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Sample records for activator plasminogen activator

  1. Plasminogen activators in human colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Mahmoud, M; Lewin, M R; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1986-01-01

    A crucial step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive colorectal cancer is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. Plasminogen activators may play a part in regulating the extracellular protease environment necessary for this to occur. Both functional and antigenic activity of the two principal activators of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator and urokinase, were measured in 30 colorectal cancers, matched samples of mucosa, and eight adenomatous polyps. Both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) had raised urokinase activities compared with normal mucosa, the activity being highest in the carcinomas. Activity of tissue plasminogen activator, however, was diminished in both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) compared with normal mucosa, the values being lowest in carcinomas. Plasmin generation by urokinase--in contrast with tissue plasminogen activator--is fibrin independent and thus less subject to physiological control. Images p730-a PMID:3094628

  2. Liposomal nanocarriers for plasminogen activators.

    PubMed

    Koudelka, Stepan; Mikulik, Robert; Mašek, Josef; Raška, Milan; Turánek Knotigová, Pavlína; Miller, Andrew D; Turánek, Jaroslav

    2016-04-10

    Several plasminogen activators (PAs) have been found effective in treating different thromboembolic diseases. However, administration of conventional thrombolytic therapy is limited by a low efficacy of present formulations of PAs. Conventional treatments using these therapeutic proteins are associated with several limitations including rapid inactivation and clearance, short half-life, bleeding complications or non-specific tissue targeting. Liposome-based formulations of PAs such as streptokinase, tissue-plasminogen activator and urokinase have been developed to improve the therapeutic efficacy of these proteins. Resulting liposomal formulations were found to preserve the original activity of PAs, promote their selective delivery and improve thrombus targeting. Therapeutic potential of these liposome-based PAs has been demonstrated successfully in various pre-clinical models in vivo. Reductions in unwanted side effects (e.g., hemorrhage or immunogenicity) as well as enhancements of efficacy and safety were achieved in comparison to currently existing treatment options based on conventional formulations of PAs. This review summarizes present achievements in: (i) preparation of liposome-based formulations of various PAs, (ii) development of PEGylated and targeted liposomal PAs, (iii) physico-chemical characterization of these developed systems, and (iv) testing of their thrombolytic efficacy. We also look to the future and the imminent arrival of theranostic liposomal formulations to move this field forward. PMID:26876783

  3. Innovative Approaches to Plasminogen Activator Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Edgar; Quertermous, Thomas; Matsueda, Gary R.; Runge, Marschall S.

    1989-01-01

    Plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction has become standard medical practice. Bleeding complications, however, limit the utility of the currently available agents. This article reviews how the tools of molecular biology and protein engineering are being used to develop safer and more effective plasminogen activators.

  4. Extravascular fibrin, plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitors, and airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Scott S.; Norton, Ryan J.; Rinaldi, Lisa M.; Bates, Jason H.T.; Sobel, Burton E.; Irvin, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying airway hyperresponsiveness are not yet fully elucidated. One of the manifestations of airway inflammation is leakage of diverse plasma proteins into the airway lumen. They include fibrinogen and thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to form fibrin, a major component of thrombi. Fibrin inactivates surfactant. Surfactant on the airway surface maintains airway patency by lowering surface tension. In this study, immunohistochemically detected fibrin was seen along the luminal surface of distal airways in a patient who died of status asthmaticus and in mice with induced allergic airway inflammation. In addition, we observed altered airway fibrinolytic system protein balance consistent with promotion of fibrin deposition in mice with allergic airway inflammation. The airways of mice were exposed to aerosolized fibrinogen, thrombin, or to fibrinogen followed by thrombin. Only fibrinogen followed by thrombin resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness compared with controls. An aerosolized fibrinolytic agent, tissue-type plasminogen activator, significantly diminished airway hyperresponsiveness in mice with allergic airway inflammation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of fibrinogen and thrombin and their accumulation on the airway surface can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:15232617

  5. Studies on the kinetics of plasminogen activation by tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Rånby, M

    1982-06-24

    The steady-state rate of plasminogen activation by tissue plasminogen activator has been determined at various plasminogen concentrations. A plasmin substrate method similar to that presented by Christensen and Müllertz (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 480 (1977) 257-281) was used. The reaction was studied using one-chain type and two-chain type tissue plasminogen activator, N-terminal glutamic acid and N-terminal lysine plasminogen in the presence and in the absence of fibrin (eight studies). The kinetic data were fitted to a general Wong-Hanes equation and the simplest equation with significant parameters was found. In the absence of fibrin N-terminal glutamic acid plasminogen activation obeyed the Michaelis-Menten rate equation (Km 4.9 and 7.6 micro M and kcat 0.0013 and 0.0078 s-1 for one-chain type and two-chain type tissue plasminogen activator, respectively. In the absence of fibrin the activation of N-terminal lysine plasminogen activation failed to obey the Michaelis-Menten rate equation. Fibrin was found to stimulate greatly (up to 1000-fold) the steady-state activation rate. A theory for the fibrin stimulating mechanism is presented.

  6. Functional Stability of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Pinar; Toksoy Oner, Ebru; Agirbasli, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), and a major regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 plays a pivotal role in acute thrombotic events such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and myocardial infarction (MI). The biological effects of PAI-1 extend far beyond thrombosis including its critical role in fibrotic disorders, atherosclerosis, renal and pulmonary fibrosis, type-2 diabetes, and cancer. The conversion of PAI-1 from the active to the latent conformation appears to be unique among serpins in that it occurs spontaneously at a relatively rapid rate. Latency transition is believed to represent a regulatory mechanism, reducing the risk of thrombosis from a prolonged antifibrinolytic action of PAI-1. Thus, relying solely on plasma concentrations of PAI-1 without assessing its function may be misleading in interpreting the role of PAI-1 in many complex diseases. Environmental conditions, interaction with other proteins, mutations, and glycosylation are the main factors that have a significant impact on the stability of the PAI-1 structure. This review provides an overview on the current knowledge on PAI-1 especially importance of PAI-1 level and stability and highlights the potential use of PAI-1 inhibitors for treating cardiovascular disease. PMID:25386620

  7. Activation of immobilized plasminogen by tissue activator. Multimolecular complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, R.L.; Nachman, R.L.; Leung, L.L.; Harpel, P.C.

    1985-08-25

    Ternary complex formation of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) and plasminogen (Plg) with thrombospondin (TSP) or histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) has been demonstrated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, an affinity bead assay, and a rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay. The formation of these complexes was specific, concentration dependent, saturable, lysine binding site-dependent, and inhibitable by fluid phase plasminogen. Apparent Kd values were approximately 12-36 nM for the interaction of TPA with TSP-Plg complexes and 15-31 nM with HRGP-Plg complexes. At saturation the relative molar stoichiometry of Plg:TPA was 3:1 within the TSP-containing complexes and 1:1 within HRGP-containing complexes. The activation of Plg to plasmin by TPA on TSP- and HRGP-coated surfaces was studied using a synthetic fluorometric plasmin substrate (D-Val-Leu-Lys-7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin). Kinetic analysis demonstrated a marked increase in the affinity of TPA for plasminogen in the presence of surface-associated TSP or HRGP. Complex formation of locally released tissue plasminogen activator with Plg immobilized on TSP or HRGP surfaces may thus play an important role in effecting proteolytic events in nonfibrin-containing microenvironments.

  8. Design of a novel chimeric tissue plasminogen activator with favorable Vampire bat plasminogen activator properties.

    PubMed

    Kazemali, MohammadReza; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Sardari, Soroush; Saadatirad, Amir Hossein; Khalaj, Vahid; Zarei, Najmeh; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinolytic agents are widely used in treatment of the thromboembolic disorders. The new generations like recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA, alteplase) are not showing promising results in clinical practice in spite of displaying specific binding to fibrin in vitro. Vampire bat plasminogen activator (b-PA) is a plasminogen activator with higher fibrin affinity and specificity in comparison to t-PA resulting in reduced probability of hemorrhage. b-PA is also resistant to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showing higher half-life compared to other variants of t-PA. However, its non-human origin was a driving force to design a human t-PA with favorable properties of b-PA. In the present study, we designed a chimeric t-PA with desirable b-PA properties and this new molecule was called as CT-b. The construct was prepared through kringle 2 domain removal and replacement of t-PA finger domain with b-PA one. In addition, the KHRR sequence at the initial part of protease domain was replaced by four alanine residues. The novel construct was integrated in Pichia pastoris genome by electroporation. Catalytic activity was investigated in the presence and absence of fibrin. The purified protein was analyzed by western blot. Fibrin binding and PAI resistance assays were also conducted. The activity of the recombinant protein in the presence of fibrin was 1560 times more than its activity in the absence of fibrin, showing its higher specificity to fibrin. The fibrin binding of CT-b was 1.2 fold more than t-PA. In addition, it was inhibited by PAI enzyme 44% less than t-PA. Although the presented data demonstrate a promising in vitro activity, more in vivo studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic advantage of this novel plasminogen activator.

  9. Design of a novel chimeric tissue plasminogen activator with favorable Vampire bat plasminogen activator properties.

    PubMed

    Kazemali, MohammadReza; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Sardari, Soroush; Saadatirad, Amir Hossein; Khalaj, Vahid; Zarei, Najmeh; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinolytic agents are widely used in treatment of the thromboembolic disorders. The new generations like recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA, alteplase) are not showing promising results in clinical practice in spite of displaying specific binding to fibrin in vitro. Vampire bat plasminogen activator (b-PA) is a plasminogen activator with higher fibrin affinity and specificity in comparison to t-PA resulting in reduced probability of hemorrhage. b-PA is also resistant to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showing higher half-life compared to other variants of t-PA. However, its non-human origin was a driving force to design a human t-PA with favorable properties of b-PA. In the present study, we designed a chimeric t-PA with desirable b-PA properties and this new molecule was called as CT-b. The construct was prepared through kringle 2 domain removal and replacement of t-PA finger domain with b-PA one. In addition, the KHRR sequence at the initial part of protease domain was replaced by four alanine residues. The novel construct was integrated in Pichia pastoris genome by electroporation. Catalytic activity was investigated in the presence and absence of fibrin. The purified protein was analyzed by western blot. Fibrin binding and PAI resistance assays were also conducted. The activity of the recombinant protein in the presence of fibrin was 1560 times more than its activity in the absence of fibrin, showing its higher specificity to fibrin. The fibrin binding of CT-b was 1.2 fold more than t-PA. In addition, it was inhibited by PAI enzyme 44% less than t-PA. Although the presented data demonstrate a promising in vitro activity, more in vivo studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic advantage of this novel plasminogen activator. PMID:25442953

  10. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hi Bahl; Ha, Hunjoo

    2005-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the kidney. Decreased ECM degradation as well as increased ECM synthesis plays an important role in ECM remodeling that favours tissue fibrosis. Plasminogen activator (PA)/plasmin/PA inhibitor (PAI) system is involved in ECM degradation and PAI-1 plays a critical role in ECM remodeling in the kidney. Normal human kidneys do not express PAI-1 but PAI-1 is overexpressed in pathologic conditions associated with renal fibrosis including diabetic nephropathy. Reactive oxygen species mediate PAI-1 up-regulation in renal cells cultured under high glucose, hypoxia, and TGF-beta1. Recent studies utilizing PAI-1 deficient mice suggest that PAI-1 induce ECM deposition in diabetic kidney through increased ECM synthesis by TGF-beta1 up-regulation as well as through decreased ECM degradation by suppression of plasmin and MMP-2 activity.

  11. A miniaturized fibrinolytic assay for plasminogen activators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Damron, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a micro-clot lysis assay (MCLA) for evaluating fibrinolytic activity of plasminogen activators (PA). Fibrin clots were formed in wells of microtiter plates. Lysis of the clots by PA, indicated by change in turbidity (optical density, OD), was monitored with a microplate reader at five minutes intervals. Log-log plots of PA dilution versus endpoint, the time at which the OD value was halfway between the maximum and minimum value for each well, were linear over a broad range of PA concentrations (2-200 International units/ml). The MCLA is a modification and miniaturization of well established fibrinolytic methods. The significant practical advantages of the MCLA are that it is a simple, relatively sensitive, non-radioactive, quantitative, kinetic, fibrinolytic micro-technique which can be automated.

  12. Binding of tissue plasminogen activator to cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, K A; Hamel, N M; Harpel, P C; Nachman, R L

    1987-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase (u-PA), the major activators of plasminogen, are synthesized and released from endothelial cells. We previously demonstrated specific and functional binding of plasminogen to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). In the present study we found that t-PA could bind to HUVEC. Binding of t-PA to HUVEC was specific, saturable, plasminogen-independent, and did not require lysine binding sites. The t-PA bound in a rapid and reversible manner, involving binding sites of both high (Kd, 28.7 +/- 10.8 pM; Bmax, 3,700 +/- 300) and low (Kd, 18.1 +/- 3.8 nM; Bmax 815,000 +/- 146,000) affinity. t-PA binding was 70% inhibited by a 100-fold molar excess of u-PA. When t-PA was bound to HUVEC, its apparent catalytic efficiency increased by three- or fourfold as measured by plasminogen activation. HUVEC-bound t-PA was active site-protected from its rapidly acting inhibitor: plasminogen activator inhibitor. These results demonstrate that t-PA specifically binds to HUVEC and that such binding preserves catalytic efficiency with respect to plasminogen activation. Therefore, endothelial cells can modulate hemostatic and thrombotic events at the cell surface by providing specific binding sites for activation of plasminogen. PMID:3119664

  13. Increased alveolar plasminogen activator in early asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, A.; Allard, C.; Begin, R.

    1989-03-01

    Alveolar macrophage-derived plasminogen activator (PA) activity is decreased in some chronic interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis but increased in experimental models of acute alveolitis. Although asbestos fibers can stimulate alveolar macrophages (AM) to release PA in vitro, the effect of chronic asbestos exposure of the lower respiratory tract on lung PA activity remains unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate PA activity of alveolar macrophages and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in asbestos-exposed sheep and asbestos workers. Forty-three sheep were exposed to either 100 mg UICC chrysotile B asbestos in 100 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or to 100 ml PBS by tracheal infusion every 2 wk for 18 months. At Month 18, chest roentgenograms were analyzed and alveolar macrophage and extracellular fluid PA activity were measured in samples obtained by BAL. Alveolar macrophage PA activity was increased in the asbestos-exposed sheep compared to control sheep (87.2 +/- 17.3 versus 41.1 +/- 7.2 U/10(5) AM-24 h, p less than 0.05) as was the BAL fluid PA activity (674.9 +/- 168.4 versus 81.3 +/- 19.7 U/mg alb-24 h, p less than 0.01). Among the asbestos-exposed sheep, 10 had normal chest roentgenograms (Group SA) and 15 had irregular interstitial opacities (Group SB). Strikingly, whereas Group SA did not differ from the control group in BAL cellularity or PA activity, Group SB had marked increases in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.005), AM PA activity (p less than 0.02), and BAL PA activity (p less than 0.001) compared to the control group.

  14. Function of streptokinase fragments in plasminogen activation.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, G Y; Chang, B I; Chen, S M; Wu, D H; Wu, H L

    1994-01-01

    Several peptide fragments of streptokinase (SK) were prepared by incubating SK with immobilized human plasmin (hPlm) and purified by h.p.l.c. with a reverse-phase phenyl column. The N-terminal sequences, amino acid compositions and molecular masses of these peptide fragments were determined. The SK peptide fragment of 36 kDa consisting of Ser60-Lys387 (SK-p), was the only peptide fragment that could be tightly bound to immobilized hPlm. Another three large SK peptide fragments, SK-m, SK-n and SK-o, with molecular masses of 7 kDa, 18 kDa and 30 kDa, and consisting of Ile1-Lys59, Glu148-Lys333, Ser60-Lys333 respectively, were also obtained from the supernatant of the reaction mixture. The purified SK-p had high affinity with hPlm and could activate human plasminogen (hPlg) with a kPlg one-sixth that of the native SK. SK-o had low affinity with hPlm and could also activate hPlg, although the catalytic constant was less than 1% of the native SK. SK-n, as well as SK-m, which is the N-terminal 59 amino acid peptide of the native SK, had no activator activity. However, SK-m could enhance the activator activity of both SK-o and SK-p and increase their second-order rate constants by two- and six-fold respectively. It was concluded from these studies that (1) SK-o, the Ser60-Lys333 peptide of SK, was essential for minimal SK activator activity, (2) the C-terminal peptide of SK-p, Ala334-Lys387, was essential for high affinity with hPlm, and (3) the N-terminal 59-amino-acid peptide was important in maintaining the proper conformation of SK to have its full activator activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7998939

  15. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in aging.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Koji; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Saito, Hidehiko

    2014-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a principal inhibitor of fibrinolysis, is induced in thrombotic, fibrotic, and cardiovascular diseases, which in turn primarily afflict the older population. This induction of PAI-1 may play an important role in the pathology of these diseases as PAI-1 can regulate the dissolution of fibrin and also inhibit the degradation of the extracellular matrix by reducing plasmin generation. PAI-1 expression is elevated in aged individuals and is significantly upregulated in a variety of pathologies associated with the process of aging, including myocardial and cerebral infarction, vascular (athero) sclerosis, cardiac and lung fibrosis, metabolic syndromes (e.g., hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance), cancer, and inflammatory/stress responses. Thus, PAI-1 may play a critical role in the development of aging-associated pathological changes. In addition, PAI-1 is recognized as a marker of senescence and a key member of a group of proteins collectively known as the senescence-messaging secretome. In this review, we highlight the role of PAI-1 in the pathophysiology of aging and aging-associated disorders.

  16. Human monocytes can produce tissue-type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that monocytes and macrophages produce urokinase-type plasminogen activator. We have shown for the first time that human monocytes, when stimulated appropriately in vitro, can produce tissue type-plasminogen activator (t-PA) of 70 kD. Detection of t-PA mRNA was consistent with the biochemical and immunological characterization of t-PA produced by human monocytes. PMID:2494295

  17. Minor Role of Plasminogen in Complement Activation on Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Jokiranta, T. Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, but severe thrombotic microangiopathy. In roughly two thirds of the patients, mutations in complement genes lead to uncontrolled activation of the complement system against self cells. Recently, aHUS patients were described with deficiency of the fibrinolytic protein plasminogen. This zymogen and its protease form plasmin have both been shown to interact with complement proteins in the fluid phase. In this work we studied the potential of plasminogen to restrict complement propagation. In hemolytic assays, plasminogen inhibited complement activation, but only when it had been exogenously activated to plasmin and when it was used at disproportionately high concentrations compared to serum. Addition of only the zymogen plasminogen into serum did not hinder complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes. Plasminogen could not restrict deposition of complement activation products on endothelial cells either, as was shown with flow cytometry. With platelets, a very weak inhibitory effect on deposition of C3 fragments was observed, but it was considered too weak to be significant for disease pathogenesis. Thus it was concluded that plasminogen is not an important regulator of complement on self cells. Instead, addition of plasminogen was shown to clearly hinder platelet aggregation in serum. This was attributed to plasmin causing disintegration of formed platelet aggregates. We propose that reduced proteolytic activity of plasmin on structures of growing thrombi, rather than on complement activation fragments, explains the association of plasminogen deficiency with aHUS. This adds to the emerging view that factors unrelated to the complement system can also be central to aHUS pathogenesis and suggests that future research on the mechanism of the disease should expand beyond complement dysregulation. PMID:26637181

  18. Tissue plasminogen activator in central nervous system physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Melchor, Jerry P.; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-01

    Summary Although conventionally associated with fibrin clot degradation, recent work has uncovered new functions for the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasminogen cascade in central nervous system physiology and pathology. This extracellular proteolytic cascade has been shown to have roles in learning and memory, stress, neuronal degeneration, addiction and Alzheimer’s disease. The current review considers the different ways tPA functions in the brain. PMID:15841309

  19. The extracellular matrix proteins laminin and fibronectin contain binding domains for human plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Moser, T L; Enghild, J J; Pizzo, S V; Stack, M S

    1993-09-01

    This study describes the binding of plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and laminin. Plasminogen bound specifically and saturably to both fibronectin and laminin immobilized on microtiter wells, with Kd(app) values of 115 and 18 nM, respectively. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase V8 coupled with ligand blotting analysis showed that both plasminogen and t-PA preferentially bind to a 55-kDa fibronectin fragment and a 38-kDa laminin fragment. Amino acid sequence analysis demonstrated that the 5-kDa fragment originates with the fibronectin amino terminus whereas the laminin fragment was derived from the carboxyl-terminal globular domain of the laminin A chain. Ligand blotting experiments using isolated plasminogen domains were also used to identify distinct regions of the plasminogen molecule involved in fibronectin and laminin binding. Solution phase fibronectin binding to immobilized plasminogen was mediated primarily via lysine binding site-dependent interactions with plasminogen kringles 1-4. Lysine binding site-dependent binding of soluble laminin to immobilized plasminogen kringles 1-5 as well as an additional lysine binding site-independent interaction between mini-plasminogen and the 38-kDa laminin A chain fragment were also observed. These studies demonstrate binding of plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator to specific regions of the extracellular matrix glycoproteins laminin and fibronectin and provide further insight into the mechanism of regulation of plasminogen activation by components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:8360181

  20. Low activity of plasminogen activator: a common feature of non- iatrogenic comorbidities of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Nardi, Antonio E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of non-iatrogenic comorbidities of schizophrenia may provide insights into the pathogenesis of schizophrenia itself. First-episode, drug-naïve schizophrenia patients are at high risk of thromboembolic events, diseases related to substance abuse, sexual dysfunction, reproductive disorders, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, as well as complications of hyperinsulinemia or hyperhomocysteinemia. This review focuses on the role of reduced plasminogen activator activity in non-iatrogenic comorbidity of schizophrenia. By preventing thrombus dissolution, low tissue plasminogen activator activity increases the risk of thrombotic events. Components of the plasminogen activator system also play a key role in reproduction. Both illicit drugs and tobacco increase plasminogen activator levels in the central nervous system, which seems to relieve symptoms of the mental disorder. Chronic alcoholism, sexual dysfunction, inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, and complications of hyperinsulinemia or hyperhomocysteinemia are somehow related to low plasminogen activator activity. Plasminogen activator mediates several neurochemical processes that seem to prevent or reverse gray-matter atrophy seen in first-episode schizophrenia patients. Such processes include cleavage of brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor to an anti-apoptotic neurotrophin and activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. Controlled, randomized studies are needed to determine if measures aimed at correcting plasminogen activator activity can improve the quality of life, reduce morbidity and mortality rates, and particularly improve the course of schizophrenia. PMID:25714971

  1. Imaging Active Urokinase Plasminogen Activator in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Sevillano, Natalia; Markham, Kate; Winter, Michael B.; Murphy, Stephanie T.; Hostetter, Daniel R.; West, James; Lowman, Henry; Craik, Charles S.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    The increased proteolytic activity of membrane-bound and secreted proteases on the surface of cancer cells and in the transformed stroma is a common characteristic of aggressive metastatic prostate cancer. We describe here the development of an active site-specific probe for detecting a secreted peritumoral protease expressed by cancer cells and the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Using a human fragment antigen binding phage display library, we identified a human antibody termed U33 that selectively inhibited the active form of the protease urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA, PLAU). In the full-length immunoglobulin form, U33 IgG labeled with near-infrared fluorophores or radionuclides allowed us to non-invasively detect active uPA in prostate cancer xenograft models using optical and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging modalities. U33 IgG labeled with 111In had a remarkable tumor uptake of 43.2% injected dose per gram (%ID/g) 72hr post tail vein injection of the radiolabeled probe in subcutaneous xenografts. Additionally, U33 was able to image active uPA in small soft-tissue and osseous metastatic lesions using a cardiac dissemination prostate cancer model that recapitulated metastatic human cancer. The favorable imaging properties were the direct result of U33 IgG internalization through an uPA receptor mediated mechanism where U33 mimicked the function of the endogenous inhibitor of uPA to gain entry into the cancer cell. Overall, our imaging probe targets a prostate cancer-associated protease, through a unique mechanism, allowing for the non-invasive preclinical imaging of prostate cancer lesions. PMID:25672980

  2. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator is quiescent in human plasma in the absence of fibrin unlike human tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Gardell, S J; Hare, T R; Bergum, P W; Cuca, G C; O'Neill-Palladino, L; Zavodny, S M

    1990-12-15

    The vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (Bat-PA) is a potent PA that exhibits remarkable selectivity toward fibrin-bound plasminogen (Gardell et al, J Biol Chem 256: 3568, 1989). Herein, we describe the activity of recombinant DNA-derived Bat-PA (rBat-PA) in a human plasma milieu. rBat-PA and recombinant human single-chain tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) are similarly efficacious at lysing plasma clots. In stark contrast to rt-PA, the addition of 250 nmol/L rBat-PA to plasma in the absence of a clot failed to deplete plasminogen, alpha 2-antiplasmin and fibrinogen. The lytic activities exhibited by finger-domain minus Bat-PA (F- rBat-PA) and finger and epidermal growth factor-like domains minus Bat-PA (FG- rBat-PA) were less than rBat-PA, especially at low concentrations of PA; nevertheless, these truncated forms also possessed a strict requirement for a fibrin cofactor. The loss of PA activity following the addition of rBat-PA to plasma was slower than that observed when either rt-PA or two-chain rt-PA was added. The efficacy, fibrin selectivity, and decreased susceptibility to inactivation exhibited by rBat-PA in vitro in a human plasma milieu suggests that rBat-PA may be superior to rt-PA for the treatment of thrombotic complications. PMID:2124935

  3. Biochemical assays on plasminogen activators and hormones from kidney sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Grant H.; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were established for the purpose of analyzing the conditioned media from human embryonic kidney cell subpopulations separated in space by electrophoresis. This data is based on the experiments performed on STS-8 on the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The primary biological activity that was analyzed was plasminogen activator activity, but some assays for erythropoeitin and human granulocyte colony stimulating activity were also performed. It is concluded that a battery of assays are required to completely define the plasminogen activator profile of a conditioned media from cell culture. Each type of assay measures different parts of the mixture and are influenced by different parameters. The functional role of each assay is given along with an indication of which combination of assays are required to answer specific questions. With this type of information it is possible by combinations of assays with mathematical analysis to pinpoint a specific component of the system.

  4. Photonic Activation of Plasminogen Induced by Low Dose UVB

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Manuel; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn; Campos, Sara R. R.; Baptista, António M.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of plasminogen to its active form plasmin is essential for several key mechanisms, including the dissolution of blood clots. Activation occurs naturally via enzymatic proteolysis. We report that activation can be achieved with 280 nm light. A 2.6 fold increase in proteolytic activity was observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm). Thermal unfolding CD studies show that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase of the fluctuations of loop 760–765, the S1-entrance frame located close to the active site. These fluctuations affect the range of solvent exposure of the catalytic triad, particularly of Asp646 and Ser74, which acquire an exposure profile similar to the values in plasmin. The presented photonic mechanism of plasminogen activation has the potential to be used in clinical applications, possibly together with other enzymatic treatments for the elimination of

  5. The tissue-type plasminogen activator-plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 complex promotes neurovascular injury in brain trauma: evidence from mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Sashindranath, Maithili; Sales, Eunice; Daglas, Maria; Freeman, Roxann; Samson, Andre L; Cops, Elisa J; Beckham, Simone; Galle, Adam; McLean, Catriona; Morganti-Kossmann, Cristina; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Madani, Rime; Vassalli, Jean-Dominique; Su, Enming J; Lawrence, Daniel A; Medcalf, Robert L

    2012-11-01

    The neurovascular unit provides a dynamic interface between the circulation and central nervous system. Disruption of neurovascular integrity occurs in numerous brain pathologies including neurotrauma and ischaemic stroke. Tissue plasminogen activator is a serine protease that converts plasminogen to plasmin, a protease that dissolves blood clots. Besides its role in fibrinolysis, tissue plasminogen activator is abundantly expressed in the brain where it mediates extracellular proteolysis. However, proteolytically active tissue plasminogen activator also promotes neurovascular disruption after ischaemic stroke; the molecular mechanisms of this process are still unclear. Tissue plasminogen activator is naturally inhibited by serine protease inhibitors (serpins): plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, neuroserpin or protease nexin-1 that results in the formation of serpin:protease complexes. Proteases and serpin:protease complexes are cleared through high-affinity binding to low-density lipoprotein receptors, but their binding to these receptors can also transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane. The matrix metalloproteinases are the second major proteolytic system in the mammalian brain, and like tissue plasminogen activators are pivotal to neurological function but can also degrade structures of the neurovascular unit after injury. Herein, we show that tissue plasminogen activator potentiates neurovascular damage in a dose-dependent manner in a mouse model of neurotrauma. Surprisingly, inhibition of activity following administration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 significantly increased cerebrovascular permeability. This led to our finding that formation of complexes between tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the brain parenchyma facilitates post-traumatic cerebrovascular damage. We demonstrate that following trauma, the complex binds to low-density lipoprotein receptors, triggering the induction of matrix

  6. Staphylokinase as a Plasminogen Activator Component in Recombinant Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, S. J.; Sihota, E. G.; Habibi, H. R.; Wong, S.-L.

    1999-01-01

    The plasminogen activator staphylokinase (SAK) is a promising thrombolytic agent for treatment of myocardial infarction. It can specifically stimulate the thrombolysis of both erythrocyte-rich and platelet-rich clots. However, SAK lacks fibrin-binding and thrombin inhibitor activities, two functions which would supplement and potentially improve its thrombolytic potency. Creating a recombinant fusion protein is one approach for combining protein domains with complementary functions. To evaluate SAK for use in a translational fusion protein, both N- and C-terminal fusions to SAK were constructed by using hirudin as a fusion partner. Recombinant fusion proteins were secreted from Bacillus subtilis and purified from culture supernatants. The rate of plasminogen activation by SAK was not altered by the presence of an additional N- or C-terminal protein sequence. However, cleavage at N-terminal lysines within SAK rendered the N-terminal fusion unstable in the presence of plasmin. The results of site-directed mutagenesis of lysine 10 and lysine 11 in SAK suggested that a plasmin-resistant variant cannot be created without interfering with the plasmin processing necessary for activation of SAK. Although putative plasmin cleavage sites are located at the C-terminal end of SAK at lysine 135 and lysine 136, these sites were resistant to plasmin cleavage in vitro. Therefore, C-terminal fusions represent stable configurations for developing improved thrombolytic agents based on SAK as the plasminogen activator component. PMID:9925575

  7. Pneumococcal phosphoglycerate kinase interacts with plasminogen and its tissue activator.

    PubMed

    Fulde, M; Bernardo-García, N; Rohde, M; Nachtigall, N; Frank, R; Preissner, K T; Klett, J; Morreale, A; Chhatwal, G S; Hermoso, J A; Bergmann, S

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is not only a commensal of the nasopharyngeal epithelium, but may also cause life-threatening diseases. Immune-electron microscopy studies revealed that the bacterial glycolytic enzyme, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), is localised on the pneumococcal surface of both capsulated and non-capsulated strains and colocalises with plasminogen. Since pneumococci may concentrate host plasminogen (PLG) together with its activators on the bacterial cell surface to facilitate the formation of plasmin, the involvement of PGK in this process was studied. Specific binding of human or murine PLG to strain-independent PGK was documented, and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicated a high affinity interaction with the kringle domains 1-4 of PLG. Crystal structure determination of pneumococcal PGK together with peptide array analysis revealed localisation of PLG-binding site in the N-terminal region and provided structural motifs for the interaction with PLG. Based on structural analysis data, a potential interaction of PGK with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was proposed and experimentally confirmed by binding studies, plasmin activity assays and thrombus degradation analyses. PMID:24196407

  8. Evaluation of Prognostic Values of Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Yunus; Ozturk, Baris; Tutuncu, Emin Ediz; Sencan, Irfan; Cicek Senturk, Gonul; Altay, Fatma Aybala

    2015-01-01

    Background: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a widespread disease in Turkey, and was responsible for many deaths in endemic regions during the last decade. The pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood yet. Objectives: In this study we aimed to determine the levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as predictors of prognosis in CCHF. Patients and Methods: Patients who were diagnosed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and IgM positivity in the reference laboratory were included in this study. Tissue Plasminogen activator and PAI-1 levels were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a commercial kit (human t-PA ELISA and human PAL-1 ELISA; BioVendor research and diagnostic products, BioVendor-Laboratorni medicina a.s., Brno, Czech Republic). Results: A total of 46 patients participated in this study. The significant differences between recovering patients and the patients who died, regarding Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Creatine Phosphokinase (CPK), Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), Prothrombin Time (PT), activated Partial Thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thrombocyte and fibrinogen levels, were consistent with many clinical studies in the literature. The fatal cases were found to have higher tPA and PAI-1 levels in contrast to the patients who completely recovered. Conclusions: We think that these findings may help the progress of understanding of CCHF pathogenesis. PMID:26587219

  9. Effect of viscous macromolecules on peritoneal plasminogen activator activity: a potential mechanism for their ability to reduce postoperative adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M; Yedgar, S; Hurwitz, A; Palti, Z; Finzi, Z; Milwidsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Activity of peritoneal plasminogen activator and its regulation by dextran and other macromolecules that clinically suppress postoperative adhesions was studied. Plasminogen activator activity was assayed by a two-stage globinolytic assay that monitors formation of plasmin, as well as by cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate (S-2444) in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). Plasminogen activator activity was located on the outer surface of human peritoneum. Incubation of peritoneal tissue with buffer in vitro (conditioning) prompted release of plasminogen activator into the conditioning medium. The released plasminogen activator formed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis at an apparent molecular weight of 174,000 and was markedly suppressed by antiserum raised against human melanoma tissue-type plasminogen activator. Nonspecific proteolytic activity did not accumulate in the medium during conditioning. The presence of dextran 80 during conditioning of peritoneum reversibly suppressed tissue-bound plasminogen activator activity and reduced plasminogen activator activity in the spent medium. A similar inhibition of peritoneal plasminogen activator was induced by dextran 500, methyl cellulose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Dextran, when added to the medium after conditioning, had no direct inhibitory effect on plasminogen activator activity. Dextran did not induce peritoneal production of inhibitor(s) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, or urokinase. On the basis of these findings, two possible mechanisms for the effect of viscous polymers in the reduction of adhesion formation are proposed. These mechanisms consider the importance of peritoneal tissue-type plasminogen activator for removal of fibrin clots and suggest that polymer coating either prevents the shedding of plasminogen activator into the abdominal cavity or reduces the access of fibrin clots to the serosal surfaces. PMID:2459968

  10. A novel serine protease secreted by medicinal maggots enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Andersen, Anders S; Nazir, Sheresma; van Tilburg, Nico H; Oestergaard, Peter R; Krogfelt, Karen A; van Dissel, Jaap T; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bertina, Rogier M; Nibbering, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As haemostatic processes play an important role in wound healing, this study focused on the effects of maggot secretions on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The results showed that maggot secretions enhance plasminogen activator-induced formation of plasmin and fibrinolysis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By contrast, coagulation was not affected by secretions. Biochemical studies indicated that a novel serine protease within secretions, designated Sericase, cleaved plasminogen to several fragments. Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis by Sericase. We conclude from our in vitro studies that the novel serine protease Sericase, with the aid of a non-proteolytic cofactor, enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis.

  11. Altered expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor in high-risk soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Benassi, M S; Ponticelli, F; Azzoni, E; Gamberi, G; Pazzaglia, L; Chiechi, A; Conti, A; Spessotto, P; Scapolan, M; Pignotti, E; Bacchini, P; Picci, P

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, classification of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) has improved with cytogenetic analyses, but their clinical behavior is still not easily predictable. The aim of this study was to detect alterations in the urokinase-type plasminogen system, involved in tumor growth and invasion, by comparing mRNA levels of its components with those of paired normal tissues, and relating them with patient clinical course. Real-time PCR was performed on human STS cell lines and tissues from highly malignant STS, including leiomyosarcomas and malignant fibrous histiocytomas, to evaluate the expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Immunohistochemistry of gene products was also performed. Median mRNA values of all genes studied were higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues. In agreement with data on STS cell lines, significant up-regulation for uPA and PAI-1 genes compared to reference values was seen. Moreover, different levels of expression were related to histotype and metastatic phenotype. There was accordance between uPA mRNA and protein expression, while immunodetection of PAI-1 product was weak and scattered. Clearly, the controversial role of PAI-1 protein requires further biological analyses, but evident involvement of uPA/PAI-1 gene overexpression in STS malignancy may highlight a molecular defect useful in discriminating STS high-risk patients. PMID:17523079

  12. Calcium regulation of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 release from cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, C; Kaji, T; Sakamoto, M; Kozuka, H; Koizumi, F

    1994-04-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) produced by vascular endothelial cells converts plasminogen to plasmin which degrades fibrin. Since t-PA activity is greatly potentiated in the presence of fibrin (1,2), the activator is implicated in intravascular fibrinolysis. On the other hand, endothelial cells also produce plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (3). The inhibitor associated with vascular endothelium rapidly inhibits t-PA, while that released into the liquid phase has a little anti-activator activity (4). However, clinical studies have shown that elevation of plasma PAI-1 level is a risk factor of thrombosis (5,6). It is thus suggested that the balance between t-PA and PAI-1 is important for the regulation of fibrinolysis. The release of t-PA and PAI-1 from vascular endothelial cells is regulated by physiological factors including thrombin (3,7), histamine (8), vasoconstrictor peptide endothelins (9,10) and cytokines (11). In addition, the regulation of the t-PA release and that of the PAI-1 release are not necessarily coupled. It has been shown that activated protein kinase C and cyclic AMP are involved in the stimulation and suppression, respectively, of the endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 production (12,13). However, the role of intracellular calcium in the regulation of endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 release has remained to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of calcium ionophore A23187 on the release of t-PA antigen (t-PA:Ag) and PAI-1 antigen (PAI-1:Ag) from cultured vascular endothelial cells derived from human umbilical vein.

  13. Neuroprotection by urokinase plasminogen activator in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunsil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Seo, Jung-Woo; Byun, Catherine Jeonghae; Chung, Sun-Ju; Suh, Dae Chul; Carmeliet, Peter; Koh, Jae-Young; Kim, Jong S; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2012-04-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), which are both used for thrombolytic treatment of acute ischemic stroke, are serine proteases that convert plasminogen to active plasmin. Although recent experimental evidences have raised controversy about the neurotoxic versus neuroprotective roles of tPA in acute brain injury, uPA remains unexplored in this context. In this study, we evaluated the effect of uPA on neuronal death in the hippocampus of mice after kainate-induced seizures. In the normal brain, uPA was localized to both nuclei and cytosol of neurons. Following severe kainate-induced seizures, uPA completely disappeared in degenerating neurons, whereas uPA-expressing astrocytes substantially increased, suggesting reactive astrogliosis. uPA-knockout mice were more vulnerable to kainate-induced neuronal death than wild-type mice. Consistent with this, inhibition of uPA by intracerebral injection of the uPA inhibitor UK122 increased the level of neuronal death. In contrast, prior administration of recombinant uPA significantly attenuated neuronal death. Collectively, these results indicate that uPA renders neurons resistant to kainate-induced excitotoxicity. Moreover, recombinant uPA suppressed cell death in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons exposed to H2O2, zinc, or various excitotoxins, suggesting that uPA protects against neuronal injuries mediated by the glutamate receptor, or by oxidation- or zinc-induced death signaling pathways. Considering that tPA may facilitate neurodegeneration in acute brain injury, we suggest that uPA, as a neuroprotectant, might be beneficial for the treatment of acute brain injuries such as ischemic stroke.

  14. Pivotal role of tissue plasminogen activator in the mechanism of action of electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Mezzasalma, Marco A U; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-02-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is an important treatment option for major depressive disorders, acute mania, mood disorders with psychotic features, and catatonia. Several hypotheses have been proposed as electroconvulsive therapy's mechanism of action. Our hypothesis involves many converging pathways facilitated by increased synthesis and release of tissue-plasminogen activator. Human and animal experiments have shown that tissue-plasminogen activator participates in many mechanisms of action of electroconvulsive therapy or its animal variant, electroconvulsive stimulus, including improved N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated signaling, activation of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, increased bioavailability of zinc, purinergic release, and increased mobility of dendritic spines. As a result, tissue-plasminogen activator helps promote neurogenesis in limbic structures, modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity, improves cognitive function, and mediates antidepressant effects. Notably, electroconvulsive therapy seems to influence tissue-plasminogen activator metabolism. For example, electroconvulsive stimulus increases the expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65 isoform in γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing neurons, which enhances the release of tissue-plasminogen activator, and the expression of p11, a protein involved in plasminogen and tissue-plasminogen activator assembling. This paper reviews how electroconvulsive therapy correlates with tissue-plasminogen activator. We suggest that interventions aiming at increasing tissue-plasminogen activator levels or its bioavailability - such as daily aerobic exercises together with a carbohydrate-restricted diet, or normalization of homocysteine levels - be evaluated in controlled studies assessing response and remission duration in patients who undergo electroconvulsive therapy.

  15. Schistosomes Enhance Plasminogen Activation: The Role of Tegumental Enolase.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Barbara C; Da'dara, Akram A; Oliveira, Sergio C; Skelly, Patrick J

    2015-12-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease of global public health importance. These relatively large parasites are able to survive prolonged periods in the human vasculature without inducing stable blood clots around them. We show here that the intravascular life stages (schistosomula and adult males and females) can all promote significant plasminogen (PLMG) activation in the presence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). This results in the generation of the potent fibrinolytic agent plasmin which could degrade blood clots forming around the worms in vivo. We demonstrate that S. mansoni enolase (SmEno) is a host-interactive tegumental enzyme that, in recombinant form, can bind PLMG and promote its activation. Like classical members of the enolase protein family, SmEno can catalyze the interconversion of 2-phospho-D-glycerate (2-PGA) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The enzyme has maximal activity at pH 7.5, requires Mg2+ for optimal activity and can be inhibited by NaF but not mefloquin. Suppressing expression of the SmEno gene significantly diminishes enolase mRNA levels, protein levels and surface enzyme activity but, surprisingly, does not affect the ability of the worms to promote PLMG activation. Thus, while SmEno can enhance PLMG activation, our analysis suggests that it is not the only contributor to the parasite's ability to perform this function. We show that the worms possess several other PLMG-binding proteins in addition to SmEno and these may have a greater importance in schistosome-driven PLMG activation.

  16. Schistosomes Enhance Plasminogen Activation: The Role of Tegumental Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Barbara C.; Da'dara, Akram A.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Skelly, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease of global public health importance. These relatively large parasites are able to survive prolonged periods in the human vasculature without inducing stable blood clots around them. We show here that the intravascular life stages (schistosomula and adult males and females) can all promote significant plasminogen (PLMG) activation in the presence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). This results in the generation of the potent fibrinolytic agent plasmin which could degrade blood clots forming around the worms in vivo. We demonstrate that S. mansoni enolase (SmEno) is a host-interactive tegumental enzyme that, in recombinant form, can bind PLMG and promote its activation. Like classical members of the enolase protein family, SmEno can catalyze the interconversion of 2-phospho-D-glycerate (2-PGA) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The enzyme has maximal activity at pH 7.5, requires Mg2+ for optimal activity and can be inhibited by NaF but not mefloquin. Suppressing expression of the SmEno gene significantly diminishes enolase mRNA levels, protein levels and surface enzyme activity but, surprisingly, does not affect the ability of the worms to promote PLMG activation. Thus, while SmEno can enhance PLMG activation, our analysis suggests that it is not the only contributor to the parasite’s ability to perform this function. We show that the worms possess several other PLMG-binding proteins in addition to SmEno and these may have a greater importance in schistosome-driven PLMG activation. PMID:26658895

  17. Nonproteolytic neuroprotection by human recombinant tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Park, J H; Hong, S H; Koh, J Y

    1999-04-23

    Human recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may benefit ischemic stroke patients by dissolving clots. However, independent of thrombolysis, tPA may also have deleterious effects on neurons by promoting excitotoxicity. Zinc neurotoxicity has been shown to be an additional key mechanism in brain injuries. Hence, if tPA affects zinc neurotoxicity, this may provide additional insights into its effect on neuronal death. Independent of its proteolytic action, tPA markedly attenuated zinc-induced cell death in cortical culture, and, when injected into cerebrospinal fluid, also reduced kainate seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal death in adult rats.

  18. The tissue plasminogen activator-plasminogen proteolytic cascade accelerates amyloid-beta (Abeta) degradation and inhibits Abeta-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Melchor, Jerry P; Pawlak, Robert; Strickland, Sidney

    2003-10-01

    Accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide depends on both its generation and clearance. To better define clearance pathways, we have evaluated the role of the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-plasmin system in Abeta degradation in vivo. In two different mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, chronically elevated Abeta peptide in the brain correlates with the upregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and inhibition of the tPA-plasmin system. In addition, Abeta injected into the hippocampus of mice lacking either tPA or plasminogen persists, inducing PAI-1 expression and causing activation of microglial cells and neuronal damage. Conversely, Abeta injected into wild-type mice is rapidly cleared and does not cause neuronal degeneration. Thus, the tPA-plasmin proteolytic cascade aids in the clearance of Abeta, and reduced activity of this system may contribute to the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, George J.; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R.; Holland, Christy K.

    2007-06-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T <= 35 °C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss Δm(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy Eeff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole-1. Eeff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole-1. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  20. Dynamic changes in plasma tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and beta-thromboglobulin content in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ping; Wo, Da; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Wei, Wei; Mao, Hui-ming

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the corresponding variations of plasma tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activities, and beta-thromboglobulin (β-TG) content in patients during different stages of ischemic stroke. Ischemic stroke is a common disease among aging people and its occurrence is associated with abnormalities in the fibrinolytic system and platelet function. However, few reports focus on the dynamic changes in the plasma fibrinolytic system and β-TG content in patients with ischemic stroke. Patients were divided into three groups: acute, convalescent and chronic. Plasma t-PA and PAI-1 activities were determined by chromogenic substrate analysis and plasma β-TG content was detected by radioimmunoassay. Patients in the acute stage of ischemic stroke had significantly increased levels of t-PA activity and β-TG content, but PAI-1 activity was significantly decreased. Negative correlations were found between plasma t-PA and PAI-1 activities and between plasma t-PA activity and β-TG content in patients with acute ischemic stroke. There were significant differences in plasma t-PA and PAI-1 activities in the aged control group, as well as in the acute, convalescent and chronic groups. It can be speculated that the increased activity of t-PA in patients during the acute stage was the result of compensatory function, and that the increase in plasma β-TG level not only implies the presence of ischemic stroke but is likely a cause of ischemic stroke. During the later stages of ischemic stroke, greater attention is required in monitoring levels of PAI-1.

