they are distinguished from each other by tissue distribution and cell activation. All PPARs are, to different extents, activated by fatty acids and derivatives. Recently, it has been shown that PPAR-delta serves as a widespread regulator of fat burning, suggesting that it might be a potential target in the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In an effort to identify polymorphic markers in potential candidate genes for type 2 diabetes, we have sequenced PPAR-delta, including -1,500 bp of the 5' flanking region. Nine polymorphisms were identified in PPAR-delta: four in the intron, one in the 5' untranslated region (UTR), and four in the 3' UTR. Among identified polymorphisms, five common sites, including c.-13454G>T, c.-87T>C, c.2022+12G>A, c.2629T>C, and c.2806C>G, were genotyped in subjects with type 2 diabetes and normal control subjects (n = 702). The genetic associations with the risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic phenotype were analyzed. No significant associations with the risk of type 2 diabetes were detected. However, several positive associations of PPAR-delta polymorphisms with fasting plasma glucose and BMI were detected in nondiabetic control subjects. The genetic information about PPAR-delta from this study would be useful for further genetic study of obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic diseases. PMID:14988273

  20. Restriction fragment length polymorphism within the class I gene loci of the equine major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, A.J.; Bailey, E.; Woodward, J.G.

    1986-03-05

    Fourteen standard bred horses were serotyped as homozygous for 1 of 6 Equine Leukocyte Antigen (ELA) specificities. DNA was purified from peripheral leukocytes and digested with Hind III or Pvu II. Southern blot hybridization analysis was carried out using a /sup 32/P-labeled mouse cDNA probe (PH2IIa) specific for class I MHC genes. Both enzymes generated blots that contained a large number of bands (23 to 30) per horse. Significant polymorphism existed among most fragment sizes, while a dozen highly conserved band sizes suggested the presence of Qa/tla - like genes. Only 2 animals (both W6's) showed identical band patterns. Polymorphism was greatest between horses of different serotypes and was significantly decreased within serotypes. Unique bands were present on both blots for both W1's and W6's and may account for the serologic specificity seen in ELA W1 and W6 horses. This study is consistent with the findings in other higher vertebrates and implies that the MHC of the horse includes a highly polymorphic class I multigene family.

  1. The BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Influences Reading Ability and Patterns of Neural Activation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Jasińska, Kaja K.; Molfese, Peter J.; Kornilov, Sergey A.; Mencl, W. Einar; Frost, Stephen J.; Lee, Maria; Pugh, Kenneth R.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Landi, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how genes impact the brain’s functional activation for learning and cognition during development remains limited. We asked whether a common genetic variant in the BDNF gene (the Val66Met polymorphism) modulates neural activation in the young brain during a critical period for the emergence and maturation of the neural circuitry for reading. In animal models, the bdnf variation has been shown to be associated with the structure and function of the developing brain and in humans it has been associated with multiple aspects of cognition, particularly memory, which are relevant for the development of skilled reading. Yet, little is known about the impact of the Val66Met polymorphism on functional brain activation in development, either in animal models or in humans. Here, we examined whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (dbSNP rs6265) is associated with children’s (age 6–10) neural activation patterns during a reading task (n = 81) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), genotyping, and standardized behavioral assessments of cognitive and reading development. Children homozygous for the Val allele at the SNP rs6265 of the BDNF gene outperformed Met allele carriers on reading comprehension and phonological memory, tasks that have a strong memory component. Consistent with these behavioral findings, Met allele carriers showed greater activation in reading–related brain regions including the fusiform gyrus, the left inferior frontal gyrus and left superior temporal gyrus as well as greater activation in the hippocampus during a word and pseudoword reading task. Increased engagement of memory and spoken language regions for Met allele carriers relative to Val/Val homozygotes during reading suggests that Met carriers have to exert greater effort required to retrieve phonological codes. PMID:27551971

  2. The BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Influences Reading Ability and Patterns of Neural Activation in Children.

    PubMed

    Jasińska, Kaja K; Molfese, Peter J; Kornilov, Sergey A; Mencl, W Einar; Frost, Stephen J; Lee, Maria; Pugh, Kenneth R; Grigorenko, Elena L; Landi, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how genes impact the brain's functional activation for learning and cognition during development remains limited. We asked whether a common genetic variant in the BDNF gene (the Val66Met polymorphism) modulates neural activation in the young brain during a critical period for the emergence and maturation of the neural circuitry for reading. In animal models, the bdnf variation has been shown to be associated with the structure and function of the developing brain and in humans it has been associated with multiple aspects of cognition, particularly memory, which are relevant for the development of skilled reading. Yet, little is known about the impact of the Val66Met polymorphism on functional brain activation in development, either in animal models or in humans. Here, we examined whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (dbSNP rs6265) is associated with children's (age 6-10) neural activation patterns during a reading task (n = 81) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), genotyping, and standardized behavioral assessments of cognitive and reading development. Children homozygous for the Val allele at the SNP rs6265 of the BDNF gene outperformed Met allele carriers on reading comprehension and phonological memory, tasks that have a strong memory component. Consistent with these behavioral findings, Met allele carriers showed greater activation in reading-related brain regions including the fusiform gyrus, the left inferior frontal gyrus and left superior temporal gyrus as well as greater activation in the hippocampus during a word and pseudoword reading task. Increased engagement of memory and spoken language regions for Met allele carriers relative to Val/Val homozygotes during reading suggests that Met carriers have to exert greater effort required to retrieve phonological codes. PMID:27551971

  3. Complex-disease networks of trait-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) unveiled by information theory

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiquan; Lee, Younghee; Chen, James L; Rebman, Ellen; Li, Jianrong

    2012-01-01

    Objective Thousands of complex-disease single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been discovered in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, these intragenic SNPs have not been collectively mined to unveil the genetic architecture between complex clinical traits. The authors hypothesize that biological annotations of host genes of trait-associated SNPs may reveal the biomolecular modularity across complex-disease traits and offer insights for drug repositioning. Methods Trait-to-polymorphism (SNPs) associations confirmed in GWAS were used. A novel method to quantify trait–trait similarity anchored in Gene Ontology annotations of human proteins and information theory was developed. The results were then validated with the shortest paths of physical protein interactions between biologically similar traits. Results A network was constructed consisting of 280 significant intertrait similarities among 177 disease traits, which covered 1438 well-validated disease-associated SNPs. Thirty-nine percent of intertrait connections were confirmed by curators, and the following additional studies demonstrated the validity of a proportion of the remainder. On a phenotypic trait level, higher Gene Ontology similarity between proteins correlated with smaller ‘shortest distance’ in protein interaction networks of complexly inherited diseases (Spearman p<2.2×10−16). Further, ‘cancer traits’ were similar to one another, as were ‘metabolic syndrome traits’ (Fisher's exact test p=0.001 and 3.5×10−7, respectively). Conclusion An imputed disease network by information-anchored functional similarity from GWAS trait-associated SNPs is reported. It is also demonstrated that small shortest paths of protein interactions correlate with complex-disease function. Taken together, these findings provide the framework for investigating drug targets with unbiased functional biomolecular networks rather than worn-out single-gene and subjective canonical pathway approaches

  4. Association of G22A and A4223C ADA1 gene polymorphisms and ADA activity with PCOS.

    PubMed

    Salehabadi, Mahshid; Farimani, Marzieh; Tavilani, Heidar; Ghorbani, Marzieh; Poormonsefi, Faranak; Poorolajal, Jalal; Shafiei, Gholamreza; Ghasemkhani, Neda; Khodadadi, Iraj

    2016-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase-1 (ADA1) regulates the concentration of adenosine as the main modulator of oocyte maturation. There is compelling evidence for the association of ADA1 gene polymorphisms with many diseases but the importance of ADA1 polymorphisms in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has not been studied before. This study investigates serum total ADA activity (tADA), ADA1 and ADA2 isoenzyme activities, and genotype and allele frequencies of G22A and A4223C polymorphisms in healthy and PCOS women. In this case-control study 200 PCOS patients and 200 healthy women were enrolled. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood and the PCR-RFLP technique was used to determine the G22A and A4223C variants. The genotype frequencies were calculated and the association between polymorphic genotypes and enzyme activities were determined. tADA activity was significantly lower in the PCOS group compared with the control group (27.76±6.0 vs. 39.63±7.48, respectively). PCOS patients also showed reduced activity of ADA1 and ADA2. PCOS was not associated with G22A polymorphism whereas AA, AC, and CC genotypes of A4223C polymorphism were found distributed differently between the control and the PCOS women where the C allele showed a strong protective role for PCOS (odds ratio=1.876, p=0.033). The present study for the first time showed that lower ADA activity may be involved in pathogenesis of PCOS by maintaining a higher concentration of adenosine affecting follicular growth. As a novel finding, we also showed great differences in genotype distribution and allele frequencies of A4223C polymorphism between groups indicating a protective role for C allele against PCOS. AbbreviationsADA: adenosine deaminase PCOS: polycystic ovary syndrome PCR-RFLP: polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism tADA: total adenosine deaminase.

  5. MDR-1 and MRP2 Gene Polymorphisms in Mexican Epileptic Pediatric Patients with Complex Partial Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Santiago, David; Feria-Romero, Iris Angélica; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Rayo-Mares, Dario; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta; Escamilla-Núñez, Consuelo; Grijalva-Otero, Israel; López-García, Miguel Angel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Although the Pgp efflux transport protein is overexpressed in resected tissue of patients with epilepsy, the presence of polymorphisms in MDR1/ABCB1 and MRP2/ABCC2 in patients with antiepileptic-drugs resistant epilepsy (ADR) is controversial. The aim of this study was to perform an exploratory study to identify nucleotide changes and search new and reported mutations in patients with ADR and patients with good response (CTR) to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a rigorously selected population. We analyzed 22 samples In Material and Methods, from drug-resistant patients with epilepsy and 7 samples from patients with good response to AEDs. Genomic DNA was obtained from leukocytes. Eleven exons in both genes were genotyped. The concentration of drugs in saliva and plasma was determined. The concentration of valproic acid in saliva was lower in ADR than in CRT. In ABCB1, five reported SNPs and five unreported nucleotide changes were identified; rs2229109 (GA) and rs2032582 (AT and AG) were found only in the ADR. Of six SNPs associated with the ABCC2 that were found in the study population, rs3740066 (TT) and 66744T > A (TG) were found only in the ADR. The strongest risk factor in the ABCB1 gene was identified as the TA genotype of rs2032582, whereas for the ABCC2 gene the strongest risk factor was the T allele of rs3740066. The screening of SNPs in ACBC1 and ABCC2 indicates that the Mexican patients with epilepsy in this study display frequently reported ABCC1 polymorphisms; however, in the study subjects with a higher risk factor for drug resistance, new nucleotide changes were found in the ABCC2 gene. Thus, the population of Mexican patients with AED-resistant epilepsy (ADR) used in this study exhibits genetic variability with respect to those reported in other study populations; however, it is necessary to explore this polymorphism in a larger population of patients with ADR. PMID:25346718

  6. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and plasma renin activity in essential hypertensive individuals.

    PubMed

    Cottone, S; Guarino, L; Arsena, R; Scazzone, C; Tornese, F; Guarneri, M; Guglielmo, C; Bono, A; Mulè, G

    2015-08-01

    Several studies analyzed 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and blood pressure (BP) relationship with mixed results. Moreover, a relationship between the risk of hypertension and vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms, FokI and BsmI, was reported. This study was aimed to analyze these relationships in essential hypertensive (EH) patients. Seventy-one EH patients, 18-75 years old, were enrolled. Patients underwent clinical BP, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring, 25[OH]D and plasma renin activity (PRA) evaluations. FokI and BsmI VDR polymorphisms were analyzed and compared with those of 72 healthy controls. In EH patients, the median 25[OH]D levels were lower than 30 ng ml(-1). We found a significant negative correlation between 25[OH]D and 24-h systolic BP (r = -0.277, P = 0.043). This correlation persisted in backward stepwise multivariate analyses (β = -0.337; P = 0.022), after adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, glomerular filtration rate, and PRA. We did not observe statistically significant correlation between 25[OH]D and PRA. We compared the allelic frequencies and genotype distribution between patients and controls, and FokI and BsmI VDR polymorphisms were not associated either with hypertensive status or with PRA. Further wide studies are needed to clarify this relationship.

  7. Polymorphisms in oxidative stress genes, physical activity, and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Santella, Regina M.; Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Millikan, Robert C.; North, Kari E.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Eng, Sybil M.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Steck, Susan E.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The mechanisms driving the physical activity–breast cancer association are unclear. Exercise both increases reactive oxygen species production, which may transform normal epithelium to a malignant phenotype, and enhances antioxidant capacity, which could protect against subsequent oxidative insult. Given the paradoxical effects of physical activity, the oxidative stress pathway is of interest. Genetic variation in CAT or antioxidant-related polymorphisms may mediate the physical activity–breast cancer association. Methods We investigated the main and joint effects of three previously unreported polymorphisms in CAT on breast cancer risk. We also estimated interactions between recreational physical activity (RPA) and 13 polymorphisms in oxidative stress-related genes. Data were from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project, with interview and biomarker data available on 1,053 cases and 1,102 controls. Results Women with ≥1 variant allele in CAT rs4756146 had a 23 % reduced risk of postmenopausal breast cancer compared with women with the common TT genotype (OR = 0.77; 95 % CI = 0.59–0.99). We observed two statistical interactions between RPA and genes in the anti-oxidant pathway (p = 0.043 and 0.006 for CAT and GSTP1, respectively). Highly active women harboring variant alleles in CAT rs1001179 were at increased risk of breast cancer compared with women with the common CC genotype (OR = 1.61; 95 % CI, 1.06–2.45). Risk reductions were observed among moderately active women carrying variant alleles in GSTP1 compared with women homozygous for the major allele (OR = 0.56; 95 % CI, 0.38–0.84). Conclusions Breast cancer risk may be jointly influenced by RPA and genes involved in the antioxidant pathway, but our findings require confirmation. PMID:23053794

  8. Complex networks in brain electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, C.; Ruffini, G.; Marco-Pallarés, J.; Fuentemilla, L.; Grau, C.

    2007-08-01

    This letter reports a method to extract a functional network of the human brain from electroencephalogram measurements. A network analysis was performed on the resultant network and the statistics of the cluster coefficient, node degree, path length, and physical distance of the links, were studied. Even given the low electrode count of the experimental data the method was able to extract networks with network parameters that clearly depend on the type of stimulus presented to the subject. This type of analysis opens a door to studying the cerebral networks underlying brain electrical activity, and links the fields of complex networks and cognitive neuroscience.

  9. Divergent population structure and climate associations of a chromosomal inversion polymorphism across the Mimulus guttatus species complex.

    PubMed

    Oneal, Elen; Lowry, David B; Wright, Kevin M; Zhu, Zhirui; Willis, John H

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal rearrangement polymorphisms are common and increasingly found to be associated with adaptive ecological divergence and speciation. Rearrangements, such as inversions, reduce recombination in heterozygous individuals and thus can protect favourable allelic combinations at linked loci, facilitating their spread in the presence of gene flow. Recently, we identified a chromosomal inversion polymorphism that contributes to ecological adaptation and reproductive isolation between annual and perennial ecotypes of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus. Here we evaluate the population genetic structure of this inverted region in comparison with the collinear regions of the genome across the M. guttatus species complex. We tested whether annual and perennial M. guttatus exhibit different patterns of divergence for loci in the inverted and noninverted regions of the genome. We then evaluated whether there are contrasting climate associations with these genomic regions through redundancy analysis. We found that the inversion exhibits broadly different patterns of divergence among annual and perennial M. guttatus and is associated with environmental variation across population accessions. This study is the first widespread population genetic survey of the diversity of the M. guttatus species complex. Our findings contribute to a greater understanding of morphological, ecological, and genetic evolutionary divergence across this highly diverse group of closely related ecotypes and species. Finally, understanding species relationships among M. guttatus sp. has hitherto been stymied by accumulated evidence of substantial gene flow among populations as well as designated species. Nevertheless, our results shed light on these relationships and provide insight into adaptation in life history traits within the complex.

  10. Active genes at the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Angela

    2007-06-01

    The nucleus is spatially and functionally organized and its architecture is now seen as a key contributor to genome functions. A central component of this architecture is the nuclear envelope, which is studded with nuclear pore complexes that serve as gateways for communication between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Although the nuclear periphery has traditionally been described as a repressive compartment and repository for gene-poor chromosome regions, several recent studies in yeast have demonstrated that repressive and activating domains can both be positioned at the periphery of the nucleus. Moreover, association with the nuclear envelope favors the expression of particular genes, demonstrating that nuclear organization can play an active role in gene regulation. PMID:17467257

  11. Association analysis of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma gene polymorphisms with asprin hypersensitivity in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sun-Hee; Park, Se-Min; Park, Jong-Sook; Jang, An-Soo; Lee, Yong-Mok; Uh, Soo-Taek; Kim, Young Hoon; Choi, In-Seon; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Park, Byeong Lae

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcriptional factors activated by ligands of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. The activation of PPARγ regulates inflammation by downregulating the production of Th2 type cytokines and eosinophil function. In addition, a range of natural substances, including arachidonate pathway metabolites such as 15-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid (15-HETE), strongly promote PPARG expression. Therefore, genetic variants of the PPARG gene may be associated with the development of aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA). We investigated the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the PPARG gene and AIA. Methods Based on the results of an oral aspirin challenge, asthmatics (n=403) were categorized into two groups: those with a decrease in FEV1 of 15% or greater (AIA) or less than 15% (aspirin-tolerant asthma, ATA). We genotyped two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PPARG gene from Korean asthmatics and normal controls (n=449): +34C>G (Pro12Ala) and +82466C>T (His449His). Results Logistic regression analysis showed that +82466C>T and haplotype 1 (CC) were associated with the development of aspirin hypersensitivity in asthmatics (P=0.04). The frequency of the rare allele of +82466C>T was significantly higher in AIA patients than in ATA patients in the recessive model [P=0.04, OR=3.97 (1.08-14.53)]. In addition, the frequency of PPARG haplotype 1 was significantly lower in AIA patients than in ATA patients in the dominant model (OR=0.25, P=0.04). Conclusions The +82466C>T polymorphism and haplotype 1 of the PPARG gene may be linked to increased risk for aspirin hypersensitivity in asthma. PMID:20224667

  12. Density of mushroom body synaptic complexes limits intraspecies brain miniaturization in highly polymorphic leaf-cutting ant workers

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Claudia; Kelber, Christina; Grübel, Kornelia; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Hymenoptera possess voluminous mushroom bodies (MBs), brain centres associated with sensory integration, learning and memory. The mushroom body input region (calyx) is organized in distinct synaptic complexes (microglomeruli, MG) that can be quantified to analyse body size-related phenotypic plasticity of synaptic microcircuits in these small brains. Leaf-cutting ant workers (Atta vollenweideri) exhibit an enormous size polymorphism, which makes them outstanding to investigate neuronal adaptations underlying division of labour and brain miniaturization. We particularly asked how size-related division of labour in polymorphic workers is reflected in volume and total numbers of MG in olfactory calyx subregions. Whole brains of mini, media and large workers were immunolabelled with anti-synapsin antibodies, and mushroom body volumes as well as densities and absolute numbers of MG were determined by confocal imaging and three-dimensional analyses. The total brain volume and absolute volumes of olfactory mushroom body subdivisions were positively correlated with head widths, but mini workers had significantly larger MB to total brain ratios. Interestingly, the density of olfactory MG was remarkably independent from worker size. Consequently, absolute numbers of olfactory MG still were approximately three times higher in large compared with mini workers. The results show that the maximum packing density of synaptic microcircuits may represent a species-specific limit to brain miniaturization. PMID:24807257

  13. cDNA cloning and genetic polymorphism of the swine major histocompatibility complex (SLA) class II DMA gene.

    PubMed

    Ando, A; Kawata, H; Murakami, T; Shigenari, A; Shiina, T; Sada, M; Tsuji, T; Toriu, A; Nakanishi, Y; Mitsuhashi, T; Sekikawa, K; Inoko, H

    2001-04-01

    cDNA clones corresponding to the swine histocompatibility complex (SLA: swine leucocyte antigen)-DM alpha chain were isolated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from the third exon in the human HLA-DMA gene as a probe. Amino acid comparative analysis revealed that these clones were more closely related to the bovine and human DMA genes than to the other swine class II genes alpha chain genes, DRA, DQA and DOA. These results suggest that the SLA-DMA gene is expressed and may function, like HLA-DM, as an important modulator in class II restricted antigen processing in swine. Furthermore, based on the sequences and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) patterns in the SLA-DMA gene, no allelic variation was recognized in the second exon, but five allelic variations were recognized in the third exon in five different breeds of swine. These DMA alleles were defined by variation at four nucleotide positions. Two of these alleles resulted in an amino acid substitution. These results suggest that SLA-DMA has little polymorphism as observed in HLA-DMA and mouse H2-Ma.

  14. Alzheimer’s Disease Associated Polymorphisms in Human OGG1 Alter Catalytic Activity and Sensitize Cells to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Kimberly D.; Hooten, Nicole Noren; Tadokoro, Takashi; Lohani, Althaf; Barnes, Janice; Evans, Michele K.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissues from Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients show increased levels of oxidative DNA damage and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) accumulation. In humans, the base excision repair protein 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) is the major enzyme that recognizes and excises the mutagenic DNA base lesion 8-oxoG. Recently, two polymorphisms of OGG1, A53T and A288V, have been identified in brain tissues of AD patients, but little is known about how these polymorphisms may contribute to AD. We characterized the A53T and A288V polymorphic variants and detected a significant reduction in the catalytic activity for both proteins in vitro and in cells. Additionally, the A53T polymorphism has decreased substrate binding, while the A288V polymorphism has reduced AP lyase activity. Both variants have decreased binding to known OGG1 binding partners PARP-1 and XRCC1. We found that OGG1−/− cells expressing A53T and A288V OGG1 were significantly more sensitive to DNA damage and had significantly decreased survival. Our results provide both biochemical and cellular evidence that A53T and A288V polymorphic proteins have deficiencies in catalytic and protein binding activities that could be related to the increase in oxidative damage to DNA found in AD brains. PMID:23684897

  15. The effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1 gene expression and adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ozel Demiralp, Duygu; Aktas, Huseyin; Akar, Nejat

    2008-10-01

    Obesity is a complex, multifactorial chronic disease frequently associated with cardiovascular risks, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high blood pressure, and the insulin resistance that appears to be central to the pathogenesis of Type II diabetes. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression induced in differentiating adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis and obesity is poorly understood. Circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels are elevated at an early stage of impaired glucose tolerance, resulting in diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels are also significantly elevated in the plasma of obese individuals and in adipose tissues of obese mice and humans. Some investigators proposed that the -675 4G/5G polymorphism in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promoter caused overexpression of this gene and predisposed carriers to obesity. In this study, we investigated the role of -675 4G/5G polymorphism in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promoter in the expression of this gene and the contribution of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 to adipogenesis. Using a dual-luciferase promoter assay, we determined that the -675 4G/5G polymorphism contributes significantly to overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the course of adipogenesis. The antidiabetic agents troglitazone and ciglitazone inhibited reporter gene expression driven by wild-type and -675 4G/5G mutant promoter, as well as the expression of endogenous plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, indicating that suppression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression may contribute to antidiabetic effects of these agents. The results indicate that absence of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in adipocytes may protect the cells against insulin resistance by promoting glucose uptake and adipocyte differentiation via a decrease in the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma expression that modulates the adipocyte

  16. Paraoxonase activity and genetic polymorphisms in greenhouse workers with long term pesticide exposure.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio F; Mackness, Bharti; Rodrigo, Lourdes; López, Olga; Pla, Antonio; Gil, Fernando; Durrington, Paul N; Pena, Gloria; Parrón, Tesifón; Serrano, José L; Mackness, Michael I

    2003-11-01

    Serum paraoxonase (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) associated protein, which plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, although it was primarily associated with the hydrolysis of organophosphorus compounds. PON1 was initially thought to be independent from physiological or pathological states, although recently some environmental factors have been reported to modulate its activity. In this study, we have investigated the promoter (PON1 -108C/T and -909 C/G) and coding region (PON1 192Q/R and 55L/M) polymorphisms, as well as PON1 activity towards different substrates (paraoxon, phenylacetate and diazoxon) in 102 individuals with long term low dose exposure to pesticides in a plastic greenhouse setting (sprayers), who are probably the group of agricultural workers with the highest exposure to pesticides. PON1 activity towards paraoxon was nonsignificantly decreased (up to 53.5%) in the sprayers subgroup exposed to organophosphates (n = 41) compared with nonsprayers acting as controls (n = 39). None of the genotypes studied was associated significantly with the subgroup of individuals exposed to organophosphates, although differences between sprayers and nonsprayers were observed in the PON1 -909 G/C polymorphism. Among the environmental factors that significantly predicted lower rates of PON1 activity towards paraoxon are, interestingly, the exposure to organophosphates and current smoking. By contrast, the utilization of protective clothing while spraying pesticides inside the greenhouses was positively associated with PON1 activity, very likely by preventing the pesticides from being absorbed. This study suggests that chronic exposure to pesticides might decrease PON1 activity and pinpoints the potential usefulness of monitoring PON1 activity in occupational settings where exposure to organophosphates occurs. PMID:14686479

  17. Association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism and immunoglobulin A nephropathy susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian-Biao; Jiang, Zong-Pei

    2015-02-01

    The association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) risk is still controversial. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association between PAI-1 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism and IgAN susceptibility. A predefined literature search and selection of eligible relevant studies were performed to collect data from electronic database. Four articles were identified for the analysis of association between PAI-1 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism and IgAN risk. 4 G allele was not associated with IgAN susceptibility in overall populations and in Asians. Furthermore, 4 G/4 G and 5 G/5 G genotype were not associated with IgAN for overall populations, Asians. In conclusion, PAI-1 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism was not associated with IgAN risk in overall populations and in Asians. However, more studies should be performed in the future.

  18. Factor VII Activating Protease Polymorphism (G534E) Is Associated with Increased Risk for Stroke and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Trompet, Stella; Pons, Douwe; Kanse, Sandip M.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Verschuren, Jeffrey J. W.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Doevendans, Pieter A. F. M.; Tio, René A.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Jukema, J. Wouter

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The FSAP-Marburg I polymorphism (1704G > A), which reduces FSAP activity, is associated with late complications of carotid stenosis in humans. Therefore, this study examines the influence of the Marburg I polymorphism and the closely linked Marburg II polymorphism (1280G > C) on various cardiovascular outcomes in two large independent study populations. Methods. The two Marburg polymorphisms in the HABP2 gene encoding FSAP were genotyped in a large population of elderly patients at risk for vascular disease (the PROSPER-study, n = 5804) and in a study population treated with a percutaneous coronary intervention (the GENDER-study, n = 3104). Results. In the PROSPER study, the Marburg I polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of clinical stroke (HR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.13–2.28) and all-cause mortality (HR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.04–1.71). In the GENDER study carriers of this variant seemed at lower risk of developing restenosis (HR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.34–1.01). The Marburg II polymorphism showed similar but weaker results. Conclusion. The increase in stroke risk in Marburg I carriers could be due to differential effects on smooth muscle cells and on matrix metalloproteinases, thereby influencing plaque stability. The possible protective effect on restenosis could be the result of reduced activation of zymogens, which are involved in hemostasis and matrix remodeling. PMID:21789270

  19. Association between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, delta, and gamma polymorphisms and risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yufeng; Li, Peiwei; Zhang, Jinjie; Shi, Yu; Chen, Kun; Yang, Jun; Wu, Yihua; Ye, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been suggested to be associated with polymorphisms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), while the results were controversial. We aimed to systematically assess the association between PPAR polymorphisms and CHD risk. Methods: A case–control study with 446 subjects was conducted to evaluate the association between CHD risk and C161T polymorphism, which was of our special interest as this polymorphism showed different effects on risks of CHD and acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Meta-analyses were conducted to assess all PPAR polymorphisms. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was adopted to estimate overall odds ratios (ORs). Results: In the case–control study, T allele carriers of C161T polymorphism were not significantly associated with CHD risk (Odds ratio (OR) = 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47–1.15, P = 0.19), while T allele carriers showed higher risk of ACS (OR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.00–2.65, P = 0.048). The meta-analysis indicated that compared with CC homozygous, T allele carriers had lower CHD risk (OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.59–0.82, P < 0.001) but higher ACS risk (OR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.09–1.87, P = 0.010). Three other polymorphisms were also found to be significantly associated with CHD risk under dominant model: PPAR-alpha intron 7G/C polymorphism (CC+GC vs GG, OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.13–1.78, P = 0.003), L162V polymorphism (VV+LV vs LL, OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.56–0.97, P = 0.031), and PPAR-delta +294T/C polymorphism (CC+TC vs TT, OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.12–2.05, P = 0.007). Conclusions: The results suggested that PPAR-alpha intron 7G/C and L162V, PPAR-delta +294T/C and PPAR-gamma C161T polymorphisms could affect CHD susceptibility, and C161T polymorphism might have different effects on CHD and ACS. PMID:27512842

  20. DRD2/ANKK1 polymorphism modulates the effect of ventral striatal activation on working memory performance.

    PubMed

    Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, P; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Klingberg, Torkel

    2014-09-01

    Motivation is important for learning and cognition. Although dopaminergic (D2) transmission in the ventral striatum (VS) is associated with motivation, learning, and cognition are more strongly associated with function of the dorsal striatum, including activation in the caudate nucleus. A recent study found an interaction between intrinsic motivation and the DRD2/ANKK1 polymorphism (rs1800497), suggesting that A-carriers of rs1800497 are significantly more sensitive to motivation in order to improve during working memory (WM) training. Using data from the two large-scale imaging genetic data sets, IMAGEN (n=1080, age 13-15 years) and BrainChild (n∼300, age 6-27), we investigated whether rs1800497 is associated with WM. In the IMAGEN data set, we tested whether VS/caudate activation during reward anticipation was associated with WM performance and whether rs1800497 and VS/caudate activation interact to affect WM performance. We found that rs1800497 was associated with WM performance in IMAGEN and BrainChild. Higher VS and caudate activation during reward processing were significantly associated with higher WM performance (p<0.0001). An interaction was found between the DRD2/ANKK1 polymorphism rs1800497 and VS activation during reward anticipation on WM (p<0.01), such that carriers of the minor allele (A) showed a significant correlation between VS activation and WM, whereas the GG-homozygotes did not, suggesting that the effect of VS BOLD on WM is modified by inter-individual genetic differences related to D2 dopaminergic transmission. PMID:24713612

  1. Dihydrogen Activation by Titanium Sulfide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Zachary K.; Polse, Jennifer L.; Bergman*, Robert G.; Andersen*, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The titanocene sulfido complex Cp*2Ti(S)py (1, Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; py = pyridine) is synthesized by addition of a suspension of S8 to a toluene solution of Cp*2Ti-(CH2CH2) (2) and py. The rate of rotation of the pyridine ligand in solution was determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy, and the structure of 1 was determined by X-ray crystallography. Complex 1 reacts reversibly with dihydrogen to give Cp*2Ti(H)SH (6) and py. Reaction of 1 with HD gives an equilibrium mixture of Cp*2Ti(D)SH and Cp*2Ti(H)SD; H2 and D2 are not formed in this reaction. 1D 1H NMR magnetization transfer spectra and 2D EXSY 1H NMR spectra of 6 in the presence of H2 show that in solution the H2, hydride, and hydrosulfido hydrogen atoms exchange. A four-center mechanism for this exchange is proposed. The EXSY studies show that the Ti–H and S–H hydrogens exchange with each other more rapidly than either of those hydrogens exchanges with external H2. A transient dihydrogen complex intermediate is proposed to explain this observation. The infrared spectrum of 6 shows an absorption assigned to the Ti–H stretching mode at 1591 cm−1 that shifts upon deuteration to 1154 cm−1. Reaction of 1 with trimethylsilane, diethylsilane, or dimethylsilane gives Cp*2-Ti(H)SSiMe3 (7), Cp*2Ti(H)SSiHEt2 (8), or Cp*2Ti(H)SSiHMe2 (9), respectively. The isotope effect for the reaction producing 7 has been measured, and a mechanism is proposed. Treatment of 1 with an additional equivalent of S8 results in the formation of the disulfide Cp*2Ti(S2) (4). Acetylene inserts into the Ti–S bond of 4 to produce the vinyl disulfide complex 5. The structures of 4 and 5 have been determined by X-ray diffraction. Compound 4 reacts with 2 in the presence of py to produce 1. Phosphines react with 4 in the presence of H2 to provide 6 and the corresponding phosphine sulfide. Reaction of hydrogen with 4 gives Cp*2-Ti(SH)2 (3). The reactions of 1 and 4 with dihydrogen provide a model for possible mechanisms of H2

  2. Regulatory polymorphism in vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) affects gene expression and warfarin dose requirement

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huizi; Momary, Kathryn M.; Cavallari, Larisa H.; Johnson, Julie A.; Sadée, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Warfarin dose requirements have been associated with 2 main haplotypes in VKORC1, but the responsible polymorphisms remain unknown. To search for regulatory polymorphisms, we measured allelic mRNA expression of VKORC1 in human liver, heart, and B lymphocytes. The observed 2-fold allelic mRNA expression imbalance narrowed possible candidate SNPs to −1639G>A and 1173Cactive chromatin, consistent with enhanced mRNA expression. The minor −1639 A allele generates a suppressor E-box binding site, apparently regulating gene expression by a mechanism undetectable with reporter gene assays. A clinical association study demonstrated that promoter SNP −1639G>A, and the tightly linked intron1 SNP 1173C>T, predict warfarin dose more accurately than intron 2 SNP 1542G>C in blacks. Increased warfarin dose requirement in blacks was accounted for by lower frequency of the −1639 A allele. Therefore, −1639G>A is a suitable biomarker for warfarin dosing across ethnic populations. PMID:18523153

  3. Molecular phylogeny and systematics of the highly polymorphic Rumex bucephalophorus complex (Polygonaceae).

    PubMed

    Talavera, M; Balao, F; Casimiro-Soriguer, R; Ortiz, M Á; Terrab, A; Arista, M; Ortiz, P L; Stuessy, T F; Talavera, S

    2011-12-01

    Rumex bucephalophorus is a very polymorphic species that has been subjected to various taxonomic studies in which diverse infraspecific taxa have been recognised on the basis of diaspore traits. In this study we used molecular markers (ITS and AFLP) to explore this remarkable diversity, to test previous hypotheses of classification, and attempt to explain biogeographic patterns. Results show that R. bucephalophorus forms a monophyletic group in which diversification began around 4.2 Mya, at the end of Messinian Salinity Crisis. The two molecular markers clearly show a deep divergence separating subsp. bucephalophorus from all other subspecific taxa, among which subsp. canariensis also constitutes a separate and well distinguishable unit. In contrast, subspecies hispanicus and subsp. gallicus constitute a monophyletic group in which three subgroups can be recognised: subsp. hispanicus, subsp. gallicus var. gallicus and subsp. gallicus var. subaegeus. However, these three subgroups are not clearly distinguished genetically or morphologically, so that in formal classification it would be preferable to treat them at the varietal level.

  4. [ASSOCIATION OF CYCLIC CITRULLINATED PEPTIDE ANTIBODIES LEVEL WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS ACTIVITY BASED ON GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR GENE BBL1 POLYMORPHISM].

    PubMed

    Prystupa, L; Savchenko, O; Koroza, S

    2015-10-01

    The ambiguity of facts on connection between glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR) Bcl1 polymorphism in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its activity as well as lack of facts on its association with serological variants of the desease, makes ir reasonable to investigate its connections between cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodiss (ACCP) concentration and clinico-laboratorial parameters of RA (DAS 28 desease activity score, C-reactive protein concentration (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) level based on GR gene Bcl1 polymorphism. Study involved 161 RA patients aged over 40 as well as 96 healthy individuals. Routine examination of RA diagnostics, anthropometric and molecular genetic methods were used in the research. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using SPSS-17 program. It has been proved that there is no significant difference in GR gene Bcl1 polymorphism distribution based on DAS 28 RA desease activity score, ACCP concentration and ESR level. However, we have found out that G/G genotype bearers have positive correlation relationship between ACCP titre and RA activity by laboratorial parameters (CRP, ESR),DAS 28 score and rheumatoid factor (RF) which has not been found in C/C and C/G genotype bearing patients. The above indicates the association of G/G genotype by GR gene Bcl1 polymorphism with clinico-laboratorial parameters of RA inflammatory activity. In course of the study we have identified the existance of correlation relationship between ACCP concentration and DAS 28 score of RA activity, CRP concentration and ESR level in individuals bearing G/G gene by GR gene Bcl11 polymorphism gene. The association between GR gene Bcl1 polymorphism and clinico-laboratorial parameters of RA inflammatory activity has not been found. PMID:26483373

  5. Association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene polymorphisms and recurrent pregnancy loss: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Nie, Shuping; Lu, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is closely related to embryonic development and pregnancy success. The association between PAI-1 gene polymorphisms (PAI-1-844G/A and PAI-1-675G/A) and the risk of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is controversial. Therefore, we perform this review to clarify the association between PAI-1 gene polymorphisms and RPL risk. We performed a systematic search for studies that described the effect of PAI-1 polymorphisms on RPL risk. The odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were considered under recessive genetic models. Furthermore, we conducted a subgroup analysis based on the studies' geographic regions of origin. Data were analyzed using Stata 11.2 software. Eighteen studies were included, and a high degree of statistical heterogeneity existed among the studies. In this study, we found a significant association between the PAI-1-675G/A polymorphism and the risk of RPL under the recessive model (OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.21-2.38). However, no significant association between the PAI-1-844G/A polymorphism and RPL was noted. PAI-1-675G/A (4G/5G) polymorphisms play a potential role in RPL. The screening of PAI-1 (4G/5G) gene mutations should be included during an RPL diagnostic workup, and patients should be treated using anticoagulant therapy during pregnancy if necessary.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weifeng; Chen, Yuanmei; Wang, Yafeng; Gu, Haiyong; Chen, Shuchen; Kang, Mingqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), a nuclear hormone receptor, plays a critical role in the lipid and glucose homeostasis, adipocyte differentiation, as well as intracellular insulin-signaling events. Several studies have been conducted to explore the associations of PPARG polymorphisms with breast cancer (BC), yet the findings are inconsistent. Methods: Databases of Pubmed and Embase were searched until October 5, 2014. The association between PPARG polymorphisms and BC risk was determined by crude odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Finally, there are nine publications involving 3,931 BC cases and 5,382 controls included in this meta-analysis. No significant association was observed between PPARG rs1801282 C>G variants and overall BC risk in all genetic comparison models. However, in a subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significant association was observed between PPARG rs1801282 C>G variants and decreased BC risk in three genetic models: GG+CG vs. CC (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.71-0.96; P = 0.011), CG vs. CC (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71-0.96; P = 0.011) and G vs. C (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75-0.97; P = 0.016) in Caucasians and in a subgroup analysis by menopausal status, significantly decreased BC risk was also found in two genetic models: GG+CG vs. CC (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67-0.95; P = 0.011) and CG vs. CC (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.64-0.92; P = 0.005) in post-menopause subgroup. For PPARG rs3856806 C>T, we found no significant association between PPARG rs3856806 C>T polymorphism and breast cancer. Conclusions: In summary, despite some limitations, the results suggest that PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism may be a protective factor for BC in Caucasians and in post-menopause women. PMID:26550133

  7. The effect of pH on polymorph formation of the pharmaceutically active compound tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Orola, Liana; Veidis, Mikelis V; Sarcevica, Inese; Actins, Andris; Belyakov, Sergey; Platonenko, Aleksandrs

    2012-08-01

    The anti-depressant pharmaceutical tianeptine has been investigated to determine the dynamics of polymorph formation under various pH conditions. By varying the pH two crystalline polymorphs were isolated. The molecular and crystal structures have been determined to identify the two polymorphs. One polymorph is an amino carboxylic acid and the other polymorph is a zwitterion. In the solid state the tianeptine moieties are bonded through hydrogen bonds. The zwitterion was found to be less stable and transformed to the acid form. During this investigation an amorphous form was identified.

  8. The effect of pH on polymorph formation of the pharmaceutically active compound tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Orola, Liana; Veidis, Mikelis V; Sarcevica, Inese; Actins, Andris; Belyakov, Sergey; Platonenko, Aleksandrs

    2012-08-01

    The anti-depressant pharmaceutical tianeptine has been investigated to determine the dynamics of polymorph formation under various pH conditions. By varying the pH two crystalline polymorphs were isolated. The molecular and crystal structures have been determined to identify the two polymorphs. One polymorph is an amino carboxylic acid and the other polymorph is a zwitterion. In the solid state the tianeptine moieties are bonded through hydrogen bonds. The zwitterion was found to be less stable and transformed to the acid form. During this investigation an amorphous form was identified. PMID:22569228

  9. Polymorphism and division of labour in a socially complex ant: neuromodulation of aggression in the Australian weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina.

    PubMed

    Kamhi, J Frances; Nunn, Kelley; Robson, Simon K A; Traniello, James F A

    2015-07-22

    Complex social structure in eusocial insects can involve worker morphological and behavioural differentiation. Neuroanatomical variation may underscore worker division of labour, but the regulatory mechanisms of size-based task specialization in polymorphic species are unknown. The Australian weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, exhibits worker polyphenism: larger major workers aggressively defend arboreal territories, whereas smaller minors nurse brood.Here, we demonstrate that octopamine (OA) modulates worker size-related aggression in O. smaragdina. We found that the brains of majors had significantly higher titres of OA than those of minors and that OA was positively and specifically correlated with the frequency of aggressive responses to non-nestmates, a key component of territorial defence. Pharmacological manipulations that effectively switched OA action in major and minor worker brains reversed levels of aggression characteristic of each worker size class. Results suggest that altering OA action is sufficient to produce differences in aggression characteristic of size-related social roles. Neuromodulators therefore may generate variation in responsiveness to task-related stimuli associated with worker size differentiation and collateral behavioural specializations, a significant component of division of labour in complex social systems. PMID:26136448

  10. Polymorphism and division of labour in a socially complex ant: neuromodulation of aggression in the Australian weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina

    PubMed Central

    Kamhi, J. Frances; Nunn, Kelley; Robson, Simon K. A.; Traniello, James F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Complex social structure in eusocial insects can involve worker morphological and behavioural differentiation. Neuroanatomical variation may underscore worker division of labour, but the regulatory mechanisms of size-based task specialization in polymorphic species are unknown. The Australian weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, exhibits worker polyphenism: larger major workers aggressively defend arboreal territories, whereas smaller minors nurse brood. Here, we demonstrate that octopamine (OA) modulates worker size-related aggression in O. smaragdina. We found that the brains of majors had significantly higher titres of OA than those of minors and that OA was positively and specifically correlated with the frequency of aggressive responses to non-nestmates, a key component of territorial defence. Pharmacological manipulations that effectively switched OA action in major and minor worker brains reversed levels of aggression characteristic of each worker size class. Results suggest that altering OA action is sufficient to produce differences in aggression characteristic of size-related social roles. Neuromodulators therefore may generate variation in responsiveness to task-related stimuli associated with worker size differentiation and collateral behavioural specializations, a significant component of division of labour in complex social systems. PMID:26136448

  11. Genetic relationship of 32 cell lines of Euplotes octocarinatus species complex revealed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Möllenbeck, M

    1999-12-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting was used in this study to determine the genetic relationship of different cell lines of the hypotrichous ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus. Stocks isolated from different habitats in the USA, and from a group of genetically recombined laboratory strains, were characterized. Band-sharing indices (D) for all possible pairwise comparisons revealed a remarkable genetic diversity between the different cell lines. Investigation of the genetic structure in natural populations found diversity--although to a different extent--in all populations investigated. No clonal structure could be observed, as proposed for several protozoa and recently shown for E. daidaleos. These findings suggest frequent conjugation in the population of E. octocarinatus. No correlation between the genetic relationship of cell lines from different habitats and the distance between the corresponding sampling locations was found. Once separated geographically, the exchange of genetic material between populations appears to be nearly impossible. Therefore, these groups tend to separate into sibling species. The data generally support the occurrence of different syngens in the E. octocarinatus species complex. This finding is in accordance with our observation that the morphological 'species' of E. octocarinatus consists of several syngens or sibling species, similar to findings for the Paramecium aurelia-, Tetrahymena pyriformis- and E. vannus- species complexes. PMID:10722304

  12. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  13. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  14. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  15. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Gene and Newcastle Disease Virus Titre and Body Weight in Leung Hang Khao Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Molee, A.; Kongroi, K.; Kuadsantia, P.; Poompramun, C.; Likitdecharote, B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene on resistance to Newcastle disease virus and body weight of the Thai indigenous chicken, Leung Hang Khao (Gallus gallus domesticus). Blood samples were collected for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis from 485 chickens. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing was used to classify single nucleotide polymorphisms of class II MHC. Body weights were measured at the ages of 3, 4, 5, and 7 months. Titres of Newcastle disease virus at 2 weeks to 7 months were determined and the correlation between body weight and titre was analysed. The association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and body weight and titre were analysed by a generalized linear model. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified: C125T, A126T, C209G, C242T, A243T, C244T, and A254T. Significant correlations between log titre and body weight were found at 2 and 4 weeks. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and titre were found for C209G and A254T, and between all single nucleotide polymorphisms (except A243T) and body weight. The results showed that class II MHC is associated with both titre of Newcastle disease virus and body weight in Leung Hang Khao chickens. This is of concern because improved growth traits are the main goal of breeding selection. Moreover, the results suggested that MHC has a pleiotropic effect on the titre and growth performance. This mechanism should be investigated in a future study. PMID:26732325

  16. Photobiont selectivity leads to ecological tolerance and evolutionary divergence in a polymorphic complex of lichenized fungi

    PubMed Central

    Muggia, Lucia; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio; Kopun, Theodora; Zellnig, Günther; Grube, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The integrity and evolution of lichen symbioses depend on a fine-tuned combination of algal and fungal genotypes. Geographically widespread species complexes of lichenized fungi can occur in habitats with slightly varying ecological conditions, and it remains unclear how this variation correlates with symbiont selectivity patterns in lichens. In an attempt to address this question, >300 samples were taken of the globally distributed and ecologically variable lichen-forming species complex Tephromela atra, together with closely allied species, in order to study genetic diversity and the selectivity patterns of their photobionts. Methods Lichen thalli of T. atra and of closely related species T. grumosa, T. nashii and T. atrocaesia were collected from six continents, across 24 countries and 62 localities representing a wide range of habitats. Analyses of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships were carried out both for photobionts amplified directly from the lichen thalli and from those isolated in axenic cultures. Morphological and anatomical traits were studied with light and transmission electron microscopy in the isolated algal strains. Key Results Tephromela fungal species were found to associate with 12 lineages of Trebouxia. Five new clades demonstrate the still-unrecognized genetic diversity of lichen algae. Culturable, undescribed lineages were also characterized by phenotypic traits. Strong selectivity of the mycobionts for the photobionts was observed in six monophyletic Tephromela clades. Seven Trebouxia lineages were detected in the poorly resolved lineage T. atra sensu lato, where co-occurrence of multiple photobiont lineages in single thalli was repeatedly observed. Conclusions Low selectivity apparently allows widespread lichen-forming fungi to establish successful symbioses with locally adapted photobionts in a broader range of habitats. This flexibility might correlate with both lower phylogenetic resolution and

  17. Exploiting Complexity Information for Brain Activation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Jiali; Lin, Qiang; Hu, Zhenghui

    2016-01-01

    We present a complexity-based approach for the analysis of fMRI time series, in which sample entropy (SampEn) is introduced as a quantification of the voxel complexity. Under this hypothesis the voxel complexity could be modulated in pertinent cognitive tasks, and it changes through experimental paradigms. We calculate the complexity of sequential fMRI data for each voxel in two distinct experimental paradigms and use a nonparametric statistical strategy, the Wilcoxon signed rank test, to evaluate the difference in complexity between them. The results are compared with the well known general linear model based Statistical Parametric Mapping package (SPM12), where a decided difference has been observed. This is because SampEn method detects brain complexity changes in two experiments of different conditions and the data-driven method SampEn evaluates just the complexity of specific sequential fMRI data. Also, the larger and smaller SampEn values correspond to different meanings, and the neutral-blank design produces higher predictability than threat-neutral. Complexity information can be considered as a complementary method to the existing fMRI analysis strategies, and it may help improving the understanding of human brain functions from a different perspective. PMID:27045838

  18. Complex columnar hexagonal polymorphism in supramolecular assemblies of a semifluorinated electron-accepting naphthalene bisimide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Chun; Leowanawat, Pawaret; Sun, Hao-Jan; Partridge, Benjamin E; Peterca, Mihai; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Hsu, Chain-Shu; Heiney, Paul A; Percec, Virgil

    2015-01-21

    Simple synthetic methods for a strongly electron-accepting naphthalene bisimide (NBI) derivative functionalized with a new environmentally friendly chiral racemic semifluorinated alkyl group and with AB3 minidendrons containing the same semifluorinated group are reported. The semifluorinated dendron was attached to the imide groups of the NBI via one, two, and three (m = 1, 2, 3) methylenic units. The NBI-containing semifluorinated groups and the dendronized NBI with m = 1 and 2 self-organize into lamellar crystals. The dendronized NBI with m = 3 self-assembles into an unprecedentedly complex and ordered column that self-organizes in a columnar hexagonal periodic array. This array undergoes a continuous transition to a columnar hexagonal superlattice that does not display a first-order phase transition during analysis by differential scanning calorimetry at heating and cooling rates of 10 and 1 °C/min. These complex columnar hexagonal periodic arrays with intramolecular order could be elucidated only by a combination of powder and fiber X-ray diffraction studies and solid-state NMR experiments. The lamellar crystals self-organized from m = 1 and the two highly ordered columnar hexagonal periodic arrays of m = 3 are assembled via thermodynamically controlled processes. Since strongly electron-accepting derivatives are of great interest to replace fullerene acceptors in organic photovoltaics and for other supramolecular electronic materials, the multitechnique structural analysis methodology elaborated here must be taken into consideration in all related studies.

  19. DRD4 and TH gene polymorphisms are associated with activity, impulsivity and inattention in Siberian Husky dogs.

    PubMed

    Wan, Michele; Hejjas, Krisztina; Ronai, Zsolt; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Champagne, Frances A; Miklósi, Adám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2013-12-01

    Both dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) exon 3 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) intron 4 repeat polymorphisms have been linked to activity and impulsivity in German Shepherd dogs (GSDs). However, the results in GSDs may not be generalisable to other breeds, as allelic frequencies vary markedly among breeds. We selected the Siberian Husky for further study, because it is highly divergent from most dog breeds, including the GSD. The study sample consisted of 145 racing Siberian Huskies from Europe and North America. We found that this breed possesses seven DRD4 length variants, two to five more variants than found in other breeds. Among them was the longest known allele, previously described only in wolves. Short alleles of the DRD4 and TH repeat polymorphisms were associated with higher levels of activity, impulsivity and inattention. Siberian Huskies possessing at least one short allele of the DRD4 polymorphism displayed greater activity in a behavioural test battery than did those with two long alleles. However, the behavioural test was brief and may not have registered variation in behaviour across time and situations. Owners also completed the Dog-Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale (Dog-ADHD RS), a more general measure of activity and attention. Siberian Huskies from Europe with two short alleles of the TH polymorphism received higher ratings of inattention on the Dog-ADHD RS than did those with the long allele. Investigation of the joint effect of DRD4 and TH showed that dogs possessing long alleles at both sites were scored as less active-impulsive than were others. Our results are aligned with previous studies showing that DRD4 and TH polymorphisms are associated with activity-impulsivity related traits in dogs. However, the prevalence of variants of these genes differs across breeds, and the functional role of specific variants is unclear.

  20. Complex, compound inversion/translocation polymorphism in an ape: presumptive intermediate stage in the karyotypic evolution of the agile gibbon Hylobates agilis.

    PubMed

    Van Tuinen, P; Mootnick, A R; Kingswood, S C; Hale, D W; Kumamoto, A T

    1999-10-01

    Karyotypic variation in five gibbon species of the subgenus Hylobates (2n = 44) was assessed in 63 animals, 23 of them wild born. Acquisition of key specimens of Hylobates agilis (agile gibbon), whose karyotype had been problematic due to unresolved structural polymorphisms, led to disclosure of a compound inversion/translocation polymorphism. A polymorphic region of chromosome 8 harboring two pericentric inversions, one nested within the other, was in turn bissected by one breakpoint of a reciprocal translocation. In double-inversion + translocation heterozygotes, the theoretical meiotic pairing configuration is a double inversion loop, with four arms of a translocation quadrivalent radiating from the loop. Electron-microscopic analysis of synaptonemal complex configurations consistently revealed translocation quadrivalents but no inversion loops. Rather, nonhomologous pairing was evident in the inverted region, a condition that should preclude crossing over and the subsequent production of duplication-deficiency gametes. This is corroborated by the existence of normal offspring of compound heterozygotes, indicating that fertility may not be reduced despite the topological complexity of this polymorphic system. The distribution of inversion and translocation morphs in these taxa suggests application of cytogenetics in identifying gibbon specimens and avoiding undesirable hybridization in captive breeding efforts.

  1. Angiotensinogen and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Gene Polymorphism in Relation to Renovascular Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Kadriye Altok Onal, Baran; Gonen, Sevim; Arinsoy, Turgay; Erten, Yasemin; Ilgit, Erhan; Soylemezoglu, Oguz; Derici, Ulver; Guz, Galip; Bali, Musa; Sindel, Sukru

    2006-02-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (4G/5G) polymorphisims in relation to the occurrence of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) and recurrent stenosis. In this study, 30 patients were enrolled after angiographic demonstration of ARAS; 100 healthy subjects for AGT polymorphism and 80 healthy subjects for PAI-1 polymorphism were considered the control group. The patients were followed for a mean 46.1 {+-} 9.2 months. The patients had significantly higher frequencies of the MT genotype and the T allele than control group ({chi}{sup 2} = 18.2, p < 0.001 and {chi}{sup 2} = 11.5 p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the PAI-1 genotype and allele findings when the data for all patients were compared with that for the controls ({chi}{sup 2}= 2.45, p = 0.29 and {chi}{sup 2} = 0.019, p = 0.89). There were no significant differences in the genotype and allele findings for the patients with and without restenosis (p > 0.05). The C-reactive protein (CRP) level was higher in the patients with restenosis than in the patients without restenosis (7.694 {+-} 0.39 mg/L and 1.56 {+-} 1.08 mg/L) (p = 0.001). Our results suggest that the M235T MT genotype and T allele might be associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. The CRP level might be an independent predictor for recurrent stenosis.

  2. Genome-wide macrosynteny among Fusarium species in the Gibberella fujikuroi complex revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Lieschen; Steenkamp, Emma T; Martin, Simon H; Santana, Quentin C; Fourie, Gerda; van der Merwe, Nicolaas A; Wingfield, Michael J; Wingfield, Brenda D

    2014-01-01

    The Gibberella fujikuroi complex includes many Fusarium species that cause significant losses in yield and quality of agricultural and forestry crops. Due to their economic importance, whole-genome sequence information has rapidly become available for species including Fusarium circinatum, Fusarium fujikuroi and Fusarium verticillioides, each of which represent one of the three main clades known in this complex. However, no previous studies have explored the genomic commonalities and differences among these fungi. In this study, a previously completed genetic linkage map for an interspecific cross between Fusarium temperatum and F. circinatum, together with genomic sequence data, was utilized to consider the level of synteny between the three Fusarium genomes. Regions that are homologous amongst the Fusarium genomes examined were identified using in silico and pyrosequenced amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fragment analyses. Homology was determined using BLAST analysis of the sequences, with 777 homologous regions aligned to F. fujikuroi and F. verticillioides. This also made it possible to assign the linkage groups from the interspecific cross to their corresponding chromosomes in F. verticillioides and F. fujikuroi, as well as to assign two previously unmapped supercontigs of F. verticillioides to probable chromosomal locations. We further found evidence of a reciprocal translocation between the distal ends of chromosome 8 and 11, which apparently originated before the divergence of F. circinatum and F. temperatum. Overall, a remarkable level of macrosynteny was observed among the three Fusarium genomes, when comparing AFLP fragments. This study not only demonstrates how in silico AFLPs can aid in the integration of a genetic linkage map to the physical genome, but it also highlights the benefits of using this tool to study genomic synteny and architecture.