  1. Structural basis of the cofactor function of denatured albumin in plasminogen activation by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Galántai, Rita; Módos, Károly; Fidy, Judit; Kolev, Krasimir; Machovich, Raymund

    2006-03-17

    Certain denatured proteins function as cofactors in the activation of plasminogen by tissue-type plasminogen activator. The present study approached the structural requirements for the cofactor activity of a model protein (human serum albumin). Heat denaturation of 100-230 microM albumin (80 degrees C and 60-90 min) reproducibly yielded aggregates with radius in the range of 10-150 nm. The major determinant of the cofactor potency was the size of the aggregates. The increase of particle size correlated with the cofactor activity, and there was a minimal requirement for the size of the cofactor (about 10 nm radius). Similar to other proteins, the molecular aggregates with cofactor function contained a significant amount of antiparallel intermolecular beta-sheets. Plasmin pre-digestion increased the cofactor efficiency (related to C-terminal lysine exposure) and did not affect profoundly the structure of the aggregates, suggesting a long-lasting and even a self-augmenting cofactor function of the denatured protein. PMID:16438933

  2. Feasibility of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Formulated for Pulmonary Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, John S.; Nayar, Rajiv; Campos, Jackie; Hybertson, Brooks M.; Zhou, Yue; Manning, Mark Cornell; Repine, John E.; Stringer, Kathleen A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of a pulmonary formulation of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for nebulization into the airway by measuring protein stability, biologic activity, particle size, and estimating human lung distribution. Methods Formulations were derived by varying the surfactant and protein concentrations. Protein stability and recovery of each nebulized tPA formulation were assessed by ultraviolet spectroscopy. Formulations that met protein stability feasibility criteria were assessed for biologic and fibrinolytic activities. Biologic activity was determined by their ability to inhibit superoxide anion production by human neutrophils. Fibrinolytic activity was assessed by the cleavage of plasminogen to plasmin. Aerodynamic properties were assessed using a cascade impactor, and an estimation of human airway deposition was made via a human lung replica. Results Twenty-seven tPA formulations were initially assessed, 15 of which met protein stability criteria. Subsequently, three of these formulations maintained biologic and fibrinolytic activities. These formulations exhibited particle sizes of 2.4–3.1 μm, and had respirable doses ≥65%. A formulation of 1 mg mL−1 tPA and 0.1% Tween 80 exhibited a 45% deposition in the lower airways of a human lung replica. Conclusions A suitable pulmonary tPA formulation was identified that, following nebulization, maintained protein stability as well as biologic and fibrinolytic activities, and resulted in an optimal respirable dose and human airway deposition. This formulation may be applicable in the treatment of lung diseases, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome by permitting targeted pulmonary delivery of a therapeutic protein to the lungs. PMID:16180128

  3. Tissue plasminogen activator-based clot busting: Controlled delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Elkholi, Islam E.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Thrombosis, the formation of blood clot (thrombus) in the circulatory system obstructing the blood flow, is one of the main causes behind various ischemic arterial syndromes such as ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction, as well as vein syndromes such as deep vein thrombosis, and consequently, pulmonary emboli. Several thrombolytic agents have been developed for treating thrombosis, the most common being tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), administrated systemically or locally via IV infusion directly proximal to the thrombus, with the aim of restoring and improving the blood flow. TPA triggers the dissolution of thrombi by inducing the conversion of plasminogen to protease plasmin followed by fibrin digestion that eventually leads to clot lysis. Although tPA provides powerful thrombolytic activity, it has many shortcomings, including poor pharmacokinetic profiles, impairment of the reestablishment of normal coronary flow, and impairment of hemostasis, leading to life-threatening bleeding consequences. The bleeding consequence is ascribed to the ability of tPA to circulate throughout the body and therefore can lysis all blood clots in the circulation system, even the good ones that prevent the bleeding and promote injury repair. This review provides an overview of the different delivery approaches for tPA including: liposomes, ultrasound-triggered thrombolysis, anti-fibrin antibody-targeted tPA, camouflaged-tPA, tpA-loaded microcarriers, and nano-modulated delivery approaches. PMID:25780787

  4. Serum-derived plasminogen is activated by apoptotic cells and promotes their phagocytic clearance.

    PubMed

    Rosenwald, Matthias; Koppe, Uwe; Keppeler, Hildegard; Sauer, Guido; Hennel, Roman; Ernst, Anne; Blume, Karin Erika; Peter, Christoph; Herrmann, Martin; Belka, Claus; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Wesselborg, Sebastian; Lauber, Kirsten

    2012-12-15

    The elimination of apoptotic cells, called efferocytosis, is fundamentally important for tissue homeostasis and prevents the onset of inflammation and autoimmunity. Serum proteins are known to assist in this complex process. In the current study, we performed a multistep chromatographic fractionation of human serum and identified plasminogen, a protein involved in fibrinolysis, wound healing, and tissue remodeling, as a novel serum-derived factor promoting apoptotic cell removal. Even at levels significantly lower than its serum concentration, purified plasminogen strongly enhanced apoptotic prey cell internalization by macrophages. Plasminogen acted mainly on prey cells, whereas on macrophages no enhancement of the engulfment process was observed. We further demonstrate that the efferocytosis-promoting activity essentially required the proteolytic activation of plasminogen and was completely abrogated by the urokinase plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and serine protease inhibitor aprotinin. Thus, our study assigns a new function to plasminogen and plasmin in apoptotic cell clearance. PMID:23150713

  5. Plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor I release during experimental endotoxaemia in chimpanzees: effect of interventions in the cytokine and coagulation cascades.

    PubMed

    Biemond, B J; Levi, M; Ten Cate, H; Van der Poll, T; Büller, H R; Hack, C E; Ten Cate, J W

    1995-05-01

    1. Disseminated intravascular coagulation frequently accompanies Gram-negative sepsis and may contribute to widespread deposition of microthrombi. Besides the endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation, an important role for the fibrinolytic system has been postulated. The precise mechanisms underlying these fibrinolytic changes during endotoxaemia are not known but have been suggested to be mediated directly by cytokines or secondary to thrombin generation. 2. In the present study we have delineated in detail the fibrinolytic response to a bolus injection of endotoxin in non-human primates and analysed the contribution of cytokines and thrombin generation to the endotoxin-induced release of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Chimpanzees received a bolus injection of endotoxin alone or in combination with blocking monoclonal antibodies directed against tumour necrosis factor or interleukin 6 or in combination with pentoxifylline. Furthermore, to assess the effect of coagulation activation on the activation of fibrinolysis, another group of chimpanzees received endotoxin in combination with either anti-tissue factor antibodies or recombinant hirudin. 3. Infusion of endotoxin induced a rapid increase in plasminogen activator activity and tissue-type plasminogen activator antigen levels and subsequent plasmin generation, reaching peak levels 2h after endotoxin administration. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels remained constant for the first 2 h, after which time a steep increase was observed. Plasminogen activator activity and plasmin generation decreased simultaneously with the rise in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels. Fibrinolytic activity remained suppressed during the remainder of the study owing to sustained increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. The administration of pentoxifylline strongly attenuated the release of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1

  6. Small molecules inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Anne; Vanucci-Bacqué, Corinne; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Baltas, Michel

    2015-03-01

    PAI-1, a glycoprotein from the serpin family and the main inhibitor of tPA and uPA, plays an essential role in the regulation of intra and extravascular fibrinolysis by inhibiting the formation of plasmin from plasminogen. PAI-1 is also involved in pathological processes such as thromboembolic diseases, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and cancer. The inhibition of PAI-1 activity by small organic molecules has been observed in vitro and with some in vivo models. Based on these findings, PAI-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Over the past decades, many efforts have therefore been devoted to developing PAI-1 inhibitors. This article provides an overview of the publishing activity on small organic molecules used as PAI-1 inhibitors. The chemical synthesis of the most potent inhibitors as well as their biological and biochemical evaluations is also presented.

  7. The influence of fibrin(ogen) fragments on the kinetic parameters of the tissue-type plasminogen-activator-mediated activation of different forms of plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, W; Voskuilen, M; Vermond, A; Hoegee-de Nobel, B; Traas, D W

    1988-05-16

    In the present work we have determined Km,app and kcat,app values for tissue-type plasminogen-activator-catalyzed activation of Glu-plasminogen, Lys-plasminogen and mini-plasminogen in the absence and in the presence of fibrinogen-derived fragments. These were CNBr fragment 2, the A alpha chain remnant of CNBr fragment 2 (A alpha 148-207) and plasmin-generated fragment D-EGTA. The time course of plasmin formation from the various types of plasminogen (plg) was measured spectrophotometrically in a coupled assay system where D-valyl-L-leucyl-L-lysine p-nitroanilide served as a plasmin substrate. The kinetic constants are summarized as follows. (Values in parentheses are concentrations at which the minimum Km,app and maximum kcat,app value is reached.) (Table: see text). In conclusion our results show that CNBr fragment 2, A alpha 148-207 and to some extent D-EGTA mimic the accelerating effect of fibrin. The first two of these fragments did not accelerate activation of mini-plasminogen, lacking the kringle structures I-IV. This suggests that the stimulating effects of these two fragments were dependent on the presence of kringles I-IV of the plasminogen molecule. PMID:3131143

  8. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  9. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator exhibits a strict and fastidious requirement for polymeric fibrin as its cofactor, unlike human tissue-type plasminogen activator. A kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergum, P W; Gardell, S J

    1992-09-01

    The vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (BatPA) is virtually inactive toward Glu-plasminogen in the absence of a fibrin-like cofactor, unlike human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) (the kcat/Km values were 4 and 470 M-1 s-1, respectively). In the presence of fibrin II, tPA and BatPA activated Glu-plasminogen with comparable catalytic efficiencies (158,000 and 174,000 M-1 s-1, respectively). BatPA's cofactor requirement was partially satisfied by polymeric fibrin I (54,000 M-1 s-1), but monomeric fibrin I was virtually ineffective (970 M-1 s-1). By comparison, a variety of monomeric and polymeric fibrin-like species markedly enhanced tPA-mediated activation of Glu-plasminogen. Fragment X polymer was 2-fold better but 9-fold worse as cofactor for tPA and BatPA, respectively, relative to fibrin II. Fibrinogen, devoid of plasminogen, was a 10-fold better cofactor for tPA than fibrinogen rigorously depleted of plasminogen, Factor XIII, and fibronectin; the enhanced stimulatory effect of the less-purified fibrinogen was apparently due to the presence of Factor XIII. By contrast, the two fibrinogen preparations were equally poor cofactors of BatPA-mediated activation of Glu-plasminogen. BatPA possessed only 23 and 4% of the catalytic efficiencies of tPA and two-chain tPA, respectively, in hydrolyzing the chromogenic substrate Spectrozyme tPA. However in the presence of fibrin II, BatPA and tPA exhibited similar kcat/Km values for the hydrolysis of Spectrozyme tPA. Our data revealed that BatPA, unlike tPA, displayed a strict and fastidious requirement for polymeric fibrin I or II. Consequently, BatPA may preferentially promote plasmin generation during a narrow temporal window of fibrin formation and dissolution. PMID:1387641

  10. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration.

  11. Patterns of plasminogen activator production in cultured normal embryonic cells

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Cultured normal low-passage embryo fibroblasts, from a number of species, and two untransformed clones of a Balb/3T3 line elaborate increasing amounts of plasminogen activator (PA) as they approach confluence; the low-passage cells then lose this PA activity after reaching confluence, while the 3T3 cells retain it indefinitely. Even at their peaks, however, the PA activities of the low-passage cells remain well below those of the corresponding virally or spontaneously transformed cells. The PA increases in normal cells are probably a result of PA production rather than of adsorption of secreted PA to the cell surface, or of changes in cell-associated protease inhibitors. The elaboration of PA by normal cells is dependent upon their metabolic activity, such that the level of serum supplementation and the growth phase of the culture directly influence the level of cell-associated PA observed. In addition, there may be a component of serum which exerts a negative control on PA production and which is not an acid-labile protease inhibitor. PMID:21193

  12. Plasminogen activator activity in cultures from human tissues. An immunological and histochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Bernik, Maria B.; Kwaan, Hau C.

    1969-01-01

    Human tissues and cells from pre- and postnatal life were cultivated and studied for plasminogen activator activity. Cultures were obtained from kidney, renal blood vessels, ureter, bladder, lung, and heart. Local activator activity of cells was demonstrated by histochemical techniques. Activator released by cells into the supernatant culture media was assayed by fibrin plate techniques and was investigated for immunological identity using specific antisera to an activator of human origin, urokinase (UK). Plasminogen activator was produced in primary cultures where cells retain specific functions and generally reflect the enzyme pattern of the tissues of origin. Cells from fetal and adult sources were found to yield activator antigenically identical to UK, as well as activator activity which differed from that of UK in immunoassays and which may represent tissue type activator. Such activity was released after injury or death of cells while UK was produced in cultures containing live, metabolizing cells. Primary cultures of kidney confirmed that this organ is a rich source of UK and demonstrated, in addition, that UK is produced from the early stages of gestation and in increasing amounts thereafter. However, primary cultures also demonstrated that the ability to produce UK is not limited to the kidney but is a function of cells which are distributed widely in body tissues. Thus, activator antigenically identical to UK accumulated progressively after many refeedings in culture supernates of fetal lung and ureter, as well as in supernates of renal blood vessels of adults. These findings indicate continuous formation of UK by the cultured cells and, furthermore, provide evidence of UK production in blood vessels. In cultures from other tissues, particularly those from fetal heart and adult lung and bladder, investigation of activator was hindered by inhibitory activity which accumulated in the supernates. Such activity was derived from cells in culture and was

  13. Tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen mediate stress-induced decline of neuronal and cognitive functions in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Robert; Rao, B S Shankaranarayana; Melchor, Jerry P; Chattarji, Sumantra; McEwen, Bruce; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-12-13

    Repeated stress can impair function in the hippocampus, a brain structure essential for learning and memory. Although behavioral evidence suggests that severe stress triggers cognitive impairment, as seen in major depression or posttraumatic stress disorder, little is known about the molecular mediators of these functional deficits in the hippocampus. We report here both pre- and postsynaptic effects of chronic stress, manifested as a reduction in the number of NMDA receptors, dendritic spines, and expression of growth-associated protein-43 in the cornu ammonis 1 region. Strikingly, the stress-induced decrease in NMDA receptors coincides spatially with sites of plasminogen activation, thereby predicting a role for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in this form of stress-induced plasticity. Consistent with this possibility, tPA-/- and plasminogen-/- mice are protected from stress-induced decrease in NMDA receptors and reduction in dendritic spines. At the behavioral level, these synaptic and molecular signatures of stress-induced plasticity are accompanied by impaired acquisition, but not retrieval, of hippocampal-dependent spatial learning, a deficit that is not exhibited by the tPA-/- and plasminogen-/- mice. These findings establish the tPA/plasmin system as an important mediator of the debilitating effects of prolonged stress on hippocampal function at multiple levels of neural organization.

  14. Keeping the blood flowing-plasminogen activator genes and feeding behavior in vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Tellgren-Roth, Asa; Dittmar, Katharina; Massey, Steven E; Kemi, Cecilia; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Savolainen, Peter; Lyons, Leslie A; Liberles, David A

    2009-01-01

    The blood feeding vampire bats emerged from New World leaf-nosed bats that fed on fruit and insects. Plasminogen activator, a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation, is known to be expressed in the saliva of Desmodus rotundus (common vampire bat) and is thought to be a key enzyme for the emergence of blood feeding in vampire bats. To better understand the evolution of this biological function, we studied the plasminogen activator (PA) genes from all vampire bat species in light of their feeding transition to bird and subsequently mammalian blood. We include the rare species Diphylla ecaudata and Diaemus youngi, where plasminogen activator had not previously been studied and demonstrate that PA gene duplication observed in Desmodus is not essential to the vampire phenotype, but relates to the emergence of predominant mammalian blood feeding in this species. Plasminogen activator has evolved through gene duplication, domain loss, and sequence evolution leading to change in fibrin-specificity and susceptibility to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Before undertaking this study, only the four plasminogen activator isoforms from Desmodus were known. The evolution of vampire bat plasminogen activators can now be linked phylogenetically to the transition in feeding behavior among vampire bat species from bird to mammalian blood.

  15. Keeping the blood flowing—plasminogen activator genes and feeding behavior in vampire bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellgren-Roth, Åsa; Dittmar, Katharina; Massey, Steven E.; Kemi, Cecilia; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Savolainen, Peter; Lyons, Leslie A.; Liberles, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The blood feeding vampire bats emerged from New World leaf-nosed bats that fed on fruit and insects. Plasminogen activator, a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation, is known to be expressed in the saliva of Desmodus rotundus (common vampire bat) and is thought to be a key enzyme for the emergence of blood feeding in vampire bats. To better understand the evolution of this biological function, we studied the plasminogen activator (PA) genes from all vampire bat species in light of their feeding transition to bird and subsequently mammalian blood. We include the rare species Diphylla ecaudata and Diaemus youngi, where plasminogen activator had not previously been studied and demonstrate that PA gene duplication observed in Desmodus is not essential to the vampire phenotype, but relates to the emergence of predominant mammalian blood feeding in this species. Plasminogen activator has evolved through gene duplication, domain loss, and sequence evolution leading to change in fibrin-specificity and susceptibility to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Before undertaking this study, only the four plasminogen activator isoforms from Desmodus were known. The evolution of vampire bat plasminogen activators can now be linked phylogenetically to the transition in feeding behavior among vampire bat species from bird to mammalian blood.

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides abrogate mesangial fibronectin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jehyun; Seo, Ji Yeon; Ha, Hunjoo

    2010-12-01

    Excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation is the main feature of chronic renal disease including diabetic nephropathy. Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is known to play an important role in renal ECM accumulation in part through suppression of plasmin generation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation. The present study examined the effect of PAI-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) on fibronectin upregulation and plasmin/MMP suppression in primary mesangial cells cultured under high glucose (HG) or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, major mediators of diabetic renal ECM accumulation. Growth arrested and synchronized rat primary mesangial cells were transfected with 1 µM phosphorothioate-modified antisense or control mis-match ODN for 24 hours with cationic liposome and then stimulated with 30 mM D-glucose or 2 ng/ml TGF-β1. PAI-1 or fibronectin protein was measured by Western blot analysis. Plasmin activity was determined using a synthetic fluorometric plasmin substrate and MMP-2 activity analyzed using zymography. HG and TGF-β1 significantly increased PAI-1 and fibronectin protein expression as well as decreased plasmin and MMP-2 activity. Transient transfection of mesangial cells with PAI-1 antisense ODN, but not mis-match ODN, effectively reversed basal as well as HG- and TGF-β1-induced suppression of plasmin and MMP-2 activity. Both basal and upregulated fibronectin secretion were also inhibited by PAI-1 antisense ODN. These data confirm that PAI-1 plays an important role in ECM accumulation in diabetic mesangium through suppression of protease activity and suggest that PAI-1 antisense ODN would be an effective therapeutic strategy for prevention of renal fibrosis including diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Isolation of a proteinase with plasminogen-activating activity from Lachesis muta muta (bushmaster) snake venom.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, E F; Santos, C I; Magalhaes, A; Diniz, C R; Figueiredo, S; Gilroy, J; Richardson, M

    2000-06-01

    A plasminogen activator enzyme (LV-PA) from Lachesis muta muta venom was purified to homogeneity using gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions showed a single protein band with an Mr of 33,000 Da. It is an acidic glycoprotein which activates plasminogen to plasmin indirectly, functioning via prior formation of a molecular complex, known as plasminogen activator. The purified preparation catalyzes the hydrolysis of several p-nitroanilide peptide substrates containing Lys at the scissile bond. In contrast, no hydrolysis was detected on the synthetic substrates TAME and BAPNA, which contain arginine. By the use of the plasmin-specific chromogenic substrate Tos-Gly-Pro-Lys-pNA, the preparation had a plasmin-like activity of 0.68 U/mg, which was 35.8-fold higher than that of the crude venom from which it was prepared. In vitro, fibrin hydrolysis using LV-PA as plasminogen activator displayed more similarity with the effect produced by streptokinase (SK). SDS-PAGE (10%) analysis showed a 115-kDa complex formation after incubation of plasminogen with either LV-PA or SK. At a molar ratio of 50:1 (fibrinogen:enzyme), the preparation exhibited weakly fibrinogenolytic activity. However, LV-PA is distinguished from thrombin in that it does not clot fibrinogen. After incubation of LV-PA with platelet-rich plasma, the enzyme (2 microM) showed no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP, epinephrine, or collagen. Comparison of the N-terminal sequence of LV-PA with other snake venom plasminogen activators revealed that LV-PA exhibits a high degree of sequence identity with the TsVPA from Trimeresurus stejnegeri (90%) and with the Haly-PA from Agkistrodon halys (85%). LV-PA also has homology with other snake venom serine proteinases such as the thrombin-like/gyroxin analogue (38%) from bushmaster venom and with other coagulation serine proteases. The proteinase was readily inhibited by treatment with p-nitrophenyl p

  18. Increased migration of murine keratinocytes under hypoxia is mediated by induction of urokinase plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Richard J; Groves, Richard W

    2002-12-01

    One of the key consequences of cutaneous wounding is the development of tissue hypoxia. Recent data have suggested that this is a potent stimulus for increased keratinocyte migration and hence re-epithelialization, although the mechanisms responsible for this remain unclear. In this study we have investigated the relationship between hypoxia, plasminogen activation, and in vitro wound healing. Exposure of keratinocyte cultures to hypoxia resulted in upregulation of urokinase plasminogen activator mRNA and a subsequent increase in urokinase plasminogen activator-mediated plasminogen activation, as determined by indirect chromogenic peptide assay and plasminogen-linked zymography. Analysis of keratinocyte wound healing in vitro confirmed enhanced wound closure in hypoxic cultures compared with normoxic cultures after 16 h. Pretreatment of normoxic and hypoxic cultures with mitomycin C and cytochalasin B indicated that in this system wound closure was due to keratinocyte migration rather than proliferation. Addition of the broad-spectrum serine proteinase inhibitor, p-aminobenzamidine, or the specific urokinase plasminogen activator inhibitors, amiloride and WX-293, significantly reduced wound closure in hypoxic cultures and abrogated the hypoxic enhancement of wound closure. These data indicate a central role for urokinase plasminogen activators in hypoxic keratinocyte migration and suggest a potential mechanism for enhanced re-epithelialization of wounds under low oxygen tensions. PMID:12485432

  19. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P < 0.05). The expression of huPA protein in eggs increased from 7.82 IU/egg in the G0 generation to 17.02 IU/egg in the G1 generation. However, huPA-expressing embryos had reduced survival and hatchability at d 18 and 21 of incubation, respectively, and the blood clotting time was significantly higher in transgenic chickens than their nontransgenic counterparts (P < 0.05). Furthermore, adult transgenic rooster showed reduced (P < 0.05) fertility, as revealed by reduced volume of semen ejaculate, sperm concentration, and sperm viability. Taken together, our data suggest that huPA transgenic chickens could be successfully produced by the retroviral vector system. Transgenic chickens, expressing the huPA under the control of a ubiquitous promoter, may not only be used as a bioreactor for pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  20. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P < 0.05). The expression of huPA protein in eggs increased from 7.82 IU/egg in the G0 generation to 17.02 IU/egg in the G1 generation. However, huPA-expressing embryos had reduced survival and hatchability at d 18 and 21 of incubation, respectively, and the blood clotting time was significantly higher in transgenic chickens than their nontransgenic counterparts (P < 0.05). Furthermore, adult transgenic rooster showed reduced (P < 0.05) fertility, as revealed by reduced volume of semen ejaculate, sperm concentration, and sperm viability. Taken together, our data suggest that huPA transgenic chickens could be successfully produced by the retroviral vector system. Transgenic chickens, expressing the huPA under the control of a ubiquitous promoter, may not only be used as a bioreactor for pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders. PMID:23960123

  1. Regulation of epithelial sodium channels in urokinase plasminogen activator deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zaixing; Zhao, Runzhen; Zhao, Meimi; Liang, Xinrong; Bhattarai, Deepa; Dhiman, Rohan; Shetty, Sreerama; Idell, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) govern transepithelial salt and fluid homeostasis. ENaC contributes to polarization, apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transformation, etc. Fibrinolytic proteases play a crucial role in virtually all of these processes and are elaborated by the airway epithelium. We hypothesized that urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates ENaC function in airway epithelial cells and tested that possibility in primary murine tracheal epithelial cells (MTE). Both basal and cAMP-activated Na+ flow through ENaC were significantly reduced in monolayers of uPA-deficient cells. The reduction in ENaC activity was further confirmed in basolateral membrane-permeabilized cells. A decrease in the Na+-K+-ATPase activity in the basolateral membrane could contribute to the attenuation of ENaC function in intact monolayer cells. Dysfunctional fluid resolution was seen in uPA-disrupted cells. Administration of uPA and plasmin partially restores ENaC activity and fluid reabsorption by MTEs. ERK1/2, but not Akt, phosphorylation was observed in the cells and lungs of uPA-deficient mice. On the other hand, cleavage of γ ENaC is significantly depressed in the lungs of uPA knockout mice vs. those of wild-type controls. Expression of caspase 8, however, did not differ between wild-type and uPA−/− mice. In addition, uPA deficiency did not alter transepithelial resistance. Taken together, the mechanisms for the regulation of ENaC by uPA in MTEs include augmentation of Na+-K+-ATPase, proteolysis, and restriction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We demonstrate for the first time that ENaC may serve as a downstream signaling target by which uPA controls the biophysical profiles of airway fluid and epithelial function. PMID:25172911

  2. Tissue plasminogen activator prevents white matter damage following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Fernando; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Macrez, Richard; Hommet, Yannick; Obiang, Pauline; Hernangómez, Miriam; Montagne, Axel; Liot, Géraldine; Guaza, Carmen; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Vivien, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only available treatment for acute stroke. In addition to its vascular fibrinolytic action, tPA exerts various effects within the brain, ranging from synaptic plasticity to control of cell fate. To date, the influence of tPA in the ischemic brain has only been investigated on neuronal, microglial, and endothelial fate. We addressed the mechanism of action of tPA on oligodendrocyte (OL) survival and on the extent of white matter lesions in stroke. We also investigated the impact of aging on these processes. We observed that, in parallel to reduced levels of tPA in OLs, white matter gets more susceptible to ischemia in old mice. Interestingly, tPA protects murine and human OLs from apoptosis through an unexpected cytokine-like effect by the virtue of its epidermal growth factor–like domain. When injected into aged animals, tPA, although toxic to the gray matter, rescues white matter from ischemia independently of its proteolytic activity. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of action of tPA and unveil OL as a target cell for cytokine effects of tPA in brain diseases. They show overall that tPA protects white matter from stroke-induced lesions, an effect which may contribute to the global benefit of tPA-based stroke treatment. PMID:21576385

  3. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  4. Modulation of zinc toxicity by tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Mustafa M; Tsirka, Stella E

    2004-01-01

    The tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-plasmin proteolytic system mediates excitotoxin-induced neurodegeneration in vivo and in cell culture. tPA also confers neuroprotection from zinc toxicity in cell culture through a proteolysis-independent mechanism. This raises two questions: what is this non-enzymatic mechanism, and why tPA does not synergize with zinc to promote neuronal cell death? We show here that zinc binds to tPA and inhibits its activity in a dose-dependent fashion, thus terminating its protease-dependent neurotoxic capacity. We extend the previously reported culture findings to demonstrate that elevated zinc is neurotoxic in vivo, and even more so when tPA is absent. Thus, physiological levels of tPA confer protection from elevated free zinc. Mechanistically, tPA promotes movement of zinc into hippocampal neuron cells through voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA/KA channels. Therefore, zinc and tPA each appear to be able to limit the potential of the other to facilitate neurodegeneration, a reciprocal set of actions that may be critical in the hippocampus where tPA is secreted during the nonpathological conditions of learning and memory at sites known to be repositories of free and sequestered zinc.

  5. Increased Plasminogen Activator (Urokinase) in Tissue Culture After Fibrin Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Bernik, Maria B.

    1973-01-01

    Lysis of fibrin in tissue culture has been shown to be due to plasminogen activator identified immunologically as urokinase. The present study examines fibrinolytic events in culture, particularly mechanisms leading to increased urokinase levels and accelerated fibrinolysis. Deposition of fibrin on cells in culture was followed by a two- to six-fold increase in urokinase in the supernates and rapid disappearance of the fibrin. Investigation of factors that might be responsible for these events (including fibrin, fibrinogen, vasoactive stimuli, and the enzymes thrombin and plasmin) indicated that the enhanced urokinase yields were mediated through plasmin and thrombin. Study of the possible modes of action of thrombin and plasmin indicated that these enzymes are capable of acting on the cells themselves as well as on cell-produced material. The effect on cells was manifested by mitotic activity or, occasionally, cell injury and death. Although these effects influenced urokinase levels, enhanced yields were explained best by the action of enzymes on cellproduced material. Studies with plasmin and thrombin, and also trypsin, indicated that proteolytic enzymes may act in various ways—affect the stability of urokinase, interfere with inhibition of urokinase by naturally occurring inhibitor(s), and induce urokinase activity from inactive material. Plasma and thrombin appeared to act primarily through the latter mechanism. Inactive material, which gave rise to urokinase upon exposure to proteolytic enzymes and which may represent urokinase precursor, was found in cultures of kidney, lung, spleen, and thyroid. Urokinase in such inactive state appears to be readily accessible to activation by enzymes, particularly plasmin and thrombin, thus facilitating removal of fibrin and possibly also providing pathways to excessive fibrinolysis. PMID:4266421

  6. Kinetic studies on novel plasminogen activators. Demonstration of fibrin enhancement for hybrid enzymes comprising the A-chain of plasmin (Lys-78) and B-chain of tissue-type plasminogen activator (Ile-276) or urokinase (Ile-159).

    PubMed Central

    Fears, R; Dodd, I; Ferres, H; Robinson, J H

    1990-01-01

    The activation of plasminogen by two novel hybrid enzymes, constructed from the A-chain of plasmin and the B-chains of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) or urokinase, was compared with the activation by the parent enzymes. Basal kinetic constants for 'Lys-plasminogen' (human plasminogen with N-terminal lysine) and 'Glu-plasminogen' (human plasminogen with N-terminal glutamic acid) activation were similar to those of the parent activators. The Km for plasminogen turnover for both hybrid enzymes was considerably decreased in the presence of both soluble fibrin and a mimic, a CNBr digest of fibrinogen. These enhancements and the related apparent negative co-operativity are similar to the behaviour of t-PA itself. The results are discussed with regard to the molecular features involved in the mechanism of fibrin stimulation. PMID:2139324

  7. Intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and deoxyribonuclease therapy for pleural infection.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Francesco; Popowicz, Natalia; Wong, Donny; Lee, Yun Chor Gary

    2015-06-01

    Pleural infection remains a global health burden associated with significant morbidity. Drainage of the infected pleural fluid is important but can often be hindered by septations and loculations. Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy alone, to break pleural adhesions, has shown no convincing advantages over placebo in improving clinical outcome. Deoxyribonucleoprotein from degradation of leukocytes contributes significantly to high viscosity of infected pleural fluid. Recombinant deoxyribonuclease (DNase) is effective in reducing pleural fluid viscosity in pre-clinical studies. The combination of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and DNase was effective in animal model experiments of empyema. The benefits were established in a randomized clinical trial: those (n=48) treated with tPA/DNase had significantly improved radiological outcomes and reduced need of surgery and duration of hospital stay. A longitudinal observational series of 107 patients further confirmed the effectiveness and safety of tPA/DNase therapy, including its use as 'rescue therapy' when patients failed to respond to antibiotics and chest tube drainage. Overall, a short course of intrapleural tPA (10 mg) and DNase (5 mg) therapy provides a cure in over 90% of patients without requiring surgery. The treatment stimulates pleural fluid formation, enhances radiographic clearance and resolution of systemic inflammation. Serious complications are uncommon; pleural bleeding requiring transfusion occurred in ~2% of cases. Pain can occur, especially with the first dose. Treatment is contraindicated in those with significant bleeding diathesis or a bronchopleural fistula. Future research is required to optimize dosing regimens and in refining patient selection. PMID:26150913

  8. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in senescence and aging.

    PubMed

    Eren, Mesut; Boe, Amanda E; Klyachko, Ekaterina A; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2014-09-01

    The average age of the US population continues to increase. Age is the most important determinant of disease and disability in humans, but the fundamental mechanisms of aging remain largely unknown. Many age-related diseases are associated with an impaired fibrinolytic system. Elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels are reported in age-associated clinical conditions including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obesity and inflammation. PAI-1 levels are also elevated in animal models of aging. While the association of PAI-1 with physiological aging is well documented, it is only recently that its critical role in the regulation of aging and senescence has become evident. PAI-1 is synthesized and secreted in senescent cells and contributes directly to the development of senescence by acting downstream of p53 and upstream of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic deficiency of PAI-1 was shown to be protective against senescence and the aging-like phenotypes in kl/kl and N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-treated wild-type mice. Further investigation into PAI-1's role in senescence and aging will likely contribute to the prevention and treatment of aging-related pathologies.

  9. Plasminogen Activators and Ischemic Stroke: Conditions for Acute Delivery

    PubMed Central

    del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate acute treatment with plasminogen activators (PAs) can significantly increase the probability of minimal or no disability in selected ischemic stroke patients. There is a great deal of evidence showing that intravenous recombinant tissue PAs (rt-PA) infusion accomplishes this goal, recanalization with other PAs has also been demonstrated in the development of this treatment. Recanalization of symptomatic, documented carotid or vertebrobasilar arterial territory occlusions have also been achieved by local intra-arterial PA delivery, although only a single prospective double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study has been reported. The increase in intracerebral hemorrhage with these agents by either delivery approach underscores the need for careful patient selection, dose-appropriate safety and efficacy, proper clinical trial design, and an understanding of the evolution of cerebral tissue injury due to focal ischemia. Principles underlying the evolution of focal ischemia have been expanded by experience with acute PA intervention. Several questions remain open that concern the manner in which PAs can be applied acutely in ischemic stroke and how injury development can be limited. PMID:23539414

  10. A Novel Serine Protease Secreted by Medicinal Maggots Enhances Plasminogen Activator-Induced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Andersen, Anders S.; Nazir, Sheresma; van Tilburg, Nico H.; Oestergaard, Peter R.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Hensbergen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As haemostatic processes play an important role in wound healing, this study focused on the effects of maggot secretions on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The results showed that maggot secretions enhance plasminogen activator-induced formation of plasmin and fibrinolysis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By contrast, coagulation was not affected by secretions. Biochemical studies indicated that a novel serine protease within secretions, designated Sericase, cleaved plasminogen to several fragments. Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis by Sericase. We conclude from our in vitro studies that the novel serine protease Sericase, with the aid of a non-proteolytic cofactor, enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. PMID:24647546

  11. Impacts of aging and amyloid-β deposition on plasminogen activators and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bi Oh, Shin; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Inki; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2015-02-01

    Plasminogen activators (PAs), which convert plasminogen into the fibrinolytic protease plasmin, may initiate the degradation of amyloid-β (Aβ) to suppress the amyloid pathogenesis. In that way, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-mediated plasmin activation could maintain a low level of Aβ deposition to delay the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In a previous study, we reported that tPA/plasmin proteolytic activity is attenuated throughout the brain during aging or with Aβ accumulation but clustered intense around the amyloid plaques in AD brain. The present study demonstrates that the altered proteolytic activity primarily results from the competition between the expressions of tPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the brains of Tg2576 Aβ-transgenic mice, as revealed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot assays. Compared with that in the brains of younger Tg2576 mice, tPA protein is generally reduced throughout the brain in older Tg2576 mice but elevated near amyloid plaques. In contrary, PAI-1 expression increases during aging or Aβ deposition with its clusters surrounding amyloid plaques. No significant alteration in the expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is detected. These results suggest reciprocal feedback influences between tPA, PAI-1 and Aβ during aging and amyloid pathogenesis in AD brain; tPA-mediated plasmin activity is declined throughout the brain causing Aβ deposition during aging, and the Aβ deposits locally attract the cluster of tPA and/or PAI-1 around their deposits to competitively determine tPA/plasmin-mediated Aβ proteolysis.

  12. Differential regulation of plasminogen activator and inhibitor gene transcription by the tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, C; Pebler, S; Otte, J; von der Ahe, D

    1995-01-01

    The ability of p53 to activate or repress transcription suggests that its biological function as tumor suppressor is in part accomplished by regulating a number of genes including such required for inhibition of cell growth. We here give evidence that p53 also may regulate genes responsible for the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is considered a crucial feature for local invasion and metastasis of neoplastic cells. An important and highly regulated cascade of such proteolytic events involves the plasminogen activator system. We show that wild-type p53 represses transcription from the enhancer and promoter of the human urokinase-type (u-PA) and the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) gene through a non-DNA binding mechanism. Oncogenic mutants lost the repressing activity. In contrast, wild-type but not mutant p53 specifically binds to and activates the promoter of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) gene. Interestingly, one of the p53 mutants (273his) inhibited PAI-1 promoter activity. Our results suggest that altered function of oncogenic forms of p53 may lead to altered expression of the plasminogen activators and their inhibitor(s) and thus to altered activation of the plasminogen/plasmin system during tumor progression. Images PMID:7479001

  13. Angiostatin inhibits endothelial and melanoma cellular invasion by blocking matrix-enhanced plasminogen activation.

    PubMed Central

    Stack, M S; Gately, S; Bafetti, L M; Enghild, J J; Soff, G A

    1999-01-01

    Angiostatin, a kringle-containing fragment of plasminogen, is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. The mechanism(s) responsible for the anti-angiogenic properties of angiostatin are unknown. We now report that human angiostatin blocks plasmin(ogen)-enhanced in vitro invasion of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing endothelial and melanoma cells. Kinetic analyses demonstrated that angiostatin functions as a non-competitive inhibitor of extracellular-matrix (ECM)-enhanced, t-PA-catalysed plasminogen activation, with a Ki of 0.9+/-0.03 microM. This mechanism suggests that t-PA has a binding site for the inhibitor angiostatin, as well as for its substrate plasminogen that, when occupied, prevents ternary complex formation between t-PA, plasminogen and matrix protein. Direct binding experiments confirmed that angiostatin bound to t-PA with an apparent Kd [Kd(app)] of 6.7+/-0.7 nM, but did not bind with high affinity to ECM proteins. Together, these data suggest that angiostatin in the cellular micro-environment can inhibit matrix-enhanced plasminogen activation, resulting in reduced invasive activity, and suggest a biochemical mechanism whereby angiostatin-mediated regulation of plasmin formation could influence cellular migration and invasion. PMID:10229661

  14. Tissue plasminogen activator mediates amyloid-induced neurotoxicity via Erk1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Medina, Manel G; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Domínguez, Jorge E; Medina, Miguel; Zafra, Delia; Alameda, Francesc; Dotti, Carlos G; Navarro, Pilar

    2005-05-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the main activator of plasminogen into plasmin in the brain where it may have beneficial roles but also neurotoxic effects that could be plasmin dependent or not. Little is known about the substrates and pathways that mediate plasmin-independent tPA neurotoxicity. Here we show in primary hippocampal neurons that tPA promotes a catalytic-independent activation of the extracellular regulated kinase (Erk)1/2 signal transduction pathway through the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, G-proteins and protein kinase C. This results in GSK3 activation in a process that requires de novo synthesis of proteins, and leads to tau aberrant phosphorylation, microtubule destabilization and apoptosis. Similar effects are produced by amyloid aggregates in a tPA-dependent manner, as demonstrated by pharmacological treatments and in wt and tPA-/- mice neurons. Consistently, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients' brains, high levels of tPA colocalize with amyloid-rich areas, activated Erk1/2 and phosphorylated tau. This is the first demonstration of an intracellular pathway by which tPA triggers kinase activation, tau phosphorylation and neurotoxicity, suggesting a key role for this molecule in AD pathology.

  15. Mechanisms of TGF-beta1-induced intimal growth: plasminogen-independent activities of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and heterogeneous origin of intimal cells.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Goro; Stempien-Otero, April; Frutkin, Andrew D; Dichek, David A

    2007-05-11

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta(1) is a potent stimulator of intimal growth. We showed previously that TGF-beta(1) stimulates intimal growth through early upregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and, subsequently, PAI-1-dependent increases in cell migration and matrix accumulation. We also showed that PAI-1 negatively regulates TGF-beta(1) expression in the artery wall. Here we use plasminogen-deficient mice to test whether TGF-beta(1)-stimulated, PAI-1-dependent intimal growth and PAI-1 suppression of TGF-beta(1) expression are mediated through inhibition of plasminogen activation by PAI-1. We also use lineage tracing to investigate the origin of cells in TGF-beta(1)-induced intimas. Surprisingly, both TGF-beta(1)-induced, PAI-1-dependent intimal growth and PAI-1 suppression of TGF-beta(1) expression are independent of plasminogen. Moreover, approximately 50% of cells that migrate into the intima of TGF-beta(1)-overexpressing arteries carry a smooth muscle lineage marker, <1% carry a bone marrow lineage marker, and the remaining cells carry neither marker. Therefore, PAI-1 stimulates intimal growth and suppresses TGF-beta(1) expression through activities other than inhibition of plasminogen activation. In addition, contrary to widely held models, our results do not support a role for plasmin (or thrombospondin) in TGF-beta(1) activation in the artery wall. Further identification of the molecular targets through which PAI-1 stimulates intimal formation and suppresses TGF-beta(1) expression in the artery wall may reveal new approaches for inhibiting intimal formation. Our studies also discount bone marrow as an important source from which TGF-beta(1) recruits intimal cells and suggest instead that TGF-beta(1) induces substantial cell migration either from the adventitia or from an extravascular, but nonhematopoietic source.

  16. Unique secretory dynamics of tissue plasminogen activator and its modulation by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuko; Mogami, Hideo; Ihara, Hayato; Urano, Tetsumei

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed the secretory dynamics of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in EA.hy926 cells, an established vascular endothelial cell (VEC) line producing GFP-tagged tPA, using total internal reflection-fluorescence (TIR-F) microscopy. tPA-GFP was detected in small granules in EA.hy926 cells, the distribution of which was indistinguishable from intrinsically expressed tPA. Its secretory dynamics were unique, with prolonged (> 5 minutes) retention of the tPA-GFP on the cell surface, appearing as fluorescent spots in two-thirds of the exocytosis events. The rapid disappearance (mostly by 250 ms) of a domain-deletion mutant of tPA-GFP possessing only the signal peptide and catalytic domain indicates that the amino-terminal heavy chain of tPA-GFP is essential for binding to the membrane surface. The addition of PAI-1 dose-dependently facilitated the dissociation of membrane-retained tPA and increased the amounts of tPA-PAI-1 high-molecular-weight complexes in the medium. Accordingly, suppression of PAI-1 synthesis in EA.hy926 cells by siRNA prolonged the dissociation of tPA-GFP, whereas a catalytically inactive mutant of tPA-GFP not forming complexes with PAI-1 remained on the membrane even after PAI-1 treatment. Our results provide new insights into the relationship between exocytosed, membrane-retained tPA and PAI-1, which would modulate cell surface-associated fibrinolytic potential.

  17. Enzymatic vitreolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for vitreomacular traction

    PubMed Central

    Raczyńska, Dorota; Lipowski, Paweł; Zorena, Katarzyna; Skorek, Andrzej; Glasner, Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of our research was to gain data about the efficacy of intravitreal injections of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) in dissolving vitreoretinal tractions (VRTs). Materials and methods The study group consisted of patients of our Ophthalmology Clinic who had received an injection of rTPA (TPA Group) for an existent vitreomacular traction confirmed by optical coherence tomography and stereoscopic examinations. The control group consisted of patients who had declined treatment despite the existence of a vitreomacular traction confirmed by the same diagnostic methods. Each group consisted of 30 people (30 eyes). The observation period was 6 months. Conclusion In both groups some of the VRTs had dissolved. In the TPA group the traction dissolved in 10 patients (33.33%) and in the control group only in 5 (16.67%). It is also important to point out that the mean baseline membrane thickness was higher in the TPA group than in the control group. Observing patients in both groups we noticed that the dissolution of vitreoretinal membrane occurred most frequently in those cases where the membrane was thin. In the TPA group, the mean membrane thickness after 6 months decreased considerably. At the same time, no significant change in the membrane thickness could be observed in the control group. Observation of the retinal thickness allows us to draw the following conclusion: in the TPA group, the retinal thickness in the macular area (edema) had decreased over the study period, whereas in the control group it had increased. In those cases where the traction had dissolved, the edema of the retina decreased by the end of the 6-month period in both groups. In the TPA group, the dissolution of the membrane occurred most often within 3 months from the primary injection. Based on statistics, we can confirm that in the control group there was a decrease in visual acuity during the 6 months of the study period. At the same time, visual acuity in the TPA

  18. Amiloride lowers blood pressure and attenuates urine plasminogen activation in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oxlund, Christina S; Buhl, Kristian B; Jacobsen, Ib A; Hansen, Mie R; Gram, Jeppe; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Schousboe, Karoline; Tarnow, Lise; Jensen, Boye L

    2014-12-01

    In conditions with albuminuria, plasminogen is aberrantly filtered across the glomerular barrier and activated along the tubular system to plasmin. In the collecting duct, plasmin activates epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) proteolytically. Hyperactivity of ENaC could link microalbuminuria/proteinuria to resistant hypertension. Amiloride, an ENaC inhibitor, inhibits urokinase-type plasminogen activator. We hypothesized that amiloride (1) reduces blood pressure (BP); (2) attenuates plasminogen-to-plasmin activation; and (3) inhibits urine urokinase-type plasminogen activator in patients with resistant hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).In an open-label, non-randomized, 8-week intervention study, a cohort (n = 80) of patients with resistant hypertension and T2DM were included. Amiloride (5 mg/d) was added to previous triple antihypertensive treatment (including a diuretic and an inhibitor of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) and increased to 10 mg if BP control was not achieved at 4 weeks. Complete dataset for urine analysis was available in 60 patients. Systolic and diastolic BP measured by ambulatory BP monitoring and office monitoring were significantly reduced. Average daytime BP was reduced by 6.3/3.0 mm Hg. Seven of 80 cases (9%) discontinued amiloride due to hyperkalemia >5.5 mol/L, the most frequent adverse event. Urinary plasmin(ogen) and albumin excretions were significantly reduced after amiloride treatment (P < .0001). Urokinase activity was detectable in macroalbuminuric urine, with a tendency toward reduction in activity after amiloride treatment. Amiloride lowers BP, urine plasminogen excretion and activation, and albumin/creatinine ratio, and is a relevant add-on medication for the treatment of resistant hypertension in patients with T2DM and microalbuminuria.

  19. Endotoxin induction of an inhibitor of plasminogen activator in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-05

    The effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) on the fibrinolytic activity of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were examined. Endotoxin suppressed the net fibrinolytic activity of cell extracts and conditioned media in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of endotoxin required at least 6 h for expression. Cell extracts and conditioned media contained a 44-kDa urokinase-like plasminogen activator. Media also contained multiple plasminogen activators with molecular masses of 65-75 and 80-100 kDa. Plasminogen activators in extracts and media were unchanged by treatment of cells with endotoxin. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP)-abolished fibrinolytic activity of extracts and conditioned media. DFP-treated samples from endotoxin-treated but not untreated cells inhibited urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator, but not plasmin. Inhibitory activity was lost by incubation at pH 3 or heating to 56/sup 0/C for 10 min. These treatments did not affect inhibitory activity of fetal bovine serum. Incubation of /sup 125/I-urokinase with DFP-treated medium from endotoxin-treated cells produced an inactive complex with an apparent molecular mass of 80-85 kDa.

  20. Staphylokinase Control of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Detachment Through Host Plasminogen Activation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Peetermans, Marijke; Liesenborghs, Laurens; Na, Manli; Björnsdottir, Halla; Zhu, Xuefeng; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Johansson, Bengt R; Geoghegan, Joan A; Foster, Timothy J; Josefsson, Elisabet; Bylund, Johan; Verhamme, Peter; Jin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, a leading cause of persistent infections, are highly resistant to immune defenses and antimicrobial therapies. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of fibrin and staphylokinase (Sak) to biofilm formation. In both clinical S. aureus isolates and laboratory strains, high Sak-producing strains formed less biofilm than strains that lacked Sak, suggesting that Sak prevents biofilm formation. In addition, Sak induced detachment of mature biofilms. This effect depended on plasminogen activation by Sak. Host-derived fibrin, the main substrate cleaved by Sak-activated plasminogen, was a major component of biofilm matrix, and dissolution of this fibrin scaffold greatly increased susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and neutrophil phagocytosis. Sak also attenuated biofilm-associated catheter infections in mouse models. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel role for Sak-induced plasminogen activation that prevents S. aureus biofilm formation and induces detachment of existing biofilms through proteolytic cleavage of biofilm matrix components.

  1. Inhibitors of urokinase type plasminogen activator and cytostatic activity from crude plants extracts.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xueqiang; Diaz, Ricardo; Franco, Jose Javier Rosado; Sanchez, Veronica Forbes; Fasoli, Ezio; Barletta, Gabriel; Carvajal, Augusto; Bansal, Vibha

    2013-01-01

    In view of the clear evidence that urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the processes of tumor cell metastasis, aortic aneurysm, and multiple sclerosis, it has become a target of choice for pharmacological intervention. The goal of this study was thus to determine the presence of inhibitors of uPA in plants known traditionally for their anti-tumor properties. Crude methanol extracts were prepared from the leaves of plants (14) collected from the subtropical dry forest (Guanica, Puerto Rico), and tested for the presence of inhibitors of uPA using the fibrin plate assay. The extracts that tested positive (6) were then partitioned with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, in a sequential manner. The resulting fractions were then tested again using the fibrin plate assay. Extracts from leaves of Croton lucidus (C. lucidus) showed the presence of a strong uPA inhibitory activity. Serial dilutions of these C. lucidus partitions were performed to determine the uPA inhibition IC₅₀ values. The chloroform extract showed the lowest IC₅₀ value (3.52 µg/mL) and hence contained the most potent uPA inhibitor. Further investigations revealed that the crude methanol extract and its chloroform and n-butanol partitions did not significantly inhibit closely related proteases such as the tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin, indicating their selectivity for uPA, and hence superior potential for medicinal use with fewer side effects. In a further evaluation of their therapeutic potential for prevention of cancer metastasis, the C. lucidus extracts displayed cytostatic activity against human pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa-2) cells, as determined through an MTS assay. The cytostatic activities recorded for each of the partitions correlated with their relative uPA inhibitory activities. There are no existing reports of uPA inhibitors being present in any of the plants reported in this study.

  2. Inhibitors of Urokinase Type Plasminogen Activator and Cytostatic Activity from Crude Plants Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Xueqiang; Diaz, Ricardo; Franco, Jose Javier Rosado; Sanchez, Veronica Forbes; Fasoli, Ezio; Barletta, Gabriel; Carvajal, Augusto; Bansal, Vibha

    2014-01-01

    In view of the clear evidence that urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the processes of tumor cell metastasis, aortic aneurysm, and multiple sclerosis, it has become a target of choice for pharmacological intervention. The goal of this study was thus to determine the presence of inhibitors of uPA in plants known traditionally for their anti-tumor properties. Crude methanol extracts were prepared from the leaves of plants (14) collected from the subtropical dry forest (Guanica, Puerto Rico), and tested for the presence of inhibitors of uPA using the fibrin plate assay. The extracts that tested positive (6) were then partitioned with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, in a sequential manner. The resulting fractions were then tested again using the fibrin plate assay. Extracts from leaves of Croton lucidus (C. lucidus) showed the presence of a strong uPA inhibitory activity. Serial dilutions of these C. lucidus partitions were performed to determine the uPA inhibition IC50 values. The chloroform extract showed the lowest IC50 value (3.52 μg/mL) and hence contained the most potent uPA inhibitor. Further investigations revealed that the crude methanol extract and its chloroform and n-butanol partitions did not significantly inhibit closely related proteases such as the tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin, indicating their selectivity for uPA, and hence superior potential for medicinal use with fewer side effects. In a further evaluation of their therapeutic potential for prevention of cancer metastasis, the C. lucidus extracts displayed cytostatic activity against human pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa-2) cells, as determined through an MTS assay. The cytostatic activities recorded for each of the partitions correlated with their relative uPA inhibitory activities. There are no existing reports of uPA inhibitors being present in any of the plants reported in this study. PMID:23896619

  3. Fluid Flow Stimulates Tissue Plasminogen Activator Secretion by Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, S. L.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1989-03-01

    Wall shear stress generated by blood flow may regulate the expression of fibrinolytic proteins by endothelial cells. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor, type 1 (PAI-1) secretion by cultured human endothelial cells were not affected by exposure to venous shear stress (4 dynes/cm2). However, at arterial shear stresses of 15 and 25 dynes/cm2, the tPA secretion rate was 2.1 and 3.0 times greater, respectively, than the basal tPA secretion rate. PAI-1 secretion was unaffected by shear stress over the entire physiological range.

  4. Localization and regulation of the tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Salles, Fernando J; Strickland, Sidney

    2002-03-15

    The extracellular protease cascade of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen has been implicated in neuronal plasticity and degeneration. We show here that unstimulated expression of tPA in the mouse hippocampus is concentrated in the mossy fiber pathway, with little or no expression within the perforant path, the Schaffer collaterals, or neuronal cell bodies. tPA protein is also expressed in vascular endothelial cells throughout the brain parenchyma. Four hours after excitotoxic injury, tPA protein is transiently induced within CA1 pyramidal neurons. The induced CA1 tPA is localized to neurons that survive the injury and is enzymatically active. Within the mossy fiber pathway, injury resulted in decreased tPA protein. In contrast, mossy fiber tPA activity displayed a biphasic character: transient increase at 8 hr, then a decrease by 24 hr after injury. Analysis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression showed that PAI-1 antigen is upregulated by 24 hr and could account for the tPA activity downregulation seen at this time point. Plasminogen immunohistochemistry suggested an increase within the mossy fiber pathway after injury. Finally, hippocampal tPA expression among various mammalian species was strikingly different. These results indicate a complex control of tPA protein and enzymatic activity in the hippocampus that may help regulate neuronal plasticity.

  5. Plasminogen activators in experimental colorectal neoplasia: a role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Lewin, M R; Driver, H E; Savage, F; Mahmoud, M; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1987-01-01

    An important step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive carcinoma is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. By the generation of plasmin, plasminogen activators may play an important role in regulating the extracellular protease activity required for this event to occur. The production of biofunctional urokinase and of tissue plasminogen activator was therefore investigated in the dimethylhydrazine induced rat model of colorectal neoplasia. Both adenomatous polyps (p values less than 0.001) and colorectal carcinomas (p values less than 0.001) were demonstrated to produce a significant excess of both urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator when compared with macroscopically normal colon. There was, however, no increased production of either enzyme by macroscopically normal preneoplastic colon when compared with control colon. This enhanced capacity of colorectal tumours to produce plasminogen activators and generate plasmin is thus a feature of both the premalignant as well as the malignant phenotype. These enzymes may contribute to the malignant potential of adenomatous polyps and to the invasive capacity of established carcinomas. PMID:3115868

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta requires its target plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 for cytostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kortlever, Roderik M; Nijwening, Jeroen H; Bernards, René

    2008-09-01

    The cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) has strong antiproliferative activity in most normal cells but contributes to tumor progression in the later stages of oncogenesis. It is not fully understood which TGFbeta target genes are causally involved in mediating its cytostatic activity. We report here that suppression of the TGFbeta target gene encoding plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by RNA interference leads to escape from the cytostatic activity of TGFbeta both in human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and primary mouse embryo fibroblasts. Consistent with this, PAI-1 knock-out mouse embryo fibroblasts are also resistant to TGFbeta growth arrest. Conversely, we show that ectopic expression of PAI-1 in proliferating HaCaT cells induces a growth arrest. PAI-1 knockdown does not interfere with canonical TGFbeta signaling as judged by SMAD phosphorylation and induction of bona fide TGFbeta target genes. Instead, knockdown of PAI-1 results in sustained activation of protein kinase B. Significantly, we find that constitutive protein kinase B activity leads to evasion of the growth-inhibitory action of TGFbeta. Our data are consistent with a model in which induction of PAI-1 by TGFbeta is critical for the induction of proliferation arrest.

  7. Breast cancer prognosis is poor when total plasminogen activator activity is low.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, J.; Ogawa, M.; Inada, K.; Yamashita, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Saishoji, T.; Nomura, K.

    1993-01-01

    Plasminogen activator (PA) is a serine protease which exists in two forms: tissue-type (t-PA) and urokinase-type (u-PA). The total PA activity was measured in tumour extracts of 235 breast cancer patients who were followed for a median of 8.5 years after surgery. Patients were initially divided into three groups with low (< 60 units mg-1 protein), intermediate (60-300 unit mg-1 protein), or high (> 300 unit mg-1 protein) total PA activity in tumour extracts. The PA activity was not significantly associated with the recognised prognostic factors of age, menstrual status, tumour size, lymph node involvement, histologic type, grade of anaplasia, and/or vessel involvement. A significant association was found between total PA activity and the oestrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PgR) status. Among receptor-positive tumours, a significantly greater proportion of patients had high PA activity in their tumour extracts. Breast cancer patients with low total PA activity had a significantly shorter disease-free and overall survival rate when compared to those with intermediate or high PA activity. In univariate and multivariate analyses, total PA activity (< 60 unit mg-1 vs > or = 60 unit mg-1 protein) was found to be a significant prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival of about the same import as lymph node involvement. Furthermore, the combination of total PA activity and nodal status could be even more precise in predicting survival times and probabilities in individual patients. This retrospective study demonstrates the total PA activity is a valuable prognostic factor in determining prognosis in human breast cancer. PMID:8431369

  8. Metabolic factors, adipose tissue, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production by adipose tissue is increased in obesity, and its circulating levels are high in type 2 diabetes. PAI-1 increases cardiovascular risk by favoring clot stability, interfering with vascular remodeling, or both. We investigated in obese diabetic per...

  9. Production of Plasminogen Activator in Cultures of Superior Cervical Ganglia and Isolated Schwann Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Valinsky, Jay E.

    1985-05-01

    Plasminogen activator has been implicated in tissue remodeling and cell migration during embryogenesis. In the developing nervous system, these processes are evident in the migration of neurons, axonal extension, Schwann cell migration, and the ensheathment and myelination of nerves. We have studied the production of plasminogen activator in cultures of superior cervical ganglia under conditions in which both neurons and glia are present. We have found that a principal source of the enzyme in these cultures is the glial cells and that the enzyme could not be detected at the growing tips of neurites. Plasminogen activator is also produced by Schwann cells isolated from neonatal rat sciatic nerve. The production of the enzyme by these cells is stimulated 6- to 10-fold by cholera toxin. Isolated Schwann cells and glial cells in the ganglion explant cultures produce the tissue form of plasminogen activator, a form of the enzyme not often found in nonmalignant cells. Preliminary experiments suggest that neuronal-glial interactions may regulate enzyme production by Schwann cells.

  10. Rat oocyte tissue plasminogen activator is a catalytically efficient enzyme in the absence of fibrin. Endogenous potentiation of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bicsak, T A; Hsueh, A J

    1989-01-01

    Rat oocytes synthesize tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in response to stimuli which initiate meiotic maturation. Purified tPA exhibits optimal activity only in the presence of fibrin or fibrin substitutes. Because oocytes are not exposed to fibrin in situ, we investigated the possible stimulation of rat oocyte tPA activity by other endogenous factor(s). Oocytes were obtained from immature female rats which were induced to ovulate with gonadotropins. tPA activity was measured by the plasminogen-dependent cleavage of a chromogenic substrate. Measurements of kinetic parameters with Glu- or Lys-plasminogen revealed a Km for the rat oocyte enzyme of 1.3-2.1 microM compared with 23-24 microM for purified human tPA. Inclusion of the soluble fibrin substitute polylysine lowered the Km of human tPA by 30-fold (0.8 microM) but had no effect on the oocyte tPA Km. Polylysine had no significant effect on the Vmax values. The rate of plasminogen activation catalyzed by oocyte tPA was increased only 4.3-fold by fibrin while fibrin stimulated purified human tPA activity by 15.2-fold. After fractionation of oocyte extract by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, polylysine enhanced oocyte tPA activity as seen by casein zymography. tPA activity in the conditioned medium of a rat insulinoma cell line was also not stimulated with polylysine prior to fractionation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These data suggest that extravascular cells which elaborate tPA may produce stimulatory factor(s) which allow for full tPA activity at physiological concentrations of plasminogen in the absence of fibrin. PMID:2491854

  11. Excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration and seizure are mediated by tissue plasminogen activator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirka, Stella E.; Gualandris, Anna; Amaral, David G.; Strickland, Sidney

    1995-09-01

    NEURONAL degeneration in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for acquisition of memory in humans, occurs in various pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia and epilepsy. When neuronal activity is stimulated in the adult rat and mouse hippocampus, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin, is transcriptionally induced1,2. The activity of tPA in neural tissue is correlated with neurite outgrowth3, regeneration4 and migration5, suggesting that it might be involved in neuronal plasticity. Here we show that tPA is produced primarily by microglia in the hippocampus. Using excitotoxins to induce neuronal cell loss, we demonstrate that tPA-deficient mice are resistant to neuronal degeneration. These mice are also less susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures than wild-type mice. These findings identify a role for tPA in neuronal degeneration and seizure.

  12. Excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration and seizure are mediated by tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Tsirka, S E; Gualandris, A; Amaral, D G; Strickland, S

    1995-09-28

    Neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for acquisition of memory in humans, occurs in various pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia and epilepsy. When neuronal activity is stimulated in the adult rat and mouse hippocampus, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin, is transcriptionally induced. The activity of tPA in neural tissue is correlated with neurite outgrowth, regeneration and migration, suggesting that it might be involved in neuronal plasticity. Here we show that tPA is produced primarily by microglia in the hippocampus. Using excitotoxins to induce neuronal cell loss, we demonstrate that tPA-deficient mice are resistant to neuronal degeneration. These mice are also less susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures than wild-type mice. These findings identify a role for tPA in neuronal degeneration and seizure.

  13. Enhanced release of plasminogen activator inhibitor(s) but not of plasminogen activators by cultured rat glial cells treated with interleukin-1.

    PubMed

    Rogister, B; Leprince, P; Delree, P; Van Damme, J; Billiau, A; Moonen, G

    1990-01-01

    Astroglial cells are known to proliferate during development of the nervous system, as well as during post-traumatic gliosis. We have previously shown that the proliferation of cultured astrocytes can be stimulated by the urokinase-type (uPA) of plasminogen activator (PA) and that astrocytes are able to release such uPA upon stimulation with basic fibroblast growth factor, which is known to act as a mitogen for these cells. Here we report studies on the effects of human interleukin-1 (IL-1) on the release of PA activity by cultured newborn rat astroglial cells. Whereas there is controversy in the literature as to whether IL-1 stimulates multiplication of astroglial cells, we failed to observe such an effect in our system. We did observe, however, a dose-dependent decrease in PA activity in the supernatant of the IL-1 treated cultures. Further analysis revealed that this apparent decrease in PA release was in fact due to an increased release of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). A similar IL-1 induced increase in PAI release was also found to occur in cultures of transformed astrocytes (human glioma LN18) and in cultured Schwann cells, but not in cultures of neurons or neuronal tumour cells. Since protease inhibitors are known to possess neuritogenic properties, our results suggest that IL-1, by its capacity to induce PAI, may promote neuritogenesis.

  14. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 interacts with alpha3 subunit of proteasome and modulates its activity.

    PubMed

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2011-02-25

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting.

  15. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Interacts with α3 Subunit of Proteasome and Modulates Its Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting. PMID:21135093

  16. Proteolytic regulation of epithelial sodium channels by urokinase plasminogen activator: cutting edge and cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Long; Zhao, Runzhen; Komissarov, Andrey A; Chang, Yongchang; Liu, Yongfeng; Matthay, Michael A

    2015-02-27

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) level is extremely elevated in the edematous fluid of acutely injured lungs and pleurae. Elevated PAI-1 specifically inactivates pulmonary urokinase-type (uPA) and tissue-type plasminogen activators (tPA). We hypothesized that plasminogen activation and fibrinolysis may alter epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity, a key player in clearing edematous fluid. Two-chain urokinase (tcuPA) has been found to strongly stimulate heterologous human αβγ ENaC activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This activity of tcuPA was completely ablated by PAI-1. Furthermore, a mutation (S195A) of the active site of the enzyme also prevented ENaC activation. By comparison, three truncation mutants of the amino-terminal fragment of tcuPA still activated ENaC. uPA enzymatic activity was positively correlated with ENaC current amplitude prior to reaching the maximal level. In sharp contrast to uPA, neither single-chain tPA nor derivatives, including two-chain tPA and tenecteplase, affected ENaC activity. Furthermore, γ but not α subunit of ENaC was proteolytically cleaved at ((177)GR↓KR(180)) by tcuPA. In summary, the underlying mechanisms of urokinase-mediated activation of ENaC include release of self-inhibition, proteolysis of γ ENaC, incremental increase in opening rate, and activation of closed (electrically "silent") channels. This study for the first time demonstrates multifaceted mechanisms for uPA-mediated up-regulation of ENaC, which form the cellular and molecular rationale for the beneficial effects of urokinase in mitigating mortal pulmonary edema and pleural effusions.

  17. [Construction of Pichia pastoris strain expressing salivary plasminogen activator from vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Su, Chang; Song, Xiaoshuang; Tang, Yalan; Bao, Zhenhong

    2009-04-01

    Vampire bat saliva contains a plasminogen activator that presumably assists these hematophagous animals during feeding. Bat-PA (H), the full-length form of Vampire Bat Salivary Plasminogen Activator (DSPAalpha1), is homologous and similar efficacy to tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA). The strict fibrin dependence of activity is a characteristic which could be desirable in the fibrinolytic therapy. It is a unique fibrinolytic enzyme that does not promote neurodegeneration. In this study, according to the reported gene sequence (GenBank Accession No. J05082) of Vampire bat (D. rotundus) plasminogen activator. It was the first time to synthesize the full sequence of DSPAalpha1 in vitro and clone it into the expression vector pPIC9K, the recombinant plasmid was linearized and transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 strain. Secreted expression of recombinant DSPAalpha1 was attained by methanol induction and its molecular mass is 47 kD. To get recombinant GS115 with high amount of protein, hundreds of His+ transformants had been screened to isolate clones resistant to high levels G418 (2-4 mg/mL), the selected clones mini-expressed in Pichia pastoris, and tested their fibrinolytic activities and expressed protein bands by fibrin plate assay and SDS-PAGE. DSPAalpha1 was determined by optical density after SDS-PAGE, the yield is about 30 mg per liter of fermentation culture. DSPAalpha1 derived often from mammalian cells: Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, Baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, COS cells, which might be produced at high cost. In Pichia pastoris, it is expected to higher yield and lower cost, thus it might be able to serve as new thrombolytic candidate.

  18. Microglia and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor/uPA system in innate brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Orla; Campion, Suzanne; Perry, V Hugh; Murray, Carol; Sidenius, Nicolai; Docagne, Fabian; Cunningham, Colm

    2009-12-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-linked cell surface protein that facilitates focused plasmin proteolytic activity at the cell surface. uPAR has been detected in macrophages infiltrating the central nervous system (CNS) and soluble uPAR has been detected in the cerebrospinal fluid during a number of CNS pathologies. However, its expression by resident microglial cells in vivo remains uncertain. In this work, we aimed to elucidate the murine CNS expression of uPAR and uPA as well as that of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) during insults generating distinct and well-characterized inflammatory responses; acute intracerebral lipopolysaccharide (LPS), acute kainate-induced neurodegeneration, and chronic neurodegeneration induced by prion disease inoculation. All three insults induced marked expression of uPAR at both mRNA and protein level compared to controls (naïve, saline, or control inoculum-injected). uPAR expression was microglial in all cases. Conversely, uPA transcription and activity was only markedly increased during chronic neurodegeneration. Dissociation of uPA and uPAR levels in acute challenges is suggestive of additional proteolysis-independent roles for uPAR. PAI-1 was most highly expressed upon LPS challenge, whereas tissue plasminogen activator mRNA was constitutively present and less responsive to all insults studied. These data are novel and suggest much wider involvement of the uPAR/uPA system in CNS function and pathology than previously supposed. PMID:19459212

  19. Microglia and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor/uPA system in innate brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Orla; Campion, Suzanne; Perry, V Hugh; Murray, Carol; Sidenius, Nicolai; Docagne, Fabian; Cunningham, Colm

    2009-12-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-linked cell surface protein that facilitates focused plasmin proteolytic activity at the cell surface. uPAR has been detected in macrophages infiltrating the central nervous system (CNS) and soluble uPAR has been detected in the cerebrospinal fluid during a number of CNS pathologies. However, its expression by resident microglial cells in vivo remains uncertain. In this work, we aimed to elucidate the murine CNS expression of uPAR and uPA as well as that of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) during insults generating distinct and well-characterized inflammatory responses; acute intracerebral lipopolysaccharide (LPS), acute kainate-induced neurodegeneration, and chronic neurodegeneration induced by prion disease inoculation. All three insults induced marked expression of uPAR at both mRNA and protein level compared to controls (naïve, saline, or control inoculum-injected). uPAR expression was microglial in all cases. Conversely, uPA transcription and activity was only markedly increased during chronic neurodegeneration. Dissociation of uPA and uPAR levels in acute challenges is suggestive of additional proteolysis-independent roles for uPAR. PAI-1 was most highly expressed upon LPS challenge, whereas tissue plasminogen activator mRNA was constitutively present and less responsive to all insults studied. These data are novel and suggest much wider involvement of the uPAR/uPA system in CNS function and pathology than previously supposed.

  20. Release of basic fibroblast growth factor-heparan sulfate complexes from endothelial cells by plasminogen activator-mediated proteolytic activity

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Cultured bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cells synthesize heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which are both secreted into the culture medium and deposited in the cell layer. The nonsoluble HSPGs can be isolated as two predominant species: a larger 800-kD HSPG, which is recovered from preparations of extracellular matrix, and a 250-kD HSPG, which is solubilized by nonionic detergent extraction of the cells. Both HSPG species bind bFGF. 125I-bFGF bound to BCE cell cultures is readily released by either heparinase or plasmin. When released by plasmin, the growth factor is recovered from the incubation medium as a complex with the partly degraded high molecular mass HSPG. Endogenous bFGF activity is released by a proteolytic treatment of cultured BCE cells. The bFGF-binding HSPGs are also released when cultures are incubated with the inactive proenzyme plasminogen. Under such experimental conditions, the release of the extracellular proteoglycans can be enhanced by treating the cells either with bFGF, which increases the plasminogen activating activity expressed by the cells, or decreased by treating the cells with transforming growth factor beta, which decreases the plasminogen activating activity of the cells. Specific immune antibodies raised against bovine urokinase also block the release of HSPG from BCE cell cultures. We propose that this plasminogen activator-mediated proteolysis provides a mechanism for the release of biologically active bFGF-HSPG complexes from the extracellular matrix and that bFGF release can be regulated by the balance between factors affecting the pericellular proteolytic activity. PMID:2137829

  1. Plasminogen mRNA induction in the mouse brain after kainate excitation: codistribution with plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) mRNA.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Ronit; Abramovitz, Rene; Miskin, Ruth

    2002-08-15

    Plasminogen (Plg), which can be converted to the active protease plasmin by plasminogen activators, has been previously implicated in brain plasticity and in toxicity inflicted in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by kainate. Here we have localized Plg. mRNA through in situ hybridization in brain cryosections derived from normal adult mice or after kainate injection (i.p.). The results indicated that Plg mRNA was undetectable in the normal brain, but after kainate injection it was induced in neuronal cells in multiple, but specific areas, including layers II-III of the neocortex; the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and the piriform cortex; the caudate/putamen and accumbens nucleus shell; throughout the amygdaloid complex; and in the CAI/CA3 subfields of the hippocampus. Interestingly, this distribution pattern coincided with what we have recently described for the plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) mRNA, however differing from that of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mRNA, as also shown here. These results suggest that enhanced Plg gene expression could be involved in events associated with olfactory, striatal, and limbic structures. Furthermore, because PAI-2 is thought to intracellularly counteract cytotoxic events, our results raise the possibility that PAI-2 can act in the brain as an intracellular neuroprotector against potential plasmin-mediated toxicity.

  2. Structural Basis of Interaction Between Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator and its Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Barinka,C.; Parry, G.; Callahan, J.; Shaw, D.; Kuo, A.; Cines, B.; Mazar, A.; Lubkowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to its high-affinity receptor (uPAR) orchestrates uPAR interactions with other cellular components that play a pivotal role in diverse (patho-)physiological processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis, inflammation, and cancer metastasis. However, notwithstanding the wealth of biochemical data available describing the activities of uPAR, little is known about the exact mode of uPAR/uPA interactions or the presumed conformational changes that accompany uPA/uPAR engagement. Here, we report the crystal structure of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), which contains the three domains of the wild-type receptor but lacks the cell-surface anchoring sequence, in complex with the amino-terminal fragment of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (ATF), at the resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. We report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of free ATF. Our results provide a structural basis, represented by conformational changes induced in uPAR, for several published biochemical observations describing the nature of uPAR/uPA interactions and provide insight into mechanisms that may be responsible for the cellular responses induced by uPA binding.

  3. Binding of Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator to the Glucose-regulated Protein 78 (GRP78) Modulates Plasminogen Activation and Promotes Human Neuroblastoma Cell Proliferation in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Gomez, Cristian Farias; de Ridder, Gustaaf G.; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    2014-01-01

    The glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is a plasminogen (Pg) receptor on the cell surface. In this study, we demonstrate that GRP78 also binds the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which results in a decrease in Km and an increase in the Vmax for both its amidolytic activity and activation of its substrate, Pg. This results in accelerated Pg activation when GRP78, t-PA, and Pg are bound together. The increase in t-PA activity is the result of a mechanism involving a t-PA lysine-dependent binding site in the GRP78 amino acid sequence 98LIGRTWNDPSVQQDIKFL115. We found that GRP78 is expressed on the surface of neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells where it is co-localized with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which is also a t-PA-binding protein in these cells. We demonstrate that both Pg and t-PA serve as a bridge between GRP78 and VDAC bringing them together to facilitate Pg activation. t-PA induces SK-N-SH cell proliferation via binding to GRP78 on the cell surface. Furthermore, Pg binding to the COOH-terminal region of GRP78 stimulates cell proliferation via its microplasminogen domain. This study confirms previous findings from our laboratory showing that GRP78 acts as a growth factor-like receptor and that its association with t-PA, Pg, and VDAC on the cell surface may be part of a system controlling cell growth. PMID:25059665

  4. Characterization of tissue plasminogen activator binding proteins isolated from endothelial cells and other cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, D.P.; Wood, L.L.; Moos, M. )

    1990-07-15

    Human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) was shown to bind specifically to human osteosarcoma cells (HOS), and human epidermoid carcinoma cells (A-431 cells). Crosslinking studies with DTSSP demonstrated high molecular weight complexes (130,000) between {sup 125}I-t-PA and cell membrane protein on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), HOS, and A-431 cells. A 48-65,000 molecular weight complex was demonstrated after crosslinking t-PA peptide (res. 7-20) to cells. Ligand blotting of cell lysates which had been passed over a t-PA affinity column revealed binding of t-PA to 54,000 and 95,000 molecular weight proteins. Several t-PA binding proteins were identified in immunopurified cell lysates, including tubulin beta chain, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and single chain urokinase.

  5. Endogenous plasminogen activators mediate progressive intracerebral hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Nuha; Abu Fanne, Rami; Abramovitch, Rinat; Yarovoi, Serge; Higazi, Muhamed; Abdeen, Suhair; Basheer, Maamon; Maraga, Emad; Cines, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major cause of death and disability after traumatic brain injury (TBI) for which no medical treatment is available. Delayed bleeding is often ascribed to consumptive coagulopathy initiated by exposed brain tissue factor. We examined an alternative hypothesis, namely, that marked release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) followed by delayed synthesis and release of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from injured brain leads to posttraumatic bleeding by causing premature clot lysis. Using a murine model of severe TBI, we found that ICH is reduced in tPA−/− and uPA−/− mice but increased in PAI-1−/− mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. tPA−/−, but not uPA−/−, mice developed a systemic coagulopathy post-TBI. Tranexamic acid inhibited ICH expansion in uPA−/−mice but not in tPA−/− mice. Catalytically inactive tPA-S481A inhibited plasminogen activation by tPA and uPA, attenuated ICH, lowered plasma d-dimers, lessened thrombocytopenia, and improved neurologic outcome in WT, tPA−/−, and uPA−/− mice. ICH expansion was also inhibited by tPA-S481A in WT mice anticoagulated with warfarin. These data demonstrate that protracted endogenous fibrinolysis induced by TBI is primarily responsible for persistent ICH and post-TBI coagulopathy in this model and offer a novel approach to interrupt bleeding. PMID:25673638

  6. PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR-1 (PAI-1): A KEY FACTOR LINKING FIBRINOLYSIS AND AGE-RELATED SUBCLINICAL AND CLINICAL CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Matteo; Pahor, Marco; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2010-01-01

    The close relationship existing between aging and thrombosis has growingly been studied in this last decade. The age-related development of a pro-thrombotic imbalance in the fibrinolysis homeostasis has been hypothesized at the basis of this increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk. Fibrinolysis is the resulting of the interactions among multiple plasminogen activators and inhibitors constituing the enzymatic cascade, and ultimately leading to the degradation of fibrin. The plasminogen activator system plays a key role in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a member of the superfamily of serine-protease inhibitors (or serpins), and the principal inhibitor of both the tissue-type and the urinary-type plasminogen activator, the two plasminogen activators able to activate plasminogen. In this review, current evidence describing the central role played by PAI-1 in a number of age-related subclinical (i.e., inflammation, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance) and clinical (i.e., obesity, comorbidities, Werner syndrome) conditions is presented. Despite some controversial and unclear issues, PAI-1 represents an extremely promising marker which may become a biological parameter to be growingly considered in the prognostic evaluation, in the disease monitoring, and as treatment target of age-related conditions in the next future. PMID:20626406

  7. Crystal structure of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in an active conformation with normal thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Thompson, Lawrence C; Bucci, Joel C; Nissen, Poul; Gettins, Peter G W; Peterson, Cynthia B; Andreasen, Peter A; Morth, J Preben

    2011-08-26

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a crucial regulator in fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. PAI-1 has been associated with several pathological conditions and is a validated prognostic marker in human cancers. However, structural information about the native inhibitory form of PAI-1 has been elusive because of its inherent conformational instability and rapid conversion to a latent, inactive structure. Here we report the crystal structure of PAI-1 W175F at 2.3 Å resolution as the first model of the metastable native molecule. Structural comparison with a quadruple mutant (14-1B) previously used as representative of the active state uncovered key differences. The most striking differences occur near the region that houses three of the four mutations in the 14-1B PAI-1 structure. Prominent changes are localized within a loop connecting β-strand 3A with the F helix, in which a previously observed 3(10)-helix is absent in the new structure. Notably these structural changes are found near the binding site for the cofactor vitronectin. Because vitronectin is the only known physiological regulator of PAI-1 that slows down the latency conversion, the structure of this region is important. Furthermore, the previously identified chloride-binding site close to the F-helix is absent from the present structure and likely to be artifactual, because of its dependence on the 14-1B mutations. Instead we found a different chlorine-binding site that is likely to be present in wild type PAI-1 and that more satisfactorily accounts for the chlorine stabilizing effect on PAI-1.

  8. Crystal Structure of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in an Active Conformation with Normal Thermodynamic Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jan K.; Thompson, Lawrence C.; Bucci, Joel C.; Nissen, Poul; Gettins, Peter G. W.; Peterson, Cynthia B.; Andreasen, Peter A.; Morth, J. Preben

    2011-01-01

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a crucial regulator in fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. PAI-1 has been associated with several pathological conditions and is a validated prognostic marker in human cancers. However, structural information about the native inhibitory form of PAI-1 has been elusive because of its inherent conformational instability and rapid conversion to a latent, inactive structure. Here we report the crystal structure of PAI-1 W175F at 2.3 Å resolution as the first model of the metastable native molecule. Structural comparison with a quadruple mutant (14-1B) previously used as representative of the active state uncovered key differences. The most striking differences occur near the region that houses three of the four mutations in the 14-1B PAI-1 structure. Prominent changes are localized within a loop connecting β-strand 3A with the F helix, in which a previously observed 310-helix is absent in the new structure. Notably these structural changes are found near the binding site for the cofactor vitronectin. Because vitronectin is the only known physiological regulator of PAI-1 that slows down the latency conversion, the structure of this region is important. Furthermore, the previously identified chloride-binding site close to the F-helix is absent from the present structure and likely to be artifactual, because of its dependence on the 14-1B mutations. Instead we found a different chlorine-binding site that is likely to be present in wild type PAI-1 and that more satisfactorily accounts for the chlorine stabilizing effect on PAI-1. PMID:21697084

  9. Membrane depolarization induces calcium-dependent secretion of tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Gualandris, A; Jones, T E; Strickland, S; Tsirka, S E

    1996-04-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to active plasmin, is produced in the rat and mouse hippocampus and participates in neuronal plasticity. To help define the role of tPA in the nervous system, we have analyzed the regulation of its expression in the neuronal cell line PC12. In control cultures, tPA activity is exclusively cell-associated, and no activity is measurable in the culture medium. When the cells are treated with depolarizing agents, such as KCI, tPA activity becomes detectable in the medium. The increased secreted tPA activity is not accompanied by an increase in tPA mRNA levels, and it is not blocked by protein synthesis inhibitors. In contrast, tPA release is abolished by Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that chemically induced membrane depolarization stimulates the secretion of preformed enzyme. Moreover, KCI has a similar effect in vivo when administered to the murine brain via an osmotic pump: tPA activity increases along the CA2-CA3 regions and dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. These results demonstrate a neuronal activity-dependent secretory mechanism that can rapidly increase the amount of tPA in neuronal tissue.

  10. Variable Resistance to Plasminogen Activator Initiated Fibrinolysis for Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, William B.; Alves, Nathan J.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Kline, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background We examine the clinical significance and biomarkers of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-catalyzed clot lysis time (CLT) in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods Platelet-poor, citrated plasma was obtained from patients with PE. Healthy age- and sex-matched patients served as disease-negative controls. Fibrinogen, α2-antiplasmin, plasminogen, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), plasminogen activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), thrombin time and D-dimer were quantified. Clotting was induced using CaCl2, tissue factor, and phospholipid. Lysis was induced using 60 ng/mL tPA. Time to 50% clot lysis (CLT) was assessed by both thromboelastography (TEG) and turbidimetry (A405). Results Compared with disease-negative controls, patients with PE exhibited significantly longer mean CLT on TEG (+2,580 seconds, 95% CI 1,380 to 3,720 sec). Patients with PE and a short CLT who were treated with tenecteplase had increased risk of bleeding, whereas those with long CLT had significantly worse exercise tolerance and psychometric testing for quality of life at 3 months. A multivariate stepwise removal regression model selected PAI-1 and TAFI as predictive biomarkers of CLT. Conclusion The CLT from TEG predicted increased risk of bleeding and clinical failure with tenecteplase treatment for intermediate-risk PE. Plasmatic PAI-1 and TAFI were independent predictors of CLT. PMID:26866684

  11. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator promotes rapid and sustained reperfusion without concomitant systemic plasminogen activation in a canine model of arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mellott, M J; Stabilito, I I; Holahan, M A; Cuca, G C; Wang, S; Li, P; Barrett, J S; Lynch, J J; Gardell, S J

    1992-02-01

    The efficacy of recombinant vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (bat-PA) as a thrombolytic agent was compared with that of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in a canine model of arterial thrombosis. An occlusive thrombus was formed in the femoral artery by insertion of a thrombogenic copper coil; femoral arterial blood flow was monitored with a Doppler flow meter. Bat-PA and t-PA, when administered by 5-minute intravenous infusion (14 nmol/kg), reperfused seven out of eight and four out of eight dogs, respectively. The median reperfusion times in the bat-PA and t-PA groups were 24 and greater than or equal to 131 minutes, respectively. The mean reperfusion times (+/- SEM) in the recanalized bat-PA- and t-PA-treated dogs were similar (20 +/- 5 and 11 +/- 2 minutes, respectively, p = NS). Maximal blood flow after reperfusion was greater with bat-PA than with t-PA (80 +/- 10% and 41 +/- 15% of control flow, respectively, p less than 0.05). Furthermore, the median reocclusion time was markedly delayed in the bat-PA group relative to the t-PA group (131 versus 34 minutes, respectively, p less than 0.05). Plasma fibrinogen and plasminogen were not significantly depleted by the administration of t-PA or bat-PA. However, plasma alpha 2-antiplasmin activity was moderately depressed in the t-PA group relative to the bat-PA group (p less than 0.05). The clearance profile for t-PA was monoexponential, with a half-life (t1/2) of 2.4 +/- 0.3 minutes and a mean residence time of 3.5 +/- 0.4 minutes. The clearance profile for bat-PA was biexponential, with a t1/2 alpha of 0.9 +/- 0.2 minutes, a t1/2 beta of 20.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, and a mean residence time of 21.3 +/- 4.3 minutes. The steady-state volume of distribution displayed by bat-PA was 16-fold greater than that of t-PA. Zymography of serial plasma samples from the bat-PA-treated dogs failed to demonstrate the apparent generation of a complex between bat-PA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1; the

  12. FDP D-dimer induces the secretion of interleukin-1, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 in a human promonocytic leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, M; Morishita, Y; Takahashi, I; Ogura, M; Takamatsu, J; Saito, H

    1991-01-01

    We studied the effect of fibrinogen degradation products D, E, and D-dimer on a human promonocytic leukemia cell line, NOMO-1. After exposure to a 10(-5)-mol/L fragment D or D-dimer, the cells displayed macrophage-like characteristics, such as adherence to plastic surfaces, and showed approximately a twofold increase in response to the nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test. The secretion of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) into the medium was markedly stimulated by a 10(-5)-mol/L fragment D, E, and D-dimer, whereas a significant increase in IL-1 beta secretion was observed only in D-dimer-stimulated cells. In addition, D-dimer induced a rapid increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator on day 1 (0.52 +/- 0.02 ng/mL v 0.07 +/- 0.01 ng/mL in the control culture) and a slow increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 on day 5 (3.9 +/- 1.6 ng/mL v 1.2 +/- 0.2 ng/mL in the control culture). An increase in tissue factor (TF) was also demonstrated on the cell surface of NOMO-1 cells exposed to fragment D or D-dimer by indirect immunofluorescence using an anti-TF monoclonal antibody. Scatchard plot analysis showed that fragment D and D-dimer bound to the NOMO-1 cells with a kd of 3.3 nmol/L and 2.7 nmol/L, respectively. These results suggest that fragment D-dimer specifically stimulates cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage to secrete key substances that regulate blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. PMID:1845845

  13. Mechanism of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 regulation by Oncostatin M and Interleukin-1 in human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kasza, Aneta; Kiss, Daniel L.; Gopalan, Sunita; Xu, Weili; Rydel, Russell E.; Koj, Aleksander; Kordula, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Glial cells that produce and respond to various cytokines mediate inflammatory processes in the brain. Here, we show that oncostatin M (OSM) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) regulate the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in human astrocytes. Using the PAI-1 reporter constructs we show that the −58 to −51 proximal element mediates activation by both cytokines. This element is already bound by c-fos/c-jun heterodimers in unstimulated astrocytes, and treatment with cytokine strongly stimulates both expression of c-fos and binding of c-fos/c-jun heterodimers. In addition, IL-1 activates an inhibitory mechanism that downregulates PAI-1 expression after longer exposure to this cytokine. Overexpression of dominant-negative signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1), STAT3, STAT5 and inhibitor of nuclear factor kB (IkB) suppressed OSM/IL-1-induced expression of the PAI-1 reporter construct. We conclude that OSM and IL-1 regulate the PAI-1 gene expression via up-regulating c-fos levels and subsequent binding of c-fos/c-jun heterodimers to the proximal element of the PAI-1 gene. PMID:12390531

  14. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is a neuroprotectant in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Ramiro; Wu, Jialing; Haile, Woldeab B; Guzman, Johanna; Yepes, Manuel

    2010-06-01

    The best-known function of the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is as a thrombolytic enzyme. However, it is also found in structures of the brain that are highly vulnerable to hypoxia-induced cell death, where its association with neuronal survival is poorly understood. Here, we have demonstrated that hippocampal areas of the mouse brain lacking tPA activity are more vulnerable to neuronal death following an ischemic insult. We found that sublethal hypoxia, which elicits tolerance to subsequent lethal hypoxic/ischemic injury in a natural process known as ischemic preconditioning (IPC), induced a rapid release of neuronal tPA. Treatment of hippocampal neurons with tPA induced tolerance against a lethal hypoxic insult applied either immediately following insult (early IPC) or 24 hours later (delayed IPC). tPA-induced early IPC was independent of the proteolytic activity of tPA and required the engagement of a member of the LDL receptor family. In contrast, tPA-induced delayed IPC required the proteolytic activity of tPA and was mediated by plasmin, the NMDA receptor, and PKB phosphorylation. We also found that IPC in vivo increased tPA activity in the cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) layer and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus, as well as ischemic tolerance in wild-type but not tPA- or plasminogen-deficient mice. These data show that tPA can act as an endogenous neuroprotectant in the murine hippocampus.

  15. Protumorigenic Activity of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Through an Antiapoptotic Function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a protease inhibitor but is paradoxically associated with poor outcomes in cancer patients. However, the mechanisms of its effects on tumor cells have not been explored. Methods Endogenous PAI-1 in human tumor cell lines (HT-1080, A549, HCT-116, and MDA-MB-231) was suppressed by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and PAI-039, a small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, and the effects on apoptosis were examined. Tumorigenicity of PAI-1 knockdown (KD) tumor cells was examined in immunodeficient PAI-1 wild-type and knockout (KO) mice (9–15 per group), and event-free survival was analyzed by the Kaplan–Meier method. The effect of PAI-1 suppression on HT-1080 xenotransplanted tumors was evaluated for cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 in the four tumor cell lines increased spontaneous apoptosis (mean fold increase relative to control: HT-1080, siRNA#1, mean = 4.0, 95% CI = 2.6 to 5.3, P < .001; siRNA#2, mean = 2.6, 95% CI = 2.4 to 2.9, P < .001, Student t test), which was blocked in the presence of recombinant PAI-1, a caspase-8 inhibitor, or Fas/FasL neutralizing antibodies and was partially attenuated by a plasmin inhibitor-aprotinin. PAI-1 KO mice implanted with PAI-1 KD HT-1080 cells had decreased tumorigenesis and prolonged survival compared with control mice (P = .002, log-rank test), and their tumors exhibited decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, five of 15 PAI-1 KO mice implanted with PAI-1 KD HT-1080 cells never developed tumors. Conclusions These data suggest that PAI-1 exerts a protective effect against tumor cell apoptosis by a mechanism that, in part, involves plasmin activation and inhibition of Fas/Fas-L-mediated apoptosis and may be a promising therapeutic target. PMID:22984202

  16. Role of tissue plasminogen activator/plasmin cascade in delayed neuronal death after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nagai, Nobuo; Urano, Tetsumei

    We studied the possible involvement of the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)/plasmin system on both delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus and the associated enhancement of locomotor activity in rats, after transient forebrain ischemia induced by a four-vessel occlusion (FVO). Seven days after FVO, locomotor activity was abnormally increased and, after 10 days, pyramidal cells were degraded in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. FVO increased the t-PA antigen level and its activity in the hippocampus, which peaked at 4 h. Both the enhanced locomotor activity and the degradation of pyramidal cells were significantly suppressed by intracerebroventricular injection of aprotinin, a plasmin inhibitor, at 4 h but not during FVO. These results suggest the importance of the t-PA/plasmin cascade during the early pathological stages of delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus following transient forebrain ischemia.

  17. Role of P225 and the C136-C201 disulfide bond in tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Vindigni, A.; Di Cera, E.

    1998-01-01

    The protease domain of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a key fibrinolytic enzyme, was expressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 1 mg per liter of media. The recombinant protein was titrated with the Erythrina caraffa trypsin inhibitor (ETI) and characterized in its interaction with plasminogen and the natural inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Analysis of the catalytic properties of tPA using a library of chromogenic substrates carrying substitutions at P1, P2, and P3 reveals a strong preference for Arg over Lys at P1, unmatched by other serine proteases like thrombin or trypsin. In contrast to these proteases and plasmin, tPA shows little or no preference for Pro over Gly at P2. A specific inhibition of tPA by Cu2+ was discovered. The divalent cation presumably binds to H188 near D189 in the primary specificity pocket and inhibits substrate binding in a competitive manner with a Kd = 19 microM. In an attempt to engineer Na+ binding and enhanced catalytic activity in tPA, P225 was replaced with Tyr, the residue present in Na+-dependent allosteric serine proteases. The P225Y mutation did not result in cation binding, but caused a significant loss of specificity (up to 100-fold) toward chromogenic substrates and plasminogen and considerably reduced the inhibition by PAI-1 and ETI. Interestingly, the P225Y substitution enhanced the ability of Cu2+ to inhibit the enzyme. Elimination of the C136-C201 disulfide bond, that is absent in all Na+-dependent allosteric serine proteases, significantly enhanced the yield (5 mg per liter of media) of expression in E. coli, but caused no changes in the properties of the enzyme whether residue 225 was Pro or Tyr. These findings point out an unanticipated crucial role for residue 225 in controlling the catalytic activity of tPA, and suggest that engineering of a Na+-dependent allosteric enhancement of catalytic activity in this enzyme, must involve substantial changes in the region homologous to the Na

  18. Hyperthermia stimulates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wojta, J.; Holzer, M.; Hufnagl, P.; Christ, G.; Hoover, R. L.; Binder, B. R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of exposure to hyperthermia on the fibrinolytic potential of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in culture was studied. HUVEC responded to exposure to 42 degrees C with a time-dependent increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) activity and antigen accompanied by a four- to fivefold increase in PAI-1 specific m-RNA and a decrease in tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen. The effect of 8 hours exposure to hyperthermia on PAI-1 activity and antigen could not be reversed by reexposure of the cells to 37 degrees C for 24 hours as evidenced by continuously increased amounts of PAI-1 released into the conditioned media. t-PA release, however, decreased during the 24-hour period at 37 degrees C after exposure to hyperthermia. No difference in PAI-1 antigen present in the extracellular matrix of heat treated HUVEC as compared to HUVEC kept at 37 degrees C could be found. Our data supports the idea that hyperthermia is one stress factor that influences the fibrinolytic potential of endothelial cells. Images Figure 6 PMID:1928306

  19. The role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in gastric mucosal protection

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Susan; Steele, Islay; Lyons, Suzanne; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Dimaline, Rod; Pritchard, D. Mark; Varro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Gastric mucosal health is maintained in response to potentially damaging luminal factors. Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) disrupt protective mechanisms leading to bleeding and ulceration. The plasminogen activator system has been implicated in fibrinolysis following gastric ulceration, and an inhibitor of this system, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, is expressed in gastric epithelial cells. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients with normal gastric histology taking aspirin or NSAIDs, we found elevated gastric PAI-1 mRNA abundance compared with controls; the increase in patients on aspirin was independent of whether they were also taking proton pump inhibitors. In the same patients, aspirin tended to lower urokinase plasminogen activator mRNA. Immunohistochemistry indicated PAI-1 localization to epithelial cells. In a model system using MKN45 or AGS-GR cells transfected with a PAI-1 promoter-luciferase reporter construct, we found no evidence for upregulation of PAI-1 expression by indomethacin, and, in fact, cyclooxygenase products such as PGE2 and PGI2 weakly stimulated expression. Increased gastric PAI-1 mRNA was also found in mice following gavage with ethanol or indomethacin, but plasma PAI-1 was unaffected. In PAI-1−/− mice, gastric hemorrhagic lesions in response to ethanol or indomethacin were increased compared with C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, in PAI-1-H/Kβ mice in which PAI-1 is overexpressed in parietal cells, there were decreased lesions in response to ethanol and indomethacin. Thus, PAI-1 expression is increased in gastric epithelial cells in response to mucosal irritants such as aspirin and NSAIDs probably via an indirect mechanism, and PAI-1 acts as a local autoregulator to minimize mucosal damage. PMID:23494120

  20. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Cancer: Rationale and Insight for Future Therapeutic Testing.

    PubMed

    Placencio, Veronica R; DeClerck, Yves A

    2015-08-01

    Despite its function as an inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator (PA), PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has a paradoxical protumorigenic role in cancer, promoting angiogenesis and tumor cell survival. In this review, we summarize preclinical evidence in support of the protumorigenic function of PAI-1 that has led to the testing of small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitors, initially developed as antithrombotic agents, in animal models of cancer. The review discusses the challenges and the opportunities that lay ahead to the development of efficacious and nontoxic PAI-1 inhibitors as anticancer agents.

  1. Targets for dioxin: Genes for plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 and interleukin-1. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, T.R.; Guzman, K.; Dold, K.M. ); Greenlee, W.F. )

    1991-10-18

    Dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, TCDD), a widespread environmental contaminant, may elicit its effects by altering gene expression in susceptible cells. Five TCDD-responsive complementary DNA clones were isolated from a human keratinocyte cell line. One of these clones encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor-2, a factor that influences growth and differentiation by regulating proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. Another encodes the cytokine interleukin-1{beta}. Thus, TCDD alters the expression of growth regulator genes and has effects similar to those of other tumor-promoting agents that affect both inflammation and differentiation.