  3. Association of autophagy-related IRGM polymorphisms with latent versus active tuberculosis infection in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Li, Qian; Peng, Jing; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Feng; Wang, Chunyu; Wang, Xiong

    2016-03-01

    The autophagy-related immunity-related GTPase family M protein, IRGM, plays an important role in the defense against tuberculosis (TB) infection. IRGM polymorphisms are associated with TB infection susceptibility, and recent studies demonstrate host genetic differences between active and latent TB. Here, we investigated the association between IRGM polymorphisms and TB infection type in a Chinese population. We recruited 268 and 321 patients with confirmed or latent TB, respectively, and 475 TB-free healthy controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs10065172, rs10051924, and rs13361189 within IRGM were genotyped using TaqMan-based assays. Interferon-gamma release levels were tested by T-SPOT. rs10065172 (P = 0.024, OR 0.67 (95% CI 0.48-0.95)), rs10051924 (P = 0.01, OR 0.64 (95% CI 0.46-0.90)), and rs13361189 (P = 0.055, OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.51-1.01)) were associated with a protective role against latent TB progression. Haplotype analysis showed that TCC was protective for latent TB (P = 0.022, OR 0.74 (95% CI 0.57-0.96)) whereas TTC conferred a higher risk of active TB. Additionally, patients with the rs10065172 TT genotype had a higher response to TB specific antigens. Thus, IRGM polymorphism differences between latent and active TB suggests that genetic differences in autophagy might partly affect host TB infection status. PMID:26980495

  4. Enzyme-like activities of algal polysaccharide - cerium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongfeng; Sun, Jipeng; Du, Dehong; Ye, Shen; Wang, Changhong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Xue, Changhu

    2005-01-01

    Water-soluble algal polysaccharides (APS) (alginic acid, fucoidan and laminaran) possess many pharmacological activities. The results of this study showed that the APS-Ce4+ complexes have some enzyme-like activities. Fucoidan and its complex with Ce4+ have activities similar to those of SOD. The activities of laminaran, alginic acid and their complexes are not measurable. The APS do not show measurable activities in the digestion of plasmid DNA. In contrast, the APS - Ce4+ complexes show these measurable activities under the comparable condition when APS bind Ce4+ and form homogenous solutions. The laminaran - Ce4+ complex shows the most obvious activity in the digestion of plasmid DNA, pNPP and chloropy-rifos under neutral conditions.

  5. A lactotransferrin single nucleotide polymorphism demonstrates biological activity that can reduce susceptibility to caries.

    PubMed

    Fine, Daniel H; Toruner, Gokce A; Velliyagounder, Kabilan; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Godboley, Dipti; Furgang, David

    2013-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans is prominently linked to dental caries. Saliva's influence on caries is incompletely understood. Our goal was to identify a salivary protein with anti-S. mutans activity, characterize its genotype, and determine genotypic variants associated with S. mutans activity and reduced caries. An S. mutans affinity column was used to isolate active moieties from saliva obtained from a subject with minimal caries. The bound and eluted protein was identified as lactotransferrin (LTF) by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis and confirmed by Western blotting with LTF antibody. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that produced a shift from arginine (R) to lysine (K) at amino acid position 47 in the LTF antimicrobial region (rs: 1126478) killed S. mutans in vitro. Saliva from a subject with moderate caries and with the LTF "wild-type" R form at position 47 had no such activity. A pilot genetic study (n = 30) showed that KK subjects were more likely to have anti-S. mutans activity than RR subjects (P = 0.001; relative risk = 3.6; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.5 to 11.13). Pretreatment of KK saliva with antibody to LTF reduced S. mutans killing in a dose-dependent manner (P = 0.02). KK subjects were less likely to have caries (P = 0.02). A synthetic 11-mer LTF/K peptide killed S. mutans and other caries-related bacteria, while the LTF/R peptide had no effect (P = 0.01). Our results provide functional evidence that the LTF/K variant results in both anti-S. mutans activity and reduced decay. We suggest that the LTF/K variant can influence oral microbial ecology in general and caries-provoking microbes specifically. PMID:23460521

  6. A Lactotransferrin Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Demonstrates Biological Activity That Can Reduce Susceptibility to Caries

    PubMed Central

    Toruner, Gokce A.; Velliyagounder, Kabilan; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Godboley, Dipti; Furgang, David

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is prominently linked to dental caries. Saliva's influence on caries is incompletely understood. Our goal was to identify a salivary protein with anti-S. mutans activity, characterize its genotype, and determine genotypic variants associated with S. mutans activity and reduced caries. An S. mutans affinity column was used to isolate active moieties from saliva obtained from a subject with minimal caries. The bound and eluted protein was identified as lactotransferrin (LTF) by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis and confirmed by Western blotting with LTF antibody. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that produced a shift from arginine (R) to lysine (K) at amino acid position 47 in the LTF antimicrobial region (rs: 1126478) killed S. mutans in vitro. Saliva from a subject with moderate caries and with the LTF “wild-type” R form at position 47 had no such activity. A pilot genetic study (n = 30) showed that KK subjects were more likely to have anti-S. mutans activity than RR subjects (P = 0.001; relative risk = 3.6; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.5 to 11.13). Pretreatment of KK saliva with antibody to LTF reduced S. mutans killing in a dose-dependent manner (P = 0.02). KK subjects were less likely to have caries (P = 0.02). A synthetic 11-mer LTF/K peptide killed S. mutans and other caries-related bacteria, while the LTF/R peptide had no effect (P = 0.01). Our results provide functional evidence that the LTF/K variant results in both anti-S. mutans activity and reduced decay. We suggest that the LTF/K variant can influence oral microbial ecology in general and caries-provoking microbes specifically. PMID:23460521

  7. Two functional polymorphisms of ROCK2 enhance arterial stiffening through inhibiting its activity and expression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Liu, Ping-Yen; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Lin, Wen-Yi; Liao, James K; Juo, Suh-Hang H

    2015-02-01

    Derangement of Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) has been related to coronary artery disease and stroke. ROCK2, rather than ROCK1, plays a predominant role in vascular contractility. The present study aims to test (1) the associations between ROCK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and arterial stiffness, and (2) the molecular mechanism accounting for their effects. Stiffness parameters including beta (β), elasticity modulus (Ep) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were obtained by carotid ultrasonography. Seven tagging SNPs of ROCK2 were initially genotyped in 856 subjects and significant SNPs were replicated in another group of 527 subjects. Two SNPs in complete linkage disequilibrium were found to be significantly associated with arterial stiffness. The major alleles of rs978906 (A allele) and rs9808232 (C allele) were associated with stiffer arteries. SNP rs978906 was predicted to influence microRNA(miR)-1183 binding to ROCK2, while rs9808232 causes amino acid substitution. To determine their functional impact, plasmid constructs carrying different alleles of the significant SNPs were created. Compared to rs978906G-allele constructs, cells transfected with rs978906A-allele constructs had higher baseline luciferase activities and were less responsive to miR-1183 changes. Oxidized-low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) suppressed miR-1183 levels and increased ROCK2 protein amounts. For rs9808232, cells transfected with C-allele constructs had significantly higher ROCK activities than those with A-allele constructs. Leukocyte ROCK activities were further measured in 52 healthy subjects. The average ROCK activity was highest in human subjects with CC genotype at rs9808232, followed by those with AC and lowest in AA. Taken together, the present study showed that two functional SNPs of ROCK2 increase susceptibility of arterial stiffness in the Chinese population. Non-synonymous SNP rs9808232 influences ROCK2 activity, while 3' UTR SNP rs978906 affects the ROCK2 protein

  8. Two functional polymorphisms of ROCK2 enhance arterial stiffening through inhibiting its activity and expression

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Liu, Ping-Yen; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Lin, Wen-Yi; Liao, James K.; Juo, Suh-Hang H.

    2016-01-01

    Derangement of Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) has been related to coronary artery disease and stroke. ROCK2, rather than ROCK1, plays a predominant role in vascular contractility. The present study aims to test (1) the associations between ROCK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and arterial stiffness, and (2) the molecular mechanism accounting for their effects. Stiffness parameters including beta (β), elasticity modulus (Ep) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were obtained by carotid ultrasonography. Seven tagging SNPs of ROCK2 were initially genotyped in 856 subjects and significant SNPs were replicated in another group of 527 subjects. Two SNPs in complete linkage disequilibrium were found to be significantly associated with arterial stiffness. The major alleles of rs978906 (A allele) and rs9808232 (C allele) were associated with stiffer arteries. SNP rs978906 was predicted to influence microRNA(miR)-1183 binding to ROCK2, while rs9808232 causes amino acid substitution. To determine their functional impact, plasmid constructs carrying different alleles of the significant SNPs were created. Compared to rs978906G-allele constructs, cells transfected with rs978906A-allele constructs had higher baseline luciferase activities and were less responsive to miR-1183 changes. Oxidized-low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) suppressed miR-1183 levels and increased ROCK2 protein amounts. For rs9808232, cells transfected with C-allele constructs had significantly higher ROCK activities than those with A-allele constructs. Leukocyte ROCK activities were further measured in 52 healthy subjects. The average ROCK activity was highest in human subjects with CC genotype at rs9808232, followed by those with AC and lowest in AA. Taken together, the present study showed that two functional SNPs of ROCK2 increase susceptibility of arterial stiffness in the Chinese population. Non-synonymous SNP rs9808232 influences ROCK2 activity, while 3' UTR SNP rs978906 affects the ROCK2 protein

  9. Genetic association of five plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) polymorphisms and idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young Joo; Kim, Young Ran; Lee, Bo Eun; Choi, Yi Seul; Kim, Ji Hyang; Shin, Ji Eun; Rah, HyungChul; Cha, Sun Hee; Lee, Woo Sik; Kim, Nam Keun

    2013-10-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is important for maintaining pregnancy. Aberrantly increased PAI-1 levels may contribute to thrombosis and inflammation, leading to pregnancy loss. This study investigated the association of PAI-1 polymorphisms (PAI-1 rs2227631 [-844G>A], rs1799889 [-675 4G/5G], rs6092 [43G>A], rs2227694 [9785G>A], and rs7242 [11053T>G]) with idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) in Korean women. We screened 308 RPL patients and 227 control participants for five PAI-1 polymorphisms. Genotyping of PAI-1 was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. PAI-1 4G4G and -844AA/4G4G/11053GG genotypes were associated with RPL. PAI-1 -844A/4G/43G/9785G/11053G haplotype was connected to hypofibrinolytic status (i.e. increased levels of plasma PAI-1, increased numbers of platelets, reduced prothrombin time, and reduced activated partial thromboplastin time). Moreover, PAI-1 11053TG+GG frequency was positively related to plasma homocysteine and urate levels, whereas -844AA frequency was associated with plasma folate concentrations according to ordinal logistic regression analysis. Based on these results, we propose that PAI-1 -844G>A, 4G/5G, and 11053T>G polymorphisms are markers of RPL.

  10. Genetic polymorphism of the swine major histocompatibility complex ( SLA) class I genes, SLA-1, -2 and -3.

    PubMed

    Ando, Asako; Kawata, Hisako; Shigenari, Atsuko; Anzai, Tatsuya; Ota, Masao; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Sada, Masaharu; Goto, Rieko; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Aida, Yoko; Iwanaga, Takahiro; Fujimura, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Gojobori, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2003-12-01

    In order to identify and characterize genetic polymorphism of the swine major histocompatibility complex ( Mhc: SLA) class I genes, RT-PCR products of the second and third exons of the three SLA classical class I genes, SLA-1, SLA-2 and SLA-3 were subjected to nucleotide determination. These analyses allowed the identification of four, eight and seven alleles at the SLA-1, SLA-2 and SLA-3 loci, respectively, from three different breeds of miniature swine and one mixed breed. Among them, 12 alleles were novel. Construction of a phylogenetic tree using the nucleotide sequences of those 19 alleles indicated that the SLA-1 and -2 genes are more closely related to each other than to SLA-3. Selective forces operating at single amino acid sites of the SLA class I molecules were analyzed by the Adaptsite Package program. Ten positive selection sites were found at the putative antigen recognition sites (ARSs). Among the 14 positively selected sites observed in the human MHC ( HLA) classical class I molecules, eight corresponding positions in the SLA class I molecules were inferred as positively selected. On the other hand, four amino acids at the putative ARSs were identified as negatively selected in the SLA class I molecules. These results suggest that selective forces operating in the SLA class I molecules are almost similar to those of the HLA class I molecules, although several functional sites for antigen and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition by the SLA class I molecules may be different from those of the HLA class I molecules.

  11. Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major histocompatibility complex class IIβ alleles of New World ranid frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M.; Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play key roles in the vertebrate immune system. However, our understanding of the evolutionary processes and underlying genetic mechanisms shaping these genes is limited in many taxa, including amphibians, a group currently impacted by emerging infectious diseases. To further elucidate the evolution of the MHC in frogs (anurans) and develop tools for population genetics, we surveyed allelic diversity of the MHC class II ??1 domain in both genomic and complementary DNA of seven New World species in the genus Rana (Lithobates). To assign locus affiliation to our alleles, we used a "gene walking" technique to obtain intron 2 sequences that flanked MHC class II?? exon 2. Two distinct intron sequences were recovered, suggesting the presence of at least two class II?? loci in Rana. We designed a primer pair that successfully amplified an orthologous locus from all seven Rana species. In total, we recovered 13 alleles and documented trans-species polymorphism for four of the alleles. We also found quantitative evidence of selection acting on amino acid residues that are putatively involved in peptide binding and structural stability of the ??1 domain of anurans. Our results indicated that primer mismatch can result in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias, which influences the number of alleles that are recovered. Using a single locus may minimize PCR bias caused by primer mismatch, and the gene walking technique was an effective approach for generating single-copy orthologous markers necessary for future studies of MHC allelic variation in natural amphibian populations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Gene Network Polymorphism Illuminates Loss and Retention of Novel RNAi Silencing Components in the Cryptococcus Pathogenic Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Clancey, Shelly Applen; Wang, Xuying; Heitman, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a ubiquitous pathway that serves central functions throughout eukaryotes, including maintenance of genome stability and repression of transposon expression and movement. However, a number of organisms have lost their RNAi pathways, including the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis, the human pathogen Cryptococcus deuterogattii, and some human parasite pathogens, suggesting there may be adaptive benefits associated with both retention and loss of RNAi. By comparing the RNAi-deficient genome of the Pacific Northwest Outbreak C. deuterogattii strain R265 with the RNAi-proficient genomes of the Cryptococcus pathogenic species complex, we identified a set of conserved genes that were lost in R265 and all other C. deuterogattii isolates examined. Genetic and molecular analyses reveal several of these lost genes play roles in RNAi pathways. Four novel components were examined further. Znf3 (a zinc finger protein) and Qip1 (a homolog of N. crassa Qip) were found to be essential for RNAi, while Cpr2 (a constitutive pheromone receptor) and Fzc28 (a transcription factor) are involved in sex-induced but not mitosis-induced silencing. Our results demonstrate that the mitotic and sex-induced RNAi pathways rely on the same core components, but sex-induced silencing may be a more specific, highly induced variant that involves additional specialized or regulatory components. Our studies further illustrate how gene network polymorphisms involving known components of key cellular pathways can inform identification of novel elements and suggest that RNAi loss may have been a core event in the speciation of C. deuterogattii and possibly contributed to its pathogenic trajectory. PMID:26943821

  13. Effectiveness of add-on l-methylfolate therapy in a complex psychiatric illness with MTHFR C677 T genetic polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shailesh; Kumar, Pankaj; Kumar, Rajesh; Das, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    The 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene plays a central role in folate metabolism. Many studies have demonstrated an association between MTHFR C677 T variant with depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder as one of them being comorbid to other. This has justified the use of folate supplement in psychiatric disorders mainly depression but still not in various other comorbid complex psychiatric disorders. Here we have tried to show how the l-methylfolate in conjunction with the conventional psychotropic drugs can be useful in a state of such complex psychiatric phenomenon and comorbid diagnosis with genetic polymorphism of MTHFR C677 T mutation. PMID:27520898

  14. Influence of the 5-HT3A Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Childhood Sexual Trauma on Central Serotonin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Hyu Jung; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background Gene-environment interactions are important for understanding alterations in human brain function. The loudness dependence of auditory evoked potential (LDAEP) is known to reflect central serotonergic activity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 5-HT3A serotonin receptor gene are associated with psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to investigate the effect between 5-HT3A receptor gene polymorphisms and childhood sexual trauma on the LDAEP as an electrophysiological marker in healthy subjects. Methods A total of 206 healthy subjects were recruited and evaluated using the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Peak-to-peak N1/P2 was measured at five stimulus intensities, and the LDAEP was calculated as the linear-regression slope. In addition, the rs1062613 SNPs of 5-HT3A (CC, CT, and TT) were analyzed in healthy subjects. Results There was a significant interaction between scores on the CTQ-sexual abuse subscale and 5-HT3A genotype on the LDAEP. Subjects with the CC polymorphism had a significantly higher LDEAP than T carriers in the sexually abused group. In addition, CC genotype subjects in the sexually abused group showed a significantly higher LDAEP compared with CC genotype subjects in the non-sexually abused group. Conclusions Our findings suggest that people with the CC polymorphism of the 5-HT3A gene have a greater risk of developing mental health problems if they have experienced childhood sexual abuse, possibly due to low central serotonin activity. Conversely, the T polymorphism may be protective against any central serotonergic changes following childhood sexual trauma. PMID:26701104

  15. Role of Metabolic Enzymes P450 (CYP) on Activating Procarcinogen and their Polymorphisms on the Risk of Cancers.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Feng, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes are the most important metabolizing enzyme family exists among all organs. Apart from their role in the deactivation of most endogenous compounds and xenobiotics, they also mediate most procarcinogens oxidation to ultimate carcinogens. There are several modes of CYP450s activation of procarcinogens. 1) Formation of epoxide and diol-epoxides intermediates, such as CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mediates PAHs oxidation to epoxide intermediates; 2) Formation of diazonium ions, such as CYP2A6, CYP2A13 and CYP2E1 mediates activation of most nitrosamines to unstable metabolites, which can rearrange to give diazonium ions. 3) Formation of reactive semiquinones and quinines, such as CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 transformation of estradiol to catechol estrogens, subsequently formation semiquinones; 4) Formation of toxic O-esterification, such as CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 metabolizes PhIP to N(2)-acetoxy-PhIP and N(2)-sulfonyloxy-PhIP, which are carcinogenic metabolites. 5) Formation of free radical, such as CYP2E1 is involved in activation tetrachloromethane to free radicals. While for CYP2B6 and CYP2D6, only a minor role has been found in procarcinogens activation. In addition, as the gene polymorphisms reflected, the polymorphisms of CYP1A1 (-3801T/C and -4889A/G), CYP1A2 (- 163C/A and -2467T/delT), CYP1B1 (-48G/C, -119G/T and -432G/C), CYP2E1 (-1293G/C and -1053 C/T) have been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. The polymorphisms CYP1A1 (-3801T/C and -4889A/G), and CYP2E1 (PstI/Rsa and 9-bp insertion) have an association with higher risk colon cancers, whereas CYP1A2 (-163C/A and -3860G/A) polymorphism is found to be among the protective factors. The polymorphisms CYP1A1 (-3801T/C and -4889A/G), CYP1B1 -432G/C, CYP2B6 (-516G/T and -785A/G) may increase the risk of breast cancer. In conclusion, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, and CYP2E1 are responsible for most of the procarcinogens activation, and their gene polymorphisms are associated with the risk of

  16. Septin 9 Exhibits Polymorphic Binding to F-Actin and Inhibits Myosin and Cofilin Activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clayton; Dolat, Lee; Angelis, Dimitrios; Forgacs, Eva; Spiliotis, Elias T; Galkin, Vitold E

    2015-10-01

    Septins are a highly conserved family of proteins in eukaryotes that is recognized as a novel component of the cytoskeleton. Septin 9 (SEPT9) interacts directly with actin filaments and functions as an actin stress fiber cross-linking protein that promotes the maturation of nascent focal adhesions and cell migration. However, the molecular details of how SEPT9 interacts with F-actin remain unknown. Here, we use electron microscopy and image analysis to show that SEPT9 binds to F-actin in a highly polymorphic fashion. We demonstrate that the basic domain (B-domain) of the N-terminal tail of SEPT9 is responsible for actin cross-linking, while the GTP-binding domain (G-domain) does not bundle F-actin. We show that the B-domain of SEPT9 binds to three sites on F-actin, and the two of these sites overlap with the binding regions of myosin and cofilin. SEPT9 inhibits actin-dependent ATPase activity of myosin and competes with the weakly bound state of myosin for binding to F-actin. At the same time, SEPT9 significantly reduces the extent of F-actin depolymerization by cofilin. Taken together, these data suggest that SEPT9 protects actin filaments from depolymerization by cofilin and myosin and indicate a mechanism by which SEPT9 could maintain the integrity of growing and contracting actin filaments.

  17. Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘N’ Roll: Hypothesizing Common Mesolimbic Activation as a Function of Reward Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Werner, Tonia; Carnes, Stefanie; Carnes, Patrick; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Giordano, John; Marlene-Oscar-Berman; Gold, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens, a site within the ventral striatum, plays a prominent role in mediating the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, food, sex, and other addictions. Indeed, it is generally believed that this structure mandates motivated behaviors such as eating, drinking, and sexual activity, which are elicited by natural rewards and other strong incentive stimuli. This article focuses on sex addiction, but we hypothesize that there is a common underlying mechanism of action for the powerful effects that all addictions have on human motivation. That is, biological drives may have common molecular genetic antecedents, which if impaired, lead to aberrant behaviors. Based on abundant scientific support, we further hypothesize that dopaminergic genes, and possibly other candidate neurotransmitter-related gene polymorphisms, affect both hedonic and anhedonic behavioral outcomes. Genotyping studies already have linked gene polymorphic associations with alcohol and drug addictions and obesity, and we anticipate that future genotyping studies of sex addicts will provide evidence for polymorphic associations with specific clustering of sexual typologies based on clinical instrument assessments. We recommend that scientists and clinicians embark on research coupling the use of neuroimaging tools with dopaminergic agonistic agents to target specific gene polymorphisms systematically for normalizing hyper- or hypo-sexual behaviors. PMID:22641964

  18. Leptin-receptor polymorphisms relate to obesity through blunted leptin-mediated sympathetic nerve activation in a Caucasian male population.

    PubMed

    Masuo, Kazuko; Straznicky, Nora E; Lambert, Gavin W; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Sugimoto, Ken; Rakugi, Hiromi; Socratous, Florentia; Hastings, Jacqueline; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Ogihara, Toshio; Esler, Murray D

    2008-06-01

    Leptin plays a key role in the regulation of body weight through the sympathetic nervous system; however, the contributions of leptin-receptor polymorphisms to obesity and sympathetic nerve activity have not been fully clarified. In the present study, we examined the relationships between leptin-receptor polymorphisms, plasma leptin and whole-body norepinephrine (NE) spillover as an index of sympathetic nerve activity in a Caucasian male cohort. In 129 young healthy normotensive men with a wide range of body mass index (BMI) (19.4-39.5 kg/m(2)), we measured leptin-receptor polymorphisms (Gln223Arg, Lys656Asn, and Lys109Arg), plasma leptin levels, whole-body NE spillover, whole-body NE clearance, BMI and blood pressure (BP) levels in the supine position after overnight fasting. Overweight-obese (BMI>or=25 kg/m(2)) subjects had significantly greater BMI, BP levels, plasma leptin and whole-body NE spillover compared to lean (BMI<25 kg/m(2)) subjects, but the NE clearance was similar. Overweight-obese subjects had significantly higher frequencies of the Arg223 allele and the Arg223 homozygous allele of Gln223Arg and the Asn656 allele of Lys656Asn compared to lean subjects. Subjects carrying the Arg223 homozygous or the Asn656 allele had higher levels of plasma leptin, BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio, but significantly less whole-body NE spillover, especially when they were also overweight-obese. BP levels and whole-body NE clearance were similar between subjects with and without the Arg223 homozygous or Asn656 allele. No differences were found in the distributions of the Arg109 allele of Lys109Arg polymorphism between nonobese and overweight-obese subjects. In addition, BMI, BP, plasma leptin levels, whole-body NE spillover and whole-body NE clearance were similar between those with and without the Arg109 allele. Together, these findings demonstrate that leptin-receptor polymorphisms were related to the incidence of obesity in a Caucasian male

  19. Backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the A147T polymorph of mouse TSPO in complex with a high-affinity radioligand.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Łukasz; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The integral polytopic membrane protein TSPO is the target for numerous endogenous and synthetic ligands. However, the affinity of many ligands is influenced by a common polymorphism in TSPO, in which an alanine at position 147 is replaced by threonine, thereby complicating the use of several radioligands for clinical diagnosis. In contrast, the best-characterized TSPO ligand (R)-PK11195 binds with similar affinity to both variants of mitochondrial TSPO (wild-type and A147T variant). Here we report the (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the A147T polymorph of TSPO from Mus Musculus in complex with (R)-PK11195 in DPC detergent micelles. More than 90 % of all resonances were sequence-specifically assigned, demonstrating the ability to obtain high-quality spectral data for both the backbone and the side-chains of medically relevant integral membrane proteins.

  20. The role of genetic (PON1 polymorphism) and environmental factors, especially physical activity, in antioxidant function of paraoxonase.

    PubMed

    Otocka-Kmiecik, Aneta; Orłowska-Majdak, Monika

    2009-12-30

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a member of a three-gene family (PON1, PON2, and PON3). PON1 activity dominates in human plasma. It is secreted from hepatic cells and is found in the circulation bound to high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). For many years it has been known only for its ability to hydrolyze organophosphate derivatives. More recently, PON1's antioxidant activity draws attention as the enzyme was described to prevent oxidation of lipoproteins by reactive oxygen species formed during oxidative stress. PON1 was also shown to hydrolyze atherogenic products of oxidative lipid modification such as phospholipid peroxides and cholesterol ester hydroperoxides. Some studies indicate that the enzyme presents a lipolactonase activity and hydrolyzes homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL). There is growing evidence as to PON1's protective role in atherosclerosis. Genetic (PON1 polymorphism) and environmental factors and lifestyle may influence PON1 blood concentration and biological activity. Among the many recognized factors accounting for lifestyle, physical activity plays an important role. Various, often opposite, effects on PON1 status are observed in regular training and single physical activities. The results of different studies are often contradictory. It may depend on the time, intensity, and frequency of physical activity. Additionally, it seems that the effects of physical activity on PON1 blood concentration and activity are modified by environmental and lifestyle factors as well as PON1 polymorphism.

  1. Influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor VIII and von Willebrand factor genes on plasma factor VIII activity: the ARIC Study.

    PubMed

    Campos, Marco; Buchanan, Ashley; Yu, Fuli; Barbalic, Maja; Xiao, Yang; Chambless, Lloyd E; Wu, Kenneth K; Folsom, Aaron R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Dong, Jing-fei

    2012-02-23

    Factor VIII (FVIII) functions as a cofactor for factor IXa in the contact coagulation pathway and circulates in a protective complex with von Willebrand factor (VWF). Plasma FVIII activity is strongly influenced by environmental and genetic factors through VWF-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the coding and promoter sequence in the FVIII gene have been extensively studied for effects on FVIII synthesis, secretion, and activity, but impacts of non-disease-causing intronic SNPs remain largely unknown. We analyzed FVIII SNPs and FVIII activity in 10,434 healthy Americans of European (EA) or African (AA) descent in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Among covariates, age, race, diabetes, and ABO contributed 2.2%, 3.5%, 4%, and 10.7% to FVIII intersubject variation, respectively. Four intronic FVIII SNPs associated with FVIII activity and 8 with FVIII-VWF ratio in a sex- and race-dependent manner. The FVIII haplotypes AT and GCTTTT also associated with FVIII activity. Seven VWF SNPs were associated with FVIII activity in EA subjects, but no FVIII SNPs were associated with VWF Ag. These data demonstrate that intronic SNPs could directly or indirectly influence intersubject variation of FVIII activity. Further investigation may reveal novel mechanisms of regulating FVIII expression and activity. PMID:22219226

  2. Association of CD14-260 Polymorphisms, Red-complex Periodontopathogens and Gingival Crevicular Fluid Cytokine Levels with Cyclosporine A-induced Gingival Overgrowth in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yiming; Bi, Wei; Cao, Lingfeng; Yang, Yi; Chen, Jake; Yu, Youcheng

    2012-01-01

    Backgroud and Objective Genetic factors may influence the colonization of pathogenic bacteria, therefore increasing the risk for the initiation and development of periodontal disease. The present study was carried out to investigate the association of CD14-260 polymorphisms, subgingival microbiota, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) cytokine levels with cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced gingival overgrowth (GO) in renal transplant patients. Material and Methods 204 patients were dichotomized into two groups: 124 with GO and 80 without GO. The CD14-260 polymorphisms were measured using an allele-specific PCR method. The levels of periodontal pathogens were determined by real-time PCR of subgingival samples. GCF levels of IL-1β and sCD14 were detected by ELISA. Results The frequency of CD14-260 genotype CT + TT was found to be similar in both groups. Patients with GO presented increased prevalence of Pg, Td, and Tf (red complex) and significantly higher levels of IL-1β than those without GO. GO patients carrying CT+TT genotypes were found to have higher frequencies of Pg, Td, and Tf than those carrying CC genotype. Furthermore, in the presence of red complex, CT+TT genotypes were associated with higher IL-1β levels and severe GO. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the severity of GO is not dependent on age, gender and pharmacological variables, being only associated with CD14-260 genotype and red complex periodontopathogens. Conclusions No association between CD14-260 polymorphisms and the prevalence of GO was revealed in renal transplant patients administered CsA. However, CD14-260 CT+TT genotypes are associated with the prevalence of red complex periodontopathogens in GO patients, and may thus play some role in the development of severe CsA-induced GO. PMID:22934794

  3. [Polymorphism of the gene for subunit 6 of the NADh dehydrogenase complex (ND6) in ethnic russian population in Russia].

    PubMed

    Kornienko, I V; Vodolazhskiĭ, D I; Mikhalkovich, L S; Pavlichenko, G N; Ivanov, P L

    2003-01-01

    A sample of ethnic Russians of Russia was tested for polymorphism of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) gene mapping to the mtDNA region 14,170-14,569. Genetic diversity of ND6 haplotypes was estimated at 0.406, and probability of haplotype random match, at 0.598. Combined with typing the mtDNA control region, analysis of the ND6 gene polymorphism was assumed to improve the reliability of forensic identification. Several point substitutions in the ND6 gene region proved to be associated with particular transitions in the mtDNA control region; the association was characterized with the phi coefficient.

  4. Molecular identification, polymorphism, and expression analysis of major histocompatibility complex class IIA and B genes of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Xi; Chen, Song-Lin

    2006-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II has a central role in the adaptive immune system by presenting foreign peptides to the T-cell receptor. The full lengths of MHC class II A and B cDNA were cloned from turbot by homology cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE PCR), and genomic organization, molecular polymorphism, and expression of turbot class IIB gene were examined to study the function of class IIB gene in fish. The deduced amino acid sequence of turbot class II A (GenBank accession no.DQ001730) and turbot class IIB (GenBank accession no. DQ094170) had 69.8%, 67.6%, 65.5%, 59.2%, 54.5%, 52.8%, 46.2%, 46.6%, 28.3%, 28.5%, 22.2% identity and 71.5%, 70.7%, 67.1%, 68.4%, 46.7%, 53.5%, 46.7%, 50.0%, 25.2%, 29.2%, 27.6% identity with those of Japanese flounder, striped sea bass, red sea bream, cichlid, rainbow trout, Atlantic salmon, carp, zebrafish, nurse shark, mouse and human, respectively. Eleven class IIB alleles were identified from three turbot individuals. The amino acid sequence of turbot class IIB designated as Scma-DAB*0101 had 86.9%, 88.6%, 88.6%, 89.4%, 87.8%, 86.9%, 84.1%, 86.5%, 87.3%, 77.1%, and 86.9% identity with those of turbot class IIB 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 (Scma-DAB*0201- Scma-DAB*1201), respectively. Six different class IIB alleles observed in a single individual may infer the existence of three loci at least. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that turbot class IIA and B were ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues. Challenge of turbot with pathogenic bacteria, Vibrio anguillarum, resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of MHC class IIB mRNA from 24 h to 48 h after infection in liver and head kidney, and a significant decrease from 24 h to 72 h after infection in spleen, followed by an increase after 96 h, respectively.

  5. VEGF Gene Polymorphisms Affect Serum Protein Levels and Alter Disease Activity and Synovial Lesions in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jin-Ping; Wu, Yu-Zhang; Yu, Nan; Yu, Zhi-Wu; Xie, Fu-Yuan; Yuan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Background Our study investigated 2 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for their influences on serum VEGF levels, disease activity, and synovial lesions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Material/Methods Clinical information and venous blood samples were collected from 98 RA patients and 100 healthy controls. Genotyping on samples from the subjects was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Serum VEGF levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The synovial thickness and joint effusion of 28 joints were measured in RA patients, and total sharp score (TSS) and disease activity score (DAS) of 28 joints were recorded. Results The genotype and allele frequencies of VEGF rs833070 (G>A) and rs3025030 (G>C) were significantly different between RA group and control group (all P<0.05). VEGF rs833070 and rs3025030 polymorphisms were associated with increasing VEGF serum levels in the RA group (all P<0.01). Statistically significant difference was observed in DAS28 between the different genotypes of VEGF rs833070 in RA patients (P<0.05). Importantly, significant differences in synovial thickening, joint effusion and synovial angiogenesis were observed between the different genotypes of VEGF rs833070 and rs3025030 polymorphisms (all P<0.05). Conclusions Our study provides evidence that VEGF polymorphisms might be important indicators of disease activity and synovial lesions, and prognostic factors in evaluating the treatment effectiveness in RA. PMID:26825024

  6. Anticancer activity assessment of two novel binuclear platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Asadi, Zahra; Erfani, Nasrollah; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Niazi, Ali; Bahaoddini, Aminollah; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, two binuclear Pt (II) complexes, containing cis, cis-[Me2Pt (μ-NN) (μ-dppm) PtMe2] (1), and cis,cis-[Me2Pt(μ-NN)(μ dppm) Pt((CH2)4)] (2) in which NN=phthalazine and dppm=bis (diphenylphosphino) methane were evaluated for their anticancer activities and DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. These Pt (II) complexes, with the non-classical structures, demonstrated a significant anticancer activity against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes were capable to stimulate an apoptotic mechanism of cell death in the cancer cells. Using different biophysical techniques and docking simulation analysis, we indicated that these complexes were also capable to interact efficiently with DNA via a non-intercalative mechanism. According to our results, substitution of cyclopentane (in complex 2) with two methyl groups (in complex 1) results in significant improvement of the complex ability to interact with DNA and subsequently to induce the anticancer activity. Overall, these binuclear Pt (II) complexes are promising group of the non-classical potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing of highly efficient platinum anticancer drugs. PMID:27289447

  7. Bovine and water buffalo Mx2 genes: polymorphism and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Babiker, H A E; Nakatsu, Y; Yamada, K; Yoneda, A; Takada, A; Ueda, J; Hata, H; Watanabe, T

    2007-01-01

    Millennia-long selective pressure of single-strand RNA viruses on the bovine Mx locus has increased the advantages of using the bovine Mx protein to evaluate the ultimate significance of the antiviral role of Mx proteins. The conclusions of research based only on the bovine Mx1 protein showed the need for comprehensive studies that demonstrate the role of all isoforms, individually or together, especially in the presence of a second isoform, the bovine Mx2 gene. This study provides information about bovine and water buffalo Mx2 genes, as well as their allelic polymorphism and basic antiviral potential. Observation of an Mx2 cDNA sequence (2,381 bp) obtained from 15 animals from 11 breeds using primers based on a previous sequence (NCBI accession no. AF335147) revealed several nucleotide substitutions, with eight different alleles and two amino acid exchanges: Gly to Ser at position 302 and Ile to Val at position 354, though the latter was found only in the NCBI database. A water buffalo Mx2 cDNA sequence was identified for the first time, revealing 46 nucleotide substitutions with 12 amino acid variations, in addition to a 9-bp insertion in the 5' untranslated region UTR, compared with the bovine Mx2 cDNA. Transfected 3T3 cells expressing bovine Mx2 mRNAs coding Gly or Ser at position 302, water buffalo Mx2 mRNA, positive control bovine Mx1 mRNA-expressing cells, and negative control parental 3T3 were subjected to infection with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVDeltaG*-G), as were empty pCI-neo vector-transfected cells. The positive control and all cells expressing Mx2 mRNAs displayed significantly higher levels of antiviral activity against VSVDeltaG*-G (P < 0.01) than did the negative controls.

  8. Association of polymorphisms in the dopamine D4 receptor gene and the activity-impulsivity endophenotype in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hejjas, K; Vas, J; Topal, J; Szantai, E; Ronai, Z; Szekely, A; Kubinyi, E; Horvath, Z; Sasvari-Szekely, M; Miklosi, A

    2007-12-01

    A variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism in exon 3 of the human dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4) has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Rodents possess no analogous repeat sequence, whereas a similar tandem repeat polymorphism of the DRD4 gene was identified in dogs, horses and chimpanzees. Here, we present a genetic association study of the DRD4 VNTR and the activity-impulsivity dimension of the recently validated dog-ADHD Rating Scale. To avoid false positives arising from population stratification, a single breed of dogs (German shepherd) was studied. Two DRD4 alleles (referred to as 2 and 3a) were detected in this breed, and genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. For modelling distinct environmental conditions, 'pet' and 'police' German shepherds were characterized. Police German shepherds possessing at least one 3a allele showed significantly higher scores in the activity-impulsivity dimension of the dog-ADHD Rating Scale than dogs without this allele (P = 0.0180). This difference was not significant in pet German shepherds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between a candidate gene and a behaviour trait in dogs, and it reinforces the functional role of DRD4 exon 3 polymorphism. PMID:17986156

  9. Association of polymorphisms in the dopamine D4 receptor gene and the activity-impulsivity endophenotype in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hejjas, K; Vas, J; Topal, J; Szantai, E; Ronai, Z; Szekely, A; Kubinyi, E; Horvath, Z; Sasvari-Szekely, M; Miklosi, A

    2007-12-01

    A variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism in exon 3 of the human dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4) has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Rodents possess no analogous repeat sequence, whereas a similar tandem repeat polymorphism of the DRD4 gene was identified in dogs, horses and chimpanzees. Here, we present a genetic association study of the DRD4 VNTR and the activity-impulsivity dimension of the recently validated dog-ADHD Rating Scale. To avoid false positives arising from population stratification, a single breed of dogs (German shepherd) was studied. Two DRD4 alleles (referred to as 2 and 3a) were detected in this breed, and genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. For modelling distinct environmental conditions, 'pet' and 'police' German shepherds were characterized. Police German shepherds possessing at least one 3a allele showed significantly higher scores in the activity-impulsivity dimension of the dog-ADHD Rating Scale than dogs without this allele (P = 0.0180). This difference was not significant in pet German shepherds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between a candidate gene and a behaviour trait in dogs, and it reinforces the functional role of DRD4 exon 3 polymorphism.

  10. Complex polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein 2 gene and its contribution to antimalarial response.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Maria Isabel; Osório, Nuno S; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Franzén, Oscar; Dahlstrom, Sabina; Lum, J Koji; Nosten, Francois; Gil, José Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has the capacity to escape the actions of essentially all antimalarial drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins are known to cause multidrug resistance in a large range of organisms, including the Apicomplexa parasites. P. falciparum genome analysis has revealed two genes coding for the multidrug resistance protein (MRP) type of ABC transporters: Pfmrp1, previously associated with decreased parasite drug susceptibility, and the poorly studied Pfmrp2. The role of Pfmrp2 polymorphisms in modulating sensitivity to antimalarial drugs has not been established. We herein report a comprehensive account of the Pfmrp2 genetic variability in 46 isolates from Thailand. A notably high frequency of 2.8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/kb was identified for this gene, including some novel SNPs. Additionally, we found that Pfmrp2 harbors a significant number of microindels, some previously not reported. We also investigated the potential association of the identified Pfmrp2 polymorphisms with altered in vitro susceptibility to several antimalarials used in artemisinin-based combination therapy and with parasite clearance time. Association analysis suggested Pfmrp2 polymorphisms modulate the parasite's in vitro response to quinoline antimalarials, including chloroquine, piperaquine, and mefloquine, and association with in vivo parasite clearance. In conclusion, our study reveals that the Pfmrp2 gene is the most diverse ABC transporter known in P. falciparum with a potential role in antimalarial drug resistance.

  11. Angiotensin I - Converting Enzyme Gene Polymorphism and Activity in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Aleksandra; Asanin, Milika; Jovanovic-Markovic, Zagorka; Alavantic, Dragan; Majkic-Singh, Nada

    2011-01-01

    The possible association of ACE polymorphism with ischemic stroke (IS) was evaluated in 65 patients with IS and 330 age and BMI-matched controls. ACE genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There was no significant difference in ACE genotype/allele frequencies between case and control group (p>0.05). Patients with D allele had 4,7 times higher risk for large vessel IS than healthy persons D allele possessors. Persons with D allele had 9.2 times higher risk for large vessel disease than small vessel disease. These data suggest a possible association of ACE gene polymorphism with pathogenesis of large vessel IS.

  12. Latent Hierarchical Model of Temporal Structure for Complex Activity Classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limin; Qiao, Yu; Tang, Xiaoou

    2014-02-01

    Modeling the temporal structure of sub-activities is an important yet challenging problem in complex activity classification. This paper proposes a latent hierarchical model (LHM) to describe the decomposition of complex activity into sub-activities in a hierarchical way. The LHM has a tree-structure, where each node corresponds to a video segment (sub-activity) at certain temporal scale. The starting and ending time points of each sub-activity are represented by two latent variables, which are automatically determined during the inference process. We formulate the training problem of the LHM in a latent kernelized SVM framework and develop an efficient cascade inference method to speed up classification. The advantages of our methods come from: 1) LHM models the complex activity with a deep structure, which is decomposed into sub-activities in a coarse-to-fine manner and 2) the starting and ending time points of each segment are adaptively determined to deal with the temporal displacement and duration variation of sub-activity. We conduct experiments on three datasets: 1) the KTH; 2) the Hollywood2; and 3) the Olympic Sports. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the LHM in complex activity classification. With dense features, our LHM achieves the state-of-the-art performance on the Hollywood2 dataset and the Olympic Sports dataset.

  13. Frequency and polymorphism of simple sequence repeats in a contiguous 685-kb DNA sequence containing the human T-cell receptor {beta}-chain gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Charmley, P.; Concannon, P.; Hood, L.; Rowen, L.

    1995-10-10

    The human T-cell receptor {beta}-chain (TCRB) gene complex spans 575 kb in chromosome region 7q35 and has been the subject of a large-scale DNA sequencing effort. A contiguous 685-kb DNA sequence from this region was searched by computer analysis for the occurrence of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites) with core sequence lengths of 2-5 nucleotides. Twenty-nine such microsatellites of repeat number n {ge} 9 were found, with the majority being dinucleotide repeats. By PCR analysis, 19 were found to be polymorphic in repeat number, thus averaging one per 36 kb. These polymorphic di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats had between 3 and 15 differently sized alleles each. The potential usefulness of these TCRB microsatellites for detecting disease susceptibility alleles was examined by measuring the linkage disequilibrium between these markers and flanking biallelic mutations. All but 4 microsatellites (79%) demonstrated significant linkage disequilibrium (P < 0.0001). This present study highlights the utility and potential outcomes of large-scale DNA sequencing for the identification of polymorphic simple sequence repeats. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Repression and activation by multiprotein complexes that alter chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Kingston, R E; Bunker, C A; Imbalzano, A N

    1996-04-15

    Recent studies have provided strong evidence that macromolecular complexes are used in the cell to remodel chromatin structure during activation and to create an inaccessible structure during repression, Although there is not yet any rigorous demonstration that modification of chromatin structure plays a direct, causal role in either activation or repression, there is sufficient smoke to indicate the presence of a blazing inferno nearby. It is clear that complexes that remodel chromatin are tractable in vitro; hopefully this will allow the establishment of systems that provide a direct analysis of the role that remodeling might play in activation. These studies indicate that establishment of functional systems to corroborate the elegant genetic studies on repression might also be tractable. As the mechanistic effects of these complexes are sorted out, it will become important to understand how the complexes are regulated. In many of the instances discussed above, the genes whose products make up these complexes were identified in genetic screens for effects on developmental processes. This implies a regulation of the activity of these complexes in response to developmental cues and further implies that the work to fully understand these complexes will occupy a generation of scientists.

  15. 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene polymorphisms, dietary linoleic acid, and risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2008-10-01

    The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid 5-lipoxygenase pathway has been shown to play a role in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study among Latina, African-American, and White women from the San Francisco Bay area to examine the association of the 5-lipoxygenase gene (ALOX5) and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene (ALOX5AP) with breast cancer risk. Three ALOX5AP polymorphisms [poly(A) microsatellite, -4900 A>G (rs4076128), and -3472 A>G (rs4073259)] and three ALOX5 polymorphisms [Sp1-binding site (-GGGCGG-) variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism, -1279 G>T (rs6593482), and 760 G>A (rs2228065)] were genotyped in 802 cases and 888 controls. We did not find significant main effects of ALOX5 and ALOX5AP genotypes on breast cancer risk that were consistent across race or ethnicity; however, there was a significant interaction between the ALOX5AP -4900 A>G polymorphism and dietary linoleic acid intake (P=0.03). Among women consuming a diet high in linoleic acid (top quartile of intake, >17.4 g/d), carrying the AA genotype was associated with higher breast cancer risk (age- and race-adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.9) compared with carrying genotypes AG or GG. Among women consuming

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism, factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutations and the risk of VTE recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sundquist, Kristina; Wang, Xiao; Svensson, Peter J; Sundquist, Jan; Hedelius, Anna; Larsson Lönn, Sara; Zöller, Bengt; Memon, Ashfaque A

    2015-11-25

    Plasminogen-activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is an important inhibitor of the plasminogen/plasmin system. PAI-1 levels are influenced by the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 promoter. We investigated the relationship between the PAI-1 polymorphism and VTE recurrence, and its possible modification by factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PTM) mutations. Patients (n=1,069) from the Malmö Thrombophilia Study were followed from discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment until diagnosis of VTE recurrence or the end of the study (maximum follow-up 9.8 years). One hundred twenty-seven patients (11.9 %) had VTE recurrence. PAI-1 was genotyped by TaqMan PCR. Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and acquired risk factors of VTE showed no evidence of an association between PAI-1 genotype and risk of VTE recurrence in the study population as a whole. However, by including an interaction term in the analysis we showed that FVL but not PTM modified the effect of PAI-1 genotype: patients with the 4G allele plus FVL had a higher risk of VTE recurrence [hazard ratio (HR) =2.3, 95 % confidence interval (CI) =1.5-3.3] compared to patients with the 4G allele but no FVL (reference group) or FVL irrespective of PAI-1 genotype (HR=1.8, 95 % CI=1.3-2.5). Compared to reference group, 5G allele irrespective of FVL was associated with lower risk of VTE recurrence only when compared with 4G allele together with FVL. In conclusion, FVL has a modifying effect on PAI-1 polymorphism in relation to risk of VTE recurrence. The role of PAI-1 polymorphism as a risk factor of recurrent VTE may be FVL dependent.

  17. Sequencing of the genus Arabidopsis identifies a complex history of nonbifurcating speciation and abundant trans-specific polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Polina Yu; Hohmann, Nora; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Ali, Jamshaid; Muir, Graham; Guggisberg, Alessia; Paape, Tim; Schmid, Karl; Fedorenko, Olga M; Holm, Svante; Säll, Torbjörn; Schlötterer, Christian; Marhold, Karol; Widmer, Alex; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute; Koch, Marcus A; Nordborg, Magnus

    2016-09-01

    The notion of species as reproductively isolated units related through a bifurcating tree implies that gene trees should generally agree with the species tree and that sister taxa should not share polymorphisms unless they diverged recently and should be equally closely related to outgroups. It is now possible to evaluate this model systematically. We sequenced multiple individuals from 27 described taxa representing the entire Arabidopsis genus. Cluster analysis identified seven groups, corresponding to described species that capture the structure of the genus. However, at the level of gene trees, only the separation of Arabidopsis thaliana from the remaining species was universally supported, and, overall, the amount of shared polymorphism demonstrated that reproductive isolation was considerably more recent than the estimated divergence times. We uncovered multiple cases of past gene flow that contradict a bifurcating species tree. Finally, we showed that the pattern of divergence differs between gene ontologies, suggesting a role for selection. PMID:27428747

  18. Assembly of a Notch transcriptional activation complex requires multimerization.

    PubMed

    Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Kaplan, Fred M; Weaver, Kelly L; VanWye, Jeffrey D; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Robbins, David J; Capobianco, Anthony J

    2011-04-01

    Notch transmembrane receptors direct essential cellular processes, such as proliferation and differentiation, through direct cell-to-cell interactions. Inappropriate release of the intracellular domain of Notch (N(ICD)) from the plasma membrane results in the accumulation of deregulated nuclear N(ICD) that has been linked to human cancers, notably T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Nuclear N(ICD) forms a transcriptional activation complex by interacting with the coactivator protein Mastermind-like 1 and the DNA binding protein CSL (for CBF-1/Suppressor of Hairless/Lag-1) to regulate target gene expression. Although it is well understood that N(ICD) forms a transcriptional activation complex, little is known about how the complex is assembled. In this study, we demonstrate that N(ICD) multimerizes and that these multimers function as precursors for the stepwise assembly of the Notch activation complex. Importantly, we demonstrate that the assembly is mediated by N(ICD) multimers interacting with Skip and Mastermind. These interactions form a preactivation complex that is then resolved by CSL to form the Notch transcriptional activation complex on DNA.

  19. Changes in complex spike activity during classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Anders; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Wetmore, Daniel Z.; Hesslow, Germund

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is necessary for adaptively timed conditioned responses (CRs) in eyeblink conditioning. During conditioning, Purkinje cells acquire pause responses or “Purkinje cell CRs” to the conditioned stimuli (CS), resulting in disinhibition of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), allowing them to activate motor nuclei that control eyeblinks. This disinhibition also causes inhibition of the inferior olive (IO), via the nucleo-olivary pathway (N-O). Activation of the IO, which relays the unconditional stimulus (US) to the cortex, elicits characteristic complex spikes in Purkinje cells. Although Purkinje cell activity, as well as stimulation of the CN, is known to influence IO activity, much remains to be learned about the way that learned changes in simple spike firing affects the IO. In the present study, we analyzed changes in simple and complex spike firing, in extracellular Purkinje cell records, from the C3 zone, in decerebrate ferrets undergoing training in a conditioning paradigm. In agreement with the N-O feedback hypothesis, acquisition resulted in a gradual decrease in complex spike activity during the conditioned stimulus, with a delay that is consistent with the long N-O latency. Also supporting the feedback hypothesis, training with a short interstimulus interval (ISI), which does not lead to acquisition of a Purkinje cell CR, did not cause a suppression of complex spike activity. In contrast, observations that extinction did not lead to a recovery in complex spike activity and the irregular patterns of simple and complex spike activity after the conditioned stimulus are less conclusive. PMID:25140129

  20. Estrogen Receptor-Beta Gene Polymorphism in women with Breast Cancer at the Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Iran

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    ER-alpha and ER-beta genes have been proven to play a significant role in breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies have revealed that age-incidence patterns of breast cancer in Middle East differ from those in the Western countries. Two selected coding regions in the ER-β gene (exons 3 and 7) were scanned in Iranian women with breast cancer (150) and in healthy individuals (147). PCR single-strand conformation polymorphism was performed. A site of silent single nucleotide polymorphism was found only on exon 7. The SNP was found only in breast cancer patients (5.7%) (χ2 = 17.122, P = 0.01). Codon 392 (C1176G) of allele 1 was found to have direct association with the occurrence of lymph node metastasis. Our data suggest that ER-β polymorphism in exon 7 codon 392 (C1176G) is correlated with various aspects of breast cancer and lymph node metastasis in our group of patients. PMID:20604969

  1. Active community profiling via capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of amplified 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hiibel, Sage R; Pruden, Amy; Crimi, Barbara; Reardon, Kenneth F

    2010-12-01

    Here, we report the validation and advancement of a high-throughput method for fingerprinting the active members of a microbial community. This method, termed active community profiling (ACP), provides information about both the composition and the activity of mixed microbial cultures via comparative measurements of amplified 16S rRNA (RNA) and 16S rRNA genes (DNA). Capillary electrophoresis is used to resolve single-strand conformation polymorphisms of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) products, producing electropherograms representative of the community structure. Active members of the community are distinguished by elevated RNA:DNA peak area ratios. Chemostat experiments with defined populations were conducted to validate the ACP approach. Using a pure culture of Escherichia coli, a direct correlation was found between the growth rate and the RNA:DNA peak ratio. In a second validation experiment, a binary culture of E. coli and Pseudomonas putida was subjected to a controlled environmental change consisting of a shift to anaerobic conditions. ACP revealed the expected cessation of growth of P. putida, an obligate aerobe, while the corresponding DNA-only analysis indicated no change in the culture. Finally, ACP was applied to a complex microbial community, and a novel binning approach was demonstrated for integrating the RNA and DNA electropherograms. ACP thus represents a significant advance from traditional DNA-based profiling techniques, which do not distinguish active from inactive or dead cells, and is well suited for high-throughput community analysis.

  2. Measuring MAP kinase activity in immune complex assays.

    PubMed

    Cherkasova, Vera A

    2006-11-01

    I present an overview of published methods for measuring mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity on endogenous associated substrates, exogenously added substrates as well as determination of activation loop phosphorylation as a read-out of kinase activity in vivo. Detailed procedures for these assays are given for two MAP kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 and compared with other published protocols, including the protocols for Hog1 and Mpk1 MAPKs. Measuring kinase activity in immune complex assays can serve as an approach for identification of potential substrates of protein kinases as well as for detecting other kinase-associated proteins. PMID:16890454

  3. Two polymorphs of 4-(4-hexyloxyphenyl)-2,6-di(pyrazin-2-yl)pyridine and the crystal structure of its copper(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Yuan Zhuo; Yang, Chengxiong; Liu, E.; Fettinger, James C.; Zhang, Guoqi

    2016-04-01

    4-(4-Hexyloxyphenyl)-2,6-di(pyrazin-2-yl)pyridine (1), an analogue of the archetypal ligand, 2,2‧:6‧,2″-terpyridine containing additional outer N-donating sets is synthesized through the facile one-step Kröhnke condensation reaction. It is observed that different crystallization conditions affect the molecular packing in 1 and as a result two crystal polymorphs are resolved via single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Distinct intermolecular π…π interactions were found to play a crucial role in driving the formation of polymorphism. The complexation of this ligand with copper(II) dichloride resulted in the formation of a mononuclear complex with CuII being in the chelating cavity of 1. X-ray structural analysis confirms that this is the only product even though the synthesis was conducted under various conditions, remarkably different from the known structure with three CuII cores.

  4. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer.

  5. Rhenium complexes with visible-light-induced anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Kastl, Anja; Dieckmann, Sandra; Wähler, Kathrin; Völker, Timo; Kastl, Lena; Merkel, Anna Lena; Vultur, Adina; Shannan, Batool; Harms, Klaus; Ocker, Matthias; Parak, Wolfgang J; Herlyn, Meenhard; Meggers, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Shedding light on the matter: Rhenium(I) indolato complexes with highly potent visible-light-triggered antiproliferative activity (complex 1: EC50 light=0.1 μM vs EC50 dark=100 μM) in 2D- and 3D-organized cancer cells are reported and can be traced back to an efficient generation of singlet oxygen, causing rapid morphological changes and an induction of apoptosis.

  6. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer. PMID:27218801

  7. Prevalence of coagulation factor XIII and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene polymorphisms among Egyptian women suffering from unexplained primary recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Elmahgoub, Iman Rifaat; Afify, Reham Abdelaleem; Abdel Aal, Asmaa Ahmed; El-Sherbiny, Walid Sayed

    2014-06-01

    Recurrent miscarriage (RM) is an obstetric challenge. Polymorphisms of factor XIII (FXIII) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may cause an imbalance between coagulation and fibrinolysis that can end in RM. The aim of the work was to determine the prevalence of FXIII Val34Leu and PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphisms in Egyptian women presenting with unexplained primary first trimester RM. Genotyping of 120 unexplained primary first trimester RM patients and 130 healthy controls by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of target genes followed by the allele-specific restriction enzyme digestion (RFLP technique). Among the cases, 67.5% of individuals had wild-type FXIII; 21.7% were heterozygous and 10.8% were homozygous for the FXIII Val34Leu polymorphism. Among controls, the proportions were 89.2%, 8.5% and 2.3% respectively. In addition, comparison between the two groups regarding Leu and 4G allele frequencies showed statistically significant differences (P values=0.0001 and 0.027 respectively). RM is more frequent in women with combined polymorphisms than in women with a single gene polymorphism (RR=3.91; OR=4.51; 95% CI=1.79-11.38; P=0.002). FXIII Val34Leu and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms are prevalent in Egyptian women, with unexplained primary first trimester RM and combined polymorphisms statistically increasing the risk.

  8. Interaction between single nucleotide polymorphism in catalase gene and catalase activity under the conditions of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Komina, A V; Korostileva, K A; Gyrylova, S N; Belonogov, R N; Ruksha, T G

    2012-01-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme the activity of which is crucial for the protection against damage caused by reactive oxygen species. The -262C>T polymorphism in the promoter region of catalase gene was found to be associated with altered catalase levels. In this study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells catalase activity was measured after H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. C/T and T/T genotypes were associated with the decrease of catalase levels in contrast to C/C donors who had elevated catalase activity in the presence of 0.4 and 0.7 mM H(2)O(2). Genotype-dependent response of catalase activity to oxidative stress might be related to the predisposition of catalase mutant allele carriers to disorders mediated by oxidative stress.

  9. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Thomas J.; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. Active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks with programmable control of local composition. PMID:26396254

  10. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale.

    PubMed

    Ober, Thomas J; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2015-10-01

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. Active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks with programmable control of local composition. PMID:26396254

  11. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale.

    PubMed

    Ober, Thomas J; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2015-10-01

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. Active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks with programmable control of local composition.

  12. Water-soluble ruthenium complexes bearing activity against protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Sarniguet, Cynthia; Toloza, Jeannette; Cipriani, Micaella; Lapier, Michel; Vieites, Marisol; Toledano-Magaña, Yanis; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Moreno, Virtudes; Maya, Juan Diego; Azar, Claudio Olea; Gambino, Dinorah; Otero, Lucía

    2014-06-01

    Parasitic illnesses are major causes of human disease and misery worldwide. Among them, both amebiasis and Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasites, Entamoeba histolytica and Trypanosoma cruzi, are responsible for thousands of annual deaths. The lack of safe and effective chemotherapy and/or the appearance of current drug resistance make the development of novel pharmacological tools for their treatment relevant. In this sense, within the framework of the medicinal inorganic chemistry, metal-based drugs appear to be a good alternative to find a pharmacological answer to parasitic diseases. In this work, novel ruthenium complexes [RuCl2(HL)(HPTA)2]Cl2 with HL=bioactive 5-nitrofuryl containing thiosemicarbazones and PTA=1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane have been synthesized and fully characterized. PTA was included as co-ligand in order to modulate complexes aqueous solubility. In fact, obtained complexes were water soluble. Their activity against T. cruzi and E. histolytica was evaluated in vitro. [RuCl2(HL4)(HPTA)2]Cl2 complex, with HL4=N-phenyl-5-nitrofuryl-thiosemicarbazone, was the most active compound against both parasites. In particular, it showed an excellent activity against E. histolytica (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50)=5.2 μM), even higher than that of the reference drug metronidazole. In addition, this complex turns out to be selective for E. histolytica (selectivity index (SI)>38). The potential mechanism of antiparasitic action of the obtained ruthenium complexes could involve oxidative stress for both parasites. Additionally, complexes could interact with DNA as second potential target by an intercalative-like mode. Obtained results could be considered a contribution in the search for metal compounds that could be active against multiple parasites. PMID:24740394

  13. Water-soluble ruthenium complexes bearing activity against protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Sarniguet, Cynthia; Toloza, Jeannette; Cipriani, Micaella; Lapier, Michel; Vieites, Marisol; Toledano-Magaña, Yanis; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Moreno, Virtudes; Maya, Juan Diego; Azar, Claudio Olea; Gambino, Dinorah; Otero, Lucía

    2014-06-01

    Parasitic illnesses are major causes of human disease and misery worldwide. Among them, both amebiasis and Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasites, Entamoeba histolytica and Trypanosoma cruzi, are responsible for thousands of annual deaths. The lack of safe and effective chemotherapy and/or the appearance of current drug resistance make the development of novel pharmacological tools for their treatment relevant. In this sense, within the framework of the medicinal inorganic chemistry, metal-based drugs appear to be a good alternative to find a pharmacological answer to parasitic diseases. In this work, novel ruthenium complexes [RuCl2(HL)(HPTA)2]Cl2 with HL=bioactive 5-nitrofuryl containing thiosemicarbazones and PTA=1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane have been synthesized and fully characterized. PTA was included as co-ligand in order to modulate complexes aqueous solubility. In fact, obtained complexes were water soluble. Their activity against T. cruzi and E. histolytica was evaluated in vitro. [RuCl2(HL4)(HPTA)2]Cl2 complex, with HL4=N-phenyl-5-nitrofuryl-thiosemicarbazone, was the most active compound against both parasites. In particular, it showed an excellent activity against E. histolytica (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50)=5.2 μM), even higher than that of the reference drug metronidazole. In addition, this complex turns out to be selective for E. histolytica (selectivity index (SI)>38). The potential mechanism of antiparasitic action of the obtained ruthenium complexes could involve oxidative stress for both parasites. Additionally, complexes could interact with DNA as second potential target by an intercalative-like mode. Obtained results could be considered a contribution in the search for metal compounds that could be active against multiple parasites.

  14. CURRENT AND KINETIC HELICITY OF LONG-LIVED ACTIVITY COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Komm, Rudolf; Gosain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    We study long-lived activity complexes and their current helicity at the solar surface and their kinetic helicity below the surface. The current helicity has been determined from synoptic vector magnetograms from the NSO/SOLIS facility, and the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows has been determined with ring-diagram analysis applied to full-disk Dopplergrams from NSO/GONG and SDO/HMI. Current and kinetic helicity of activity complexes follow the hemispheric helicity rule with mainly positive values (78%; 78%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 31%) in the southern hemisphere and negative ones (80%; 93%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 22% and 14%, respectively) in the northern hemisphere. The locations with the dominant sign of kinetic helicity derived from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and SDO/HMI data are more organized than those of the secondary sign even if they are not part of an activity complex, while locations with the secondary sign are more fragmented. This is the case for both hemispheres even for the northern one where it is not as obvious visually due to the large amount of magnetic activity present as compared to the southern hemisphere. The current helicity shows a similar behavior. The dominant sign of current helicity is the same as that of kinetic helicity for the majority of the activity complexes (83% with a 95% confidence level of 15%). During the 24 Carrington rotations analyzed here, there is at least one longitude in each hemisphere where activity complexes occur repeatedly throughout the epoch. These ''active'' longitudes are identifiable as locations of strong current and kinetic helicity of the same sign.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) rs1801282 C>G polymorphism is associated with cancer susceptibility in asians: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Heping; Tang, Weifeng; Kang, Mingqiang; Liu, Tianyun; Guo, Zengqing; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) is related to inflammation and plays an important role in the development of cancer. PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism might influence the risk of cancer by regulating production of PPARG gene. Hence, a comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to explore the association of PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism with cancer susceptibility. An extensive search of PubMed and Embase databases for all relevant publications was carried out. A total of 38 publications with 16,844 cancer cases and 23,736 controls for PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism were recruited in our study. Our results indicated that PPARG rs1801282 C>G variants were associated with an increased cancer risk in Asian populations and gastric cancer. In summary, the findings suggest that PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism may play a crucial role in malignant transformation and the development of cancer. PMID:26550180

  16. Comparison of Solar Active Region Complexity Andgeomagnetic Activity from 1996 TO 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanskanen, E. I.; Nikbakhsh, S.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Hackman, T.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the influence of magnetic complexity of solar Active Regions (ARs)on geomagnetic activity from 1996 to 2014. Sunspots are visual indicators of ARswhere the solar magnetic field is disturbed. We have used International, American,Space Environment Service Center (SESC) and Space Weather Prediction Center(SWPC) sunspot numbers to examine ARs. Major manifestations of solar magneticactivity, such as flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), are associated withARs. For this study we chose the Mount Wilson scheme. It classifies ARs in terms oftheir magnetic topology from the least complex (?) to the most complex one ( ?).Several cases have been found where the more complex structures produce strongerflares and CMEs than the less complex ones. We have a list of identified substormsavailable with different phases and their durations. This will be compared to ourmagnetic complexity data to analyse the effects of active region magnetic complexityto the magnetic activity on the vicinity of the Earth.

  17. [Polymer Complexes of Ofloxacin and Their Antibacterial Activity].

    PubMed

    Ananyeva, E P; Baranov, S S; Karavaeva, A V; Borisenko, M S; Solovskiy, M V; Zacharova, N V; Prazdnikova, T A; Tarabukina, E B

    2014-01-01

    To lower the toxicity and to prolong the action of the monofluoroquinolone ofloxacin, its water-soluble polymer complexes were developed. Cationic copolymers of N-vinylpyrrolidone (VP) with 2-aminoethylmethacrylate (2-AEM) and its hydrochloride (2-AEM-HCl), containing 10.9-28.3 mol. % -NH2 or -NH3Cl group with the molecular mass (MM) of 10500 to 89000 were synthesized as the complex-forming polymers. The cationic copolymers showed their own antimicrobial activity. The polymer complexes contained 18-36% of fluoroquinolone and had high antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and E. coli, that increased with an increase of the ofloxacin content in the complex and a decrease of its MM. The kinetic studies on the ofloxacin release from its polymer complex with MM of 60000, containing 36% of fluoroquinolone revealed prolongation of the medicinal substance release from the complex in the buffer solution at pH 2.0 and a temperature of 37 degrees C. The acute toxicity tests on mice with intraperitoneal administration of ofloxacin and copolymer VP containing 20.8 mol. % -NH3Cl group (MM of 51000) showed that ofloxacin was a nontoxic antimicrobial and the polymer carrier was a low toxic substance.

  18. Environmental layout complexity affects neural activity during navigation in humans.

    PubMed

    Slone, Edward; Burles, Ford; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Navigating large-scale surroundings is a fundamental ability. In humans, it is commonly assumed that navigational performance is affected by individual differences, such as age, sex, and cognitive strategies adopted for orientation. We recently showed that the layout of the environment itself also influences how well people are able to find their way within it, yet it remains unclear whether differences in environmental complexity are associated with changes in brain activity during navigation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how the brain responds to a change in environmental complexity by asking participants to perform a navigation task in two large-scale virtual environments that differed solely in interconnection density, a measure of complexity defined as the average number of directional choices at decision points. The results showed that navigation in the simpler, less interconnected environment was faster and more accurate relative to the complex environment, and such performance was associated with increased activity in a number of brain areas (i.e. precuneus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus) known to be involved in mental imagery, navigation, and memory. These findings provide novel evidence that environmental complexity not only affects navigational behaviour, but also modulates activity in brain regions that are important for successful orientation and navigation.

  19. Environmental layout complexity affects neural activity during navigation in humans.

    PubMed

    Slone, Edward; Burles, Ford; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Navigating large-scale surroundings is a fundamental ability. In humans, it is commonly assumed that navigational performance is affected by individual differences, such as age, sex, and cognitive strategies adopted for orientation. We recently showed that the layout of the environment itself also influences how well people are able to find their way within it, yet it remains unclear whether differences in environmental complexity are associated with changes in brain activity during navigation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how the brain responds to a change in environmental complexity by asking participants to perform a navigation task in two large-scale virtual environments that differed solely in interconnection density, a measure of complexity defined as the average number of directional choices at decision points. The results showed that navigation in the simpler, less interconnected environment was faster and more accurate relative to the complex environment, and such performance was associated with increased activity in a number of brain areas (i.e. precuneus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus) known to be involved in mental imagery, navigation, and memory. These findings provide novel evidence that environmental complexity not only affects navigational behaviour, but also modulates activity in brain regions that are important for successful orientation and navigation. PMID:26990572

  20. C-H bond activation by f-block complexes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L; McMullon, Max W; Rieb, Julia; Kühn, Fritz E

    2015-01-01

    Most homogeneous catalysis relies on the design of metal complexes to trap and convert substrates or small molecules to value-added products. Organometallic lanthanide compounds first gave a tantalizing glimpse of their potential for catalytic C-H bond transformations with the selective cleavage of one C-H bond in methane by bis(permethylcyclopentadienyl)lanthanide methyl [(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Ln(CH3 )] complexes some 25 years ago. Since then, numerous metal complexes from across the periodic table have been shown to selectively activate hydrocarbon C-H bonds, but the challenges of closing catalytic cycles still remain; many f-block complexes show great potential in this important area of chemistry.

  1. Effect of cyclodextrin complexation on phenylpropanoids’ solubility and antioxidant activity

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Miriana; Landy, David; Auezova, Lizette; Greige-Gerges, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Summary The complexation abilities of five cyclodextrins (CDs) with seven phenylpropanoids (PPs) were evaluated by UV–visible spectroscopy, phase solubility studies and molecular modeling. Formation constants (K f), complexation efficiency (CE), PP:CD molar ratio, increase in formulation bulk and complexation energy were assessed. All complexes exhibited a 1:1 stoichiometry but their stability was influenced by the nature and the position of the phenyl ring substituents. A relationship between the intrinsic solubility of guests (S 0) and the solubilizing potential of CD was proposed. Molecular modeling was used to investigate the complementarities between host and guest. Finally, the antioxidant activity of encapsulated PPs was evaluated by scavenging of the stable DPPH radical. PMID:25298799

  2. C-H bond activation by f-block complexes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L; McMullon, Max W; Rieb, Julia; Kühn, Fritz E

    2015-01-01

    Most homogeneous catalysis relies on the design of metal complexes to trap and convert substrates or small molecules to value-added products. Organometallic lanthanide compounds first gave a tantalizing glimpse of their potential for catalytic C-H bond transformations with the selective cleavage of one C-H bond in methane by bis(permethylcyclopentadienyl)lanthanide methyl [(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Ln(CH3 )] complexes some 25 years ago. Since then, numerous metal complexes from across the periodic table have been shown to selectively activate hydrocarbon C-H bonds, but the challenges of closing catalytic cycles still remain; many f-block complexes show great potential in this important area of chemistry. PMID:25384554

  3. Activation of CO2 by phosphinoamide hafnium complexes.

    PubMed

    Sgro, Michael J; Stephan, Douglas W

    2013-04-01

    Hf-phosphinoamide cation complexes behave as metal-based frustrated Lewis pairs and bind one or two equivalent of CO2 and in as well can activate CO2 in a bimetallic fashion to give a pseudo-tetrahedral P2CO2 fragment linking two Hf centres.

  4. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms and activity analysis of the promoter and enhancer of the pig lactase gene.

    PubMed

    Du, Hai-Ting; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Jia-Mei; Zhao, Wei; Tao, Xiao-Li; Ba, Cai-Feng; Tian, Yu-Min; Su, Yu-Hong

    2014-07-15

    Lactose intolerance in northern Europeans is strongly associated with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 14 kb upstream of the human lactase gene: -13,910 C/T. We examined whether SNPs in the 5' flanking region of the pig lactase gene are similar to those in the human gene and whether these polymorphisms play a functional role in regulating pig lactase gene expression. The 5' flanking region of the lactase gene from several different breeds of pigs was cloned and analyzed for gene regulatory activity of a luciferase reporter gene. One SNP was found in the enhancer region (-797 G/A) and two were found in the promoter region (-308G/C and -301 A/G). The promoter C-308,G-301(Pro-CG) strongly promotes the expression of the lactase gene, but the promoter G-308,A-301(Pro-GA) does not. The enhancer A-797(Enh-A) genotype for Pro-GA can significantly enhance promoter activity, but has an inhibitory effect on Pro-CG. The Enhancer G-797(Enh-G) has a significant inhibitory effect on both promoters. In conclusion, the order of effectiveness on the pig lactase gene is Enh-A+Pro-GA>Enh-A/G+Pro-CG>Enh-G+Pro-GA.

  5. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms and activity analysis of the promoter and enhancer of the pig lactase gene.

    PubMed

    Du, Hai-Ting; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Jia-Mei; Zhao, Wei; Tao, Xiao-Li; Ba, Cai-Feng; Tian, Yu-Min; Su, Yu-Hong

    2014-07-15

    Lactose intolerance in northern Europeans is strongly associated with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 14 kb upstream of the human lactase gene: -13,910 C/T. We examined whether SNPs in the 5' flanking region of the pig lactase gene are similar to those in the human gene and whether these polymorphisms play a functional role in regulating pig lactase gene expression. The 5' flanking region of the lactase gene from several different breeds of pigs was cloned and analyzed for gene regulatory activity of a luciferase reporter gene. One SNP was found in the enhancer region (-797 G/A) and two were found in the promoter region (-308G/C and -301 A/G). The promoter C-308,G-301(Pro-CG) strongly promotes the expression of the lactase gene, but the promoter G-308,A-301(Pro-GA) does not. The enhancer A-797(Enh-A) genotype for Pro-GA can significantly enhance promoter activity, but has an inhibitory effect on Pro-CG. The Enhancer G-797(Enh-G) has a significant inhibitory effect on both promoters. In conclusion, the order of effectiveness on the pig lactase gene is Enh-A+Pro-GA>Enh-A/G+Pro-CG>Enh-G+Pro-GA. PMID:24809963

  6. Immersion freezing of ice nucleating active protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Augustin, S.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Niedermeier, D.; Wex, H.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-08-01

    Biological particles, e.g. bacteria and their Ice Nucleating Active (INA) protein complexes, might play an important role for the ice formation in atmospheric mixed-phase clouds. Therefore, the immersion freezing behavior of INA protein complexes generated from a SnomaxTM solution/suspension was investigated as function of temperature in a range of -5 °C to -38 °C at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). The immersion freezing of droplets containing small numbers of INA protein complexes occurs in a temperature range of -7 °C and -10 °C. The experiments performed in the lower temperature range, where all droplets freeze which contain at least one INA protein complex, are used to determine the average number of INA protein complexes present, assuming that the INA protein complexes are Poisson distributed over the droplet ensemble. Knowing the average number of INA protein complexes, the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate and rate coefficient of a single INA protein complex is determined by using the newly-developed CHESS model (stoCHastic model of idEntical poiSSon distributed ice nuclei). Therefore, we assume the ice nucleation process to be of stochastic nature, and a parameterization of the INA protein complex's nucleation rate. Analyzing the results of immersion freezing experiments from literature (SnomaxTM and Pseudomonas syringae bacteria), to results gained in this study, demonstrates that first, a similar temperature dependence of the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate for a single INA protein complex was found in all experiments, second, the shift of the ice fraction curves to higher temperatures can be explained consistently by a higher average number of INA protein complexes being present in the droplet ensemble, and finally the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate of one single INA protein complex might be also applicable for intact Pseudomonas syringae bacteria cells. The results obtained in this study allow a new perspective on the

  7. Evidence of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism, but not of parallel evolution, despite high levels of concerted evolution in the major histocompatibility complex of flamingo species.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, M A F; Courtiol, A; Teixeira, M; Galan, M; Bechet, A; Cezilly, F

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cornerstone in the study of adaptive genetic diversity. Intriguingly, highly polymorphic MHC sequences are often not more similar within species than between closely related species. Divergent selection of gene duplicates, balancing selection maintaining trans-species polymorphism (TSP) that predate speciation and parallel evolution of species sharing similar selection pressures can all lead to higher sequence similarity between species. In contrast, high rates of concerted evolution increase sequence similarity of duplicated loci within species. Assessing these evolutionary models remains difficult as relatedness and ecological similarities are often confounded. As sympatric species of flamingos are more distantly related than allopatric species, flamingos represent an ideal model to disentangle these evolutionary models. We characterized MHC Class I exon 3, Class IIB exon 2 and exon 3 of the six extant flamingo species. We found up to six MHC Class I loci and two MHC Class IIB loci. As all six species shared the same number of MHC Class IIB loci, duplication appears to predate flamingo speciation. However, the high rate of concerted evolution has prevented the divergence of duplicated loci. We found high sequence similarity between all species regardless of codon position. The latter is consistent with balancing selection maintaining TSP, as under this mechanism amino acid sites under pathogen-mediated selection should be characterized by fewer synonymous codons (due to their common ancestry) than under parallel evolution. Overall, balancing selection maintaining TSP appears to result in high MHC similarity between species regardless of species relatedness and geographical distribution.

  8. Influences of a DRD2 polymorphism on updating of long-term memory representations and caudate BOLD activity: magnification in aging.

    PubMed

    Persson, Jonas; Rieckmann, Anna; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Fischer, Håkan; Bäckman, Lars

    2015-04-01

    A number of genetic polymorphisms are related to individual differences in cognitive performance. Striatal dopamine (DA) functions, associated with cognitive performance, are linked to the TaqIA polymorphism of the DRD2/ANKK1 gene. In humans, presence of an A1 allele of the DRD2/ANKK1-TaqIA polymorphism is related to reduced density of striatal DA D2 receptors. The resource-modulation hypothesis assumes that aging-related losses of neurochemical and structural brain resources modulate the extent to which genetic variations affect cognitive functioning. Here, we tested this hypothesis using functional MRI during long-term memory (LTM) updating in younger and older carriers and noncarriers of the A1-allele of the TaqIa polymorphism. We demonstrate that older A1-carriers have worse memory performance, specifically during LTM updating, compared to noncarriers. Moreover, A1-carriers exhibited less blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation in left caudate nucleus, a region critical to updating. This effect was only seen in older adults, suggesting magnification of genetic effects on functional brain activity in aging. Further, a positive relationship between caudate BOLD activation and updating performance among non-A1 carriers indicated that caudate activation was behaviorally relevant. These results demonstrate a link between the DRD2/ANKK1-TaqIA polymorphism and neurocognitive deficits related to LTM updating, and provide novel evidence that this effect is magnified in aging. PMID:25486867

  9. Differentiation and grouping of isolates of the Ganoderma lucidum complex by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR compared with grouping on the basis of internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, R S; Wang, H H; Wang, H F; Moncalvo, J M

    1996-01-01

    Laccate polypores of the Ganoderma lucidum species complex are widespread white rot fungi of economic importance, but isolates cannot be identified by traditional taxonomic methods. Parsimony analysis of nucleotide sequences from the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the ribosomal gene (rDNA) distinguished six lineages in this species complex. Each ITS lineage may represent one or more putative species. While some isolates have identical ITS sequences, all of them could be clearly differentiated by genetic fingerprinting using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). To investigate the suitability of RAPD markers for taxonomic identification and grouping of isolates of the G. lucidum complex, RAPD fragments (RAPDs) were used as phenotypic characters in numerical and parsimony analyses. Results show that data from RAPDS do not distinguish the same clades as ITS data do. Groupings based on analysis of RAPD data were very sensitive to the choice of the grouping method used, and no consistent grouping of isolates could be proposed. However, analysis with RAPDs did resolve several robust terminal clades containing putatively conspecific isolates, suggesting that RAPDs might be helpful for systematics at the lower taxonomic levels that are unresolved by ITS sequence data. The limitations of RAPDs for systematics are briefly discussed. The conclusion of this study is that ITS sequences can be used to identify isolates of the G. lucidum complex, whereas RAPDs can be used to differentiate between isolates having identical ITS sequences. The practical implications of these results are briefly illustrated. PMID:8919797

  10. Informational Complexity and Functional Activity of RNA Structures

    PubMed Central

    Carothers, James M.; Oestreich, Stephanie C.; Davis, Jonathan H.

    2004-01-01

    Very little is known about the distribution of functional DNA, RNA, and protein molecules in sequence space. The question of how the number and complexity of distinct solutions to a particular biochemical problem varies with activity is an important aspect of this general problem. Here we present a comparison of the structures and activities of eleven distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers). By experimentally measuring the amount of information required to specify each optimal binding structure, we show that defining a structure capable of 10-fold tighter binding requires approximately 10 additional bits of information. This increase in information content is equivalent to specifying the identity of five additional nucleotide positions and corresponds to an ∼1000-fold decrease in abundance in a sample of random sequences. We observe a similar relationship between structural complexity and activity in a comparison of two catalytic RNAs (ribozyme ligases), raising the possibility of a general relationship between the complexity of RNA structures and their functional activity. Describing how information varies with activity in other heteropolymers, both biological and synthetic, may lead to an objective means of comparing their functional properties. This approach could be useful in predicting the functional utility of novel heteropolymers. PMID:15099096

  11. Spin crossover and polymorphism in a family of 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene-bridged binuclear iron(II) complexes. A key role of structural distortions.

    PubMed

    Matouzenko, Galina S; Jeanneau, Erwann; Verat, Alexander Yu; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2011-10-01

    Two polymorphic modifications 1 and 3 of binuclear compound [{Fe(dpia)(NCS)(2)}(2)(bpe)] and pseudo-polymorphic modification [{Fe(dpia)(NCS)(2)}(2)(bpe)]·2CH(3)OH (2), where dpia = di-(2-picolyl)amine, bpe = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene, were synthesized, and their structures, magnetic properties, and Mössbauer spectra were studied. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements of three binuclear compounds show different types of magnetic behaviour. The complex 1 exhibits a gradual two-step spin crossover (SCO) suggesting the occurrence of the mixed [HS-LS] (HS: high spin, LS: low spin) pair at the plateau temperature (182 K), at which about 50% of the complexes undergoes a thermal spin conversion. The complex 2 displays an abrupt full one-step spin transition without hysteresis, centred at about 159 K. The complex 3 is paramagnetic over the temperature range 20-290 K. The single-crystal X-ray studies show that all three compounds are built up from the bpe-bridged binuclear molecules. The structure of 1 was solved for three spin isomers [HS-HS], [HS-LS], and [LS-LS] at three temperatures 300 K, 183 K, and 90 K. The crystal structures for 2 and 3 were determined for the [HS-HS] complexes at room temperature. The analysis of correlations between the structural characteristics and different types of magnetic behaviour for new 1-3 binuclear complexes, as well as for previously reported binuclear compounds, revealed that the SCO process (occurrence of full one-step, two-step, or partial (50%) SCO) is specified by the degree of distortion of the octahedral geometry of the [FeN(6)] core, caused by both packing and strain effects arising from terminal and/or bridging ligands. The comparison of the magnetic properties and the networks of intra- and inter-molecular interactions in the crystal lattice for the family of related SCO binuclear compounds suggests that the intermolecular interactions play a predominant role in the cooperativeness of the spin transition

  12. Superoxide scavenging activity of pirfenidone-iron complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Yoshihiro; Sato, Keizo Muramoto, Yosuke; Karakawa, Tomohiro; Kitamado, Masataka; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Nabeshima, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Sasamoto, Kazumi

    2008-07-18

    Pirfenidone (PFD) is focused on a new anti-fibrotic drug, which can minimize lung fibrosis etc. We evaluated the superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}) scavenging activities of PFD and the PFD-iron complex by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay, and cytochrome c reduction assay. Firstly, we confirmed that the PFD-iron complex was formed by mixing iron chloride with threefold molar PFD, and the complex was stable in distillated water and ethanol. Secondary, the PFD-iron complex reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} produced by xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine without inhibiting the enzyme activity. Thirdly, it also reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} released from phorbor ester-stimulated human neutrophils. PFD alone showed few such effects. These results suggest the possibility that the O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} scavenging effect of the PFD-iron complex contributes to the anti-fibrotic action of PFD used for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. Similar Biological Activities of Two Isostructural Ruthenium and Osmium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimoska,J.; Williams, D.; Atilla-Gokcumen, G.; Smalley, K.; Carroll, P.; Webster, R.; Filippakopoulos, P.; Knapp, S.; Herlyn, M.; Meggers, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we probe and verify the concept of designing unreactive bioactive metal complexes, in which the metal possesses a purely structural function, by investigating the consequences of replacing ruthenium in a bioactive half-sandwich kinase inhibitor scaffold by its heavier congener osmium. The two isostructural complexes are compared with respect to their anticancer properties in 1205?Lu melanoma cells, activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, IC50 values against the protein kinases GSK-3? and Pim-1, and binding modes to the protein kinase Pim-1 by protein crystallography. It was found that the two congeners display almost indistinguishable biological activities, which can be explained by their nearly identical three-dimensional structures and their identical mode of action as protein kinase inhibitors. This is a unique example in which the replacement of a metal in an anticancer scaffold by its heavier homologue does not alter its biological activity.

  14. CLYBL is a polymorphic human enzyme with malate synthase and β-methylmalate synthase activity

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, Laura; Li, Yang; Nakatsuka, Nathan J.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    CLYBL is a human mitochondrial enzyme of unknown function that is found in multiple eukaryotic taxa and conserved to bacteria. The protein is expressed in the mitochondria of all mammalian organs, with highest expression in brown fat and kidney. Approximately 5% of all humans harbor a premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL that has been associated with reduced levels of circulating vitamin B12. Using comparative genomics, we now show that CLYBL is strongly co-expressed with and co-evolved specifically with other components of the mitochondrial B12 pathway. We confirm that the premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL leads to a loss of protein expression. To elucidate the molecular function of CLYBL, we used comparative operon analysis, structural modeling and enzyme kinetics. We report that CLYBL encodes a malate/β-methylmalate synthase, converting glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to malate, or glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalate. Malate synthases are best known for their established role in the glyoxylate shunt of plants and lower organisms and are traditionally described as not occurring in humans. The broader role of a malate/β-methylmalate synthase in human physiology and its mechanistic link to vitamin B12 metabolism remain unknown. PMID:24334609

  15. Heredity mode of genetic polymorphism in aldehyde oxidase activity in Donryu strain rats.

    PubMed

    Adachi, M; Itoh, K; Abe, H; Tanaka, Y

    2008-01-01

    Donryu strain rats show genetic polymorphisms in the aldehyde oxidase gene, resulting in the phenotypic expression of ultrarapid metabolizers with homozygous nucleotide sequences (337G, 2604C), extensive metabolizers with heterozygous nucleotide sequences (377G/A, 2604C/T), and poor metabolizers with homozygous nucleotide sequences (377A, 2604T). In the mating experiments the ratio of the number of ultrarapid metabolizers, extensive metabolizers, and poor metabolizers rats in the F1 generation from the heterozygous F0 extensive metabolizers male and female rats was roughly 0.6 : 1.5 : 1, and the ratio converged to approximately 1 : 2 : 1 in the F2 generation from the heterozygous F1 extensive metabolizers male and female rats. On the contrary, all the F2 generation from homozygous F1 ultrarapid metabolizers male and female rats or from homozygous F1 poor metabolizers male and female rats had the ultrarapid metabolizers or the poor metabolizers genotypes and phenotypes. The genotypes completely agreed with the phenotypes in all individuals of F0, F1, and F2 generations. The results indicate that the genetic polymorphism of aldehyde oxidase in Donryu strain rats obeys Mendelian heredity. The reason for a low ratio of the ultrarapid metabolizers rats in the commercially available Donryu strain rats - not more than several per cent - compared with the ratio expected from the Mendelian rule is unknown.

  16. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Biologically Active Lanthanide (III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostova, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Kiefer, W.

    2008-11-01

    The complexation ability and the binding mode of the ligand coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Dy(III) lanthanide ions (Ln(III)) are elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques as well as DFT quantum chemical calculations were used for characterization of the binding mode and the structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of HCCA. The metal—ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different Ln—CCA structures using B3LYP/6-31G(d) method combined with a large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanide ion. The energies obtained predict bidentate coordination of CCA- to Ln(III) ions through the carbonylic oxygen and the carboxylic oxygen. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA- and Ln(III) complexes based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal—ligand binding mode. The natural bonding analysis predicts strongly ionic character of the Ln(III)-CCA bonding in the- complexes studied. With the relatively resistant tumor cell line K-562 we obtained very interesting in-vitro results which are in accordance with our previously published data concerning the activity of lanthanide(III) complexes with other coumarin derivatives.

  17. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism and retinopathy risk in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence has suggested that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a candidate for increased risk of diabetic retinopathy. Studies have reported that insertion/deletion polymorphism in the PAI-1 gene may influence the risk of this disease. To comprehensively address this issue, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association of PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism with diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes. Methods Data were retrieved in a systematic manner and analyzed using Review Manager and STATA Statistical Software. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of associations. Results Nine studies with 1, 217 cases and 1, 459 controls were included. Allelic and genotypic comparisons between cases and controls were evaluated. Overall analysis suggests a marginal association of the 4G/5G polymorphism with diabetic retinopathy (for 4G versus 5G: OR 1.13, 95%CI 1.01 to 1.26; for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G: OR 1.30, 95%CI 1.04 to 1.64; for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G + 4G/5G: OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.05 to 1.52). In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, we found an association among the Caucasian population (for 4G versus 5G: OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.30; for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G: OR 1.33, 95%CI 1.02 to 1.74; for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G + 4G/5G: OR 1.41, 95%CI 1.13 to 1.77). When stratified by the average duration of diabetes, patients with diabetes histories longer than 10 years have an elevated susceptibility to diabetic retinopathy than those with shorter histories (for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G: OR 1.47, 95%CI 1.08 to 2.00). We also detected a higher risk in hospital-based studies (for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G+4G/5G: OR 1.27, 95%CI 1.02 to 1.57). Conclusions The present meta-analysis suggested that 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 gene potentially increased the risk of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes and showed a discrepancy in different ethnicities. A higher susceptibility in patients with longer duration of diabetes (more than 10

  18. A Fractal Dimension Survey of Active Region Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Gallagher, Peter; Ireland, Jack

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to quantifying the magnetic complexity of active regions using a fractal dimension measure is presented. This fully-automated approach uses full disc MDI magnetograms of active regions from a large data set (2742 days of the SoHO mission; 9342 active regions) to compare the calculated fractal dimension to both Mount Wilson classification and flare rate. The main Mount Wilson classes exhibit no distinct fractal dimension distribution, suggesting a self-similar nature of all active regions. Solar flare productivity exhibits an increase in both the frequency and GOES X-ray magnitude of flares from regions with higher fractal dimensions. Specifically a lower threshold fractal dimension of 1.2 and 1.25 exists as a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for an active region to produce M- and X-class flares respectively .

  19. The COMT Val/Met polymorphism is associated with reading-related skills and consistent patterns of functional neural activation.

    PubMed

    Landi, Nicole; Frost, Stephen J; Mencl, W Einar; Preston, Jonathan L; Jacobsen, Leslie K; Lee, Maria; Yrigollen, Carolyn; Pugh, Kenneth R; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2013-01-01

    In both children and adults there is large variability in reading skill, with approximately 5-10% of individuals characterized as having reading disability; these individuals struggle to learn to read despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. Although it is well established that a substantial portion of this variability is attributed to the genetic differences between individuals, specifics of the connections between reading and the genome are not understood. This article presents data that suggest that variation in the COMT gene, which has previously been associated with variation in higher-order cognition, is associated with reading and reading-related skills, at the level of both brain and behavior. In particular, we found that the COMT Val/Met polymorphism at rs4680, which results in the substitution of the ancestral Valine (Val) by Methionine (Met), was associated with better performance on a number of critical reading measures and with patterns of functional neural activation that have been linked to better readers. We argue that this polymorphism, known for its broad effects on cognition, may modulate (likely through frontal lobe function) reading skill.

  20. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter polymorphism and coronary artery disease in non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, M W; Stickland, M H; Grant, P J

    1995-10-01

    Elevated levels of PAI-1 are found in coronary artery disease (CAD) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). PAI-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of CAD through suppression of fibrinolysis, alternatively the high levels may result from vascular damage. There is evidence that PAI-1 levels are related to genotype at a PAI-1 promoter polymorphism. Genotype at this 4G/5G polymorphism was determined in 160 NIDDM (90 males and 70 females) patients with (n = 38) or without (n = 122) clinical evidence of CAD. Levels of cholesterol were higher (6.5 vs 5.9 mM, p < 0.01) and PAI-1 tended to be higher (PAI-1 activity 23.0 vs 20.4 U/ml) with CAD. The frequency of the 4G/4G genotype was increased and the 5G/5G genotype decreased, in the group CAD compared to those without (p < 0.05). These results suggest that possession of the 4G/4G PAI-1 promoter genotype is a risk factor for the development of CAD in subjects with NIDDM.

  1. Analysis of the effects of depression associated polymorphisms on the activity of the BICC1 promoter in amygdala neurones

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, S; Shanley, L; Cowie, P; Lear, M; McGuffin, P; Quinn, J P; Barrett, P; MacKenzie, A

    2016-01-01

    The Bicaudal C Homolog 1 (BICC1) gene, which encodes an RNA binding protein, has been identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS) as a candidate gene associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). We explored the hypothesis that MDD associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affected the ability of cis-regulatory elements within intron 3 of the BICC1 gene to modulate the activity of the BICC1 promoter region. We initially established that the BICC1 promoter drove BICC1 mRNA expression in amygdala, hippocampus and hypothalamus. Intriguingly, we provide evidence that MDD associated polymorphisms alter the ability of the BICC1 promoter to respond to PKA signalling within amygdala neurones. Considering the known role of amygdala PKA pathways in fear learning and mood these observations suggest a possible mechanism through which allelic changes in the regulation of the BICC1 gene in amygdala neurones may contribute to mood disorders. Our findings also suggest a novel direction for the identification of novel drug targets and the design of future personalised therapeutics. PMID:26440730

  2. FASL -844C polymorphism is associated with increased activation-induced T cell death and risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Zhou, Yifeng; Li, Hua; Han, Xiaohong; Shi, Yuankai; Wang, Li; Miao, Xiaoping; Tan, Wen; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Xuemei; Guo, Yongli; Lin, Dongxin

    2005-10-01

    The FAS receptor-ligand system plays a key role in regulating apoptotic cell death, and corruption of this signaling pathway has been shown to participate in tumor-immune escape and carcinogenesis. We have recently demonstrated (Sun, T., X. Miao, X. Zhang, W. Tan, P. Xiong, and D. Lin. 2004. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 96:1030-1036; Zhang, X., X. Miao, T. Sun, W. Tan, S. Qu, P. Xiong, Y. Zhou, and D. Lin. 2005. J. Med. Genet. 42:479-484) that functional polymorphisms in FAS and FAS ligand (FASL) are associated with susceptibility to lung cancer and esophageal cancer; however, the mechanisms underlying this association have not been elucidated. We show that the FAS -1377G, FAS -670A, and FASL -844T variants are expressed more highly on ex vivo-stimulated T cells than the FAS -1377A, FAS -670G, and FASL -844C variants. Moreover, activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells carrying the FASL -844C allele was increased. We also found a threefold increased risk of cervical cancer among subjects with the FASL -844CC genotype compared with those with the -844TT genotype in a case-control study in Chinese women. Together, these observations suggest that genetic polymorphisms in the FAS-FASL pathway confer host susceptibility to cervical cancers, which might be caused by immune escape of tumor cells because of enhanced AICD of tumor-specific T cells.

  3. Active control technique of fractional-order chaotic complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Gamal M.; Ahmed, Mansour E.; Abed-Elhameed, Tarek M.

    2016-06-01

    Several kinds of synchronization of fractional-order chaotic complex systems are challenging research topics of current interest since they appear in many applications in applied sciences. Our main goal in this paper is to introduce the definition of modified projective combination-combination synchronization (MPCCS) of some fractional-order chaotic complex systems. We show that our systems are chaotic by calculating their Lyapunov exponents. The fractional Lyapunov dimension of the chaotic solutions of these systems is computed. A scheme is introduced to calculate MPCCS of four different (or identical) chaotic complex systems using the active control technique. Special cases of this type, which are projective and anti C-C synchronization, are discussed. Some figures are plotted to show that MPCCS is achieved and its errors approach zero.

  4. Methadone dose in heroin-dependent patients: role of clinical factors, comedications, genetic polymorphisms and enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Mouly, Stéphane; Bloch, Vanessa; Peoc'h, Katell; Houze, Pascal; Labat, Laurence; Ksouda, Kamilia; Simoneau, Guy; Declèves, Xavier; Bergmann, Jean Francois; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Vorspan, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Aims Methadone is characterized by wide intersubject variability regarding the dose needed to obtain full therapeutic response. We assessed the influence of sociodemographic, ethnic, clinical, metabolic and genotypic variables on methadone maintenance dose requirement in opioid-dependent responder patients. Methods Eighty-one stable patients (60 men and 21 women, 43.7 ± 8.1 years old, 63.1 ± 50.9 mg day−1 methadone), divided into quartiles with respect to the median daily dose, were enrolled and underwent clinical examination, treatment history and determination of liver/intestinal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 activity measured by the midazolam test, R,S-methadone trough concentration and clinically significant polymorphisms of the OPRM1, DRD2, COMT, ABCB1, CYP2B6, CYP3A5, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 genes. Results Methadone maintenance dose was correlated to the highest dose ever used (r2 = 0.57, P < 0.0001). Fractioned methadone intake (odds ratio 4.87, 95% confidence interval 1.27–18.6, P = 0.02), bodyweight (odds ratio 1.57, 95% confidence interval 1.01–2.44, P = 0.04), history of cocaine dependence (80 vs. 44 mg day−1 in never-addict patients, P = 0.005) and ethnicity (Asian > Caucasian > African, P = 0.04) were independently associated with high-dose methadone in multiple regression analysis. A modest correlation was observed between liver/intestinal CYP3A4 activity and methadone dose at steady state (Spearman rank correlation coefficient [rs] = 0.21, P = 0.06) but not with highest dose ever used (rs = 0.15, P = 0.18) or dose-normalized R,S-methadone trough concentrations (rs = −0.05, P = 0.64). Concomitant CYP3A4 inhibitors only affected the relationship between methadone dose and R,S-methadone trough concentration. None of the genetic polymorphisms explored was predictive of the methadone maintenance dose. Conclusions Methadone maintenance dose was predicted by sociodemographic and clinical variables rather than genetic polymorphisms or liver/intestinal CYP

  5. Visualizing active membrane protein complexes by electron cryotomography

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Vicki A.M.; Ieva, Raffaele; Walter, Andreas; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Unravelling the structural organization of membrane protein machines in their active state and native lipid environment is a major challenge in modern cell biology research. Here we develop the STAMP (Specifically TArgeted Membrane nanoParticle) technique as a strategy to localize protein complexes in situ by electron cryotomography (cryo-ET). STAMP selects active membrane protein complexes and marks them with quantum dots. Taking advantage of new electron detector technology that is currently revolutionizing cryotomography in terms of achievable resolution, this approach enables us to visualize the three-dimensional distribution and organization of protein import sites in mitochondria. We show that import sites cluster together in the vicinity of crista membranes, and we reveal unique details of the mitochondrial protein import machinery in action. STAMP can be used as a tool for site-specific labelling of a multitude of membrane proteins by cryo-ET in the future. PMID:24942077

  6. Task complexity modulates pilot electroencephalographic activity during real flights.

    PubMed

    Di Stasi, Leandro L; Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Suárez, Juan; McCamy, Michael B; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Roca-Dorda, Joaquín; Catena, Andrés

    2015-07-01

    Most research connecting task performance and neural activity to date has been conducted in laboratory conditions. Thus, field studies remain scarce, especially in extreme conditions such as during real flights. Here, we investigated the effects of flight procedures of varied complexity on the in-flight EEG activity of military helicopter pilots. Flight procedural complexity modulated the EEG power spectrum: highly demanding procedures (i.e., takeoff and landing) were associated with higher EEG power in the higher frequency bands, whereas less demanding procedures (i.e., flight exercises) were associated with lower EEG power over the same frequency bands. These results suggest that EEG recordings may help to evaluate an operator's cognitive performance in challenging real-life scenarios, and thus could aid in the prevention of catastrophic events. PMID:25728307

  7. Polymorphism rs7278468 is associated with Age-related cataract through decreasing transcriptional activity of the CRYAA promoter

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoyin; Jiao, Xiaodong; Ma, Zhiwei; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    CRYAA plays critical functional roles in lens transparency and opacity, and polymorphisms near CRYAA have been associated with age-related cataract (ARC). This study examines polymorphisms in the CRYAA promoter region for association with ARC and elucidates the mechanisms of this association. Three SNPs nominally associated with ARC were identified in the promoter region of CRYAA: rs3761382 (P = 0.06, OR (Odds ratio) = 1.5), rs13053109 (P = 0.04, OR = 1.6), rs7278468 (P = 0.007, OR = 0.6). The C-G-T haplotype increased the risk for ARC overall (P = 0.005, OR = 1.8), and both alleles and haplotypes show a stronger association with cortical cataract (rs3761382, P = 0.002, OR = 2.1; rs13053109, P = 0.002, OR = 2.1; rs7278468, P = 0.0007, OR = 0.5; C-G-T haplotype, P = 0.0003, OR = 2.2). The C-G-T risk haplotype decreased transcriptional activity through rs7278468, which lies in a consensus binding site for the transcription repressor KLF10. KLF10 binding inhibited CRYAA transcription, and both binding and inhibition were greater with the T rs7278468 allele. Knockdown of KLF10 in HLE cells partially rescued the transcriptional activity of CRYAA with rs7278468 T allele, but did not affect activity with the G allele. Thus, our data suggest that the T allele of rs7278468 in the CRYAA promoter is associated with ARC through increasing binding of KLF-10 and thus decreasing CRYAA transcription. PMID:26984531

  8. A phylogenetic assessment of the polyphyletic nature and intraspecific color polymorphism in the Bactrocera dorsalis complex (Diptera, Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Luc; San Jose, Michael; Barr, Norman; Rubinoff, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Bactrocera dorsalis complex (Tephritidae) comprises 85 species of fruit flies, including five highly destructive polyphagous fruit pests. Despite significant work on a few key pest species within the complex, little has been published on the majority of non-economic species in the complex, other than basic descriptions and illustrations of single specimens regarded as typical representatives. To elucidate the species relationships within the Bactrocera dorsalis complex, we used 159 sequences from one mitochondrial (COI) and two nuclear (elongation factor-1α and period) genes to construct a phylogeny containing 20 described species from within the complex, four additional species that may be new to science, and 26 other species from Bactrocera and its sister genus Dacus. The resulting concatenated phylogeny revealed that most of the species placed in the complex appear to be unrelated, emerging across numerous clades. This suggests that they were placed in the Bactrocera dorsalis complex based on the similarity of convergent characters, which does not appear to be diagnostic. Variations in scutum and abdomen color patterns within each of the non-economic species are presented and demonstrate that distantly-related, cryptic species overlap greatly in traditional morphological color patterns used to separate them in keys. Some of these species may not be distinguishable with confidence by means other than DNA data. PMID:26798267

  9. Formation of proteasome-PA700 complexes directly correlates with activation of peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Adams, G M; Crotchett, B; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N; Gogol, E P

    1998-09-15

    The proteolytic activity of the eukaryotic 20S proteasome is stimulated by a multisubunit activator, PA700, which forms both 1:1 and 2:1 complexes with the proteasome. Formation of the complexes is enhanced by an additional protein assembly called modulator, which also stimulates the enzymatic activity of the proteasome only in the presence of PA700. Here we show that the binding of PA700 to the proteasome is cooperative, as is the activation of the proteasome's intrinsic peptidase activity. Modulator increases the extent of complex formation and peptidase activation, while preserving the cooperative kinetics. Furthermore, the increase in activity is not linear with the number of PA700 assemblies bound to the proteasome, but rather with the number of proteasome-PA700 complexes, regardless of the PA700:proteasome stoichiometry. Hence the stimulation of peptidase activity is fully (or almost fully) effected by the binding of a single PA700 to the 20S proteasome. The stimulation of peptidase by modulator is explained entirely by the increased number of proteasome-PA700 complexes formed in its presence, rather than by any substantial direct stimulation of catalysis. These observations are consistent with a model in which PA700, either alone or assisted by modulator, promotes conformational changes in the proteasome that activate the catalytic sites and/or facilitate access of peptide substrates to these sites. PMID:9737872

  10. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  11. Characterization of the breakpoints of a polymorphic inversion complex detects strict and broad breakpoint reuse at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Puerma, Eva; Orengo, Dorcas J; Salguero, David; Papaceit, Montserrat; Segarra, Carmen; Aguadé, Montserrat

    2014-09-01

    Inversions are an integral part of structural variation within species, and they play a leading role in genome reorganization across species. Work at both the cytological and genome sequence levels has revealed heterogeneity in the distribution of inversion breakpoints, with some regions being recurrently used. Breakpoint reuse at the molecular level has mostly been assessed for fixed inversions through genome sequence comparison, and therefore rather broadly. Here, we have identified and sequenced the breakpoints of two polymorphic inversions-E1 and E2 that share a breakpoint-in the extant Est and E1 + 2 chromosomal arrangements of Drosophila subobscura. The breakpoints are two medium-sized repeated motifs that mediated the inversions by two different mechanisms: E1 via staggered breaks and subsequent repair and E2 via repeat-mediated ectopic recombination. The fine delimitation of the shared breakpoint revealed its strict reuse at the molecular level regardless of which was the intermediate arrangement. The occurrence of other rearrangements in the most proximal and distal extended breakpoint regions reveals the broad reuse of these regions. This differential degree of fragility might be related to their sharing the presence outside the inverted region of snoRNA-encoding genes.

  12. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors.

  13. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors. PMID:22931592

  14. The Effect of Clade-Specific Sequence Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Protease Activity and Inhibitor Resistance Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Kolli, Madhavi; King, Nancy M.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Heroux, Annie; Kakizawa, Junko; Sugiura, Wataru; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-09-08

    The majority of HIV-1 infections around the world result from non-B clade HIV-1 strains. The CRF01{_}AE (AE) strain is seen principally in Southeast Asia. AE protease differs by {approx}10% in amino acid sequence from clade B protease and carries several naturally occurring polymorphisms that are associated with drug resistance in clade B. AE protease has been observed to develop resistance through a nonactive-site N88S mutation in response to nelfinavir (NFV) therapy, whereas clade B protease develops both the active-site mutation D30N and the nonactive-site mutation N88D. Structural and biochemical studies were carried out with wild-type and NFV-resistant clade B and AE protease variants. The relationship between clade-specific sequence variations and pathways to inhibitor resistance was also assessed. AE protease has a lower catalytic turnover rate than clade B protease, and it also has weaker affinity for both NFV and darunavir (DRV). This weaker affinity may lead to the nonactive-site N88S variant in AE, which exhibits significantly decreased affinity for both NFV and DRV. The D30N/N88D mutations in clade B resulted in a significant loss of affinity for NFV and, to a lesser extent, for DRV. A comparison of crystal structures of AE protease shows significant structural rearrangement in the flap hinge region compared with those of clade B protease and suggests insights into the alternative pathways to NFV resistance. In combination, our studies show that sequence polymorphisms within clades can alter protease activity and inhibitor binding and are capable of altering the pathway to inhibitor resistance.

  15. TNF-α gene polymorphisms and expression.

    PubMed

    El-Tahan, Radwa R; Ghoneim, Ahmed M; El-Mashad, Noha

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine with an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Its encoding gene is located in the short arm of chromosome 6 in the major histocompatibility complex class III region. Most of the TNF-α gene polymorphisms are located in its promoter region and they are thought to affect the susceptibility and/or severity of different human diseases. This review summarizes the data related to the association between TNF-α gene and its receptor polymorphisms, and the development of autoimmune diseases. Among these polymorphisms the -308G/A TNF-α promotor polymorphism has been associated several times with the the development of autoimmune diseases, however some discrepant results have been recorded. The other TNF-α gene polymorphisms had little or no association with autoimmune diseases. Current results about the molecules controlling TNF-α expression are also presented. The discrepancy between different records could be related partly to either the differences in the ethnic origin or number of the studied individuals, or the abundance and activation of other molecules that interact with the TNF-α promotor region or other elements. PMID:27652081

  16. miR-196a-2 rs11614913 polymorphism is associated with vitiligo by affecting heterodimeric molecular complexes of Tyr and Tyrp1.

    PubMed

    Cui, T-T; Yi, X-L; Zhang, W-G; Wei, C; Zhou, F-B; Jian, Z; Wang, G; Gao, T-W; Li, C-Y; Li, K

    2015-10-01

    Tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyr-Tyrp1) complex plays a critical role in the synthesis of melanin intermediates, which involves the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and contributes to the development of vitiligo. Based on our previous observation that rs11614913 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in miR-196a-2 could affect the risk of vitiligo by influencing Tyrp1, we hypothesized that the same SNP could also regulate the level of Tyr in vitiligo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential association between rs11614913 SNP in miR-196a-2 and serum Tyr level in vitiligo and the regulatory role of miR-196a-2 in the expression of Tyr in melanocytes. The serum Tyr level was detected in 116 patients with vitiligo and 116 controls by ELISA plate assay. The expression level of Tyrp1 and Tyr in PIG1(normal melanocyte cell lines) cells was analyzed by western blotting. The ROS level and apoptosis rate in PIG1 cells transfected with si-Tyr or control siRNA were tested by flow cytometry. The results show that the individuals with TT+TC genotypes in miR-196a-2 and higher Tyr level in serum had an increased risk of vitiligo compared with those who had the CC genotype and lower Tyr level (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the rs11614913 C allele in miR-196a-2 enhanced its inhibitory regulation on the expression of Tyr, the down-regulation of which in melanocytes successfully reduced the intracellular ROS levels and the apoptosis rate. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miR-196a-2 polymorphisms can regulate the Tyr levels, which influences the susceptibility of vitiligo.