  2. The c-myc-regulated gene mrl encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, G C; Diamond, L E; Dahl, D; Cole, M D

    1990-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the c-myc-regulated gene mrl (G. C. Prendergast and M. D. Cole, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:124-134, 1989) reveals that it encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a regulator of extracellular proteolysis. Comparison of the human and mouse PAI-1 promoters and cDNA 3' noncoding regions revealed several highly conserved sequence domains, potential targets for c-myc and other factors influencing PAI-1 expression. We discuss possible roles for PAI-1 in normal and neoplastic cell growth control. PMID:2406566

  3. Stability of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator at −30 °C Over One Year

    PubMed Central

    Alkatheri, Abdulmalik

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is used to restore patency and avoid inadvertent removal of peripheral and central venous catheters. rt-PA was reconstituted (1 mg/mL) then cryopreserved at −30 °C for 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, and 12 months and, then its stability was determined. After cryopreservation for one and two months, rt-PA kept more than 95% of its activity compared to standard samples, while cryopreservation for three months caused 8% loss of activity. However, after cryopreservation for six months or more, rt-PA retained only 87.5% or less activity compared to standard samples. Therefore, it is recommended that reconstituted rt-PA be cryopreserved at −30 °C for a maximum period of three months. PMID:24275785

  4. Specific interaction of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) with annexin II on the membrane of pancreatic cancer cells activates plasminogen and promotes invasion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, V M; Hurtado, M; Thomson, T M; Reventós, J; Paciucci, R

    2004-01-01

    Background: Overexpression of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) in pancreatic cancer cells promotes invasion and proliferation in vitro and tumour growth and angiogenesis in vivo. Aims: To understand the mechanisms by which t-PA favours cancer progression, we analysed the surface membrane proteins responsible for binding specifically t-PA and studied the contribution of this interaction to the t-PA promoted invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. Methods: The ability of t-PA to activate plasmin and a fluorogenic plasmin substrate was used to analyse the nature of the binding of active t-PA to cell surfaces. Specific binding was determined in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (SK-PC-1 and PANC-1), and complex formation analysed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and co-immunolocalisation in tumours. The functional role of the interaction was studied in Matrigel invasion assays. Results: t-PA bound to PANC-1 and SK-PC-1 cells in a specific and saturable manner while maintaining its activity. This binding was competitively inhibited by specific peptides interfering with the interaction of t-PA with annexin II. The t-PA/annexin II interaction on pancreatic cancer cells was also supported by co-immunoprecipitation assays using anti-t-PA antibodies and, reciprocally, with antiannexin II antibodies. In addition, confocal microscopy showed t-PA and annexin II colocalisation in tumour tissues. Finally, disruption of the t-PA/annexin II interaction by a specific hexapeptide significantly decreased the invasive capacity of SK-PC-1 cells in vitro. Conclusion: t-PA specifically binds to annexin II on the extracellular membrane of pancreatic cancer cells where it activates local plasmin production and tumour cell invasion. These findings may be clinically relevant for future therapeutic strategies based on specific drugs that counteract the activity of t-PA or its receptor annexin II, or their interaction at the surface level. PMID:15194650

  5. Release of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 from human astrocytes is regulated by intracellular ceramide.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Soeda, S; Oda, M; Ochiai, T; Kihara, T; Ono, N; Shimeno, H

    2000-12-15

    The present study underscores a regulatory role of intracellular ceramide in astrocytes for the release of an extracellular serine protease, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), and its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Treatment of cultured human astrocytes with N-acetylsphingosine, a cell-permeable short-chain ceramide analogue or daunorubicin that could increase intracellular ceramide via activation of ceramide synthase or sphingomyelin hydrolysis increased the release of t-PA and conversely decreased the PAI-1 release. Interestingly, treatment of the astrocytes with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha also increased the intracellular ceramide levels but caused the elevation of PAI-1 release without altering the t-PA release. These data suggest that the generation of ceramide in astrocytes is linked at least with the regulation of PAI-1 release. We also demonstrate that the suppression of PAI-1 release with daunorubicin accelerates the cell death of neuronally differentiated PC12 cells and suggest an antiapoptotic role of PAI-1 in the nervous system.

  6. Successful silencing of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Hecke, Anneke; Brooks, Hilary; Meryet-Figuière, Matthieu; Minne, Stephanie; Konstantinides, Stavros; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Lebleu, Bernard; Schäfer, Katrin

    2006-05-01

    Clinical as well as experimental evidence suggests that vascular overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, the primary physiological inhibitor of both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator, may be involved in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the feasibility, efficacy and functional effects of PAI-1 gene silencing in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA. Double-stranded 21 bp-RNA molecules targeted at sequences within the human PAI-1 gene were constructed. Successful siRNA transfection of HUVEC was confirmed using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. One of five candidate siRNA sequences reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Suppression of PAI-1 mRNA was detected up to 72 hours after transfection. Moreover, siRNA treatment reduced the activity of PAI-1 released from HUVEC, and prevented the oxLDL- or LPS-induced upregulation of PAI-1 secretion. Importantly, siRNA treatment did not affect the expression of other endothelial-cell markers. Moreover, downregulation of PAI-1 significantly enhanced the ability of endothelial cells to adhere to vitronectin, and this effect could be reversed upon addition of recombinant PAI-1. SiRNA-mediated reduction of PAI-1 expression may be a promising strategy for dissecting the effects of PAI-1 on vascular homeostasis.

  7. Involvement of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mekkawy, Ahmed H; Pourgholami, Mohammad H; Morris, David L

    2014-09-01

    Currently, there are several studies supporting the role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system in cancer. The association of uPA to its receptor triggers the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. This process is regulated by the uPA inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2). Plasmin promotes degradation of basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM) components as well as activation of ECM latent matrix metalloproteases. Degradation and remodeling of the surrounding tissues is crucial in the early steps of tumor progression by facilitating expansion of the tumor mass, release of tumor growth factors, activation of cytokines as well as induction of tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Hence, many tumors showed a correlation between uPA system component levels and tumor aggressiveness and survival. Therefore, this review summarizes the structure of the uPA system, its contribution to cancer progression, and the clinical relevance of uPA family members in cancer diagnosis. In addition, the review evaluates the significance of uPA system in the development of cancer-targeted therapies.

  8. mRNAs encoding urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 are elevated in the mouse brain following kainate-mediated excitation.

    PubMed

    Masos, T; Miskin, R

    1997-07-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is an inducible extracellular serine protease implicated in fibrinolysis and in tissue remodeling. Recently, we have localized uPA mRNA strictly in limbic structures and the parietal cortex of the adult mouse brain. Here, we tested whether the systemic treatment of mice with kainic acid (KA), an amino acid inducing limbic seizures, could elevate in the brain mRNAs encoding uPA and its specific inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major antifibrinolytic agent. Brain sections encompassing the hippocampus were tested through in situ hybridization using radiolabeled riboprobes specific for the two mRNA species. The results showed that KA greatly enhanced both mRNA species in sites of limbic structures and cortex. However, in the hypothalamus and brain blood vessels only PAI-1 mRNA was elevated. Those were also the only two locations where PAI-1 mRNA was detected in the non-treated control brain, although at a low level. For both mRNAs, KA enhancement was first evident 2-4 h after treatment, and it was most prolonged in the hippocampal area, where prominent hybridization signals persisted for three days. Here, both mRNAs were initially elevated in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus and in the molecular and oriens layers; however, PAI-1 mRNA became evident throughout the area, while uPA mRNA became especially pronounced in the CA3/CA4 subfield. In the cortex both mRNA types were induced, but only uPA mRNA was elevated in the retrosplenial cortex, and also in the subiculum. In the amygdaloid complex, uPA mRNA was restricted to the basolateral nucleus, whereas PAI-1 mRNA was seen throughout the structure, however, excluding this nucleus. These data show that seizure activity enhances the expression of uPA and PAI-1 genes in the brain; the patterns of enhancement suggest that the protease and its inhibitor may act in brain plasticity in synchrony, however, also independently of each other. Furthermore, the

  9. Tissue-type plasminogen activator mediates neuroglial coupling in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    An, J; Haile, W B; Wu, F; Torre, E; Yepes, M

    2014-01-17

    The interaction between neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells plays a central role coupling energy supply with changes in neuronal activity. For a long time it was believed that glucose was the only source of energy for neurons. However, a growing body of experimental evidence indicates that lactic acid, generated by aerobic glycolysis in perivascular astrocytes, is also a source of energy for neuronal activity, particularly when the supply of glucose from the intravascular space is interrupted. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionary conserved kinase that couples cellular activity with energy consumption via induction of the uptake of glucose and activation of the glycolytic pathway. The uptake of glucose by the blood-brain barrier is mediated by glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), which is abundantly expressed in endothelial cells and astrocytic end-feet processes. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine proteinase that is found in endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons. Genetic overexpression of neuronal tPA or treatment with recombinant tPA protects neurons from the deleterious effects of metabolic stress or excitotoxicity, via a mechanism independent of tPA's ability to cleave plasminogen into plasmin. The work presented here shows that exposure to metabolic stress induces the rapid release of tPA from murine neurons but not from astrocytes. This tPA induces AMPK activation, membrane recruitment of GLUT1, and GLUT1-mediated glucose uptake in astrocytes and endothelial cells. Our data indicate that this is followed by the synthesis and release of lactic acid from astrocytes, and that the uptake of this lactic acid via the monocarboxylate transporter-2 promotes survival in neurons exposed to metabolic stress.

  10. Heparanase procoagulant activity, factor Xa, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 are increased in shift work female nurses.

    PubMed

    Nadir, Yona; Saharov, Gleb; Hoffman, Ron; Keren-Politansky, Anat; Tzoran, Inna; Brenner, Benjamin; Shochat, Tamar

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate on an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer in shift workers, although the underlying mechanism is obscure. Heparanase directly enhances tissue factor (TF) activity leading to increased factor Xa production and subsequent activation of the coagulation system. In the present study, a comparison of coagulation markers among healthy shift working (SW) vs. healthy daytime working (DW) female nurses was performed. Thirty SW and 30 DW female nurses were enrolled. For each of the 60 participants, blood was drawn between 7:00 and 8:00 a.m. and at least 8 h after the last work shift. Plasma was studied for coagulation marker that included TF/heparanase procoagulant activity, TF activity, heparanase procoagulant activity, heparanase level, factor Xa level, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), plasminogen, α2-antiplasmin, fibrinogen, global protein C, von Willebrand factor, and D-dimer by chromogenic assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Sleep quality was assessed by self-report according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The heparanase procoagulant activity increased by 2-fold and the TF/heparanase procoagulant activity increased by 1.5-fold in SW nurses compared to DW nurses (P < 0.05). Factor Xa levels and PAI-1 levels were significantly higher among SW nurses compared to the DW group (22 vs. 18 ng/ml, P < 0.05, and 32 vs. 22 ng/ml, P < 0.005, respectively). No significant differences were found in the other tested coagulation markers between the study groups. Heparanase procoagulant activity, factor Xa level, and PAI-1 level were significantly higher in SW nurses compared to the DW group. These alterations of blood coagulation activation may potentially contribute to cardiovascular and cancer morbidity.

  11. Construction of a plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 variant without measurable affinity to vitronectin but otherwise normal.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Durand, Michelle K V; Skeldal, Sune; Dupont, Daniel M; Bødker, Julie S; Wind, Troels; Andreasen, Peter A

    2004-01-01

    Vitronectin (VN) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have important functional interactions: VN stabilises the protease inhibitory activity of PAI-1 and PAI-1 inhibits binding of adhesion receptors to VN. Having previously mapped the PAI-1 binding area for VN, we have now constructed a PAI-1 variant, R103A-M112A-Q125A, without measurable affinity to VN, but with full protease inhibitory activity and endocytosis receptor binding. As a tool for evaluating the physiological and pathophysiological functions of the PAI-1-VN interaction, our new variant is far superior to the previously widely used PAI-1 variant Q125K, which we have found possesses an only about 10-fold reduced affinity to VN.

  12. Physiological and pathological roles of tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor neuroserpin in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tsang, Vicky W. K.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    Although its roles in the vascular space are most well-known, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is widely expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, where its activity is believed to be regulated by neuroserpin, a predominantly brain-specific member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. In the normal physiological state, tPA has been shown to play roles in the development and plasticity of the nervous system. Ischemic damage, however, may lead to excess tPA activity in the brain and this is believed to contribute to neurodegeneration. In this article, we briefly review the physiological and pathological roles of tPA in the nervous system, which includes neuronal migration, axonal growth, synaptic plasticity, neuroprotection and neurodegeneration, as well as a contribution to neurological disease. We summarize tPA's multiple mechanisms of action and also highlight the contributions of the inhibitor neuroserpin to these processes. PMID:26528129

  13. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  14. Staphylokinase has distinct modes of interaction with antimicrobial peptides, modulating its plasminogen-activation properties.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Leonard T; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-01-01

    Staphylokinase (Sak) is a plasminogen activator protein that is secreted by many Staphylococcus aureus strains. Sak also offers protection by binding and inhibiting specific antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here, we evaluate Sak as a more general interaction partner for AMPs. Studies with melittin, mCRAMP, tritrpticin and bovine lactoferricin indicate that the truncation of the first ten residues of Sak (SakΔN10), which occurs in vivo and uncovers important residues in a bulge region, improves its affinity for AMPs. Melittin and mCRAMP have a lower affinity for SakΔN10, and in docking studies, they bind to the N-terminal segment and bulge region of SakΔN10. By comparison, lactoferricin and tritrpticin form moderately high affinity 1:1 complexes with SakΔN10 and their cationic residues form several electrostatic interactions with the protein's α-helix. Overall, our work identifies two distinct AMP binding surfaces on SakΔN10 whose occupation would lead to either inhibition or promotion of its plasminogen activating properties. PMID:27554435

  15. Ultrastructural localization of plasma membrane-associated urokinase- type plasminogen activator at focal contacts

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have recently shown that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 are both found extracellularly beneath cultured human skin fibroblasts and HT-1080 sarcoma cells, but in distinct localizations. Here, the ultrastructural distribution of u-PA was studied using immunoferritin electron microscopy. In HT-1080 cells, u-PA on the extracellular aspect of the plasma membrane was detected at sites of direct contact of the cell with the growth substratum beneath all parts of the ventral cell surface. The ferritin-labeled adhesion plaques, which were enriched in submembraneous microfilaments, were frequently seen at the leading lamellae of the cells as well as in lamellipodia and microspikes. Besides the cell-substratum adhesion plaques, ferritin label was detected at cell-cell contact sites. Double-label immunofluorescence showed a striking colocalization of u-PA and vinculin in both HT-1080 cells and WI-38 lung fibroblasts, which is consistent with u-PA being a focal contact component. The u-PA-containing focal contacts of WI-38 cells had no direct codistribution with fibronectin fibrils. In WI-38 cells made stationary by cultivation in a medium containing 0.5% FCS, vinculin plaques became highly elongated and more centrally located, whereas u-PA immunolabel disappeared from such focal adhesions. These findings show that plasma membrane-associated u-PA is an intrinsic component of focal contacts, where, we propose, it enables directional proteolysis for cell migration and invasion. PMID:3123496

  16. Urokinase-like plasminogen activator receptor expression on disseminated breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tögel, F; Datta, C; Badbaran, A; Kröger, N; Renges, H; Gieseking, F; Jänicke, F; Zander, A R; Krüger, W

    2001-02-01

    Disseminated tumor cells are detected frequently in bone marrow, peripheral blood, and cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood cell products of women undergoing high-dose therapy for breast cancer. Several attempts were made to purge autografts from contaminating cancer cells; however, the biological and clinical impact of these contaminations has not been clarified so far. Expression of distinct phenotypes is a surrogate marker for metastatic behavior of cancer cells. The expression of the urokinase-like plasminogen activator receptor seems to be a factor of high importance. It is not expressed by normal mammary tissue. Disseminated cancer cells from marrow, blood, and stem cell products have been investigated by double-stain technique for urokinase-like plasminogen activator receptor (uPA-R) expressing cytokeratin-positive cells. uPA-R(+)/CK(+) cells could be found in all qualities of samples; however, significantly less in G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells compared to samples of other provenance (p = 0.02). It can be concluded that epithelial cells of malignant phenotype occur in blood, marrow, and autografts of breast cancer patients. Populations of disseminated tumor cells are phenotypically heterogeneous. Reduced uPA-R expression on cancer cells from leukapheresis samples might suggest a less aggressive nature of these cells compared to disseminated cells found in bone marrow. Furthermore, the data suggest that the phenotype of tumor cell contamination in leukapheresis products differs significantly from those of disseminated cancer cells in bone marrow or blood.

  17. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling.

  18. Relationship between cathepsin D, urokinase, and plasminogen activator inhibitors in malignant vs benign breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Foucré, D.; Bouchet, C.; Hacène, K.; Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Gentile, A.; Martin, P. M.; Desplaces, A.; Oglobine, J.

    1991-01-01

    The concentrations of cathepsin D (Cath D), urokinase (uPA) and two plasminogen activator inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2) were analysed in the cytosols of 130 human mammary tumours (43 benign tumours and 87 primary and unilateral breast carcinomas). uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 levels were measured by antigenic immunoassays and Cath D by immunoradiometric assay. The median levels of the four parameters were significantly higher in the malignant tumours than in the benign ones. Cath D and uPA increases were 4-fold and 5-fold respectively. PAI-1 and PAI-2 increases were much more important, 74-fold and 29-fold respectively. In malignant tumours, median levels of Cath D and uPA did not vary according to classical prognostic factors (histologic grade, presence or absence of axillary lymph nodes, steroid receptors, UICC stage, tumour size, age, and menopausal status). However, PAI-1 decreased in ER+ and PR+ tumours and PAI-2 increased in menopausal women's tumours. When Cath D, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 levels in malignant tumours were compared, positive correlations were found for all combinations. The implication of plasminogen activator inhibitors in the phenomenon was surprising and merits further investigation using tools other than global antigen measurements in tumours. PMID:1931618

  19. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  20. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  1. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Coating on Implant Surfaces Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Peetermans, Marijke; Verhamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are a major medical challenge because of their high prevalence and antibiotic resistance. As fibrin plays an important role in S. aureus biofilm formation, we hypothesize that coating of the implant surface with fibrinolytic agents can be used as a new method of antibiofilm prophylaxis. The effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) coating on S. aureus biofilm formation was tested with in vitro microplate biofilm assays and an in vivo mouse model of biofilm infection. tPA coating efficiently inhibited biofilm formation by various S. aureus strains. The effect was dependent on plasminogen activation by tPA, leading to subsequent local fibrin cleavage. A tPA coating on implant surfaces prevented both early adhesion and later biomass accumulation. Furthermore, tPA coating increased the susceptibility of biofilm infections to antibiotics. In vivo, significantly fewer bacteria were detected on the surfaces of implants coated with tPA than on control implants from mice treated with cloxacillin. Fibrinolytic coatings (e.g., with tPA) reduce S. aureus biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel way to prevent bacterial biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices. PMID:26519394

  2. Staphylokinase has distinct modes of interaction with antimicrobial peptides, modulating its plasminogen-activation properties

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Leonard T.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylokinase (Sak) is a plasminogen activator protein that is secreted by many Staphylococcus aureus strains. Sak also offers protection by binding and inhibiting specific antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here, we evaluate Sak as a more general interaction partner for AMPs. Studies with melittin, mCRAMP, tritrpticin and bovine lactoferricin indicate that the truncation of the first ten residues of Sak (SakΔN10), which occurs in vivo and uncovers important residues in a bulge region, improves its affinity for AMPs. Melittin and mCRAMP have a lower affinity for SakΔN10, and in docking studies, they bind to the N-terminal segment and bulge region of SakΔN10. By comparison, lactoferricin and tritrpticin form moderately high affinity 1:1 complexes with SakΔN10 and their cationic residues form several electrostatic interactions with the protein’s α-helix. Overall, our work identifies two distinct AMP binding surfaces on SakΔN10 whose occupation would lead to either inhibition or promotion of its plasminogen activating properties. PMID:27554435

  3. Exogenous tissue plasminogen activator enhances peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery after injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tie; Ling, Changchun; Xiao, Yao; Tao, Xianmei; Ma, Duan; Chen, Zu-Lin; Strickland, Sidney; Song, Houyan

    2006-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an essential component of the proteolytic cascade that lyses blood clots. Various studies also suggest that tPA plays important roles in the nervous system. We show that exogenous tPA or tPA/plasminogen (plg) promotes axonal regeneration, remyelination, and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in the mouse. Local application of tPA or tPA/plg 7 days after sciatic nerve crush significantly increased the total number of axons and myelinated axons, which is accompanied by enhanced expression of neurofilament. Treatment with tPA or tPA/plg reduced the deposition of fibrin(ogen) after nerve injury. Moreover, tPA or tPA/plg increased the number of macrophages and induced MMP-9 expression at the injury site, coincident with reduced collagen scar formation and accelerated clearance of myelin and lipid debris after treatment. Consequently, tPA or tPA/plg treatment protected muscles from atrophy after nerve injury, indicating better functional recovery. These results suggest that administration of exogenous tPA or tPA/plg promotes axonal regeneration and remyelination through removal of fibrin deposition and activation of MMP-9-positive macrophages, which may be responsible for myelin debris clearance and preventing collagen scar formation. Therefore, tPA may be useful for treatment of peripheral nerve injury.

  4. Engineering of plasminogen activators for targeting to thrombus and heightening thrombolytic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Absar, S; Gupta, N; Nahar, K; Ahsan, F

    2015-09-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of the coronary artery, which triggers acute myocardial infarction, is one of the major causes of death in the USA. Currently, arterial occlusions are treated with intravenous plasminogen activators (PAs), which dissolve the clot by activating plasminogen. However, PAs indiscriminately generate plasmin, which depletes critical clotting factors (fibrinogen, factor V, and factor VIII), precipitates a lytic state in the blood, and produces bleeding complications in a large patient population. PAs have been extensively investigated to achieve thrombus specificity, to attenuate the bleeding risk, and to widen their clinical applications. In this review, we discuss various strategies that have been pursued since the beginning of thrombolytic therapy. We review the biotechnological approaches that have been used to develop mutant and chimeric PAs for thrombus selectivity, including the use of specific antibodies for targeting thrombi. We discuss particulate carrier-based systems and triggered-release concepts. We propose new hypotheses and strategies to spur future studies in this research arena. Overall, we describe the approaches and accomplishments in the development of patient-friendly and workable delivery systems for thrombolytic drugs. PMID:26074048

  5. Dual functionality of phosphonic-acid-appended phthalocyanines: inhibitors of urokinase plasminogen activator and anticancer photodynamic agents.

    PubMed

    Venkatramaiah, N; Pereira, Patrícia M R; Almeida Paz, Filipe A; Ribeiro, Carlos A F; Fernandes, Rosa; Tomé, João P C

    2015-11-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pcs) bearing phosphonic acid groups at the periphery exhibit a potential photodynamic effect to induce phototoxicity on human bladder cancer epithelial cells (UM-UC-3). In vitro photophysical and biological studies show high intrinsic ability to inhibit the activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9).

  6. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by the naphthoquinone shikonin.

    PubMed

    Han, Tingting; Zhang, Guangping; Yan, Dong; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui; Ye, Zuguang

    2016-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key negative regulator of the fibrinolytic system. Elevated levels of PAI-1 are associated with thrombosis and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Inhibition of PAI-1 activity represents a new strategy for antithrombotic and antifibrinolysis therapies. In this study, we systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of shikonin on PAI-1 activity. In the chromogenic substrate-based urokinase (uPA)/PAI-1 assay, we found that shikonin inhibited human PAI-1 activity with IC50 values of 30.68±2.32μM. This result was further confirmed by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated clot lysis assay. Mechanistic studies indicated that shikonin directly could bind to PAI-1 and prevent the binding of PAI-1 to uPA in a dose-dependent manner. Shikonin also blocked the formation of PAI-1/uPA complex, as shown by SDS/PAGE analysis. In the mouse arterial thrombosis model, intraperitoneal injection of shikonin at 1mgkg(-1) dose significantly prolonged tail bleeding time from 12.956±4.457min to 26.576±2.443min. It also reduced arterial thrombus weight from 0.01±0.001g to 0.006±0.001g (p<0.05). In a liver fibrosis treatment model, when shikonin was continuously injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 1mgkg(-1) over a two-week period, the hydroxyproline content in the mice plasma was significantly reduced and the degree of liver fibrosis was decreased significantly. Thus, shikonin may represent a novel small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1 that could have become a lead drug the treatment of thrombus and fibrosis. PMID:27476618

  7. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by the naphthoquinone shikonin.

    PubMed

    Han, Tingting; Zhang, Guangping; Yan, Dong; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui; Ye, Zuguang

    2016-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key negative regulator of the fibrinolytic system. Elevated levels of PAI-1 are associated with thrombosis and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Inhibition of PAI-1 activity represents a new strategy for antithrombotic and antifibrinolysis therapies. In this study, we systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of shikonin on PAI-1 activity. In the chromogenic substrate-based urokinase (uPA)/PAI-1 assay, we found that shikonin inhibited human PAI-1 activity with IC50 values of 30.68±2.32μM. This result was further confirmed by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated clot lysis assay. Mechanistic studies indicated that shikonin directly could bind to PAI-1 and prevent the binding of PAI-1 to uPA in a dose-dependent manner. Shikonin also blocked the formation of PAI-1/uPA complex, as shown by SDS/PAGE analysis. In the mouse arterial thrombosis model, intraperitoneal injection of shikonin at 1mgkg(-1) dose significantly prolonged tail bleeding time from 12.956±4.457min to 26.576±2.443min. It also reduced arterial thrombus weight from 0.01±0.001g to 0.006±0.001g (p<0.05). In a liver fibrosis treatment model, when shikonin was continuously injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 1mgkg(-1) over a two-week period, the hydroxyproline content in the mice plasma was significantly reduced and the degree of liver fibrosis was decreased significantly. Thus, shikonin may represent a novel small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1 that could have become a lead drug the treatment of thrombus and fibrosis.

  8. Effect of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    DING, YOUCHENG; ZHANG, HUI; LU, AIGUO; ZHOU, ZHUQING; ZHONG, MINGAN; SHEN, DONGWEI; WANG, XUJING; ZHU, ZHENGGANG

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a primary cause of mortality in patients with gastric cancer. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) has been demonstrated to be associated with tumor cell metastasis through the degradation of the extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of the uPA system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis. Expression of uPA, uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in four gastric cell lines (AGS, SGC7901, MKN45 and MKN28) was measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. uPA activity was detected using a uPA activity kit. Peritoneal implantation models of rats were established by injecting four gastric cancer cell lines for the selection of the cancer cells with a high planting potential. Biological behaviors, including adhesion, migration and invasion, were determined using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Expression of the uPA system was observed to be highest in the SGC7901 cells among the four gastric cell lines. uPA activity was observed to be highest in the MKN45 cells and lowest in the AGS cells. Furthermore, peritoneal implantation analysis demonstrated that no peritoneal tumors were identified in the AGS cells, whilst the tumor masses observed in the SGC7901 and MKN45 cells were of different sizes. The survival times of the rats injected with the MKN28 and SGC7901 cells were longer than those of the rats injected with the MKN45 cells. Antibodies for uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 in the uPA system had the ability to inhibit the adhesion, migration and invasion of peritoneal metastasis in the gastric cancer cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that the uPA system was positively associated with peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:27313768

  9. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are potential predictive biomarkers in early stage oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC).

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Synnøve; Rikardsen, Oddveig G; Hadler-Olsen, Elin; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Steigen, Sonja E; Svineng, Gunbjørg

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is often associated with metastatic disease and a poor 5 year survival rate. Patients diagnosed with small tumours generally have a more favourable outcome, but some of these small tumours are aggressive and lead to early death. To avoid harmful overtreatment of patients with favourable prognosis, there is a need for predictive biomarkers that can be used for treatment stratification. In this study we assessed the possibility to use components of the plasminogen activator (PA) system as prognostic markers for OSCC outcome and compared this to the commonly used biomarker Ki-67. A tissue-micro-array (TMA) based immunohistochemical analysis of primary tumour tissue obtained from a North Norwegian cohort of 115 patients diagnosed with OSCC was conducted. The expression of the biomarkers was compared with clinicopathological variables and disease specific death. The statistical analyses revealed that low expression of uPAR (p = 0.031) and PAI-1 (p = 0.021) in the tumour cells was significantly associated with low disease specific death in patients with small tumours and no lymph node metastasis (T1N0). The commonly used biomarker, Ki-67, was not associated with disease specific death in any of the groups of patients analysed. The conclusion is that uPAR and PAI-1 are potential predictive biomarkers in early stage tumours and that this warrants further studies on a larger cohort of patients.

  10. Tissue plasminogen activator is required for the development of fetal alcohol syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Noel, Melissa; Norris, Erin H; Strickland, Sidney

    2011-03-22

    Ethanol exposure during developmental synaptogenesis can lead to brain defects referred to as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), which can include mental health problems such as cognitive deficits and mental retardation. In FAS, widespread neuronal death and brain mass loss precedes behavioral and cognitive impairments in adulthood. Because tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been implicated in neurodegeneration, we examined whether it mediates FAS. Neonatal WT and tPA-/- mice were injected with ethanol to mimic FAS in humans. In WT mice, ethanol elicited caspase-3 activation, significant forebrain neurodegeneration, and decreased contextual fear conditioning in adults. However, tPA-deficient mice were protected from these neurotoxicities, and this protection could be abrogated by exogenous tPA. Selective pharmacological modulators of NMDA and GABAA receptor pathways revealed that the effects of tPA were mediated by the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. This study identifies tPA as a critical signaling component in FAS.

  11. Acceleration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Mediated Thrombolysis by Magnetically Powered Nanomotors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dose control and effectiveness promotion of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) for thrombolysis are vitally important to alleviate serious side effects such as hemorrhage in stroke treatments. In order to increase the effectiveness and reduce the risk of stroke treatment, we use rotating magnetic nanomotors to enhance the mass transport of t-PA molecules at the blood clot interface for local ischemic stroke therapy. The in vitro experiments demonstrate that, when combined with magnetically activated nanomotors, the thrombolysis speed of low-concentration t-PA (50 μg mL–1) can be enhanced up to 2-fold, to the maximum lysis speed at high t-PA concentration. Based on the convection enhanced transport theory due to rotating magnetic nanomotors, a theoretical model is proposed and predicts the experimental results reasonably well. The validity and efficiency of this enhanced treatment has been demonstrated in a rat embolic model. PMID:25006696

  12. Cardiovascular-renal complications and the possible role of plasminogen activator inhibitor: a review.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, John A; Bayliss, George; Gleason, Ray E; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2016-10-01

    Since angiotensin increases the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), mechanisms associated with an actively functioning renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system can be expected to be associated with increased PAI-1 expression. These mechanisms are present not only in common conditions resulting in glomerulosclerosis associated with aging, diabetes or genetic mutations, but also in autoimmune disease (like scleroderma and lupus), radiation injury, cyclosporine toxicity, allograft nephropathy and ureteral obstruction. While the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), are almost always part of the process, there are rare experimental observations of PAI-1 expression without their interaction. Here we review the literature on PAI-1 and its role in vascular, fibrotic and oxidative injury as well as work suggesting potential areas of intervention in the pathogenesis of multiple disorders. PMID:27679717

  13. Cardiovascular-renal complications and the possible role of plasminogen activator inhibitor: a review

    PubMed Central

    D'Elia, John A.; Bayliss, George; Gleason, Ray E.; Weinrauch, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Since angiotensin increases the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), mechanisms associated with an actively functioning renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system can be expected to be associated with increased PAI-1 expression. These mechanisms are present not only in common conditions resulting in glomerulosclerosis associated with aging, diabetes or genetic mutations, but also in autoimmune disease (like scleroderma and lupus), radiation injury, cyclosporine toxicity, allograft nephropathy and ureteral obstruction. While the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), are almost always part of the process, there are rare experimental observations of PAI-1 expression without their interaction. Here we review the literature on PAI-1 and its role in vascular, fibrotic and oxidative injury as well as work suggesting potential areas of intervention in the pathogenesis of multiple disorders. PMID:27679717

  14. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induction in Purkinje Neurons After Cerebellar Motor Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeds, Nicholas W.; Williams, Brian L.; Bickford, Paula C.

    1995-12-01

    The cerebellar cortex is implicated in the learning of complex motor skills. This learning may require synaptic remodeling of Purkinje cell inputs. An extracellular serine protease, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), is involved in remodeling various nonneural tissues and is associated with developing and regenerating neurons. In situ hybridization showed that expression of tPA messenger RNA was increased in the Purkinje neurons of rats within an hour of their being trained for a complex motor task. Antibody to tPA also showed the induction of tPA protein associated with cerebellar Purkinje cells. Thus, the induction of tPA during motor learning may play a role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity.

  15. The regulatory region of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, A; Lund, L R; Sartorio, R; Lania, A; Andreasen, P A; Danø, K; Blasi, F

    1988-01-01

    The human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has been isolated and its promoter region characterized. PAI-1 regulation by glucocorticoids, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and the phorbol ester PMA is shown to be exerted at the promoter level. A fragment spanning 805 nucleotides of the 5' flanking and 72 of the 5' untranslated region contain information enough to promote transcription and to respond to glucocorticoids when fused to a reporter gene and transfected into human fibrosarcoma cells. A moderately repetitive DNA sequence, containing a TATA box, a GRE consensus, a Z-DNA forming sequence and two imperfect direct repeats at the extremities, is present a few nucleotides 5' of the human PAI-1 gene transcription start site, raising the possibility that this gene could have been activated by DNA insertion during evolution. Images PMID:3130610

  16. Cardiovascular-renal complications and the possible role of plasminogen activator inhibitor: a review

    PubMed Central

    D'Elia, John A.; Bayliss, George; Gleason, Ray E.; Weinrauch, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Since angiotensin increases the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), mechanisms associated with an actively functioning renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system can be expected to be associated with increased PAI-1 expression. These mechanisms are present not only in common conditions resulting in glomerulosclerosis associated with aging, diabetes or genetic mutations, but also in autoimmune disease (like scleroderma and lupus), radiation injury, cyclosporine toxicity, allograft nephropathy and ureteral obstruction. While the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), are almost always part of the process, there are rare experimental observations of PAI-1 expression without their interaction. Here we review the literature on PAI-1 and its role in vascular, fibrotic and oxidative injury as well as work suggesting potential areas of intervention in the pathogenesis of multiple disorders.

  17. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 suppresses profibrotic responses in fibroblasts from fibrotic lungs.

    PubMed

    Marudamuthu, Amarnath S; Shetty, Shwetha K; Bhandary, Yashodhar P; Karandashova, Sophia; Thompson, Michael; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Florova, Galina; Hogan, Taryn B; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Fu, Jian; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Idell, Steven; Shetty, Sreerama

    2015-04-10

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial scarification. A hallmark morphological lesion is the accumulation of myofibroblasts or fibrotic lung fibroblasts (FL-fibroblasts) in areas called fibroblastic foci. We previously demonstrated that the expression of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the uPA receptor are elevated in FL-fibroblasts from the lungs of patients with IPF. FL-fibroblasts isolated from human IPF lungs and from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis showed an increased rate of proliferation compared with normal lung fibroblasts (NL-fibroblasts) derived from histologically "normal" lung. Basal expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in human and murine FL-fibroblasts was reduced, whereas collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin were markedly elevated. Conversely, alveolar type II epithelial cells surrounding the fibrotic foci in situ, as well as those isolated from IPF lungs, showed increased activation of caspase-3 and PAI-1 with a parallel reduction in uPA expression. Transduction of an adenovirus PAI-1 cDNA construct (Ad-PAI-1) suppressed expression of uPA and collagen-I and attenuated proliferation in FL-fibroblasts. On the contrary, inhibition of basal PAI-1 in NL-fibroblasts increased collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin. Fibroblasts isolated from PAI-1-deficient mice without lung injury also showed increased collagen-I and uPA. These changes were associated with increased Akt/phosphatase and tensin homolog proliferation/survival signals in FL-fibroblasts, which were reversed by transduction with Ad-PAI-1. This study defines a new role of PAI-1 in the control of fibroblast activation and expansion and its role in the pathogenesis of fibrosing lung disease and, in particular, IPF.

  18. The effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1 gene expression and adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ozel Demiralp, Duygu; Aktas, Huseyin; Akar, Nejat

    2008-10-01

    Obesity is a complex, multifactorial chronic disease frequently associated with cardiovascular risks, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high blood pressure, and the insulin resistance that appears to be central to the pathogenesis of Type II diabetes. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression induced in differentiating adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis and obesity is poorly understood. Circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels are elevated at an early stage of impaired glucose tolerance, resulting in diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels are also significantly elevated in the plasma of obese individuals and in adipose tissues of obese mice and humans. Some investigators proposed that the -675 4G/5G polymorphism in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promoter caused overexpression of this gene and predisposed carriers to obesity. In this study, we investigated the role of -675 4G/5G polymorphism in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promoter in the expression of this gene and the contribution of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 to adipogenesis. Using a dual-luciferase promoter assay, we determined that the -675 4G/5G polymorphism contributes significantly to overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the course of adipogenesis. The antidiabetic agents troglitazone and ciglitazone inhibited reporter gene expression driven by wild-type and -675 4G/5G mutant promoter, as well as the expression of endogenous plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, indicating that suppression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression may contribute to antidiabetic effects of these agents. The results indicate that absence of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in adipocytes may protect the cells against insulin resistance by promoting glucose uptake and adipocyte differentiation via a decrease in the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma expression that modulates the adipocyte

  19. New role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in alcohol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Arteel, Gavin E

    2008-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, thereby playing a major role in fibrinolysis. Whereas hyperfibrinolysis is common in alcoholic cirrhosis, hypofibrinolysis (driven mostly by elevated levels of PAI-1) is common during the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, whether or not PAI-1 plays a causal role in the development of ALD has been unclear. The role of PAI-1 was therefore investigated in models of early (steatosis), intermediate (inflammation/necrosis) and late (fibrosis) stages of alcoholic liver disease. For example, hepatic steatosis caused by both acute and chronic ethanol was blunted by inhibiting PAI-1 activation. This effect of inhibiting PAI-1 appears to be mediated, at least in part, by an increase in very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) synthesis in the absence of PAI-1. The results from that study also indicated that PAI-1 plays a critical role in both acute and chronic hepatic inflammation. Lastly, knocking out PAI-1 potently protected against experimental hepatic fibrosis; the mechanism of this protective effect appears to be mediated predominantly by extracellular matrix (ECM) resolution by matrix metalloproteases, which are indirectly inhibited by PAI-1. In summary, targeting PAI-1 protects against all three stages of ALD in model systems. The mechanisms by which PAI-1 contributes to these disease stages appear to not only involve the ‘classical’ function of PAI-1 (i.e. in mediating fibrinolysis), but also other functions of this protein. These data support a role of PAI-1 in the initiation and progression of ALD, and suggest that PAI-1 may be a useful target for clinical therapy to halt or blunt disease progression. PMID:18336665

  20. XR5967, a novel modulator of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity, suppresses tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Teresa D; Wang, Shouming W; Brünner, Nils; Charlton, Peter A

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 may contribute to tumor progression. We have recently shown that antibodies to PAI-1 block the invasive and migratory potential of human fibrosarcoma cells and suppress angiogenesis in vitro. Here we report the in vitro evaluation of a low-molecular-weight modulator of PAI-1, XR5967, on invasion, migration and angiogenesis. XR5967, a diketopiperazine, dose-dependently inhibited the activity of human and murine PAI-1, towards urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), with IC50 values of 800 nM and 8.3 microM, respectively. This was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, revealing that XR5967 inhibited complex formation between PAI-1 and uPA. This suppression may be caused by XR5967 promoting insertion of the reactive center loop within PAI-1. XR5967 dose-dependently inhibited the invasion of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells through Matrigel. Their invasion was reduced by 57% (p<0.001) at 5 microM. HT1080 cell migration was inhibited in a similar manner, indicating that PAI-1 may play an additional role in invasion, which is distinct to its role in the regulation of proteolysis. The potential of XR5967 to inhibit the invasion/migration of human endothelial cells was investigated in an in vitro model of angiogenesis. In this model XR5967 reduced tubule formation by 77% at 5 microM (p<0.001), highlighting a crucial role for PAI-1 in angiogenesis. These data stress the importance of a balanced proteolysis in the processes of invasion, migration and angiogenesis. Our results support the clinical findings and indicate that modulation of PAI-1 activity, with low-molecular-weight inhibitor of PAI-1 activity, may be of therapeutic benefit for the treatment of cancer.

  1. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 fused with erythropoietin (EPO) mimetic peptide (EMP) enhances the EPO activity of EMP.

    PubMed

    Kuai, L; Wu, C; Qiu, Q; Zhang, J; Zhou, A; Wang, S; Zhang, H; Song, Q; Liao, S; Han, Y; Liu, J; Ma, Z

    2000-08-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) mimetic peptide (EMP) encoding sequence was inserted into the gene of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) between Ala348 and Pro349 (P2'-P3'), generating a novel gene, PAI-1/EMP (PMP). This was cloned into pET32a expression vector, fused with TrxA peptide in the vector, and a 63-kDa protein was expressed in inclusion bodies with an expression level >50%. The TrxA/PMP protein was purified by Ni-NTA-agarose metal-ligand affinity chromatography to a purity >90%, showing a single, silver-stained band on SDS-PAGE. Using a reticulocyte counting assay, the EPO activity of PMP was determined to be 5,000 IU/mg, 2,500-fold that of EMP.

  2. Relationships between plasma insulin triglyceride, body mass index, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1.

    PubMed

    Juhan-Vague, I; Vague, P; Alessi, M C; Badier, C; Valadier, J; Aillaud, M F; Atlan, C

    1987-07-01

    Low fibrinolytic activity, as measured by euglobulin (EFA), has been observed in obese subjects, and hypofibrinolysis may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its complications. Blood fibrinolytic activity is regulated through a complex system of activators and inhibitors, especially plasminogen activator inhibitors (PA Inhibitors). In a group of 35 non-diabetic subjects with a wide range of body mass index (BMI), EFA was negatively correlated, and PA Inhibitor activity positively correlated, with BMI and plasma insulin levels. In a population of 49 non-diabetic obese women (differing from a control group of normal weight by lower EFA and higher level, of PA Inhibitor activity, plasma insulin and triglyceride), the PA Inhibitor activity was positively correlated with BMI, insulin and triglyceride. The increase in PA Inhibitor activity was associated with a high value of PA Inhibitor 1 antigen measured by an immuno-radiometric assay, indicating that the increased activity was due to a high level of circulating PA Inhibitor 1. Plasma insulin was lowered in obese non-diabetic subjects, without modification of the body weight, by a 24 hour fast or by treatment with Metformin. After 24 hours' fast, ten obese subjects had lower levels of insulin and PA Inhibitor activity and an increase in EFA. Treatment for 15 days by 1.75 g Metformin (or placebo), on a weight maintaining diet, induced, in the Metformin group, a decrease in plasma insulin, triglyceride and PA Inhibitor activity and an increase in EFA, while no change was observed in the placebo group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. High-fat diet enhances and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency attenuates bone loss in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1-/-) on bone structure in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) by 22% and 21%, trabecular number (Tb.N) by 8% and 4% and bone mineral de...

  4. Infusion of recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator through the superior mesenteric artery in the treatment of acute mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    da Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Mauricio; Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; de Oliveira Sousa, Wilson; Grillo, Luiz Sérgio Pereira; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2011-08-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is an uncommon condition that is usually treated with systemic anticoagulation. Catheter-directed thrombolysis through the superior mesenteric artery may be a viable adjunct to treat this morbid condition. In the present article, we have described a case of superior mesenteric venous thrombosis treated with catheter-directed infusion of tissue plasminogen activator through the superior mesenteric artery.

  5. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator as a novel treatment option for infective endocarditis: a retrospective clinical study in 32 children.

    PubMed

    Levitas, Aviva; Krymko, Hanna; Richardson, Justin; Zalzstein, Eli; Ioffe, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening infectious syndrome, with high morbidity and mortality. Current treatments for infective endocarditis include intravenous antibiotics, surgery, and involve a lengthy hospital stay. We hypothesised that adjunctive recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment for infective endocarditis may facilitate faster resolution of vegetations and clearance of positive blood cultures, and therefore decrease morbidity and mortality. This retrospective study included follow-up of patients, from 1997 through 2014, including clinical presentation, causative organism, length of treatment, morbidity, and mortality. We identified 32 patients, all of whom were diagnosed with endocarditis and were treated by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Among all, 27 patients (93%) had positive blood cultures, with the most frequent organisms being Staphylococcus epidermis (nine patients), Staphylococcus aureus (six patients), and Candida (nine patients). Upon treatment, in 31 patients (97%), resolution of vegetations and clearance of blood cultures occurred within hours to few days. Out of 32 patients, one patient (3%) died and three patients (9%) suffered embolic or haemorrhagic events, possibly related to the recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. None of the patients required surgical intervention to assist vegetation resolution. In conclusion, it appears that recombinant tissue plasminogen activator may become an adjunctive treatment for infective endocarditis and may decrease morbidity as compared with current guidelines. Prospective multi-centre studies are required to validate our findings. PMID:25682953

  6. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator as a novel treatment option for infective endocarditis: a retrospective clinical study in 32 children.

    PubMed

    Levitas, Aviva; Krymko, Hanna; Richardson, Justin; Zalzstein, Eli; Ioffe, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening infectious syndrome, with high morbidity and mortality. Current treatments for infective endocarditis include intravenous antibiotics, surgery, and involve a lengthy hospital stay. We hypothesised that adjunctive recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment for infective endocarditis may facilitate faster resolution of vegetations and clearance of positive blood cultures, and therefore decrease morbidity and mortality. This retrospective study included follow-up of patients, from 1997 through 2014, including clinical presentation, causative organism, length of treatment, morbidity, and mortality. We identified 32 patients, all of whom were diagnosed with endocarditis and were treated by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Among all, 27 patients (93%) had positive blood cultures, with the most frequent organisms being Staphylococcus epidermis (nine patients), Staphylococcus aureus (six patients), and Candida (nine patients). Upon treatment, in 31 patients (97%), resolution of vegetations and clearance of blood cultures occurred within hours to few days. Out of 32 patients, one patient (3%) died and three patients (9%) suffered embolic or haemorrhagic events, possibly related to the recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. None of the patients required surgical intervention to assist vegetation resolution. In conclusion, it appears that recombinant tissue plasminogen activator may become an adjunctive treatment for infective endocarditis and may decrease morbidity as compared with current guidelines. Prospective multi-centre studies are required to validate our findings.

  7. Serum Level of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type-1 in Addicted Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Forood, Afsaneh; Malekpour-Afshar, Reza; Mahdavi, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a glycoprotein with inhibitory effects on the formation of plasmin from plasminogen by plasminogen activator. Thus, it prevents clot lysis in vessel walls. Several evidences prove the relationship between coronary artery disease and response to fibrinolytic therapy in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) with PAI-1 level. Opium addiction is one of the most important factors in causing MI and cardiovascular events. This is due to it causing imbalance between coagulation and anticoagulation factors in the blood. This study was designed and implemented to determine the levels of PAI-I in opium-addicted patients with coronary artery disease in comparison with non addicts. Methods In this case-control study, 160 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), which was confirmed by angiography results, were enrolled. All of the patients had a medical history, their creatinine levels and lipid profile were evaluated, morphine urine test was performed, and after that a blood sample was taken to determine the levels of PAI-1. Thus, the 80 patients who had a positive morphine urine test result formed the case group, and the control group was constituted of the 80 patients with negative morphine test results. The two groups were matched. Findings Average level of PAI-1 in the control group was 2.4 ± 2.6 and in the case group was 8.8 ± 9.1 and it was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The frequency of two vessel disease was higher in opium addicted patients than non-addicted patients and this was statistically significant (P = 0.030). However, the frequency of single vessel and three vessel disease was the same in the two groups. The two groups had no differences in age, lipid profile, and creatinine level. Moreover, females are at a higher risk of high PAI-1 levels. Conclusion PAI-1 levels in opium addicted patients with CHD are higher than other patients. In these patients, the risk of atherosclerosis and MI is

  8. [A case of successful thrombolysis by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for postoperative pulmonary thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Chiyo; Yano, Toshiyuki; Tashiro, Hironori; Terasaki, Hidenori

    2002-02-01

    A 52-year-old female suspected of hypercoagulability underwent modified radical hysterectomy and left oophorectomy for uterus cancer and left giant ovarian tumor under general combined with epidural anesthesia. On the day after the operation, the patient complained of dyspnea and developed tachypnea, a low Spo2, and hypotension after the intermittent external pneumatic compression of the legs. Echocardiography showed acute right cardiac failure and pulmonary angiography revealed massive pulmonary thromboembolism. The patient fell into shock with severe hypotension and unconsciousness during the catheter fragmentation and aspiration therapy for pulmonary thrombi. Bolus intravenous injection of monteplase 1.6 million units, a mutant of tissue plasminogen activator with a longer half-life, rapidly improved the shock status and stabilized the hemodynamic condition. Monteplase would be useful for life-threatening pulmonary thromboembolism although the risk of hemorrhagic complication remains.

  9. Primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and soluble factor urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, Hernán

    2013-11-01

    Primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) may be due to genetic or acquired etiologies and is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome with high morbidity that often leads to end-stage renal failure. The different available therapeutic approaches are unsuccessful, in part due to partially deciphered heterogeneous and complex pathophysiological mechanisms. Moreover, the term FSGS, even in its primary form, comprises a histological description shared by a number of different causes with completely different molecular pathways of disease. This review focuses on the latest developments regarding the pathophysiology of primary acquired FSGS caused by soluble factor urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor, a circulating permeability factor involved in proteinuria and edema formation, and describes recent advances with potential success in therapy.

  10. Alcoholic liver disease and the potential role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and fibrin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Beier, Juliane I; Arteel, Gavin E

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a major player in fibrinolysis due to its classical role of inhibiting plasminogen activators. Although increased fibrinolysis is common in alcoholic cirrhosis, decreased fibrinolysis (driven mostly by elevated levels of PAI-1) is common during the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, whether or not PAI-1 plays a causal role in the development of early ALD was unclear. Recent studies in experimental models have suggested that PAI-1 may contribute to the development of early (steatosis), intermediate (steatohepatitis) and late (fibrosis) stages of ALD. For example, fatty liver owing to both acute and chronic ethanol was blunted by the genetic inhibition of PAI-1. This effect of targeting PAI-1 appears to be mediated, at least in part, by an increase in very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) synthesis in the genetic absence of this acute phase protein. Results from a two-hit model employing ethanol and lipopolysaccharide administration suggest that PAI-1 plays a critical role in hepatic inflammation, most likely due to its ability to cause fibrin accumulation, which subsequently sensitizes the liver to ensuing damaging insults. Lastly, the role of PAI-1 in hepatic fibrosis is less clear and appears that PAI-1 may serve a dual role in this pathological change, both protective (enhancing regeneration) and damaging (blocking matrix degradation). In summary, results from these studies suggest that PAI-1 may play multiple roles in the various stages of ALD, both protective and damaging. The latter effect is mediated by its influence on steatosis (i.e. decreasing VLDL synthesis), inflammation (i.e. impairing fibrinolysis) and fibrosis (i.e. blunting matrix degradation), whereas the former is mediated by maintaining hepatocyte division after an injury.

  11. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Promotes Dendritic Spine Recovery and Improves Neurological Outcome Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Catano, Marcela; Echeverry, Ramiro; Torre, Enrique; Haile, Woldeab B.; An, Jie; Chen, Changhua; Cheng, Lihong; Nicholson, Andrew; Tong, Frank C.; Park, Jaekeun

    2014-01-01

    Spines are dendritic protrusions that receive most of the excitatory input in the brain. Early after the onset of cerebral ischemia dendritic spines in the peri-infarct cortex are replaced by areas of focal swelling, and their re-emergence from these varicosities is associated with neurological recovery after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine proteinase that plays a central role in tissue remodeling via binding to the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report that cerebral cortical neurons release uPA during the recovery phase from ischemic stroke in vivo or hypoxia in vitro. Although uPA does not have an effect on ischemia- or hypoxia-induced neuronal death, genetic deficiency of uPA (uPA−/−) or uPAR (uPAR−/−) abrogates functional recovery after AIS. Treatment with recombinant uPA after ischemic stroke induces neurological recovery in wild-type and uPA−/− but not in uPAR−/− mice. Diffusion tensor imaging studies indicate that uPA−/− mice have increased water diffusivity and decreased anisotropy associated with impaired dendritic spine recovery and decreased length of distal neurites in the peri-infarct cortex. We found that the excitotoxic injury induces the clustering of uPAR in dendritic varicosities, and that the binding of uPA to uPAR promotes the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and re-emergence of dendritic filopodia from uPAR-enriched varicosities. This effect is independent of uPA's proteolytic properties and instead is mediated by Rac-regulated profilin expression and cofilin phosphorylation. Our data indicate that binding of uPA to uPAR promotes dendritic spine recovery and improves functional outcome following AIS. PMID:25339736

  12. Alcoholic liver disease and the potential role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and fibrin metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Juliane I; Arteel, Gavin E

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a major player in fibrinolysis due to its classical role of inhibiting plasminogen activators. Although increased fibrinolysis is common in alcoholic cirrhosis, decreased fibrinolysis (driven mostly by elevated levels of PAI-1) is common during the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, whether or not PAI-1 plays a causal role in the development of early ALD was unclear. Recent studies in experimental models have suggested that PAI-1 may contribute to the development of early (steatosis), intermediate (steatohepatitis) and late (fibrosis) stages of ALD. For example, fatty liver owing to both acute and chronic ethanol was blunted by the genetic inhibition of PAI-1. This effect of targeting PAI-1 appears to be mediated, at least in part, by an increase in very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) synthesis in the genetic absence of this acute phase protein. Results from a two-hit model employing ethanol and lipopolysaccharide administration suggest that PAI-1 plays a critical role in hepatic inflammation, most likely due to its ability to cause fibrin accumulation, which subsequently sensitizes the liver to ensuing damaging insults. Lastly, the role of PAI-1 in hepatic fibrosis is less clear and appears that PAI-1 may serve a dual role in this pathological change, both protective (enhancing regeneration) and damaging (blocking matrix degradation). In summary, results from these studies suggest that PAI-1 may play multiple roles in the various stages of ALD, both protective and damaging. The latter effect is mediated by its influence on steatosis (i.e. decreasing VLDL synthesis), inflammation (i.e. impairing fibrinolysis) and fibrosis (i.e. blunting matrix degradation), whereas the former is mediated by maintaining hepatocyte division after an injury. PMID:22238286

  13. Improvement of Psychotic Symptoms and the Role of Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Nardi, Antonio E

    2015-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mediates a number of processes that are pivotal for synaptogenesis and remodeling of synapses, including proteolysis of the brain extracellular matrix, degradation of adhesion molecules, activation of neurotrophins, and activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Abnormalities in these processes have been consistently described in psychotic disorders. In this paper, we review the physiological roles of tPA, focusing on conditions characterized by low tPA activity, which are prevalent in schizophrenia. We then describe how tPA activity is influenced by lifestyle interventions and nutritional supplements that may ameliorate psychotic symptoms. Next, we analyze the role of tPA in the mechanism of action of hormones and medications effective in mitigating psychotic symptoms, such as pregnenolone, estrogen, oxytocin, dopamine D3 receptor antagonists, retinoic acid, valproic acid, cannabidiol, sodium nitroprusside, N-acetyl cysteine, and warfarin. We also review evidence that tPA participates in the mechanism by which electroconvulsive therapy and cigarette smoking may reduce psychotic symptoms. PMID:26593907

  14. Improvement of Psychotic Symptoms and the Role of Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Nardi, Antonio E.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mediates a number of processes that are pivotal for synaptogenesis and remodeling of synapses, including proteolysis of the brain extracellular matrix, degradation of adhesion molecules, activation of neurotrophins, and activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Abnormalities in these processes have been consistently described in psychotic disorders. In this paper, we review the physiological roles of tPA, focusing on conditions characterized by low tPA activity, which are prevalent in schizophrenia. We then describe how tPA activity is influenced by lifestyle interventions and nutritional supplements that may ameliorate psychotic symptoms. Next, we analyze the role of tPA in the mechanism of action of hormones and medications effective in mitigating psychotic symptoms, such as pregnenolone, estrogen, oxytocin, dopamine D3 receptor antagonists, retinoic acid, valproic acid, cannabidiol, sodium nitroprusside, N-acetyl cysteine, and warfarin. We also review evidence that tPA participates in the mechanism by which electroconvulsive therapy and cigarette smoking may reduce psychotic symptoms. PMID:26593907

  15. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  16. The plasminogen activator system in the ovine placentome during late gestation and stage-two of parturition.

    PubMed

    McNeel, Anthony K; Cushman, Robert A; Vallet, Jeffrey L

    2013-06-01

    The process of placental separation is not completely understood. In domestic animals, especially cattle, it is important that expulsion of the fetal membranes takes place in a timely manner in order to achieve maximal reproductive efficiency. The activity of the matrix-metalloprotease (MMP) family of proteases is known to be reduced in placentomes from cases of retained placenta. Members of the MMP family are known to be activated by the plasminogen activator (PA) family of proteases. We hypothesized that the expression and activity of the PA family increase in the cotyledon and/or caruncle as parturition approaches, with maximal expression and activity at parturition. To test this hypothesis, we performed reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR and plasminogen-casein zymography to detect the presence and activity of PA family members in the placentome leading up to and during parturition in spontaneous and dexamethasone-induced parturient ewes. The results from our experiments indicated that serine proteases inhibitor E1 (SERPINE1) mRNA abundance in the cotyledon was different between treatment groups (P = 0.0002). In the caruncle, gene expression for plasminogen activator urokinase-type (PLAU) was different (P = 0.0154), and there was a strong trend for differences in SERPINE1 expression (P = 0.0565). These results demonstrate that expression of the PA system in the placentome changes from late pregnancy to parturition, and the presence or activity of these enzymes may occur after fetal expulsion.

  17. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator-like Proteases in Teleosts Lack Genuine Receptor-binding Epidermal Growth Factor-like Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Bager, René; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Jensen, Jan K.; Szczur, Agnieszka; Christensen, Anni; Andersen, Lisbeth M.; Johansen, Jesper S.; Larsen, Niels; Baatrup, Erik; Huang, Mingdong; Ploug, Michael; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen activation catalyzed by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in normal and pathological tissue remodeling processes. Since its discovery in the mid-1980s, the cell membrane-anchored urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been believed to be central to the functions of uPA, as uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation activity appeared to be confined to cell surfaces through the binding of uPA to uPAR. However, a functional uPAR has so far only been identified in mammals. We have now cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized two zebrafish proteases, zfuPA-a and zfuPA-b, which by several criteria are the fish orthologs of mammalian uPA. Thus, both proteases catalyze the activation of fish plasminogen efficiently and both proteases are inhibited rapidly by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). But zfuPA-a differs from mammalian uPA by lacking the exon encoding the uPAR-binding epidermal growth factor-like domain; zfuPA-b differs from mammalian uPA by lacking two cysteines of the epidermal growth factor-like domain and a uPAR-binding sequence comparable with that found in mammalian uPA. Accordingly, no zfuPA-b binding activity could be found in fish white blood cells or fish cell lines. We therefore propose that the current consensus of uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation taking place on cell surfaces, derived from observations with mammals, is too narrow. Fish uPAs appear incapable of receptor binding in the manner known from mammals and uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation in fish may occur mainly in solution. Studies with nonmammalian vertebrate species are needed to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of plasminogen activation. PMID:22733817

  18. Abrogation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-vitronectin interaction ameliorates acute kidney injury in murine endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kamlesh K; Donahue, Deborah L; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to the high mortality and morbidity in patients. Although the pathogenesis of AKI during sepsis is poorly understood, it is well accepted that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and vitronectin (Vn) are involved in AKI. However, the functional cooperation between PAI-1 and Vn in septic AKI has not been completely elucidated. To address this issue, mice were utilized lacking either PAI-1 (PAI-1-/-) or expressing a PAI-1-mutant (PAI-1R101A/Q123K) in which the interaction between PAI-1 and Vn is abrogated, while other functions of PAI-1 are retained. It was found that both PAI-1-/- and PAI-1R101A/Q123K mice are associated with decreased renal dysfunction, apoptosis, inflammation, and ERK activation as compared to wild-type (WT) mice after LPS challenge. Also, PAI-1-/- mice showed attenuated fibrin deposition in the kidneys. Furthermore, a lack of PAI-1 or PAI-1-Vn interaction was found to be associated with an increase in activated Protein C (aPC) in plasma. These results demonstrate that PAI-1, through its interaction with Vn, exerts multiple deleterious mechanisms to induce AKI. Therefore, targeting of the PAI-1-Vn interaction in kidney represents an appealing therapeutic strategy for the treatment of septic AKI by not only altering the fibrinolytic capacity but also regulating PC activity.

  19. Modulation of urokinase plasminogen activator system by poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Madunić, Josip; Antica, Mariastefania; Cvjetko, Petra; Požgaj, Lidija; Matulić, Maja

    2016-08-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system is a complex regulator of extracellular proteolysis which is involved in various physiological and pathological processes. The major components of this system are the serine protease uPA, two inhibitors PAI-1 and PAI-2, and the receptor uPAR. It has been previously shown by several groups that the uPA system has an important role in cancer progression and therefore its possible prognostic and therapeutic value has been evaluated. The aim of this study is to tackle the role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in the induction of uPA activity in a glioblastoma cell line, A1235. This cell line is sensitive to alkylation damage and is a model for drug treatment. The components of the uPA system and the level of DNA damage were analyzed after alkylation agent treatment in combination with poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition. Here we show that the increase in uPA activity results from the net balance change between uPA and its inhibitor at mRNA level. Further, PARP-1 inhibition exerts its influence on uPA activity through DNA damage increase. Involvement of several signaling pathways, as well as cell specific regulation influencing the uPA system are discussed.

  20. Microglial tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) triggers neuronal apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Flavin, M P; Zhao, G; Ho, L T

    2000-02-15

    Several CNS disorders feature microglial activation. Microglia are known to have both restorative and cytotoxic capabilities. Neuronal apoptosis has been noted after an acute insult such as ischemia. Microglia may participate in this event. We previously showed that conditioned medium (CM) harvested from peritoneal macrophages or from activated microglia triggered apoptosis in rat hippocampal neurons in culture. We wished to characterize the factor responsible for triggering neuronal death. Quiescent microglia produced CM that did not disrupt hippocampal neurons. Lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia produced CM which resulted in neuronal death. This effect was blocked by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, by tPA STOP, and by co-incubation with tPA antibody. Recombinant human tPA exaggerated the neurotoxic effects of microglial CM, while tPA alone was toxic only at very high concentrations. This in vitro system, which probably excludes any significant impact of microglial free radicals, suggests that microglial tPA may contribute significantly to hippocampal neuronal death.

  1. Validation of an ELISA for the quantitation of lanoteplase, a novel plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, B; Habte, S; Vachharajani, N; Tay, L

    1999-11-01

    An ELISA was developed and validated for the quantitation of lanoteplase in human citrated plasma. The ELISA employed a monoclonal anti-lanoteplase antibody absorbed onto 96-well microtiter plates to capture lanoteplase in citrated human plasma samples containing PPACK, a protease inhibitor. The captured lanoteplase was detected using a biotinylated rabbit anti-lanoteplase polyclonal antibody. The standard curve range in human plasma for the ELISA was 7-100 ng/ml. Assessment of individual standard curve variability indicated reproducible responses with r2 values of > or = 0.985. The accuracy (% DEV) and precision (%RSD) estimates for the ELISA based on the predicted values from quality control (QC) samples were within 7.3% and 11%, respectively. Cross-reactivity with t-PA was determined to be less than 11% by ELISA. The stability of lanoteplase was established in human citrated PPACK plasma for 24 hours at 4 degrees C, for 2 months at -20 degrees C, for 22 months at -70 degrees C, three weeks at room temperature, and through four freeze/thaw cycles. To quantify lanoteplase plasminogen activator (PA) activity, a commercially available chromogenic activity assay was also validated. This method and its application is described briefly here. The lanoteplase ELISA as well as the commercial activity method were successfully employed to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters of lanoteplase in support of clinical Phase II/III studies. PMID:10595857

  2. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is a neuroprotectant in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Yepes, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine proteinase found not only in the intravascular space but also in a well-defined sub-set of neurons in the brain. tPA is rapidly released from neurons after either exposure to hypoxia or hypoglycemia in vitro, or the induction of cerebral ischemia in vivo. It has been proposed that tPA has a neurotoxic effect in the ischemic brain. However, recent evidence indicate that once released into the synaptic cleft tPA activates specific cell signaling pathways that promote the detection and adaptation to metabolic stress. More specifically, the non-proteolytic interaction of tPA with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family in dendritic spines activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway that adapts cellular processes to the availability of energy and metabolic resources. TPA-induced mTOR activation in neurons leads to hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) accumulation, HIF-1α-induced expression and membrane recruitment of the neuronal transporter of glucose GLUT3, and GLUT3-mediated uptake of glucose. These and other data discussed in this Review suggest that the postulated neurotoxic effect of tPA needs to be reconsidered and instead indicate the emergence of a new paradigm: that tPA is an endogenous neuroprotectant in the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:26347605

  3. Inhibitory effect of a new butadiene derivative on the production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in cultured bovine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, A; Takagi, T; Hirano, A; Murakami, J; Sasaki, Y

    1996-12-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and its physiological inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are known to be synthesized by vascular endothelial cells and to play important roles in regulating the fibrinolytic activity of plasma. We found that a new butadiene derivative, (3E, 4E)-3-benzylidene-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidene)pyrrolidine -2,5-dione (T-686), inhibits PAI-1 production without affecting plasminogen activator (PA) synthesis in cultured bovine endothelial cells. T-686 (1-10 microM) dose-dependently decreased the accumulation of PAI-1 in conditioned medium from the treated cells and elevated PA activity in the conditioned medium. Analysis of the conditioned medium by the zymography technique indicated that T-686 decreased the activities of PAI-1 with an M(r) of 55,000 and t-PA/PAI-1 complex with an M(r) of 99,000. Furthermore, T-686 attenuated the augmentation of PAI-1 antigen induced by lipopolysaccharide in the conditioned medium. The decrease of PAI-1 antigen was in parallel with the reduction of the PAI-1 mRNA level (Northern blots). These results suggest that T-686 can promote net fibrinolytic activity through suppression of PAI-1 production without affecting PA elaboration in endothelial cells.

  4. Seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells by competing with intracellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and inhibiting uPA-mediated activation of plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Se-kwon; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Sun Joo

    2014-12-01

    α-Enolase is a glycolytic enzyme and a surface receptor for plasminogen. α-Enolase-bound plasminogen promotes tumor cell invasion and cancer metastasis by activating plasmin and consequently degrading the extracellular matrix degradation. Therefore, α-enolase and plasminogen are novel targets for cancer therapy. We found that the amino acid sequence of a peptide purified from enzymatic hydrolysates of seahorse has striking similarities to that of α-enolase. In this study, we report that this peptide competes with cellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and suppresses urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated activation of plasminogen, which results in decreased invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. In addition, the peptide treatment decreased the expression levels of uPA compared to that of untreated controls. These results provide new insight into the mechanism by which the seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive properties of human cancer cells. Our findings suggest that this peptide could emerge as a potential therapeutic agent for cancer.

  5. Full Time Course Kinetics of the Streptokinase-Plasminogen Activation Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Miranda; Bouldin, Samantha D.; Bock, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Our previously hypothesized mechanism for the pathway of plasminogen (Pg) activation by streptokinase (SK) was tested by the use of full time course kinetics. Three discontinuous chromogenic substrate initial rate assays were developed with different quenching conditions that enabled quantitation of the time courses of Pg depletion, plasmin (Pm) formation, transient formation of the conformationally activated SK·Pg* catalytic complex intermediate, formation of the SK·Pm catalytic complex, and the free concentrations of Pg, Pm, and SK. Analysis of full time courses of Pg activation by five concentrations of SK along with activity-based titrations of SK·Pg* and SK·Pm formation yielded rate and dissociation constants within 2-fold of those determined previously by continuous measurement of parabolic chromogenic substrate hydrolysis and fluorescence-based equilibrium binding. The results obtained with orthogonal assays provide independent support for a mechanism in which the conformationally activated SK·Pg* complex catalyzes an initial cycle of Pg proteolytic conversion to Pm that acts as a trigger. Higher affinity binding of the formed Pm to SK outcompetes Pg binding, terminating the trigger cycle and initiating the bullet catalytic cycle by the SK·Pm complex that converts the residual Pg into Pm. The new assays can be adapted to quantitate SK-Pg activation in the context of SK- or Pg-directed inhibitors, effectors, and SK allelic variants. To support this, we show for the first time with an assay specific for SK·Pg* that fibrinogen forms a ternary SK·Pg*·fibrinogen complex, which assembles with 200-fold enhanced SK·Pg* affinity, signaled by a perturbation of the SK·Pg* active site. PMID:23970549

  6. Dopamine D3 receptor deletion increases tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) activity in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Castorina, A; D'Amico, A G; Scuderi, S; Leggio, G M; Drago, F; D'Agata, V

    2013-10-10

    Considerable evidence indicates that dopamine (DA) influences tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-mediated proteolytic processing of the precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF) into mature BDNF (mBDNF). However, specific roles in this process for the dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) and the underlying molecular mechanisms are yet to be fully characterized. In the present study, we hypothesized that D3R deletion could influence tPA activity in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Using D3R knockout (D3(-/-)) mice, we show that receptor inactivation is associated with increased tPA expression/activity both in the prefrontal cortex and, to a greater extent, in the hippocampus. Augmented tPA expression in D3(-/-) mice correlated with increased BDNF mRNA levels, plasmin/plasminogen protein ratio and the conversion of proBDNF into mBDNF, as well as enhanced tPA and mBDNF immunoreactivity, as determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In addition, when compared to wild-type controls, D3(-/-) mice exhibited increased basal activation of the canonical cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-driven Akt/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling cascade, as determined by the increased Akt phosphorylation both at Thr304 and Ser473 residues, of DA and cAMP-regulated protein of 32kDa (DARPP-32) at Thr34 and a phosphorylation state-dependent inhibition of glycogen synthetase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9, a substrate of Akt whose constitutive function impairs normal CREB transcriptional activity through phosphorylation at its Ser129 residue. Accordingly, CREB phosphorylation at Ser133 was significantly increased in D3(-/-) mice, whereas the GSK-3β-dependent phosphorylation at Ser129 was diminished. Altogether, our finding reveals that mice lacking D3Rs show enhanced tPA proteolytic activity on BDNF which may involve, at least in part, a potentiated Akt/CREB signaling

  7. Metals affect the structure and activity of human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. II. Binding affinity and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lawrence C; Goswami, Sumit; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2011-01-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor with a metastable active conformation. The lifespan of the active form of PAI-1 is modulated via interaction with the plasma protein, vitronectin, and various metal ions. These metal ions fall into two categories: Type I metals, including calcium, magnesium, and manganese, stabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, whereas Type II metals, including cobalt, copper, and nickel, destabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, but stabilize PAI-1 in its presence. To provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the unusual modulation of PAI-1 structure and activity, the binding characteristics and conformational effects of these two types of metals were further evaluated. Steady-state binding measurements using surface plasmon resonance indicated that both active and latent PAI-1 exhibit a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range for binding to immobilized nickel. Stopped-flow measurements of approach-to-equilibrium changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence indicated that the Type I and Type II metals bind in different modes that induce distinct conformational effects on PAI-1. Changes in the observed rate constants with varying concentrations of metal allowed accurate determination of binding affinities for cobalt, nickel, and copper, yielding dissociation constants of ∼40, 30, and 0.09 μM, respectively. Competition experiments that tested effects on PAI-1 stability were consistent with these measurements of affinity and indicate that copper binds tightly to PAI-1. PMID:21280128

  8. Novel Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitors Prevent Diabetic Kidney Injury in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hi Bahl; Miyata, Toshio; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, but no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Because plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is increasingly recognized as a key factor in extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy, this study examined the renoprotective effects of TM5275 and TM5441, two novel orally active PAI-1 inhibitors that do not trigger bleeding episodes, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. TM5275 (50 mg/kg) and TM5441 (10 mg/kg) were administered orally for 16 weeks to STZ-induced diabetic and age-matched control mice. Relative to the control mice, the diabetic mice showed significantly increased (p < 0.05) plasma glucose and creatinine levels, urinary albumin excretion, kidney-to-bodyweight ratios, glomerular volume, and fractional mesangial area. Markers of fibrosis and inflammation along with PAI-1 were also upregulated in the kidney of diabetic mice, and treatment with TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited albuminuria, mesangial expansion, ECM accumulation, and macrophage infiltration in diabetic kidneys. Furthermore, in mouse proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24) cells, both TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited PAI-1-induced mRNA expression of fibrosis and inflammation markers and also reversed PAI-1-induced inhibition of plasmin activity, which confirmed the efficacy of the TM compounds as PAI-1 inhibitors. These data suggest that TM compounds could be used to prevent diabetic kidney injury. PMID:27258009

  9. PGE2 reduces MMP-14 and increases plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Kamal M; Clevenger, Margarette H; Szandzik, David L; Peterson, Edward; Harding, Pamela

    2014-10-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is elevated during cardiac injury and we have previously shown that mice lacking the PGE2 EP4 receptor display dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with increased expression of the membrane type matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-14. We thus hypothesized that PGE2 regulates expression of MMP-14 and also affects fibroblast migration. Primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular fibroblasts (NVFs) were used to test the effects of PGE2. Gene and protein expression was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blot, MMP activity was determined by zymography and migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. PGE2 reduced expression of MMP-14 and these effects were antagonized by an EP4 antagonist. An EP4 agonist mimicked the effect of PGE2. PGE2 also increased mRNA and protein levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), an inhibitor of MMP activation. However, PGE2-stimulation of PAI-1 was mediated by the EP1/EP3 receptor and not EP4. Migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. Treatment of NVFs with PGE2 reduced the number of cells migrating toward 10% FCS. Treatment with the EP2 agonist also reduced migration but did not affect MMP-14 expression or PAI-1. Our results suggest that PGE2 utilizes different receptors and mechanisms to ultimately decrease MMP expression and NVF migration.

  10. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    SciTech Connect

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  11. Adhesive properties of the purified plasminogen activator Pla of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leandro Araujo

    2006-09-01

    The beta-barrel outer membrane protease Pla from Yersinia pestis is an important virulence factor in plague and enables initiation of the bubonic plague. Pla is a multifunctional protease whose expression also enhances bacterial adherence to extracellular matrix. It has remained uncertain whether the increase in cellular adhesiveness results from modification of the bacterial surface by Pla, or whether the Pla molecule is an adhesin. Pla was purified as a His6-fusion protein from Escherichia coli and reconstituted with lipopolysaccharide to an enzymatically active form. Purified His6-Pla was coated onto fluorescent micro-particles (FMPs) that expressed plasminogen activity. Pla-coated FMPs also bound to laminin and to reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel) immobilized on permanox slides, whereas only poor activity was seen with lipopolysaccharide-coated FMPs or bovine serum albumin-coated FMPs. The results show that the Pla molecule has intrinsic adhesive properties and that purified transmembrane proteins coated onto FMPs can be used for functional assays. PMID:16923070

  12. Tissue plasminogen activator modulates the cellular and behavioral response to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Maiya, Rajani; Zhou, Yan; Norris, Erin H.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Strickland, Sidney

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine exposure induces long-lasting molecular and structural adaptations in the brain. In this study, we show that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), an extracellular protease involved in neuronal plasticity, modulates the biochemical and behavioral response to cocaine. When injected in the acute binge paradigm, cocaine enhanced tPA activity in the amygdala, which required activation of corticotropin-releasing factor type-1 (CRF-R1) receptors. Compared with WT mice, tPA−/− mice injected with cocaine displayed attenuated phosphorylation of ERK, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and blunted induction of immediate early genes (IEGs) c-Fos, Egr-1, and Homer 1a in the amygdala and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). tPA−/− mice also displayed significantly higher basal preprodynorphin (ppDyn) mRNA levels in the NAc in comparison to WT mice, and cocaine decreased ppDyn mRNA levels in tPA−/− mice only. Cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference (CPP) were attenuated in tPA−/− mice. Cocaine exposure also had an anxiolytic effect in tPA−/− but not WT mice. These results identify tPA as an important and novel component of the signaling pathway that modulates cocaine-induced changes in neuroadaptation and behavior. PMID:19181855

  13. Human retinal pigment epithelial lysis of extracellular matrix: functional urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, collagenase, and elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Susan G

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show (1) human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) expression of functional urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR; CD87), (2) HRPE secretion of collagenase and elastase, (3) uPAR-dependent HRPE migration, and (4) uPAR expression in diseased human retinal tissue. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry for uPAR was performed on cultured HRPE cells and in sections of human retina. Double-immunofluorescent staining of live human RPE cells with anti-CR3 antibody (CD11b) was performed to demonstrate the physical proximity of this beta 2 integrin with uPAR and determine whether associations were dependent on RPE confluence and polarity. Extracellular proteolysis by HRPE uPAR was evaluated using fluorescent bodipy-BSA and assessed for specificity by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) inhibition. The effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) on uPAR expression was assessed. Collagenase and elastase secretion by unstimulated and IL-1-stimulated HRPE cells was measured by 3H-labelled collagen and elastin cleavage. HRPE-associated collagenase was also assessed by cleavage of fluorescent DQ-collagen and inhibited by phenanthroline. Using an extracellular matrix assay, the roles of uPAR and collagenase in HRPE migration were assessed. RESULTS: Immunoreactive uPAR was detected on cultured HRPE cells and increased by IL-1. On elongated, live HRPE cells, uPAR dissociated from CD11b (CR3) and translocated to anterior poles of migrating cells. Extracellular proteolysis was concentrated at sites of uPAR expression and specifically inhibited by PAI-1. Cultured HRPE cells secreted substantial, functional collagenase and elastase. IL-1 upregulated uPAR, collagenase, and elastase activities. Specific inhibition of uPAR, and to a lesser degree collagenase, reduced HRPE migration in matrix/gel assays. Immunoreactive uPAR was present along the HRPE basolateral membrane in retinal sections and in sections of diseased retinal tissue. CONCLUSIONS: HRPE cells express functional u

  14. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1--insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 cascade regulates stress-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Elzi, David J; Lai, Yanlai; Song, Meihua; Hakala, Kevin; Weintraub, Susan T; Shiio, Yuzuru

    2012-07-24

    Cellular senescence is widely believed to play a key role in tumor suppression, but the molecular pathways that regulate senescence are only incompletely understood. By using a secretome proteomics approach, we identified insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) as a secreted mediator of breast cancer senescence upon chemotherapeutic drug treatment. The senescence-inducing activity of IGFBP3 is inhibited by tissue-type plasminogen activator-mediated proteolysis, which is counteracted by plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), another secreted mediator of senescence. We demonstrate that IGFBP3 is a critical downstream target of PAI-1-induced senescence. These results suggest a role for an extracellular cascade of secreted proteins in the regulation of cellular senescence.

  15. Acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in a patient taking dabigatran with radiographic evidence of recanalization.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Navdeep; El Khoury, Ramy; Misra, Vivek; Lopez, George

    2012-11-01

    Dabigatran etexelate is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. A 51-year-old man with a history of atrial fibrillation who was taking dabigatran presented with an acute ischemic stroke. The patient had a normal international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, and an elevated thrombin time of 26.4 seconds. Recanalization of the middle cerebral artery with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was apparent on digital subtraction angiography, and there was no evidence of intracerebral hemorrhage on the repeat computed tomographic scan. This is the first report of a patient who was taking dabigatran etexilate and who had an ischemic stroke caused by a middle cerebral artery occlusion, with an elevated thrombin time and radiographic recanalization with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator without evidence of hemorrhagic transformation. PMID:22683118

  16. Plasminogen-stimulated airway smooth muscle cell proliferation is mediated by urokinase and annexin A2, involving plasmin-activated cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A G; Xia, Y C; Harris, T; Royce, S; Hamilton, J A; Schuliga, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The conversion of plasminogen into plasmin by interstitial urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is potentially important in asthma pathophysiology. In this study, the effect of uPA-mediated plasminogen activation on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation was investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Human ASM cells were incubated with plasminogen (0.5–50 μg·mL−1) or plasmin (0.5–50 mU·mL−1) in the presence of pharmacological inhibitors, including UK122, an inhibitor of uPA. Proliferation was assessed by increases in cell number or MTT reduction after 48 h incubation with plasmin(ogen), and by earlier increases in [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cyclin D1 expression. KEY RESULTS Plasminogen (5 μg·mL−1)-stimulated increases in cell proliferation were attenuated by UK122 (10 μM) or by transfection with uPA gene-specific siRNA. Exogenous plasmin (5 mU·mL−1) also stimulated increases in cell proliferation. Inhibition of plasmin-stimulated ERK1/2 or PI3K/Akt signalling attenuated plasmin-stimulated increases in ASM proliferation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of cell signalling mediated by the EGF receptor, a receptor trans-activated by plasmin, also reduced plasmin(ogen)-stimulated cell proliferation. Knock down of annexin A2, which has dual roles in both plasminogen activation and plasmin-signal transduction, also attenuated ASM cell proliferation following incubation with either plasminogen or plasmin. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Plasminogen stimulates ASM cell proliferation in a manner mediated by uPA and involving multiple signalling pathways downstream of plasmin. Targeting mediators of plasminogen-evoked ASM responses, such as uPA or annexin A2, may be useful in the treatment of asthma. PMID:24111848

  17. Promotion of Wound Healing by an Agonist of Adenosine A2A Receptor Is Dependent on Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, M Carmen; Desai-Merchant, Avani; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2015-12-01

    Impaired wound healing, as it occurs in diabetes mellitus or long-term corticoid treatment, is commonly associated with disability, diminished quality of life, and high economic costs. Selective agonists of the A2A receptor subtype of adenosine, an endogenous regulator of inflammation, promote tissue repair in animal models, both healthy and with impaired healing. Plasmin-mediated proteolysis of fibrin and other matrix proteins is essential for cell migration at sites of injury. Since adenosine A2A receptor activation increases plasminogen activator release from macrophages and mast cells, we studied the effect of a selective agonist, CGS-21680, on full-thickness excisional wound closure in wild-type, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-deficient, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-deficient mice. Wound closure was impaired in tPA- and uPA-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice, and topical application of CGS-21680 significantly increased the rate at which wounds closed in wild-type mice and uPA-deficient mice, but not in tPA-deficient mice. Immunostaining of tissue sections showed that tPA was present in endothelial cells and histiocytes by day 3 post-wound and also by day 6. In contrast, uPA was more prominent in these cell types only by day 6 post-wound. Our results confirm that plasminogen activation contributes to wound repair and are consistent with the hypothesis that adenosine A2A receptor activation promotes wound closure by a mechanism that depends upon tPA, but not uPA. Moreover, our results suggest that topical adenosine A2A receptor agonists may be useful in promotion of wound closure in patients with impaired wound healing.

  18. SIRT1-mediated epigenetic downregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 prevents vascular endothelial replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yan-Zhen; Gao, Peng; Zhou, Shuang; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Hao, De-Long; Lian, Li-Shan; Li, Yong-Jun; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-10-01

    The inactivation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has been shown to exert beneficial effects in age-related vascular diseases. Limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms regarding the negatively regulated expression of PAI-1 in the vascular system. In this study, we observed an inverse correlation between SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase, and PAI-1 expression in human atherosclerotic plaques and the aortas of old mice, suggesting that internal negative regulation exists between SIRT1 and PAI-1. SIRT1 overexpression reversed the increased PAI-1 expression in senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and aortas of old mice, accompanied by decreased SA-β-gal activity in vitro and improved endothelial function and reduced arterial stiffness in vivo. Moreover, the SIRT1-mediated inhibition of PAI-1 expression exerted an antisenescence effect in HUVECs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that SIRT1 is able to bind to the PAI-1 promoter, resulting in a decrease in the acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16) on the PAI-1 promoter region. Thus, our findings suggest that the SIRT1-mediated epigenetic inhibition of PAI-1 expression exerts a protective effect in vascular endothelial senescence.

  19. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in glucocorticoid-induced diabetes and osteopenia in mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yukinori; Kawao, Naoyuki; Yano, Masato; Okada, Kiyotaka; Okumoto, Katsumi; Chiba, Yasutaka; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    Long-term use of glucocorticoids (GCs) causes numerous adverse effects, including glucose/lipid abnormalities, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The pathogenic mechanism, however, is not completely understood. In this study, we used plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)-deficient mice to explore the role of PAI-1 in GC-induced glucose/lipid abnormalities, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. Corticosterone markedly increased the levels of circulating PAI-1 and the PAI-1 mRNA level in the white adipose tissue of wild-type mice. PAI-1 deficiency significantly reduced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance but not hyperlipidemia induced by GC. An in vitro experiment revealed that active PAI-1 treatment inhibits insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt and glucose uptake in HepG2 hepatocytes. However, this was not observed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myotubes, indicating that PAI-1 suppressed insulin signaling in hepatocytes. PAI-1 deficiency attenuated the GC-induced bone loss presumably via inhibition of apoptosis of osteoblasts. Moreover, the PAI-1 deficiency also protected from GC-induced muscle loss. In conclusion, the current study indicated that PAI-1 is involved in GC-induced glucose metabolism abnormality, osteopenia, and muscle wasting in mice. PAI-1 may be a novel therapeutic target to mitigate the adverse effects of GC.

  20. Resistin regulates the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yoshito; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hama, Susumu; Kajimoto, Kazuaki; Kogure, Kentaro

    2014-05-30

    Resistin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are adipokines, which are secreted from adipocytes. Increased plasma resistin and PAI-1 levels aggravate metabolic syndrome through exacerbation of insulin resistance and induction of chronic inflammation. However, the relationship between resistin and PAI-1 gene expression remains unclear. Previously, we found that resistin regulates lipid metabolism via carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) during adipocyte maturation (Ikeda et al., 2013) [6]. In this study, to clarify the relationship between expression of resistin and PAI-1, PAI-1 expression in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes was measured after transfection with anti-resistin siRNA. We found that PAI-1 gene expression and secreted PAI-1 protein were significantly decreased by resistin knockdown. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Akt, which can inhibit PAI-1 expression, was accelerated and the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) was suppressed in resistin knockdown 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In addition, the expression of glucose transporter type 4, a ChREBP target gene, was reduced and was associated with inhibition of PP2A. The addition of culture medium collected from COS7 cells transfected with a resistin expression plasmid rescued the suppression of PAI-1 expression in resistin knockdown 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our findings suggest that resistin regulates PAI-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via Akt phosphorylation.

  1. SIRT1-mediated epigenetic downregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 prevents vascular endothelial replicative senescence

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yan-Zhen; Gao, Peng; Zhou, Shuang; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Hao, De-Long; Lian, Li-Shan; Li, Yong-Jun; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-01-01

    The inactivation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has been shown to exert beneficial effects in age-related vascular diseases. Limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms regarding the negatively regulated expression of PAI-1 in the vascular system. In this study, we observed an inverse correlation between SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase, and PAI-1 expression in human atherosclerotic plaques and the aortas of old mice, suggesting that internal negative regulation exists between SIRT1 and PAI-1. SIRT1 overexpression reversed the increased PAI-1 expression in senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and aortas of old mice, accompanied by decreased SA-β-gal activity in vitro and improved endothelial function and reduced arterial stiffness in vivo. Moreover, the SIRT1-mediated inhibition of PAI-1 expression exerted an antisenescence effect in HUVECs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that SIRT1 is able to bind to the PAI-1 promoter, resulting in a decrease in the acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16) on the PAI-1 promoter region. Thus, our findings suggest that the SIRT1-mediated epigenetic inhibition of PAI-1 expression exerts a protective effect in vascular endothelial senescence. PMID:25040736

  2. Augmented expression of urokinase plasminogen activator and extracellular matrix proteins associates with multiple myeloma progression.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rehan; Gupta, Nidhi; Kumar, Raman; Sharma, Manoj; Kumar, Lalit; Sharma, Alpana

    2014-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) represents a B cell malignancy, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells. Interactions between tumor cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) are of importance for tumor invasion and metastasis. Protein levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and fibulin 1, nidogen and laminin in plasma and serum respectively and mRNA levels of these molecules in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined in 80 subjects by using ELISA and quantitative PCR and data was analyzed with severity of disease. Pearson correlation was determined to observe interrelationship between different molecules. A statistical significant increase for ECM proteins (laminin, nidogen and fibulin 1) and uPA at circulatory level as well as at mRNA level was observed compared to healthy controls. The levels of these molecules in serum might be utilized as a marker of active disease. Significant positive correlation of all ECM proteins with uPA was found and data also correlates with severity of disease. Strong association found between ECM proteins and uPA in this study supports that there might be interplay between these molecules which can be targeted. This study on these molecules may help to gain insight into processes of growth, spread, and clinical behavior of MM.

  3. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-deficient mice demonstrate reduced hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Florquin, Sandrine; de Beer, Regina; Pater, Jennie M; Verstege, Marleen I; Meijers, Joost C M; van der Poll, Tom

    2009-06-01

    Patients with respiratory failure often require supplemental oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation. Although both supportive measures are necessary to guarantee adequate oxygen uptake, they can also cause or worsen lung inflammation and injury. Hyperoxia-induced lung injury is characterized by neutrophil infiltration into the lungs. The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been deemed important for leukocyte trafficking. To determine the expression and function of neutrophil uPAR during hyperoxia-induced lung injury, uPAR expression was determined on pulmonary neutrophils of mice exposed to hyperoxia. Hyperoxia exposure (O2>80%) for 4 days elicited a pulmonary inflammatory response as reflected by a profound rise in the number of neutrophils that were recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung cell suspensions, as well as increased bronchoalveolar keratinocyte-derived chemokine, interleukin-6, total protein, and alkaline phosphatase levels. In addition, hyperoxia induced the migration of uPAR-positive granulocytes into lungs from wild-type mice compared with healthy control mice (exposed to room air). uPAR deficiency was associated with diminished neutrophil influx into both lung tissues and bronchoalveolar spaces, which was accompanied by a strong reduction in lung injury. Furthermore, in uPAR(-/-) mice, activation of coagulation was diminished. These data suggest that uPAR plays a detrimental role in hyperoxia-induced lung injury and that uPAR deficiency is associated with diminished neutrophil influx into both lung tissues and bronchoalveolar spaces, accompanied by decreased pulmonary injury. PMID:19435793

  4. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  5. Airway Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prevents Acute Mortality Due to Lethal Sulfur Mustard Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Veress, Livia A.; Anderson, Dana R.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Houin, Paul R.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; Loader, Joan E.; Paradiso, Danielle C.; Smith, Russell W.; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Holmes, Wesley W.; White, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical weapon stockpiled today in volatile regions of the world. SM inhalation causes a life-threatening airway injury characterized by airway obstruction from fibrin casts, which can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is more than 80%. No therapy exists to prevent mortality after SM exposure. Our previous work using the less toxic analog of SM, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, identified tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) an effective rescue therapy for airway cast obstruction (Veress, L. A., Hendry-Hofer, T. B., Loader, J. E., Rioux, J. S., Garlick, R. B., and White, C. W. (2013). Tissue plasminogen activator prevents mortality from sulfur mustard analog-induced airway obstruction. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 48, 439–447). It is not known if exposure to neat SM vapor, the primary agent used in chemical warfare, will also cause death due to airway casts, and if tPA could be used to improve outcome. Methods: Adult rats were exposed to SM, and when oxygen saturation reached less than 85% (median: 6.5 h), intratracheal tPA or placebo was given under isoflurane anesthesia every 4 h for 48 h. Oxygen saturation, clinical distress, and arterial blood gases were assessed. Microdissection was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Results: Intratracheal tPA treatment eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h) and greatly improved morbidity after lethal SM inhalation (100% death in controls). tPA normalized SM-associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress. Moreover, tPA treatment resulted in greatly diminished airway casts, preventing respiratory failure from airway obstruction. Conclusions: tPA given via airway more than 6 h after exposure prevented death from lethal SM inhalation, and normalized oxygenation and ventilation defects, thereby rescuing from respiratory distress and failure. Intra-airway tPA should be considered as a life

  6. Tissue plasminogen activator protects hippocampal neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation injury.

    PubMed

    Flavin, M P; Zhao, G

    2001-03-01

    We have previously shown that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) participates in the neurotoxicity of microglial conditioned medium (MgCM). Killing of hippocampal neurons by MgCM was prevented by both plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and anti-tPA antibody. An N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker protected neurons from MgCM, suggesting that this subtype of glutamate receptor is involved. Whereas glutamate receptor-mediated events are important in cerebral ischemia and tPA has previously been shown to enhance excitotoxicity in hippocampus, we hypothesized that tPA would exaggerate oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) injury in cultures of hippocampal neurons. Dissociated rat hippocampal cells were grown under conditions designed to optimize neuronal growth while minimizing glial replication. At 7--10 days, cultures were subjected to OGD for 2.5 hr. Recombinant human tPA (1,000 IU) was added immediately after OGD. Viability was assessed 24 hr later. Viable, apoptotic, and necrotic cells were classified and quantified based on staining patterns of acridine orange and ethidium bromide under fluorescence microscopy. tPA alone did not alter neuronal integrity. OGD produced significant neuronal death (viability reduced by 45%, P < 0.001). tPA completely protected OGD-exposed cultures. Potential mechanisms of tPA protection were explored. Whereas tPA antibody abolished the protective effect of tPA, its proteolytic inhibitor PAI-1 did not alter the effect. The effect of tPA was tested in separate free radical and excitatory amino acid insults. It did not protect neurons from hydrogen peroxide (1 microM), S-nitro-acetylpenicillamine (10 microM), glutamate (50 microM), or NMDA (10 microM) damage but significantly attenuated injury caused by 250 microM kainate. We conclude that tPA is capable of protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD by a nonproteolytic action. The mechanism of protection was not defined, although attenuation of AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator suppresses activated stellate cells through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Liang-I; Isse, Kumiko; Koral, Kelly; Bowen, William C; Muratoglu, Selen; Strickland, Dudley K; Michalopoulos, George K; Mars, Wendy M

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and trans-differentiation into myofibroblast (MFB)-like cells is key for fibrogenesis after liver injury and a potential therapeutic target. Recent studies demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent signaling by tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a pro-fibrotic regulator of the MFB phenotype in kidney. This study investigated whether LRP1 signaling by t-PA is also relevant to HSC activation following injury. Primary and immortalized rat HSCs were treated with t-PA and assayed by western blot, MTT, and TUNEL. In vitro results were then verified using an in vivo, acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injury model that examined the phenotype and recovery kinetics of MFBs from wild-type animals vs mice with a global (t-PA) or HSC-targeted (LRP1) deletion. In vitro, in contrast to kidney MFBs, exogenous, proteolytically inactive t-PA suppressed, rather than induced, activation markers in HSCs following phosphorylation of LRP1. This process was mediated by LRP1 as inhibition of t-PA binding to LRP1 blocked the effects of t-PA. In vivo, following acute injury, phosphorylation of LRP1 on activated HSCs occurred immediately prior to their disappearance. Mice lacking t-PA or LRP1 retained higher densities of activated HSCs for a longer time period compared with control mice after injury cessation. Hence, t-PA, an FDA-approved drug, contributes to the suppression of activated HSCs following injury repair via signaling through LRP1. This renders t-PA a potential target for exploitation in treating patients with fibrosis.