  17. Evidence of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism, but not of parallel evolution, despite high levels of concerted evolution in the major histocompatibility complex of flamingo species.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, M A F; Courtiol, A; Teixeira, M; Galan, M; Bechet, A; Cezilly, F

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cornerstone in the study of adaptive genetic diversity. Intriguingly, highly polymorphic MHC sequences are often not more similar within species than between closely related species. Divergent selection of gene duplicates, balancing selection maintaining trans-species polymorphism (TSP) that predate speciation and parallel evolution of species sharing similar selection pressures can all lead to higher sequence similarity between species. In contrast, high rates of concerted evolution increase sequence similarity of duplicated loci within species. Assessing these evolutionary models remains difficult as relatedness and ecological similarities are often confounded. As sympatric species of flamingos are more distantly related than allopatric species, flamingos represent an ideal model to disentangle these evolutionary models. We characterized MHC Class I exon 3, Class IIB exon 2 and exon 3 of the six extant flamingo species. We found up to six MHC Class I loci and two MHC Class IIB loci. As all six species shared the same number of MHC Class IIB loci, duplication appears to predate flamingo speciation. However, the high rate of concerted evolution has prevented the divergence of duplicated loci. We found high sequence similarity between all species regardless of codon position. The latter is consistent with balancing selection maintaining TSP, as under this mechanism amino acid sites under pathogen-mediated selection should be characterized by fewer synonymous codons (due to their common ancestry) than under parallel evolution. Overall, balancing selection maintaining TSP appears to result in high MHC similarity between species regardless of species relatedness and geographical distribution. PMID:26606731

  18. Low Levels of Polymorphism in Genes That Control the Activation of Defense Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Erica G.; Traw, M. Brian; Toomajian, Christopher; Kreitman, Martin; Bergelson, Joy

    2008-01-01

    Plants use signaling pathways involving salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene to defend against pathogen and herbivore attack. Many defense response genes involved in these signaling pathways have been characterized, but little is known about the selective pressures they experience. A representative set of 27 defense response genes were resequenced in a worldwide set of 96 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, and patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were evaluated in relation to an empirical distribution of SNPs generated from either 876 fragments or 236 fragments with >400 bp coding sequence (this latter set was selected for comparisons with coding sequences) distributed across the genomes of the same set of accessions. Defense response genes have significantly fewer protein variants, display lower levels of nonsynonymous nucleotide diversity, and have fewer nonsynonymous segregating sites. The majority of defense response genes appear to be experiencing purifying selection, given the dearth of protein variation in this set of genes. Eight genes exhibit some evidence of partial selective sweeps or transient balancing selection. These results therefore provide a strong contrast to the high levels of balancing selection exhibited by genes at the upstream positions in these signaling pathways. PMID:18245336

  19. Polymorphism in the Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) Gene Is Associated with Activity-Impulsivity in German Shepherd Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kubinyi, Enikő; Vas, Judit; Hejjas, Krisztina; Ronai, Zsolt; Brúder, Ildikó; Turcsán, Borbála; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Miklósi, Ádám

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between repeat polymorphism in intron 4 of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene and two personality traits, activity-impulsivity and inattention, in German Shepherd Dogs. The behaviour of 104 dogs was characterized by two instruments: (1) the previously validated Dog-Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale (Dog-ADHD RS) filled in by the dog owners and (2) the newly developed Activity-impulsivity Behavioural Scale (AIBS) containing four subtests, scored by the experimenters. Internal consistency, inter-observer reliability, test-retest reliability and convergent validity were demonstrated for AIBS. Dogs possessing at least one short allele were proved to be more active-impulsive by both instruments, compared to dogs carrying two copies of the long allele (activity-impulsivity scale of Dog-ADHD RS: p = 0.007; AIBS: p = 0.023). The results have some potential to support human studies; however, further research should reveal the molecular function of the TH gene variants, and look for the effect in more breeds. PMID:22272320

  20. A nuclear single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) potentially useful for the separation of Rhodnius prolixus from members of the Rhodnius robustus cryptic species complex (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Márcio G.; Mesquita, Rafael D.; Lawrence, Gena G.; Lazoski, Cristiano; Dotson, Ellen M.; Abubucker, Sahar; Mitreva, Makedonka; Randall-Maher, Jennifer; Monteiro, Fernando A.

    2013-01-01

    The design and application of rational strategies that rely on accurate species identification are pivotal for effective vector control. When morphological identification of the target vector species is impractical, the use of molecular markers is required. Here we describe a non-coding, single-copy nuclear DNA fragment that contains a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with the potential to distinguish the important domestic Chagas disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus, from members of the four sylvatic Rhodnius robustus cryptic species complex. A total of 96 primer pairs obtained from whole genome shotgun sequencing of the R. prolixus genome (12,626 random reads) were tested on 43 R. prolixus and R. robustus s.l. samples. One of the seven amplicons selected (AmpG) presented a SNP, potentially diagnostic for R. prolixus, on the 280th site. The diagnostic nature of this SNP was then performed on 154 R. prolixus and R. robustus s.l. samples aimed at achieving the widest possible geographic coverage. The results of a 60% majority rule Bayesian consensus tree and a median-joining network constructed based on the genetic variability observed reveal the paraphyletic nature of the R. robustus species complex, with respect to R. prolixus. AmpG region is located in the fourth intron of the Transmembrane protein 165 gene, which seems to be in the R. prolixus X chromosome. Other possible chromosomal locations of the AmpG region in the R. prolixus genome are also presented and discussed. PMID:23219914

  1. Association Between Polymorphisms of ADRBK1 Gene and Plasma Renin Activity in Hypertensive Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Li, Nanfang; Yao, Xiaoguang; Heizati, Mulalibieke; Zhang, Delian; Zhu, Qing; Chang, Guijuan; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Background Renin is the first step of the RAS cascade, which is a major regulator of salt-volume homeostasis. Adrenergic beta receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1) plays important roles in regulating blood pressure via the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC), which plays an important role in Na+ reabsorption in the renal collecting duct. The present case-control study was designed to investigate the potential relationship between polymorphisms of ADRBK1 and plasma renin activity (PRA) in hypertension. Material/Methods We recruited 1831 hypertensive and 422 normotensive Han Chinese subjects. Sitting PRA (ng/mL/h) was measured using radioimmunoassay method. Hypertensive patients were classified into 4 renin categories via PRA quartile. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ADRBK1 gene (rs1894111, rs4930416, rs7127431, rs12286664, and rs3730147) were identified via TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. Results Comparison of the hypertensive group and the control group showed significant differences in distribution of genotypes and alleles of rs1894111 (P<0.05). Moreover, distribution of the dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) in rs1894111 was lower in the hypertensive group than in the control group (P<0.05). Subjects were classified into 4 subgroups based on PRA quartile; the dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) of rs1894111 was significantly lower in the quartile 1 group (the group with the lowest PRA) than in the control group (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) of rs1894111 was significantly different in the hypertensive group (OR=1.590, 95%CI=1.022–2.474, P<0.05), particularly in the quartile 1 group (OR=1.845, 95%CI=1.119–3.042, P<0.05), but not in the quartile 4 group. Conclusions The dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) of rs1894111 polymorphism in the ADRBK1 gene might be associated with low-renin hypertension in Han Chinese. PMID:27555048

  2. Association Between Polymorphisms of ADRBK1 Gene and Plasma Renin Activity in Hypertensive Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Li, Nanfang; Yao, Xiaoguang; Heizati, Mulalibieke; Zhang, Delian; Zhu, Qing; Chang, Guijuan; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Renin is the first step of the RAS cascade, which is a major regulator of salt-volume homeostasis. Adrenergic beta receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1) plays important roles in regulating blood pressure via the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC), which plays an important role in Na+ reabsorption in the renal collecting duct. The present case-control study was designed to investigate the potential relationship between polymorphisms of ADRBK1 and plasma renin activity (PRA) in hypertension. MATERIAL AND METHODS We recruited 1831 hypertensive and 422 normotensive Han Chinese subjects. Sitting PRA (ng/mL/h) was measured using radioimmunoassay method. Hypertensive patients were classified into 4 renin categories via PRA quartile. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ADRBK1 gene (rs1894111, rs4930416, rs7127431, rs12286664, and rs3730147) were identified via TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS Comparison of the hypertensive group and the control group showed significant differences in distribution of genotypes and alleles of rs1894111 (P<0.05). Moreover, distribution of the dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) in rs1894111 was lower in the hypertensive group than in the control group (P<0.05). Subjects were classified into 4 subgroups based on PRA quartile; the dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) of rs1894111 was significantly lower in the quartile 1 group (the group with the lowest PRA) than in the control group (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) of rs1894111 was significantly different in the hypertensive group (OR=1.590, 95%CI=1.022-2.474, P<0.05), particularly in the quartile 1 group (OR=1.845, 95%CI=1.119-3.042, P<0.05), but not in the quartile 4 group. CONCLUSIONS The dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) of rs1894111 polymorphism in the ADRBK1 gene might be associated with low-renin hypertension in Han Chinese. PMID:27555048

  3. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  4. [Functional polymorphisms in clock genes and circadian rhythm sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Takashi

    2007-06-01

    Polymorphisms in clock genes induce circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Mutations in Per2 gene (S662G) or Casein Kinasel delta (CK16) gene (T44A) cause Familial advanced sleep phase syndrome. Missense polymorphisms in Per3 (V647G) and CK1e (S408N) genes increase or decrease the risk of developing delayed sleep phase syndrome. All of these polymorphisms seem to affect the phosphorylation of the clock proteins. Some of the polymorphisms in CK1, which shows reduced enzyme activity in vitro, induced increased phosphorylation of PER proteins in in vivo assays. Careful attention should be paid to analyze the complex system composed of feedback loops, such as the biological clock. PMID:17633519

  5. A comparative study of the packing of two polymorphs of the nickel(II) pincer complex [2,6-bis(di-tert-butylphosphinoyl)-4-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyloxy)phenyl-κ(3)P,C(1),P']chloridonickel(II).

    PubMed

    García-Eleno, Marco A; Quezada-Miriel, Magdalena; Reyes-Martínez, Reyna; Hernández-Ortega, Simón; Morales-Morales, David

    2016-05-01

    Pincer complexes can act as catalysts in organic transformations and have potential applications in materials, medicine and biology. They exhibit robust structures and high thermal stability attributed to the tridentate coordination of the pincer ligands and the strong σ metal-carbon bond. Nickel derivatives of these ligands have shown high catalytic activities in cross-coupling reactions and other industrially relevant transformations. This work reports the crystal structures of two polymorphs of the title Ni(II) POCOP pincer complex, [Ni(C29H41N2O8P2)Cl] or [NiCl{C6H2-4-[OCOC6H4-3,5-(NO2)2]-2,6-(OP(t)Bu2)2}]. Both pincer structures exhibit the Ni(II) atom in a distorted square-planar coordination geometry with the POCOP pincer ligand coordinated in a typical tridentate manner via the two P atoms and one arene C atom via a C-Ni σ bond, giving rise to two five-membered chelate rings. The coordination sphere of the Ni(II) centre is completed by a chloride ligand. The asymmetric units of both polymorphs consist of one molecule of the pincer complex. In the first polymorph, the arene rings are nearly coplanar, with a dihedral angle between the mean planes of 27.9 (1)°, while in the second polymorph, this angle is 82.64 (1)°, which shows that the arene rings are almost perpendicular to one another. The supramolecular structure is directed by the presence of weak C-H...O=X (X = C or N) interactions, forming two- and three-dimensional chain arrangements. PMID:27146567

  6. Aluminum complexes of the redox-active [ONO] pincer ligand.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Géza; Heyduk, Alan F

    2012-07-14

    A series of aluminum complexes containing the tridentate, redox-active ligand bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-phenol)amine ([ONO]H(3)) in three different oxidation states were synthesized. The aluminum halide salts AlCl(3) and AlBr(3) were reacted with the doubly deprotonated form of the ligand to afford five-coordinate [ONHO(cat)]AlX(solv) complexes (1a, X = Cl, solv = OEt(2); 1b, X = Br, solv = THF), each having a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry at the aluminum and containing the [ONHO(cat)](2-) ligand with a protonated, sp(3)-hybridized nitrogen donor. The [ONO] ligand platform may also be added to aluminum through the use of the oxidized ligand salt [ONO(q)]K, which was reacted with AlCl(3) in the presence of either diphenylacetylacetonate (acacPh(2)(-)) or 8-oxyquinoline (quinO(-)) to afford [ONO(q)]Al(acacPh(2))Cl (2) or [ONO(q)]Al(quinO)Cl (3), respectively, with well-defined [ONO(q)](-) ligands. Quinonate complexes 2 and 3 were reduced by one electron to afford the corresponding complexes K{[ONO(sq)]Al(acacPh(2))(py)} (4) and K{[ONO(sq)]Al(quinO)(py)} (5), respectively, containing well-defined [ONO(sq)](2-) ligands. The addition of tetrachloro-1,2-quinone to 1a in the presence of pyridine resulted in the expulsion of HCl and the formation of an aluminum complex with two different redox active ligands, [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(6)Cl(4))(py) (6). Similar results were obtained when 1a was reacted with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(14)H(8))(py) (7) or with pyrene-4,5-dione to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(16)H(8))(py) (8). Structural, spectroscopic and preliminary magnetic measurements on 6-8 suggest ligand non-innocent redox behavior in these complexes. PMID:22669327

  7. GT-CATS: Tracking Operator Activities in Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Mitchell, Christine M.; Palmer, Everett A.

    1999-01-01

    Human operators of complex dynamic systems can experience difficulties supervising advanced control automation. One remedy is to develop intelligent aiding systems that can provide operators with context-sensitive advice and reminders. The research reported herein proposes, implements, and evaluates a methodology for activity tracking, a form of intent inferencing that can supply the knowledge required for an intelligent aid by constructing and maintaining a representation of operator activities in real time. The methodology was implemented in the Georgia Tech Crew Activity Tracking System (GT-CATS), which predicts and interprets the actions performed by Boeing 757/767 pilots navigating using autopilot flight modes. This report first describes research on intent inferencing and complex modes of automation. It then provides a detailed description of the GT-CATS methodology, knowledge structures, and processing scheme. The results of an experimental evaluation using airline pilots are given. The results show that GT-CATS was effective in predicting and interpreting pilot actions in real time.

  8. Interaction between peroxisome proliferator- activated receptor gamma polymorphism and overweight on diabetic retinopathy in a Chinese case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Li, Ruo-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ (PPAR γ) and overweight were both associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR), so the aim of this study was to investigate the association of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PPAR γ with DR and additional role of gene-BMI interaction. Methods: A total of 500 patients with T2DM (236 men, 264 women), with a mean age of 54.3 ± 15.8 years old, were selected, including 247 diabetic retinopathy patients and 253 controls. Four SNPs were selected for genotyping in the case-control study: rs1805192, rs709158, rs3856806, rs4684847. Logistic regression model was used to examine the interaction between SNP and overweight on DR, odds ratio (OR) and 95% confident interval (95% CI) were calculated. Results: The carriers of C allele of the rs1805192 polymorphism revealed decreased DR risk than those with Pro/Pro variants (Pro/Ala+Ala/Ala versus Pro/Pro, adjusted OR (95% CI)=0.86 (0.65-0.96), P=0.012), after adjusting for covariates. We also found that obese subjects with Pro/Ala or Ala/Ala variants genotype have lowest DR risk, compared to obese subjects with Pro/Pro genotype or non- obese subjects with Pro/Ala or Ala/Ala (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.32-0.63), after covariates adjustment. Conclusions: Our results support an important association between rs1805192 minor allele (Ala allele) of PPAR γ and DR, the interaction analysis shown a combined effect of Ala- BMI interaction on DR. PMID:26885119

  9. Evaluation of HLA-G 14 bp Ins/Del and +3142G>C Polymorphism with Susceptibility and Early Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sandoughi, Mahnaz; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Bahari, Gholamreza; Rezaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Background. Mounting evidence designates that HLA-G plays a role in the regulation of inflammatory processes and autoimmune diseases. There are controversial reports concerning the impact of HLA-G gene polymorphism on rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was aimed at examining the impact of 14 bp ins/del and +3142G>C polymorphism with susceptibility and early disease activity in RA patients in a sample of the Iranian population. Methods. This case-control study was done on 194 patients with RA and 158 healthy subjects. The HLA-G rs1063320 (+3142G>C) and rs66554220 (14 bp ins/del) variants were genotype by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFP) and PCR method, respectively. Results. The HLA-G +3142G>C polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in codominant (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38–0.97, p = 0.038, GC versus GG; OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.14–0.92, p = 0.034, CC versus GG), dominant (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36–0.87, p = 0.011, GC + CC versus GG), and allele (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.41–0.84, p = 0.004, C versus G) inheritance models tested. Our finding did not support an association between HLA-G 14 bp ins/del variant and risk/protection of RA. In addition, no significant association was found between the polymorphism and early disease activity. Conclusion. In summary, our results showed that HLA-G +3142G>C gene polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in a sample of the Iranian population. PMID:27610404

  10. Evaluation of HLA-G 14 bp Ins/Del and +3142G>C Polymorphism with Susceptibility and Early Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sandoughi, Mahnaz; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Bahari, Gholamreza; Rezaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Background. Mounting evidence designates that HLA-G plays a role in the regulation of inflammatory processes and autoimmune diseases. There are controversial reports concerning the impact of HLA-G gene polymorphism on rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was aimed at examining the impact of 14 bp ins/del and +3142G>C polymorphism with susceptibility and early disease activity in RA patients in a sample of the Iranian population. Methods. This case-control study was done on 194 patients with RA and 158 healthy subjects. The HLA-G rs1063320 (+3142G>C) and rs66554220 (14 bp ins/del) variants were genotype by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFP) and PCR method, respectively. Results. The HLA-G +3142G>C polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in codominant (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38–0.97, p = 0.038, GC versus GG; OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.14–0.92, p = 0.034, CC versus GG), dominant (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36–0.87, p = 0.011, GC + CC versus GG), and allele (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.41–0.84, p = 0.004, C versus G) inheritance models tested. Our finding did not support an association between HLA-G 14 bp ins/del variant and risk/protection of RA. In addition, no significant association was found between the polymorphism and early disease activity. Conclusion. In summary, our results showed that HLA-G +3142G>C gene polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in a sample of the Iranian population.

  11. Evaluation of HLA-G 14 bp Ins/Del and +3142G>C Polymorphism with Susceptibility and Early Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Sandoughi, Mahnaz; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Bahari, Gholamreza; Rezaei, Maryam; Zakeri, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Background. Mounting evidence designates that HLA-G plays a role in the regulation of inflammatory processes and autoimmune diseases. There are controversial reports concerning the impact of HLA-G gene polymorphism on rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was aimed at examining the impact of 14 bp ins/del and +3142G>C polymorphism with susceptibility and early disease activity in RA patients in a sample of the Iranian population. Methods. This case-control study was done on 194 patients with RA and 158 healthy subjects. The HLA-G rs1063320 (+3142G>C) and rs66554220 (14 bp ins/del) variants were genotype by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFP) and PCR method, respectively. Results. The HLA-G +3142G>C polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in codominant (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38-0.97, p = 0.038, GC versus GG; OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.14-0.92, p = 0.034, CC versus GG), dominant (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36-0.87, p = 0.011, GC + CC versus GG), and allele (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.41-0.84, p = 0.004, C versus G) inheritance models tested. Our finding did not support an association between HLA-G 14 bp ins/del variant and risk/protection of RA. In addition, no significant association was found between the polymorphism and early disease activity. Conclusion. In summary, our results showed that HLA-G +3142G>C gene polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in a sample of the Iranian population. PMID:27610404

  12. Immersion freezing of ice nucleation active protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Augustin, S.; Clauss, T.; Wex, H.; Šantl-Temkiv, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Niedermeier, D.; Stratmann, F.

    2013-06-01

    Utilising the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS), the immersion freezing behaviour of droplet ensembles containing monodisperse particles, generated from a Snomax™ solution/suspension, was investigated. Thereto ice fractions were measured in the temperature range between -5 °C to -38 °C. Snomax™ is an industrial product applied for artificial snow production and contains Pseudomonas syringae} bacteria which have long been used as model organism for atmospheric relevant ice nucleation active (INA) bacteria. The ice nucleation activity of such bacteria is controlled by INA protein complexes in their outer membrane. In our experiments, ice fractions increased steeply in the temperature range from about -6 °C to about -10 °C and then levelled off at ice fractions smaller than one. The plateau implies that not all examined droplets contained an INA protein complex. Assuming the INA protein complexes to be Poisson distributed over the investigated droplet populations, we developed the CHESS model (stoCHastic modEl of similar and poiSSon distributed ice nuclei) which allows for the calculation of ice fractions as function of temperature and time for a given nucleation rate. Matching calculated and measured ice fractions, we determined and parameterised the nucleation rate of INA protein complexes exhibiting class III ice nucleation behaviour. Utilising the CHESS model, together with the determined nucleation rate, we compared predictions from the model to experimental data from the literature and found good agreement. We found that (a) the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate expression quantifying the ice nucleation behaviour of the INA protein complex is capable of describing the ice nucleation behaviour observed in various experiments for both, Snomax™ and P. syringae bacteria, (b) the ice nucleation rate, and its temperature dependence, seem to be very similar regardless of whether the INA protein complexes inducing ice nucleation are attached

  13. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  14. Active printed materials for complex self-evolving deformations.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-18

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  15. The Chromosomal Passenger Complex Activates Polo Kinase at Centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Mar; Pinson, Xavier; Platani, Melpi; Salloum, Zeina; Xu, Zhenjie; Clark, Anthony; MacIsaac, Fiona; Ogawa, Hiromi; Eggert, Ulrike; Glover, David M.; Archambault, Vincent; Earnshaw, William C.

    2012-01-01

    The coordinated activities at centromeres of two key cell cycle kinases, Polo and Aurora B, are critical for ensuring that the two sister kinetochores of each chromosome are attached to microtubules from opposite spindle poles prior to chromosome segregation at anaphase. Initial attachments of chromosomes to the spindle involve random interactions between kinetochores and dynamic microtubules, and errors occur frequently during early stages of the process. The balance between microtubule binding and error correction (e.g., release of bound microtubules) requires the activities of Polo and Aurora B kinases, with Polo promoting stable attachments and Aurora B promoting detachment. Our study concerns the coordination of the activities of these two kinases in vivo. We show that INCENP, a key scaffolding subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), which consists of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin, and Borealin/Dasra B, also interacts with Polo kinase in Drosophila cells. It was known that Aurora A/Bora activates Polo at centrosomes during late G2. However, the kinase that activates Polo on chromosomes for its critical functions at kinetochores was not known. We show here that Aurora B kinase phosphorylates Polo on its activation loop at the centromere in early mitosis. This phosphorylation requires both INCENP and Aurora B activity (but not Aurora A activity) and is critical for Polo function at kinetochores. Our results demonstrate clearly that Polo kinase is regulated differently at centrosomes and centromeres and suggest that INCENP acts as a platform for kinase crosstalk at the centromere. This crosstalk may enable Polo and Aurora B to achieve a balance wherein microtubule mis-attachments are corrected, but proper attachments are stabilized allowing proper chromosome segregation. PMID:22291575

  16. Supramolecular coordination and antimicrobial activities of constructed mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Abou-Dobara, M. I.; Seyam, H. A.

    2013-03-01

    A novel series of copper(II) and palladium(II) with 4-derivatives benzaldehyde pyrazolone (Ln) were synthesized. The mixed ligand complexes were prepared by using 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) as second ligand. The structure of these complexes was identified and confirm by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, UV-Vis, IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy and magnetic moment measurements as well as thermal analysis. The ligand behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand through ON donor sites. ESR spectra show the simultaneous presence of a planar trans and a nearly planar cis isomers in the 1:2 ratio for all N,O complexes [Cu(Ln)2]Cl2ṡ2H2O. Schiff bases (Ln) were tested against bacterial species; namely two Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and two Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungal species (Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporium, Penicillium italicum and Alternaria alternata). The tested compounds have antibacterial activity against S. aureus, B. cereus and K. pneumoniae.

  17. Electron acceleration and radiation in evolving complex active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, A.; Gontikakis, C.; Vilmer, N.; Vlahos, L.

    2004-07-01

    We present a model for the acceleration and radiation of solar energetic particles (electrons) in evolving complex active regions. The spatio - temporal evolution of active regions is calculated using a cellular automaton model, based on self-organized criticality. The acceleration of electrons is due to the presence of randomly placed, localized electric fields produced by the energy release process, simulated by the cellular automaton model. We calculate the resulting kinetic energy distributions of the particles and their emitted X-ray radiation spectra using the thick target approximation, and we perform a parametric study with respect to number of electric fields present and thermal temperature of the injected distribution. Finally, comparing our results with the existing observations, we find that they are in a good agreement with the observed X-ray spectra in the energy range 100-1000 keV.

  18. Polymorph control of luminescence properties in molecular crystals of a platinum and organoarsenic complex and formation of stable one-dimensional nanochannel.

    PubMed

    Unesaki, Hikaru; Kato, Takuji; Watase, Seiji; Matsukawa, Kimihiro; Naka, Kensuke

    2014-08-18

    The mononuclear diiodoplatinum(II) complex (trans-PtI2(cis-DHDAMe)2), where cis-DHDAMe = cis-1,4-dihydro-1,4-dimethyl-2,3,5,6-tetrakis(methoxycarbonyl)-1,4-diarsinine, forms three different crystalline polymorphs that can be either concomitantly or separately obtained on varying the recrystallization conditions. Cubic red crystals (α-phase) and red-orange needles (β-phase) exhibit solid-state red emissions at room temperature. Cubic red crystals of the γ-phase show no solid-state emission at room temperature. All crystalline structures were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Room-temperature strongly luminescent crystals (α-phase) (λem = 657 nm, Φ = 0.52) have a triclinic P1 (No. 2) structure and no voids in the crystal structure. Red-orange needle-shaped crystals of the β-phase exhibit moderate red luminescence (λem = 695 nm, Φ = 0.09) at room temperature and have a trigonal, R3 (No. 148), structure. In the needlelike crystals of the β-phase, stable hexagonal arrays of nanoporous channels, 5.0 Å in diameter, are formed. Room-temperature nonluminescent crystals (γ-phase) have an orthorhombic, Pbca (No. 61), structure with a void volume that is 4.9% of the total crystal volume. After heating the α-phase crystals at 150 °C for 2 min, a powder XRD pattern different from the original crystal is obtained, and its solid-state emission at room temperature decreased. After heating the β-phase crystals at 150 °C for 2 min, the emission wavelength and the quantum yield of the solid-state emission at room temperature and the powder XRD pattern are the same as those of the α-phase after heating at 150 °C. A crystal-to-crystal transition triggered by the thermal stimulus produces a different stable polymorph of the mononuclear diiodoplatinum(II) complex. The one-dimensional nanoporous crystals encapsulated iodine without distorting the crystal packing.

  19. Activation of signalling by the activin receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Montalvo, E; Massagué, J

    1996-01-01

    Activin exerts its effects by simultaneously binding to two types of p rotein serine/threonine kinase receptors, each type existing in various isoforms. Using the ActR-IB and ActR-IIB receptor isoforms, we have investigated the mechanism of activin receptor activation. ActR-IIB are phosphoproteins with demonstrable affinity for each other. However, activin addition strongly promotes an interaction between these two proteins. Activin binds directly to ActR-IIB, and this complex associates with ActR-IB, which does not bind ligand on its own. In the resulting complex, ActR-IB becomes hyperphosphorylated, and this requires the kinase activity of ActR-IIB. Mutation of conserved serines and threonines in the GS domain, a region just upstream of the kinase domain in ActR-IB, abrogates both phosphorylation and signal propagation, suggesting that this domain contains phosphorylation sites required for signalling. ActR-IB activation can be mimicked by mutation of Thr-206 to aspartic acid, which yields a construct, ActR-IB(T206D), that signals in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the signalling activity of this mutant construct is undisturbed by overexpression of a dominant negative kinase-defective ActR-IIB construct, indicating that ActR-IB(T206D) can signal independently of ActR-IIB. The evidence suggests that ActR-IIB acts as a primary activin receptor and ActR-IB acts as a downstream transducer of activin signals. PMID:8622651

  20. Performance Assessment Assistance Activities in the DOE Complex - 12325

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger R.; Phifer, Mark A.; Letourneau, Martin J.

    2012-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) has established a Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) to foster the sharing of information among performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, regulators and oversight personnel. The general intent is to contribute to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy and quality of implementation of PAs and risk assessments around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP activities have involved commercial disposal facilities and international participants to provide a global perspective. The PA CoP has also sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from on-going modelling activities. The PA CoP encourages activities to provide programmatic and technical assistance in the form of sharing experience and lessons learned with practitioners during the development of PAs and risk assessments. This assistance complements DOE-EM reviews through the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) that are conducted after modelling efforts are completed. Such up-front assistance is providing additional value in terms of improving consistency and sharing of information. There has been a substantial increase in the amount of assistance being provided. The assistance has been well received by practitioners and regulators that have been involved. The paper highlights assistance and sharing of information that has been conducted in the last two years to support activities underway in support of proposed disposal facilities at Paducah, Portsmouth, and the Idaho National Laboratory and tank closure at Hanford. DOE-EM established the PA CoP to help improve the consistency and quality of implementation of modelling activities around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP has sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from ongoing

  1. Recovery of CD4+ T Cells in HIV patients with a stable virologic response to antiretroviral therapy is associated with polymorphisms of interleukin-6 and central major histocompatibility complex genes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Sonia; Rosenow, Ann A; James, Ian R; Roberts, Steven G; Nolan, Richard C; French, Martyn A; Price, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether polymorphisms in genes associated with HIV disease progression and/or immune activation affect CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV patients who began combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) with advanced immunodeficiency and achieved stable control of plasma viremia. Patients with CD4 T-cell counts <300 cells/microL (n = 33) and >400 cells/microL (n = 37) on ART were compared. A multiple case-control logistic regression associated carriage of BAT1(1,2) or interleukin (IL)6-174(2,2) with low CD4 T-cell counts (P = 0.012). BAT1*2 uniquely marks the central major histocompatibility complex region of a conserved haplotype (HLA-A1,B8,BAT1*2,TNFA-308*2,DR3,DQ2). There was no association between alleles carried at CCR5Delta32, CCR5 59029, CCR5 59353, CCR2+190 (V64I), SDF1 3'UTR, IL1A+4845, IL1B+3953, IL4-589, IL10-592, IL10-R1+536, IL10-R1+1112, IL12B 3'UTR, TNFA-308, or TNFA-1031 and CD4 T-cell counts. We suggest that immune activation and/or CD4 T-cell apoptosis in HIV patients on effective ART is influenced by genetic factors.

  2. Distribution and genotype frequency of the C1431T and pro12ala polymorphisms of the peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma gene in an Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Rooki, Hassan; Haerian, Monir-Sadat; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Mirhafez, Reza; Ferns, Gordon; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Zali, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear transcription factor regulating multiple genes involved in cell growth, differentiation, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and energy production. Several genetic variations in the PPARγ gene have been identified to be associated with diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease. The present study was designed to explore the distribution of two common single nucleotide polymorphisms of the PPARγ gene (C1431T and Pro12Ala) in an Iranian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genotype frequencies for these two polymorphisms were compared for 160 healthy Iranian individuals with reports from other populations. The Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The genotype distribution of the C1431T PPARγ polymorphism was 0.869 for the CC genotype, 0.119 for the CT genotype and 0.013 for uncommon TT genotype. Allelic frequencies were 0.93 for C and 0.07 for T allele respectively. For the Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPARγ gene, genotypic distributions and allelic frequencies were, 0.813 for CC, 0.181 for CG and 0.06 for GG and 0.903 for C and 0.097 for G respectively. Allelic and genotypic frequencies for both polymorphisms of PPARγ gene were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. CONCLUSIONS: Iran is a country with an ethnically diverse population and a comparison of allelic and genotypic frequencies of PPARγ C1431T and Pro12Ala polymorphisms between our population and others showed significant differences. PMID:24497707

  3. Pro198Leu polymorphism affects the selenium status and GPx activity in response to Brazil nut intake.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Bárbara R; Busse, Alexandre L; Hare, Dominic J; Cominetti, Cristiane; Horst, Maria A; McColl, Gawain; Magaldi, Regina M; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Cozzolino, Silvia M F

    2016-02-01

    Selenoproteins play important roles in antioxidant mechanisms, and are thus hypothesised to have some involvement in the pathology of certain types of dementia. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are both thought to involve impaired biological activity of certain selenoproteins. Previously, supplementation with a selenium-rich Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) has shown potential in reducing cognitive decline in MCI patients, and could prove to be a safe and effective nutritional approach early in the disease process to slow decline. Here, we have conducted a pilot study that examined the effects of a range of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the selenoproteins glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) and selenoprotein P (SEPP) in response to selenium supplementation via dietary Brazil nuts, including selenium status, oxidative stress parameters and GPX1 and SEPP gene expression. Our data suggest that GPX1 Pro198Leu rs1050450 genotypes may differentially affect the selenium status and GPx activity. Moreover, rs7579 and rs3877899 SNPs in SEPP gene, as well as GPX1 rs1050450 genotypes can influence the expression of GPX1 and SEPP mRNA in response to Brazil nuts intake. This small study gives cause for larger investigations into the role of these SNPs in both the selenium status and response to selenium dietary intake, especially in chronic degenerative conditions like MCI and AD. PMID:26661784

  4. Pro198Leu polymorphism affects the selenium status and GPx activity in response to Brazil nut intake.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Bárbara R; Busse, Alexandre L; Hare, Dominic J; Cominetti, Cristiane; Horst, Maria A; McColl, Gawain; Magaldi, Regina M; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Cozzolino, Silvia M F

    2016-02-01

    Selenoproteins play important roles in antioxidant mechanisms, and are thus hypothesised to have some involvement in the pathology of certain types of dementia. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are both thought to involve impaired biological activity of certain selenoproteins. Previously, supplementation with a selenium-rich Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) has shown potential in reducing cognitive decline in MCI patients, and could prove to be a safe and effective nutritional approach early in the disease process to slow decline. Here, we have conducted a pilot study that examined the effects of a range of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the selenoproteins glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) and selenoprotein P (SEPP) in response to selenium supplementation via dietary Brazil nuts, including selenium status, oxidative stress parameters and GPX1 and SEPP gene expression. Our data suggest that GPX1 Pro198Leu rs1050450 genotypes may differentially affect the selenium status and GPx activity. Moreover, rs7579 and rs3877899 SNPs in SEPP gene, as well as GPX1 rs1050450 genotypes can influence the expression of GPX1 and SEPP mRNA in response to Brazil nuts intake. This small study gives cause for larger investigations into the role of these SNPs in both the selenium status and response to selenium dietary intake, especially in chronic degenerative conditions like MCI and AD.

  5. Disappearing Polymorphs Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bučar, Dejan-Krešimir; Lancaster, Robert W; Bernstein, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Nearly twenty years ago, Dunitz and Bernstein described a selection of intriguing cases of polymorphs that disappear. The inability to obtain a crystal form that has previously been prepared is indeed a frustrating and potentially serious problem for solid-state scientists. This Review discusses recent occurrences and examples of disappearing polymorphs (as well as the emergence of elusive crystal forms) to demonstrate the enduring relevance of this troublesome, but always captivating, phenomenon in solid-state research. A number of these instances have been central issues in patent litigations. This Review, therefore, also highlights the complex relationship between crystal chemistry and the law. PMID:26031248

  6. 75 FR 77047 - Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured.... Title of Proposal: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance... Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities describes the types of internal controls and...

  7. A single-nucleotide-polymorphism-based genotyping assay for simultaneous detection of different carbendazim-resistant genotypes in the Fusarium graminearum species complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Brankovics, Balázs; van der Lee, Theo A.J.; Waalwijk, Cees; van Diepeningen, Anne A.D.; Xu, Jin; Xu, Jingsheng

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence resistance to methyl benzimidazole carbamates (MBC)-fungicides in the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) is becoming a serious problem in the control of Fusarium head blight in China. The resistance is caused by point mutations in the β2-tubulingene. So far, five resistant genotypes (F167Y, E198Q, E198L, E198K and F200Y) have been reported in the field. To establish a high-throughput method for rapid detection of all the five mutations simultaneously, an efficient single-nucleotide-polymorphism-based genotyping method was developed based on the Luminex xMAP system. One pair of amplification primers and five allele specific primer extension probes were designed and optimized to specially distinguish the different genotypes within one single reaction. This method has good extensibility and can be combined with previous reported probes to form a highly integrated tool for species, trichothecene chemotype and MBC resistance detection. Using this method, carbendazim resistant FGSC isolates from Jiangsu, Anhui and Sichuan Province in China were identified. High and moderate frequencies of resistance were observed in Jiangsu and Anhui Province, respectively. Carbendazim resistance in F. asiaticum is only observed in the 3ADON genotype. Overall, our method proved to be useful for early detection of MBC resistance in the field and the result aids in the choice of fungicide type. PMID:27812414

  8. Extensive polymorphism and evidence of selection pressure on major histocompatibility complex DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 class II genes in Croatian grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Arbanasić, H; Huber, Đ; Kusak, J; Gomerčić, T; Hrenović, J; Galov, A

    2013-01-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a key component of the mammalian immune system and have become important molecular markers for measuring fitness-related genetic variation in wildlife populations. Because of human persecution and habitat fragmentation, the grey wolf has become extinct from a large part of Western and Central Europe, and remaining populations have become isolated. In Croatia, the grey wolf population, part of the Dinaric-Balkan population, shrank nearly to extinction during the 20th century, and is now legally protected. Using the cloning-sequencing method, we investigated the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of exon 2 of MHC class II DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 genes in 77 individuals. We identified 13 DRB1, 7 DQA1 and 11 DQB1 highly divergent alleles, and 13 DLA-DRB1/DQA1/DQB1 haplotypes. Selection analysis comparing the relative rates of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations (d(N)/d(S)) showed evidence of positive selection pressure acting on all three loci. Trans-species polymorphism was found, suggesting the existence of balancing selection. Evolutionary codon models detected considerable difference between alpha and beta chain gene selection patterns: DRB1 and DQB1 appeared to be under stronger selection pressure, while DQA1 showed signs of moderate selection. Our results suggest that, despite the recent contraction of the Croatian wolf population, genetic variability in selectively maintained immune genes has been preserved. PMID:23134500

  9. Structure-activity relationships for organometallic osmium arene phenylazopyridine complexes with potent anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Habtemariam, Abraha; Basri, Aida M B H; Braddick, Darren; Clarkson, Guy J; Sadler, Peter J

    2011-10-28

    We report the synthesis and characterisation of 32 half sandwich phenylazopyridine Os(II) arene complexes [Os(η(6)-arene)(phenylazopyridine)X](+) in which X is chloride or iodide, the arene is p-cymene or biphenyl and the pyridine and phenyl rings contain a variety of substituents (F, Cl, Br, I, CF(3), OH or NO(2)). Ten X-ray crystal structures have been determined. Cytotoxicity towards A2780 human ovarian cancer cells ranges from high potency at nanomolar concentrations to inactivity. In general the introduction of an electron-withdrawing group (e.g. F, Cl, Br or I) at specific positions on the pyridine ring significantly increases cytotoxic activity and aqueous solubility. Changing the arene from p-cymene to biphenyl and the monodentate ligand X from chloride to iodide also increases the activity significantly. Activation by hydrolysis and DNA binding appears not to be the major mechanism of action since both the highly active complex [Os(η(6)-bip)(2-F-azpy)I]PF(6) (9) and the moderately active complex [Os(η(6)-bip)(3-Cl-azpy)I]PF(6) (23) are very stable and inert towards aquation. Studies of octanol-water partition coefficients (log P) and subcellular distributions of osmium in A2780 human ovarian cancer cells suggested that cell uptake and targeting to cellular organelles play important roles in determining activity. Although complex 9 induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A2780 cells, the ROS level did not appear to play a role in the mechanism of anticancer activity. This class of organometallic osmium complexes has new and unusual features worthy of further exploration for the design of novel anticancer drugs.

  10. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the ST3GAL4 Gene with VWF Antigen and Factor VIII Activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Jaewoo; Xue, Cheng; Preisser, John S; Cramer, Drake W; Houck, Katie L; Liu, Guo; Folsom, Aaron R; Couper, David; Yu, Fuli; Dong, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    VWF is extensively glycosylated with biantennary core fucosylated glycans. Most N-linked and O-linked glycans on VWF are sialylated. FVIII is also glycosylated, with a glycan structure similar to that of VWF. ST3GAL sialyltransferases catalyze the transfer of sialic acids in the α2,3 linkage to termini of N- and O-glycans. This sialic acid modification is critical for VWF synthesis and activity. We analyzed genetic and phenotypic data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study for the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ST3GAL4 gene with plasma VWF levels and FVIII activity in 12,117 subjects. We also analyzed ST3GAL4 SNPs found in 2,535 subjects of 26 ethnicities from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) project for ethnic diversity, SNP imputation, and ST3GAL4 haplotypes. We identified 14 and 1,714 ST3GAL4 variants in the ARIC GWAS and 1000G databases respectively, with 46% being ethnically diverse in their allele frequencies. Among the 14 ST3GAL4 SNPs found in ARIC GWAS, the intronic rs2186717, rs7928391, and rs11220465 were associated with VWF levels and with FVIII activity after adjustment for age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, ever-smoking status, and ABO. This study illustrates the power of next-generation sequencing in the discovery of new genetic variants and a significant ethnic diversity in the ST3GAL4 gene. We discuss potential mechanisms through which these intronic SNPs regulate ST3GAL4 biosynthesis and the activity that affects VWF and FVIII. PMID:27584569

  11. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the ST3GAL4 Gene with VWF Antigen and Factor VIII Activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jaewoo; Xue, Cheng; Preisser, John S.; Cramer, Drake W.; Houck, Katie L.; Liu, Guo; Folsom, Aaron R.; Couper, David; Yu, Fuli; Dong, Jing-fei

    2016-01-01

    VWF is extensively glycosylated with biantennary core fucosylated glycans. Most N-linked and O-linked glycans on VWF are sialylated. FVIII is also glycosylated, with a glycan structure similar to that of VWF. ST3GAL sialyltransferases catalyze the transfer of sialic acids in the α2,3 linkage to termini of N- and O-glycans. This sialic acid modification is critical for VWF synthesis and activity. We analyzed genetic and phenotypic data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study for the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ST3GAL4 gene with plasma VWF levels and FVIII activity in 12,117 subjects. We also analyzed ST3GAL4 SNPs found in 2,535 subjects of 26 ethnicities from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) project for ethnic diversity, SNP imputation, and ST3GAL4 haplotypes. We identified 14 and 1,714 ST3GAL4 variants in the ARIC GWAS and 1000G databases respectively, with 46% being ethnically diverse in their allele frequencies. Among the 14 ST3GAL4 SNPs found in ARIC GWAS, the intronic rs2186717, rs7928391, and rs11220465 were associated with VWF levels and with FVIII activity after adjustment for age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, ever-smoking status, and ABO. This study illustrates the power of next-generation sequencing in the discovery of new genetic variants and a significant ethnic diversity in the ST3GAL4 gene. We discuss potential mechanisms through which these intronic SNPs regulate ST3GAL4 biosynthesis and the activity that affects VWF and FVIII. PMID:27584569

  12. Analysis of Polymorphic Residues Reveals Distinct Enzymatic and Cytotoxic Activities of the Streptococcus pyogenes NAD+ Glycohydrolase*

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Sukantha; Ghosh, Joydeep; Port, Gary C.; Koh, Eun-ik; Caparon, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    The Streptococcus pyogenes NAD+ glycohydrolase (SPN) is secreted from the bacterial cell and translocated into the host cell cytosol where it contributes to cell death. Recent studies suggest that SPN is evolving and has diverged into NAD+ glycohydrolase-inactive variants that correlate with tissue tropism. However, the role of SPN in both cytotoxicity and niche selection are unknown. To gain insight into the forces driving the adaptation of SPN, a detailed comparison of representative glycohydrolase activity-proficient and -deficient variants was conducted. Of a total 454 amino acids, the activity-deficient variants differed at only nine highly conserved positions. Exchanging residues between variants revealed that no one single residue could account for the inability of the deficient variants to cleave the glycosidic bond of β-NAD+ into nicotinamide and ADP-ribose; rather, reciprocal changes at 3 specific residues were required to both abolish activity of the proficient version and restore full activity to the deficient variant. Changing any combination of 1 or 2 residues resulted in intermediate activity. However, a change to any 1 residue resulted in a significant decrease in enzyme efficiency. A similar pattern involving multiple residues was observed for comparison with a second highly conserved activity-deficient variant class. Remarkably, despite differences in glycohydrolase activity, all versions of SPN were equally cytotoxic to cultured epithelial cells. These data indicate that the glycohydrolase activity of SPN may not be the only contribution the toxin has to the pathogenesis of S. pyogenes and that both versions of SPN play an important role during infection. PMID:23689507

  13. High selective antileishmanial activity of vanadium complex with stilbene derivative.

    PubMed

    Machado, Patrícia de Almeida; Mota, Vinícius Zamprogno; Cavalli, Ana Clara de Lima; de Carvalho, Gustavo Senra Gonçalves; Da Silva, Adilson David; Gameiro, Jacy; Cuin, Alexandre; Coimbra, Elaine Soares

    2015-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a group of disease caused by different species of the parasite Leishmania affecting millions of people worldwide. Conventional therapy relies on multiple parenteral injections with pentavalent antimonials which exhibit high toxicity and various side effects have been reported. Hence, the research for an effective and low toxic effect drug is necessary. In the present work, the synthesis, spectroscopic and analytical characterizations of stilbene derivative (H2Salophen) and its vanadium complex (VOSalophen) are reported. Besides the chemical ancillary information, investigation of the leishmanicidal effects of these compounds were provided. The biological assays against promastigote and amastigote forms of L. amazonensis have been shown that VOSalophen exhibited a strong antiparasitic activity (IC50 of 6.65 and 3.51 μM, respectively). Furthermore, the leishmanicidal activity was concentration and time-dependent. Regarding toxicity and selectivity on mammalian cells, VOSalophen have not caused significant damage to human erythrocytes in all concentrations tested and VOSalophen was almost seven times more destructive for the intracellular parasite than for macrophages. Furthermore, the leishmanicidal activity of VOSalophen in promastigote forms of L. amazonensis could be associated to mitochondrial dysfunction and increase of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In L. amazonensis-infected macrophages, VOSalophen induces ROS production and a microbicidal action NO-dependent. Our biological results indicate the effective and selective action of VOSalophen against L. amazonensis and the leishmanicidal effect can be associated to parasite disorders and immumodulatory effects.

  14. Abdominal aortic aneurysm as a complex multifactorial disease: interactions of polymorphisms of inflammatory genes, features of autoimmunity, and current status of MMPs.

    PubMed

    Pearce, William H; Shively, Vera P

    2006-11-01

    The role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has focused on the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The new frontier of MMP biology involves the role of MMPs in releasing cryptic fragments and neoepitopes from the ECM and the impact of MMPs on the regulation of the inflammatory response. The ECM is a complex structure, much more important than an inert scaffold. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 expose a cryptic epitope that controls angiogenesis. MMPs inhibit angiogenesis through the release of endostatin, endorepellin, arresten, canstatin, and tumstatin. Other breakdown products of the ECM include fragments of fragmin and elastin degradation products (EDPs). In addition, the ECM contains embedded vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Inflammation is a complex, highly regulated system that involves the identification of injury or infection, response to the injury or infection, repair and healing, and return to normal homeostasis. In some instances, the inflammatory process leads to a pathologic process that is damaging to the host. MMPs play an important role in the control of the inflammatory response through the modification of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and shedding of membrane receptors. Genetic association studies have been performed to help determine the genetic risk associated with certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) However, because of the variability in the patient populations and the size of the population, it is difficult to draw any conclusions from these studies. While the etiology of AAA remains unknown, understanding of the inflammatory process and its regulatory points will develop new strategies for the treatment of AAA. Perhaps one difficulty with understanding the pathogenesis of AAA is the lack of precise definition of the phenotype.

  15. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  16. Sphingosine Facilitates SNARE Complex Assembly and Activates Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Darios, Frédéric; Wasser, Catherine; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Giniatullin, Artur; Goodman, Kerry; Munoz-Bravo, Jose L.; Raingo, Jesica; Jorgačevski, Jernej; Kreft, Marko; Zorec, Robert; Rosa, Juliana M.; Gandia, Luis; Gutiérrez, Luis M.; Binz, Thomas; Giniatullin, Rashid; Kavalali, Ege T.; Davletov, Bazbek

    2009-01-01

    Summary Synaptic vesicles loaded with neurotransmitters fuse with the plasma membrane to release their content into the extracellular space, thereby allowing neuronal communication. The membrane fusion process is mediated by a conserved set of SNARE proteins: vesicular synaptobrevin and plasma membrane syntaxin and SNAP-25. Recent data suggest that the fusion process may be subject to regulation by local lipid metabolism. Here, we have performed a screen of lipid compounds to identify positive regulators of vesicular synaptobrevin. We show that sphingosine, a releasable backbone of sphingolipids, activates synaptobrevin in synaptic vesicles to form the SNARE complex implicated in membrane fusion. Consistent with the role of synaptobrevin in vesicle fusion, sphingosine upregulated exocytosis in isolated nerve terminals, neuromuscular junctions, neuroendocrine cells and hippocampal neurons, but not in neurons obtained from synaptobrevin-2 knockout mice. Further mechanistic insights suggest that sphingosine acts on the synaptobrevin/phospholipid interface, defining a novel function for this important lipid regulator. PMID:19524527

  17. Natural lecithin promotes neural network complexity and activity.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Shahrzad; Tamayol, Ali; Habibey, Rouhollah; Sabzevari, Reza; Kahn, Cyril; Geny, David; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Annabi, Nasim; Blau, Axel; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2016-05-27

    Phospholipids in the brain cell membranes contain different polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are critical to nervous system function and structure. In particular, brain function critically depends on the uptake of the so-called "essential" fatty acids such as omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) PUFAs that cannot be readily synthesized by the human body. We extracted natural lecithin rich in various PUFAs from a marine source and transformed it into nanoliposomes. These nanoliposomes increased neurite outgrowth, network complexity and neural activity of cortical rat neurons in vitro. We also observed an upregulation of synapsin I (SYN1), which supports the positive role of lecithin in synaptogenesis, synaptic development and maturation. These findings suggest that lecithin nanoliposomes enhance neuronal development, which may have an impact on devising new lecithin delivery strategies for therapeutic applications.

  18. Natural lecithin promotes neural network complexity and activity

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Shahrzad; Tamayol, Ali; Habibey, Rouhollah; Sabzevari, Reza; Kahn, Cyril; Geny, David; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Annabi, Nasim; Blau, Axel; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipids in the brain cell membranes contain different polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are critical to nervous system function and structure. In particular, brain function critically depends on the uptake of the so-called “essential” fatty acids such as omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) PUFAs that cannot be readily synthesized by the human body. We extracted natural lecithin rich in various PUFAs from a marine source and transformed it into nanoliposomes. These nanoliposomes increased neurite outgrowth, network complexity and neural activity of cortical rat neurons in vitro. We also observed an upregulation of synapsin I (SYN1), which supports the positive role of lecithin in synaptogenesis, synaptic development and maturation. These findings suggest that lecithin nanoliposomes enhance neuronal development, which may have an impact on devising new lecithin delivery strategies for therapeutic applications. PMID:27228907

  19. Activating and Elucidating Metabolism of Complex Sugars in Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seunghyun; Hipp, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is an industrially important host for production of organic acids, oleochemicals, lipids, and proteins with broad biotechnological applications. Albeit known for decades, the unique native metabolism of Y. lipolytica for using complex fermentable sugars, which are abundant in lignocellulosic biomass, is poorly understood. In this study, we activated and elucidated the native sugar metabolism in Y. lipolytica for cell growth on xylose and cellobiose as well as their mixtures with glucose through comprehensive metabolic and transcriptomic analyses. We identified 7 putative glucose-specific transporters, 16 putative xylose-specific transporters, and 4 putative cellobiose-specific transporters that are transcriptionally upregulated for growth on respective single sugars. Y. lipolytica is capable of using xylose as a carbon source, but xylose dehydrogenase is the key bottleneck of xylose assimilation and is transcriptionally repressed by glucose. Y. lipolytica has a set of 5 extracellular and 6 intracellular β-glucosidases and is capable of assimilating cellobiose via extra- and intracellular mechanisms, the latter being dominant for growth on cellobiose as a sole carbon source. Strikingly, Y. lipolytica exhibited enhanced sugar utilization for growth in mixed sugars, with strong carbon catabolite activation for growth on the mixture of xylose and cellobiose and with mild carbon catabolite repression of glucose on xylose and cellobiose. The results of this study shed light on fundamental understanding of the complex native sugar metabolism of Y. lipolytica and will help guide inverse metabolic engineering of Y. lipolytica for enhanced conversion of biomass-derived fermentable sugars to chemicals and fuels. PMID:26682853

  20. Activating and Elucidating Metabolism of Complex Sugars in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seunghyun; Hipp, Julie; Trinh, Cong T

    2016-02-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is an industrially important host for production of organic acids, oleochemicals, lipids, and proteins with broad biotechnological applications. Albeit known for decades, the unique native metabolism of Y. lipolytica for using complex fermentable sugars, which are abundant in lignocellulosic biomass, is poorly understood. In this study, we activated and elucidated the native sugar metabolism in Y. lipolytica for cell growth on xylose and cellobiose as well as their mixtures with glucose through comprehensive metabolic and transcriptomic analyses. We identified 7 putative glucose-specific transporters, 16 putative xylose-specific transporters, and 4 putative cellobiose-specific transporters that are transcriptionally upregulated for growth on respective single sugars. Y. lipolytica is capable of using xylose as a carbon source, but xylose dehydrogenase is the key bottleneck of xylose assimilation and is transcriptionally repressed by glucose. Y. lipolytica has a set of 5 extracellular and 6 intracellular β-glucosidases and is capable of assimilating cellobiose via extra- and intracellular mechanisms, the latter being dominant for growth on cellobiose as a sole carbon source. Strikingly, Y. lipolytica exhibited enhanced sugar utilization for growth in mixed sugars, with strong carbon catabolite activation for growth on the mixture of xylose and cellobiose and with mild carbon catabolite repression of glucose on xylose and cellobiose. The results of this study shed light on fundamental understanding of the complex native sugar metabolism of Y. lipolytica and will help guide inverse metabolic engineering of Y. lipolytica for enhanced conversion of biomass-derived fermentable sugars to chemicals and fuels. PMID:26682853

  1. Interaction effect between handedness and CNTNAP2 polymorphism (rs7794745 genotype) on voice-specific frontotemporal activity in healthy individuals: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Koeda, Michihiko; Watanabe, Atsushi; Tsuda, Kumiko; Matsumoto, Miwako; Ikeda, Yumiko; Kim, Woochan; Tateno, Amane; Naing, Banyar Than; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Takashi; Suzuki, Hidenori; Matsuura, Masato; Okubo, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that Contactin-associated protein-like2 (CNTNAP2) polymorphisms affect left-hemispheric function of language processing in healthy individuals, but no study has investigated the influence of these polymorphisms on right-hemispheric function involved in human voice perception. Further, although recent reports suggest that determination of handedness is influenced by genetic effect, the interaction effect between handedness and CNTNAP2 polymorphisms for brain activity in human voice perception and language processing has not been revealed. We aimed to investigate the interaction effect of handedness and CNTNAP2 polymorphisms in respect to brain function for human voice perception and language processing in healthy individuals. Brain function of 108 healthy volunteers (74 right-handed and 34 non-right-handed) was examined while they were passively listening to reverse sentences (rSEN), identifiable non-vocal sounds (SND), and sentences (SEN). Full factorial design analysis was calculated by using three factors: (1) rs7794745 (A/A or A/T), (2) rs2710102 [G/G or A carrier (A/G and A/A)], and (3) voice-specific response (rSEN or SND). The main effect of rs7794745 (A/A or A/T) was significantly revealed at the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG) and bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG). This result suggests that rs7794745 genotype affects voice-specific brain function. Furthermore, interaction effect was significantly observed among MFG-STG activations by human voice perception, rs7794745 (A/A or A/T), and handedness. These results suggest that CNTNAP2 polymorphisms could be one of the important factors in the neural development related to vocal communication and language processing in both right-handed and non-right-handed healthy individuals. PMID:25941478

  2. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES IN THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, R.

    2012-01-23

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) has established a Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) to foster the sharing of information among performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, regulators and oversight personnel. The general intent is to contribute to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy and quality of implementation of PAs and risk assessments around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP activities have involved commercial disposal facilities and international participants to provide a global perspective. The PA CoP has also sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from on-going modelling activities. The PA CoP encourages activities to provide programmatic and technical assistance in the form of sharing experience and lessons learned with practitioners during the development of PAs and risk assessments. This assistance complements DOE-EM reviews through the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) that are conducted after modelling efforts are completed. Such up-front assistance is providing additional value in terms of improving consistency and sharing of information. There has been a substantial increase in the amount of assistance being provided. The assistance has been well received by practitioners and regulators that have been involved. The paper highlights assistance and sharing of information that has been conducted in the last two years to support activities underway in support of proposed disposal facilities at Paducah, Portsmouth, and the Idaho National Laboratory and tank closure at Hanford.