  8. Plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Sharon, R; Abramovitz, R; Miskin, R

    2001-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) specifically inhibits plasminogen activators, extracellular fibrinolytic serine proteases that are also implicated in brain plasticity and toxicity. Primarily localized intracellularly, PAI-2 is thought to also counteract apoptosis mediated by a currently undefined intracellular protease. Here we localized PAI-2 mRNA through in situ hybridization in brain cryosections derived from normal adult mice or after kainate excitation. We found that in the normal brain PAI-2 mRNA was confined to an area within the accumbens nucleus shell. After kainate was injected (i.p.), PAI-2 mRNA was substantially and rapidly (within 2 h) induced in neuron-like cells primarily in layers II-III of the neocortex; the cingulate, piriform, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices; the olfactory bulb, nucleus and tubercle; in the accumbens nucleus, shell and core; throughout the caudate putamen and the amygdaloid complex; in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus, and in the parasubiculum. These findings suggest that PAI-2 could play a role in the accumbens nucleus as well as in activity-related events associated with olfactory, striatal, and limbic structures.

  9. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289. PMID:26029848

  10. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 enhances radioresistance and aggressiveness of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Youn, HyeSook; Kim, Joong Sun; Youn, BuHyun

    2016-01-01

    Acquired resistance of tumor cells during treatment limits the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy. Recent studies to investigate acquired resistance under treatment have focused on intercellular communication because it promotes survival and aggressiveness of tumor cells, causing therapy failure and tumor relapse. Accordingly, a better understanding of the functional communication between subpopulations of cells within a tumor is essential to development of effective cancer treatment strategies. Here, we found that conditioned media (CM) from radioresistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells increased survival of radiosensitive cells. Comparative proteomics analysis revealed plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as a key molecule in the secretome that acts as an extracellular signaling trigger to strengthen resistance to radiation. Our results revealed that expression and secretion of PAI-1 in radioresistant cells was increased by radiation-induced transcription factors, including p53, HIF-1α, and Smad3. When CM from radioresistant cells was applied to radiosensitive cells, extracellular PAI-1 activated the AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathway and inhibited caspase-3 activity. Our study also proposed that PAI-1 activates the signaling pathway in radiosensitive cells via extracellular interaction with its binding partners, not clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, secreted PAI-1 increased cell migration capacity and expression of EMT markers in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PAI-1 secreted from radioresistant NSCLC cells reduced radiosensitivity of nearby cells in a paracrine manner, indicating that functional inhibition of PAI-1 signaling has therapeutic potential because it prevents sensitive cells from acquiring radioresistance. PMID:27004408

  11. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator in stress responsivity during acute cocaine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Maiya, Rajani; Norris, Erin H; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Strickland, Sidney

    2010-11-01

    There is evidence that increased release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) contributes to stress responsivity during cocaine withdrawal (WD). Recent studies suggest that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the CeA is a downstream effector protein for CRF after acute "binge" cocaine administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if tPA modulates cocaine WD-induced stress responsivity. Wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA - / - ) mice were subjected to chronic (14 days) "binge" cocaine (45 mg/kg per day) or its acute (1 day) WD. Extracellular tPA activity, CRF mRNA levels, and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured in tPA - / -  and WT mice. Extracellular tPA activity was reduced by 50% in the CeA and medial amygdala of WT mice after chronic cocaine and returned to basal levels after acute WD. Unlike WT mice, tPA - / -  mice did not display elevated amygdalar CRF mRNA levels during cocaine WD. In comparison to WT mice, tPA - / -  mice showed a blunted plasma CORT response during acute WD. These results demonstrate that tPA activity in the amygdala (Amy) is altered by chronic cocaine exposure, and further suggest an involvement of tPA in modulating amygdalar CRF stress responsive system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to acute cocaine WD.

  12. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator in stress responsivity during acute cocaine withdrawal in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Maiya, Rajani; Norris, Erin H.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Strickland, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that increased release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) contributes to stress responsivity during cocaine withdrawal (WD). Recent studies suggest that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the CeA is a downstream effector protein for CRF after acute “binge” cocaine administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if tPA modulates cocaine WD-induced stress responsivity. Wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA −/−) mice were subjected to chronic (14 days) “binge” cocaine (45 mg/kg per day) or its acute (1 day) WD. Extracellular tPA activity, CRF mRNA levels, and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured in tPA −/− and WT mice. Extracellular tPA activity was reduced by 50% in the CeA and medial amygdala of WT mice after chronic cocaine and returned to basal levels after acute WD. Unlike WT mice, tPA −/− mice did not display elevated amygdalar CRF mRNA levels during cocaine WD. In comparison to WT mice, tPA −/− mice showed a blunted plasma CORT response during acute WD. These results demonstrate that tPA activity in the amygdala (Amy) is altered by chronic cocaine exposure, and further suggest an involvement of tPA in modulating amygdalar CRF stress responsive system and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis in response to acute cocaine WD. PMID:20666641

  13. A high-affinity receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator on human keratinocytes: characterization and potential modulation during migration.

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, H; Jensen, P J

    1990-01-01

    Low passage cultures of normal human keratinocytes produce several components of the plasminogen activator/plasmin proteolytic cascade, including urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and two specific inhibitors. Studies here presented demonstrate that these cells also contain a high-affinity (Kd = 3 x 10(-10) M) plasma membrane-binding site for uPA. High molecular weight uPA, either as the single-chain precursor or two-chain activated form, bound to the receptor; however, low molecular weight (33 kD) uPA, tPA, or epidermal growth factor did not compete for binding, demonstrating specificity. Acid treatment, which removed endogenous uPA from the receptor, was required to detect maximal binding (45,000 sites per cell). To investigate the possibility that the uPA receptor on keratinocytes may be involved in epithelial migration during wound repair, cultures were wounded and allowed to migrate into the wounded site. Binding sites for uPA were localized by autoradiographic analysis of 125I-uPA binding as well as by immunocytochemical studies using anti-uPA IgG. With both techniques uPA binding sites were detected selectively on the plasma membrane of cells at the leading edge of the migrating epithelial sheet. This localization pattern suggests that uPA receptor expression on keratinocytes may be coupled to cell migration during cutaneous wounding. Images PMID:1965151

  14. Hypoxia-Ischemia or Excitotoxin-Induced Tissue Plasminogen Activator- Dependent Gelatinase Activation in Mice Neonate Brain Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Omouendze, Priscilla L.; Henry, Vincent J.; Porte, Baptiste; Dupré, Nicolas; Carmeliet, Peter; Gonzalez, Bruno J.; Marret, Stéphane; Leroux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and excitotoxicity are validated causes of neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor-mediated pathways. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from neonates in culture, contain and release more t-PA and gelatinases upon glutamate challenge than adult cells. We have studied t-PA to gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activity links in HI and excitotoxicity lesion models in 5 day–old pups in wild type and in t-PA or its inhibitor (PAI-1) genes inactivated mice. Gelatinolytic activities were detected in SDS-PAGE zymograms and by in situ fluorescent DQ-gelatin microscopic zymographies. HI was achieved by unilateral carotid ligature followed by a 40 min hypoxia (8%O2). Excitotoxic lesions were produced by intra parenchymal cortical (i.c.) injections of 10 µg ibotenate (Ibo). Gel zymograms in WT cortex revealed progressive extinction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities near day 15 or day 8 respectively. MMP-2 expression was the same in all strains while MMP-9 activity was barely detectable in t-PA−/− and enhanced in PAI-1−/− mice. HI or Ibo produced activation of MMP-2 activities 6 hours post-insult, in cortices of WT mice but not in t-PA−/− mice. In PAI-1−/− mice, HI or vehicle i.c. injection increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. In situ zymograms using DQ-gelatin revealed vessel associated gelatinolytic activity in lesioned areas in PAI-1−/− and in WT mice. In WT brain slices incubated ex vivo, glutamate (200 µM) induced DQ-gelatin activation in vessels. The effect was not detected in t-PA−/−mice, but was restored by concomitant exposure to recombinant t-PA (20 µg/mL). In summary, neonatal brain lesion paradigms and ex vivo excitotoxic glutamate evoked t-PA-dependent gelatinases activation in vessels. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities appeared t-PA-dependent. The data suggest that vascular directed protease inhibition may have neuroprotection

  15. Add-on rosiglitazone therapy improves plasminogen activity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mustaffa, Nazri; Ibrahim, Suhairi; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Yusof, Zurkurnai

    2011-09-01

    Rosiglitazone is an oral hypoglycaemic agent of the thiazolidinedione group. This study aimed to assess changes in the diabetic prothrombotic state via plasminogen activity and changes in surrogate markers of atherosclerotic burden via ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) measurements after rosiglitazone was added to a pre-existing type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment regime. A nonblinded interventional study was designed. Fifty-nine patients were enrolled. Rosiglitazone-naïve patients were prescribed oral rosiglitazone 4 mg daily for 10 weeks. ABPI, plasminogen activity, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting lipid profile were measured pretreatment and post-treatment. Forty-eight patients completed the study. At the end of this study, mean plasminogen activity improvement was nearly 16% (P<0.05), mean ABPI improvement was 0.01 (P=0.439), mean HbA1c reduction was 0.51% (P<0.05), mean total cholesterol (TC) increase was 0.36 mmol/l (P<0.05), mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increase was 0.15 mmol/l (P<0.05) and mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 0.19 mmol/l (P=0.098). Rosiglitazone significantly improved plasminogen activity. There was also significant HbA1c reduction, and rise in both TC and HDL-C. Thus, rosiglitazone potentially improves the atherosclerotic burden and prothrombotic state. In future, more studies are needed to confirm the relationship between rosiglitazone, fibrinolytic system and atheromatous reduction in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:21537159

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 as an early potential diagnostic marker for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaeho; Lee, Hye-Ja; Song, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang Ick; Kim, Hyunyoung

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in individuals over 65 years old. However, to date, no useful early diagnostic markers for AD have been discovered. We examined the utility of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as a potential biomarker for AD in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD, as well as in nondemented healthy controls. Plasma PAI-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in samples collected from 76 patients with MCI, 74 patients with AD, and 76 healthy controls. Our results show that plasma PAI-1 levels gradually increased as dementia progressed. The mean levels of plasma PAI-1 in patients with MCI and AD patients were significantly higher than those of in healthy controls. Consistently, neuropsychological examination (e.g., MMSE, CDR) also demonstrated significant correlations between the plasma PAI-1 levels and cognitive function. In conclusion, the level of plasma PAI-1 is a potential biomarker for the early detection and diagnosis of AD.

  17. Hypothermia Increases Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression and Decreases Post-Operative Intra-Abdominal Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Wang, Hsuan-Mao; Chou, Tzung-Hsin; Wu, Meng-Che; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia during operation decreases postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. We sought to determine the most appropriate duration of hypothermia, and whether hypothermia affects the expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Methods 80 male BALB/c mice weighing 25–30 g are randomized into one of five groups: adhesion model with infusion of 15°C saline for 15 minutes (A); 30 minutes (B); 45 minute (C); adhesion model without infusion of cold saline (D); and sham operation without infusion of cold saline (E). Adhesion scores and tPA levels in the peritoneum fluid levels were analyzed on postoperative days 1, 7, and 14. Results On day 14, the cold saline infusion groups (A, B, and C) had lower adhesion scores than the without infusion of cold saline group (D). However, only group B (cold saline infusion for 30 minutes) had a significantly lower adhesion scores than group D. Also, group B was found to have 3.4 fold, 2.3 fold, and 2.2 fold higher levels of tPA than group D on days 1, 7, and 14 respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that cold saline infusion for 30 minutes was the optimum duration to decrease postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. The decrease in the adhesion formations could be partly due to an increase in the level of tPA. PMID:27583464

  18. Effects of pharmacological suppression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in myocardial remodeling after ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryo; Nakajima, Takuya; Ogawa, Masahito; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Muto, Susumu; Itai, Akiko; Hirata, Yasunobu; Nagai, Ryozo; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) contributes to cardiac ventricular remodeling because migration of inflammatory cells and attenuation of extracellular matrix degradation are caused by plasmin and matrix metalloproteinase. However, the roles of PAI-1 in myocardial ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury and the following inflammatory response have not yet been well elucidated. To clarify the role of PAI-1 in myocardial I/R injury, we used a specific PAI-1 inhibitor (IMD-1622) in a rat model. The left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated and reperfusion was performed by loosening the suture after 30 minutes of arterial occlusion. A single administration of IMD-1622 (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was given intraperitoneally and then the rats were sacrificed on day 1 or day 14 after I/R. Blood pressure, echocardiograms, histopathology, and molecular examination were performed. The examinations revealed that PAI-1 inhibitor showed limited effects on cardiac dysfunction and ventricular remodeling after I/R. We conclude that the pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 may not affect ventricular remodeling after myocardial I/R injury.

  19. Are free fatty acids related to plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 in android obesity?

    PubMed

    Bastard, J P; Bruckert, E; Robert, J J; Ankri, A; Grimaldi, A; Jardel, C; Hainque, B

    1995-11-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) levels are elevated in obese insulin-resistant subjects. However the mechanism underlying increased PAI-1 levels is unknown. To determine the impact of diabetes on PAI-1 levels and its possible relationship to insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies were performed in nine lean control subjects, nine non-diabetic obese subjects and eight obese patients with NIDDM. Fasting plasma PAI-1 levels were 4.0 to 4.7 fold higher in the two obese groups than in the control group. During the 40 mU/m2 x min insulin infusion, suppression of FFA concentration was correlated with fasting plasma PAI-1 levels in both obese non-diabetic and obese NIDDM subjects. It is concluded that (1) obesity rather than diabetes itself plays a major role for the increased PAI-1 levels in NIDDM; (2) resistance to the antilipolytic effect of insulin, resulting in increased FFA concentrations, may participate in producing elevated PAI-1 levels in android obese subjects.

  20. Full-length soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor down-modulates nephrin expression in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Massimo; Cinque, Paola; Giusti, Guido; Proietti, Silvia; Nebuloni, Manuela; Danese, Silvio; D’Alessio, Silvia; Genua, Marco; Portale, Federica; Lo Porto, Manuela; Singhal, Pravin C.; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Saleem, Moin A.; Mavilio, Domenico; Mikulak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma level of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was associated recently with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In addition, different clinical studies observed increased concentration of suPAR in various glomerular diseases and in other human pathologies with nephrotic syndromes such as HIV and Hantavirus infection, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Here, we show that suPAR induces nephrin down-modulation in human podocytes. This phenomenon is mediated only by full-length suPAR, is time-and dose-dependent and is associated with the suppression of Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT-1) transcription factor expression. Moreover, an antagonist of αvβ3 integrin RGDfv blocked suPAR-induced suppression of nephrin. These in vitro data were confirmed in an in vivo uPAR knock out Plaur−/− mice model by demonstrating that the infusion of suPAR inhibits expression of nephrin and WT-1 in podocytes and induces proteinuria. This study unveiled that interaction of full-length suPAR with αvβ3 integrin expressed on podocytes results in down-modulation of nephrin that may affect kidney functionality in different human pathologies characterized by increased concentration of suPAR. PMID:26380915

  1. Full-length soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor down-modulates nephrin expression in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Massimo; Cinque, Paola; Giusti, Guido; Proietti, Silvia; Nebuloni, Manuela; Danese, Silvio; D'Alessio, Silvia; Genua, Marco; Portale, Federica; Lo Porto, Manuela; Singhal, Pravin C; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Saleem, Moin A; Mavilio, Domenico; Mikulak, Joanna

    2015-09-18

    Increased plasma level of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was associated recently with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In addition, different clinical studies observed increased concentration of suPAR in various glomerular diseases and in other human pathologies with nephrotic syndromes such as HIV and Hantavirus infection, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Here, we show that suPAR induces nephrin down-modulation in human podocytes. This phenomenon is mediated only by full-length suPAR, is time-and dose-dependent and is associated with the suppression of Wilms' tumor 1 (WT-1) transcription factor expression. Moreover, an antagonist of αvβ3 integrin RGDfv blocked suPAR-induced suppression of nephrin. These in vitro data were confirmed in an in vivo uPAR knock out Plaur(-/-) mice model by demonstrating that the infusion of suPAR inhibits expression of nephrin and WT-1 in podocytes and induces proteinuria. This study unveiled that interaction of full-length suPAR with αvβ3 integrin expressed on podocytes results in down-modulation of nephrin that may affect kidney functionality in different human pathologies characterized by increased concentration of suPAR.

  2. Electroanalysis of pM-levels of urokinase plasminogen activator in serum by phosphorothioated RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Kékedy-Nagy, László; Nielsen, Jesper S; Campos, Rui; Kjems, Jørgen; Malinowska, Elżbieta; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2015-06-01

    Protein biomarkers of cancer allow a dramatic improvement in cancer diagnostics as compared to the traditional histological characterisation of tumours by enabling a non-invasive analysis of cancer development and treatment. Here, an electrochemical label-free assay for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), a universal biomarker of several cancers, has been developed based on the recently selected uPA-specific fluorinated RNA aptamer, tethered to a gold electrode via a phosphorothioated dA tag, and soluble redox indicators. The binding properties of the uPA-aptamer couple and interference from the non-specific adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were modulated by the electrode surface charge. A nM uPA electroanalysis at positively charged surfaces, complicated by the competitive adsorption of BSA, was tuned to the pM uPA analysis at negative surface charges of the electrode, being improved in the presence of negatively charged BSA. The aptamer affinity for uPA displayed via the binding/dissociation constant relationship correspondingly increased, ca. three orders of magnitude, from 0.441 to 367. Under optimal conditions, the aptasensor allowed 10(-12)-10(-9) M uPA analysis, also in serum, being practically useful for clinical applications. The proposed strategy for optimization of the electrochemical protein sensing is of particular importance for the assessment and optimization of in vivo protein ligand binding by surface-tethered aptamers.

  3. Expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    No, Jae Hong; Jo, Hoenil; Kim, Su-Hyeong; Park, In-Ae; Kang, Daehee; Lee, Chae Hyeong; Han, Seung-Su; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Noh-Hyun; Kang, Soon-Beom; Song, Yong-Sang

    2009-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) are important factors for cancer invasion and metastasis, degrading the extracellular matrix. They are also associated with angiogenesis. Angiogenic phenotype is another feature of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). However, their associations with the progression of low-grade CIN to high-grade CIN are unexplored. We investigated whether these proteolytic enzyme expressions correlate with the progression of CIN. A total of 39 paraffin-embedded specimens from 10 patients with CIN grade 1, nine with CIN grade 2, and 20 with CIN grade 3 were assessed immunohistochemically by specific antibodies against MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA. MMP-9 expression was higher in CIN 3 lesions (47.4%) than in CIN 1 (22.2%) and CIN 2 (20.2%) lesions, although the difference failed to reach statistical significance. The expression level of uPA and MMP-2 was not associated with the grade of CIN lesions. Interestingly, we found a significant association between expressions of uPA and MMP-2 (P= 0.028). Our results suggest that MMP-9 might play a role in the progression of CIN.

  4. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor signaling is critical in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ying-Na; Cao, Xue; Luo, Dong-Hua; Sun, Rui; Peng, Li-Xia; Wang, Lin; Yan, Yong-Pan; Zheng, Li-Sheng; Xie, Ping; Cao, Yun; Liang, Ying-Ying; Zheng, Fang-Jing; Huang, Bi-Jun; Xiang, Yan-Qun; Lv, Xing; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Chen, Ming-Yuan; Huang, Pei-Yu; Guo, Ling; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Guo, Xiang; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Qian, Chao-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common malignancies in southern China and Southeast Asia, with the highest metastasis rate among head and neck cancers. The mechanisms underlying NPC progression remain poorly understood. Genome-wide expression profiling on 18 NPC vs. 18 noncancerous nasopharyngeal tissues together with GeneGo pathway analysis and expression verification in NPC cells and tissues revealed a potential role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in NPC progression, which has not been investigated in NPC. We then observed that uPAR expression is increased in poorly differentiated, highly metastatic NPC cells compared with lowly metastatic cells or differentiated NPC cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that uPAR regulates NPC cell growth, colony formation, migration, and invasion and promotes the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additional tumor xenograft and spontaneous metastasis experiments revealed that uPAR promotes NPC cell growth and metastasis in vivo. The JAK-STAT pathway is involved in uPAR-regulated signaling in NPC cells as determined by immunoblotting. Moreover, uPAR-mediated growth and motility is partially abolished upon treatment with the Jak1/Jak2 inhibitor INCB018424. We suppressed uPA expression in uPAR-overexpressing NPC cells and found that uPAR-mediated cellular growth and motility is not exclusively dependent on uPA. In summary, uPAR is a significant regulator of NPC progression and could serve as a promising therapeutic target. PMID:24763226

  5. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in depression: Results from Animal and Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haitang; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Suzhen; Lu, Na; Yue, Yingying; Liang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Zhijun; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a stress-related factor, and serum PAI-1 levels are increased in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). Herein, we analysed PAI-1 protein levels in the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of rodents exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress or treated with escitalopram. In addition, we examined PAI-1 concentrations in serum obtained from 17 drug-free depressed patients before and after escitalopram treatment. We found that PAI-1 expression was increased in area 1 of the cingulate cortex and prelimbic cortex of the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 and dentate gyrus in stressed rats. A downregulation of PAI-1 following chronic escitalopram treatment was also found. PAI-1 levels were higher in the CSF and serum in stressed rats than in controls, although the difference did not reach statistical significance in the serum. Escitalopram treatment significantly decreased PAI-1 levels in the serum, but not in the CSF. MDD patients had significantly greater serum PAI-1 concentrations than controls. Our results suggest that PAI-1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:27456456

  6. Evaluation of Cerebral Perfusion in Patients Undergoing Intravenous Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, Teruyuki

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the indication for thrombolytic therapy using intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is restricted strictly to patients with acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h of onset. The effect of rt-PA declines over time; therefore, we need to minimize the time delay while generating imaging information. The use of cerebral blood flow imaging is not recommended within this time window. Conversely, the balance of efficacy and the risk of bleeding complications differ among patients > 4.5 h after onset. Several ongoing studies are using mismatch concepts to extend the therapeutic time window for rt-PA. Long-awaited reliable software, such as RAPID and PMA, are now available to analyze computed tomography/magnetic resonance perfusion data. Patients with wake-up stroke (WUS) are another group that can be used to expand rt-PA candidates. Diffusion fluid- attenuated inversion recovery mismatch is a promising imaging surrogate to select good candidates with WUS. These trials will cause a therapeutic paradigm shift from time-based to tissue-based strategies in the near future. PMID:26369875

  7. Early intracardiac thrombosis in preterm infants and thrombolysis with recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, F; Vagnarelli, F; Gargano, G; Roversi, M; Biagioni, O; Ranzi, A; Cavazzuti, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the incidence of catheter related thrombosis and to test the efficacy of recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in preterm infants.
STUDY DESIGN—From January 1995 to December 1998, echocardiography was performed in the first few days of life in 76 very low birthweight (⩽ 1500 g) infants out of a total of 147 having an umbilical catheter placed. When intracardiac thrombosis was diagnosed, rt-PA infusion was performed.
RESULTS—Four infants (5%) developed an intracardiac thrombosis during the first few days of life. In three of them, rt-PA at a dose of 0.4-0.5 mg/kg in a 20-30 minute bolus led to dissolution of the clot. One patient received a three hour infusion after the bolus, at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/h, with resolution of the thrombus. No systemic effects were observed after rt-PA infusion.
CONCLUSIONS—Early thrombosis may occur as a complication of umbilical catheterisation in preterm infants; early echocardiographic detection of this disorder allows complete, safe, and rapid lysis with rt-PA.

 PMID:11420328

  8. Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression in Escherichia coli using Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Cumulative Power.

    PubMed

    Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hemayatkar, Mahdi; Davami, Fatemeh; Barkhordary, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Soleimani, Mohammad; Davoudi, Noushin; Khalaj, Vahid

    2010-07-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease, which is composed of five distinct structural domains with 17 disulfide bonds, representing a model of high-disulfide proteins in human body. One of the most important limitations for high yield heterologous protein production in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the expression of complex proteins with multiple disulfide bridges. In this study the combination of two distinct strategies, manipulated cytoplasm and native periplasm, was applied to produce the functional full length tPA enzyme in E. coli. Using a PelB signal peptide sequence at 5' site of tPA gene, the expression cassette was prepared and subsequently was transformed into a strain with manipulated oxidizing cytoplasm. Then the induction was made to express the protein of interest. The SDS-PAGE analysis and gelatin hydrolysis confirmed the successful expression of functional tPA. The results of this study showed that complex proteins can be produced in E. coli using the cumulative power of both cytoplasm and periplasm.

  9. Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression in Escherichia coli using Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Cumulative Power

    PubMed Central

    Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hemayatkar, Mahdi; Davami, Fatemeh; Barkhordary, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Soleimani, Mohammad; Davoudi, Noushin; Khalaj, Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease, which is composed of five distinct structural domains with 17 disulfide bonds, representing a model of high-disulfide proteins in human body. One of the most important limitations for high yield heterologous protein production in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the expression of complex proteins with multiple disulfide bridges. In this study the combination of two distinct strategies, manipulated cytoplasm and native periplasm, was applied to produce the functional full length tPA enzyme in E. coli. Using a PelB signal peptide sequence at 5′ site of tPA gene, the expression cassette was prepared and subsequently was transformed into a strain with manipulated oxidizing cytoplasm. Then the induction was made to express the protein of interest. The SDS-PAGE analysis and gelatin hydrolysis confirmed the successful expression of functional tPA. The results of this study showed that complex proteins can be produced in E. coli using the cumulative power of both cytoplasm and periplasm. PMID:23408156

  10. TFRC and ACTB as the best reference genes to quantify Urokinase Plasminogen Activator in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomedical researchers have long looked for ways to diagnose and treat cancer patients at the early stages through biomarkers. Although conventional techniques are routinely applied in the detection of biomarkers, attitudes towards using Real-Time PCR techniques in detection of many biomarkers are increasing. Normalization of quantitative Real-Time PCR is necessary to validate non-biological alteration occurring during the steps of RNA quantification. Selection of variably expressed housekeeping genes (HKs) will affect the validity of the data. The aim of the present study was to identify uniformly expressed housekeeping genes in order to use in the breast cancer gene expression studies. Urokinase Plasminogen Activator was used as a gene of interest. Findings The expression of six HKs (TFRC, GUSB, GAPDH, ACTB, HPRT1 and RPLP0) was investigated using geNorm and NormFinder softwares in forty breast tumor, four normal and eight adjacent tissues. RPLP0 and GAPDH revealed maximum M value, while TFRC demonstrated lowest M value. Conclusions In the present study the most and the least stable genes were TFRC and RPLP0 respectively. TFRC and ACTB were verified as the best combination of two genes for breast cancer quantification. The result of this study shows that in each gene expression analysis HKs selection should be done based on experiment conditions. PMID:21702980

  11. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is a potential therapeutic strategy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Satsuki; Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Toyoshima, Masafumi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Dan, Takashi; Usui, Toshinori; Ishibashi, Masumi; Shigeta, Shogo; Nagase, Satoru; Miyata, Toshio; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is predictive of poor outcome in several types of cancer. The present study investigated the biological role for PAI-1 in ovarian cancer and potential of targeted pharmacotherapeutics. In patients with ovarian cancer, PAI-1 mRNA expression in tumor tissues was positively correlated with poor prognosis. To determine the role of PAI-1 in cell proliferation in ovarian cancer, the effects of PAI-1 inhibition were examined in PAI-1-expressing ovarian cancer cells. PAI-1 knockdown by small interfering RNA resulted in significant suppression of cell growth accompanied with G2/M cell cycle arrest and intrinsic apoptosis. Similarly, treatment with the small molecule PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 effectively blocked cell proliferation of ovarian cancer cells that highly express PAI-1. Together these results suggest that PAI-1 promotes cell growth in ovarian cancer. Interestingly, expression of PAI-1 was increased in ovarian clear cell carcinoma compared with that in serous tumors. Our results suggest that PAI-1 inhibition promotes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer and that PAI-1 inhibitors potentially represent a novel class of anti-tumor agents.

  12. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Controls Vascular Integrity by Regulating VE-Cadherin Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Anna E.; Timmerman, Ilse; Kovacevic, Igor; Hordijk, Peter L.; Adriaanse, Luc; Paatero, Ilkka; Belting, Heinz-Georg; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor, is expressed and secreted by endothelial cells. Patients with PAI-1 deficiency show a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis, which has been exclusively ascribed to the function of PAI-1 in down-regulating fibrinolysis. We tested the hypothesis that PAI-1 function plays a direct role in controlling vascular integrity and permeability by keeping endothelial cell-cell junctions intact. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized PAI-039, a specific small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, to investigate the role of PAI-1 in protecting endothelial integrity. In vivo inhibition of PAI-1 resulted in vascular leakage from intersegmental vessels and in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos. In addition PAI-1 inhibition in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers leads to a marked decrease of transendothelial resistance and disrupted endothelial junctions. The total level of the endothelial junction regulator VE-cadherin was reduced, whereas surface VE-cadherin expression was unaltered. Moreover, PAI-1 inhibition reduced the shedding of VE-cadherin. Finally, we detected an accumulation of VE-cadherin at the Golgi apparatus. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that PAI-1 function is important for the maintenance of endothelial monolayer and vascular integrity by controlling VE-cadherin trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Our data further suggest that therapies using PAI-1 antagonists like PAI-039 ought to be used with caution to avoid disruption of the vessel wall. PMID:26714278

  13. Successful Emergency Carotid Endarterectomy after Thrombolysis with Intravenous Recombinant Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Okazaki, Toshiyuki; Yoda, Keishi; Tada, Yoshiteru; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Acute internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion may result in severe disability or death. Revascularization by carotid artery stenting after treatment with intravenous (iv) recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) has been documented. However, there are few reports on emergency carotid endarterectomy (CEA) within 24 hours after the iv administration of rt-PA. We treated a 58-year-old man with right ICA occlusion with iv rt-PA. Although partial recanalization of the ICA was obtained, severe stenosis at the origin of the ICA persisted and he developed fluctuating neurological deficits. To prevent progressive stroke he underwent CEA 10.5 hours after rt-PA treatment. Thereafter his blood pressure was strictly controlled under sedation. During and after CEA there were no hemorrhagic complications. Our findings suggest that emergency CEA may be an option to address symptomatic severe residual ICA stenosis even after iv rt-PA therapy delivered in the acute stage. J. Med. Invest. 63: 300-304, August, 2016. PMID:27644576

  14. Pharmacologic partial salvage of a failing free flap with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA).

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B S; Fuleihan, N S; Musharafieh, R S

    1999-11-01

    Despite all the technical improvements in microvascular surgery and the experience gained in clinical practice, thrombosis at the site of microanastomosis remains a significant problem and a continuous source of frustration to most microsurgeons. Early recognition of vascular complications and prompt reexploration with vascular revision remain an essential and standard conduct for salvage. However, in situations where conditions for no-reflow have been established due to severe vasospasm or prolonged ischemia time, it becomes obvious that surgical reexploration alone is not enough to salvage a failing flap or a replanted limb. In such situations, the loss of the revascularized tissues seems to be inevitable. The authors describe their experience in partially salvaging a failing free flap with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), reversing an established state of no-reflow. Pharmacologic manipulation of the complex and variable factors influencing anastomotic patency in microvascular tissue transfer seems to offer a new hope for preventing failures, as well as for salvaging failing flaps. It appears also that free-tissue transfer failure is not an all-or-none phenomenon.

  15. Impacts of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) on neuronal survival

    PubMed Central

    Chevilley, Arnaud; Lesept, Flavie; Lenoir, Sophie; Ali, Carine; Parcq, Jérôme; Vivien, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) a serine protease is constituted of five functional domains through which it interacts with different substrates, binding proteins, and receptors. In the last years, great interest has been given to the clinical relevance of targeting tPA in different diseases of the central nervous system, in particular stroke. Among its reported functions in the central nervous system, tPA displays both neurotrophic and neurotoxic effects. How can the protease mediate such opposite functions remain unclear but several hypotheses have been proposed. These include an influence of the degree of maturity and/or the type of neurons, of the level of tPA, of its origin (endogenous or exogenous) or of its form (single chain tPA versus two chain tPA). In this review, we will provide a synthetic snapshot of our current knowledge regarding the natural history of tPA and discuss how it sustains its pleiotropic functions with focus on excitotoxic/ischemic neuronal death and neuronal survival. PMID:26528141

  16. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is not required for kainate-induced motoneuron death in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, W; Van Den Bosch, L; Robberecht, W

    1998-08-24

    Spinal motoneurons are highly vulnerable to kainate both in vivo and in vitro. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin have recently been shown to mediate kainate-induced neuronal death in the mouse hippocampus in vivo. The aim of the present study was to determine whether tPA also mediates the kainate-induced death of motoneurons in vitro. A motoneuron-enriched neuronal population was isolated from the ventral spinal cord of wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mouse embryos. WT and tPA-/- neurons were cultured on WT and tPA-/- spinal glial feeder layers, respectively. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were morphologically indistinguishable. Expression of tPA in WT co-cultures was demonstrated using RT-PCR. WT and tPA-/- co-cultures were exposed to kainate for 24 h. The neurotoxic effect of kainate did not differ significantly between WT and tPA-/- cultures. The plasmin inhibitor alpha2-antiplasmin did not protect WT neurons against kainate-induced injury. These results indicate that the plasmin system is not a universal mediator of kainate-induced excitotoxicity.

  17. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in depression: Results from Animal and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haitang; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Suzhen; Lu, Na; Yue, Yingying; Liang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Zhijun; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a stress-related factor, and serum PAI-1 levels are increased in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). Herein, we analysed PAI-1 protein levels in the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of rodents exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress or treated with escitalopram. In addition, we examined PAI-1 concentrations in serum obtained from 17 drug-free depressed patients before and after escitalopram treatment. We found that PAI-1 expression was increased in area 1 of the cingulate cortex and prelimbic cortex of the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 and dentate gyrus in stressed rats. A downregulation of PAI-1 following chronic escitalopram treatment was also found. PAI-1 levels were higher in the CSF and serum in stressed rats than in controls, although the difference did not reach statistical significance in the serum. Escitalopram treatment significantly decreased PAI-1 levels in the serum, but not in the CSF. MDD patients had significantly greater serum PAI-1 concentrations than controls. Our results suggest that PAI-1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:27456456

  18. EXTRACELLULAR PROTEOLYSIS OF REELIN BY TISSUE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR FOLLOWING SYNAPTIC POTENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    TROTTER, J. H.; LUSSIER, A. L.; PSILOS, K. E.; MAHONEY, H. L.; SPONAUGLE, A. E.; HOE, H.-S.; REBECK, G. W.; WEEBER, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    The secreted glycoprotein reelin plays an indispensable role in neuronal migration during development and in regulating adult synaptic functions. The upstream mechanisms responsible for initiating and regulating the duration and magnitude of reelin signaling are largely unknown. Here we report that reelin is cleaved between EGF-like repeats 6–7 (R6–7) by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) under cell-free conditions. No changes were detected in the level of reelin and its fragments in the brains of tPA knockouts, implying that other unknown proteases are responsible for generating reelin fragments found constitutively in the adult brain. Induction of NMDAR-independent long-term potentiation with the potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA-Cl) led to a specific up-regulation of reelin processing at R6–7 in wild-type mice. In contrast, no changes in reelin expression and processing were observed in tPA knockouts following TEA-Cl treatment. These results demonstrate that synaptic potentiation results in tPA-dependent reelin processing and suggest that extracellular proteolysis of reelin may regulate reelin signaling in the adult brain. PMID:24892761

  19. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Deficiency Promotes Neoplasmatogenesis in the Colon of Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Karamanavi, Elisavet; Angelopoulou, Katerina; Lavrentiadou, Sophia; Tsingotjidou, Anastasia; Abas, Zaphiris; Taitzoglou, Ioannis; Vlemmas, Ioannis; Erdman, Suzan E.; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) participates in cancer-related biologic processes, such as wound healing and inflammation. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of uPA deficiency on the long-term outcome of early life episodes of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)–induced colitis in mice. Wild-type (WT) and uPA-deficient (uPA−/−) BALB/c mice were treated with DSS or remained untreated. Mice were necropsied either 1 week or 7 months after DSS treatment. Colon samples were analyzed by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. At 7 months, with no colitis evident, half of the uPA−/− mice had large colonic polypoid adenomas, whereas WT mice did not. One week after DSS treatment, there were typical DSS-induced colitis lesions in both WT and uPA−/− mice. The affected colon of uPA−/− mice, however, had features of delayed ulcer re-epithelialization and dysplastic lesions of higher grade developing on the basis of a significantly altered mucosal inflammatory milieu. The later was characterized by more neutrophils and macrophages, less regulatory T cells (Treg), significantly upregulated cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-10, and lower levels of active transforming growth factor–β1 (TGF-β1) compared to WT mice. Dysfunctional Treg, more robust protumorigenic inflammatory events, and an inherited inability to produce adequate amounts of extracellular active TGF-β1 due to uPA deficiency are interlinked as probable explanations for the inflammatory-induced neoplasmatogenesis in the colon of uPA−/− mice. PMID:24913672

  20. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and insulin levels in various insulin resistance states.

    PubMed

    Scelles, V; Raccah, D; Alessi, M C; Vialle, J M; Juhan-Vague, I; Vague, P

    1992-01-01

    Among obese insulin resistant subjects plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI 1) levels are closely associated with fasting insulin levels in cross sectional as well as intervention studies. Insulin concentration by itself does not seem to modulate PAI 1 levels at least in acute conditions. PAI 1 levels could be more directly related to the insulin resistant state than to hyperinsulinaemia. To elucidate further this phenomenon we compared insulin, triglyceride and PAI 1 levels in twenty control subjects and in three groups of patients presenting insulin resistance 14 obese subjects, 6 patients with Cushing disease and 7 with acromegaly. None of the tested subjects was diabetic. Fasting insulin levels were elevated in obese (21.4 +/- 8.0) hypercortisolic (20.3 +/- 11.0) and acromegalic patients (16.1 +/- 5.0) compared to controls (9.2 +/- 3.0 microU/ml, m +/- SD). PAI activity and PAI 1 antigen levels were elevated in the obese group only (34.3 +/- 13.0 for PAI 1 activity) and not in the others: 10.2 +/- 10.0, 7.0 +/- 4.6 I U/l for hypercortisolic and acromegalic patients respectively (normal controls 9.7 +/- 5.4). Triglyceride levels were also elevated among obese subjects 2.2 +/- 1.3 vs 1.1 +/- 0.4 mM/l in the controls; they were slightly higher than normal but not significantly in the hypercortisolic (1.5 +/- 0.6) and acromegalic (1.43 +/- 0.6 mM/l) patients. The mechanism of insulin resistance is different in the three conditions studied here. This may explain why elevated PAI 1 concentration are restricted to the common form of insulin resistance as seen in obese subjects. Therefore insulin resistant state per se is not associated with elevated PAI 1 levels.

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator involvement in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis: aggravation and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Gur-Wahnon, Devorah; Mizrachi, Tehila; Wald-Altman, Shane; Al-Roof Higazi, Abd; Brenner, Talma

    2014-08-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a component of the PA/plasmin system, is elevated in inflammatory areas and plays a role in inflammatory neurological disorders. In the present study we explored the involvement of tPA and the potential immunomodulatory activity of tPA in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Mice deficient in tPA (tPA(-/-)) present with a markedly more severe disease than wild type EAMG mice. In an attempt to treat EAMG with an 18aa peptide derived from the PA system inhibitor (PAI-1), designed to tether out the endogenous inhibitor, a significant suppression of disease severity was demonstrated. The more severe disease in tPA(-/-) mice was accompanied by a higher level of anti-AChR antibodies and increased expression of B-cell markers. In view of the essential role of B-cell activating factor (BAFF) in B-cell maturation, the expression of BAFF family components was tested. An increase in BAFF and BAFF receptor was observed in EAMG tPA(-/-) mice, whereas BCMA expression was reduced, consistent with the increased level of pathogenic antibodies and the more severe disease. Given the importance of T regulatory cells (Tregs) in EAMG, they were evaluated and their number was reduced in tPA(-/-) mice, in which EAMG was aggravated, whereas following PAI-1dp treatment, Tregs were replenished and the disease was ameliorated. The results show the involvement of tPA in EAMG, implying a protective role for tPA in EAMG pathogenesis. The amelioration of EAMG by PAI-1dp treatment suggests that the PA system may be considered a potential site for therapeutic intervention in neuroimmune diseases.

  2. Leucocyte expression of genes implicated in the plasminogen activation cascade is modulated by yoghurt peptides.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Georgios; Politis, Ioannis

    2016-08-01

    The urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA), its receptor (u-PAR) and the inhibitors of u-PA (PAI-1 and PAI-2) provide a multi-molecular system in leucocytes that exerts pleiotropic functions influencing the development of inflammatory and immune responses. The objective of the present study was to examine the ability of water soluble extracts (WSE) obtained from traditional Greek yoghurt made from bovine or ovine milk to modulate the expression of u-PA, u-PAR, PAI-1 and PAI-2 in ovine monocytes and neutrophils. WSE were obtained from 8 commercial traditional type Greek yoghurts made from ovine or bovine milk. WSE upregulated the expression of all 4 u-PA related genes in monocytes but the upregulation was much higher in the PAI-1 (10-fold) than in u-PA and u-PAR (3-4 fold) thus, shifting the system towards inhibition. In line with this observation, WSE reduced total and membrane-bound u-PA activity in monocytes. In neutrophils, WSE caused small (50-60%) but significant (P < 0·05) reductions in expression of u-PAR and PAI-2 but had no effect on expression of u-PA, PAI-1 and on total cell-associated and membrane-bound u-PA activity. WSE from yoghurts made from bovine or ovine milk were essentially equally effective in affecting the u-PA system except for the u-PAR gene in ovine neutrophils that was affected (reduced) by the ovine and not the bovine WSE. In conclusion, peptides present in WSE modulated the expression of u-PA related genes but the effect was much more prominent in monocytes than in neutrophils. PMID:27600972

  3. Gelsolin Induces Colorectal Tumor Cell Invasion via Modulation of the Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jingli; Tan, Ee Hong; Yan, Benedict; Tochhawng, Lalchhandami; Jayapal, Manikandan; Koh, Shiuan; Tay, Hwee Kee; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Hooi, Shing Chuan; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Kumar, Alan Prem; Goh, Yaw Chong; Lim, Yaw Chyn; Yap, Celestial T.

    2012-01-01

    Gelsolin is a cytoskeletal protein which participates in actin filament dynamics and promotes cell motility and plasticity. Although initially regarded as a tumor suppressor, gelsolin expression in certain tumors correlates with poor prognosis and therapy-resistance. In vitro, gelsolin has anti-apoptotic and pro-migratory functions and is critical for invasion of some types of tumor cells. We found that gelsolin was highly expressed at tumor borders infiltrating into adjacent liver tissues, as examined by immunohistochemistry. Although gelsolin contributes to lamellipodia formation in migrating cells, the mechanisms by which it induces tumor invasion are unclear. Gelsolin’s influence on the invasive activity of colorectal cancer cells was investigated using overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown. We show that gelsolin is required for invasion of colorectal cancer cells through matrigel. Microarray analysis and quantitative PCR indicate that gelsolin overexpression induces the upregulation of invasion-promoting genes in colorectal cancer cells, including the matrix-degrading urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Conversely, gelsolin knockdown reduces uPA levels, as well as uPA secretion. The enhanced invasiveness of gelsolin-overexpressing cells was attenuated by treatment with function-blocking antibodies to either uPA or its receptor uPAR, indicating that uPA/uPAR activity is crucial for gelsolin-dependent invasion. In summary, our data reveals novel functions of gelsolin in colorectal tumor cell invasion through its modulation of the uPA/uPAR cascade, with potentially important roles in colorectal tumor dissemination to metastatic sites. PMID:22927998

  4. Neuroserpin Differentiates Between Forms of Tissue Type Plasminogen Activator via pH Dependent Deacylation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Karen-Sue B.; Nguyen, Lan; Schwartz, Kat; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Bradford S.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), initially characterized for its critical role in fibrinolysis, also has key functions in both physiologic and pathologic processes in the CNS. Neuroserpin (NSP) is a t-PA specific serine protease inhibitor (serpin) found almost exclusively in the CNS that regulates t-PA’s proteolytic activity and protects against t-PA mediated seizure propagation and blood–brain barrier disruption. This report demonstrates that NSP inhibition of t-PA varies profoundly as a function of pH within the biologically relevant pH range for the CNS, and reflects the stability, rather than the formation of NSP: t-PA acyl-enzyme complexes. Moreover, NSP differentiates between the zymogen-like single chain form (single chain t-PA, sct-PA) and the mature protease form (two chain t-PA, tct-PA) of t-PA, demonstrating different pH profiles for protease inhibition, different pH ranges over which catalytic deacylation occurs, and different pH dependent profiles of deacylation rates for each form of t-PA. NSP’s pH dependent inhibition of t-PA is not accounted for by differential acylation, and is specific for the NSP-t-PA serpin-protease pair. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the differential regulation of the two forms of t-PA in the CNS, and suggest a potential specific regulatory role for CNS pH in controlling t-PA proteolytic activity. PMID:27378851

  5. Safety and Efficacy of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase during Extended Use in Complicated Pleural Space Infections

    PubMed Central

    McClune, Jason R.; Wilshire, Candice L.; Gorden, Jed A.; Louie, Brian E.; Farviar, Alexander S.; Stefanski, Michael J.; Vallieres, Eric; Aye, Ralph W.

    2016-01-01

    The use of intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase improves outcomes in patients with complicated pleural space infections. However, little data exists for the use of combination intrapleural therapy after the initial dosing period of six doses. We sought to describe the safety profile and outcomes of intrapleural therapy beyond this standard dosing. A retrospective review of patients receiving intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase was performed at two institutions. We identified 101 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 receiving intrapleural therapy for complicated pleural space infection. The extended use of intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and DNase therapy beyond six doses was utilized in 20% (20/101) of patients. The mean number of doses in those undergoing extended dosing was 9.8 (range of 7–16). Within the population studied there appears to be no statistically significant increased risk of complications, need for surgical referral, or outcome differences when comparing those receiving standard or extended dosing intrapleural therapy. Future prospective study of intrapleural therapy as an alternative option for patients who fail initial pleural drainage and are unable to tolerate/accept a surgical intervention appears a potential area of study. PMID:27445574

  6. Safety and Efficacy of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase during Extended Use in Complicated Pleural Space Infections.

    PubMed

    McClune, Jason R; Wilshire, Candice L; Gorden, Jed A; Louie, Brian E; Farviar, Alexander S; Stefanski, Michael J; Vallieres, Eric; Aye, Ralph W; Gilbert, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    The use of intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase improves outcomes in patients with complicated pleural space infections. However, little data exists for the use of combination intrapleural therapy after the initial dosing period of six doses. We sought to describe the safety profile and outcomes of intrapleural therapy beyond this standard dosing. A retrospective review of patients receiving intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase was performed at two institutions. We identified 101 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 receiving intrapleural therapy for complicated pleural space infection. The extended use of intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and DNase therapy beyond six doses was utilized in 20% (20/101) of patients. The mean number of doses in those undergoing extended dosing was 9.8 (range of 7-16). Within the population studied there appears to be no statistically significant increased risk of complications, need for surgical referral, or outcome differences when comparing those receiving standard or extended dosing intrapleural therapy. Future prospective study of intrapleural therapy as an alternative option for patients who fail initial pleural drainage and are unable to tolerate/accept a surgical intervention appears a potential area of study.

  7. The Omptins of Yersinia pestis and Salmonella enterica Cleave the Reactive Center Loop of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1▿

    PubMed Central

    Haiko, Johanna; Laakkonen, Liisa; Juuti, Katri; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Korhonen, Timo K.

    2010-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) and a key molecule that regulates fibrinolysis by inactivating human plasminogen activators. Here we show that two important human pathogens, the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis and the enteropathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, inactivate PAI-1 by cleaving the R346-M347 bait peptide bond in the reactive center loop. No cleavage of PAI-1 was detected with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, an oral/fecal pathogen from which Y. pestis has evolved, or with Escherichia coli. The cleavage and inactivation of PAI-1 were mediated by the outer membrane proteases plasminogen activator Pla of Y. pestis and PgtE protease of S. enterica, which belong to the omptin family of transmembrane endopeptidases identified in Gram-negative bacteria. Cleavage of PAI-1 was also detected with the omptins Epo of Erwinia pyrifoliae and Kop of Klebsiella pneumoniae, which both belong to the same omptin subfamily as Pla and PgtE, whereas no cleavage of PAI-1 was detected with omptins of Shigella flexneri or E. coli or the Yersinia chromosomal omptins, which belong to other omptin subfamilies. The results reveal a novel serpinolytic mechanism by which enterobacterial species expressing omptins of the Pla subfamily bypass normal control of host proteolysis. PMID:20639337

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase during Extended Use in Complicated Pleural Space Infections.

    PubMed

    McClune, Jason R; Wilshire, Candice L; Gorden, Jed A; Louie, Brian E; Farviar, Alexander S; Stefanski, Michael J; Vallieres, Eric; Aye, Ralph W; Gilbert, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    The use of intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase improves outcomes in patients with complicated pleural space infections. However, little data exists for the use of combination intrapleural therapy after the initial dosing period of six doses. We sought to describe the safety profile and outcomes of intrapleural therapy beyond this standard dosing. A retrospective review of patients receiving intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase was performed at two institutions. We identified 101 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 receiving intrapleural therapy for complicated pleural space infection. The extended use of intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and DNase therapy beyond six doses was utilized in 20% (20/101) of patients. The mean number of doses in those undergoing extended dosing was 9.8 (range of 7-16). Within the population studied there appears to be no statistically significant increased risk of complications, need for surgical referral, or outcome differences when comparing those receiving standard or extended dosing intrapleural therapy. Future prospective study of intrapleural therapy as an alternative option for patients who fail initial pleural drainage and are unable to tolerate/accept a surgical intervention appears a potential area of study. PMID:27445574

  9. Tissue plasminogen activator promotes the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor on the amygdala and anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Matys, Tomasz; Pawlak, Robert; Matys, Elzbieta; Pavlides, Constantine; McEwen, Bruce S.; Strickland, Sidney

    2004-01-01

    Stress-induced plasticity in the brain requires a precisely orchestrated sequence of cellular events involving novel as well as well known mediators. We have previously demonstrated that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the amygdala promotes stress-induced synaptic plasticity and anxiety-like behavior. Here, we show that tPA activity in the amygdala is up-regulated by a major stress neuromodulator, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), acting on CRF type-1 receptors. Compared with WT, tPA-deficient mice responded to CRF treatment with attenuated expression of c-fos (an indicator of neuronal activation) in the central and medial amygdala but had normal c-fos responses in paraventricular nuclei. They exhibited reduced anxiety-like behavior to CRF but had a sustained corticosterone response after CRF administration. This effect of tPA deficiency was not mediated by plasminogen, because plasminogen-deficient mice demonstrated normal behavioral and hormonal changes to CRF. These studies establish tPA as an important mediator of cellular, behavioral, and hormonal responses to CRF. PMID:15522965

  10. Fragment-based discovery of mexiletine derivatives as orally bioavailable inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Frederickson, Martyn; Callaghan, Owen; Chessari, Gianni; Congreve, Miles; Cowan, Suzanna R; Matthews, Julia E; McMenamin, Rachel; Smith, Donna-Michelle; Vinković, Mladen; Wallis, Nicola G

    2008-01-24

    Fragment-based lead discovery has been applied to urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). The (R)-enantiomer of the orally active drug mexiletine 5 (a fragment hit from X-ray crystallographic screening) was the chemical starting point. Structure-aided design led to elaborated inhibitors that retained the key interactions of (R)-5 while gaining extra potency by simultaneously occupying neighboring regions of the active site. Subsequent optimization led to 15, a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of uPA. PMID:18163548

  11. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Binding to Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Covalent Versus Adsorptive Approach.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Ralf P; Zaloga, Jan; Schreiber, Eveline; Tóth, Ildikó Y; Tombácz, Etelka; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are frequently used to develop vehicles for drug delivery, hyperthermia, and photodynamic therapy and as tools used for magnetic separation and purification of proteins or for biomolecular imaging. Depending on the application, there are various possible covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of particles, each of them shows different advantages and disadvantages for drug release and activity at the desired location.Particularly important for the production of adsorptive and covalent bound drugs to nanoparticles is the pureness of the involved formulation. Especially the covalent binding strategy demands defined chemistry of the drug, which is stabilized by excess free amino acids which could reduce reaction efficiency. In this study, we therefore used tangential flow filtration (TFF) method to purify the drugs before the reaction and used the frequently applied and clinically available recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA; Actilyse(®)) as a proof of concept. We then coupled the tPA preparation to polyacrylic acid-co-maleic acid (PAM)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) using an amino-reactive activated ester reaction and compared these particles to PAM-coated SPIONs with electrostatically adsorbed tPA.Using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and pH-dependent electrokinetic mobility measurements, we showed that surface properties of the SPIONs were significantly greater affected after activation of the particles compared to the adsorption controls. Different in vitro assays were used to investigate the activity of tPA after coupling to the particles and purification of the ferrofluid. Covalent linkage significantly improves the reactivity and long-term stability of the conjugated SPION-tPA system compared to simple adsorption. In conclusion, we have shown an effective way to produce SPIONs with covalent and non-covalent ultra-filtrated drugs. We showed

  12. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, fibroblast apoptosis resistance, and aging-related susceptibility to lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Tan; Akhter, Hasina; Jiang, Chunsun; MacEwen, Mark; Ding, Qiang; Antony, Veena; Thannickal, Victor John; Liu, Rui-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disorder with unknown cause and no effective treatment. The incidence of and mortality from IPF increase with age, suggesting that advanced age is a major risk factor for IPF. The mechanism underlying the increased susceptibility of the elderly to IPF, however, is unknown. In this study, we show for the first time that the protein level of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a protease inhibitor which plays an essential role in the control of fibrinolysis, was significantly increased with age in mouse lung homogenate and lung fibroblasts. Upon bleomycin challenge, old mice experienced augmented PAI-1 induction and lung fibrosis as compared to young mice. Most interestingly, we show that fewer (myo)fibroblasts underwent apoptosis and more (myo)fibroblasts with increased level of PAI-1 accumulated in the lung of old than in young mice after bleomycin challenge. In vitro studies further demonstrate that fibroblasts isolated from lungs of old mice were resistant to H2O2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis and had augmented fibrotic responses to TGF-β1, compared to fibroblasts isolated from young mice. Inhibition of PAI-1 activity with a PAI-1 inhibitor, on the other hand, eliminated the aging-related apoptosis resistance and TGF-β1 sensitivity in isolated fibroblasts. Moreover, we show that knocking down PAI-1 in human lung fibroblasts with PAI-1 siRNA significantly increased their sensitivity to apoptosis and inhibited their responses to TGF-β1. Together, the results suggest that increased PAI-1 expression may underlie the aging-related sensitivity to lung fibrosis in part by protecting fibroblasts from apoptosis.

  13. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels in Patients With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Røge, Rasmus; Pristed, Sofie Gry; Viuff, Anne Grethe; Ullum, Henrik; Thørner, Lise Wegner; Werge, Thomas; Vang, Torkel

    2015-01-01

    Background: The etiology of schizophrenia remains largely unknown but alterations in the immune system may be involved. In addition to the psychiatric symptoms, schizophrenia is also associated with up to 20 years reduction in life span. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a protein that can be measured in blood samples and reflects the levels of inflammatory activity. It has been associated with mortality and the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Methods: suPAR levels in patients with schizophrenia were compared to healthy controls from the Danish Blood Donor Study. SuPAR levels were dichotomized at >4.0 ng/ml, which is considered the threshold for low grade inflammation. A multiple logistic regression model was used and adjusted for age, sex, and current smoking. Results: In total we included 1009 subjects, 105 cases with schizophrenia (10.4%) and 904 controls (89.6%). The mean suPAR values were 4.01 ng/ml (SD = 1.43) for the cases vs 1.91 ng/ml (SD = 1.35) for the controls (P < .001). Multiple logistic regression with odds ratio (OR) for suPAR levels >4.0 ng/ml yielded: schizophrenia, OR: 46.15 95% CI 22.69–93.87, P < .001; age, OR: 1.02 95% CI 0.99–1.02, P = .15; male sex, OR: 0.70 95% CI 0.35–1.36, P = .29; and current smoking, OR: 3.51 95% CI 1.78–6.94, P < .001. Conclusions: Patients with schizophrenia had significantly higher suPAR levels than healthy controls. Further studies are warranted to clarify if elevated suPAR levels are involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and/or the increased mortality found in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25154621

  14. Cerebrovascular Thromboprophylaxis in Mice by Erythrocyte-Coupled Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Danielyan, Kristina; Ganguly, Kumkum; Ding, Bi-Sen; Atochin, Dmitriy; Zaitsev, Sergei; Murciano, Juan-Carlos; Huang, Paul L.; Kasner, Scott E.; Cines, Douglas B.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cerebrovascular thrombosis is a major source of morbidity and mortality after surgery, but thromboprophylaxis in this setting is limited because of the formidable risk of perioperative bleeding. Thrombolytics (eg, tissue-type plasminogen activator [tPA]) cannot be used prophylactically in this high-risk setting because of their short duration of action and risk of causing hemorrhage and central nervous system damage. We found that coupling tPA to carrier red blood cells (RBCs) prolongs and localizes tPA activity within the bloodstream and converts it into a thromboprophylactic agent, RBC/tPA. To evaluate the utility of this new approach for preventing cerebrovascular thrombosis, we examined the effect of RBC/tPA in animal models of cerebrovascular thromboembolism and ischemia. Methods and Results Preformed fibrin microemboli were injected into the middle carotid artery of mice, occluding downstream perfusion and causing severe infarction and 50% mortality within 48 hours. Preinjected RBC/tPA rapidly lysed nascent cerebral thromboemboli, providing rapid, durable reperfusion and reducing morbidity and mortality. These beneficial effects were not achieved by preinjection of tPA, even at a 10-fold higher dose, which increased mortality from 50% to 90% by 10 hours after embolization. RBC/tPA injected 10 minutes after tail amputation to simulate postsurgical hemostasis did not cause bleeding from the wound, whereas soluble tPA caused profuse bleeding. RBC/tPA neither aggravated brain damage caused by focal ischemia in a filament model of middle carotid artery occlusion nor caused postthrombotic hemorrhage in hypertensive rats. Conclusions These results suggest a potential RBC/tPA utility as thromboprophylaxis in patients who are at risk for acute cerebrovascular thromboembolism. PMID:18794394

  15. The Role of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator and Plasmin Activator Inhibitor-1 on Vein Wall Remodeling in Experimental Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Joe F.; Sood, Vikram; Elfline, Megan A.; Luke, Cathy E.; Dewyer, Nicholas A.; Diaz, Jose A.; Myers, Dan D.; Wakefield, Thomas; Henke, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) resolution instigates an inflammatory response, resulting in vessel wall damage and scarring. Urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are integral components of the fibrinolytic system, essential for VT resolution. This study determined the vein wall response when exposed to increased and decreased plasmin activity. Methods A mouse inferior vena cava (IVC) ligation model in uPA −/− or PAI-1 −/− and their genetic wild types (B6/SvEv and C57/BL6, respectively) was used to create stasis thrombi, with tissue harvest at either 8 or 21d. Tissue analysis included gene expression of vascular smooth muscle cells (alpha SMA [αSMA], SM22) and endothelial marker (CD31), by real time PCR, ELISA, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2 and 9 activity by zymography and vein wall collagen by picrosirius red histological analysis. A P < .05 was considered significant. RESULTS Thrombi were significantly larger in both 8d and 21d uPA −/− as compared to WT, and were significantly smaller in both 8 and 21d PAI-1 −/− as compared to WT. Correspondingly, 8d plasmin levels were reduced in half in uPA −/− and increased 3 fold in PAI-1 −/− when compared to respective WT thrombi (P < .05, N = 5 – 6). The endothelial marker CD31 was elevated 2 fold in PAI-1 −/− mice at 8d, but reduced 2.5 fold at 21d in uPA −/− as compared with WT (P = .02, N = 5 – 6), suggesting less endothelial preservation. Vein wall VSMC gene expression showed that 8d and 21d PAI-1 −/− mice had 2.3 and 3.8 fold more SM22 and 1.8 and 2.3 fold more αSMA expression than respective WT (P < .05, N = 5 – 7), as well as 1.8 fold increased αSMA (+) cells (N = 3 – 5, P ≤ .05). No significant difference in MMP2 or 9 activity was found in the PAI-1 −/− mice compared with WT, while 5.4 fold more MMP9 was present in 21d WT than 21d uPA −/− (P = .03, N = 5). Lastly, collagen was ~2 fold

  16. Monocyte procoagulant activity and plasminogen activator. Role in human renal allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.H.; Cardella, C.J.; Schulman, J.; Levy, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    Currently the mechanism of renal allograft rejection is not well understood. This study was designed to determine whether induction of monocyte procoagulant activity (MCPA) is important in the pathogenesis of renal allograft rejection. The MPCA assay was performed utilizing a one stage clotting assay both in normal and in factor-VII-deficient plasma. There was no increase in spontaneous MPCA in 20 patients with endstage renal failure and in 10 patients following abdominal or orthopedic operation, as compared with 20 normal controls. MPCA was assessed daily in 18 patients who had received renal allografts. Rejection episodes (RE) were predicted on the basis of persistent elevation in MPCA as compared with pretransplant levels. Rejection was diagnosed clinically and treated on the basis of standard criteria. Treated RE were compared with those predicted by elevated MPCA, and 3 patients were assessed as having no RE by MPCA and by standard criteria. In 8 RE, MPCA correlated temporally with RE (same day) when compared with standard criteria. In 12 RE, MPCA was predictive of rejection preceding standard criteria by at least 24 hr. There were 7 false-positive predictions on the basis of MPCA; however, there was only 1 false negative. MPCA was shown to be a prothrombinase by its dependence only on prothrombin and fibrinogen for full activity. MPCA may be important in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection, and additionally it may be a useful adjunct in the clinical management of this disease.

  17. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mina; Nagai, Taku; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2006-11-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. In the present study, we investigated the role of the tPA-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus, respectively, of mice, by using in vivo microdialysis. Microinjection of either tPA or plasmin significantly potentiated 40 mM KCl-induced DA release without affecting basal DA levels. In contrast, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 dose-dependently reduced 60 mM KCl-induced DA release. The 60 mM KCl-evoked DA release in the NAc was markedly diminished in tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice, although basal DA levels did not differ between the two groups. Microinjections of either exogenous tPA (100 ng) or plasmin (100 ng) into the NAc of tPA-/-mice restored 60 mM KCl-induced DA release, as observed in wild-type mice. In contrast, there was no difference in either basal or 60 mM KCl-induced ACh release in the hippocampus between wild-type and tPA-/-mice. Our findings suggest that the tPA-plasmin system is involved in the regulation of depolarization-evoked DA release in the NAc.

  18. Plasminogen activator system modulates invasive capacity and proliferation in prostatic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Festuccia, C; Dolo, V; Guerra, F; Violini, S; Muzi, P; Pavan, A; Bologna, M

    1998-08-01

    The malignant phenotype of prostatic tumor cells correlates with the expression of both uPA and its cell-membrane receptor (uPAR); however, there is little information concerning the role of cell-bound uPA in matrix degradation and invasion. Our results suggest that cell-associated uPA plays a key role in regulating the amount of plasmin present at the surface of prostatic carcinoma (PRCA) cells and show that differential production of uPA corresponds with the capacity to bind and activate plasminogen. In addition, we provide direct evidence that both uPA secretion and the presence of uPA-uPAR complexes characterize the invasive phenotype of PRCA cells and suggest the existence of several pathways by which tumor cells acquire plasmin activity. LNCaP cells (which do not produce uPA but express uPAR) may activate plasmin through exogenous uPA. In vivo, the source of uPA may be infiltrating macrophages and/or fibroblasts as observed in several other systems. PAI-1 accumulation in the conditioned medium (CM) limits plasmin action to the pericellular microenvironment. Our results indicate that MMP-9 and MMP-2 are also activated by plasmin generated by cell-bound but not by soluble, extracellular uPA. Plasmin activation and triggering of the proteolytic cascade involved in Matrigel invasion is blocked by antibodies against uPA (especially by anti- A-chain of uPA which interacts with uPAR) and by PA inhibitors such as p-aminobenzamidine which may regulate levels of cell-bound uPA. uPA may also regulate growth in PRCA cells. Indeed, antibodies against uPA A-chain (and also p-aminobenzamidine treatment) interfere with the ATF domain and inhibit cell growth in uPA-producing PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines, whereas exogenous uPA (HMW-uPA with ATF) induces growth of LNCaP prostate tumor cell line. These data support the hypothesis that in prostatic cancer patients at risk of progression, uPA/plasmin blockade may be of therapeutic value by blocking both growth of the

  19. Autocrine activities of basic fibroblast growth factor: regulation of endothelial cell movement, plasminogen activator synthesis, and DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have found that the spontaneous migration of bovine aortic endothelial cells from the edge of a denuded area in a confluent monolayer is dependent upon the release of endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Cell movement is blocked by purified polyclonal rabbit IgG to bFGF as well as affinity purified anti-bFGF IgG and anti- bFGF F(ab')2 fragments. The inhibitory effect of the immunoglobulins is dependent upon antibody concentration, is reversible, is overcome by the addition of recombinant bFGF, and is removed by affinity chromatography of the antiserum through a column of bFGF-Sepharose. Cell movement is also reversibly inhibited by the addition of protamine sulfate and suramin; two agents reported to block bFGF binding to its receptor. The addition of recombinant bFGF to wounded monolayers accelerates the movement of cells into the denuded area. Transforming growth factor beta which has been shown to antagonize several other effects of bFGF also inhibits cell movement. The anti-bFGF IgG prevents the movement of bovine capillary endothelial cells, BHK-21, NIH 3T3, and human skin fibroblasts into a denuded area. Antibodies to bFGF, as well as suramin and protamine sulfate also suppress the basal levels of plasminogen activator and DNA synthesis in bovine aortic endothelial cells. PMID:3417781

  20. Polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and apolipoprotein E in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Al-Mueilo, Samir; Al-Ali, Amein; Larbi, Emmanuel; Rubaish, Abdullah; Abdulmohsen, Mohammed Fakhry; Al-Zahrani, Alhussain; Al-Ateeq, Suad

    2008-11-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism, apolipoprotein E (apo epsilon4) gene polymorphism and polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been shown to be associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). To determine the prevalence of these mutations in Saudi patients with ESRD on hemodialysis, we studied the allelic frequency and genotype distribution in patients receiving hemodialysis and in a control group, all residing in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. The genotypes were determined using allele specific hybridization procedures and were confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The T allele frequency and homozygous genotype of MTHFR in ESRD patients were 14% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13.4% and 0%, respectively in the control group. The allele frequency and homozygous genotype of 4G/4G PAI-1 gene polymorphism were 46.4% and 4.8% respectively in ESRD patients compared to 57.1% and 32% respectively in the control group. The apo s4 allele frequency and homozygous genotype distribution in hemodialysis patients were 7% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13% and 2% in the control group. Although allele frequency of C677T of MTHFR was statistically similar in the hemodialysis patients and in the control group, the homozygotes T allele genotype was over represented in the hemodialysis group compared to normal. The prevalence of PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism in ESRD patients was lower when compared to the control group. The prevalence of apo s4 allele did not differ significantly between the two groups. The present results demonstrate that all three studied polymorphic mutations are present in our population and that they may contribute to the etiology of the disease in our area. PMID:18974580

  1. Leptin links with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human obesity: the SABPA study.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, Chiné; Schutte, Rudolph; Schutte, Aletta E

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between obesity and the development of cardiovascular disease is well established. However, the underlying mechanisms contributing to vascular disease and increased cardiovascular risk in the obese remain largely unexplored. Since leptin exerts direct vascular effects, we investigated leptin and the relationship thereof with circulating markers of vascular damage, namely plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen (PAI-1(ag)), von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF(ag)) and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). The study included a bi-ethnic population of 409 African and Caucasian teachers who were stratified into lean (<0.5) and obese (⩾0.5) groups according to waist-to-height ratio. We obtained ambulatory blood pressure measurements and determined serum leptin levels, PAI-1(ag), vWF(ag) and ACR, as markers of vascular damage. The obese group had higher leptin (P<0.001) and PAI-1(ag) (P<0.001) levels and a tendency existed for higher vWF(ag) (P=0.068). ACR did not differ between the two groups (P=0.21). In single regression analyses positive associations existed between leptin and all markers of vascular damage (all P<0.001) only in the obese group. After adjusting for covariates and confounders in multiple regression analyses, only the association between leptin and PAI-1(ag) remained (R(2)=0.440; β=0.293; P=0.0021). After adjusting for gender, ethnicity and age, additional analyses indicated that leptin also associated with fibrinogen and clot lysis time in both lean and obese groups, which in turn is associated with 24- h blood pressure and pulse pressure. This result provides evidence that elevated circulating leptin may directly contribute to vascular damage, possibly through mechanism related to thrombotic vascular disease.

  2. Direct stroke unit admission of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: safety, clinical outcome, and hospital cost savings

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Anne W.; Coleman, Kisha C.; Palazzo, Paola; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the USA, stable intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) patients have traditionally been cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU). We examined the safety of using an acuity-adaptable stroke unit (SU) to manage IV tPA patients. Methods: We conducted an observational study of consecutive patients admitted to our acuity-adaptable SU over the first 3 years of operation. Safety was assessed by symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) rates, systemic hemorrhage (SH) rates, tPA-related deaths, and transfers from SU to ICU; cost savings and length of stay (LOS) were determined. Results: We admitted 333 IV tPA patients, of which 302 were admitted directly to the SU. A total of 31 (10%) patients had concurrent systemic hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise warranting direct ICU admission. There were no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores between SU and ICU patients (9.0 versus 9.5, respectively). Overall sICH rate was 3.3% (n = 10) and SH rate was 2.9 (n = 9), with no difference between SU and ICU patients. No tPA-related deaths occurred, and no SU patients required transfer to the ICU. Estimated hospital cost savings were US$362,400 for ‘avoided’ ICU days, and hospital LOS decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 9.8 ± 15.6 days (median 5) in year 1, to 5.2 ± 4.8 days (median 3) by year 3. Conclusions: IV tPA patients may be safely cared for in a SU when nurses undergo extensive education to ensure clinical competence. Use of the ICU solely for monitoring may constitute significant overuse of system resources at an expense that is not associated with additional safety benefit. PMID:27366237

  3. Leptin links with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human obesity: the SABPA study.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, Chiné; Schutte, Rudolph; Schutte, Aletta E

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between obesity and the development of cardiovascular disease is well established. However, the underlying mechanisms contributing to vascular disease and increased cardiovascular risk in the obese remain largely unexplored. Since leptin exerts direct vascular effects, we investigated leptin and the relationship thereof with circulating markers of vascular damage, namely plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen (PAI-1(ag)), von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF(ag)) and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). The study included a bi-ethnic population of 409 African and Caucasian teachers who were stratified into lean (<0.5) and obese (⩾0.5) groups according to waist-to-height ratio. We obtained ambulatory blood pressure measurements and determined serum leptin levels, PAI-1(ag), vWF(ag) and ACR, as markers of vascular damage. The obese group had higher leptin (P<0.001) and PAI-1(ag) (P<0.001) levels and a tendency existed for higher vWF(ag) (P=0.068). ACR did not differ between the two groups (P=0.21). In single regression analyses positive associations existed between leptin and all markers of vascular damage (all P<0.001) only in the obese group. After adjusting for covariates and confounders in multiple regression analyses, only the association between leptin and PAI-1(ag) remained (R(2)=0.440; β=0.293; P=0.0021). After adjusting for gender, ethnicity and age, additional analyses indicated that leptin also associated with fibrinogen and clot lysis time in both lean and obese groups, which in turn is associated with 24- h blood pressure and pulse pressure. This result provides evidence that elevated circulating leptin may directly contribute to vascular damage, possibly through mechanism related to thrombotic vascular disease. PMID:25740294

  4. Genetics of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a Ghanaian Population

    PubMed Central

    White, Marquitta J.; Kodaman, Nuri M.; Harder, Reed H.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Brown, Nancy J.; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a major modulator of the fibrinolytic system, is an important factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD) susceptibility and severity. PAI-1 is highly heritable, but the few genes associated with it explain only a small portion of its variation. Studies of PAI-1 typically employ linear regression to estimate the effects of genetic variants on PAI-1 levels, but PAI-1 is not normally distributed, even after transformation. Therefore, alternative statistical methods may provide greater power to identify important genetic variants. Additionally, most genetic studies of PAI-1 have been performed on populations of European descent, limiting the generalizability of their results. We analyzed >30,000 variants for association with PAI-1 in a Ghanaian population, using median regression, a non-parametric alternative to linear regression. Three variants associated with median PAI-1, the most significant of which was in the gene arylsulfatase B (ARSB) (p = 1.09 x 10−7). We also analyzed the upper quartile of PAI-1, the most clinically relevant part of the distribution, and found 19 SNPs significantly associated in this quartile. Of note an association was found in period circadian clock 3 (PER3). Our results reveal novel associations with median and elevated PAI-1 in an understudied population. The lack of overlap between the two analyses indicates that the genetic effects on PAI-1 are not uniform across its distribution. They also provide evidence of the generalizability of the circadian pathway’s effect on PAI-1, as a recent meta-analysis performed in Caucasian populations identified another circadian clock gene (ARNTL). PMID:26322636

  5. Genetics of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a Ghanaian Population.

    PubMed

    White, Marquitta J; Kodaman, Nuri M; Harder, Reed H; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Vaughan, Douglas E; Brown, Nancy J; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a major modulator of the fibrinolytic system, is an important factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD) susceptibility and severity. PAI-1 is highly heritable, but the few genes associated with it explain only a small portion of its variation. Studies of PAI-1 typically employ linear regression to estimate the effects of genetic variants on PAI-1 levels, but PAI-1 is not normally distributed, even after transformation. Therefore, alternative statistical methods may provide greater power to identify important genetic variants. Additionally, most genetic studies of PAI-1 have been performed on populations of European descent, limiting the generalizability of their results. We analyzed >30,000 variants for association with PAI-1 in a Ghanaian population, using median regression, a non-parametric alternative to linear regression. Three variants associated with median PAI-1, the most significant of which was in the gene arylsulfatase B (ARSB) (p = 1.09 x 10(-7)). We also analyzed the upper quartile of PAI-1, the most clinically relevant part of the distribution, and found 19 SNPs significantly associated in this quartile. Of note an association was found in period circadian clock 3 (PER3). Our results reveal novel associations with median and elevated PAI-1 in an understudied population. The lack of overlap between the two analyses indicates that the genetic effects on PAI-1 are not uniform across its distribution. They also provide evidence of the generalizability of the circadian pathway's effect on PAI-1, as a recent meta-analysis performed in Caucasian populations identified another circadian clock gene (ARNTL).

  6. Angiotensinogen and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Gene Polymorphism in Relation to Renovascular Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Kadriye Altok Onal, Baran; Gonen, Sevim; Arinsoy, Turgay; Erten, Yasemin; Ilgit, Erhan; Soylemezoglu, Oguz; Derici, Ulver; Guz, Galip; Bali, Musa; Sindel, Sukru

    2006-02-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (4G/5G) polymorphisims in relation to the occurrence of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) and recurrent stenosis. In this study, 30 patients were enrolled after angiographic demonstration of ARAS; 100 healthy subjects for AGT polymorphism and 80 healthy subjects for PAI-1 polymorphism were considered the control group. The patients were followed for a mean 46.1 {+-} 9.2 months. The patients had significantly higher frequencies of the MT genotype and the T allele than control group ({chi}{sup 2} = 18.2, p < 0.001 and {chi}{sup 2} = 11.5 p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the PAI-1 genotype and allele findings when the data for all patients were compared with that for the controls ({chi}{sup 2}= 2.45, p = 0.29 and {chi}{sup 2} = 0.019, p = 0.89). There were no significant differences in the genotype and allele findings for the patients with and without restenosis (p > 0.05). The C-reactive protein (CRP) level was higher in the patients with restenosis than in the patients without restenosis (7.694 {+-} 0.39 mg/L and 1.56 {+-} 1.08 mg/L) (p = 0.001). Our results suggest that the M235T MT genotype and T allele might be associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. The CRP level might be an independent predictor for recurrent stenosis.

  7. Abnormal expression of plasminogen activator inhibitors in patients with gestational trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Estellés, A.; Grancha, S.; Gilabert, J.; Thinnes, T.; Chirivella, M.; España, F.; Aznar, J.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We previously reported significantly elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in plasma and placenta from pregnant women with severe pre-eclampsia, and pre-eclampsia is a frequent problem in molar pregnancies. As increases in PAI-1 may contribute to the placental alterations that occur in pre-eclampsia, we have begun to investigate changes in PAI-1 as well as PAI-2 and several other components of the fibrinolytic system in patients with trophoblastic disease. Significant increases in plasma PAI-1 and decreases in plasma PAI-2 levels were observed in molar pregnancies when compared with the levels in normal pregnant women of similar gestational age. PAI-1 antigen levels also were increased, and PAI-2 levels were decreased in placenta from women with molar pregnancies compared with placenta obtained by spontaneous abortion. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong positive and specific staining of PAI-1 in trophoblastic epithelium in molar pregnancies and relatively weak staining of PAI-2. No association between the distribution of PAI-1 and vitronectin was found, and no specific signal for tissue type PA, urokinase type PA, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or interleukin-1 was detected. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in PAI-1 but not PAI-2 mRNAs in placenta from molar pregnancies in comparison with placenta from abortions. These results demonstrate increased PAI-1 protein and mRNA in trophoblastic disease and suggest that localized elevated levels of PAI-1 may contribute to the hemostatic problems associated with this disorder. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8863672

  8. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor modulates epileptogenesis in mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ndode-Ekane, Xavier Ekolle; Pitkänen, Asla

    2013-06-01

    Mutation in Plaur gene encoding urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) results in epilepsy and autistic phenotype in mice. In humans, a single nucleotide polymorphism in PLAUR gene represents a risk for autism spectrum disorders. Importantly, the expression of uPAR is elevated in the brain after various epileptogenic insults like traumatic brain injury and status epilepticus. So far, the consequences of altered uPAR expression on brain networks are poorly known. We tested a hypothesis that uPAR regulates post-injury neuronal reorganization and consequent functional outcome, particularly epileptogenesis. Epileptogenesis was induced by intrahippocampal injection of kainate in adult male wild type (Wt) or uPAR knockout (uPAR-/-) mice, and animals were monitored with continuous (24/7) video-electroencephalogram for 30 days. The severity of status epilepticus did not differ between the genotypes. The spontaneous electrographic seizures which developed were, however, longer and their behavioral manifestations were more severe in uPAR-/- than Wt mice. The more severe epilepsy phenotype in uPAR-/- mice was associated with delayed but augmented inflammatory response and more severe neurodegeneration in the hippocampus. Also, the distribution of newly born cells in the dentate gyrus was more scattered, and the recovery of hippocampal blood vessel length from status epilepticus-induced damage was compromised in uPAR-/- mice as compared to Wt mice. Our data demonstrate that a deficiency in uPAR represents a mechanisms which results in the development of a more severe epilepsy phenotype and progressive brain pathology after status epilepticus. We suggest that uPAR represents a rational target for disease-modifying treatments after epileptogenic brain insults. PMID:23263886

  9. DNA repair and induction of plasminogen activator in human fetal cells treated with ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Sharon, R.; Rothman, M.; Miskin, R.

    1984-03-01

    We have tested human fetal fibroblasts for development associated changes in DNA repair by utilizing nucleoid sedimentation as an assay for excision repair. Among skin fibroblasts the rate of excision repair was significantly higher in non-fetal cells than in fibroblasts derived from an 8 week fetus; this was evident by a delay in both the relaxation and the restoration of DNA supercoiling in nucleoids after irradiation. Skin fibroblasts derived at 12 week gestation were more repair proficient than those derived at 8 week gestation. However, they exhibited a somewhat lower rate of repair than non-fetal cells. The same fetal and non-fetal cells were also tested for induction of the protease plasminogen activator (PA) after u.v. irradiation. Enhancement of PA was higher in skin fibroblasts derived at 8 week than in those derived at 12 week gestation and was absent in non-fetal skin fibroblasts. These results are consistent with our previous findings that in human cells u.v. light-induced PA synthesis is correlated with reduced DNA repair capacity. Excision repair and PA inducibility were found to depend on tissue of origin in addition to gestational stage, as shown for skin and lung fibroblasts from the same 12 week fetus. Lung compared to skin fibroblasts exhibited lower repair rates and produced higher levels of PA after irradiation. The sedimentation velocity of nucleoids, prepared from unirradiated fibroblasts, in neutral sucrose gradients with or without ethidium bromide, indicated the presence of DNA strand breaks in fetal cells. It is proposed that reduced DNA repair in fetal cells may result from alterations in DNA supercoiling, and that persistent DNA strand breaks enhance transcription of PA gene(s).

  10. Extracellular alpha 6 integrin cleavage by urokinase-type plasminogen activator in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Demetriou, Manolis C.; Pennington, Michael E.; Nagle, Raymond B.; Cress, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    During human prostate cancer progression, the integrin α6β1 (laminin receptor) is expressed on the cancer cell surface during invasion and in lymph node metastases. We previously identified a novel structural variant of the α6 integrin called α6p. This variant was produced on the cell surface and was missing the β-barrel extracellular domain. Using several different concentrations of amiloride, aminobenzamidine and PAI-1 and the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) function-blocking antibody (3689), we showed that uPA, acting as a protease, is responsible for production of α6p. We also showed that addition of uPA in the culture media of cells that do not produce α6p, resulted in a dose-dependent α6p production. In contrast, the addition of uPA did not result in the cleavage of other integrins. Using α2-antiplasmin and plasmin depleted media, we observed that uPA cleaves the α6 integrin directly. Further, 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced the production of α6p, and this induction was abolished by PAI-1 but not α2-antiplasmin. Finally, the α6p integrin variant was detected in invasive human prostate carcinoma tissue indicating that this is not a tissue culture phenomenon. These data, taken together, suggest that this is a novel function of uPA, that is, to remove the β-barrel ligand-binding domain of the integrin while preserving its heterodimer association. PMID:15023541

  11. Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator Can Be Safely Given without Complete Blood Count Results Back

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi; Yang, Lumeng; Ren, Jinma; Nair, Deepak S.; Parker, Sarah; Jahnel, Jan L.; Swanson-Devlin, Teresa G.; Beck, Judith M.; Mathews, Maureen; McNeil, Clayton J.; Ling, Yifeng; Cheng, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Qiang; Wang, David Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is well known that the efficacy of intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is time-dependent when used to treat patients with acute ischemic strokes. Aim Our study examines the safety issue of giving IV tPA without complete blood count (CBC) resulted. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective observational study by examining the database from Huashan Hospital in China and OSF/INI Comprehensive Stroke Center in United States. Patient data collected included demographics, occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, door to needle intervals, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale scores on admission, CBC results on admission and follow-up modified Rankin Scale scores. Linear regression and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to identify factors that would have an impact on door-to-needle intervals. Results Our study included120 patients from Huashan Hospital and 123 patients from INI. Among them, 36 in Huashan Hospital and 51in INI received IV tPA prior to their CBC resulted. Normal platelet count was found in 98.8% patients after tPA was given. One patient had thrombocytopenia but no hemorrhagic event. A significantly shorter door to needle interval (DTN) was found in the group without CBC resulted. There was also a difference in treatment interval between the two hospitals. Door to needle intervals had a strong correlation to onset to treatment intervals and NIHSS scores on admission. Conclusion In patients presented with acute ischemic stroke, the risk of developing hemorrhagic event is low if IV tPA is given before CBC has resulted. The door to needle intervals can be significantly reduced. PMID:26147994

  12. Modulation by the noble gas argon of the catalytic and thrombolytic efficiency of tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    David, Hélène N; Haelewyn, Benoît; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H

    2013-01-01

    Argon has been shown to provide cortical as well as, under certain conditions, subcortical neuroprotection in all models so far (middle cerebral artery occlusion, trauma, neonatal asphyxia, etc.). This has led to the suggestion that argon could be a cost-efficient alternative to xenon, a metabolically inert gas thought to be gold standard in gas pharmacology but whose clinical development suffers its little availability and excessive cost of production. However, whether argon interacts with the thrombolytic agent tissue plasminogen activator, which is the only approved therapy of acute ischemic stroke to date, still remains unknown. This latter point is not trivial since previous data have clearly demonstrated the inhibiting effect of xenon on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency and the critical importance of the time at which xenon is administered, during or after ischemia, in order not to block thrombolysis and to obtain neuroprotection. Here, we investigated the effect of argon on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency using in vitro methods shown to provide reliable prediction of the in vivo effects of both oxygen and the noble inert gases on tPA-induced thrombolysis. We found that argon has a concentration-dependent dual effect on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency. Low and high concentrations of argon of 25 and 75 vol% respectively block and increase tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency. The possible use of argon at low and high concentrations in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke if given during ischemia or after tPA-induced reperfusion is discussed as regards to its neuroprotectant action and its inhibiting and facilitating effects on tPA-induced thrombolysis. The mechanisms of argon-tPA interactions are also discussed.

  13. Cellular localization of type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor messenger RNA and protein in murine renal tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Keeton, M.; Eguchi, Y.; Sawdey, M.; Ahn, C.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) may be markedly increased in the plasma of patients with endotoxemia and/or renal disease. To investigate renal PAI-1 production during acute endotoxemia, a murine model system was used. Mice were injected with either saline alone or saline containing 50 micrograms endotoxin, and sacrificed 3 hours later and their tissues analyzed for PAI-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and antigen. Northern blot analysis confirmed that the level of renal PAI-1 mRNA was greatly increased in the endotoxemic mice relative to the saline controls. In situ hybridization was then performed to determine the cellular localization of PAI-1 mRNA within the renal tissues. In the control kidneys, low levels of PAI-1 mRNA were detected in the renal papilla and in the muscular walls of renal arteries. However, in the endotoxemic mice, an intense hybridization signal for PAI-1 mRNA was observed in glomerular and peritubular cells. These cells also stained positively for von Willebrand factor antigen, an endothelial cell-specific marker. The PAI-1 mRNA hybridization signal could further be observed in peritubular endothelial cells in the medulla and in endothelial cells of veins and arteries throughout the kidney. Immunochemical analysis revealed that PAI-1 antigen co-localized to the cytoplasm of cells expressing PAI-1 mRNA. This study provides the first direct evidence that PAI-1 is induced in endothelial cells of the kidney during endotoxemia in vivo and suggests a role for PAI-1 in the pathogenesis of renal disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8424466

  14. Targeting of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 improves fibrinolytic therapy for tetracycline-induced pleural injury in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Florova, Galina; Azghani, Ali; Karandashova, Sophia; Schaefer, Chris; Koenig, Kathleen; Stewart-Evans, Kris; Declerck, Paul J; Idell, Steven; Komissarov, Andrey A

    2015-04-01

    Endogenous active plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) was targeted in vivo with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that redirect its reaction with proteinases to the substrate branch. mAbs were used as an adjunct to prourokinase (single-chain [sc] urokinase [uPA]) intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT) of tetracycline-induced pleural injury in rabbits. Outcomes of scuPA IPFT (0.25 or 0.0625 mg/kg) with 0.5 mg/kg of mouse IgG or mAbs (MA-33H1F7 and MA-8H9D4) were assessed at 24 hours. Pleural fluid (PF) was collected at 0, 10, 20, and 40 minutes and 24 hours after IPFT and analyzed for plasminogen activating (PA), uPA, fibrinolytic activities, levels of total plasmin/plasminogen, α-macroglobulin (αM), mAbs/IgG antigens, free active uPA, and αM/uPA complexes. Anti-PAI-1 mAbs, but not mouse IgG, delivered with an eightfold reduction in the minimal effective dose of scuPA (from 0.5 to 0.0625 mg/kg), improved the outcome of IPFT (P < 0.05). mAbs and IgG were detectable in PFs at 24 hours. Compared with identical doses of scuPA alone or with IgG, treatment with scuPA and anti-PAI-1 mAbs generated higher PF uPA amidolytic and PA activities, faster formation of αM/uPA complexes, and slower uPA inactivation. However, PAI-1 targeting did not significantly affect intrapleural fibrinolytic activity or levels of total plasmin/plasminogen and αM antigens. Targeting PAI-1 did not induce bleeding, and rendered otherwise ineffective doses of scuPA able to improve outcomes in tetracycline-induced pleural injury. PAI-1-neutralizing mAbs improved IPFT by increasing the durability of intrapleural PA activity. These results suggest a novel, well-tolerated IPFT strategy that is tractable for clinical development.

  15. Regulation of plasminogen activator in 3T3 cells: effect of phorbol myristate acetate on subcellular distribution and molecular weight

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The tumor promoter, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), stimulates plasminogen activator production and extracellular release in confluent Swiss 3T3 cells. Coordinated with the increased extracellular release is a redistribution of the activity into plasma membrane-enriched fractions and a shift in the predominant molecular weight species from 75,000 to 49,000 daltons. The evidence suggests that PMA induces the formation of the 49,000 dalton species which is preferentially located in plasma membrane-enriched fractions. PMID:7197280

  16. Transforming growth factor-1 promotes the transcriptional activation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Yin, Wan-Le; Ba, Yu-Feng; Tian, Lin; Gu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Ming-Sheng; Zhong, Chu-Nan

    2012-11-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a pivotal role in promoting the growth, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. However, to date little is known about the oncogenic mechanisms of CAFs. This study aimed to identify the microenvironmental factors involved in tumor development and progression directed by CAFs in liver metastases. Tissue samples collected from 20 patients with colorectal liver metastases were used in this study. Histological and morphological characterization of the samples was performed using hybridization and immunohistological assays. The mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was measured by northern blotting. The expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). As a result, co-expression of Thy-1 (CD90) and α-SMA was identified in CAFs, while normal liver samples were negative for α-SMA and Thy-1. Compared with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) incubation, the expression of α-SMA increased significantly following transforming growth factor-1 (TGF-1) incubation (P<0.05), while platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) caused a significant suppression of α-SMA expression (P<0.05). PAI-1 expression was significantly lower in unstimulated fibroblasts compared to TGF-1-treated fibroblasts (P<0.01). The levels of PAI-1 transcription were significantly higher in CAFs from the patient samples compared with the healthy controls. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAFs may be important in migration, matrix degradation, invasion and angiogenesis of tumors, and TGF-1 may promote the activation of PAI-1 transcription in CAFs.

  17. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  18. Triglyceride concentration and waist circumference influence alcohol-related plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity increase in black South Africans.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Marlien; de Lange, Zelda; Hoekstra, Tiny; Ellis, Suria M; Kruger, Annamarie

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the association between alcohol consumption and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity (PAI-1act) and fibrinogen concentration in a black South African population presenting with lower PAI-1act and higher fibrinogen than what is typically observed in white populations. We, furthermore, wanted to investigate the effect of urbanization, sex, central obesity, increased triglycerides, 4G/5G polymorphism (PAI-1 only) and BMI on the association of alcohol with PAI-1act and fibrinogen. Data from 2010 apparently healthy, randomly collected black South African volunteers from the Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study were cross-sectionally analyzed. Alcohol consumption was recorded using quantitative food frequency questionnaires and fasting blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis including PAI-1act and fibrinogen. Heavy alcohol consumption is associated with significantly increased PAI-1act, in the total population as well as in the women separately, and tended to be so in men. This alcohol-related PAI-1act increase was observed in volunteers with increased triglycerides and central obesity but not in volunteers with normal levels and waist circumference. Urbanization, the 4G/5G polymorphism and BMI did not affect the association of alcohol with PAI-1act. Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with decreased fibrinogen concentration. Sex and level of urbanization did not affect the association of alcohol with fibrinogen. Fibrinogen decreased in normal and overweight volunteers but not in obese and centrally obese volunteers following moderate alcohol consumption. Triglyceride levels and waist circumference influence alcohol-related PAI-1act increase potentially through modulating adipocyte and triglyceride-induced PAI-1 production. Obesity prevented alcohol-related fibrinogen decrease possibly by counteracting the anti-inflammatory effect of moderate alcohol consumption.

  19. Association of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) with proteasome within endothelial cells activated with inflammatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2011-12-16

    Quiescent endothelial cells contain low concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2). However, its synthesis can be rapidly stimulated by a variety of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we provide evidence that PAI-2 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity in endothelial cells. To ensure that the PAI-2·proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after (a) transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-2 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-2 antibodies and (b) silencing of the PAI-2 gene using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-2·proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. As judged by confocal microscopy, both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern, but they also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. PAI-2 was not polyubiquitinated, suggesting that it bound to proteasome not as the substrate but rather as its inhibitor. Consistently, increased PAI-2 expression (a) abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-2 and pd2EGFP-N1, (b) prevented degradation of p53, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting, and (c) inhibited proteasome cleavage of specific fluorogenic substrate. This suggests that PAI-2, in endothelial cells induced with inflammatory stimuli, can inhibit proteasome and thus tilt the balance favoring proapoptotic signaling.