  3. Polymorphism in the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex and Early Viral Decline during Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Leland J.; Im, KyungAh; Wahed, Abdus S.; Bugawan, Teodorica; Li, Jia; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Erlich, Henry; Rosen, Hugo R.; Liang, T. Jake; Yang, Huiying

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of the viral decline immediately after the start of therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may have prognostic potential for ultimate sustained virologic response. Considerable interindividual variability in the decline has been reported, including differences by race. The human major histocompatability complex (MHC) genes encode the human leukocyte antigens, which are important in the immune response to viral infections. We examined whether carriage of specific human MHC alleles are associated with the rate of the early viral decline. Longitudinal viral level data (baseline and days 1, 2, 7, 14, and 28 of treatment), medium resolution MHC genotyping, and random coefficients models were used to examine associations between MHC class I and class II allele carriage and the dynamics of the viral decline in 180 African-Americans (AAs) and 194 Caucasian Americans (CAs) with genotype-1 HCV infection over the first 28 days of treatment with peginterferon α2a plus ribavirin. Baseline viral levels were similar by race, irrespective of allele carriage. However, the rate of change in the viral decline was associated with both allele and race. Among the four subgroups defined by race and specific allele, the fastest rates of decline were observed (in terms of estimated mean viral declines log10 IU/ml during the first four weeks) in CA noncarriers for A*03 (2.75; P = 0.018), in CA carriers for Cw*03 (2.99; P = 0.046), and in CA noncarriers for DQA1*04 (2.66; P = 0.018) or DQB1*0402 (2.65; P = 0.018). MHC alleles are associated with the viral decline during the first 28 days of peginterferon therapy. PMID:18852273

  4. Resting posterior versus frontal delta/theta EEG activity is associated with extraversion and the COMT VAL(158)MET polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Jan; Gatt, Justine Megan

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that resting posterior versus frontal EEG delta/theta activity (delta/theta Pz-Fz) is both sensitive to pharmacological manipulations of neural dopamine and associated with the agency facet of extraversion (i.e., a motivational disposition comprising enthusiasm, energy, assertiveness, achievement striving and social dominance). These observations suggest that posterior versus frontal resting EEG delta/theta activity may represent a useful marker for investigating the molecular genetic basis of extraversion. The present study aimed to test the novel hypothesis of an association between delta/theta Pz-Fz and a functional polymorphism of the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT VAL(158)MET) involved in dopamine catabolism. This was conducted in a large EEG data set from the Brain Resource International Database (BRID; resting EEG from N=1093 healthy individuals, 382 of which also genotyped for COMT VAL(158)MET). In summary, we (1) showed for the first time that the VAL allele is associated with increased delta/theta Pz-Fz; (2) replicated the association between extraversion and delta/theta Pz-Fz in a large, heterogeneous sample including both genders; and (3) documented that the VAL allele of the COMT VAL(158)MET is associated with increased extraversion scores, as previously reported for an overlapping BRID sample. This coherent pattern of findings adds further support to the suggestion that the posterior-anterior distribution of resting EEG slow wave activity in the delta/theta range represents a useful tool for probing the dopaminergic basis of extraversion. PMID:20450956

  5. Host Competence and Helicase Activity Differences Exhibited by West Nile Viral Variants Expressing NS3-249 Amino Acid Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Stanley A.; Bowen, Richard A.; Reisen, William K.; Andrade, Christy C.; Ramey, Wanichaya N.; Maharaj, Payal D.; Anishchenko, Michael; Kenney, Joan L.; Duggal, Nisha K.; Romo, Hannah; Bera, Aloke Kumar; Sanders, Todd A.; Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Smith, Janet L.; Kuhn, Richard; Brault, Aaron C.

    2014-01-01

    A single helicase amino acid substitution, NS3-T249P, has been shown to increase viremia magnitude/mortality in American crows (AMCRs) following West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Lineage/intra-lineage geographic variants exhibit consistent amino acid polymorphisms at this locus; however, the majority of WNV isolates associated with recent outbreaks reported worldwide have a proline at the NS3-249 residue. In order to evaluate the impact of NS3-249 variants on avian and mammalian virulence, multiple amino acid substitutions were engineered into a WNV infectious cDNA (NY99; NS3-249P) and the resulting viruses inoculated into AMCRs, house sparrows (HOSPs) and mice. Differential viremia profiles were observed between mutant viruses in the two bird species; however, the NS3-249P virus produced the highest mean peak viral loads in both avian models. In contrast, this avian modulating virulence determinant had no effect on LD50 or the neurovirulence phenotype in the murine model. Recombinant helicase proteins demonstrated variable helicase and ATPase activities; however, differences did not correlate with avian or murine viremia phenotypes. These in vitro and in vivo data indicate that avian-specific phenotypes are modulated by critical viral-host protein interactions involving the NS3-249 residue that directly influence transmission efficiency and therefore the magnitude of WNV epizootics in nature. PMID:24971589

  6. Comparing activated sludge fungal community population diversity using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tegan N; Watson, Garth; Rees, Gavin N; Seviour, Robert J

    2014-03-01

    We compared the relative values of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) for profiling fungal communities in wastewater treatment plants using both ITS and 18S rRNA gene fragments as phylogenetic markers. A similar number of fungal ribotypes was obtained with both methods for the same treatment plant when the ITS primer set was used, while a greater number of ribotypes was obtained with T-RFLP compared to DGGE with the 18S rRNA primer set. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling of presence/absence data and analysis of similarity showed that both methods could distinguish between the different plant communities at a statistically significant level (p < 0.05), regardless of which phylogenetic marker was used. The data suggest that both methods can be used preferably together to profile activated sludge fungal communities. A comparison of profiles generated with both these phylogenetic markers based on the number of ribotypes/bands, suggests that the 18S rRNA region is more discriminatory than the ITS region. Detected differences in fungal community compositions between plants probably reflect differences in their influent compositions and operational parameters.

  7. Glucagon gene polymorphism modifies the effects of smoking and physical activity on risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Gao, Kaiping; Zhao, Jingzhi; Feng, Tianping; Yin, Lei; Wang, Jinjin; Wang, Chongjian; Li, Chunyang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhai, Yujia; You, Haifei; Ren, Yongcheng; Wang, Bingyuan; Hu, Dongsheng

    2014-01-25

    Few genome-wide association studies have considered interactions between multiple genetic variants and environmental factors associated with disease. The interaction was examined between a glucagon gene (GCG) polymorphism and smoking, alcohol consumption and physical activity and the association with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a case-control study of Chinese Han subjects. The rs12104705 polymorphism of GCG and interactions with environmental variables were analyzed for 9619 participants by binary multiple logistic regression. Smoking with the C-C haplotype of rs12104705 was associated with increased risk of T2DM (OR=1.174, 95% CI=1.013-1.361). Moderate and high physical activity with the C-C genotype was associated with decreased risk of T2DM as compared with low physical activity with the genotype (OR=0.251, 95% CI=0.206-0.306 and OR=0.190, 95% CI=0.164-0.220). However, the interaction of drinking and genotype was not associated with risk of T2DM. Genetic polymorphism in rs12104705 of GCG may interact with smoking and physical activity to modify the risk of T2DM. PMID:24185078

  8. Active Learning for Directed Exploration of Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael C.; Wang, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Physics-based simulation codes are widely used in science and engineering to model complex systems that would be infeasible to study otherwise. Such codes provide the highest-fidelity representation of system behavior, but are often so slow to run that insight into the system is limited. For example, conducting an exhaustive sweep over a d-dimensional input parameter space with k-steps along each dimension requires k(sup d) simulation trials (translating into k(sup d) CPU-days for one of our current simulations). An alternative is directed exploration in which the next simulation trials are cleverly chosen at each step. Given the results of previous trials, supervised learning techniques (SVM, KDE, GP) are applied to build up simplified predictive models of system behavior. These models are then used within an active learning framework to identify the most valuable trials to run next. Several active learning strategies are examined including a recently-proposed information-theoretic approach. Performance is evaluated on a set of thirteen synthetic oracles, which serve as surrogates for the more expensive simulations and enable the experiments to be replicated by other researchers.

  9. Bioengineered nisin derivatives with enhanced activity in complex matrices.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Susan; Field, Des; Daly, Karen M; O'Connor, Paula M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2012-07-01

    Nisin A is the best known and most extensively characterized lantibiotic. As it is ribosomally synthesized, bioengineering-based strategies can be used to generate variants. We have previously demonstrated that bioengineering of the hinge region of nisin A can result in the generation of variants with enhanced anti-microbial activity against Gram-positive pathogens. Here we created a larger bank of hinge variant producers and screened for producers that exhibit enhanced bioactivity as assessed by agar-based assays against a selection of target strains. Further analysis of 12 'lead' variants reveals that in many cases enhanced bioactivity is not attributable to enhanced specific activity but is instead as a consequence of an enhanced ability to diffuse through complex polymers. In the case of two variants, which contain the residues SVA and NAK, respectively, within the hinge region, we demonstrate that this enhanced trait enables the peptides to dramatically outperform nisin A with respect to controlling Listeria monocytogenes in commercially produced chocolate milk that contains carrageenan as a stabilizer. PMID:22260415

  10. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  11. Interspecies insertion polymorphism analysis reveals recent activity of transposable elements in extant coelacanths.

    PubMed

    Naville, Magali; Chalopin, Domitille; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Coelacanths are lobe-finned fish represented by two extant species, Latimeria chalumnae in South Africa and Comoros and L. menadoensis in Indonesia. Due to their intermediate phylogenetic position between ray-finned fish and tetrapods in the vertebrate lineage, they are of great interest from an evolutionary point of view. In addition, extant specimens look similar to 300 million-year-old fossils; because of their apparent slowly evolving morphology, coelacanths have been often described as « living fossils ». As an underlying cause of such a morphological stasis, several authors have proposed a slow evolution of the coelacanth genome. Accordingly, sequencing of the L. chalumnae genome has revealed a globally low substitution rate for protein-coding regions compared to other vertebrates. However, genome and gene evolution can also be influenced by transposable elements, which form a major and dynamic part of vertebrate genomes through their ability to move, duplicate and recombine. In this work, we have searched for evidence of transposition activity in coelacanth genomes through the comparative analysis of orthologous genomic regions from both Latimeria species. Comparison of 5.7 Mb (0.2%) of the L. chalumnae genome with orthologous Bacterial Artificial Chromosome clones from L. menadoensis allowed the identification of 27 species-specific transposable element insertions, with a strong relative contribution of CR1 non-LTR retrotransposons. Species-specific homologous recombination between the long terminal repeats of a new coelacanth endogenous retrovirus was also detected. Our analysis suggests that transposon activity is responsible for at least 0.6% of genome divergence between both Latimeria species. Taken together, this study demonstrates that coelacanth genomes are not evolutionary inert: they contain recently active transposable elements, which have significantly contributed to post-speciation genome divergence in Latimeria.

  12. Human mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase polymorphic variant Ile58Thr reduces activity by destabilizing the tetrameric interface

    SciTech Connect

    Borgstahl, G.E.O.; Hickey, M.J.; Johnson, M.J.

    1996-04-09

    Human manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a homotetrameric enzyme which protects mitochondria against oxygen-mediated free radical damage. Within each subunit, both the N-terminal helical hairpin and C-terminal {alpha}/{beta} domains contribute ligands to the catalytic manganese site. Two identical four-helix bundles,symmetrically assembled form the N-terminal helical hairpins, form a novel tetrameric interface that stabilizes the active sites. The 2.5 {angstrom} crystallographic structure of the naturally occurring polymorphic variant Ile58Thr MnSOD reveals that the helical hairpin mutation Thr58 causes two packing defects in each of the two four-helix bundles of the tetrameric interface. Similar mutations, expected to cause packing defects in the Cu,ZnSOD dimer interface, are associated with the degenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Ile58Thr MnSOD is primarily dimeric in solution and is significantly less thermostable than the normal enzyme, with decreases of 15{degrees}C in the main melting temperature and 20{degrees}C in the heat-inactivation temperature. Consequently, this mutant MnSOD is compromised at normal body temperatures: thermal inactivation, predicted from the decrease in thermal stability, occurs with a theoretical half-life of only 3.2h at 37{degrees}C (1.4 h at 41 {degrees}C), compared with 3.1 years for native MnSOD. This prediction is supported by direct measurements: incubation at 41.7{degrees}C for 3 h has no effect on the activity of native MnSOD but completely inactivates mutant MnSOD. Rapid inactivation of Ile58Thr MnSOD at the elevated temperatures associated with fever and inflammation could provide an early advantage by killing infected cells, but also would increase superoxide-mediated oxidative damage and perhaps contribute to late-onset diseases. 63 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Metabolic polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Smith, G; Stanley, L A; Sim, E; Strange, R C; Wolf, C R

    1995-01-01

    The vast majority of cancers arise as a consequence of exposure to environmental agents that are toxic or mutagenic. In response to this, all higher organisms have evolved complex mechanisms by which they can protect themselves from environmental challenge. In many cases, this involves an adaptive response in which the levels of expression of enzymes active in the metabolism and detoxification of the foreign chemical are induced. The best characterized of these enzyme systems are the cytochrome P450s, the GSTs and the NATs. An unfortunate consequence of many of these reactions, however, is the creation of a toxic or mutagenic reaction product from chemicals that require metabolic activation before realizing their full carcinogenic potential. Altered expression of one or more of these drug metabolizing enzymes can therefore be predicted to have profound toxicological consequences. Genetic polymorphisms with well defined associated phenotypes have now been characterized in P450, GST and NAT genes. Indeed, many of these polymorphisms have been associated with decreased or increased metabolism of many tumour promoters and chemical carcinogens and hence offer protection against or increased susceptibility to many distinct tumour types.

  14. Polymorphism of genes coding for nuclear 18S rRNA indicates genetic distinctiveness of anastomosis group 10 from other groups in the Rhizoctonia solani species complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z L; Domier, L L; Sinclair, J B

    1995-07-01

    DNA polymorphism in the 18S nuclear rRNA gene region was investigated by using 11 restriction endonucleases for 161 isolates of 25 intraspecific groups (ISGs) representing 11 reported anastomosis groups (AGs) of Rhizoctonia solani. A PCR-based restriction mapping method in which enzymatically amplified DNA fragments and subfragments were digested with one or two restriction enzymes was employed. Four types of DNA restriction maps of this region were constructed for these 25 ISGs. Map type I of the 18S rDNA region was represented by isolates of a majority of R. solani ISGs. Map types II and III, represented by ISG 2E and 9 isolates and 5C isolates, respectively, differed from map I by the absence of one (map type II) or two (map type III) restriction sites. Map type IV, represented by ISG 10A and B (or AG 10) isolates, showed significant restriction site variations, with five enzymes in this region compared with those of the remaining ISGs or AGs. Ten of the 25 restriction sites in the 18S rRNA gene region were informative and selected for analysis. Previously reported restriction maps of the 5.8S rRNA gene region, including the internal transcribed spacers, were aligned with each other, and 12 informative restriction sites were identified. These data were used alone and in combination to evaluate group relationships. Analyses derived from these data sets by maximum parsimony and likelihood methods showed that AG 10 isolates were distinct and distantly related to the majority isolates of the other AGs of this species complex.

  15. Complex Relationships between Occupation, Environment, DNA Adducts, Genetic Polymorphisms and Bladder Cancer in a Case-Control Study Using a Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Porru, Stefano; Pavanello, Sofia; Carta, Angela; Arici, Cecilia; Simeone, Claudio; Izzotti, Alberto; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC) risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028), whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (p<0.006) was related with a decreased adduct levels, but with no impact on BC risk. Previous findings on increased BC risk by packyears (p<0.001), coffee (p<0.001), cumulative AAs exposure (p = 0.041) and MnSOD (p = 0.009) and a decreased risk by MPO (p<0.008) were also confirmed by SEM analysis. Our results for the first time make evident an association between occupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different critical life

  16. Complexation study and anticellular activity enhancement by doxorubicin-cyclodextrin complexes on a multidrug-resistant adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Al-Omar, A; Abdou, S; De Robertis, L; Marsura, A; Finance, C

    1999-04-19

    Ability of molecular complexes of [Doxorubicin (DX)-cyclodextrin (Cd)] to enhance the anticellular activity of antineoplastic drug Doxorubicin and to reverse its multidrug resistance has been investigated. A spectroscopic study of the alpha, beta, and gamma-[DX-Cds] complexes has been investigated in relation to their biological effects on a multidrug resistant (MDR) human rectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HRT-18). A ten fold enhancement of DX anticellular activity in presence of beta-cyclodextrin alone was detected. PMID:10328296

  17. [Anti-pyretic activity of aqua-(diacetoxybenoate)-copper complexes].

    PubMed

    Sokolík, J; Tumová, I; Lucanská, B; Blahová, M; Svec, P

    1993-08-01

    The antipyretic activity of binuclear (diacetoxybenzoato)-copper(II) aquacomplexes [Cu2(2,Y-DAB)4(H2O)2] (Y = 4 and 5) as well as cupric acetylsalicylate [Cu2(AcSal)4] was assayed in a rabbit model of endotoxin-induced fever. The complexes and uncomplexed carboxylic acids (administered i.p. in a dose of 20 mg/kg) exhibited even a subnormothermic course in lowering of febrile animals' body temperature in the order: 2,5-diacetoxybenzoic acid (-0.09 degree C) < 2,4-diacetoxybenzoic acid (-0.35 degree C) < Cu(AcSal)2(-0.39 degree C) approximately equal to acetylsalicylic acid (-0.40 degree C) < Cu(2,4-DAB)2.H2O (-0.61 degree C) < Cu(2.5-DAB)2.H2O (-0.97 degree C). On the other hand, the mean value of untreated fevered animals was +0.67 degree C. PMID:8402974

  18. Characterisation of the active/de-active transition of mitochondrial complex I☆

    PubMed Central

    Babot, Marion; Birch, Amanda; Labarbuta, Paola; Galkin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of NADH in the mitochondrial matrix of aerobic cells is catalysed by mitochondrial complex I. The regulation of this mitochondrial enzyme is not completely understood. An interesting characteristic of complex I from some organisms is the ability to adopt two distinct states: the so-called catalytically active (A) and the de-active, dormant state (D). The A-form in situ can undergo de-activation when the activity of the respiratory chain is limited (i.e. in the absence of oxygen). The mechanisms and driving force behind the A/D transition of the enzyme are currently unknown, but several subunits are most likely involved in the conformational rearrangements: the accessory subunit 39 kDa (NDUFA9) and the mitochondrially encoded subunits, ND3 and ND1. These three subunits are located in the region of the quinone binding site. The A/D transition could represent an intrinsic mechanism which provides a fast response of the mitochondrial respiratory chain to oxygen deprivation. The physiological role of the accumulation of the D-form in anoxia is most probably to protect mitochondria from ROS generation due to the rapid burst of respiration following reoxygenation. The de-activation rate varies in different tissues and can be modulated by the temperature, the presence of free fatty acids and divalent cations, the NAD+/NADH ratio in the matrix, the presence of nitric oxide and oxygen availability. Cysteine-39 of the ND3 subunit, exposed in the D-form, is susceptible to covalent modification by nitrosothiols, ROS and RNS. The D-form in situ could react with natural effectors in mitochondria or with pharmacological agents. Therefore the modulation of the re-activation rate of complex I could be a way to ameliorate the ischaemia/reperfusion damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira. PMID:24569053

  19. Characteristics, location and origin of flare activity in a complex active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.; Gary, G. A.; Hagyard, M. J.; Hernandez, A. M.; Rovira, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    The observational characteristics of series of multiple-loop flares from a complex active region are summarized. The location of the highest observed photospheric magnetic shear is found to be the commonly observed site of flare onset, but not, in many cases, the magnetic region where the largest time-integrated energy release is observed. The observations thus reveal a consistent pattern of energy-release processes related to the magnetic-field topology.

  20. The Pro12Ala Polymorphism of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Gene Modifies the Association of Physical Activity and Body Mass Changes in Polish Women

    PubMed Central

    Zarebska, Aleksandra; Jastrzebski, Zbigniew; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Leonska-Duniec, Agata; Kotarska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Sawczuk, Marek; Maciejewska-Karlowska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ is a key regulator of adipogenesis, responsible for fatty acid storage and maintaining energy balance in the human body. Studies on the functional importance of the PPARG Pro12Ala polymorphic variants indicated that the observed alleles may influence body mass measurements; however, obtained results were inconsistent. We have decided to check if body mass changes observed in physically active participants will be modulated by the PPARG Pro12Ala genotype. The genotype distribution of the PPARG Pro12Ala allele was examined in a group of 201 Polish women measured for selected body mass variables before and after the completion of a 12-week training program. The results of our experiment suggest that PPARG genotype can modulate training-induced body mass measurements changes: after completion of the training program, Pro12/Pro12 homozygotes were characterised by a greater decrease of body fat mass measurements in comparison with 12Ala allele carriers. These results indicate that the PPARG 12Ala variant may impair the training-induced positive effects on body mass measurements; however, the detailed mechanism of such interaction remained unclear and observed correlation between PPARG genotype and body mass differential effects should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25371663

  1. Biochemical Analysis of Initiator Caspase-Activating Complexes: The Apoptosome and the Death-Inducing Signaling Complex.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Claudia; Hughes, Michelle A; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion

    2015-12-02

    Apoptosis is a highly regulated process that can be initiated by activation of death receptors or perturbation of mitochondria causing the release of apoptogenic proteins. This results in the activation of caspases, which are responsible for many of the biochemical and morphological changes associated with apoptosis. Caspases are normally inactive and require activation in a cascade emanating from an "initiator" or activating caspase, which in turn activates a downstream or "effector" caspase. Activation of initiator caspases is tightly regulated and requires the assembly of caspase-9 (via mitochondrial perturbation) or caspase-8/10 (via death receptor ligation) activating complexes, which are termed the apoptosome and the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), respectively. These large multiprotein complexes can initially be separated according to size by gel filtration chromatography and subsequently analyzed by affinity purification or immunoprecipitation. The advantage of combining these techniques is one can first assess the assembly of individual components into a multiprotein complex, and then assess the size and composition of the native functional signaling platform within a particular cell type alongside a biochemical analysis of the enriched/purified complex. Here, we describe various methods currently used for characterization of the apoptosome and DISC.

  2. Diurnal variation in cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase activity is determined by the -203A>C polymorphism of the CYP7A1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Vlachová, Miluše; Blahová, Tereza; Lánská, Věra; Leníček, Martin; Piťha, Jan; Vítek, Libor; Kovář, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine whether the promoter polymorphism -203A>C of cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase encoding gene (CYP7A1) affects diurnal variation in CYP7A1 enzyme activity. Methods The study included 16 healthy male volunteers – 8 homozygous for -203A and 8 homozygous for the -203C allele of CYP7A1. Three 15-hour examinations (from 7am to 10pm) were carried out for each of the participants: after one-day treatment with cholestyramine; after one-day treatment with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA); and a control examination without any treatment. The plasma concentration of 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4), a marker of CYP7A1 activity, was determined in all the experiments at 90-min intervals. Results CYP7A1 activity was up-regulated after treatment with cholestyramine and suppressed after treatment with CDCA. There were no differences between -203A and -203C allele carriers in the response of enzyme activity to both drugs. In the control experiment, -203A allele carriers displayed diurnal variation in enzyme activity, whereas CYP7A1 activity did not change in -203C allele carriers. These results were confirmed by modeling the dynamics of C4 using polynomial regression. Conclusion The promoter polymorphism of the CYP7A1 gene has a pronounced impact on diurnal variation in CYP7A1 activity. PMID:27106353

  3. 75 FR 61857 - Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured... Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities. OMB Number: 1550-0111. Form Number: N/A. Description: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities describes...

  4. Investigation of Uranium Polymorphs

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Henager, Charles H.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Meier, David E.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2011-08-01

    The UO3-water system is complex and has not been fully characterized, even though these species are common throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. As an example, most production schemes for UO3 result in a mixture of up to six or more different polymorphic phases, and small differences in these conditions will affect phase genesis that ultimately result in measureable changes to the end product. As a result, this feature of the UO3-water system may be useful as a means for determining process history. This research effort attempts to better characterize the UO3-water system with a variety of optical techniques for the purpose of developing some predictive capability for estimating process history in polymorphic phases of unknown origin. Three commercially relevant preparation methods for the production of UO3 were explored. Previously unreported low temperature routes to β- and γ-UO3 were discovered. Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic libraries were established for pure and mixed polymorphic forms of UO3 in addition to the common hydrolysis products of UO3. An advantage of the sensitivity of optical fluorescence microscopy over XRD has been demonstrated. Preliminary aging studies of the α and γ forms of UO3 have been conducted. In addition, development of a 3-D phase field model used to predict phase genesis of the system was initiated. Thermodynamic and structural constants that will feed the model have been gathered from the literature for most of the UO3 polymorphic phases.

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta +294T > C polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The association of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) +294T > C polymorphism and serum lipid levels is inconsistent in several previous studies. Bai Ku Yao is an isolated subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of PPARD +294T > C (rs2016520) polymorphism and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 609 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 573 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the PPARD +294T > C polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), apolipoprotein (Apo) AI and ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.001 for all). The frequency of T and C alleles was 77.50% and 22.50% in Bai Ku Yao, and 72.43% and 27.57% in Han (P < 0.01); respectively. The frequency of TT, TC and CC genotypes was 60.59%, 33.83% and 5.53% in Bai Ku Yao, and 52.18%, 40.50% and 7.32% in Han (P < 0.05); respectively. The subjects with CC genotype in Bai Ku Yao had higher serum LDL-C and ApoB levels and lower the ratio of ApoAI to ApoB than the subjects with TT and TC genotypes in females but not in males. The C allele carriers in Han had higher serum TC levels in males (P < 0.01) and ApoB levels in females (P < 0.05) than the C allele noncarriers. Serum TC and ApoB levels were correlated with genotypes in Han (P < 0.05 for each) but not in Bai Ku Yao. Serum lipid parameters were also correlated with sex, age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and blood pressure in both ethnic groups. Conclusions These results suggest that the association of PPARD +294T > C polymorphism and serum lipid levels is

  6. Inhibition of constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation by novel platinum complexes with potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Turkson, James; Zhang, Shumin; Palmer, Jay; Kay, Heidi; Stanko, Joseph; Mora, Linda B; Sebti, Said; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2004-12-01

    DNA-alkylating agents that are platinum complexes induce apoptotic responses and have wide application in cancer therapy. The potential for platinum compounds to modulate signal transduction events that contribute to their therapeutic outcome has not been extensively examined. Among the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins, Stat3 activity is frequently up-regulated in many human tumors. Various lines of evidence have established a causal role for aberrant Stat3 activity in malignant transformation and provided validation for its targeting in the development of small-molecule inhibitors as novel cancer therapeutics. We report here that platinum-containing compounds disrupt Stat3 signaling and suppress its biological functions. The novel platinum (IV) compounds, CPA-1, CPA-7, and platinum (IV) tetrachloride block Stat3 activity in vitro at low micromolar concentrations. In malignant cells that harbor constitutively activated Stat3, CPA-1, CPA-7, and platinum (IV) tetrachloride inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in a manner that reflects the attenuation of persistent Stat3 activity. By contrast, cells that do not contain persistent Stat3 activity are marginally affected or are not affected by these compounds. Moreover, CPA-7 induces the regression of mouse CT26 colon tumor, which correlates with the abrogation of persistent Stat3 activity in tumors. Thus, the modulation of oncogenic signal transduction pathways, such as Stat3, may be one of the key molecular mechanisms for the antitumor effects of platinum (IV)-containing complexes.

  7. Alkene to carbyne: tandem Lewis acid activation and dehydrogenation of a molybdenum ethylene complex.

    PubMed

    Stennett, Tom E; Haddow, Mairi F; Wass, Duncan F

    2013-10-18

    Carbyne formation: Treatment of a molybdenum ethylene complex with B(C6 F5 )3 induces ditopic activation of an ethylene ligand and acceptor-assisted ethane elimination to generate a novel type of zwitterionic carbyne complex. PMID:24038792

  8. Association analysis of the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism and complex quantitative body composition and performance phenotypes in adolescent Greeks.

    PubMed

    Moran, Colin N; Yang, Nan; Bailey, Mark E S; Tsiokanos, Athanasios; Jamurtas, Athanasios; MacArthur, Daniel G; North, Kathryn; Pitsiladis, Yannis P; Wilson, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    The functional allele (577R) of ACTN3, which encodes human alpha-actinin-3, has been reported to be associated with elite athletic status and with response to resistance training, while the nonfunctional allele (577X) has been proposed as a candidate metabolically thrifty allele. In a study of 992 adolescent Greeks, we show that there is a significant association (P=0.003) between the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism and 40 m sprint time in males that accounts for 2.3% of phenotypic variance, with the 577R allele contributing to faster times in an additive manner. The R577X polymorphism is not associated with other power phenotypes related to 40 m sprint, nor with an endurance phenotype. Furthermore, the polymorphism is not associated with obesity-related phenotypes in our population, suggesting that the 577X allele is not a thrifty allele, and thus the persistence of this null allele must be explained in other terms.

  9. 8-Oxoguanine incision activity is impaired in lung tissues of NSCLC patients with the polymorphism of OGG1 and XRCC1 genes.

    PubMed

    Janik, Justyna; Swoboda, Maja; Janowska, Beata; Cieśla, Jarosław M; Gackowski, Daniel; Kowalewski, Janusz; Olinski, Ryszard; Tudek, Barbara; Speina, Elżbieta

    2011-05-10

    Decreased repair of oxidative DNA damage is a risk factor for developing certain human malignancies. We have previously found that the capacity of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine repair was lower in leukocytes of NSCLC patients than in controls. To explain these observations, we searched for mutations and polymorphisms in the OGG1 gene among 88 NSCLC patients and 79 controls. One patient exhibited a heterozygous mutation in exon 1, which resulted in Arg46Gln substitution. Normal lung and tumor tissue carrying this mutation showed markedly lower 8-oxoG incision activity than the mean for all patients. The predominant polymorphism of OGG1 was Ser326Cys. A significant difference was observed in the frequencies of the OGG1 variants between populations of NSCLC patients and controls. The frequency of the Cys326 allele and the number of Cys326Cys homozygotes was higher among patients than controls. In individuals with either Ser326Cys or Cys326Cys genotype 8-oxoG incision rate was lower than in those with both Ser326 alleles, either in lung or leukocytes. Moreover, 8-oxodG level was higher in lung tissue and leukocytes of patients carrying two Cys326 alleles and in leukocytes of patients with the Ser326Cys genotype. We also screened for polymorphisms of the XRCC1 gene. Only heterozygotes of the XRCC1 variants Arg194Trp, Arg280His and Arg399Gln were found among patients and controls, with the frequency of Arg280His being significantly higher among patients. NSCLC patients with Arg280His or Arg399Gln polymorphism revealed lower 8-oxoG incision activity in their lung tissues, but not in leukocytes. We can conclude that the OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphisms may have an impact on the efficiency of 8-oxoG incision in humans and the XRCC1 His280 and Gln399 may influence the OGG1 activity in tissues exposed to chronic oxidative/inflammatory stress. Higher frequency of the OGG1 Cys326 allele among NSCLC patients may partially explain the impairment of the 8-oxoG repair observed in their

  10. A low polymorphic mouse H-2 class I gene from the Tla complex is expressed in a broad variety of cell types

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have previously described the isolation of pH-2d-37, a cDNA clone that encodes a so far unknown, poorly polymorphic, class I surface molecule. We report here the isolation of the corresponding gene, its nucleotide sequence, and its localization in the Tla region of the murine MHC. Using a RNase mapping assay, we have confirmed that the second domain coding region of the 37 gene displays very limited polymorphism, and that the gene is transcribed in a broad variety of cell types, in contrast to the genes encoding the known Qa and TL antigens. Possible functions are discussed. PMID:3036997

  11. Identification of polymorphisms and transcriptional activity of the proto-oncogene KIT located on both autosomal and B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog.

    PubMed

    Li, Y M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, W J; Yan, S Q; Sun, J H

    2016-01-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable and co-exist with autosomal and sex chromosomes. The karyotype of the Chinese raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides procyonoides) comprises 0-4 B chromosomes. The proto-oncogene KIT is found on all B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog. In the present study, partial DNA and mRNA sequences of KIT were amplified and sequenced from four individuals containing B chromosomes. Sequence analyses revealed that polymorphisms including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inserts/deletions were rich in the KIT gene of Chinese raccoon dog at the genomic level. However, no polymorphism was detected at the mRNA level. A comparison of mRNA sequences from Chinese raccoon dogs with the corresponding sequences derived from arctic fox and dog, which do not contain B chromosomes, revealed the mRNA sequences of the 10 SNPs to be identical between these three species. Therefore, these findings suggest that KIT located on the B chromosomes in Chinese raccoon dog lacks transcriptional activity. PMID:26909958

  12. Identification of polymorphisms and transcriptional activity of the proto-oncogene KIT located on both autosomal and B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog.

    PubMed

    Li, Y M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, W J; Yan, S Q; Sun, J H

    2016-01-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable and co-exist with autosomal and sex chromosomes. The karyotype of the Chinese raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides procyonoides) comprises 0-4 B chromosomes. The proto-oncogene KIT is found on all B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog. In the present study, partial DNA and mRNA sequences of KIT were amplified and sequenced from four individuals containing B chromosomes. Sequence analyses revealed that polymorphisms including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inserts/deletions were rich in the KIT gene of Chinese raccoon dog at the genomic level. However, no polymorphism was detected at the mRNA level. A comparison of mRNA sequences from Chinese raccoon dogs with the corresponding sequences derived from arctic fox and dog, which do not contain B chromosomes, revealed the mRNA sequences of the 10 SNPs to be identical between these three species. Therefore, these findings suggest that KIT located on the B chromosomes in Chinese raccoon dog lacks transcriptional activity.

  13. Polymorphisms in the lectin pathway of complement activation influence the incidence of acute rejection and graft outcome after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Golshayan, Déla; Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Bibert, Stéphanie; Pyndiah, Nitisha; Manuel, Oriol; Binet, Isabelle; Buhler, Leo H; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Mueller, Thomas; Steiger, Jürg; Pascual, Manuel; Meylan, Pascal; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2016-04-01

    There are conflicting data on the role of the lectin pathway of complement activation and its recognition molecules in acute rejection and outcome after transplantation. To help resolve this we analyzed polymorphisms and serum levels of lectin pathway components in 710 consecutive kidney transplant recipients enrolled in the nationwide Swiss Transplant Cohort Study, together with all biopsy-proven rejection episodes and 1-year graft and patient survival. Functional mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels were determined in serum samples, and previously described MBL2, ficolin 2, and MBL-associated serine protease 2 polymorphisms were genotyped. Low MBL serum levels and deficient MBL2 diplotypes were associated with a higher incidence of acute cellular rejection during the first year, in particular in recipients of deceased-donor kidneys. This association remained significant (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.60) in a Cox regression model after adjustment for relevant covariates. In contrast, there was no significant association with rates of antibody-mediated rejection, patient death, early graft dysfunction or loss. Thus, results in a prospective multicenter contemporary cohort suggest that MBL2 polymorphisms result in low MBL serum levels and are associated with acute cellular rejection after kidney transplantation. Since MBL deficiency is a relatively frequent trait in the normal population, our findings may lead to individual risk stratification and customized immunosuppression.

  14. Association of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene polymorphisms and gene-gene interaction with asthma risk in a Chinese adults population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wancheng; Dai, Wenjing; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Ma, Chunlan; Wang, Chunmao; He, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ (PPAR γ) and additional gene-gene interactions on asthma risk. Methods: A total of 882 subjects (602 males, 280 females), with a mean age of 61.3±14.8 years old, including 430 asthma patients and 452 normal subjects were selected in this study, including the genotyping of polymorphisms. Logistic regression was performed to investigate association between SNP and asthma. Generalized MDR (GMDR) was used to analysis the interaction among four SNP. Results: Asthma risk was significantly lower in carriers of Ala allele of the rs1805192 polymorphism than those with Pro/Pro (Pro/Ala+ Ala/Ala versus Pro/Pro, adjusted OR (95% CI)=0.70 (0.51-0.94). In addition, we also found a significant association between rs10865710 and asthma, asthma risk was significantly lower in carriers of G allele of the rs10865710 polymorphism than those with CC (CG+ GG versus CC, adjusted OR (95% CI)=0.68 (0.55-0.95). There was a significant three-locus model (P=0.0107) involving rs1805192, rs10865710 and rs709158, indicating a potential gene-gene interaction among rs1805192, rs10865710 and rs709158. Overall, the three-locus models had a cross-validation consistency of 10 of 10, and had the testing accuracy of 60.72% after covariates adjustment. Conclusions: Our results support an important association of rs1805192 and rs10865710 with asthma, and additional interaction among rs1805192, rs10865710 and rs709158. PMID:26770574

  15. Polymorphisms in Pfmdr1, Pfcrt, and Pfnhe1 genes are associated with reduced in vitro activities of quinine in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cheruiyot, Jelagat; Ingasia, Luicer A; Omondi, Angela A; Juma, Dennis W; Opot, Benjamin H; Ndegwa, Joseph M; Mativo, Joan; Cheruiyot, Agnes C; Yeda, Redemptah; Okudo, Charles; Muiruri, Peninah; Bidii, Ngalah S; Chebon, Lorna J; Angienda, Paul O; Eyase, Fredrick L; Johnson, Jacob D; Bulimo, Wallace D; Andagalu, Ben; Akala, Hoseah M; Kamau, Edwin

    2014-07-01

    In combination with antibiotics, quinine is recommended as the second-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, an alternative first-line treatment for severe malaria, and for treatment of malaria in the first trimester of pregnancy. Quinine has been shown to have frequent clinical failures, and yet the mechanisms of action and resistance have not been fully elucidated. However, resistance is linked to polymorphisms in multiple genes, including multidrug resistance 1 (Pfmdr1), the chloroquine resistance transporter (Pfcrt), and the sodium/hydrogen exchanger gene (Pfnhe1). Here, we investigated the association between in vitro quinine susceptibility and genetic polymorphisms in Pfmdr1codons 86 and 184, Pfcrt codon 76, and Pfnhe1 ms4760 in 88 field isolates from western Kenya. In vitro activity was assessed based on the drug concentration that inhibited 50% of parasite growth (the IC50), and parasite genetic polymorphisms were determined from DNA sequencing. Data revealed there were significant associations between polymorphism in Pfmdr1-86Y, Pfmdr1-184F, or Pfcrt-76T and quinine susceptibility (P < 0.0001 for all three associations). Eighty-two percent of parasites resistant to quinine carried mutant alleles at these codons (Pfmdr1-86Y, Pfmdr1-184F, and Pfcrt-76T), whereas 74% of parasites susceptible to quinine carried the wild-type allele (Pfmdr1-N86, Pfmdr1-Y184, and Pfcrt-K76, respectively). In addition, quinine IC50 values for parasites with Pfnhe1 ms4760 3 DNNND repeats were significantly higher than for those with 1 or 2 repeats (P = 0.033 and P = 0.0043, respectively). Clinical efficacy studies are now required to confirm the validity of these markers and the importance of parasite genetic background.

  16. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kristen A.; Horgan, Briony H. N.; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O.; Bell, James F.; Paige, David A.

    2016-07-01

    Oppenheimer crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  17. Cytochrome P450 polymorphism--molecular, metabolic and pharmacogenetic aspects. I. Mechanisms of activity of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Pachecka, Jan; Tomaszewski, Piotr; Kubiak-Tomaszewska, Grazyna

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450, initially perceived as a type of cell pigment, was soon identified as a hemoprotein with an enzymatic activity characteristic for monooxygenases with an affinity for differentiated endo- or exogenous substrates, including drugs. So far in the human organism 58 CYP isoenzymes belonging to 18 families have been described. Most from the CYP monooxygenases superfamily turned out to be integral elements of hepatocytic reticular monooxygenase complexes which also contain NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Later investigations indicated the possibility of the participation in electron transport for reticular CYP isoenzymes, alternative NADH-dependent reticular system composed of cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR) and cytochrome b5. The demonstration of the activity of some CYP superfamily isoenzymes not only in hepatocytes but also in many other cells of the human organism, numerous plant and animal tissues and even in cells of fungi, protists and prokaryotes has contributed to the significantly increased understanding of the role of CYP in biological systems. In addition, some CYP isoenzymes were found to be characteristic for the inner mitochondrial membrane monooxygenase complexes which contain NADPH-dependent adrenodoxin reductase (AR) and adrenodoxin (Ad), which is identical with ferredoxin-1 (Fd-1) and hepatoredoxin (Hd).

  18. Two Polymorphic Forms of a Six-Coordinate Mononuclear Cobalt(II) Complex with Easy-Plane Anisotropy: Structural Features, Theoretical Calculations, and Field-Induced Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhadip; Oyarzabal, Itziar; Vallejo, Julia; Cano, Joan; Colacio, Enrique; Bauza, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Kirillov, Alexander M; Drew, Michael G B; Das, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    A mononuclear cobalt(II) complex [Co(3,5-dnb)2(py)2(H2O)2] {3,5-Hdnb = 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid; py = pyridine} was isolated in two polymorphs, in space groups C2/c (1) and P21/c (2). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are not isostructural in spite of having equal formulas and ligand connectivity. In both structures, the Co(II) centers adopt octahedral {CoN2O4} geometries filled by pairs of mutually trans terminal 3,5-dnb, py, and water ligands. However, the structures of 1 and 2 disclose distinct packing patterns driven by strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bonds, leading to their 0D→2D (1) or 0D→1D (2) extension. The resulting two-dimensional layers and one-dimensional chains were topologically classified as the sql and 2C1 underlying nets, respectively. By means of DFT theoretical calculations, the energy variations between the polymorphs were estimated, and the binding energies associated with the noncovalent interactions observed in the crystal structures were also evaluated. The study of the direct-current magnetic properties, as well as ab initio calculations, reveal that both 1 and 2 present a strong easy-plane magnetic anisotropy (D > 0), which is larger for the latter polymorph (D is found to exhibit values between +58 and 117 cm(-1) depending on the method). Alternating current dynamic susceptibility measurements show that these polymorphs exhibit field-induced slow relaxation of the magnetization with Ueff values of 19.5 and 21.1 cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. The analysis of the whole magnetic data allows the conclusion that the magnetization relaxation in these polymorphs mainly takes place through a virtual excited state (Raman process). It is worth noting that despite the notable difference between the supramolecular networks of 1 and 2, they exhibit almost identical magnetization dynamics. This fact suggests that the relaxation process is intramolecular in nature and that the virtual state involved in the

  19. Two Polymorphic Forms of a Six-Coordinate Mononuclear Cobalt(II) Complex with Easy-Plane Anisotropy: Structural Features, Theoretical Calculations, and Field-Induced Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhadip; Oyarzabal, Itziar; Vallejo, Julia; Cano, Joan; Colacio, Enrique; Bauza, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Kirillov, Alexander M; Drew, Michael G B; Das, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    A mononuclear cobalt(II) complex [Co(3,5-dnb)2(py)2(H2O)2] {3,5-Hdnb = 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid; py = pyridine} was isolated in two polymorphs, in space groups C2/c (1) and P21/c (2). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are not isostructural in spite of having equal formulas and ligand connectivity. In both structures, the Co(II) centers adopt octahedral {CoN2O4} geometries filled by pairs of mutually trans terminal 3,5-dnb, py, and water ligands. However, the structures of 1 and 2 disclose distinct packing patterns driven by strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bonds, leading to their 0D→2D (1) or 0D→1D (2) extension. The resulting two-dimensional layers and one-dimensional chains were topologically classified as the sql and 2C1 underlying nets, respectively. By means of DFT theoretical calculations, the energy variations between the polymorphs were estimated, and the binding energies associated with the noncovalent interactions observed in the crystal structures were also evaluated. The study of the direct-current magnetic properties, as well as ab initio calculations, reveal that both 1 and 2 present a strong easy-plane magnetic anisotropy (D > 0), which is larger for the latter polymorph (D is found to exhibit values between +58 and 117 cm(-1) depending on the method). Alternating current dynamic susceptibility measurements show that these polymorphs exhibit field-induced slow relaxation of the magnetization with Ueff values of 19.5 and 21.1 cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. The analysis of the whole magnetic data allows the conclusion that the magnetization relaxation in these polymorphs mainly takes place through a virtual excited state (Raman process). It is worth noting that despite the notable difference between the supramolecular networks of 1 and 2, they exhibit almost identical magnetization dynamics. This fact suggests that the relaxation process is intramolecular in nature and that the virtual state involved in the

  20. Cytochrome P450 (CYP2C9*2,*3) & vitamin-K epoxide reductase complex (VKORC1 -1639Gpolymorphisms & their effect on acenocoumarol dose in patients with mechanical heart valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Anupriya; Khan, Farah; Agrawal, Suraksha S.; Kapoor, Aditya; Agarwal, Surendra K.; Phadke, Shubha R.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies have demonstrated the effect of CYP2C9 (cytochrome P450) and VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex) gene polymorphisms on the dose of acenocoumarol. The data from India about these gene polymorphisms and their effects on acenocoumarol dose are scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of CYP2C9*2,*3 and VKORC 1 -1639G>A gene polymorphisms and to study their effects on the dose of acenocoumarol required to maintain a target International Normalized Ratio (INR) in patients with mechanical heart valve replacement. Methods: Patients from the anticoagulation clinic of a tertiary care hospital in north India were studied. The anticoagulation profile, INR (International Normalized Ratio) values and administered acenocoumarol dose were obtained from the clinical records of patients. Determination of the CYP2C9*2,*3 and VKORC1 -1639G>A genotypes was done by PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism). Results: A total of 111 patients were studied. The genotype frequencies of CYP2C9 *1/*1,*1/*2,*1/*3 were as 0.883, 0.072, 0.036 and that of VKORC1 -1639G>A for GG, AG, and AA genotypes were 0.883, 0.090, and 0.027, respectively. The percentage of patients carrying any of the variant alleles of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 in heterozygous or homozygous form was 34% among those receiving a low dose of ≤20 mg/wk while it was 13.8 per cent in those receiving >20 mg/wk (P=0.014). A tendency of lower dose requirements was seen among carriers of the studied polymorphisms. There was considerable variability in the dose requirements of patients with and without variant alleles. Interpretation & conclusions: The study findings point towards the role of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene polymorphisms in determining the inter-individual dose variability of acenocoumarol in the Indian patients with mechanical heart valve replacement. PMID:23481074

  1. Antiproliferative Pt(IV) complexes: synthesis, biological activity, and quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Papa, Ester; Luini, Mara; Monti, Elena; Gariboldi, Marzia B; Ravera, Mauro; Gabano, Elisabetta; Gaviglio, Luca; Osella, Domenico

    2010-09-01

    Several Pt(IV) complexes of the general formula [Pt(L)2(L')2(L'')2] [axial ligands L are Cl-, RCOO-, or OH-; equatorial ligands L' are two am(m)ine or one diamine; and equatorial ligands L'' are Cl- or glycolato] were rationally designed and synthesized in the attempt to develop a predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. Numerous theoretical molecular descriptors were used alongside physicochemical data (i.e., reduction peak potential, Ep, and partition coefficient, log Po/w) to obtain a validated QSAR between in vitro cytotoxicity (half maximal inhibitory concentrations, IC50, on A2780 ovarian and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines) and some features of Pt(IV) complexes. In the resulting best models, a lipophilic descriptor (log Po/w or the number of secondary sp3 carbon atoms) plus an electronic descriptor (Ep, the number of oxygen atoms, or the topological polar surface area expressed as the N,O polar contribution) is necessary for modeling, supporting the general finding that the biological behavior of Pt(IV) complexes can be rationalized on the basis of their cellular uptake, the Pt(IV)-->Pt(II) reduction, and the structure of the corresponding Pt(II) metabolites. Novel compounds were synthesized on the basis of their predicted cytotoxicity in the preliminary QSAR model, and were experimentally tested. A final QSAR model, based solely on theoretical molecular descriptors to ensure its general applicability, is proposed.

  2. Recent Progress in Some Active Topics on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Guo, L.; Jiang, J.; Chi, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Q. A.; Cai, X.

    2015-04-01

    Complex networks have been extensively studied across many fields, especially in interdisciplinary areas. It has since long been recognized that topological structures and dynamics are important aspects for capturing the essence of complex networks. The recent years have also witnessed the emergence of several new elements which play important roles in network study. By combining the results of different research orientations in our group, we provide here a review of the recent advances in regards to spectral graph theory, opinion dynamics, interdependent networks, graph energy theory and temporal networks. We hope this will be helpful for the newcomers of those fields to discover new intriguing topics.

  3. Acute intravenous synaptamine complex variant KB220™ "normalizes" neurological dysregulation in patients during protracted abstinence from alcohol and opiates as observed using quantitative electroencephalographic and genetic analysis for reward polymorphisms: part 1, pilot study with 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Miller, David K; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Manka, Matthew; Miller, Merlene; Stokes, Stanley; Manka, Debra; Allen, Cameron; Gant, Charles; Downs, B William; Smolen, Andrew; Stevens, Emily; Yeldandi, Swetha; Blum, Kenneth

    2010-11-01

    It is well established that in both food- and drug-addicted individuals, there is dopamine resistance due to an association with the DRD2 gene A1 allele. Evidence is emerging whereby the potential of utilizing a natural, nonaddicting, safe, putative D2 agonist may find its place in recovery from reward deficiency syndrome (RDS) in patients addicted to psychoactive chemicals. Utilizing quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) as an imaging tool, we show the impact of Synaptamine Complex Variant KB220™ as a putative activator of the mesolimbic system. We demonstrate for the first time that its intravenous administration reduces or "normalizes" aberrant electrophysiological parameters of the reward circuitry site. For this pilot study, we report that the qEEGs of an alcoholic and a heroin abuser with existing abnormalities (ie, widespread theta and widespread alpha activity, respectively) during protracted abstinence are significantly normalized by the administration of 1 intravenous dose of Synaptamine Complex Variant KB220™. Both patients were genotyped for a number of neurotransmitter reward genes to determine to what extent they carry putative dopaminergic risk alleles that may predispose them for alcohol or heroin dependence, respectively. The genes tested included the dopamine transporter (DAT1, locus symbol SLC6A3), dopamine D4 receptor exon 3 VNTR (DRD4), DRD2 TaqIA (rs1800497), COMT val158 met SNP (rs4680), monoamine oxidase A upstream VNTR (MAOA-uVNTR), and serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR, locus symbol SLC6A4). We emphasize that these are case studies, and it would be unlikely for all individuals to carry all putative risk alleles. Based on previous research and our qEEG studies (parts 1 and 2 of this study), we cautiously suggest that long-term activation of dopaminergic receptors (ie, DRD2 receptors) will result in their proliferation and lead to enhanced "dopamine sensitivity" and an increased sense of happiness

  4. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein.

  5. Ternary metal complexes of guaifenesin drug: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and in vitro anticancer activity of the metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, W H; Mahmoud, N F; Mohamed, G G; El-Sonbati, A Z; El-Bindary, A A

    2015-01-01

    The coordination behavior of a series of transition metal ions named Cr(III), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) with a mono negative tridentate guaifenesin ligand (GFS) (OOO donation sites) and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) is reported. The metal complexes are characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, (1)H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, UV-vis spectral studies, mass spectroscopy, ESR, XRD and thermal analysis (TG and DTG). The ternary metal complexes were found to have the formulae of [M(GFS)(Phen)Cl]Cl·nH2O (M=Cr(III) (n=1) and Fe(III) (n=0)), [M(GFS)(Phen)Cl]·nH2O (M=Mn(II) (n=0), Zn(II) (n=0) and Cu(II) (n=3)) and [M(GFS)(Phen)(H2O)]Cl·nH2O (M=Co(II) (n=0), Ni(II) (n=0) and Cd(II) (n=4)). All the chelates are found to have octahedral geometrical structures. The ligand and its ternary chelates are subjected to thermal analyses (TG and DTG). The GFS ligand, in comparison to its ternary metal complexes also was screened for their antibacterial activity on gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) and for in vitro antifungal activity against (Candida albicans). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent GFS ligand. The complexes were also screened for its in vitro anticancer activity against the Breast cell line (MFC7) and the results obtained show that they exhibit a considerable anticancer activity. PMID:26067934

  6. Immune complexes that contain HIV antigens activate peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, L B; Shmagel, K V; Saidakova, E V; Shmagel, N G; Chereshnev, V A

    2016-07-01

    Uninfected donor T cells were treated in vitro by model immune complexes that contained either HIV or hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens. Unlike HCV antigen-containing complexes, the immune complexes that contained HIV antigens have been shown to activate peripheral blood T cells of uninfected donors under in vitro conditions. Both the antiviral antibodies and HIV antigen were involved in the activation process. The unique properties of the immune complexes formed by HIV antigens and antiviral antibodies are believed to result from the virus-specific antibody properties and molecular conformation of the antigen-antibody complex. PMID:27595830

  7. Fast isolation of highly active photosystem II core complexes from spinach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Gai; Xu, Tian-Hua; Liu, Cheng; Yang, Chun-Hong

    2010-09-01

    Purification of photosystem II (PSII) core complexes is a time-consuming and low-efficiency process. In order to isolate pure and active PSII core complexes in large amounts, we have developed a fast method to isolate highly active monomeric and dimeric PSII core complexes from spinach leaves by using sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. By using a vertical rotor the process was completed significantly faster compared with a swing-out rotor. In order to keep the core complexes in high activity, the whole isolation procedure was performed in the presence of glycine betain and pH at 6.3. The isolated pigment-protein complexes were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, absorption spectroscopy, 77 K fluorescence spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. Our results show that this method is a better choice for quick and efficient isolation of functionally active PSII core complexes. PMID:20738723

  8. Antimalarial, antimicrobial, cytotoxic, DNA interaction and SOD like activities of tetrahedral copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Jugal V.; Gajera, Sanjay B.; Patel, Mohan N.

    2015-02-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes with P, O-donor ligand and different fluoroquinolones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electronic spectra, TGA, EPR, FT-IR and LC-MS spectroscopy. An antimicrobial efficiency of the complexes has been tested against five different microorganisms in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and displays very good antimicrobial activity. The binding strength and binding mode of the complexes with Herring Sperm DNA (HS DNA) have been investigated by absorption titration and viscosity measurement studies. The studies suggest the classical intercalative mode of DNA binding. Gel electrophoresis assay determines the ability of the complexes to cleave the supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using nonenzymatic NBT/NADH/PMS system and found to have good antioxidant activity. All the complexes show good cytotoxic and in vitro antimalarial activities.

  9. Antimalarial and antimicrobial activities of 8-Aminoquinoline-Uracils metal complexes

    PubMed Central

    Phopin, Kamonrat; Sinthupoom, Nujarin; Treeratanapiboon, Lertyot; Kunwittaya, Sarun; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-01-01

    8-Aminoquinoline (8AQ) derivatives have been reported to have antimalarial, anticancer, and antioxidant activities. This study investigated the potency of 8AQ-5-substituted (iodo and nitro) uracils metal (Mn, Cu, Ni) complexes (1-6) as antimalarial and antimicrobial agents. Interestingly, all of these metal complexes (1-6) showed fair antimalarial activities. Moreover, Cu complexes 2 (8AQ-Cu-5Iu) and 5 (8AQ-Cu-5Nu) exerted antimicrobial activities against Gram-negative bacteria including P. shigelloides and S. dysenteriae. The results reveal application of 8AQ and its metal complexes as potential compounds to be further developed as novel antimalarial and antibacterial agents. PMID:27103894

  10. A Classroom Activity Exploring the Complexity of Sexual Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madson, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students categorize the sexual orientation (heterosexual, bisexual, homosexual) of 10 fictional people. Students study aspects of sexual orientation, including its resistance to rigid and consistent definitions. The activity has been used in Psychology of Women, Sexual Behavior, and Psychology of Sexual Orientation…

  11. Impaired translocation and activation of mitochondrial Akt1 mitigated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation Complex V activity in diabetic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Ying; Deng, Wu; Chen, Yumay; Fan, Weiwei; Baldwin, Kenneth M; Jope, Richard S; Wallace, Douglas C; Wang, Ping H

    2013-06-01

    Insulin can translocate Akt to mitochondria in cardiac muscle. The goals of this study were to define sub-mitochondrial localization of the translocated Akt, to dissect the effects of insulin on Akt isoform translocation, and to determine the direct effect of mitochondrial Akt activation on Complex V activity in normal and diabetic myocardium. The translocated Akt sequentially localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space, inner membrane, and matrix. To confirm Akt translocation, in vitro import assay showed rapid entry of Akt into mitochondria. Akt isoforms were differentially regulated by insulin stimulation, only Akt1 translocated into mitochondria. In the insulin-resistant Type 2 diabetes model, Akt1 translocation was blunted. Mitochondrial activation of Akt1 increased Complex V activity by 24% in normal myocardium in vivo and restored Complex V activity in diabetic myocardium. Basal mitochondrial Complex V activity was lower by 22% in the Akt1(-/-) myocardium. Insulin-stimulated Complex V activity was not impaired in the Akt1(-/-) myocardium, due to compensatory translocation of Akt2 to mitochondria. Akt1 is the primary isoform that relayed insulin signaling to mitochondria and modulated mitochondrial Complex V activity. Activation of mitochondrial Akt1 enhanced ATP production and increased phosphocreatine in cardiac muscle cells. Dysregulation of this signal pathway might impair mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic myocardium.

  12. Studies on the haemolytic activity of circulating C1q-C3/C4 complexes.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diana; Brouwer, Mieke C; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2008-04-01

    During classical complement pathway activation, the internal thio-ester of both C3 and C4 becomes exposed which enables C3 and C4 to bind covalently to nearby molecules. Recently, we described that C3 and C4 bind to C1q, the recognition molecule of the classical pathway, upon activation of this pathway. Covalently linked complexes between C1q and activated C4 (C1q-C4 complexes) are specific markers for classical complement pathway activation. In the present study we further investigated the molecular characteristics of complexes between C1q and activated C3 or C4 that occur in vivo. In human serum only complexes of C1q with C3d or C4d fragments were detected but not those with the larger C3b/bi or C4b/bi fragments. We identified that C1q-C4 complexes circulate as part of the intact C1 complex instead of as free C1q. Finally, we investigated whether deposited C3d or C4d affect C1 haemolytic activity. We observed that both C1q-C3 and C1q-C4 complexes are significantly (P<0.05) less active in a C1q-haemolytic assay than non-complexed C1q. Thus, the dominant types of C1q complexes that circulate in vivo are C1q-C3d and C1q-C4d complexes. These complexes are still able to interact with C1r and C1s to form a C1 complex, but seem to have a reduced activity as compared to C1q not carrying C3- or C4-fragments.

  13. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  14. Genetic polymorphisms and disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Martin C

    2007-06-15

    Building upon the resources of traditional epidemiology, molecular epidemiology has extended our understanding that disease risk varies based not only upon acquired factors (e.g., exposures, behaviors, demographics), but also as a function of inherited factors (e.g., genetic polymorphisms). Individual susceptibility to cancer is influenced by polymorphisms in phase I enzymes (e.g., activation), phase 2 enzymes (e.g., detoxification), defects in the repair of DNA damage and other cancer susceptibility genes. Because tobacco use and nutrition represent behaviors/exposures which account for a significant number of cancer cases and deaths, these two factors are used to illustrate the relationship between genetic polymorphisms and disease prevention. Susceptibility to the health risks of smoking appears to be influenced by genetic factors that impact initiation, dependence, and nicotine metabolism. Nutrient metabolism also involves polymorphic enzyme pathways and gene-nutrient interactions may influence cancer risk. While the discipline of molecular epidemiology continues to face methodologic challenges related to the need to study large numbers of subjects, current knowledge can be applied to prevention activities. Genetic polymorphisms, and other molecular markers, can be used to develop clinical prevention studies targeted to unique subsets of persons at the highest risk of developing disease. Knowledge about the relationships between polymorphisms and disease outcomes can also be used for reinforcing healthy lifestyles, motivating positive behavior changes, helping to target medical therapy, and aiding in better focusing surveillance activities. PMID:17252563

  15. Recognizing Complex Upper Extremity Activities Using Body Worn Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lemmens, Ryanne J. M.; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J. M.; Timmermans, Annick A. A.; Smeets, Rob J. E. M.; Seelen, Henk A. M.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate arm-hand therapies for neurological patients it is important to be able to assess actual arm-hand performance objectively. Because instruments that measure the actual quality and quantity of specific activities in daily life are lacking, a new measure needs to be developed. The aims of this study are to a) elucidate the techniques used to identify upper extremity activities, b) provide a proof-of-principle of this method using a set of activities tested in a healthy adult and in a stroke patient, and c) provide an example of the method’s applicability in daily life based on readings taken from a healthy adult. Multiple devices, each of which contains a tri-axial accelerometer, a tri-axial gyroscope and a tri-axial magnetometer were attached to the dominant hand, wrist, upper arm and chest of 30 healthy participants and one stroke patient, who all performed the tasks ‘drinking’, ‘eating’ and ‘brushing hair’ in a standardized environment. To establish proof-of-principle, a prolonged daily life recording of 1 participant was used to identify the task ‘drinking’. The activities were identified using multi-array signal feature extraction and pattern recognition algorithms and 2D-convolution. The activities ‘drinking’, ‘eating’ and ‘brushing hair’ were unambiguously recognized in a sequence of recordings of multiple standardized daily activities in a healthy participant and in a stroke patient. It was also possible to identify a specific activity in a daily life recording. The long term aim is to use this method to a) identify arm-hand activities that someone performs during daily life, b) determine the quantity of activity execution, i.e. amount of use, and c) determine the quality of arm-hand skill performance. PMID:25734641

  16. Complex relation between triazine-susceptible phenotype and genotype in the weed Senecio vulgaris may be caused by chloroplast DNA polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Frey, J E; Müller-Schärer, H; Frey, B; Frei, D

    1999-08-01

    The weed Senecio vulgaris acquired high levels of resistance to triazine herbicides soon after the latter's introduction. As in most weeds, triazine resistance is conferred by a point mutation in the chloroplast psbA gene that negatively affects the fitness of its carrier. To assess levels of triazine resistance in S. vulgaris field populations, we adopted a PCR-RFLP-based molecular diagnostic test recently developed for the triazine resistance-conferring region of the psbA gene of other weeds, including Brassica napus, Chenopodium spp. and Amaranthus spp., and compared these molecular results to the phenotypic response after triazine application. A highly significant linear correlation was found between phytotoxic symptoms and biomass reduction. Variability in phenotypic response was not only found between populations or inbred lines of S. vulgaris but also within replicates of the same inbred line. No clear relationship, however, was found between the DNA restriction pattern and the phenotypic response to triazine application, thereby throwing doubt on the use of such molecular diagnostic tests to track triazine resistance in S. vulgaris. Our results indicate that the chloroplast genome of S. vulgaris is polymorphic and that the level of polymorphism may be variable within single leaves of individual plants. We discuss the possible genetic basis of this polymorphism and its consequence for the acquisition and inheritance of chloroplast-based traits. PMID:22665192

  17. Glucosyltransferase gene polymorphism among Streptococcus mutans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Chia, J S; Hsu, T Y; Teng, L J; Chen, J Y; Hahn, L J; Yang, C S

    1991-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases were detected among Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains by Southern blot analysis with DNA probes located within the gtfB gene (H. Aoki, T. Shiroza, M. Hayakawa, S. Sato, and H. K. Kuramitsu, Infect. Immun. 53:587-594, 1986). Restriction endonucleases were used to examine genomic DNAs isolated from serotype a to h strains. The variations were readily detected among 33 strains of serotype c by EcoRI and PstI restriction enzyme digestions. Serotypes e and f, which are genetically similar to serotype c, also had comparable polymorphism; however, serotypes a, b, d, g, and h did not hybridize to the same DNA probes in parallel experiments. Further analysis of enzymatic activities for glucan synthesis and sucrose-dependent adherence revealed no significant differences among the serotype c strains. Our results suggested that genetic polymorphisms existing in S. mutans serotype c strains may reflect a complexity in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases, which are produced ubiquitously in members of the S. mutans group. Images PMID:1826894

  18. Antileishmanial Activity and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation by RuNO Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Natalia Yoshie; Fortes dos Santos Thomazelli, Ana Paula; Tomiotto-Pellissier, Fernanda; Kian, Danielle; Megumi Yamauchi, Lucy; Gouveia Júnior, Florêncio S.; de França Lopes, Luiz Gonzaga; Cecchini, Rubens; Nazareth Costa, Idessânia; Jerley Nogueira da Silva, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Parasites of the genus Leishmania are capable of inhibiting effector functions of macrophages. These parasites have developed the adaptive ability to escape host defenses; for example, they inactivate the NF-κB complex and suppress iNOS expression in infected macrophages, which are responsible for the production of the major antileishmanial substance nitric oxide (NO), favoring then its replication and successful infection. Metal complexes with NO have been studied as potential compounds for the treatment of certain tropical diseases, such as ruthenium compounds, known to be exogenous NO donors. In the present work, the compound cis-[Ru(bpy)2SO3(NO)]PF6, or RuNO, showed leishmanicidal activity directly and indirectly on promastigote forms of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis. In addition, treatment with RuNO increased NO production by reversing the depletion of NO caused by Leishmania. We also found increased expression of Akt, iNOS, and NF-κB in infected and treated macrophages. These results demonstrated that RuNO was able to kill the parasite by NO release and modulate the transcriptional capacity of the cell. PMID:27795620

  19. Switching on oxygen activation by cobalt complexes of pentadentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Vad, Mads S; Nielsen, Anne; Lennartson, Anders; Bond, Andrew D; McGrady, John E; McKenzie, Christine J

    2011-10-28

    The monoanionic N(4)O ligand N-methyl-N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine-N'-acetate (mebpena(-)) undergoes oxidative C-N bond cleavage in the presence of Co(II) and O(2). The two resultant fragments are coordinated to the metal ion in the product [Co(III)(2-pyridylformate)(mepena)]ClO(4) (mepena(-) = N-methyl-N'-(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine-N'-acetato). Bond cleavage does not occur in the presence of chloride ions and [Co(III)(mebpena)Cl](+), containing intact mebpena(-), can be isolated. The oxidative instability of the mebpena(-) in the presence of Co(II) and air stands in contrast to the oxidative stability of the family of very closely related penta- and hexa-dentate ligands in their cobalt complexes. Cyclic voltammetry on the matched pair [Co(III)Cl(mebpena)](+) and [Co(II)Cl(bztpen)](+), bztpen = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine, shows that substitution of a pyridine donor for a carboxylato donor results in a relatively small cathodic shift of 150 mV in the E°(Co(II)/Co(III)) oxidation potential, presumably this is enough to determine the contrasting metal oxidation state in the complexes isolated under ambient conditions. DFT calculations support a proposal that [Co(II)(mebpena)](+) reacts with O(2) to form a Co(III)-superoxide complex which can abstract an H atom from a ligand methylene C atom as the initial step towards the observed oxidative C-N bond cleavage.

  20. Interindividual variation in Complex I activity in Fundulus heteroclitus along a steep thermocline.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Samuel J; Crawford, Douglas L

    2013-01-01

    The first enzyme in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway is Complex I (EC 1.6.5.3). Complex I is a large heteromeric enzyme complex with 45 protein subunits that translocates H(+) ions across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Among northern and southern populations of the teleost fish Fundulus heteroclitus, Complex I subunits have fixed amino acid substitutions. Additionally, there are differences in oxidative phosphorylation activity among populations of F. heteroclitus. To investigate whether these differences are related to Complex I, enzyme activity was measured in 121 individuals from five populations of F. heteroclitus and its sister species Fundulus grandis acclimated to a constant 20°C temperature. Within each population, Complex I activity is highly variable among individuals of F. heteroclitus (coefficient of variation percentage among individuals has a mean of 90% in the five F. heteroclitus populations), and the mean Complex I activity among populations is significantly different at the latitudinal extremes of the range. Importantly, Complex I activity is more similar between F. heteroclitus from the southernmost population and its sister species F. grandis than to the northern populations of F. heteroclitus, suggesting important evolutionary differences. Unexpectedly, the activity is nearly fourfold higher in southern populations than northern populations. Mitochondrial density appears to compensate partially for decreased activity in northern individuals; activity per wet weight is only twofold higher in southern populations. We suggest that some of the variation in Complex I activity is genetically based and thus is being influenced by directional selection. However, this conclusion presents a conundrum: there should not be so much variation in Complex I activity within a population if this variation is biologically important.

  1. Polymorphism within a Neuronal Activity-Dependent Enhancer of NgR1 Is Associated with Corpus Callosum Morphology in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Masanori; Tanigaki, Kenji; Muraki, Kazue; Miyata, Jun; Takemura, Ariyoshi; Sugihara, Genichi; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Hazama, Masaaki; Murai, Toshiya

    2015-01-01

    The human Nogo-66 receptor 1 (NgR1) gene, also termed Nogo receptor 1 or reticulon 4 receptor (RTN4R) and located within 22q11.2, inhibits axonal growth and synaptic plasticity. Patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome show multiple changes in brain morphology, with corpus callosum (CC) abnormalities being among the most prominent and frequently reported. Thus, we hypothesized that, in humans, NgR1 may be involved in CC formation. We focused on rs701428, a single nucleotide polymorphism of NgR1, which is associated with schizophrenia. We investigated the effects of the rs701428 genotype on CC structure in 50 healthy participants using magnetic resonance imaging. Polymorphism of rs701428 was associated with CC structural variation in healthy participants; specifically, minor A allele carriers had larger whole CC volumes and lower radial diffusivity in the central CC region compared with major G allele homozygous participants. Furthermore, we showed that the NgR1 3′ region, which contains rs701428, is a neuronal activity-dependent enhancer, and that the minor A allele of rs701428 is susceptible to regulation of enhancer activity by MYBL2. Our results suggest that NgR1 can influence the macro- and microstructure of the white matter of the human brain.

  2. Interaction of drug based copper(II) complexes with Herring Sperm DNA and their biological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Patel, Chintan R.; Joshi, Hardik N.

    2012-11-01

    Square pyramidal Cu(II) complexes with NS donor ligand and ciprofloxacin have been synthesized and characterized using analytical and spectral techniques. The synthesized complexes have been tested for their antimicrobial activity using double dilution technique in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and colony forming unit (CFU). The DNA binding ability of the complexes with Sperm Herring DNA has been performed using absorption titration and viscosity measurement. The nuclease activity of complexes with plasmid DNA (pUC19) has been carried out using agarose gel electrophoresis technique. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using NBT/NADH/PMS system. The cytotoxic properties of metal complexes have been evaluated using brine shrimp lethality bioassay.

  3. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Timothy J.; Amoyaw, Prince N. -A.; Roewe, Kimberly D.; Simpson, Natalie C.; Maples, Randall D.; Carder Freeman, TaRynn N.; Cain, Amy N.; Le, Justin G.; Archibald, Stephen J.; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, M. O. Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Using transition metals such as manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and zinc(II), several new metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic chelators namely, cyclen- and cyclam-analogs with benzyl groups, were synthesized and screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The metal-free chelators tested showed little or no antimalarial activity. All the metal complexes of the dibenzyl cross-bridged cyclam ligand exhibited potent antimalarial activity. The Mn2+ complex of this ligand was the most potent with IC50s of 0.127 and 0.157 µM against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) P. falciparum strains, respectively. In general, the dibenzyl hydrophobic ligands showed better antimalarial activity compared to the activity of monobenzyl ligands, potentially because of their higher lipophilicity and thus better cell penetration ability. The higher antimalarial activity displayed by the manganese complex for the cyclam ligand in comparison to that of the cyclen, correlates with the larger pocket of cyclam compared to that of cyclen which produces a more stable complex with the Mn2+. Few of the Cu2+ and Fe2+ complexes also showed improvement in activity but Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ complexes did not show any improvement in activity upon the metal-free ligands for anti-malarial development. PMID:24857776

  4. Effects of Mind-Body Training on Personality and Behavioral Activation and Inhibition System According to BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ye-Ha; Lee, Ul Soon; Jang, Joon Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Objective It has been known that mind-body training (MBT) can affect personality and behavior system as well as emotional well-being, but different effects of MBT on them has not been reported according to BDNF genetic polymorphism. Methods Healthy subjects consisted of 64 subjects and the MBT group who practiced meditation regularly consisted of 72 practitioners. Participants completed neuroticism-extraversion-openness (NEO) Five-Factor Inventory and Behavioral Activation System/Behavioral Inhibition System (BAS/BIS) scales. All subjects were genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism. Results In the same genotypes of the BDNF Val/Val+Val/Met group, MBT group showed the increased Extraversion (p=0.033) and the increased Openness to Experience (p=0.004) compared to the control group. Also, in the same Met/Met carriers, MBT group exhibited the increase of Extraversion (p=0.008), the reduction of Neuroticism (p=0.002), and the increase of Openness to Experience (p=0.008) compared to the control group. In the same genotypes of the BDNF Val/Val+Val/Met group, MBT group showed the decreased BAS-Reward Responsiveness (p=0.016) and the decrease of BIS (p=0.004) compared to the control group. In the BDNF Met/Met group, MBT group increased BAS-Fun Seeking (p=0.045) and decreased BIS (p=0.013) compared to the control group. Conclusion MBT would differently contribute to NEO personality and BAS/BIS according to BDNF genetic polymorphism, compensating for different vulnerable traits based on each genotype. PMID:27247601

  5. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 gene (STAT3) associated with body measurement and carcass quality traits in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Song, N; Gui, L S; Xu, H C; Wu, S; Zan, L S

    2015-09-22

    Previous studies have shown that the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 gene (STAT3) is involved in lipid storage and energy metabolism, suggesting that STAT3 is a potential candidate gene that affects body measurement and carcass quality traits in animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms in bovine STAT3 and to analyze their possible associations with body measurement and carcass quality traits in 493 individuals of 2 native Chinese cattle breeds: Qinchuan (N = 371) and Jiaxian cattle (N = 122). DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) were employed to detect STAT3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We found 5 SNPs: 1 in an exon (g.65812G>A: exon 16) and 4 in introns (g.43591G>A: 13 intron, g.67492T>G: 19 intron, g.67519T>C: 19 intron, and g.68964G>A: 20 intron). Both g.65812G>A and g.68964G>A were not in Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), whereas individual frequencies of each genotype were consistent with HWE for other SNPs in Qinchuan cattle populations. For the Jiaxian cattle, the genotype distributions of the 4 mutations were in HWE except for g.67519T>C. The results indicate that these SNPs have a significant association with some body measurements and carcass quality traits (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Therefore, STAT3 might have potential effects on production traits in beef cattle populations and could be used for marker-assisted selection.

  6. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  7. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  8. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  9. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  10. Brains and Brawn: Complex Motor Activities to Maximize Cognitive Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, David

    2015-01-01

    The target articles in this special issue address the timely question of embodied cognition in the classroom, and in particular the potential of this approach to facilitate learning in children. The interest for motor activities within settings that typically give little space to nontraditional content is proof of a shift from a Cartesian…

  11. Comparing Theoretical Perspectives in Describing Mathematics Departments: Complexity and Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beswick, Kim; Watson, Anne; De Geest, Els

    2010-01-01

    We draw on two studies of mathematics departments in 11-18 comprehensive maintained schools in England to compare and contrast the insights provided by differing theoretical perspectives. In one study, activity theory was used to describe common features of the work of three departments. In the other, a mathematics department was viewed and…

  12. Cognitive Activities in Complex Science Text and Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromley, Jennifer G.; Snyder-Hogan, Lindsey E.; Luciw-Dubas, Ulana A.

    2010-01-01

    Ainsworth's (2006) DeFT framework posits that different representations may lead learners to use different strategies. We wanted to investigate whether students use different strategies, and more broadly, different cognitive activities in diagrams vs. in running text. In order to do so, we collected think-aloud protocol and other measures from 91…

  13. Production of extracellular proteolytic activity by Histoplasma capsulatum grown in Histoplasma-macrophage medium is limited to restriction fragment length polymorphism class 1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Zarnowski, Robert; Connolly, Patricia A; Wheat, L Joseph; Woods, Jon P

    2007-09-01

    Extracellular proteolytic activity was studied for 28 strains of Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum and 2 strains of H. capsulatum var. duboisii. Secreted protease activity assessed by skim milk agarose clearance was limited solely to H. capsulatum var. capsulatum restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) class 1 strains. There was a difference in proteolytic activity levels among class 1 strains. Extracellular proteolytic activity was further determined during growth of those strains in liquid medium using azodye-impregnated protein substrates. In general, the highest activities were measured when azocollagen was used, whereas azocasein and azoalbumin were cleaved less efficiently. The activity was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride, antipain, and chymostatin, indicating, thereby, the presence of chymotrypsin-like serine proteases. Chromatographic analyses as well as variable substrate use at different culture times revealed production of at least 2 different enzyme pools of the same serine-like protease family. Our results demonstrate a distinctive ability of RFLP class 1 isolates to produce and secrete serine proteinase-type activity. This peculiarity may be relevant to the biology and pathogenesis of this particular clade of H. capsulatum isolates. Overall, the feature of extracellular proteolytic activity production enables a convenient and unequivocal identification of RFLP class 1 isolates and, thereby, can be used in H. capsulatum strain differentiation and typing. PMID:17509799

  14. G protein activation by G protein coupled receptors: ternary complex formation or catalyzed reaction?

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2004-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors catalyze the GDP/GTP exchange on G proteins, thereby activating them. The ternary complex model, designed to describe agonist binding in the absence of GTP, is often extended to G protein activation. This is logically unsatisfactory as the ternary complex does not accumulate when G proteins are activated by GTP. Extended models taking into account nucleotide binding exist, but fail to explain catalytic G protein activation. This review puts forward an enzymatic model of G protein activation and compares its predictions with the ternary complex model and with observed receptor phenomenon. This alternative model does not merely provide a new set of formulae but leads to a new philosophical outlook and more readily accommodates experimental observations. The ternary complex model implies that, HRG being responsible for efficient G protein activation, it should be as stable as possible. In contrast, the enzyme model suggests that although a limited stabilization of HRG facilitates GDP release, HRG should not be "too stable" as this might trap the G protein in an inactive state and actually hinder G protein activation. The two models also differ completely in the definition of the receptor "active state": the ternary complex model implies that the active state corresponds to a single active receptor conformation (HRG); in contrast, the catalytic model predicts that the active receptor state is mobile, switching smoothly through various conformations with high and low affinities for agonists (HR, HRG, HRGGDP, HRGGTP, etc.).

  15. Associations of MICA Polymorphisms with Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingwen; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by inflammation resulting from the immune dysregulation that usually attacks joints, skin and internal organs. Many of them are considered as complex disease that may be predisposed by multiple genes and/or genetic loci, and triggered by environmental factors such as microbiome and cellular stress. The major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is a highly polymorphic gene that encodes protein variants expressed under cellular stress conditions, and these MICA variants play important roles in immune activation and surveillance. Recently, accumulating evidences from both genetic and functional studies have suggested that MICA polymorphisms may be associated with various rheumatic diseases, and the expression of MICA variants may attribute to the altered immune responses in the diseases. The objective of this review is to discuss potential genetic associations and pathological relevance of MICA in inflammatory rheumatic diseases that may help us to understand pathogenesis contributing to the development of these diseases.

  16. Contribution of complex stapes motion to cochlea activation.

    PubMed

    Eiber, Albrecht; Huber, Alexander M; Lauxmann, Michael; Chatzimichalis, Michail; Sequeira, Damien; Sim, Jae Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Classic theories of hearing have considered only a translational component (piston-like component) of the stapes motion as being the effective stimulus for cochlear activation and thus the sensation of hearing. Our previous study (Huber et al., 2008) qualitatively showed that rotational components around the long and short axes of the footplate (rocking-like components) lead to cochlear activation as well. In this study, the contribution of the piston-like and rocking-like components of the stapes motion to cochlea activation was quantitatively investigated with measurements in live guinea pigs and a related mathematical description. The isolated stapes in anesthetized guinea pigs was stimulated by a three-axis piezoelectric actuator, and 3-D motions of the stapes and compound action potential (CAP) of the cochlea were measured simultaneously. The measured values were used to fit a hypothesis of the CAP as a linear combination of the logarithms of the piston-like and rocking-like components. Both the piston-like and rocking-like components activate cochlear responses when they exceed certain thresholds. These thresholds as well as the relation between CAP and intensity of the motion component were different for piston-like and rocking-like components. The threshold was found to be higher and the sensitivity lower for the rocking-like component than the corresponding values for the piston-like component. The influence of the rocking-like component was secondary in cases of piston-dominant motions of the stapes although it may become significant for low amplitudes of the piston-like component.

  17. Predicting Water Activity for Complex Wastes with Solvation Cluster Equilibria (SCE) - 12042

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, S.F.; Reynolds, J.G.; Johnston, C.T.

    2012-07-01

    Predicting an electrolyte mixture's water activity, i.e. the ratio of water vapor pressure over a solution with that of pure water, in principle reveals both boiling point and solubilities for that mixture. Better predictions of these properties helps support the ongoing missions to concentrate complex nuclear waste mixtures in order to conserve tank space and improved predictions of water activity will help. A new approach for predicting water activity, the solvation cluster equilibria (SCE) model, uses pure electrolyte water activities to predict water activity for a complex mixture of those electrolytes. An SCE function based on electrolyte hydration free energy and a standard Debye- Hueckel (DH) charge compression fits each pure electrolyte's water activity with three parameters. Given these pure electrolyte water activities, the SCE predicts any mixture water activity over a large range of concentration with an additional parameter for each mixture vector, the multinarity. In contrast to ionic strength, which scales with concentration, multinarity is related to the relative proportion of electrolytes in a mixture and can either increase or decrease the water activity prediction over a broad range of concentration for that mixture. The SCE model predicts water activity for complex electrolyte mixtures based on the water activities of pure electrolytes. Three parameter SCE functions fit the water activities of pure electrolytes and along with a single multinarity parameter for each mixture vector then predict the mixture water activity. Predictions of water activity can in principle predict solution electrolyte activity and this relationship will be explored in the future. Predicting electrolyte activities for complex mixtures provides a means of determining solubilities for each electrolyte. Although there are a number of reports [9, 10, 11] of water activity models for pure and binary mixtures of electrolytes, none of them compare measured versus calculated

  18. Homodinuclear lanthanide complexes of phenylthiopropionic acid: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, DNA cleavage, and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shiju, C; Arish, D; Kumaresan, S

    2013-03-15

    Lanthanide complexes of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), and Ho(III) with phenylthiopropionic acid were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR, electronic spectra, molar conductance, TGA, and powder XRD. The results show that the lanthanide complexes are homodinuclear in nature. The two lanthanide ions are bridged by eight oxygen atoms from four carboxylate groups. Thermal decomposition profiles are consistent with the proposed formulations. Powder XRD studies show that all the complexes are amorphous in nature. Antimicrobial studies indicate that these complexes exhibit more activity than the ligand itself. The DNA cleavage activity of the ligand and its complexes were assayed on Escherichia coli DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence of H(2)O(2). The result shows that the Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes have completely cleaved the DNA. The anticancer activities of the complexes have also been studied towards human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and colon cancer cells (HCT116) and it was found that the La(III) and Nd(III) complexes are more active than the corresponding Pr(III), Sm(III), Ho(III) complexes, and the free ligand on both the cancer cells.

  19. Homodinuclear lanthanide complexes of phenylthiopropionic acid: Synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, DNA cleavage, and antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiju, C.; Arish, D.; Kumaresan, S.

    2013-03-01

    Lanthanide complexes of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), and Ho(III) with phenylthiopropionic acid were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR, electronic spectra, molar conductance, TGA, and powder XRD. The results show that the lanthanide complexes are homodinuclear in nature. The two lanthanide ions are bridged by eight oxygen atoms from four carboxylate groups. Thermal decomposition profiles are consistent with the proposed formulations. Powder XRD studies show that all the complexes are amorphous in nature. Antimicrobial studies indicate that these complexes exhibit more activity than the ligand itself. The DNA cleavage activity of the ligand and its complexes were assayed on Escherichia coli DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence of H2O2. The result shows that the Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes have completely cleaved the DNA. The anticancer activities of the complexes have also been studied towards human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and colon cancer cells (HCT116) and it was found that the La(III) and Nd(III) complexes are more active than the corresponding Pr(III), Sm(III), Ho(III) complexes, and the free ligand on both the cancer cells.

  20. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  1. Active listening for spatial orientation in a complex auditory scene.

    PubMed

    Moss, Cynthia F; Bohn, Kari; Gilkenson, Hannah; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2006-04-01

    To successfully negotiate a complex environment, an animal must control the timing of motor behaviors in coordination with dynamic sensory information. Here, we report on adaptive temporal control of vocal-motor behavior in an echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus, as it captured tethered insects close to background vegetation. Recordings of the bat's sonar vocalizations were synchronized with high-speed video images that were used to reconstruct the bat's three-dimensional flight path and the positions of target and vegetation. When the bat encountered the difficult task of taking insects as close as 10-20 cm from the vegetation, its behavior changed significantly from that under open room conditions. Its success rate decreased by about 50%, its time to initiate interception increased by a factor of ten, and its high repetition rate "terminal buzz" decreased in duration by a factor of three. Under all conditions, the bat produced prominent sonar "strobe groups," clusters of echolocation pulses with stable intervals. In the final stages of insect capture, the bat produced strobe groups at a higher incidence when the insect was positioned near clutter. Strobe groups occurred at all phases of the wingbeat (and inferred respiration) cycle, challenging the hypothesis of strict synchronization between respiration and sound production in echolocating bats. The results of this study provide a clear demonstration of temporal vocal-motor control that directly impacts the signals used for perception.

  2. Impact of ABCB1 1236C > T-2677G > T-3435C > T polymorphisms on the anti-proliferative activity of imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib

    PubMed Central

    Dessilly, Géraldine; Panin, Nadtha; Elens, Laure; Haufroid, Vincent; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 (also called P-glycoprotein) confers resistance to multiple anticancer drugs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Several ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms affect the transporter activity. The most common ABCB1 variants are 1236C > T, 2677G > T, 3435C > T and have been associated with clinical response to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) in some studies. We evaluated the impact of these polymorphisms on the anti-proliferative effect and the intracellular accumulation of TKIs (imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib) in transfected HEK293 and K562 cells. ABCB1 overexpression increased the resistance of cells to doxorubicin, vinblastine and TKIs. Imatinib anti-proliferative effect and accumulation were decreased to a larger extent in cells expressing the ABCB1 wild-type protein compared with the 1236T-2677T-3435T variant relatively to control cells. By contrast, ABCB1 polymorphisms influenced the activity of nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib to a much lesser extent. In conclusion, our data suggest that wild-type ABCB1 exports imatinib more efficiently than the 1236T-2677T-3435T variant protein, providing a molecular basis for the reported association between ABCB1 polymorphisms and the response to imatinib in CML. Our results also point to a weaker impact of ABCB1 polymorphisms on the activity of nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib. PMID:27405085

  3. Activation of the cAMP cascade in human fibroblast cultures rescues the activity of oxidatively damaged complex I.

    PubMed

    De Rasmo, Domenico; Signorile, Anna; Larizza, Maria; Pacelli, Consiglia; Cocco, Tiziana; Papa, Sergio

    2012-02-15

    A study of the relationship between cAMP/PKA-dependent phosphorylation and oxidative damage of subunits of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is presented. It is shown that, in fibroblast cultures, PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the NDUFS4 subunit of complex I rescues the activity of the oxidatively damaged complex. Evidence is presented showing that this effect is mediated by phosphorylation-dependent exchange of carbonylated NDUFS4 subunit in the assembled complex with the de novo synthesized subunit. These results indicate a potential use for β-adrenoceptor agonists in preventing/reversing the detrimental effects of oxidative stress in the mitochondrial respiratory system.

  4. [Active radiation telethermometry in the complex diagnosis of ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Hozhenko, A I; Peresun'ko, O P; Orenchuk, V S; Vysochyna, K V

    1999-07-01

    An active remote radiation thermometry was used in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of ovarian tumours by determining the heat flow from the area of projection of the ovaries and control background. Overall fourty three patients with ovarian tumours were examined by this method. Significance of the results secured was verified during the histological technique-aided operation. The authors have come to the conclusion that remote thermometry involving loading tests is a simple supplementary method of investigation that is helpful in diagnosing of both benign and malignant ovarian tumours.

  5. Assessing design activity in complex CMOS circuit design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Gautam; Goldman, Susan R.; Fisher, Doug; Bhuva, Bharat; Glewwe, Grant

    1994-03-01

    This chapter characterizes human problem solving in digital circuit design. We analyze protocols of designers with varying degrees of training, identifying problem solving strategies used by these designers, discuss activity patterns that differentiate designers, and propose these as a tentative basis for assessing expertise in digital design. Throughout, we argue that a comprehensive model of human design should integrate a variety of strategies, which heretofore have been proposed as individually sufficient models of human design problem solving. We close by describing an automated tool for design and its assessment.

  6. Complex Explosive Volcanic Activity on the Moon in Oppenheimer Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, B. H. N.; Bennett, K. A.; Gaddis, L. R.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Allen, C.; Hayne, P. O.; Bell, J. F., III; Paige, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Oppenheimer is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic deposits on the Moon are thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rates and Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. However, using new methods to derive iron mineralogy from Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, we find that the mineralogy of the Oppenheimer pyroclastics is not consistent with a simple Vulcanian eruption mechanism. The Oppenheimer pyroclastic deposits are mixtures of pyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene (CPX), and juvenile iron-rich glass. A Vulcanian (plugged conduit) eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit. However, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases (glass or CPX mixed with glass) and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least some portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire fountaining eruption at higher effusion rates. Significant along-fracture mineralogical variations within many of the deposits suggest multiple eruptions and that eruption styles may have been variable in time and space. Diviner mid-infrared spectra also indicate that these local deposits may be much more iron-rich than regional pyroclastic deposits, and thus are valuable resource targets. These results suggest that local lunar pyroclastic deposits may have a more complex origin and mode of emplacement than previously thought.

  7. Metallurgical and Biological Activity of Peroxo Complexes of Molybdenum (VI) Containing Organic Acid and Amine Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrin, Jahanara; Saidul Islam, M.

    This study describes with the preparation, characterization and bioactivity of peroxo complexes [A: MoO(O2)(gly)(Q); B: MoO(O2)(ala)(2-pic)]of Mo(VI)] containing organic acid and amine bases. Both the complexes A and B were characterized by a variety of physicochemical techniques, viz., elemental analyses, molar conductivity, IR, NMR and electronic spectral studies. The analytical data were in good agreement with the proposed emperical formulae of both the complexes. The molar conductance values indicated both the complexes are non-electrolytes in DMF revealing that the anions are covalently bonded in all the cases. The magnetic moment values indicated that both the complexes were dimagnetic in nature suggesting that there were no changes in the oxidation states of the metal ions upon complexation. The electronic spectral data of the complexes A and B showed bands at 315-355 nm region due to the charge transfers band only. The antimicrobial properties of the peroxo complexes of Mo(VI) indicated that both the complexes were stronger antibacterial and antifungal agents. However, the highest antifungal activity was shown in the complex B against A. niger (16 mm) while the complex A of Mo(VI) showed lowest activity (10 mm). The MIC experiment showed that the complex B of Mo(VI) were more potent against all the bacteria tested than the complex A. Results showed that the complex A of Mo(VI) exhibits more toxic to brine shrimp compared to complex B of Mo(VI) indicating the lower values of LC50 for both the exposure 16 and 36 h.

  8. Primitive Genepools of Asian Pears and Their Complex Hybrid Origins Inferred from Fluorescent Sequence-Specific Amplification Polymorphism (SSAP) Markers Based on LTR Retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuang; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Yu, Peiyuan; Yue, Xiaoyan; Ahmed, Maqsood; Cai, Danying; Teng, Yuanwen

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicated that interspecific hybridization was the major mode of evolution in Pyrus. The genetic relationships and origins of the Asian pear are still unclear because of frequent hybrid events, fast radial evolution, and lack of informative data. Here, we developed fluorescent sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP) markers with lots of informative sites and high polymorphism to analyze the population structure among 93 pear accessions, including nearly all species native to Asia. Results of a population structure analysis indicated that nearly all Asian pear species experienced hybridization, and originated from five primitive genepools. Four genepools corresponded to four primary Asian species: P. betulaefolia, P. pashia, P. pyrifolia, and P. ussuriensis. However, cultivars of P. ussuriensis were not monophyletic and introgression occurred from P. pyrifolia. The specific genepool detected in putative hybrids between occidental and oriental pears might be from occidental pears. The remaining species, including P. calleryana, P. xerophila, P. sinkiangensis, P. phaeocarpa, P. hondoensis, and P. hopeiensis in Asia, were inferred to be of hybrid origins and their possible genepools were identified. This study will be of great help for understanding the origin and evolution of Asian pears. PMID:26871452

  9. Platinum(iv) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: their synthesis, characterisation and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Bouché, M; Dahm, G; Wantz, M; Fournel, S; Achard, T; Bellemin-Laponnaz, S

    2016-07-28

    Platinum(ii) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes have been oxidized by bromine or iodobenzene dichloride to provide the fully characterised corresponding platinum(iv) NHC complexes. Antiproliferative activities of Pt(iv) NHC complexes were assayed against several cancer cell lines and the results were correlated with respect to their stability. Mechanistic investigations revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS production were associated with the cytotoxic process induced by these compounds. PMID:27331604

  10. The effect of the Gly16Arg polymorphism of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor gene on plasma free fatty acid levels is modulated by physical activity.

    PubMed

    Meirhaeghe, A; Luan, J; Selberg-Franks, P; Hennings, S; Mitchell, J; Halsall, D; O'Rahilly, S; Wareham, N J

    2001-12-01

    The lipolytic effects of catecholamines are mediated through members of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (BAR-2) family. Previous studies have suggested that genetic variants in the BAR-2 gene may be associated with obesity in some populations. To our knowledge, no studies have directly examined the effects of this polymorphism on circulating nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels. To explore this issue further, a cohort of 604 Caucasian individuals (aged 40-65 yr) was genotyped for a common polymorphism in the BAR-2 gene (Gly16Arg), and the relationships between genotype, body mass index (BMI), NEFA, and lipid levels were examined. Women bearing the Arg16 allele had higher BMI values (P < 0.01) than Gly16Gly women. Women carriers of the Arg16Arg genotype had lower fasting plasma NEFAs (P < 0.01) and greater suppression of NEFAs (P < 0.01) after an oral glucose load than women bearing the Gly16 allele. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for age, sex, and smoking status, the interaction between the BAR-2 genotype and BMI in determining fasting NEFA concentrations was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The availability of objective measures of total energy expenditure in this population permitted the further examination of interactions, particularly that between genotype and physical activity. In the population as a whole, after adjustment for confounding by age, smoking, and BMI, the effect of the Arg16Arg genotype on the suppression of NEFA levels was modified by physical activity level (P for interaction <0.05). These data suggest the existence in this population of a gene-physical activity interaction on NEFA levels.

  11. TIM-1 rs41297579 G>A (-1454) and TIM-4 rs7700944 gene polymorphisms as possible risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis: relation to activity and severity.

    PubMed

    Mosaad, Y M; El-Bassiony, S R; El-Ghaweet, A E; Elhindawy, M M; El-Deek, B S; Sultan, W A

    2015-08-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the impact of both TIM-1 rs41297579 G>A (-1454) and TIM-4 rs7700944 polymorphisms on susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a cohort of Egyptian population and to evaluate for the first time their relation to activity, severity, disease-related disability and erosion. TIM-1 rs41297579 G>A (-1454) and TIM-4 rs7700944 gene polymorphisms were typed by RFLP for 128 patients with RA and 125 healthy controls. The A allele, A-containing genotypes (GA and AA) of the TIM-4 and GA haplotype were present with significant higher frequency in patients with RA than healthy controls (Pc  < 0.001). These findings suggest that the A allele, A-containing genotypes (GA and AA) and GA haplotype may be a susceptibility risk factor for RA [OR = 5.83 (3.6-9.4), OR = 9.41 (5.0-17.6) and OR = 4.21 (1.07-19.2), respectively]. No associations were found between TIM genotypes and disease activity, severity or presence of erosion. However, the RA patients with GA genotype of TIM-4 have higher grade of rheumatoid factor (RF) positivity (P = 0.018), and have worse disease-related disability (P = 0.007) and worse pain (0.025). TIM-4 rs7700944 and not TIM-1 rs41297579 G>A (-1454) is associated with RA in the present cohort of Egyptian and may be a risk factor for development of RA in Egyptian. Both SNPs have no effect on disease activity, severity or erosion. However, TIM-4 GA genotype is associated with higher grade of RF positivity and worse disease-related disability and pain.

  12. Association of gene polymorphisms encoding dopaminergic system components and platelet MAO-B activity with alcohol dependence and alcohol dependence-related phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Nenadic Sviglin, Korona; Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Jovanovic, Tanja; Pivac, Nela

    2014-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the association of alcohol dependence and alcohol dependence-related phenotypes with platelet monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) activity, Val108/158Met of catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT), variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in the third exon of dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene, VNTR in the 3'-untranslated region of dopamine transporter (DAT) gene, -1021C/T of dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) and MAO-B intron 13 polymorphisms. The study included 1270 Caucasian men and women of Croatian origin: 690 patients with alcohol dependence and 580 healthy controls. Patients with alcohol dependence were subdivided according to the presence or absence of withdrawal symptoms, aggressive behavior, severity of alcohol dependence, delirium tremens, comorbid depression, suicidal behavior, lifetime suicide attempt and early/late onset of alcohol abuse. The results, corrected for multiple testing, revealed increased platelet MAO-B activity in patients with alcohol dependence, subdivided into those with or without alcohol-related liver diseases, compared to control subjects (P<0.001). In addition, we found an increased frequency of the COMT Met/Met genotype among suicidal (P=0.002) and patients who attempted suicide (P<0.001) and an increased frequency of COMT Val/Val genotype in patients with an early onset of alcohol dependence (P=0.004). This study provides data from a sample of ethnically homogeneous unrelated Caucasian subjects for future meta-analyses and suggests that the increased platelet MAO-B activity might be used as independent peripheral indicator of alcohol dependence, while COMT Val108/158Met polymorphism is associated with increased suicidality and early onset of alcohol dependence. PMID:25035107

  13. Ubiquitin-SUMO circuitry controls activated fanconi anemia ID complex dosage in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Rajendra, Eeson; Weinert, Brian T; Passmore, Lori A; Patel, Ketan J; Olsen, Jesper V; Choudhary, Chunaram; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2015-01-01

    We show that central components of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, the tumor suppressor proteins FANCI and FANCD2 (the ID complex), are SUMOylated in response to replication fork stalling. The ID complex is SUMOylated in a manner that depends on the ATR kinase, the FA ubiquitin ligase core complex, and the SUMO E3 ligases PIAS1/PIAS4 and is antagonized by the SUMO protease SENP6. SUMOylation of the ID complex drives substrate selectivity by triggering its polyubiquitylation by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 to promote its removal from sites of DNA damage via the DVC1-p97 ubiquitin segregase complex. Deregulation of ID complex SUMOylation compromises cell survival following replication stress. Our results uncover a regulatory role for SUMOylation in the FA pathway, and we propose that ubiquitin-SUMO signaling circuitry is a mechanism that contributes to the balance of activated ID complex dosage at sites of DNA damage.

  14. Carbon bridged triphenolate lanthanide complexes: synthesis, characterization, DFT studies and catalytic activities for isoprene polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Liang, Zhenhua; Ling, Jun; Ni, Xufeng; Shen, Zhiquan

    2015-06-28

    The dinuclear lanthanide complexes [Ln2(L)2(THF)n] (Ln = Nd (1) n = 4, Gd (2) n = 3, Lu (3) n = 2) supported by carbon bridged triphenolate ligands [LH3 = tris(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)methane] were synthesized via a salt metathesis reaction between lanthanide trichlorides and LNa3 in THF. All complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and X-ray crystallography, and complex 3 was characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Agostic interactions were found in these complexes and were further substantiated by DFT calculations of complex 3. These lanthanide complexes in combination with aluminum alkyls and [Ph3C](+)[B(C6F5)4](-) generated efficient homogeneous catalysts for the cis-1,4 polymerization of isoprene, with complex 1 having the best catalytic activity. PMID:26008592

  15. Synthesis, structural characterization and antimicrobial activity evaluation of metal complexes of sparfloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gamel, Nadia E. A.; Zayed, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    The synthesis and characterization of binary Cu(II)- ( 1), Co(II)- ( 2), Ni(II)- ( 3), Mn(II)- ( 4), Cr(III)- ( 5), Fe(III)- ( 6), La(III)- ( 7), UO 2(VI)- ( 8) complexes with sparfloxacin ( HL1) and ternary Cu(II)- ( 9), Co(II)- ( 10), Ni(II)- ( 11), Mn(II)- ( 12), Cr(III)- ( 13), Fe(III)- ( 14), La(III)- ( 15), UO 2(VI)- ( 16) complexes with sparfloxacin ( HL1) and DL-alanine ( H2L2) complexes are reported using elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, UV-Vis, thermal analysis and 1H-NMR spectral studies. The molar conductance measurements of all the complexes in DMF solution correspond to non-electrolytic nature. All complexes were of the high-spin type and found to have six-coordinate octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which were four coordinate, square planar and U- and La-atoms in the uranyl and lanthanide have a pentagonal bipyramidal coordination sphere. The antimicrobial activity of these complexes has been screened against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria. Antifungal activity against two different fungi has been evaluated and compared with reference drug sparfloxacin. All the binary and ternary complexes showed remarkable potential antimicrobial activity higher than the recommended standard agents. Ni(II)- and Mn(II) complexes exhibited higher potency as compared to the parent drug against Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Evidence for surface Ag + complexes as the SERS-active sites on Ag electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Kawanami, O.; Honda, K.; Pettinger, B.

    1983-12-01

    Evidence is given that SERS-active sites at Ag electrodes are associated with Ag + ions, forming sparingly soluble surface complexes with ligands such as pyridine molecules and halide ions. Such surface Ag + complexes contribute a factor of >800 to the overall (10 7-fold) enhancement, possibly via a resonance Raman effect.

  17. A study of in vitro antibacterial activity of lanthanides complexes with a tetradentate Schiff base ligand

    PubMed Central

    Al Momani, Waleed Mahmoud; Taha, Ziyad Ahmed; Ajlouni, Abdulaziz Mahmoud; Shaqra, Qasem Mohammad Abu; Al Zouby, Muaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish the antibacterial activity of lanthanides complexes with a tetradentate Schiff base ligand L. Methods (N, N′-bis (1-naphthaldimine)-o-phenylenediamine) was prepared from the condensation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde with o-phenylenediamine in a molar ratio of 2:1. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant Ln (III) complexes was investigated using agar well diffusion and micro-broth dilution techniques; the latter was used to establish the minimum inhibitory concentrations for each compound investigated. Results Most of Ln (III) complexes were found to exhibit antibacterial activities against a number of pathogenic bacteria with MICs ranging between 1.95-250.00 µg/mL. Staphylococcus aureus was the most susceptible bacterial species to [LaL(NO3)2(H2O)](NO3) complex while Shigella dysenteriae and Escherichia coli required a relatively higher MIC (250 µg/mL). The complexes La (III) and Pr (III) were effective inhibitors against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas Sm (III) complex was effective against Serratia marcescens. On the other hand, Gd (III), La (III) and Nd (III) were found to be more potent inhibitors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa than two of commonly used antibiotics. The remaining Ln (III) complexes showed no remarkable activity as compared to the two standard drugs used. Conclusions Tetradentate Schiff base ligand L and its complexes could be a potential antibacterial compounds after further investigation. PMID:23646299

  18. Surface confined heteroleptic copper(II)-polypyridyl complexes for photonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikram; Mondal, Prakash C; Kumar, Anup; Jeyachandran, Yekkoni L; Awasthi, Satish K; Gupta, Rinkoo D; Zharnikov, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Heteroleptic copper(II)-polypyridyl complexes with extended π-conjugated, aromatic terminal units were immobilized on glass/Si substrates to intercalate DNA and cleave it upon photoexposure. Photonuclease activity is shown to be high, well reproducible and non-destructible towards the assembled complexes.

  19. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Biological Activity Studies of Ni(II) and Zn(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Palakuri; Laxma Reddy, K.

    2014-01-01

    Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from tridentate 3-formyl chromone Schiff bases such as 3-((2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL1), 2-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylneamino)benzoic acid (HL2), 3-((3-hydroxypyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL3), and 3-((2-mercaptophenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL4). All the complexes were characterized in the light of elemental analysis, molar conductance, FTIR, UV-VIS, magnetic, thermal, powder XRD, and SEM studies. The conductance and spectroscopic data suggested that, the ligands act as neutral and monobasic tridentate ligands and form octahedral complexes with general formula [M(L1–4)2]·nH2O (M = Ni(II) and Zn(II)). Metal complexes exhibited pronounced activity against tested bacteria and fungi strains compared to the ligands. In addition metal complexes displayed good antioxidant and moderate nematicidal activities. The cytotoxicity of ligands and their metal complexes have been evaluated by MTT assay. The DNA cleavage activity of the metal complexes was performed using agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of oxidant H2O2. All metal complexes showed significant nuclease activity in the presence of H2O2. PMID:24948904

  20. Budding Yeast Silencing Complexes and Regulation of Sir2 Activity by Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tanny, Jason C.; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Gerber, Scott A.; Gygi, Steven P.; Moazed, Danesh

    2004-01-01

    Gene silencing in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the enzymatic activity of the Sir2 protein, a highly conserved NAD-dependent deacetylase. In order to study the activity of native Sir2, we purified and characterized two budding yeast Sir2 complexes: the Sir2/Sir4 complex, which mediates silencing at mating-type loci and at telomeres, and the RENT complex, which mediates silencing at the ribosomal DNA repeats. Analyses of the protein compositions of these complexes confirmed previously described interactions. We show that the assembly of Sir2 into native silencing complexes does not alter its selectivity for acetylated substrates, nor does it allow the deacetylation of nucleosomal histones. The inability of Sir2 complexes to deacetylate nucleosomes suggests that additional factors influence Sir2 activity in vivo. In contrast, Sir2 complexes show significant enhancement in their affinities for acetylated substrates and their sensitivities to the physiological inhibitor nicotinamide relative to recombinant Sir2. Reconstitution experiments showed that, for the Sir2/Sir4 complex, these differences stem from the physical interaction of Sir2 with Sir4. Finally, we provide evidence that the different nicotinamide sensitivities of Sir2/Sir4 and RENT in vitro could contribute to locus-specific differences in how Sir2 activity is regulated in vivo. PMID:15282295

  1. Insights into the activation mechanism of class I HDAC complexes by inositol phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Peter J.; Millard, Christopher J.; Riley, Andrew M.; Robertson, Naomi S.; Wright, Lyndsey C.; Godage, Himali Y.; Cowley, Shaun M.; Jamieson, Andrew G.; Potter, Barry V. L.; Schwabe, John W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1, 2 and 3 form the catalytic subunit of several large transcriptional repression complexes. Unexpectedly, the enzymatic activity of HDACs in these complexes has been shown to be regulated by inositol phosphates, which bind in a pocket sandwiched between the HDAC and co-repressor proteins. However, the actual mechanism of activation remains poorly understood. Here we have elucidated the stereochemical requirements for binding and activation by inositol phosphates, demonstrating that activation requires three adjacent phosphate groups and that other positions on the inositol ring can tolerate bulky substituents. We also demonstrate that there is allosteric communication between the inositol-binding site and the active site. The crystal structure of the HDAC1:MTA1 complex bound to a novel peptide-based inhibitor and to inositol hexaphosphate suggests a molecular basis of substrate recognition, and an entropically driven allosteric mechanism of activation. PMID:27109927

  2. LL37:DNA complexes provide antimicrobial activity against intracellular bacteria in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Alexander; Batinica, Marina; Steiger, Julia; Hartmann, Pia; Zaucke, Frank; Bloch, Wilhelm; Fabri, Mario

    2016-08-01

    As part of the innate host response neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), protein:DNA complexes that contain a number of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), such as cathelicidin. Human cathelicidin in its active form, LL37, has potent antimicrobial activity against bacteria. However, whether LL37 derived from NETs contributes to antimicrobial activity against intracellular pathogens remains unclear. Here, we report that NETs induced by mycobacteria contain cathelicidin. Human macrophages internalized NET-bound cathelicidin, which is transported to lysosomal compartments. Furthermore, using a model of in vitro-generated LL37:DNA complexes we found that LL37 derived from such complexes attacks mycobacteria in macrophage phagolysosomes resulting in antimicrobial activity. Taken together, our results suggest a mechanism by which LL37 in complex with DNA contributes to host defence against intracellular bacteria in human macrophages.

  3. [The effects of complex platinum compounds on the neuraminidase activity of the Sendai virus].

    PubMed

    Repanovici, R; Călinoiu, A; Iliescu, R; Löber, G; Popa, L M

    1989-01-01

    The effect of di- and tetravalent cis-diaminoplatinum chlorides on Sendai virus envelop HN glycoprotein was investigated. The partial inhibition of neuraminidase activity was greater in the case of the divalent platinum complex derivative. PMID:2556835

  4. Coordinating complex decision support activities across distributed applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge-based technologies have been applied successfully to automate planning and scheduling in many problem domains. Automation of decision support can be increased further by integrating task-specific applications with supporting database systems, and by coordinating interactions between such tools to facilitate collaborative activities. Unfortunately, the technical obstacles that must be overcome to achieve this vision of transparent, cooperative problem-solving are daunting. Intelligent decision support tools are typically developed for standalone use, rely on incompatible, task-specific representational models and application programming interfaces (API's), and run on heterogeneous computing platforms. Getting such applications to interact freely calls for platform independent capabilities for distributed communication, as well as tools for mapping information across disparate representations. Symbiotics is developing a layered set of software tools (called NetWorks! for integrating and coordinating heterogeneous distributed applications. he top layer of tools consists of an extensible set of generic, programmable coordination services. Developers access these services via high-level API's to implement the desired interactions between distributed applications.

  5. Physical properties and biological activities of hesperetin and naringenin in complex with methylated β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Sangpheak, Waratchada; Kicuntod, Jintawee; Schuster, Roswitha; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Wolschann, Peter; Kungwan, Nawee; Viernstein, Helmut; Mueller, Monika; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to improve physical properties and biological activities of the two flavanones hesperetin and naringenin by complexation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and its methylated derivatives (2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin, DM-β-CD and randomly methylated-β-CD, RAMEB). The free energies of inclusion complexes between hesperetin with cyclodextrins (β-CD and DM-β-CD) were theoretically investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The free energy values obtained suggested a more stable inclusion complex with DM-β-CD. The vdW force is the main guest-host interaction when hesperetin binds with CDs. The phase solubility diagram showed the formation of a soluble complex of AL type, with higher increase in solubility and stability when hesperetin and naringenin were complexed with RAMEB. Solid complexes were prepared by freeze-drying, and the data from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) confirmed the formation of inclusion complexes. The data obtained by the dissolution method showed that complexation with RAMEB resulted in a better release of both flavanones to aqueous solution. The flavanones-β-CD/DM-β-CD complexes demonstrated a similar or a slight increase in anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity towards three different cancer cell lines. The overall results suggested that solubilities and bioactivities of both flavanones were increased by complexation with methylated β-CDs.

  6. DNA-binding affinity and nuclease activity of two cytotoxic copper terpyridine complexes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pengfei; Lin, Miaoxin; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhang, Yangmiao; Jiang, Qin

    2009-01-01

    Two copper(II) terpyridine complexes, [Cu(atpy)(NO(3))(H(2)O)](NO(3)) 3H(2)O (1) and [Cu(ttpy)(NO(3))(2)] (2) (atpy = 4'-p-N9-adeninylmethyl-phenyl-2,2':6,2''-terpyridine; ttpy = 4'-p-tolyl-2,2':6,2''-terpyridine) exhibited high cytotoxicity, with average ten times more potency than cisplatin against the human cervix carcinoma cell line (HeLa), the human liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2), the human galactophore carcinoma cell line (MCF7), and the human prostate carcinoma cell line (PC-3). The cytotoxicity of the complex 1 was lower than that of the complex 2. Both complexes showed more efficient oxidative DNA cleavage activity under irradiation with UV light at 260 nm than in the presence of ascorbic acid. Especially, complex 1 exhibited evident photoinduced double-stranded DNA cleavage activity. The preliminary mechanism experiments revealed that hydrogen peroxide was involved in the oxidative DNA damage induced by both complexes. From the absorption titration data, the DNA-binding affinity of the complexes with surpersoiled plasmid pUC19 DNA, polydAdT, and polydGdC was calculated and complex 2 showed higher binding affinity than complex 1 with all these substrates. The DNA cleavage ability and DNA-binding affinity of both complexes depended on the substituent group on the terpyrdine ligands. PMID:19705364

  7. Physical properties and biological activities of hesperetin and naringenin in complex with methylated β-cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Sangpheak, Waratchada; Kicuntod, Jintawee; Schuster, Roswitha; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Wolschann, Peter; Kungwan, Nawee; Viernstein, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this work is to improve physical properties and biological activities of the two flavanones hesperetin and naringenin by complexation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and its methylated derivatives (2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin, DM-β-CD and randomly methylated-β-CD, RAMEB). The free energies of inclusion complexes between hesperetin with cyclodextrins (β-CD and DM-β-CD) were theoretically investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The free energy values obtained suggested a more stable inclusion complex with DM-β-CD. The vdW force is the main guest–host interaction when hesperetin binds with CDs. The phase solubility diagram showed the formation of a soluble complex of AL type, with higher increase in solubility and stability when hesperetin and naringenin were complexed with RAMEB. Solid complexes were prepared by freeze-drying, and the data from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) confirmed the formation of inclusion complexes. The data obtained by the dissolution method showed that complexation with RAMEB resulted in a better release of both flavanones to aqueous solution. The flavanones-β-CD/DM-β-CD complexes demonstrated a similar or a slight increase in anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity towards three different cancer cell lines. The overall results suggested that solubilities and bioactivities of both flavanones were increased by complexation with methylated β-CDs. PMID:26877798

  8. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  9. Influence of Various Polymorphic Variants of Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase (POR) on Drug Metabolic Activity of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6

    PubMed Central

    Naranmandura, Hua; Zeng, Su; Chen, Shu Qing

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is known as the sole electron donor in the metabolism of drugs by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in human. However, little is known about the effect of polymorphic variants of POR on drug metabolic activities of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6. In order to better understand the mechanism of the activity of CYPs affected by polymorphic variants of POR, six full-length mutants of POR (e.g., Y181D, A287P, K49N, A115V, S244C and G413S) were designed and then co-expressed with CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 in the baculovirus-Sf9 insect cells to determine their kinetic parameters. Surprisingly, both mutants, Y181D and A287P in POR completely inhibited the CYP3A4 activity with testosterone, while the catalytic activity of CYP2B6 with bupropion was reduced to approximately ∼70% of wild-type activity by Y181D and A287P mutations. In addition, the mutant K49N of POR increased the CLint (Vmax/Km) of CYP3A4 up to more than 31% of wild-type, while it reduced the catalytic efficiency of CYP2B6 to 74% of wild-type. Moreover, CLint values of CYP3A4-POR (A115V, G413S) were increased up to 36% and 65% of wild-type respectively. However, there were no appreciable effects observed by the remaining two mutants of POR (i.e., A115V and G413S) on activities of CYP2B6. In conclusion, the extent to which the catalytic activities of CYP were altered did not only depend on the specific POR mutations but also on the isoforms of different CYP redox partners. Thereby, we proposed that the POR-mutant patients should be carefully monitored for the activity of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 on the prescribed medication. PMID:22719896

  10. Complex active regions as the main source of extreme and large solar proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, V. N.

    2013-12-01

    A study of solar proton sources indicated that solar flare events responsible for ≥2000 pfu proton fluxes mostly occur in complex active regions (CARs), i.e., in transition structures between active regions and activity complexes. Different classes of similar structures and their relation to solar proton events (SPEs) and evolution, depending on the origination conditions, are considered. Arguments in favor of the fact that sunspot groups with extreme dimensions are CARs are presented. An analysis of the flare activity in a CAR resulted in the detection of "physical" boundaries, which separate magnetic structures of the same polarity and are responsible for the independent development of each structure.

  11. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  12. Correlation between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter 4G/5G polymorphism and metabolic/proinflammatory factors in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sales, M F; Sóter, M O; Candido, A L; Fernandes, A P; Oliveira, F R; Ferreira, A C S; Sousa, M O; Ferreira, C N; Gomes, K B

    2013-10-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of subfertility associated to metabolic disorders. The aim of this study was to correlate metabolic and proinflammatory factors in women with PCOS. The frequency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter 4 G/5 G polymorphism was also compared to healthy controls. We evaluated 79 PCOS and 79 healthy women. PAI-1 levels are positively correlated with proinflammatory factors in PCOS group. 4 G allele in PAI-1 gene was more frequent in PCOS and the 4G/4 G genotype was associated with increased PAI-1 levels. A correlation between insulin resistance and proinflammatory and overweight was also observed. C-reactive protein, serum levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), Lipid Accumulation Product (LAP) and vitamin D are good tools to evaluated factors associated to cardiovascular risk in women with PCOS.

  13. Polymorphisms in the Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene are Associated with Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin Functional Activity in Crohn's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Choteau, Laura; Vasseur, Francis; Lepretre, Frederic; Figeac, Martin; Gower-Rousseau, Corine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sendid, Boualem; Jawhara, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin, together with mannose-associated serine proteases, activates the lectin pathway of the complement system and subsequent inflammatory mechanisms. An association between mannose-binding lectin deficiency and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody levels is observed in Crohn's disease and this deficiency is frequently associated with a severe Crohn's disease phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of mannose-binding lectin, mannose-binding lectin functional activity, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms, anti-S. cerevisiae antibody levels and clinical Crohn's disease phenotype in 69 Crohn's disease patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The results show that the MBL2 variant rs5030737 at codon 52 was associated with a low level of mannose-binding lectin and impaired mannose-binding lectin-mannose-associated serine protease (MBL-MASP) functional activity in Crohn's disease patients. This MBL2 variant was also associated with a higher level of anti-S. cerevisiae antibodies. In addition, the NOD2 variant rs2066844, which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease, was significantly correlated with an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity. These results provide evidence that Crohn's disease patients have an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity and that this defect is associated with MBL2 and NOD2 variants.

  14. Combined bromodeoxyuridine immunocapture and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis highlights differences in the active soil bacterial metagenome due to Glomus mosseae inoculation or plant species.

    PubMed

    Artursson, Veronica; Finlay, Roger D; Jansson, Janet K

    2005-12-01

    High numbers of bacteria are associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, but their functions and in situ activities are largely unknown and most have never been characterized. The aim of the present study was to study the impact of Glomus mosseae inoculation and plant type on the active bacterial communities in soil by using a molecular approach, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) immunocapture in combination with terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). This approach combined with sequence information from clone libraries, enabled the identification of actively growing populations, within the total bacterial community. Distinct differences in active bacterial community compositions were found according to G. mosseae inoculation, treatment with an antifungal compound (Benomyl) and plant type. The putative identities of the dominant bacterial species that were activated as a result of G. mosseae inoculation were found to be mostly uncultured bacteria and Paenibacillus species. These populations may represent novel bacterial groups that are able to influence the AM relationship and its subsequent effect on plant growth.

  15. Polymorphisms in the Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene are Associated with Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin Functional Activity in Crohn’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Choteau, Laura; Vasseur, Francis; Lepretre, Frederic; Figeac, Martin; Gower-Rousseau, Corine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sendid, Boualem; Jawhara, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin, together with mannose-associated serine proteases, activates the lectin pathway of the complement system and subsequent inflammatory mechanisms. An association between mannose-binding lectin deficiency and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody levels is observed in Crohn’s disease and this deficiency is frequently associated with a severe Crohn’s disease phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of mannose-binding lectin, mannose-binding lectin functional activity, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms, anti-S. cerevisiae antibody levels and clinical Crohn’s disease phenotype in 69 Crohn’s disease patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The results show that the MBL2 variant rs5030737 at codon 52 was associated with a low level of mannose-binding lectin and impaired mannose-binding lectin–mannose-associated serine protease (MBL-MASP) functional activity in Crohn’s disease patients. This MBL2 variant was also associated with a higher level of anti-S. cerevisiae antibodies. In addition, the NOD2 variant rs2066844, which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn’s disease, was significantly correlated with an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity. These results provide evidence that Crohn’s disease patients have an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity and that this defect is associated with MBL2 and NOD2 variants. PMID:27404661

  16. DNA binding and nuclease activity of a one-dimensional heterometallic nitrosyl complex.

    PubMed

    Selim, Md; Chowdhury, Sujoy Roy; Mukherjea, Kalyan K

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of a structurally characterized Sr-Fe nitrosyl complex with DNA has been studied by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, viscometric, and gel electrophoresis techniques. From the absorption titration studies the intrinsic binding constant of the complex with DNA was calculated to be 1.6x10(4)M(-1). Fluorimetric studies indicate that the complex compete with EB in binding to DNA. The complex shows nuclease activity on pUC19 supercoiled DNA in presence of H(2)O(2). PMID:17825903

  17. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method to distinguish three mealybug groups within the Planococcus citri-P. minor species complex (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Rung, A; Miller, D R; Scheffer, S J

    2009-02-01

    The mealybug species Planococcus citri (Risso) and Planococcus minor (Maskell) (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae) have special significance to U.S. quarantine and U.S. agriculture. Commonly intercepted at U.S. ports-of-entry, they are difficult to identify based on morphological characters. This study presents a molecular method for distinguishing P. citri, P. minor, and a genetically distinct group that is morphologically identical to P. citri, from Hawaii. This method uses polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction fragment polymorphism analysis (RFLP) using the restriction enzymes BspH1, BsmH1, and HpH1. The resulting band patterns can be visualized in a 2% agarose gel and are sufficient to differentiate between the three entities mentioned above. PCR-RFLP diagnostics can be used for all life stages and is cheaper and faster than DNA sequencing.

  18. Monocyte recruitment by HLA IgG-activated endothelium: The relationship between IgG subclass and FcγRIIa polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Trinh, K. Ryan; Mulder, Arend; Morrison, Sherie L.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear which donor specific HLA antibodies confer the highest risk of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and allograft loss. In this study, we hypothesized that two distinct features (HLA IgG subclass and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) polymorphisms), which vary from patient to patient, influence the process of monocyte trafficking to and macrophage accumulation in the allograft during AMR in an interrelated fashion. Here, we investigated the contribution of human IgG subclass and FcγR polymorphisms in monocyte recruitment in vitro by primary human aortic endothelium activated with chimeric anti-HLA I human IgG1 and IgG2. Both subclasses triggered monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, via a two-step process. First, HLA I crosslinking by antibodies stimulated upregulation of P-selectin on endothelium irrespective of IgG subclass. P-selectin-induced monocyte adhesion was enhanced by secondary interactions of IgG with FcγRs, which was highly dependent upon subclass. IgG1 was more potent than IgG2 through differential engagement of FcγRs. Monocytes homozygous for FcγRIIa-H131 adhered more readily to HLA antibody-activated endothelium compared with FcγRIIa-R131 homozygous. Finally, direct modification of HLA I antibodies with immunomodulatory enzymes EndoS and IdeS dampened recruitment by eliminating antibody-FcγR binding, an approach that may have clinical utility in reducing AMR and other forms of antibody-induced inflammation. PMID:25648976

  19. Monocyte recruitment by HLA IgG-activated endothelium: the relationship between IgG subclass and FcγRIIa polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, N M; Trinh, K R; Mulder, A; Morrison, S L; Reed, E F

    2015-06-01

    It is currently unclear which donor specific HLA antibodies confer the highest risk of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and allograft loss. In this study, we hypothesized that two distinct features (HLA IgG subclass and Fcγ receptor [FcγR] polymorphisms) which vary from patient to patient, influence the process of monocyte trafficking to and macrophage accumulation in the allograft during AMR in an interrelated fashion. Here, we investigated the contribution of human IgG subclass and FcγR polymorphisms in monocyte recruitment in vitro by primary human aortic endothelium activated with chimeric anti-HLA I human IgG1 and IgG2. Both subclasses triggered monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, via a two-step process. First, HLA I crosslinking by antibodies stimulated upregulation of P-selectin on endothelium irrespective of IgG subclass. P-selectin-induced monocyte adhesion was enhanced by secondary interactions of IgG with FcγRs, which was highly dependent upon subclass. IgG1 was more potent than IgG2 through differential engagement of FcγRs. Monocytes homozygous for FcγRIIa-H131 adhered more readily to HLA antibody-activated endothelium compared with FcγRIIa-R131 homozygous. Finally, direct modification of HLA I antibodies with immunomodulatory enzymes EndoS and IdeS dampened recruitment by eliminating antibody-FcγR binding, an approach that may have clinical utility in reducing AMR and other forms of antibody-induced inflammation. PMID:25648976

  20. Synthesis and antioxidant activities of transition metal complexes based 3-hydroxysalicylaldehyde-S-methylthiosemicarbazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal-Demirci, Tülay; Şahin, Musa; Kondakçı, Esin; Özyürek, Mustafa; Ülküseven, Bahri; Apak, Reşat

    2015-03-01

    The nickel(II), iron(III), oxovanadium(IV) complexes of the 3-hydroxysalicylidene-S-methyl-thiosemicarbazone (L) were obtained from the 3-hydroxysalicyldehyde-S-methylthiosemicarbazone with the R1-substituted-salicylaldehyde (R1: H, 3-OH) in the presence of Ni(II), Fe(III), VO(IV) as template ion. The ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, electronic, UV/Vis., 1H NMR, EPR and IR studies. The free ligand and its metal complexes have been tested for in vitro antioxidant capacity by reduction of copper(II) neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) using the CUPRAC method. The ligand exhibited more potent in vitro antioxidant capacity than its complexes. The obtained trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) value of the iron(III) complex (TEACCUPRAC = 3.27) was higher than those of other complexes. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the free ligand and its complexes were determined by in vitro methods measuring the scavenging activity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydroxyl radical (radOH), superoxide anion radical (O2rad -), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), showing that especially the V(IV) and Fe(III) complexes had significant scavenging activity for ROS.

  1. Cyclodextrin complexed [60]fullerene derivatives with high levels of photodynamic activity by long wavelength excitation.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Atsushi; Iizuka, Tatsuya; Maekubo, Naotake; Aono, Ryota; Kikuchi, Jun-Ichi; Akiyama, Motofusa; Konishi, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Takuya; Ishida-Kitagawa, Norihiro; Tatebe, Hisashi; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2013-08-01

    We have evaluated the photodynamic activities of C60 derivative·γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CDx) complexes and demonstrated that they were significantly higher than those of the pristine C60 and C70·γ-CDx complexes under photoirradiation at long wavelengths (610-720 nm), which represent the optimal wavelengths for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In particular, the cationic C60 derivative·γ-CDx complex had the highest photodynamic ability because the complex possessed the ability to generate high levels of (1)O2 and provided a higher level of intracellular uptake. The photodynamic activity of this complex was greater than that of photofrin, which is the most widely used of the known clinical photosensitizers. These findings therefore provide a significant level of information toward the optimization of molecular design strategies for the synthesis of fullerene derivatives for PDT. PMID:24900742

  2. DNA binding, antioxidant activity, and DNA damage protection of chiral macrocyclic Mn(III) salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Nirali; Khan, Noor-ul H; Prathap, K Jeya; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Abdi, Sayed H R; Mishra, Sandhya; Bajaj, Hari C

    2012-12-01

    We are reporting the synthesis, characterization, and calf thymus DNA binding studies of novel chiral macrocyclic Mn(III) salen complexes S-1, R-1, S-2, and R-2. These chiral complexes showed ability to bind with DNA, where complex S-1 exhibits the highest DNA binding constant 1.20 × 10(6) M(-1). All the compounds were screened for superoxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities; among them, complex S-1 exhibited significant activity with IC(50) 1.36 and 2.37 μM, respectively. Further, comet assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage protection in white blood cells against the reactive oxygen species wherein complex S-1 was found effective in protecting the hydroxyl radicals mediated plasmid and white blood cells DNA damage.

  3. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity of Steroidal Thiosemicarbazone Platinum (Pt(II)) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmin; Kong, Erbin; Gan, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiping; Lin, Qifu; Cui, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal compounds exhibit particular physiological activities. In this paper, some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes were synthesized by the condensation of steroidal ketones with thiosemicarbazide using estrone, chenodeoxycholic acid, and 7-deoxycholic acid as starting materials and complexation of steroidal thiosesemicarbazones with Pt(II). The complexes were characterized by IR, NMR, and MS, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated. The results showed that some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes displayed moderate cytotoxicity to HeLa and Bel-7404 cells. Thereinto, complex 6 showed an excellent inhibited selectivity to HeLa cells with an IC50 value of 9.2 μM and SI value of 21.7. At the same time, all compounds were almost inactive to HEK293T (normal kidney epithelial cells). The information obtained from the studies may be useful for the design of novel chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26635511

  4. Antitumor activity of a 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid hydrazone copper complex and the related mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingli; Huang, Tengfei; Zhou, Sufeng; Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Yuan, Yanbin; Zhang, Qiongqing; Li, Shaoshan; Li, Changzheng

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid hydrazone (PPAH) was prepared and its antitumor activity was evaluated. The inhibition of proliferation of PPAH against the HepG2 and HCT-116 cell lines was less effective, yet in the presence of copper ions, the mixture demonstrated excellent antitumor activity (IC50 at 2.75±0.30 µM for the HepG2 cell line, and 1.90±0.20 µM for the HCT-116 cell line, respectively) and the new active species was confirmed to be a PPAH copper complex with a 1:1 ratio by spectral analysis. The excellent antitumor activity of the copper complex prompted us to investigate the underlying mechanism. RT-PCR was performed to detect the changes in the expression of apoptotic genes induced by PPAH and its copper complex. However, no changes were observed when the cells were treated by the agents for 24 or 48 h, indicating that ROS were unlikely involved. Cell cycle analysis showed that both PPAH and its copper complex led to S phase arrest of the cells. The sDNA relaxation assay revealed that the PPAH-copper complex displayed dual topoisomerase inhibition for type I and II. The data suggest that the inhibition of proliferation exhibited by the PPAH copper complex may stem from its dual topoisomerase inhibition, which is rarely observed for a metal complex.

  5. Single molecule microscopy reveals mechanistic insight into RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex assembly and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Abigail E.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a complex process that requires general transcription factors and Pol II to assemble on DNA into preinitiation complexes that can begin RNA synthesis upon binding of NTPs (nucleoside triphosphate). The pathways by which preinitiation complexes form, and how this impacts transcriptional activity are not completely clear. To address these issues, we developed a single molecule system using TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy and purified human transcription factors, which allows us to visualize transcriptional activity at individual template molecules. We see that stable interactions between polymerase II (Pol II) and a heteroduplex DNA template do not depend on general transcription factors; however, transcriptional activity is highly dependent upon TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF. We also found that subsets of general transcription factors and Pol II can form stable complexes that are precursors for functional transcription complexes upon addition of the remaining factors and DNA. Ultimately we found that Pol II, TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF can form a quaternary complex in the absence of promoter DNA, indicating that a stable network of interactions exists between these proteins independent of promoter DNA. Single molecule studies can be used to learn how different modes of preinitiation complex assembly impact transcriptional activity. PMID:27112574

  6. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  7. Electrochemical, catalytic and antimicrobial activity of N-functionalized tetraazamacrocyclic binuclear nickel(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, R.; Vijayaraj, A.; Suresh, R.; Shenbhagaraman, R.; Kaviyarasan, V.; Narayanan, V.

    2011-02-01

    The five binuclear nickel(II) complexes have been synthesized by the Schiff base condensation of 1,8-[bis(3-formyl-2-hydroxy-5-methyl)benzyl]-l,4,8,11-tetraazacyclo-tetradecane (PC) with appropriate aliphatic diamines and nickel(II) perchlorate. All the five complexes were characterized by elemental and spectral analysis. The electronic spectra of the complexes show three d-d transition in the range of 550-1055 nm due to 3A 2g → 3T 2g(F), 3A 2g → 3T 1g(F) and 3A 2g → 3T 1g(P). These spin allowed electronic transitions are characteristic of an octahedral Ni 2+ center. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two irreversible one electron reduction waves at cathodic region. The reduction potential of the complexes shifts towards anodically upon increasing the chain length of the macrocyclic ring. All the nickel(II) complexes show two irreversible one electron oxidation waves at anodic region. The oxidation potential of the complexes shift towards anodically upon increasing the chain length of the macrocyclic ring. The catalytic activities of the complexes were observed to be increase with increase the macrocyclic ring size. The observed rate constant values for the catalytic hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate are in the range of 5.85 × 10 -3 to 9.14 × 10 -3 min -1. All the complexes were screened for antimicrobial activity.

  8. Effect of oxygen on activation state of complex I and lack of oxaloacetate inhibition of complex II in Langendorff perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Maklashina, Elena; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Karliner, Joel S; Cecchini, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Two main entry points for electrons into the mitochondrial respiratory chain are NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) and succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex II). Metabolic regulation of these two respiratory complexes is not understood in detail. It has been suggested that the Krebs cycle metabolic intermediate oxaloacetate (OAA) inhibits complex II in vivo, whereas complex I undergoes a reversible active/de-active transition. In normoxic and anoxic hearts it has been shown that the proportion of complex I in the active and de-active states is different suggesting a possible mode of regulation of the enzyme by oxygen concentration. In the current studies rapid isolation of mitochondrial membranes in a state that preserves the activity of both complex I and complex II has been achieved using Langendorff perfused rat hearts. The findings indicate that the state of activation of complex I is controlled by the oxygen saturation in the perfusate. In addition, these studies show that complex II is fully active in the mitochondrion and not inhibited by OAA regardless of the oxygen concentration.

  9. TNF-induced recruitment and activation of the IKK complex require Cdc37 and Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqing; Cao, Ping; Goeddel, David V

    2002-02-01

    The IKK complex, containing two catalytic subunits IKKalpha and IKKbeta and a regulatory subunit NEMO, plays central roles in signal-dependent activation of NF-kappaB. We identify Cdc37 and Hsp90 as two additional components of the IKK complex. IKKalpha/IKKbeta/NEMO and Cdc37/Hsp90 form an approximately 900 kDa heterocomplex, which is assembled via direct interactions of Cdc37 with Hsp90 and with the kinase domain of IKKalpha/IKKbeta. Geldanamycin (GA), an antitumor agent that disrupts the formation of this heterocomplex, prevents TNF-induced activation of IKK and NF-kappaB. GA treatment reduces the size of the IKK complex and abolishes TNF-dependent recruitment of the IKK complex to TNF receptor 1 (TNF-R1). Therefore, heterocomplex formation with Cdc37/Hsp90 is a prerequisite for TNF-induced activation and trafficking of IKK from the cytoplasm to the membrane.

  10. Supramolecular assembly and antitumor activity of multiwalled carbon nanotube-camptothecin complexes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhong; Yin, Min; Ma, Hongmei; Zhu, Longzhang; Shen, Hebei; Jia, Nengqin

    2011-02-01

    The novel supramolecular complexes were prepared with a water-insoluble anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT) loading onto functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes via pi-stacking, in order to improve their solubility and antitumor activity. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes were firstly coated with the tri-block copolymer (Pluronic P123) to render high aqueous solubility. The copolymer-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes can effectively form non-covalent supramolecular complexes with camptothecin. The supramolecular assembly of the complexes (f-MWNTs-CPT) were systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectrophotometry (UV), fluorescence spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity studies of f-MWNTs-CPT supramolecular complexes using the MTT assay exhibit enhanced antitumor activity, suggesting that the functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes can facilitate intracellular delivery of anticancer drug and improve drug activity.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, DNA/BSA interactions and anticancer activity of achiral and chiral copper complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-Quan; Sun, Qian; Jiang, Lin; Li, Si-Tong; Gu, Wen; Tian, Jin-Lei; Liu, Xin; Yan, Shi-Ping

    2015-05-28

    Six novel copper(ii) complexes of [CuCl]ClO4 (), [Cu(acac)]PF6 (), [CuCl]2(PF6)2 (), [CuCl]2(PF6)2 (), [Cu(acac)]PF6 () and [Cu(acac)]PF6 (), ( = 1-naphthyl-N,N-[bis(2-pyridyl)methyl]amine, = R/S-1-naphthyl-N,N-[bis(2-pyridyl)methyl]ethanamine, acac = diacetone) were synthesized to serve as artificial nucleases. All complexes were structurally characterized using X-ray crystallography. The crystal structures showed the presence of distorted square-planar CuLCl (, and ) and distorted tetragonal-pyramidal CuL(acac) (, and ) geometry. The interaction of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was researched by means of several spectroscopy methods, which indicated that the complexes were bound to CT-DNA by an intercalation binding mode. DNA cleavage experiments revealed that the complexes exhibited remarkable DNA cleavage activities in the presence of H2O2, and single oxygen ((1)O2) or hydroxyl radicals may serve as the major cleavage active species. In particular, the in vitro cytotoxicity of the complexes on four human cancer cell lines (HeLa, MCF-7, Bel-7404 and HepG-2) demonstrated that the six compounds had broad-spectrum anti-cancer activity with low IC50 values. The stronger cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage activity of the chiral enantiomers compared with chiral analogues verified the influence of chirality on the antitumor activity of complexes. Meanwhile, the protein binding ability was revealed by quenching of tryptophan emission with the addition of complexes using BSA as a model protein. The results indicated that the quenching mechanism of BSA by the complexes was a static process.

  12. Identification of an iridium(III) complex with anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Liu, Li-Juan; Chao, Wei-chieh; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Li, Ruei-nian; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Group 9 transition metal complexes have been widely explored as therapeutic agents due to their unique geometry, their propensity to undergo ligand exchanges with biomolecules and their diverse steric and electronic properties. These metal complexes can offer distinct modes of action in living organisms compared to carbon-based molecules. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial and anti-proliferative abilities of a series of cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes. The iridium(III) complex 1 inhibited the growth of S. aureus with MIC and MBC values of 3.60 and 7.19 μM, respectively, indicating its potent bactericidal activity. Moreover, complex 1 also exhibited cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines, with particular potency against ovarian, cervical and melanoma cells. This cyclometallated iridium(III) complex is the first example of a substitutionally-inert, Group 9 organometallic compound utilized as a direct and selective inhibitor of S. aureus. PMID:26416333

  13. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of enoxacin metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Arayne, Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Haroon, Urooj; Mesaik, M Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    The present work comprises the synthesis of enoxacin (Heno) complexes with various transition metals. Two types of complexes [M(eno)(2)(H(2)O)(2)]3H(2)O(M = Cu(II), Ni(II) or Mn(II)) and [M(eno)(H(2)O)(2)]Cl . 4H(2)O (M = Fe(III)) were obtained. The complexes were characterized by different physicochemical, spectroscopic, and elemental analysis. Results suggest that enoxacin interacts with the metals as a monoanionic bidentate ligand. These complexes were also tested for their antibacterial activity against eleven (11) different microorganisms, and the results were compared with the parent drug. Moreover all the metal complexes were also tested for their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species where by Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes exhibited potential to mediate anti-inflammatory response.

  14. Synthesis, spectral, thermal and antimicrobial studies of some new tri metallic biologically active ceftriaxone complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Alaa E.

    2011-01-01

    Iron, cobalt, nickel and copper complexes of ceftriaxone were prepared in 1:3 ligand:metal ratio to examine the ligating properties of the different moieties of the drug. The complexes were found to have high percentages of coordinated water molecules. The modes of bonding were discussed depending on the infrared spectral absorption peaks of the different allowed vibrations. The Nujol mull electronic absorption spectra and the magnetic moment values indicated the Oh geometry of the metal ions in the complexes. The ESR spectra of the iron, cobalt, and copper complexes were determined and discussed. The thermal behaviors of the complexes were studied by TG and DTA techniques. The antimicrobial activities of the complexes were examined and compared to that of the ceftriaxone itself.

  15. Cdk-activating kinase complex is a component of human transcription factor TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Shiekhattar, R; Mermelstein, F; Fisher, R P; Drapkin, R; Dynlacht, B; Wessling, H C; Morgan, D O; Reinberg, D

    1995-03-16

    Transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) contains a kinase capable of phosphorylating the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we report the identification of the Cdk-activating kinase (Cak) complex (Cdk7 and cyclin H) as a component of TFIIH after extensive purification of TFIIH by chromatography. We find that affinity-purified antibodies directed against cyclin H inhibit TFIIH-dependent transcription and that both cyclin H and Cdk7 antibodies inhibit phosphorylation of the CTD of the largest subunit of the RNAPII in the preinitiation complex. Cak is present in at least two distinct complexes, TFIIH and a smaller complex that is unable to phosphorylate RNAPII in the preinitiation complex. Both Cak complexes, as well as recombinant Cak, phosphorylate a CTD peptide. Finally, TFIIH was shown to phosphorylate both Cdc2 and Cdk2, suggesting that there could be a link between transcription and the cell cycle machinery.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology and In-Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Aspergillus terreus Species Complex Isolates in Delhi, India: Evidence of Genetic Diversity by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism and Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Shallu; Sharma, Cheshta; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Agarwal, Puneet; Agarwal, Kshitij; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F.; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus terreus is emerging as an etiologic agent of invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals in several medical centers in the world. Infections due to A. terreus are of concern due to its resistance to amphotericin B, in vivo and in vitro, resulting in poor response to antifungal therapy and high mortality. Herein we examined a large collection of molecularly characterized, geographically diverse A. terreus isolates (n = 140) from clinical and environmental sources in India for the occurrence of cryptic A. terreus species. The population structure of the Indian A. terreus isolates and their association with those outside India was determined using microsatellite based typing (STR) technique and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis (AFLP). Additionally, in vitro antifungal susceptibility of A. terreus isolates was determined against 7 antifungals. Sequence analyses of the calmodulin locus identified the recently described cryptic species A. hortai, comprising 1.4% of Aspergillus section Terrei isolates cultured from cases of aspergilloma and probable invasive aspergillosis not reported previously. All the nine markers used for STR typing of A. terreus species complex proved to be highly polymorphic. The presence of high genetic diversity revealing 75 distinct genotypes among 101 Indian A. terreus isolates was similar to the marked heterogeneity noticed in the 47 global A. terreus population exhibiting 38 unique genotypes mainly among isolates from North America and Europe. Also, AFLP analysis showed distinct banding patterns for genotypically diverse A. terreus isolates. Furthermore, no correlation between a particular genotype and amphotericin B susceptibility was observed. Overall, 8% of the A. terreus isolates exhibited low MICs of amphotericin B. All the echinocandins and azoles (voriconazole, posaconazole and isavuconazole) demonstrated high potency against all the isolates. The study emphasizes the need of molecular

  17. A complex of equine lysozyme and oleic acid with bactericidal activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Emily A; Wilhelm, Kristina R; Schleucher, Jürgen; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A; Hakansson, Anders P

    2013-01-01

    HAMLET and ELOA are complexes consisting of oleic acid and two homologous, yet functionally different, proteins with cytotoxic activities against mammalian cells, with HAMLET showing higher tumor cells specificity, possibly due to the difference in propensity for oleic acid binding, as HAMLET binds 5-8 oleic acid molecules per protein molecule and ELOA binds 11-48 oleic acids. HAMLET has been shown to possess bactericidal activity against a number of bacterial species, particularly those with a respiratory tropism, with Streptococcus pneumoniae displaying the greatest degree of sensitivity. We show here that ELOA also displays bactericidal activity against pneumococci, which at lower concentrations shows mechanistic similarities to HAMLET's bactericidal activity. ELOA binds to S. pneumoniae and causes perturbations of the plasma membrane, including depolarization and subsequent rupture, and activates an influx of calcium into the cells. Selective inhibition of calcium channels and sodium/calcium exchange activity significantly diminished ELOA's bactericidal activity, similar to what we have observed with HAMLET. Finally, ELOA-induced death was also accompanied by DNA fragmentation into high molecular weight fragments - an apoptosis-like morphological phenotype that is seen during HAMLET-induced death. Thus, in contrast to different mechanisms of eukaryote cell death induced by ELOA and HAMLET, these complexes are characterized by rather similar activities towards bacteria. Although the majority of these events could be mimicked using oleic acid alone, the concentrations of oleic acid required were significantly higher than those present in the ELOA complex, and for some assays, the results were not identical between oleic acid alone and the ELOA complex. This indicates that the lipid, as a common denominator in both complexes, is an important component for the complexes' bactericidal activities, while the proteins are required both to solubilize and/or present the

  18. Lessons from isolable nickel(I) precursor complexes for small molecule activation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenglai; Driess, Matthias

    2012-02-21

    Small-molecule activation by transition metals is essential to numerous organic transformations, both biological and industrial. Creating useful metal-mediated activation systems often depends on stabilizing the metal with uncommon low oxidation states and low coordination numbers. This provides a redox-active metal center with vacant coordination sites well suited for interacting with small molecules. Monovalent nickel species, with their d(9) electronic configuration, are moderately strong one-electron reducing agents that are synthetically attractive if they can be isolated. They represent suitable reagents for closing the knowledge gap in nickel-mediated activation of small molecules. Recently, the first strikingly stable dinuclear β-diketiminate nickel(I) precursor complexes were synthesized, proving to be suitable promoters for small-molecule binding and activation. They have led to many unprecedented nickel complexes bearing activated small molecules in different reduction stages. In this Account, we describe selected achievements in the activation of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), O(2), the heavier chalcogens (S, Se, and Te), and white phosphorus (P(4)) through this β-diketiminatonickel(I) precursor species. We emphasize the reductive activation of O(2), owing to its promise in oxidation processes. The one-electron-reduced O(2) activation product, that is, the corresponding β-diketiminato-supported Ni-O(2) complex, is a genuine superoxonickel(II) complex, representing an important intermediate in the early stages of O(2) activation. It selectively acts as an oxygen-atom transfer agent, hydrogen-atom scavenger, or both towards exogenous organic substrates to yield oxidation products. The one-electron reduction of the superoxonickel(II) moiety was examined by using elemental potassium, β-diketiminatozinc(II) chloride, and β-diketiminatoiron(I) complexes, affording the first heterobimetallic complexes featuring a [NiO(2)M] subunit (M is K, Zn, or Fe). Through

  19. Synthesis, characterization and antitumoral activity of new cobalt(II)complexes: Effect of the ligand isomerism on the biological activity of the complexes.

    PubMed

    Morcelli, Samila R; Bull, Érika S; Terra, Wagner S; Moreira, Rafaela O; Borges, Franz V; Kanashiro, Milton M; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Maciel, Leide L F; de A Almeida, João Carlos; Júnior, Adolfo Horn; Fernandes, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis, physico-chemical characterization and cytotoxicity against five human tumoral cell lines (THP-1, U937, Molt-4, Colo205 and H460) of three new cobalt(II) coordination compounds are reported (i.e. Co(HL1)Cl (1), Co(HL2)Cl (2) and [Co(HL3)Cl]0.0.5 (CH3)2CHOH (3)). H2L2 (2-{[[2-hydroxy-3-(1-naphthyloxy)propyl](pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}phenol) and H2L3 (2-{[[2-hydroxy-3-(2-naphthyloxy)propyl](pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}phenol) present α and β-naphthyl groups respectively, which is absent in H2L1 (N-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-N-(2-pyridylmethyl)[(3-chloro)(2-hydroxy)]propylamine. These compounds were characterized by a range of physico-chemical methods. X-ray diffraction studies were performed for complex (3), indicating the formation of a mononuclear complex. Complexes (2) and (3), which contain α and β-naphthyl groups respectively, have presented lower IC50 values than those exhibited by complex (1). Complex (3) presents IC50 values lower than cisplatin against Colo205 (90 and 196μmolL(-1), respectively) and H460 (147 and 197μmolL(-1), respectively). These human neoplastic cells under investigation were also more susceptible toward complex (3) than peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Transmission electron microscopy investigations are in agreement with the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) observed by JC-1 mitochondrial potential sensor and indicate that the activity of complex (3) against leukemic cell line (U937) is mediated by an apoptotic mechanism associated with mitochondrial dysfunction (intrinsic pathway).

  20. Coordination behavior and antifungicidal, antibacterial, and antifertility activities of dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes of biologically active heterocyclic benzothiazolines.

    PubMed

    Kanoongo, N; Singh, R V; Tandon, J P; Goyal, R B

    1990-01-01

    Synthesis, characterization, and structural aspects of a new class of dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes with biologically active benzothiazolines, 2-(2-pyridyl) benzothiazoline, 2-(2-thienyl) benzothiazoline, 2-(2-furyl) benzothiazoline, 2-(3-indolyl) benzothiazoline, glyoxal benzothiazoline, biacetylbenzothiazoline, benzil benzothiazoline, and terphthaldehyde benzothiazoline have been described. The newly synthesized complexes, [MoO2(Bzt)2] and [MoO2(Bzt')] (where BztH and Bzt'H2 represent benzothazoline molecules) have been characterized by elemental analysis, conductance measurements, molecular weight determinations, and magnetic studies. Based on IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and electronic spectral studies, distorted octahedral geometry with cis-MoO2 group has been indicated for the resulting complexes. Two benzothiazolines and their corresponding metal complexes were screened for their antifungicidal and antibacterial activity on several fungi and bacteria and found to be quite active in this respect. In addition, antifertility activity of representative ligands and their molybdenum complexes was also evaluated and discussed in male mice.

  1. Regulation of Mec1 kinase activity by the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Prabodh; Bao, Yunhe; Xiao, Jing; Luo, Jie; Shen, Jianfeng; Persinger, Jim; Peng, Guang; Ranish, Jeff; Bartholomew, Blaine; Shen, Xuetong

    2015-03-15

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes alter chromatin structure through interactions with chromatin substrates such as DNA, histones, and nucleosomes. However, whether chromatin remodeling complexes have the ability to regulate nonchromatin substrates remains unclear. Saccharomyces cerevisiae checkpoint kinase Mec1 (ATR in mammals) is an essential master regulator of genomic integrity. Here we found that the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is capable of regulating Mec1 kinase activity. In vivo, Mec1 activity is reduced by the deletion of Snf2, the core ATPase subunit of the SWI/SNF complex. SWI/SNF interacts with Mec1, and cross-linking studies revealed that the Snf2 ATPase is the main interaction partner for Mec1. In vitro, SWI/SNF can activate Mec1 kinase activity in the absence of chromatin or known activators such as Dpb11. The subunit requirement of SWI/SNF-mediated Mec1 regulation differs from that of SWI/SNF-mediated chromatin remodeling. Functionally, SWI/SNF-mediated Mec1 regulation specifically occurs in S phase of the cell cycle. Together, these findings identify a novel regulator of Mec1 kinase activity and suggest that ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes can regulate nonchromatin substrates such as a checkpoint kinase.

  2. High activity of an indium alkoxide complex toward ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters.

    PubMed

    Quan, Stephanie M; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2015-06-14

    An indium complex supported by a ferrocene-derived Schiff base ligand has an unprecedented high activity toward ε-caprolactone, δ-valerolactone, and β-butyrolactone. l-Lactide, d,l-lactide, and trimethylene carbonate polymerizations also showed moderate to high activity.

  3. MICA polymorphism: biology and importance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2014-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA) encodes a membrane-bound protein acting as a ligand to stimulate an activating receptor, NKG2D, expressed on the surface of essentially all human natural killer (NK), γδ T and CD8(+) αβ T cells. MICA protein is absent from most cells but can be induced by infections and oncogenic transformation and is frequently expressed in epithelial tumors. Upon binding to MICA, NKG2D activates cytolytic responses of NK and γδ T cells against infected and tumor cells expressing MICA. Therefore, membrane-bound MICA acts as a signal during the early immune response against infection or spontaneously arising tumors. On the other hand, human tumor cells spontaneously release a soluble form of MICA, causing the downregulation of NKG2D and in turn severe impairment of the antitumor immune response of NK and CD8(+) T cells. This is considered to promote tumor immune evasion and also to compromise host resistance to infections. MICA is the most polymorphic non-classical class I gene. A possible association of MICA polymorphism with genetic predisposition to different cancer types has been investigated in candidate gene-based studies. Two genome-wide association studies have identified loci in MICA that influence susceptibility to cervical neoplasia and hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma, respectively. Given the current level of interest in the field of MICA gene, we discuss the genetics and biology of the MICA gene and the role of its polymorphism in cancer. Gaps in our understanding and future research needs are also discussed.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structures and biological activity of set of Cu(II) benzothiazole complexes: artificial nucleases with cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ramsey A; Foreman, David; Lin, Han X; Carney, Bruce K; Fox, Kristin M; Cassimeris, Lynne; Tanski, Joseph M; Tyler, Laurie A

    2014-08-01

    A series of Cu(II) complexes with ligand frames based on quinoline derivatives appended with a benzothiazole substituent has been isolated. The complexes, Cu(Q(oBt))(NO3)2(H2O)∙CH3OH (1∙CH3OH), Cu(8OHQ(oBt))Cl2∙CH3OH (2∙CH3OH), Cu(8OQ(oBt))Cl(CH3OH)∙CH3OH (3∙CH3OH) and [Cu(8OH1/2Q(oBt))(CH3OH)(NO3)]2(NO3) (4) have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR and UV-visible spectroscopies, and elemental analysis. The ligand frame within the set of complexes differs in the substituent on the quinoline ring: complex 1 remains unsubstituted at this position while complexes 2-4 have a substituted OH group. In complex 2, the bound phenol remains protonated while in 3 it is a phenolato group. Complex 4 contains two complexes within the unit cell and one NO3(-) giving rise to an overall 'half-protonation'. The interaction between complexes 1-3 with CT-DNA was investigated using fluorescence emission spectroscopy and revealed 2 and 3 strongly intercalate DNA with Kapp values of 1.47×10(7)M(-1) and 3.09×10(7)M(-1), respectively. The ability of complexes 1-3 to cleave SC-DNA was monitored using gel electrophoresis. Each complex exhibits potent, concentration dependent nuclease activity forming single and double-nicked DNA as low as 10μM. The nuclease activity of complexes 1-3 is primarily dependent on (1)O2 species while ·OH radicals play a secondary role in the cleavage by complexes 2 and 3. The cytotoxic effects of 1-3 were examined using HeLa cells and show cell death in the micromolar range. The distribution of cell cycle stages remains unchanged when complexes are present indicating DNA damage may be occurring throughout the cell cycle. PMID:24794274

  5. Tuning cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes as activated protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heffern, Marie C; Reichova, Viktorie; Coomes, Joseph L; Harney, Allison S; Bajema, Elizabeth A; Meade, Thomas J

    2015-09-21

    Cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes ([Co(acacen)(L)2](+), where L = NH3) inhibit histidine-containing proteins through dissociative exchange of the labile axial ligands (L). This work investigates axial ligand exchange dynamics of [Co(acacen)(L)2](+) complexes toward the development of protein inhibitors that are activated by external triggers such as light irradiation. We sought to investigate ligand exchange dynamics to design a Co(III) complex that is substitutionally inert under normal physiological conditions for selective activation. Fluorescent imidazoles (C3Im) were prepared as axial ligands in [Co(acacen)(L)2](+) to produce complexes (CoC3Im) that could report on ligand exchange and, thus, complex stability. These fluorescent imidazole reporters guided the design of a new dinuclear Co(III) Schiff base complex containing bridging diimidazole ligands, which exhibits enhanced stability to ligand exchange with competing imidazoles and to hydrolysis within a biologically relevant pH range. These studies inform the design of biocompatible Co(III) Schiff base complexes that can be selectively activated for protein inhibition with spatial and temporal specificity.

  6. Synthesis, structures and urease inhibitory activity of cobalt(III) complexes with Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Jing, Changling; Wang, Cunfang; Yan, Kai; Zhao, Kedong; Sheng, Guihua; Qu, Dan; Niu, Fang; Zhu, Hailiang; You, Zhonglu

    2016-01-15

    A series of new cobalt(III) complexes were prepared. They are [CoL(1)(py)3]·NO3 (1), [CoL(2)(bipy)(N3)]·CH3OH (2), [CoL(3)(HL(3))(N3)]·NO3 (3), and [CoL(4)(MeOH)(N3)] (4), where L(1), L(2), L(3) and L(4) are the deprotonated form of N'-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzylidene)-3-methylbenzohydrazide, N'-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-3-hydroxylbenzohydrazide, 2-[(2-dimethylaminoethylimino)methyl]-4-methylphenol, and N,N'-bis(5-methylsalicylidene)-o-phenylenediamine, respectively, py is pyridine, and bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine. The complexes were characterized by infrared and UV-Vis spectra, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Co atoms in the complexes are in octahedral coordination. Complexes 1 and 4 show effective urease inhibitory activities, with IC50 values of 4.27 and 0.35 μmol L(-1), respectively. Complex 2 has medium activity against urease, with IC50 value of 68.7 μmol L(-1). While complex 3 has no activity against urease. Molecular docking study of the complexes with Helicobacter pylori urease was performed.

  7. Syntheses, crystal structures, anticancer activities of three reduce Schiff base ligand based transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hui-Qin; Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Tao-Feng; Xu, Zhou-Qing; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ma, Tie-Liang; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Wei-Na

    2016-02-01

    Three nickel(II) complexes, [Ni2(L1)2(tren)2(H2O)](ClO4)3 (1), [NiL2(tren)2](ClO4)·2.5H2O (2), [NiL2(tren)2]I·1.5H2O·CH3OH (3) based on amino acid reduced Schiff ligands are synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The results show that in all complexes, the amino acid ligand is deprotonated and acts as an anionic ligand. In the dinuclear complex 1, each Ni(II) atom has a distorted octahedron geometry while with different coordination environment. However, the complexes 2 and 3 are mononuclear, almost with the same coordination environment. Furthermore, in vitro experiments are carried out, including MTT assay, Annexin V/PI flow cytometry and western blotting, to assess whether the complexes have antitumor effect. And the results show that all the three complexes have moderate anticancer activity towards human hepatic cancer (HepG2), human cervical cancer (HeLa) and human prostate (PC3) cell lines, in a concentration dependent way. The complex 1 exhibit higher cytotoxicity than the other two complexes and can induce human hepatic cancer cell (HepG2) to cell apoptosis by activating caspase 3.

  8. Syntheses, crystal structures, anticancer activities of three reduce Schiff base ligand based transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hui-Qin; Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Tao-Feng; Xu, Zhou-Qing; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ma, Tie-Liang; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Wei-Na

    2016-02-01

    Three nickel(II) complexes, [Ni2(L1)2(tren)2(H2O)](ClO4)3 (1), [NiL2(tren)2](ClO4)·2.5H2O (2), [NiL2(tren)2]I·1.5H2O·CH3OH (3) based on amino acid reduced Schiff ligands are synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The results show that in all complexes, the amino acid ligand is deprotonated and acts as an anionic ligand. In the dinuclear complex 1, each Ni(II) atom has a distorted octahedron geometry while with different coordination environment. However, the complexes 2 and 3 are mononuclear, almost with the same coordination environment. Furthermore, in vitro experiments are carried out, including MTT assay, Annexin V/PI flow cytometry and western blotting, to assess whether the complexes have antitumor effect. And the results show that all the three complexes have moderate anticancer activity towards human hepatic cancer (HepG2), human cervical cancer (HeLa) and human prostate (PC3) cell lines, in a concentration dependent way. The complex 1 exhibit higher cytotoxicity than the other two complexes and can induce human hepatic cancer cell (HepG2) to cell apoptosis by activating caspase 3.

  9. Dissecting allosteric effects of activator-coactivator complexes using a covalent small molecule ligand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningkun; Lodge, Jean M; Fierke, Carol A; Mapp, Anna K

    2014-08-19

    Allosteric binding events play a critical role in the formation and stability of transcriptional activator-coactivator complexes, perhaps in part due to the often intrinsically disordered nature of one or more of the constituent partners. The kinase-inducible domain interacting (KIX) domain of the master coactivator CREB binding protein/p300 is a conformationally dynamic domain that complexes with transcriptional activators at two discrete binding sites in allosteric communication. The complexation of KIX with the transcriptional activation domain of mixed-lineage leukemia protein leads to an enhancement of binding by the activation domain of CREB (phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain of CREB) to the second site. A transient kinetic analysis of the ternary complex formation aided by small molecule ligands that induce positive or negative cooperative binding reveals that positive cooperativity is largely governed by stabilization of the bound complex as indicated by a decrease in koff. Thus, this suggests the increased binding affinity for the second ligand is not due to an allosteric creation of a more favorable binding interface by the first ligand. This is consistent with data from us and from others indicating that the on rates of conformationally dynamic proteins approach the limits of diffusion. In contrast, negative cooperativity is manifested by alterations in both kon and koff, suggesting stabilization of the binary complex.

  10. Characterization of the casein gene complex in West African goats and description of a new alpha(s1)-casein polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Caroli, A; Chiatti, F; Chessa, S; Rignanese, D; Ibeagha-Awemu, E M; Erhardt, G

    2007-06-01

    The analysis of casein polymorphisms was carried out in West Africa goat populations: Red Sokoto (n = 57), West African Dwarf Nigeria (n = 27), West African Dwarf Cameroon (n = 39), and Borno (n = 37). The 4 casein genes alpha(s1) (CSN1S1), beta (CSN2), alpha(s2) (CSN1S2), and kappa (CSN3) were typed at the DNA level. No null alleles were found in any of the genes analyzed. A PCR single-strand conformation polymorphism method was implemented for the identification of CSN1S1*F allele simultaneously with A/0(1), B/E, N and the new allele. The allele differed from CSN1S1*B by a synonymous transversion TCG-->TCT in the codon corresponding to Ser(66) of the mature protein. The new allele, named CSN1S1*B', occurred at a high frequency in all the populations, ranging from 0.295 (West African Dwarf Cameroon) to 0.405 (Borno). A greater frequency was found for alleles associated with high alpha(s1)-casein quantity, as has already been observed in the goat populations from the Mediterranean area. The intermediate E allele occurred only in the Red Sokoto and at a low frequency. The faint F allele occurred in 3 populations at frequencies lower than 0.03. Linkage disequilibrium occurred in all the populations, with highly significant differences in Borno, Red Sokoto, and West Africa Dwarf Nigeria, and significant differences in West Africa Dwarf Cameroon. Only 10 haplotypes showed frequencies > or =0.05 in at least 1 of the 4 populations considered, and the overall frequency was >0.1 only for 4 haplotypes: BAAB, B'ACA, ACAB, and BACA (in the order CSN1S1-CSN2-CSN1S2-CSN3). Haplotype BAAB, postulated as an ancestral haplotype in previous studies, was the most common haplotype in all breeds except Borno, where B'ACA was predominant. The results obtained are of considerable significance given that very little information exists on the subject for African goats. The high frequency of strong alleles in the calcium-sensitive caseins as well as the high linkage disequilibrium found

  11. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  12. Characterization of Fus3 localization: active Fus3 localizes in complexes of varying size and specific activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, K Y; Kranz, J E; Mahanty, S K; Park, K S; Elion, E A

    1999-05-01

    The MAP kinase Fus3 regulates many different signal transduction outputs that govern the ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid cells to mate. Here we characterize Fus3 localization and association with other proteins. By indirect immunofluorescence, Fus3 localizes in punctate spots throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus, with slightly enhanced nuclear localization after pheromone stimulation. This broad distribution is consistent with the critical role Fus3 plays in mating and contrasts that of Kss1, which concentrates in the nucleus and is not required for mating. The majority of Fus3 is soluble and not bound to any one protein; however, a fraction is stably bound to two proteins of approximately 60 and approximately 70 kDa. Based on fractionation and gradient density centrifugation properties, Fus3 exists in a number of complexes, with its activity critically dependent upon association with other proteins. In the presence of alpha factor, nearly all of the active Fus3 localizes in complexes of varying size and specific activity, whereas monomeric Fus3 has little activity. Fus3 has highest specific activity within a 350- to 500-kDa complex previously shown to contain Ste5, Ste11, and Ste7. Ste5 is required for Fus3 to exist in this complex. Upon alpha factor withdrawal, a pool of Fus3 retains activity for more than one cell cycle. Collectively, these results support Ste5's role as a tether and suggest that association of Fus3 in complexes in the presence of pheromone may prevent inactivation in addition to enhancing activation. PMID:10233162

  13. Dependency of {gamma}-secretase complex activity on the structural integrity of the bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hua; Zhou, Shuxia; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Partial solubilization of membranes with CHAPSO can increase {gamma}-secretase activity. {yields} Completely solubilized {gamma}-secretase is inactive. {yields} Purified {gamma}-secretase regains activity after reconstitution into lipid bilayers. {yields} A broad range of detergents can be used to successfully reconstitute {gamma}-secretase. -- Abstract: {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex associated with the production of A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease. We have characterized the activity of {gamma}-secretase complexes under a variety of detergent solubilization and reconstitution conditions, and the structural state of proteoliposomes by electron microscopy. We found that {gamma}-secretase activity is highly dependent on the physical state or integrity of the membrane bilayer - partial solubilization may increase activity while complete solubilization will abolish it. The activity of well-solubilized {gamma}-secretase can be restored to near native levels when properly reconstituted into a lipid bilayer environment.

  14. Can simple interactions capture complex features of neural activity underlying behavior in a virtual reality environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshulam, Leenoy; Gauthier, Jeffrey; Brody, Carlos; Tank, David; Bialek, William

    The complex neural interactions which are abundant in most recordings of neural activity are relatively poorly understood. A prime example of such interactions can be found in the in vivo neural activity which underlies complex behaviors of mice, imaged in brain regions such as hippocampus and parietal cortex. Experimental techniques now allow us to accurately follow these neural interactions in the simultaneous activity of large neuronal populations of awake behaving animals. Here, we demonstrate that pairwise maximum entropy models can predict a surprising number of properties of the neural activity. The models, that are constrained with activity rates and interactions between pairs of neurons, are well fit to the activity `states' in the hippocampus and cortex of mice performing cognitive tasks while navigating in a virtual reality environment.

  15. Identification of functional targets of the Zta transcriptional activator by formation of stable preinitiation complex intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, P

    1994-01-01

    Transcriptional activator proteins stimulate the formation of a preinitiation complex that may be distinct from a basal-level transcription complex in its composition and stability. Components of the general transcription factors that form activator-dependent stable intermediates were determined by the use of Sarkosyl and oligonucleotide challenge experiments. High-level transcriptional activation by the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded Zta protein required an activity in the TFIID fraction that is distinct from the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the TBP-associated factors. This additional activity copurifies with and is likely to be identical to the previously defined coactivator, USA (M. Meisterernst, A. L. Roy, H. M. Lieu, and R. G. Roeder, Cell 66:981-994, 1991). The formation of a stable preinitiation complex intermediate resistant to Sarkosyl required the preincubation of the promoter DNA with Zta, holo-TFIID (TBP and TBP-associated factors), TFIIB, TFIIA, and the coactivator USA. The formation of a Zta response element-resistant preinitiation complex required the preincubation of promoter DNA with Zta, holo-TFIID, TFIIB, and TFIIA. Agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift showed that a preformed Zta-holo-TFIID-TFIIA complex was resistant to Sarkosyl and to Zta response element oligonucleotide challenge. DNase I footprinting suggests that only Zta, holo-TFIID, and TFIIA make significant contacts with the promoter DNA. These results provide functional and physical evidence that the Zta transcriptional activator influences at least two distinct steps in preinitiation complex assembly, the formation of the stable holo-TFIID-TFIIA-promoter complex and the subsequent binding of TFIIB and a USA-like coactivator. Images PMID:7969171

  16. Exploring the Molecular Basis of Qo bc1 Complex Inhibitors Activity to Find Novel Antimalarials Hits.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Marta P; Gut, Jiri; Rodrigues, Tiago; Ribeiro, Maria H L; Lopes, Francisca; Rosenthal, Philip J; Moreira, Rui; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2013-07-01

    Cytochrome bc1 complex is a crucial element in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, being indispensable for the survival of several species of Plasmodia that cause malaria and, therefore, it is a promising target for antimalarial drug development. We report a molecular docking study building on the most recently obtained X-ray structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae bc1 complex (PDB code: 3CX5) using several reported inhibitors with experimentally determined IC50 values against the Plasmodium falciparum bc1 complex. We produced a molecular docking model that correlated the calculated binding free energy with the experimental inhibitory activity of each compound. This Qo model was used to search the drug-like database included in the MOE package for novel potential bc1 complex inhibitors. Twenty three compounds were chosen to be tested for their antimalarial activity and four of these compounds demonstrated activity against the chloroquine-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. The most active compounds were also active against the atovaquone-resistant P. falciparum FCR3 strain and S. cerevisiae. Our study suggests the validity of the yeast bc1 complex structure as a model for the discovery of new antimalarial hits.

  17. The Small Molecule IMR-1 Inhibits the Notch Transcriptional Activation Complex to Suppress Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Astudillo, Luisana; Da Silva, Thiago G; Wang, Zhiqiang; Han, Xiaoqing; Jin, Ke; VanWye, Jeffrey; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Weaver, Kelly; Oashi, Taiji; Lopes, Pedro E M; Orton, Darren; Neitzel, Leif R; Lee, Ethan; Landgraf, Ralf; Robbins, David J; MacKerell, Alexander D; Capobianco, Anthony J

    2016-06-15

    In many cancers, aberrant Notch activity has been demonstrated to play a role in the initiation and maintenance of the neoplastic phenotype and in cancer stem cells, which may allude to its additional involvement in metastasis and resistance to therapy. Therefore, Notch is an exceedingly attractive therapeutic target in cancer, but the full range of potential targets within the pathway has been underexplored. To date, there are no small-molecule inhibitors that directly target the intracellular Notch pathway or the assembly of the transcriptional activation complex. Here, we describe an in vitro assay that quantitatively measures the assembly of the Notch transcriptional complex on DNA. Integrating this approach with computer-aided drug design, we explored potential ligand-binding sites and screened for compounds that could disrupt the assembly of the Notch transcriptional activation complex. We identified a small-molecule inhibitor, termed Inhibitor of Mastermind Recruitment-1 (IMR-1), that disrupted the recruitment of Mastermind-like 1 to the Notch transcriptional activation complex on chromatin, thereby attenuating Notch target gene transcription. Furthermore, IMR-1 inhibited the growth of Notch-dependent cell lines and significantly abrogated the growth of patient-derived tumor xenografts. Taken together, our findings suggest that a novel class of Notch inhibitors targeting the transcriptional activation complex may represent a new paradigm for Notch-based anticancer therapeutics, warranting further preclinical characterization. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3593-603. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197169

  18. Opposing LSD1 complexes function in developmental gene activation and repression programmes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxun; Scully, Kathleen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Cai, Ling; Zhang, Jie; Prefontaine, Gratien G; Krones, Anna; Ohgi, Kenneth A; Zhu, Ping; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Liu, Forrest; Taylor, Havilah; Lozach, Jean; Jayes, Friederike L; Korach, Kenneth S; Glass, Christopher K; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2007-04-19

    Precise control of transcriptional programmes underlying metazoan development is modulated by enzymatically active co-regulatory complexes, coupled with epigenetic strategies. One thing that remains unclear is how specific members of histone modification enzyme families, such as histone methyltransferases and demethylases, are used in vivo to simultaneously orchestrate distinct developmental gene activation and repression programmes. Here, we report that the histone lysine demethylase, LSD1--a component of the CoREST-CtBP co-repressor complex--is required for late cell-lineage determination and differentiation during pituitary organogenesis. LSD1 seems to act primarily on target gene activation programmes, as well as in gene repression programmes, on the basis of recruitment of distinct LSD1-containing co-activator or co-repressor complexes. LSD1-dependent gene repression programmes can be extended late in development with the induced expression of ZEB1, a Krüppel-like repressor that can act as a molecular beacon for recruitment of the LSD1-containing CoREST-CtBP co-repressor complex, causing repression of an additional cohort of genes, such as Gh, which previously required LSD1 for activation. These findings suggest that temporal patterns of expression of specific components of LSD1 complexes modulate gene regulatory programmes in many mammalian organs.

  19. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  20. DNA interaction, antioxidant activity, and bioactivity studies of two ruthenium(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing-Jie; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Li, Wei; Wang, Ji; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Two new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(dmb)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(bpy)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (2) were prepared and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex 2 was solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/n with a = 12.9622(14) Å, b = 17.1619(19) Å, c = 22.7210(3) Å, β = 100.930(2)°, R = 0.0536, Rω = 0.1111. The DNA-binding constants for complexes 1 and 2 were determined to be 1.92 × 105 (s = 1.72) and 2.24 × 105 (s = 1.86) M-1, respectively. The DNA-binding behaviors showed that complexes 1 and 2 interact with DNA by intercalative mode. The antioxidant activities of the ligand and the complexes were performed. Ligand, dcdppz, has no cytotoxicity against the selected cell lines. Complex 1 shows higher cytotoxicity than complex 2, but lower than cisplatin toward selected cell lines. The apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were investigated, and the apoptotic mechanism of BEL-7402 cells was studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis. Complex 1 induces apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway and by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  1. DJ-1 binds to mitochondrial complex I and maintains its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Takuya; Ishimori, Chikako; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Taira, Takahiro; Kim, Yun-chul; Maita, Hiroshi; Maita, Chinatsu; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M.M.

    2009-12-18

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by neuronal cell death, and oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be responsible for onset of PD. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of Parkinson's disease, PARK7, plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress. The possible mitochondrial function of DJ-1 has been proposed, but its exact function remains unclear. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to NDUFA4 and ND1, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoding subunits of mitochondrial complex I, respectively, and was colocalized with complex I and that complex I activity was reduced in DJ-1-knockdown NIH3T3 and HEK293 cells. These findings suggest that DJ-1 is an integral mitochondrial protein and that DJ-1 plays a role in maintenance of mitochondrial complex I activity.

  2. The activity of platinum, iridium and rhodium drug complexes against Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Croft, S L; Neal, R A; Craciunescu, D G; Certad-Fombona, G

    1992-03-01

    The activities of twenty seven Platinum, Rhodium and Iridium drug complexes were determined against Leishmania donovani amastigotes in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Eight compounds showed antileishmanial activity of which only three, Rh(III)-mepacrine, Ir(III) pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Ir(III) diethyl dithiocarbamate had ED50 values of less than 1 microM. The two Iridium complexes produced, respectively, a 50% and 39% suppression of L. donovani amastigotes in the liver of BALB/c mice following the subcutaneous administration of 200 mg/kg for 5 consecutive days. Ultrastructural studies suggest that the amastigote kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex is the primary site of action of the Ir and Rh complexes. PMID:1598504

  3. Prevalence of the angiotensin I converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism, plasma angiotensin converting enzyme activity, and left ventricular mass in a normotensive Chilean population.

    PubMed

    Jalil, J E; Piddo, A M; Cordova, S; Chamorro, G; Braun, S; Jalil, R; Vega, J; Jadue'P, L; Lavandero, S; Lastra, P

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of the different alleles of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and associated plasma ACE activity, as well as cardiac echocardiographic structure, in a healthy Chilean population. We selected 117 healthy normotensive subjects (aged 45 to 60 years, middle socioeconomic status, nonobese, and nondiabetic) from a population-based study concerning the prevalence of risk factors for chronic diseases (Conjunto de Acciones Para la Reducción Multifactorial de las Enfermedades no Transmisibles [CARMEN]). The frequencies of the I and D alleles were 0.57 and 0.43, respectively. Mean plasma ACE activity was 15.3 +/- 3.9 U/mL. Compared with subjects with the II genotype, plasma ACE activity was significantly higher in subjects with the ID and DD genotypes with no difference between them. No correlation was observed between blood pressure and plasma ACE activity. Among the three different genotypes there was no difference in left ventricular (LV) dimensions or in LV mass. No correlation between plasma ACE activity and LV mass was observed for either gender or different genotypes. Multivariate linear regression analysis using LV mass and LV mass index as dependent variables showed independent effects (P < .05) for gender (higher LV mass in men) and diastolic blood pressure, but not for the DD genotype. In conclusion, in this population, the presence of the D allele on the ACE gene determined higher circulating ACE activity. However, in this normotensive healthy population, male gender and diastolic blood pressure, but not the presence of the D allele, were associated with increased LV mass.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and anticancer activities of two lanthanide(III) complexes with a nicotinohydrazone ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhou-Qin; Mao, Xian-Jie; Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Tao-Feng; Cai, Hong-Xin; Bie, Hong-Yan; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ma, Tie-liang

    2015-12-01

    Two isostructural acylhydrazone based complexes, namely [Ce(penh)2(H2O)4](NO3)3·4H2O (1) and [Sm(penh)2(NO3)2](NO3)·C2H5OH (2) (penh = 2-acetylpyridine nicotinohydrazone), have been obtained and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The ten-coordinated lanthanide metal ion in each complex is surrounded by two independent tridentate neutral acylhydrazones with two ON2 donor sets. The other four coordination oxygen atoms are from four water molecules and two bidentate nitrate anions for complexes 1 and 2, respectively, thus giving distorted bicapped square antiprism geometry. Both complexes have excellent antitumor activity towards human pancreatic cancer (PATU8988), human colorectal cancer (lovo) and human gastric cancer(SGC7901) cell line. Furthermore, the cell apoptosis of complex 1 is detected by AnnexinV/PI flow cytometry.

  5. Nickel(II) complexes containing thiosemicarbazone and triphenylphosphine: Synthesis, spectroscopy, crystallography and catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyarega, S.; Kalaivani, P.; Prabhakaran, R.; Hashimoto, T.; Endo, A.; Natarajan, K.

    2011-09-01

    Four new Ni(II) complexes of the general formula [Ni(PPh 3)(L)] (L = dibasic tridentate ligand derived from 4-diethylamino-salicylaldehyde and thiosemicarbazide or 4-N-substituted thiosemicarbazide) have been reported. The new complexes have been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectroscopic (IR, electronic, 1H NMR and 31P NMR) techniques. Molecular structure of one of the complexes has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The complex, [Ni(PPh 3)(L4)] (H 2L4 = thiosemicarbazone prepared from 4-diethylamino-salicylaldehyde and 4-phenylthiosemicarbazide) crystallized in monoclinic space group with two molecules per unit cell and has the dimensions of a = 13.232(6) Å, b = 10.181(5) Å, c = 13.574(7) Å, α = 90°, β = 98.483(2)° and γ = 90°. Catalytic activity of the complexes has been explored for aryl-aryl coupling reaction.

  6. Characterization and biological activities of two copper(II) complexes with dipropylenetriamine and diamine as ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Noaimi, Mousa; Choudhary, Mohammad I.; Awwadi, Firas F.; Talib, Wamidh H.; Hadda, Taibi Ben; Yousuf, Sammer; Sawafta, Ashraf; Warad, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, [Cu(dipn)(Nsbnd N)]Br2(1-2) [dipn = dipropylenetriamine, Nsbnd N = ethylenediamine (en) (1) and propylenediamine (pn) (2)], have been synthesized. These complexes were characterized by spectroscopic and thermal techniques. Crystal structure for 2 shows a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry around Cu(II) ion with one solvate water molecule. Antimicrobial and antiproliferative assays were conducted to evaluate the biological activities of these complexes. The complexes exhibit a promising antimicrobial effect against an array of microbes at 200 μg/mL concentration. The antiproliferative assay shows a high potential of these complexes to target Human keratinocyte cell line with IC50 values of 155 and 152 μM. The absorption spectrum of 2 in water was modeled by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  7. Degradation and antioxidant activities of peptides and zinc-peptide complexes during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chan; Li, Bo; Wang, Bo; Xie, Ningning

    2015-04-15

    The degradation characteristics of three peptides (Ser-Met, Asn-Cys-Ser, and glutathione) and their zinc-peptide complexes were studied using a two-stage in vitro digestion model. Enzyme-resistant peptides and zinc-peptide complexes, antioxidant activities, and free amino acids released by digestive enzymes, were measured in this study. The results revealed that the three peptides and their zinc-peptide complexes were resistant to pepsin but not to pancreatin. Pancreatin can partly hydrolyse both peptides and zinc-peptide complexes, but more than half of them remaining in their original form after gastrointestinal digestion. The coordination of zinc improved the enzymatic resistance of the peptide due to lower solubility of complexes and affected the hydrolytic site of pepsin and pancreatin. Zinc-Asn-Cys-Ser, which is highly resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis and maintains Zn in a soluble form, may have potential to improve Zn bioavailability.

  8. DNA Binding and Antitumor Activity of α-Diimineplatinum(II) and Palladium(II) Dithiocarbamate Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Saeidifar, Maryam; Khosravi, Fatemeh; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Hassani, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    The two water-soluble designed platinum(II) complex, [Pt(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3 (Oct-dtc = Octyldithiocarbamate and bpy = 2,2′ -bipyridine) and palladium(II) complex, [Pd(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductivity measurements, IR, 1H NMR, and electronic spectra studies. Studies of antitumor activity of these complexes against human cell tumor lines (K562) have been carried out. They show Ic50 values lower than that of cisplatin. The complexes have been investigated for their interaction with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) by utilizing the electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectra, and ethidium bromide displacement and gel filtration techniques. Both of these water-soluble complexes bound cooperatively and intercalatively to the CT-DNA at very low concentrations. Several binding and thermodynamic parameters are also described. PMID:22110410

  9. Antiangiogenic activity of mononuclear copper(II) polypyridyl complexes for the treatment of cancers.

    PubMed

    Nagababu, Penumaka; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Thulasiram, Bathini; Devi, C Shobha; Satyanarayana, S; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Sreedhar, Bojja

    2015-07-01

    A series of four new mononuclear copper(II) polypyridyl complexes (1-4) have been designed, developed, and thoroughly characterized by several physicochemical techniques. The CT-DNA binding properties of 1-4 have been investigated by absorption, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. All the complexes especially 1 and 4 exhibit cytotoxicity toward several cancer cell lines, suggesting their anticancer properties as observed by several in vitro assays. Additionally, the complexes show inhibition of endothelial cell (HUVECs) proliferation, indicating their antiangiogenic nature. In vivo chick embryo angiogenesis assay again confirms the antiangiogenic properties of 1 and 4. The formation of excessive intracellular ROS (H2O2 and O2(•-)) and upregulation of BAX induced by copper(II) complexes may be the plausible mechanisms behind their anticancer activities. The present study may offer a basis for the development of new transition metal complexes through suitable choice of ligands for cancer therapeutics by controlling tumor angiogenesis.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of some unsymmetrical Schiff base transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Esmadi, Fatima T; Khabour, Omar F; Abbas, Khamis; Mohammad, Abdel Elah; Obeidat, Ra'ad T; Mfady, Doa'a

    2016-01-01

    In this study, several unsymmetrical Schiff bases and their cobalt and manganese complexes have been synthesized and characterized. The unsymmetrical Schiff bases were prepared from reaction of o-phenylendiamine derivatives with 1-hydroxy-2-acetonaphthone and then the product was reacted with the following aldehydes: salicyaldehyde, 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde, 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde and 2-qinolinecarboxaldehyde to produce the desired tetradentate unsymmetrical Schiff base ligands H2SL, H2NL, HPYL and HQN, respectively. Reaction of these ligands with cobalt and manganese salts produced complexes of the general formula [M(SL)], [(NL)], [M(PYL)] and [M(QL)]. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The prepared complexes were examined for their anti-bacterial activity using gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens. The following complexes showed strong antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus: MnSL1, MnSL2 and MnSL3. The genotoxic activity of four complexes, which are MnNL1, MnSL1, CoNL1 and CoSL1, were examined using 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) assay in cultured human blood lymphocytes. All examined complexes were found to be genotoxic at examined concentrations (0.1-100 µg/mL), but with variable magnitudes (p < 0.05). The levels of 8-OHdG induced by MnNL1 and MnSL1 were significantly higher than that induced by CoNL1 and CoSL1 ones. In general, the order of mutagenicity of the compounds is MnSL1 > MnNL1 > CoSL1 > CoNL1. In conclusion, some of the prepared complexes showed some biological activities that might be of interest for future research.

  11. Molecular Complexity via C–H Activation: A Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Erik M.; White, M. Christina

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, C–H oxidation reactions install oxidized functionality onto a preformed molecular skeleton, resulting in a local molecular change. The use of C–H activation chemistry to construct complex molecular scaffolds is a new area with tremendous potential in synthesis. We report a Pd(II)/bis-sulfoxide catalyzed dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction that converts simple terminal olefins into complex cycloadducts in a single operation. PMID:21842902

  12. Molecular complexity via C-H activation: a dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Stang, Erik M; White, M Christina

    2011-09-28

    Traditionally, C-H oxidation reactions install oxidized functionality onto a preformed molecular skeleton, resulting in a local molecular change. The use of C-H activation chemistry to construct complex molecular scaffolds is a new area with tremendous potential in synthesis. We report a Pd(II)/bis-sulfoxide-catalyzed dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction that converts simple terminal olefins into complex cycloadducts in a single operation.

  13. Genetic variability of respiratory complex abundance, organization, and activity in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Kari J.; Walter, Nicole A.R.; Denmark, Deaunne L.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous human disorders involving tissues with high energy demand. Murine models are widely used to elucidate genetic determinants of phenotypes relevant to human disease, with recent studies of C57BL/6J (B6), DBA/2J (D2) and B6xD2 populations implicating naturally occurring genetic variation in mitochondrial function/dysfunction. Using blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblots, and in-gel activity analyses of complexes I, II, IV and V, our studies are the first to assess abundance, organization, and catalytic activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes and supercomplexes in mouse brain. Remarkable strain differences in supercomplex assembly and associated activity are evident, without differences in individual complexes I, II, III, or IV. Supercomplexes I1III2IV2-3 exhibit robust complex III immunoreactivity and complex I and IV activities in D2, but with little detected in B6 for I1III2IV2, and I1III2IV3 is not detected in B6. I1III2IV1 and I1III2 are abundant and catalytically active in both strains, but significantly more so in B6. Furthermore, while supercomplex III2IV1 is abundant in D2, none is detected in B6. In aggregate, these results indicate a shift toward more highly assembled supercomplexes in D2. Respiratory supercomplexes are thought to increase electron flow efficiency and individual complex stability, and to reduce electron leak and generation of reactive oxygen species. Our results provide a framework to begin assessing the role of respiratory complex suprastructure in genetic vulnerability and treatment for a wide variety of mitochondrial-related disorders. PMID:24164700

  14. Metal Complexes of Macrocyclic Schiff-Base Ligand: Preparation, Characterisation, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Riyadh M.; Yousif, Enaam I.; Hasan, Hasan A.; Al-Jeboori, Mohamad J.

    2013-01-01

    A new macrocyclic multidentate Schiff-base ligand Na4L consisting of two submacrocyclic units (10,21-bis-iminomethyl-3,6,14,17-tricyclo[17.3.1.18,12]tetracosa-1(23),2,6,8,10,12(24),13,17,19,21,-decaene-23,24-disodium) and its tetranuclear metal complexes with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) are reported. Na4L was prepared via a template approach, which is based on the condensation reaction of sodium 2,4,6-triformyl phenolate with ethylenediamine in mole ratios of 2 : 3. The tetranuclear macrocyclic-based complexes were prepared from the reaction of the corresponding metal chloride with the ligand. The mode of bonding and overall geometry of the compounds were determined through physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. These studies revealed tetrahedral geometries about Mn, Co, and Zn atoms. However, square planar geometries have been suggested for NiII and CuII complexes. Biological activity of the ligand and its metal complexes against Gram positive bacterial strain Staphylococcus aureus and Gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli revealed that the metal complexes become more potentially resistive to the microbial activities as compared to the free ligand. However, these metal complexes do not exhibit any effects on the activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. There is therefore no inhibition zone. PMID:23935414

  15. Mirror-image organometallic osmium arene iminopyridine halido complexes exhibit similar potent anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Soni, Rina; Romero, María J; Pizarro, Ana M; Salassa, Luca; Clarkson, Guy J; Hearn, Jessica M; Habtemariam, Abraha; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Four chiral Os(II) arene anticancer complexes have been isolated by fractional crystallization. The two iodido complexes, (S(Os),S(C))-[Os(η(6)-p-cym)(ImpyMe)I]PF6 (complex 2, (S)-ImpyMe: N-(2-pyridylmethylene)-(S)-1-phenylethylamine) and (R(Os),R(C))-[Os(η(6)-p-cym)(ImpyMe)I]PF6 (complex 4, (R)-ImpyMe: N-(2-pyridylmethylene)-(R)-1-phenylethylamine), showed higher anticancer activity (lower IC50 values) towards A2780 human ovarian cancer cells than cisplatin and were more active than the two chlorido derivatives, (S(Os),S(C))-[Os(η(6)-p-cym)(ImpyMe)Cl]PF6, 1, and (R(Os),R(C))-[Os(η(6)-p-cym)(ImpyMe)Cl]PF6, 3. The two iodido complexes were evaluated in the National Cancer Institute 60-cell-line screen, by using the COMPARE algorithm. This showed that the two potent iodido complexes, 2 (NSC: D-758116/1) and 4 (NSC: D-758118/1), share surprisingly similar cancer cell selectivity patterns with the anti-microtubule drug, vinblastine sulfate. However, no direct effect on tubulin polymerization was found for 2 and 4, an observation that appears to indicate a novel mechanism of action. In addition, complexes 2 and 4 demonstrated potential as transfer-hydrogenation catalysts for imine reduction.

  16. Activation, Isolation, and Analysis of the Death-Inducing Signaling Complex.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michelle A; Langlais, Claudia; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion

    2015-12-02

    This protocol describes activation, isolation, and analysis of the CD95 (APO-1/Fas) death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) using affinity purification. Activation is achieved using a biotin-labeled anti-CD95 antibody and the native DISC complex is captured using streptavidin beads. This approach minimizes both the number of steps involved and any potential nonspecific interactions or cross-reactivity of antibodies commonly seen in immunoprecipitations using unlabeled antibodies and protein A/G beads. Composition of the isolated complex is analyzed via western blot to identify known DISC components, and dimerization-induced autocatalytic processing of procaspase-8 at the DISC can be confirmed by detection of caspase-8 cleavage products. The potential for DISC-associated caspase-8 to activate the caspase cascade can be determined by measuring caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the fluorigenic substrate Ac-IETD.AFC, or by performing a bioassay using exogenous protein substrates.

  17. Thymus catharinae Camarda essential oil: β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes, evaluation of antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Delogu, Giovanna; Juliano, Claudia Clelia Assunta; Usai, Marianna

    2016-09-01

    An efficient antimicrobial activity was evidenced in a complex β-cyclodextrin-essential oil of Thymus catharinae Camarda (carvacrol chemotype). The release of carvacrol with respect to the antimicrobial activity was calculated as function of time. The βCD-complex of the bioactive agent was obtained by a simple, efficient and non-expensive method without purification of the carvacrol chemotype essential oil. According to the starting stoichiometry of β-cyclodextrin with respect to carvacrol, two inclusion complexes were produced, 1:1 and 2:1, respectively. The results demonstrate that, although the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of T. catharinae Camarda is remarkable but acts too quickly in some types of application, its inclusion in a bio-matrix allows a slower release and improves its effectiveness.

  18. Chitosan-Copper (II) complex as antibacterial agent: synthesis, characterization and coordinating bond- activity correlation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekahlia, S.; Bouzid, B.

    2009-11-01

    The antimicrobial activity of chitosan is unstable and sensitive to many factors such as molecular weight. Recent investigations showed that low molecular weight chitosan exhibited strong bactericidal activities compared to chitosan with high molecular weight. Since chitosan degradation can be caused by the coordinating bond, we attempt to synthesize and characterize the chitosan-Cu (II) complex, and thereafter study the coordinating bond effect on its antibacterial activity against Salmonella enteritidis. Seven chitosan-copper complexes with different copper contents were prepared and characterized by FT-IR, UV-vis, XRD and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Results indicated that for chitosan-Cu (II) complexes with molar ratio close to 1:1, the inhibition rate reached 100%.

  19. Fighting Fenton Chemistry: A Highly Active Iron(III) Tetracarbene Complex in Epoxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kück, Jens W; Anneser, Markus R; Hofmann, Benjamin; Pöthig, Alexander; Cokoja, Mirza; Kühn, Fritz E

    2015-12-01

    Organometallic Fe complexes with exceptionally high activities in homogeneous epoxidation catalysis are reported. The compounds display Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states and bear a tetracarbene ligand. The more active catalyst exhibits activities up to 183 000 turnovers per hour at room temperature and turnover numbers of up to 4300 at -30 °C. For the Fe(III) complex, a decreased Fenton-type reactivity is observed compared with Fe(II) catalysts reported previously as indicated by a substantially lower H2 O2 decomposition and higher (initial) turnover frequencies. The dependence of the catalyst performance on the catalyst loading, substrate, water addition, and the oxidant is investigated. Under all applied conditions, the advantageous nature of the use of the Fe(III) complex is evident.

  20. Complement factor H polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Albert O; Ritter, Robert; Abel, Kenneth J; Manning, Alisa; Panhuysen, Carolien; Farrer, Lindsay A

    2005-04-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, late-onset, and complex trait with multiple risk factors. Concentrating on a region harboring a locus for AMD on 1q25-31, the ARMD1 locus, we tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms for association with AMD in two independent case-control populations. Significant association (P = 4.95 x 10(-10)) was identified within the regulation of complement activation locus and was centered over a tyrosine-402 --> histidine-402 protein polymorphism in the gene encoding complement factor H. Possession of at least one histidine at amino acid position 402 increased the risk of AMD 2.7-fold and may account for 50% of the attributable risk of AMD.

  1. Enhancement of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of bioflavonoid rutin by complexation with transition metals.

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, I B; Ostrakhovitch, E A; Mikhal'chik, E V; Ibragimova, G A; Korkina, L G

    2001-03-15

    The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of two transition metal complexes of bioflavonoid rutin, Fe(rut)Cl(3) and Cu(rut)Cl(2), were studied. It was found that Cu(rut)Cl(2) was a highly efficient in vitro and ex vivo free radical scavenger that sharply decreased (by 2-30 times compared to the parent rutin): oxygen radical production by xanthine oxidase, rat liver microsomes, and rat peritoneal macrophages; the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive products in microsomal lipid peroxidation; and the generation of oxygen radicals by broncho-alveolar cells from bleomycin-treated rats. The copper-rutin complex was also a superior inhibitor of inflammatory and fibrotic processes (characterized by such parameters as macrophage/neutrophil ratio, wet lung weight, total protein content, and hydroxyproline concentration) in the bleomycin-treated rats. The antioxidant activity of Fe(rut)Cl(3) was much lower and in some cases approached that of rutin. Fe(rut)Cl(3) also stimulated to some degree spontaneous oxygen radical production by macrophages. We suggested that the superior antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of the copper-rutin complex is a consequence of its acquiring the additional superoxide-dismuting copper center. The inhibitory activity of Fe(rut)Cl(3) was lower, probably due to the partial reduction into Fe(rut)Cl(2) in the presence of biological reductants; however, similarly to the copper-rutin complex, this complex efficiently suppressed lung edema. PMID:11266652

  2. CARBONIC ANHYDRASE ACTIVITY OF INTEGRAL-FUNCTIONAL COMPLEXES OF THYLAKOID MEMBRANES OF SPINACH CHLOROPLASTS.

    PubMed

    Semenihin, A V; Zolotareva, O K

    2015-01-01

    Isolated thylakoid membranes were disrupted by treatment with nonionic detergents digitonin or dodecyl maltoside. Solubilized polypeptide complexes were separated by native gel charge shift electrophoresis. The position of ATP-synthase complex and its isolated catalytic part (CF1) within gel was determined using the color reaction for ATPase activity. Due to the presence of cytochromes, the red band in unstained gels corresponded to the cytochrome b6f complex. Localization of the cytochrome b6f complex, ATP synthase and coupling CF1 in the native gel was confirmed by their subunit composition determined after SDS-electrophoretic analysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity in polypeptide zones of PS II, cytochrome b6f complex, and ATP-synthase CF1 was identified in native gels using indicator bromothymol blue. CA activity of isolated CF1 in solution was determined by infrared gas analysis as the rate of bicarbonate dehydration. The water-soluble acetazolamide, an inhibitor of CA, unlike lipophilic ethoxyzolamide inhibited CA activity of CF1 Thus, it was shown for the first time that ATP-synthase has a component which is capable of catalyzing the interconversion of forms of carbonic acid associated with proton exchange. The data obtained suggest the presence of multiple forms of carbonic anhydrase in the thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts and confirm their involvement in the proton transfer to the ATP synthase. PMID:26502699

  3. Independent complexity patterns in single neuron activity induced by static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Spasić, S; Nikolić, Lj; Mutavdžić, D; Saponjić, J

    2011-11-01

    We applied a combination of fractal analysis and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) method to detect the sources of fractal complexity in snail Br neuron activity induced by static magnetic field of 2.7 mT. The fractal complexity of Br neuron activity was analyzed before (Control), during (MF), and after (AMF) exposure to the static magnetic field in six experimental animals. We estimated the fractal dimension (FD) of electrophysiological signals using Higuchi's algorithm, and empirical FD distributions. By using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and FastICA algorithm we determined the number of components, and defined the statistically independent components (ICs) in the fractal complexity of signal waveforms. We have isolated two independent components of the empirical FD distributions for each of three groups of data by using FastICA algorithm. ICs represent the sources of fractal waveforms complexity of Br neuron activity in particular experimental conditions. Our main results have shown that there could be two opposite intrinsic mechanisms in single snail Br neuron response to static magnetic field stimulation. We named identified ICs that correspond to those mechanisms - the component of plasticity and the component of elasticity. We have shown that combination of fractal analysis with ICA method could be very useful for the decomposition and identification of the sources of fractal complexity of bursting neuronal activity waveforms.

  4. Synthesis, spectral characterization and catalytic activity of Co(II) complexes of drugs: Crystal structure of Co(II)-trimethoprim complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhupriya, Selvaraj; Elango, Kuppanagounder P.

    2014-01-01

    New Co(II) complexes with drugs such as trimethoprim (TMP), cimetidine (CTD), niacinamide (NAM) and ofloxacin (OFL) as ligands were synthesized. The complexes were characterized by analytical analysis, various spectral techniques such as FT-IR, UV-Vis, magnetic measurements and molar conductivity. The magnetic susceptibility results coupled with the electronic spectra suggested a tetrahedral geometry for the complexes. The coordination mode of trimethoprim ligand and geometry of the complex were confirmed by single crystal X-ray studies. In this complex the metal ion possesses a tetrahedral geometry with two nitrogen atom from two TMP ligands and two chloride ions coordinated to it. The catalytic activity of the complexes in aryl-aryl coupling reaction was screened and the results indicated that among the four complexes [Co(OFL)Cl(H2O)] exhibited excellent catalytic activity.

  5. A RASSF1A polymorphism restricts p53/p73 activation and associates with poor survival and accelerated age of onset of soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Karen S.; Grochola, Lukasz; Hamilton, Garth; Grawenda, Anna; Bond, Elisabeth E.; Taubert, Helge; Wurl, Peter; Bond, Gareth L.; O’Neill, Eric

    2016-01-01

    RASSF1A (Ras association domain containing family 1A), a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently inactivated in human cancers, is phosphorylated by Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) on Ser131 upon DNA damage, leading to activation of a p73-dependent apoptotic response. A single nucleotide polymorphism located in the region of the key ATM activation site of RASSF1A predicts the conversion of alanine (encoded by the major G-allele) to serine (encoded by the minor T-allele) at residue 133 of RASSF1A (p.Ala133Ser). Secondary protein structure prediction studies suggest that an alpha helix containing the ATM recognition site is disrupted in the serine isoform of RASSF1A (RASSF1A-p.133Ser). In this study, we observed a reduced ability of ATM to recruit and phosphorylate RASSF1A-p.133Ser upon DNA damage. RASSF1A-p.133Ser failed to activate the MST2/LATS pathway, which is required for YAP/p73 mediated apoptosis, and negatively affected the activation of p53, culminating in a defective cellular response to DNA damage. Consistent with a defective p53 response, we found that male soft tissue sarcoma patients carrying the minor T-allele encoding RASSF1A-p.133Ser exhibited poorer tumor-specific survival and earlier age of onset compared with patients homozygous for the major G-allele. Our findings propose a model that suggests a certain subset of the population have inherently weaker p73/p53 activation due to inefficient signaling through RASSF1A, which affects both cancer incidence and survival. PMID:22389451

  6. Differential activity by polymorphic variants of a remote enhancer that supports galanin expression in the hypothalamus and amygdala: implications for obesity, depression and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Scott; Lear, Marissa; Shanley, Lynne; Hing, Benjamin; Baizan-Edge, Amanda; Herwig, Annika; Quinn, John P; Breen, Gerome; McGuffin, Peter; Starkey, Andrew; Barrett, Perry; MacKenzie, Alasdair

    2011-10-01

    The expression of the galanin gene (GAL) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and in the amygdala of higher vertebrates suggests the requirement for highly conserved, but unidentified, regulatory sequences that are critical to allow the galanin gene to control alcohol and fat intake and modulate mood. We used comparative genomics to identify a highly conserved sequence that lay 42 kb 5' of the human GAL transcriptional start site that we called GAL5.1. GAL5.1 activated promoter activity in neurones of the PVN, arcuate nucleus and amygdala that also expressed the galanin peptide. Analysis in neuroblastoma cells demonstrated that GAL5.1 acted as an enhancer of promoter activity after PKC activation. GAL5.1 contained two polymorphisms; rs2513280(C/G) and rs2513281(A/G), that occurred in two allelic combinations (GG or CA) where the dominant GG alelle occurred in 70-83 % of the human population. Intriguingly, both SNPs were found to be in LD (R(2) of 0.687) with another SNP (rs2156464) previously associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). Recreation of these alleles in reporter constructs and subsequent magnetofection into primary rat hypothalamic neurones showed that the CA allele was 40 % less active than the GG allele. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the weaker allele may affect food and alcohol preference. The linkage of the SNPs analysed in this study with a SNP previously associated with MDD together with the functioning of GAL5.1 as a PVN and amygdala specific enhancer represent a significant advance in our ability to understand alcoholism, obesity and major depressive disorder.

  7. Transcriptome and Complexity-Reduced, DNA-Based Identification of Intraspecies Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Polyploid Gossypium hirsutum L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qian-Hao; Spriggs, Andrew; Taylor, Jennifer M.; Llewellyn, Danny; Wilson, Iain

    2014-01-01

    Varietal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the differences within one of the two subgenomes between different tetraploid cotton varieties and have not been practically used in cotton genetics and breeding because they are difficult to identify due to low genetic diversity and very high sequence identity between homeologous genes in cotton. We have used transcriptome and restriction site−associated DNA sequencing to identify varietal SNPs among 18 G. hirsutum varieties based on the rationale that varietal SNPs can be more confidently called when flanked by subgenome-specific SNPs. Using transcriptome data, we successfully identified 37,413 varietal SNPs and, of these, 22,121 did not have an additional varietal SNP within their 20-bp flanking regions so can be used in most SNP genotyping assays. From restriction site−associated DNA sequencing data, we identified an additional 3090 varietal SNPs between two of the varieties. Of the 1583 successful SNP assays achieved using different genotyping platforms, 1363 were verified. Many of the SNPs behaved as dominant markers because of coamplification from homeologous loci, but the number of SNPs acting as codominant markers increased when one or more subgenome-specific SNP(s) were incorporated in their assay primers, giving them greater utility for breeding applications. A G. hirsutum genetic map with 1244 SNP markers was constructed covering 5557.42 centiMorgan and used to map qualitative and quantitative traits. This collection of G. hirsutum varietal SNPs complements existing intra-specific SNPs and provides the cotton community with a valuable marker resource applicable to genetic analyses and breeding programs. PMID:25106949

  8. Major histocompatibility complex class II polymorphisms are associated with the development of anti-resorptive agent-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Philipp; Nkenke, Emeka; Englbrecht, Matthias; Schlittenbauer, Tilo; Wehrhan, Falk; Rauh, Claudia; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Kreusch, Thomas; Mackensen, Andreas; Wullich, Bernd; Schett, Georg; Spriewald, Bernd M

    2013-01-01

    The aetiology of anti-resorptive agent-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw (ARONJ) is still under debate. Clinical and genetic risk factors are currently being investigated to help understand its pathogenesis. This case-control study analysed a large number of cancer patients (n = 230) under therapy with intravenous bisphosphonates, half of which were diagnosed with ARONJ. Multiple myeloma, greater patient age and the use of more than one bisphosphonate were identified as clinical risk factors on logistic regression analysis. In addition, 204 patients were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 and the allele frequencies were compared between ARONJ (n = 94) and unaffected cancer patients (n = 110). For the HLA class II alleles, a strong increase in the frequency of DRB1*15, DQB1*06:02, DRB1*01 and DQB1*05:01 was observed in the ARONJ group. These results were reinforced on analysis of the respective haplotypes, with DRB1*15-DQB1*06:02 being significantly associated with the development of ARONJ (odds ratio [OR] 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-5.0). The presence of at least one of the haplotypes DRB1*15-DQB1*06:02 and DRB1*01-DQB1*05:01 was highly associated with the development of ARONJ (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.7-5.5). The data in this study of a large number of cancer patients receiving intravenous bisphosphonates suggest that MHC class II polymorphisms represent genetic risk factors for the development of ARONJ. This result supports recent findings that inflammation and infection might play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARONJ.

  9. Synthesis and characterisation of thiosemicarbazonato molybdenum(VI) complexes and their in vitro antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Vrdoljak, Visnja; Dilović, Ivica; Rubcić, Mirta; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Kralj, Marijeta; Matković-Calogović, Dubravka; Piantanida, Ivo; Novak, Predrag; Rozman, Andrea; Cindrić, Marina

    2010-01-01

    New dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes were obtained by the reaction of [MoO2(acac)2] with thiosemicarbazone ligands derived from 3-thiosemicarbazide and 4-(diethylamino)salicylaldehyde (H2L1), 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde (H2L2) or 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (H2L3). In all complexes thiosemicarbazonato ligands are coordinated to molybdenum as tridentate ONS-donors. Octahedral coordination of each molybdenum atom is completed by methanol molecule (in 1a-3a) or by oxygen atom of Mo=O unit from the neighbouring molecule (in 1-3). All complexes were characterized by means of chemical analyses, IR spectroscopy, TG and NMR measurements. The molecular structures of the ligand H2L2 and complex [MoO2L2(CH3OH)].CH3OH (2a) have been determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The characterisation of thiosemicarbazonato molybdenum(VI) complexes (1-4) as well as of the 4-phenylthisemicarbazonato molybdenum(VI) complexes (5-8) in aqueous medium revealed that upon dissolving complexes in water, most likely to some extent dissociation took place, although experimental data didn't allow exact quantification of dissociation. The antiproliferative effects of studied molybdenum(VI) complexes (1-8) on the human cell lines were identical to the activity of their corresponding ligands.

  10. Ldb1-nucleated transcription complexes function as primary mediators of global erythroid gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, LiQi; Freudenberg, Johannes; Cui, Kairong; Dale, Ryan; Song, Sang-Hyun; Dean, Ann; Zhao, Keji

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is dependent on the lineage-specific transcription factors Gata1, Tal1, and Klf1. Several erythroid genes have been shown to require all 3 factors for their expression, suggesting that they function synergistically; however, there is little direct evidence for widespread cooperation. Gata1 and Tal1 can assemble within higher-order protein complexes (Ldb1 complexes) that include the adapter molecules Lmo2 and Ldb1. Ldb1 proteins are capable of coassociation, and long-range Ldb1-mediated oligomerization of enhancer- and promoter-bound Ldb1 complexes has been shown to be required for β-globin gene expression. In this study, we generated a genomewide map of Ldb1 complex binding sites that revealed widespread binding at erythroid genes and at known erythroid enhancer elements. Ldb1 complex binding sites frequently colocalized with Klf1 binding sites and with consensus binding motifs for other erythroid transcription factors. Transcriptomic analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between Ldb1 complex binding and Ldb1 dependency for gene expression and identified a large cohort of genes coregulated by Ldb1 complexes and Klf1. Together, these results provide a foundation for defining the mechanism and scope of Ldb1 complex activity during erythropoiesis. PMID:23610375

  11. Micronuclei in Cord Blood Lymphocytes and Associations with Biomarkers of Exposure to Carcinogens and Hormonally Active Factors, Gene Polymorphisms, and Gene Expression: The NewGeneris Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Domenico Franco; Agramunt, Silvia; Anna, Lívia; Besselink, Harrie; Botsivali, Maria; Brady, Nigel J.; Ceppi, Marcello; Chatzi, Leda; Chen, Bowang; Decordier, Ilse; Farmer, Peter B.; Fleming, Sarah; Fontana, Vincenzo; Försti, Asta; Fthenou, Eleni; Gallo, Fabio; Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Gmuender, Hans; Godschalk, Roger W.; Granum, Berit; Hardie, Laura J.; Hemminki, Kari; Hochstenbach, Kevin; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kovács, Katalin; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Løvik, Martinus; Nielsen, Jeanette K; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Pedersen, Marie; Rydberg, Per; Schoket, Bernadette; Segerbäck, Dan; Singh, Rajinder; Sunyer, Jordi; Törnqvist, Margareta; van Loveren, Henk; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Vande Loock, Kim; von Stedingk, Hans; Wright, John; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; van Delft, Joost H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leukemia incidence has increased in recent decades among European children, suggesting that early-life environmental exposures play an important role in disease development. Objectives: We investigated the hypothesis that childhood susceptibility may increase as a result of in utero exposure to carcinogens and hormonally acting factors. Using cord blood samples from the NewGeneris cohort, we examined associations between a range of biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and hormonally acting factors with micronuclei (MN) frequency as a proxy measure of cancer risk. Associations with gene expression and genotype were also explored. Methods: DNA and protein adducts, gene expression profiles, circulating hormonally acting factors, and GWAS (genome-wide association study) data were investigated in relation to genomic damage measured by MN frequency in lymphocytes from 623 newborns enrolled between 2006 and 2010 across Europe. Results: Malondialdehyde DNA adducts (M1dG) were associated with increased MN frequency in binucleated lymphocytes (MNBN), and exposure to androgenic, estrogenic, and dioxin-like compounds was associated with MN frequency in mononucleated lymphocytes (MNMONO), although no monotonic exposure–outcome relationship was observed. Lower frequencies of MNBN were associated with a 1-unit increase expression of PDCD11, LATS2, TRIM13, CD28, SMC1A, IL7R, and NIPBL genes. Gene expression was significantly higher in association with the highest versus lowest category of bulky and M1dG–DNA adducts for five and six genes, respectively. Gene expression levels were significantly lower for 11 genes in association with the highest versus lowest category of plasma AR CALUX® (chemically activated luciferase expression for androgens) (8 genes), ERα CALUX® (for estrogens) (2 genes), and DR CALUX® (for dioxins). Several SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) on chromosome 11 near FOLH1 significantly modified associations between androgen activity and MNBN

  12. Experimental and DFT characterization, antioxidant and anticancer activities of a Cu(II)-irbesartan complex: structure-antihypertensive activity relationships in Cu(II)-sartan complexes.

    PubMed

    Islas, María S; Luengo, Alicia; Franca, Carlos A; Merino, Mercedes Griera; Calleros, Laura; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Lezama, Luis; Ferrer, Evelina G; Williams, Patricia A M

    2016-10-01

    The coordination compound of the antihypertensive ligand irbesartan (irb) with copper(II) (CuIrb) was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, reflectance and EPR spectroscopies. Experimental evidence allowed the implementation of structural and vibrational studies by theoretical calculations made in the light of the density functional theory (DFT). This compound was designed to induce structural modifications on the ligand. No antioxidant effects were displayed by both compounds, though CuIrb behaved as a weak 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(·)) scavenger (IC50 = 425 μM). The measurements of the contractile capacity on human mesangial cell lines showed that CuIrb improved the antihypertensive effects of the parent medication. In vitro cell growth inhibition against prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP and DU 145) was measured for CuIrb, irbesartan and copper(II). These cell lines have been selected since the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor (that was blocked by the angiotensin receptor blockers, ARB) has been identified in them. The complex exerted anticancer behavior (at 100 μM) improving the activity of the ligand. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. Experimental and DFT characterization of an irbesartan copper(II) complex has been performed. The complex exhibits low scavenging activity against DPPH(·) and significant growth inhibition of LNCaP and DU 145 prostate cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. This compound improved the antihypertensive effect of irbesartan. This effect was observed earlier for the mononuclear Cu-candesartan complex, but not in structurally modified sartans forming dinuclear or octanuclear Cu-sartan compounds.

  13. Bivalent transition metal complexes of cetirizine: spectroscopic, equilibrium studies and biological activity.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A; Shoukry, Mohamed M; Abobakr, Lamis O

    2013-08-01

    Metal complexes of cetirizine·2HCl (CTZ=2-[2-[4-[(4-chlorophenyl)phenyl methyl]piperazine-1-yl]-ethoxy]acetic acid, dihydrochloride have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, and UV-Vis spectra. The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio, where M represents Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated CTZ ligand. IR spectra show that CTZ is coordinated to the metal ions in a monodentate manner through carboxylate-O atom. Protonation equilibria of CTZ and its metal complexation by some divalent metal ions were determined in aqueous solution at constant ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl) using an automatic potentiometric technique. Thermodynamic parameters for the protonation equilibria of CTZ were calculated and discussed. The stability order of M(II)-CTZ complexes were found to obey Mn(2+)complexes in solution is evaluated as a function of pH. The CTZ ligand and its metal complexes were screened for their biological activity against bacterial species (Bacillus subtillis RCMB 010067, Staphylococcus aureus RCMB 010028, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa RCMB 010043, and Escherichia coli RCMB 010052) and fungi as (Aspergillus flavus RCMB 02568, Pencicillium italicum RCMB 03924, Candida albicans RCMB 05031 and Geotricum candidum RCMB 05097). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent CTZ ligand against one or more bacterial or fungi species. MIC was evaluated for the isolated complexes. PMID:23685158

  14. Bivalent transition metal complexes of cetirizine: Spectroscopic, equilibrium studies and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A.; Shoukry, Mohamed M.; Abobakr, Lamis O.

    2013-08-01

    Metal complexes of cetirizineṡ2HCl (CTZ = 2-[2-[4-[(4-chlorophenyl)phenyl methyl]piperazine-1-yl]-ethoxy]acetic acid, dihydrochloride have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, and UV-Vis spectra. The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio, where M represents Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated CTZ ligand. IR spectra show that CTZ is coordinated to the metal ions in a monodentate manner through carboxylate-O atom. Protonation equilibria of CTZ and its metal complexation by some divalent metal ions were determined in aqueous solution at constant ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl) using an automatic potentiometric technique. Thermodynamic parameters for the protonation equilibria of CTZ were calculated and discussed. The stability order of M(II)-CTZ complexes were found to obey Mn2+ < Co2+ < Ni2+ < Cu2+, in accordance with the Irving-Williams order. The concentration distribution of the complexes in solution is evaluated as a function of pH. The CTZ ligand and its metal complexes were screened for their biological activity against bacterial species (Bacillus subtillis RCMB 010067, Staphylococcus aureus RCMB 010028, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa RCMB 010043, and Escherichia coli RCMB 010052) and fungi as (Aspergillus flavus RCMB 02568, Pencicillium italicum RCMB 03924, Candida albicans RCMB 05031 and Geotricum candidum RCMB 05097). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent CTZ ligand against one or more bacterial or fungi species. MIC was evaluated for the isolated complexes.

  15. Antibacterial, antifungal and in vitro antileukaemia activity of metal complexes with thiosemicarbazones

    PubMed Central

    Pahontu, Elena; Julea, Felicia; Rosu, Tudor; Purcarea, Victor; Chumakov, Yurie; Petrenco, Petru; Gulea, Aurelian

    2015-01-01

    1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone 4-ethyl-thiosemicarbazone (HL) and its copper(II), vanadium(V) and nickel(II) complexes: [Cu(L)(Cl)]·C2H5OH·(1), [Cu(L)2]·H2O (2), [Cu(L)(Br)]·H2O·CH3OH (3), [Cu(L)(NO3)]·2C2H5OH (4), [VO2(L)]·2H2O (5), [Ni(L)2]·H2O (6), were synthesized and characterized. The ligand has been characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The tridentate nature of the ligand is evident from the IR spectra. The copper(II), vanadium(V) and nickel(II) complexes have been characterized by different physico-chemical techniques such as molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility measurements and electronic, infrared and electron paramagnetic resonance spectral studies. The structures of the ligand and its copper(II) (2, 4), and vanadium(V) (5) complexes have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The composition of the coordination polyhedron of the central atom in 2, 4 and 5 is different. The tetrahedral coordination geometry of Cu was found in complex 2 while in complex 4, it is square planar, in complex 5 the coordination polyhedron of the central ion is distorted square pyramid. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the complexes against Escherichia coli, Salmonella abony, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and the antifungal activity against Candida albicans strains was higher for the metal complexes than for free ligand. The effect of the free ligand and its metal complexes on the proliferation of HL-60 cells was tested. PMID:25708540

  16. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:27074256

  17. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA.

    PubMed

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-04-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories.

  18. A dicopper complex with distant metal centers. Structure, magnetic properties, electrochemistry and catecholase activity.

    PubMed

    Gasque, Laura; Ugalde-Saldívar, Víctor Manuel; Membrillo, Ingrid; Olguín, Juan; Mijangos, Edgar; Bernès, Sylvain; González, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of a dinuclear copper(II) complex of the ligand [2,8-dimethyl-5,11-di-(dimethylethyleneamine) 1,4,5,6,7,10,11,12-octahydroimidazo [4,5-h] imidazo [4,5-c] [1,6]diazecine] dimeim have been investigated. Also, its catecholase activity has been explored in different solvent mixtures: MeCN/H2O and OH/H2O, each at several pH values. In CH3OH/H2O, where the activity was superior, the optimal pH value for the catalytic activity was found to be lower than in CH3CN/H2O. The study of the complex's electrochemical behavior (cyclic voltammetry) which was also investigated in these various media, revealed that although an increase in pH in both solvent mixtures results in an increase both in Me oxidizing power (E(1/2)) and reversibility (ipa/ipc) the change of solvent system seems to be a more influencing factor. The superior catalytic activity found in MeOH/H2O pH=8.0, is associated with a significantly more reversible behavior displayed in this medium. Potentiometric determination of the overall formation constant and three successive pKas for the complex, suggest the formation of stable hydroxo complexes which could be the catalytically active species.

  19. C1473G polymorphism in mouse tph2 gene is linked to tryptophan hydroxylase-2 activity in the brain, intermale aggression, and depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V; Popova, Nina K

    2009-04-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) is the rate-limiting enzyme of brain serotonin synthesis. The C1473G polymorphism in the mouse tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene affects the enzyme's activity. In the present study, we investigated the linkage between the C1473G polymorphism, enzyme activity in the brain, and behavior in the forced swim, intermale aggression, and open field tests using mice of the C57BL/6 (C/C) and CC57BR/Mv (G/G) strains and the B6-1473C (C/C) and B6-1473G (G/G) lines created by three successive backcrossings on C57BL/6. Mice of the CC57BR/Mv strain had decreased brain enzyme activity, aggression intensity, and immobility in the forced swim test, but increased locomotor activity and time spent in the central part of the open field arena compared with animals of the C57BL/6 strain. Mice of the B6-1473G line homozygous for the 1473G allele had lower TPH2 activity in the brain, aggression intensity, and immobility time in the forced swim test compared with animals of the B6-1473C line homozygous for the 1473C allele. No differences were found between the B6-1473G and B6-1473C mice in locomotor activity and time spent in the central part of the arena in the open field test. Thus, the C1473G polymorphism is involved in the determination of TPH2 activity and is linked to aggression intensity and forced-swim immobility in mice. At the same time, the polymorphism does not affect locomotion and anxiety-related behavior in the open field test. The B6-1473C and B6-1473G mice represent a valuable experimental model for investigating molecular mechanisms of serotonin-related behavior.

  20. Anticancer activity and DNA-binding properties of novel cationic Pt(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Mehrnaz; Yousefi, Reza; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Haghighi, Mohsen Golbon; Niazi, Ali; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali-Akbar

    2014-05-01

    In this study, three structurally related cationic Pt complexes, [Pt(ppy)(dppe)]CF3CO2: C1, [Pt(bhq)(dppe)]CF3CO2: C2, and [Pt(bhq)(dppf)]CF3CO2: C3, in which ppy=deprotonated 2-phenylpyridine, bhq=deprotonated benzo[h]quinoline, dppe=bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane and dppf=1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene, were used for the assessment of their anticancer activities against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The Pt complexes (C1-C3) demonstrated significant level of anticancer properties, as measured using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Moreover, the changes in nuclear morphology with Acridine Orange (AO) staining reveal that these complexes are capable to induce apoptosis, and only C1 stimulates activity of Caspase-3 in Jurkat cancer cells. To get a better insight into the nature of binding between these cationic Pt complexes and DNA, different spectroscopic techniques and gel electrophoresis were applied. On the basis of the results of UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, CD experiment and fluorescence quenching of ethidium bromide (EB)-DNA, the interaction between DNA and the Pt complexes is likely to occur through a mixed-binding mode. Overall, the present work suggests that a controlled modification could result in new potentially antitumor complexes which can survive the repair mechanism and induce facile apoptosis. PMID:24530367

  1. Actors of the main activity in large complex centres during the 23 solar cycle maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Démoulin, P.; Pariat, E.; Török, T.; Molodij, G.; Mandrini, C. H.; Dasso, S.; Chandra, R.; Uddin, W.; Kumar, P.; Manoharan, P. K.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Srivastava, N.

    2011-06-01

    During the maximum of Solar Cycle 23, large active regions had a long life, spanning several solar rotations, and produced large numbers of X-class flares and CMEs, some of them associated to magnetic clouds (MCs). This is the case for the Halloween active regions in 2003. The most geoeffective MC of the cycle (Dst = -457) had its source during the disk passage of one of these active regions (NOAA 10501) on 18 November 2003. Such an activity was presumably due to continuous emerging magnetic flux that was observed during this passage. Moreover, the region exhibited a complex topology with multiple domains of different magnetic helicities. The complexity was observed to reach such unprecedented levels that a detailed multi-wavelength analysis is necessary to precisely identify the solar sources of CMEs and MCs. Magnetic clouds are identified using in situ measurements and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) data. Results from these two different sets of data are also compared.

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of metal complexes of novel Schiff base. Synthesis, thermal and biological activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. M.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; Ibrahim, Amr A.

    2009-07-01

    Novel Schiff base (HL) ligand is prepared via condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine and 2-aminobenzoic acid. The ligand is characterized based on elemental analysis, mass, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Metal complexes are reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analyses (TGA, DrTGA and DTA). The molar conductance data reveal that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra show that HL is coordinated to the metal ions in a uninegatively tridentate manner with NNO donor sites of the azomethine N, amino N and deprotonated caroxylic-O. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it is found that the geometrical structures of these complexes are octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated complexes losses water molecules of hydration in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* are calculated from the DrTG curves using Coats-Redfern method. The synthesized ligands, in comparison to their metal complexes also were screened for their antibacterial activity