  20. Association of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 2 (PAI-2) with Proteasome within Endothelial Cells Activated with Inflammatory Stimuli*

    PubMed Central

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2011-01-01

    Quiescent endothelial cells contain low concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2). However, its synthesis can be rapidly stimulated by a variety of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we provide evidence that PAI-2 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity in endothelial cells. To ensure that the PAI-2·proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after (a) transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-2 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-2 antibodies and (b) silencing of the PAI-2 gene using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-2·proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. As judged by confocal microscopy, both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern, but they also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. PAI-2 was not polyubiquitinated, suggesting that it bound to proteasome not as the substrate but rather as its inhibitor. Consistently, increased PAI-2 expression (a) abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-2 and pd2EGFP-N1, (b) prevented degradation of p53, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting, and (c) inhibited proteasome cleavage of specific fluorogenic substrate. This suggests that PAI-2, in endothelial cells induced with inflammatory stimuli, can inhibit proteasome and thus tilt the balance favoring proapoptotic signaling. PMID:21976669

  1. Rosiglitazone prevents advanced glycation end products-induced renal toxicity likely through suppression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyan; Li, Cai; Li, Xiaokun; Cai, Lu

    2007-04-01

    In the development of diabetic nephropathy, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play a causative role via induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), as a major inhibitor of plasminogen activator that plays an important role in degrading ECM, was found to significantly increase in renal fibrotic diseases. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma prevented diabetic nephropathy. The present study, therefore, was to define whether or not AGE-induced renal ECM accumulation and renal dysfunction are mediated by upregulation of PAI-1 expression and whether or not PPAR-gamma agonist can attenuate these AGE effects via suppressing PAI-1 expression. Rats were given AGEs alone by iv injection at 100 mg/kg daily with or without oral supplementation of PPAR-gamma agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ) at 2 mg/kg daily for 6 weeks. Results showed that AGEs induced a renal ECM accumulation, as shown by increases in periodic acid-Schiff-positive materials, fibronectin, and type IV collagen (Col IV) contents in glomeruli, and a mild renal dysfunction, as shown by an increase in urinary proteins. AGEs also caused an increase in PAI-1 expression and a decrease in plasminogen activator bioactivity in the kidney. Treatment with RGZ significantly ameliorated AGE-induced renal ECM accumulation, proteinuria, and PAI-1 upregulation. Direct exposure of rat mesangial cells to AGEs in vitro induced increases in fibronectin and Col IV syntheses along with an increase in PAI-1 expression, effects significantly attenuated by RGZ. Preincubation of PAI-1 antibody to AGE-treated mesangial cells completely prevented AGE-induced fibronectin and Col IV production. These results suggest that upregulation of PAI-1 expression plays a critical role in AGE-induced renal ECM accumulation. Renal protection of RGZ from AGEs may be associated with the suppression of PAI-1 expression through PPAR-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  2. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 by Triton X-100--identification of two consecutive conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Gils, A; Declerck, P J

    1998-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a unique member of the serpin superfamily because of its conformational and functional flexibility. In the present study, we have evaluated the influence of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100) on the functional stability and conformational transitions of PAI-1. At 37 degrees C, TX-100 induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the functional half-life of PAI-1 resulting in half-lives of 177 +/- 54 min (mean +/- SD, n = 3), 19 +/- 2 min, 1.7 +/- 0.3 min and 0.53 +/- 0.03 min in the presence of 0.005, 0.010, 0.020 and 0.2% TX-100, respectively, compared to a half-life of 270 +/- 146 min in the absence of TX-100. Conformational analysis at various time points and at different temperatures (0 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 37 degrees C) revealed that this inactivation proceeds through the formation of a substrate-like intermediate followed by the formation of the latent form. Kinetic evaluation demonstrated that this conversion fits to two consecutive first-order transitions, i.e. active k1--> substrate k2--> latent. The k1 value was strongly dependent on the concentration of TX-100 (e.g. 0.002 +/- 0.0006 s(-1) and 0.029 +/- 0.003 s(-1) for 0.01% and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C) whereas the conversion of substrate to latent (k2) was virtually independent of the TX-100 concentration (i.e. 0.012 +/- 0.002 s(-1) and 0.011 +/- 0.001 s(-1) for 0.01 and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C). Experiments with a variety of other non-ionic amphiphilic compounds revealed that the amphiphilic character of the compound is, at least in part, responsible for the observed effects and strongly indicate that the currently reported mechanism of inactivation is of general importance for the conformational transitions in PAI-1. In conclusion, TX- 100 changes the initial conformation of PAI-1 resulting in altered functional properties. This observation allows us to develop a new model for the mechanism involved in the conformational flexibility of

  3. Tumour Microenvironments Induce Expression of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) and Concomitant Activation of Gelatinolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Synnøve; Hadler-Olsen, Elin; Latysheva, Nadezhda; Pirila, Emma; Steigen, Sonja E.; Hanes, Robert; Salo, Tuula; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Svineng, Gunbjørg

    2014-01-01

    Background The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and increased expression of uPAR is often found at the invasive tumour front. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the role of uPAR in invasion and metastasis of OSCC, and the effects of various tumour microenvironments in these processes. Furthermore, we wanted to study whether the cells’ expression level of uPAR affected the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes. Methods The Plaur gene was both overexpressed and knocked-down in the murine OSCC cell line AT84. Tongue and skin tumours were established in syngeneic mice, and cells were also studied in an ex vivo leiomyoma invasion model. Soluble factors derived from leiomyoma tissue, as well as purified extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, were assessed for their ability to affect uPAR expression, glycosylation and cleavage. Activity of gelatinolytic enzymes in the tissues were assessed by in situ zymography. Results We found that increased levels of uPAR did not induce tumour invasion or metastasis. However, cells expressing low endogenous levels of uPAR in vitro up-regulated uPAR expression both in tongue, skin and leiomyoma tissue. Various ECM proteins had no effect on uPAR expression, while soluble factors originating from the leiomyoma tissue increased both the expression and glycosylation of uPAR, and possibly also affected the proteolytic processing of uPAR. Tumours with high levels of uPAR, as well as cells invading leiomyoma tissue with up-regulated uPAR expression, all displayed enhanced activity of gelatinolytic enzymes. Conclusions Although high levels of uPAR are not sufficient to induce invasion and metastasis, the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes was increased. Furthermore, several tumour microenvironments have the capacity to induce up-regulation of uPAR expression, and soluble factors in the tumour microenvironment may have an important role in the

  4. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator "tPA" in ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned-place preference.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is one of the most abused drugs in the western societies. It is well established that mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons mediate the rewarding properties of ethanol. In our previous studies we have shown that the serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is involved in the rewarding properties of morphine and amphetamine. In the current study, we investigated the role of tPA in ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization and conditioned-place preference (CPP). Ethanol treatment dose-dependently induced tPA enzymatic activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In addition, ethanol-induced increase in tPA activity was completely inhibited by pre-treatment with the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and raclopride respectively. Furthermore, ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation, behavioral sensitization and conditioned-place preference were enhanced following tPA over-expression in the NAc using a lentiviral vector. In contrast, tPA knock down in the NAc with specific shRNA blocked the rewarding properties of ethanol. The defect of locomotor stimulation in shRNA-injected mice was reversed by microinjections of exogenous recombinant tPA into the nucleus accumbens. Collectively, these results indicate, for the first time, that activation of tPA is effective in enhancing the rewarding effects of ethanol. Targeting the tissue plasminogen activator system would provide new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of alcoholism.

  5. Controlled insect-sting challenge in 55 patients: correlation between activation of plasminogen and the development of anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, P W; Hack, C E; Struyvenberg, A; Roem, D; Brouwer, M C; de Boer, J P; van der Zwan, J K

    1993-09-15

    The pathogenesis of anaphylactic shock is not completely understood. Mast cell degranulation products may stimulate endothelial cells, leading to activation of fibrinolytic and coagulation systems. We investigated the activation of these systems in insect-sting anaphylaxis. Fifty-five patients with a previous insect-sting anaphylactic reaction and 8 volunteers were challenged with an in-hospital sting. Plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF), coagulation, and fibrinolytic parameters were assessed. After the sting challenge, 20 patients developed anaphylactic symptoms, 7 of whom developed hypotension. In only these 7 patients, but not in the volunteers or in the other patients with no or mild anaphylactic symptoms, vWF levels increased from 107% +/- 33% (mean +/- SD) before, to 235% +/- 134% 60 minutes after the onset of clinical symptoms. This increase of vWF was accompanied by an increase of circulating tissue-type plasminogen-activator (tPA) levels from 5 +/- 3 micrograms/L to 50 +/- 59 micrograms/L and of plasminogen-alpha 2-antiplasmin complex (PAP-c) levels from 6 +/- 3 nmol/L to 297 +/- 225 nmol/L. Both tPA and PAP-c levels peaked 5 minutes after the onset of clinical symptoms. Such increases of tPA and PAP-c were not observed in the volunteers or in the patients who did not develop shock. The increase of tPA and PAP-c levels in the hypotensive patients correlated positively with the degree of mast cell degranulation and inversely with the mean arterial pressure. We conclude that activation of plasminogen may be involved in the pathogenesis of anaphylactic shock induced by insect venom.

  6. Regulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator gene transcription by macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, K J; Fowles, L F; Colman, M S; Ostrowski, M C; Hume, D A

    1995-01-01

    The mouse urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene was used as a model macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)-inducible gene to investigate CSF-1 signalling pathways. Nuclear run-on analysis showed that induction of uPA mRNA by CSF-1 and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was at the transcriptional level in bone marrow-derived macrophages. CSF-1 and PMA synergized strongly in the induction of uPA mRNA, showing that at least some components of CSF-1 action are mediated independently of protein kinase C. Promoter targets of CSF-1 signalling were investigated with NIH 3T3 cells expressing the human CSF-1 receptor (c-fms). uPA mRNA was induced in these cells by treatment with CSF-1, and a PEA3/AP-1 element at -2.4 kb in the uPA promoter was involved in this response. Ets transcription factors can act through PEA3 sequences, and the involvement of Ets factors in the induction of uPA was confirmed by use of a dominant negative Ets-2 factor. Expression of the DNA binding domain of Ets-2 fused to the lacZ gene product prevented CSF-1-mediated induction of uPA mRNA in NIH 3T3 cells expressing the CSF-1 receptor. Examination of ets-2 mRNA expression in macrophages showed that it was also induced synergistically by CSF-1 and PMA. In the macrophage cell line RAW264, the uPA PEA3/AP-1 element mediated a response to both PMA and cotransfected Ets-2. uPA promoter constructs were induced 60- to 130-fold by Ets-2 expression, and the recombinant Ets-2 DNA binding domain was able to bind to the uPA PEA3/AP-1 element. This work is consistent with a proposed pathway for CSF-1 signalling involving sequential activation of fms, ras, and Ets factors. PMID:7760840

  7. Inhibition of urokinase plasminogen activator “uPA” activity alters ethanol consumption and conditioned place preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Al Maamari, Elyazia; Al Ameri, Mouza; Al Mansouri, Shamma; Bahi, Amine

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator, uPA, is a serine protease implicated in addiction to drugs of abuse. Using its specific inhibitor, B428, we and others have characterized the role of uPA in the rewarding properties of psychostimulants, including cocaine and amphetamine, but none have examined the role of uPA in ethanol use disorders. Therefore, in the current study, we extended our observations to the role of uPA in ethanol consumption and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference. The general aim of the present series of experiments was to investigate the effects of the administration of the B428 on voluntary alcohol intake and ethanol conditioned reward. A two-bottle choice, unlimited-access paradigm was used to compare ethanol intake between vehicle- and 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg B428-administered mice. For this purpose, the mice were presented with an ethanol solution (2.5%–20%) and water, at each concentration for 4 days, and their consumption was measured daily. Consumption of saccharin and quinine solutions was also measured. Systemic administration of B428 dose-dependently decreased ethanol intake and preference. Additionally, B428 mice did not differ from vehicle mice in their intake of graded solutions of tastants, suggesting that the uPA inhibition did not alter taste function. Also, ethanol metabolism was not affected following B428 injection. More importantly, 1.5 g/kg ethanol-induced conditioned place preference acquisition was blocked following B428 administration. Taken together, our results are the first to implicate uPA inhibition in the regulation of ethanol consumption and preference, and suggest that uPA may be considered as a possible therapeutic drug target for alcoholism and abstinence. PMID:25258509

  8. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 regulates LPS-induced TLR4/MD-2 pathway activation and inflammation in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weiying; Wang, Zhonghui; Hua, Feng; Zhu, Lei

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) are the main lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding receptors that respond to inflammatory stimuli and mediate NF-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway in macrophages. We have previously shown that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deletion increased lung injury induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS through downregulation of TLR4 negative regulators. However, the mechanisms by which PAI-1 regulates lung inflammation are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between PAI-1 and TLR4 signaling pathways in LPS-induced NR8383 cells inflammatory reaction. The results showed that the levels of PAI-1, TNF-α, and IL-1β protein were increased remarkably in NR8383 cell supernatants after LPS stimulation. PAI-1 gene knockdown reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels in cell supernatants and inhibited the NF-κB p65 protein expression in NR8383 cells. The upregulated mRNA and protein expressions of TLR4, MD-2, and myeloid differentiation protein (MyD88) induced by LPS were attenuated after PAI-1 gene knockdown. Conversely, overexpression of PAI-1 in NR8383 cells not only resulted in additional mRNA and protein production of PAI-1, TLR4, MD-2, and MyD88, it also aggravated the inflammatory response induced by LPS. In conclusion, PAI-1 contributes to the regulation of LPS-induced inflammatory response in NR8383 cells, likely by affecting the TLR4-MD-2/NF-κB signaling transduction pathway.

  9. Modulation of NR2B-regulated contextual fear in the hippocampus by the tissue plasminogen activator system.

    PubMed

    Norris, Erin H; Strickland, Sidney

    2007-08-14

    Contextual fear conditioning is regulated by the hippocampus, and NR2B, a subunit of the NMDA receptor (NR), is involved in this process. We show that acute stress modulates tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) activity in the hippocampus by inducing expression of its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Acute stress increases NR2B expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, a classical marker of postsynaptic plasticity, in the hippocampus. tPA forms a complex with NR2B and is necessary for binding NR2B to postsynaptic density-95, allowing for NR activation and membrane anchoring. Acute stress increases the interaction between NR2B and RACK-1, which is also dependent on tPA, further suggesting that tPA is an important factor in NMDA signaling and plasticity in the hippocampus. Finally, acutely stressed tPA(-/-) mice show a decrease in contextual fear conditioning compared with stressed WT mice. These results indicate that tPA is a key modulator in stabilizing the NR complex during stress and participates in changes in behavior and synaptic plasticity.

  10. Systemic thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute life-threatening Blalock-Taussig shunt obstruction.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Franco; Sasser, William C; Law, Mark A; Alten, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    Modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (mBTS) obstruction can be life-threatening, especially when it represents the only source of pulmonary blood flow. Current therapeutic options to reverse obstruction include surgical shunt revision/replacement, interventional endovascular procedures including balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement, and a combination of local and systemic thrombolytic therapy. We report two cases of acute mBTS thrombosis successfully treated with systemic recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in infants convalescing after cardiac surgery when the clinical status and resources precluded traditionally described rescue therapies. PMID:27555699

  11. Serum soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor levels in male patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Genc, Abdullah; Kalelioglu, Tevfik; Karamustafalioglu, Nesrin; Tasdemir, Akif; Genc, Esra Sena; Akkus, Mustafa; Emul, Murat

    2016-02-28

    Inflammatory abnormalities have been shown in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a protein that is measurable in the circulating blood and reflects the inflammation in the body. We aimed to investigate serum suPAR levels in patients with schizophrenia who were in acute state and to compare with healthy controls. Forty five patients and 43 healthy controls were included in the study. We found no significant difference in suPAR levels between patients and controls, suggesting that suPAR as an inflammatory marker does not have a role in the inflammatory process of acute schizophrenia.

  12. Systemic thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute life-threatening Blalock-Taussig shunt obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Franco; Sasser, William C.; Law, Mark A.; Alten, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (mBTS) obstruction can be life-threatening, especially when it represents the only source of pulmonary blood flow. Current therapeutic options to reverse obstruction include surgical shunt revision/replacement, interventional endovascular procedures including balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement, and a combination of local and systemic thrombolytic therapy. We report two cases of acute mBTS thrombosis successfully treated with systemic recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in infants convalescing after cardiac surgery when the clinical status and resources precluded traditionally described rescue therapies. PMID:27555699

  13. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is a useful alternative to heparin in priming quinton permcath.

    PubMed

    Schenk, P; Rosenkranz, A R; Wölfl, G; Hörl, W H; Traindl, O

    2000-01-01

    Soft, cuffed, implantable central venous catheters such as the Quinton Permcath (Quinton Instrument Co, Seattle, WA) are increasingly used as permanent access in patients with end-stage renal disease. Their major limitations, besides infection, are thrombosis and inadequate blood flow. To prevent those complications, heparin is conventionally used for priming the Quinton Permcath between dialysis sessions. In this study, we compared recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) with heparin for priming the Quinton Permcath in a prospective, randomized, crossover design. Twelve patients were randomly assigned to receive 2,000 IU of heparin or 2 mg of rTPA injected into each catheter lumen at the end of each dialysis session over a period of 4 months, followed by a switch to the other substance. Blood flow rate (flow), venous pressure (VP), and arterial pressure (AP) were monitored at each dialysis session hourly. Flow was significantly greater (P = 0.0001) with rTPA (mean +/- SD, 237.7 +/- 18.1 and 231.6 +/- 12.4 mL/min for the first and second 2 months, respectively) compared with heparin (208.5 +/- 10.1 and 206.9 +/- 14.2 mL/min for the first and second 2 months, respectively). VP was significantly less (P = 0.0001) with rTPA (135.4 +/- 8.2 and 140 +/- 15.2 mm Hg for the first and second 2 months, respectively) compared with heparin (160.5 +/- 16.1 and 159.2 +/- 20.7 mm Hg for the first and second 2 months, respectively). AP was significantly greater (P = 0.0002) with rTPA (-113.5 +/- 11.8 and -115.9 +/- 12.7 mm Hg for the first and second 2 months, respectively) compared with heparin (-136.5 +/- 23.3 and -134.7 +/- 25.8 mm Hg for the first and second 2 months, respectively). In addition, fewer complications (flow problems, clotting, and need for fibrinolysis) occurred in the rTPA period. These results show that rTPA is superior to heparin for priming the Quinton Permcath between hemodialysis sessions and can be used as a valuable alternative to conventional

  14. Characterization of the interaction in vivo of tissue-type plasminogen activator with liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, J.; Otter, M.; Rijken, D.C.; van Berkel, T.J.

    1988-12-05

    The interaction in vivo of 125I-labeled tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) with the rat liver and the various liver cell types was characterized. Intravenously injected 125I-t-PA was rapidly cleared from the plasma (t1/2 = 1 min), and 80% of the injected dose associated with the liver. After uptake, t-PA was rapidly degraded in the lysosomes. The interaction of 125I-t-PA with the liver could be inhibited by preinjection of the rats with ovalbumin or unlabeled t-PA. The intrahepatic recognition site(s) for t-PA were determined by subfractionation of the liver in parenchymal, endothelial, and Kupffer cells. It can be calculated that parenchymal cells are responsible for 54.5% of the interaction of t-PA with the liver, endothelial cells for 39.5%, and Kupffer cells for only 6%. The association of t-PA with parenchymal cells was not mediated by a carbohydrate-specific receptor and could only be inhibited by an excess of unlabeled t-PA, indicating involvement of a specific t-PA recognition site. The association of t-PA with endothelial cells could be inhibited 80% by the mannose-terminated glycoprotein ovalbumin, suggesting that the mannose receptor plays a major role in the recognition of t-PA by endothelial liver cells. An excess of unlabeled t-PA inhibited the association of 125I-t-PA to endothelial liver cells 95%, indicating that an additional specific t-PA recognition site may be responsible for 15% of the high affinity interaction of t-PA with this liver cell type. It is concluded that the uptake of t-PA by the liver is mainly mediated by two recognition systems: a specific t-PA site on parenchymal cells and the mannose receptor on endothelial liver cells. It is suggested that for the development of strategies to prolong the half-life of t-PA in the blood, the presence of both types of recognition systems has to be taken into account.

  15. Regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in endothelial cells with exposure to metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Mo, Yiqun; Wan, Rong; Chien, Sufan; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Qunwei

    2010-05-19

    Recent studies demonstrated that exposure to nanoparticles could enhance the adhesion of endothelial cells and modify the membrane structure of vascular endothelium. The endothelium plays an important role in the regulation of fibrinolysis, and imbalance of the fibrinolysis system potential contributes to the development of thrombosis. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the most potent endogenous inhibitor of fibrinolysis and is involved in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the alteration of PAI-1 expression in mouse pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MPMVEC) exposed to the metal nanoparticles that are known to be reactive, and the potential underlying mechanisms. We compared the alteration of PAI-1 expression in MPMVEC exposed to non-toxic doses of nano-size copper (II) oxide (Nano-CuO) and nano-size titanium dioxide (Nano-TiO(2)). Our results showed that Nano-CuO caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in PAI-1 expression. Moreover, exposure of MPMVEC to Nano-CuO caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation that was abolished by pre-treatment of cells with ROS scavengers or inhibitors, DPI, NAC and catalase. Exposure of MPMVEC to Nano-CuO also caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in p38 phosphorylation by Western blot. These effects were significantly attenuated when MPMVEC were pre-treated with DPI, NAC and catalase. To further investigate the role of p38 phosphorylation in Nano-CuO-induced PAI-1 overexpression, the p38 inhibitor, SB203580, was used to pre-treat cells prior to Nano-CuO exposure. We found that Nano-CuO-induced overexpression of PAI-1 was attenuated by p38 inhibitor pre-treatment. However, Nano-TiO(2) did not show the same results. Our results suggest that Nano-CuO caused up-regulation of PAI-1 in endothelial cells is mediated by p38 phosphorylation due to oxidative stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the potential health

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promotes synaptogenesis and protects against aβ(1-42)-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cho, Harim; Joo, Yuyoung; Kim, Seonghan; Woo, Ran-Sook; Lee, Sang Hyung; Kim, Hye-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a soluble factor that is released from astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cell in the brain. PAI-1 was initially identified as inhibiting two types of plasminogen activators, that is, tissue-type plasminogen and urokinase activators that are known to lead to the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix. Recently, PAI-1 was reported to mediate the neuroprotective activity of transforming growth factor-β1 against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and to be involved in angiogenesis following ischemic stroke, independently of the effects via the inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen and urokinase-type plasminogen activators. In this study, we examined whether PAI-1 influences synaptogenesis and neurotoxicity induced by amyloid beta peptide(1-42) (Aß(1-42)) in rat primary hippocampal neurons. Using immunostaining, treatment with PAI-1 for 24 h was found to significantly upregulate synaptophysin, postsynaptic density-95, and the polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule, compared to treatment with vehicle alone. In addition, PAI-1 has neuroprotective effects against Aβ(1-42)-induced cytotoxicity in rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that PAI-1 has therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease by promoting synaptogenesis and by demonstrating neuroprotective effects against Aβ(1-42)-oligomer-induced neurotoxicity in rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

  17. Neutralization of plasminogen activator inhibitor I (PAI-1) by the synthetic antagonist PAI-749 via a dual mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Gardell, Stephen J; Krueger, Julie A; Antrilli, Thomas A; Elokdah, Hassan; Mayer, Scott; Orcutt, Steven J; Crandall, David L; Vlasuk, George P

    2007-10-01

    PAI-749 is a potent and selective synthetic antagonist of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) that preserved tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activities in the presence of PAI-1 (IC(50) values, 157 and 87 nM, respectively). The fluorescence (Fl) of fluorophore-tagged PAI-1 (PAI-NBD119) was quenched by PAI-749; the apparent K(d) (254 nM) was similar to the IC(50) (140 nM) for PAI-NBD119 inactivation. PAI-749 analogs displayed the same potency rank order for neutralizing PAI-1 activity and perturbing PAI-NBD119 Fl; hence, binding of PAI-749 to PAI-1 and inactivation of PAI-1 activity are tightly linked. Exposure of PAI-1 to PAI-749 for 5 min (sufficient for full inactivation) followed by PAI-749 sequestration with Tween 80 micelles yielded active PAI-1; thus, PAI-749 did not irreversibly inactivate PAI-1, a known metastable protein. Treatment of PAI-1 with a PAI-749 homolog (producing less assay interference) blocked the ability of PAI-1 to displace p-aminobenzamidine from the uPA active site. Consistent with this observation, PAI-749 abolished formation of the SDS-stable tPA/PAI-1 complex. PAI-749-mediated neutralization of PAI-1 was associated with induction of PAI-1 polymerization as assessed by native gel electrophoresis. PAI-749 did not turn PAI-1 into a substrate for tPA; however, PAI-749 promoted plasmin-mediated degradation of PAI-1. In conclusion, PAI-1 inactivation by PAI-749 using purified components can result from a dual mechanism of action. First, PAI-749 binds directly to PAI-1, blocks PAI-1 from accessing the active site of tPA, and abrogates formation of the SDS-stable tPA/PAI-1 complex. Second, binding of PAI-749 to PAI-1 renders PAI-1 vulnerable to plasmin-mediated proteolytic degradation. PMID:17622579

  18. Interferons Induce STAT1-Dependent Expression of Tissue Plasminogen Activator, a Pathogenicity Factor in Puumala Hantavirus Disease.

    PubMed

    Strandin, Tomas; Hepojoki, Jussi; Laine, Outi; Mäkelä, Satu; Klingström, Jonas; Lundkvist, Åke; Julkunen, Ilkka; Mustonen, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-05-15

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses that show various degrees of vasculopathy in humans. In this study, we analyzed the regulation of 2 fibrinolytic parameters, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its physiological inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), in Puumala hantavirus (PUUV)-infected patients and in human microvascular endothelial cells. We detected strong upregulation of tPA in the acute phase of illness and in PUUV-infected macaques and found the tPA level to positively correlate with disease severity. The median levels of PAI-1 during the acute stage did not differ from those during the recovery phase. In concordance, hantaviruses induced tPA but not PAI-1 in microvascular endothelial cells, and the induction was demonstrated to be dependent on type I interferon. Importantly, type I and II interferons directly upregulated tPA through signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), which regulated tPA gene expression via a STAT1-responsive enhancer element. These results suggest that tPA may be a general factor in the immunological response to viruses.

  19. Tissue plasminogen activator contributes to the late phase of LTP and to synaptic growth in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    PubMed

    Baranes, D; Lederfein, D; Huang, Y Y; Chen, M; Bailey, C H; Kandel, E R

    1998-10-01

    The expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is increased during activity-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity. We have found that inhibitors of tPA inhibit the late phase of long-term potentiation (L-LTP) induced by either forskolin or tetanic stimulation in the hippocampal mossy fiber and Schaffer collateral pathways. Moreover, application of tPA enhances L-LTP induced by a single tetanus. Exposure of granule cells in culture to forskolin results in secretion of tPA, elongation of mossy fiber axons, and formation of new, active presynaptic varicosities contiguous to dendritic clusters of the glutamate receptor R1. These structural changes are blocked by tPA inhibitors and induced by application of tPA. Thus, tPA may be critically involved in the production of L-LTP and specifically in synaptic growth.

  20. Relationship of hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in Pima Indians.

    PubMed

    Nagi, D K; Tracy, R; Pratley, R

    1996-10-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is related to insulin resistance and several components of the insulin resistance syndrome, and PAI-1 levels are elevated in subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Many Pima Indians are obese, insulin-resistant, and hyperinsulinemic, and they have high rates of diabetes but a low risk of ischemic heart disease. In contrast to whites and Asians, PAI-1 activity is similar between nondiabetic and diabetic Pima Indians. We therefore examined the association of PAI-1 with hepatic and peripheral insulin action measured using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. To investigate if insulin per se has any effect on PAI-1 in vivo, we also assessed the effects of endogenous (during a 75-g oral glucose load) and exogenous (during hyperinsulinemic clamp) insulin on PAI-1 antigen. Twenty-one (14 men and seven women; mean age, 26.3 +/- 4.8 years) Pima Indians underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a sequential hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Peripheral insulin action was measured as absolute glucose uptake (M value) and normalized to estimated metabolic body size (EMBS). Hepatic insulin action was measured as percent suppression of basal hepatic glucose output during hyperinsulinemia. PAI-1 antigen was determined using a two-site enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that detects only free PAI-1. PAI-1 antigen concentrations were significantly related to body mass index ([BMI] rs = .54, P = .012), waist (rs=.52, P=.016) and thigh (rs=.63, P=.002) circumference, and fasting plasma insulin concentration (rs=.59, P=.004). PAI-1 antigen concentrations were not significantly associated with peripheral glucose uptake (M value) during either low-dose (rs= -.01, P=NS) or high-dose (rs= -.11, P=NS) insulin infusion. PAI-1 antigen was negatively correlated with basal hepatic glucose output (rs= -.57, P=.013) and percent suppression of hepatic glucose output during hyperinsulinemia (rs= -.69, P=.005). However, this

  1. Interaction of urokinase A chain with the receptor of human keratinocytes stimulates release of urokinase-like plasminogen activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Magnelli, L.; Pucci, M.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1990-03-01

    On the basis of a fibrinolytic assay with {sup 125}I-fibrin, zymography, and immunoprobing with anti-human urokinase antibody, the authors have observed that the in vitro established NCTC human keratinocyte cell line releases into the culture medium a 54,000-Da plasminogen activator which is indistinguishable from human urokinase. Only the early release following the washing of keratinocyte monolayers is accounted for by secretion of preformed enzyme, while late secretory events require the de novo synthesis of urokinase. The released enzyme can interact by autocriny with its own receptor present on keratinocytes. The addition to the keratinocyte culture medium of the urokinase A chain can stimulate a concentration-dependent urokinase oversecretion, which is not paralleled by oversecretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Since stimulation of urokinase production can be obtained by an A chain concentration which was previously shown to be efficient in inducing keratinocyte mobilization in an in vitro migration model system, they hypothesize that this mechanism may be important in vivo during the process of wound repair.

  2. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and size of infarct, left ventricular function, and survival in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Werf, F.; Arnold, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To assess effect of intravenous recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator on size of infarct, left ventricular function, and survival in acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Double blind, randomised, placebo controlled prospective trial of patients with acute myocardial infarction within five hours after onset of symptoms. SETTING--Twenty six referral centres participating in European cooperative study for recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator. PATIENTS--Treatment group of 355 patients with acute myocardial infarction allocated to receive intravenous recombinant plasminogen activator. Controls comprised 366 similar patients allocated to receive placebo. INTERVENTION--All patients were given aspirin 250 mg and bolus injection of 5000 IU heparin immediately before start of trial. Patients in treatment group were given 100 mg recombinant tissue plasminogen activator over three hours (10 mg intravenous bolus, 50 mg during one hour, and 40 mg during next two hours) by infusion. Controls were given placebo by same method. Full anticoagulation treatment and aspirin were given to both groups until angiography (10-22 days after admission). beta Blockers were given at discharge. END POINT--Left ventricular function at 10-22 days, enzymatic infarct size, clinical course, and survival to three month follow up. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Mortality was reduced by 51% (95% confidence interval -76 to 1) in treated patients at 14 days after start of treatment and by 36% (-63 to 13) at three months. For treatment within three hours after myocardial infarction mortality was reduced by 82% (-95 to -31) at 14 days and by 59% (-83 to -2) at three months. During 14 days in hospital incidence of cardiac complications was lower in treated patients than controls (cardiogenic shock, 2.5% v 6.0%; ventricular fibrillation, 3.4% v 6.3%; and pericarditis, 6.2% v 11.0% respectively), but that of angioplasty or artery bypass, or both was higher (15.8% v 9

  3. Copper(II) Ions Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Dynamics in Key Structural Regions That Govern Stability.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Joel C; Trelle, Morten Beck; McClintock, Carlee S; Qureshi, Tihami; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2016-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) regulates the fibrinolysis pathway by inhibiting the protease activity of plasminogen activators. PAI-1 works in concert with vitronectin (VN), an extracellular protein that aids in localization of active PAI-1 to tissues. The Peterson laboratory demonstrated that Cu(II) and other transition metals modulate the stability of PAI-1, exhibiting effects that are dependent on the presence or absence of the somatomedin B (SMB) domain of VN. The study presented here dissects the changes in molecular dynamics underlying the destabilizing effects of Cu(II) on PAI-1. We utilize backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to assess PAI-1 dynamics in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions with and without the SMB domain of VN. We show that Cu(II) produces an increase in dynamics in regions important for the function and overall stability of PAI-1, while the SMB domain elicits virtually the opposite effect. A mutant form of PAI-1 lacking two N-terminal histidine residues at positions 2 and 3 exhibits similar increases in dynamics upon Cu(II) binding compared to that of active wild-type PAI-1, indicating that the observed structural effects are not a result of coordination of Cu(II) to these histidine residues. Finally, addition of Cu(II) results in an acceleration of the local unfolding kinetics of PAI-1 presumed to be on pathway to the latency conversion. The effect of ligands on the dynamics of PAI-1 adds another intriguing dimension to the mechanisms for regulation of PAI-1 stability and function. PMID:27416303

  4. Copper(II) Ions Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Dynamics in Key Structural Regions That Govern Stability.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Joel C; Trelle, Morten Beck; McClintock, Carlee S; Qureshi, Tihami; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2016-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) regulates the fibrinolysis pathway by inhibiting the protease activity of plasminogen activators. PAI-1 works in concert with vitronectin (VN), an extracellular protein that aids in localization of active PAI-1 to tissues. The Peterson laboratory demonstrated that Cu(II) and other transition metals modulate the stability of PAI-1, exhibiting effects that are dependent on the presence or absence of the somatomedin B (SMB) domain of VN. The study presented here dissects the changes in molecular dynamics underlying the destabilizing effects of Cu(II) on PAI-1. We utilize backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to assess PAI-1 dynamics in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions with and without the SMB domain of VN. We show that Cu(II) produces an increase in dynamics in regions important for the function and overall stability of PAI-1, while the SMB domain elicits virtually the opposite effect. A mutant form of PAI-1 lacking two N-terminal histidine residues at positions 2 and 3 exhibits similar increases in dynamics upon Cu(II) binding compared to that of active wild-type PAI-1, indicating that the observed structural effects are not a result of coordination of Cu(II) to these histidine residues. Finally, addition of Cu(II) results in an acceleration of the local unfolding kinetics of PAI-1 presumed to be on pathway to the latency conversion. The effect of ligands on the dynamics of PAI-1 adds another intriguing dimension to the mechanisms for regulation of PAI-1 stability and function.

  5. The profibrinolytic enzyme subtilisin NAT purified from Bacillus subtilis Cleaves and inactivates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1.

    PubMed

    Urano, T; Ihara, H; Umemura, K; Suzuki, Y; Oike, M; Akita, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Suzuki, I; Takada, A

    2001-07-01

    In this report, we demonstrate an interaction between subtilisin NAT (formerly designated BSP, or nattokinase), a profibrinolytic serine proteinase from Bacillus subtilis, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). Subtilisin NAT was purified to homogeneity (molecular mass, 27.7 kDa) from a saline extract of B. subtilis (natto). Subtilisin NAT appeared to cleave active recombinant prokaryotic PAI-1 (rpPAI-1) into low molecular weight fragments. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in combination with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and peptide sequence analysis revealed that rpPAI-1 was cleaved at its reactive site (P1-P1': Arg(346)-Met(347)). rpPAI-1 lost its specific activity after subtilisin NAT treatment in a dose-dependent manner (0.02-1.0 nm; half-maximal effect at approximately 0.1 nm). Subtilisin NAT dose dependently (0.06-1 nm) enhanced tissue-type plasminogen activator-induced fibrin clot lysis both in the absence of rpPAI-1 (48 +/- 1.4% at 1 nm) and especially in the presence of rpPAI-1 (78 +/- 2.0% at 1 nm). The enhancement observed in the absence of PAI-1 seems to be induced through direct fibrin dissolution by subtilisin NAT. The stronger enhancement by subtilisin NAT of rpPAI-1-enriched fibrin clot lysis seems to involve the cleavage and inactivation of active rpPAI-1. This mechanism is suggested to be important for subtilisin NAT to potentiate fibrinolysis.

  6. Defect of vacuolar protein sorting stimulates proteolytic processing of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael; Romanova, Nina; Sokolov, Sviatoslav; Iline, Anna; Kalebina, Tatyana; Gellissen, Gerd; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is poorly secreted by yeast cells. Here, we have selected Hansenula polymorpha mutants with increased productivity of active extracellular uPA. Several of the obtained mutants also demonstrated a defect of sorting of carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole and the mutant loci have been identified in six of them. All these mutations damaged genes involved in protein traffic between the Golgi apparatus and the vacuole, namely PEP3, VPS8, VPS10, VPS17, and VPS35. We have shown that inactivation of the VPS10 gene encoding the vacuolar protein sorting receptor does not increase uPA secretion but stimulates its proteolytic processing. PMID:16181812

  7. Up-regulation of gelatinases and tissue type plasminogen activator by root canal sealers in human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2008-03-01

    Histologic investigations have demonstrated that root canal sealers can induce mild to severe inflammatory alternations. However, there is little information on the precise mechanisms about root canal sealer-induced inflammatory reaction. The proteolysis of extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and plasminogen activators (PAs) seems to be a key initiating event for the progression of the inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of epoxy resin-based root canal sealer AH26 and zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer Canals and one paste sealer N2 on the expression of MMPs and PAs in human osteoblastic cell line U2OS cells. The levels of gelatinolytic and caseinolytic activities were measured by gelatin and casein zymography. The results showed that AH26, Canals, and N2 were cytotoxic to U2OS cells in a concentration-dependent manner (P < .05). The gelatin zymograms revealed that MMP-2 (72 kd) and MMP-9 (92 kd) were secreted by U2OS cells. The exposure of U2OS cells to root canal sealers resulted in the up-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression (P < .05). Casein zymography exhibited a caseinolytic band with a molecular weight of 70 kd, indicative of the presence of tissue type plasminogen activators (t-PA). t-PA was also found to be up-regulated by root canal sealers (P < .05). Taken together, the activation of gelatinases and t-PA might play an important role in the pathogenesis of root canal sealer-induced periapical inflammation.

  8. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 and Vitronectin Expression Level and Stoichiometry Regulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration through Physiological Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Goyal, N.; Strawn, T. L.; Wu, J.; Mann, K. M.; Lawrence, D. A.; Fay, W. P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration is a critical process in arterial remodeling. Purified plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is reported to both promote and inhibit VSMC migration on 2-dimensional (D) surfaces. Objective To determine the effects of PAI-1 and vitronectin (VN) expressed by VSMC themselves on migration through physiological collagen matrices. Methods We studied migration of wild-type (WT), PAI-1-deficient, VN-deficient, PAI-1/VN doubly-deficient (DKO), and PAI-1-transgenic (Tg) VSMC through 3-D collagen gels. Results WT VSMC migrated significantly slower than PAI-1- and VN-deficient VSMC, but significantly faster than DKO VSMC. Experiments with recombinant PAI-1 suggested that basal VSMC PAI-1 expression inhibits migration by binding VN, which is secreted by VSMC and binds collagen. However, PAI-1-over-expressing Tg VSMC migrated faster than WT VSMC. Reconstitution experiments with recombinant PAI-1 mutants suggested that the pro-migratory effect of PAI-1 over-expression required its anti-plasminogen activator (PA) and LDL receptor-related protein (LRP) binding functions, but not VN binding. While promoting VSMC migration in the absence of PAI-1, VN inhibited the pro-migratory effect of active PAI-1. Conclusions In isolation, VN and PAI-1 are each pro-migratory. However, via formation of a high-affinity, non-motogenic complex, PAI-1 and VN each buffers the other's pro-migratory effect. The level of PAI-1 expression by VSMC and the concentration of VN in extracellular matrix are critical determinants of whether PAI-1 and VN promote or inhibit migration. These findings help to rectify previously conflicting reports and suggest that PAI-1/VN stoichiometry plays an important role in VSMC migration and vascular remodeling. PMID:20492459

  9. Immunoradiometric quantitation of tissue plasminogen activator-related antigen in human plasma: crypticity phenomenon and relationship to plasma fibrinolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wun, T.C.; Capuano, A.

    1987-05-01

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) antigen has been developed using immunoaffinity purified antibody. Various treatments enhanced the detection of tPA antigen in the plasma samples. Maximum detection was obtained by acidification of plasma to pH 4.8 to 6.5 or addition of 0.5 mol/L of L-lysine or L-arginine. Acidification or addition of lysine to plasma is also required for maximum immunoadsorption of plasma tPA antigen on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose. These results indicate that plasma tPA antigen is partially cryptic to antibody in untreated plasma. The plasma tPA antigen isolated by immunoadsorption of either untreated plasma or acidified plasma on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose consists mainly of a 100-kd plasminogen activator species as determined by fibrin-agar zymography. The 100-kd activity is possibly a tPA:inhibitor complex. A standardized sample preparation method was conveniently adopted by mixing 3 vol of plasma and 1 vol of 2 mol/L of L-lysine for the assay. Reconstitution and recovery studies showed that the method is specific and permits full detection of both free tPA and tPA:inhibitor complex. The validity of the assay is further supported by the finding that the spontaneous plasma fibrinolysis previously demonstrated to be dependent on plasma tPA antigen is correlated with tPA antigen content. Using the standardized assay, we found that tPA antigen concentrations in 16 blood bank plasmas are equivalent to 3.7 to 20 ng of 60 kd tPA/mL. In all the plasma tested, more than half of the antigen is undetected unless the plasma is treated as described above.

  10. Tissue-type plasminogen activator-plasmin-BDNF modulate glutamate-induced phase-shifts of the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiang; Peterson, Cynthia B; Prosser, Rebecca A

    2009-10-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) maintains environmental synchrony through light signals transmitted by glutamate released from retinal ganglion terminals. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for light/glutamate to reset the clock. In the hippocampus, BDNF is activated by the extracellular protease, plasmin, which is produced from plasminogen by tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). We provide data showing expression of proteins from the plasminogen activation cascade in the SCN and their involvement in circadian clock phase-resetting. Early night glutamate application to SCN-containing brain slices resets the circadian clock. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) blocked these shifts in slices from wild-type mice but not mice lacking its stabilizing protein, vitronectin (VN). Plasmin, but not plasminogen, prevented inhibition by PAI-1. Both plasmin and active BDNF reversed alpha(2)-antiplasmin inhibition of glutamate-induced shifts. alpha(2)-Antiplasmin decreased the conversion of inactive to active BDNF in the SCN. Finally, both tPA and BDNF allowed daytime glutamate-induced phase-resetting. Together, these data are the first to demonstrate expression of these proteases in the SCN, their involvement in modulating photic phase-shifts, and their activation of BDNF in the SCN, a potential 'gating' mechanism for photic phase-resetting. These data also demonstrate a functional interaction between PAI-1 and VN in adult brain. Given the usual association of these proteins with the extracellular matrix, these data suggest new lines of investigation into the locations and processes modulating mammalian circadian clock phase-resetting.

  11. PULMONARY LOCALIZATION AND EXPRESSION OF PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR-1 (PAI-1) IN HEALTHY OR HYPERTENSIVE RATS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY LOCALIZATION AND EXPRESSION OF PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR-1 (PAI-1) IN HEALTHY OR HYPERTENSIVE RATS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM). GS Backus1, R Vincent2, UP Kodavanti2, 1Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill; 2NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Research Triangle Park,...

  12. Effects of Lewis lung carcinoma on trabecular microstructural changes in wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone is a major target organ of metastasis. The present study investigated the effects of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) on trabecular microstructural changes, using tomographic analysis, in distal femur and lumbar 4 vertebra from LLC-bearing wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) defi...

  13. Effects of a high-fat diet on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient and wild-type mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1-/-) and wildtype mice (C57BL/6J background) fed the AIN93G diet or that diet modified with 45% calories from fat. The high-fat diet i...

  14. Fiber intake and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in type 2 diabetes: Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Trial findings at baseline and 1 year

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is elevated in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes and may contribute, independently of traditional factors, to increased cardiovascular disease risk. Fiber intake may decrease PAI-1 levels. We examined the associations of fiber intake and its changes wit...

  15. Association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism and immunoglobulin A nephropathy susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian-Biao; Jiang, Zong-Pei

    2015-02-01

    The association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) risk is still controversial. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association between PAI-1 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism and IgAN susceptibility. A predefined literature search and selection of eligible relevant studies were performed to collect data from electronic database. Four articles were identified for the analysis of association between PAI-1 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism and IgAN risk. 4 G allele was not associated with IgAN susceptibility in overall populations and in Asians. Furthermore, 4 G/4 G and 5 G/5 G genotype were not associated with IgAN for overall populations, Asians. In conclusion, PAI-1 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism was not associated with IgAN risk in overall populations and in Asians. However, more studies should be performed in the future.

  16. Successful treatment of severe mechanical mitral valve thrombosis with tissue plasminogen activator in a 7-month-old infant.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eva W; Aponte-Patel, Linda; Bacha, Emile A; Singh, Rakesh K; Rosenzweig, Erika Berman; Sen, Anita I

    2013-01-01

    Severe thrombosis of a mechanical valve is a rare complication in pediatric patients. Thrombolytic therapy as treatment of mechanical mitral valve thrombosis has rarely been reported in young infants. We report the successful treatment with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator of a mechanical mitral valve thrombus in a 7 month-old patient with trisomy 21, complete atrioventricular canal defect and pulmonary hypertension status post complete atrioventricular canal repair and subsequent prosthetic mitral valve replacement. He presented with respiratory decompensation and shock secondary to severe mechanical mitral valve stenosis. Serial echocardiograms showed significant resolution of the thrombus within 18 h of infusion with no major bleeding complications during the treatment course. Although a rare complication of mechanical valve placement in pediatrics, thrombosis of mechanical valves may result in severe hemodynamic and respiratory compromise. This case demonstrates that thrombolytic therapy is a feasible option for the treatment of critical thrombosis in pediatric patients after MVR.

  17. Repurposing an old drug to improve the safety and use of tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: Minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C; Fagan, Susan

    2014-01-01

    There is only 1 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for acute ischemic stroke: tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Due to a short time window and fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), tPA remains underutilized. There is great interest in developing combination drugs to use with tPA to improve the odds of a favorable recovery and to reduce the risk of ICH. Minocycline is a broad spectrum antibiotic that has been found to be a neuroprotective agent in preclinical ischemic stroke models. Minocycline inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9, a biomarker for ICH associated with tPA use. Minocycline is also an anti-inflammatory agent and inhibits poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase- 1. Minocycline has been safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:20575623

  18. The vitronectin binding area of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, mapped by mutagenesis and protection against an inactivating organochemical ligand.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Wind, Troels; Andreasen, Peter A

    2002-06-19

    A distinguishing feature of serpins is their ability to undergo a conformational change consisting in insertion of the reactive centre loop (RCL) into beta-sheet A. In the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), RCL movements are regulated by vitronectin, having a previously poorly defined binding site lateral to PAI-1's beta-sheet A. Using a novel strategy, based on identification of amino acid residues necessary for vitronectin protection of PAI-1 against inactivation by 4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-bisnaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid, we have defined a vitronectin binding surface spanning 10 residues between alpha-helix F, beta-strand 2A, and alpha-helix E. Our results contribute to elucidating the unique serpin conformational change.

  19. Plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, factor VIII, prothrombin activation fragment 1+2, anticardiolipin, and antiprothrombin antibodies are risk factors for thrombosis in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Molino, Daniela; De Santo, Natale G; Marotta, Rosa; Anastasio, Pietro; Mosavat, Mahrokh; De Lucia, Domenico

    2004-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease are prone to hemorrhagic complications and simultaneously are at risk for a variety of thrombotic complications such as thrombosis of dialysis blood access, the subclavian vein, coronary arteries, cerebral vessel, and retinal veins, as well as priapism. The study was devised for the following purposes: (1) to identify the markers of thrombophilia in hemodialyzed patients, (2) to establish a role for antiphospholipid antibodies in thrombosis of the vascular access, (3) to characterize phospholipid antibodies in hemodialysis patients, and (4) to study the effects of dialysis on coagulation cascade. A group of 20 hemodialysis patients with no thrombotic complications (NTC) and 20 hemodialysis patients with thrombotic complications (TC) were studied along with 400 volunteer blood donors. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and those with nephrotic syndrome were excluded. All patients underwent a screening prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen (Fg), coagulation factors of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, antithrombin III (AT-III), protein C (PC), protein S (PS), resistance to activated protein C, prothrombin activation fragment 1+2 (F1+2), plasminogen, tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen tissue activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), anticardiolipin antibodies type M and G (ACA-IgM and ACA-IgG), lupus anticoagulant antibodies, and antiprothrombin antibodies type M and G (aPT-IgM and aPT-IgG). The study showed that PAI-1, F 1+2, factor VIII, ACA-IgM, and aPT-IgM levels were increased significantly over controls both in TC and NTC, however, they could distinguish patients with thrombotic complications from those without, being increased maximally in the former group. The novelty of the study is represented by the significant aPT increase that was observed in non-systemic lupus erythematosus hemodialysis patients, and particularly in those with thrombotic events. In addition

  20. CCl4 induces tissue-type plasminogen activator in rat brain; protective effects of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Lavrentiadou, Sophia N; Tsantarliotou, Maria P; Zervos, Ioannis A; Nikolaidis, Efstathios; Georgiadis, Marios P; Taitzoglou, Ioannis A

    2013-11-01

    The high metabolic rate and relatively low antioxidant defenses of the lipid-rich brain tissue render it highly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress, whereas the implication of ROS in the pathogenesis of several diseases in the central nervous system is well-established. The plasminogen activator (PA) system is a key modulator of extracellular proteolysis, extracellular matrix remodeling and neuronal cell signaling and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases. This study evaluates the role of tissue-type PA (t-PA) in oxidative stress and the protective role of dietary antioxidants in the rat brain. We used the CCl4 experimental model of ROS-induced lipid peroxidation and evaluated the antioxidant effect of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E. CCl4-treated Wistar rats exhibited elevated brain t-PA activity, which was decreased upon long-term administration of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E. PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activity was also slightly elevated by CCl4, but this increase was not affected by the antioxidants. We hypothesize that the CCl4-induced t-PA activity indicates extracellular proteolytic activity that may be linked to neuronal cell death and brain damage. Vitamin E or antioxidants present in oregano or rosemary are effective in inhibiting t-PA elevation and can be considered as a potential protection against neuronal damage.

  1. Cell type-specific roles for tissue plasminogen activator released by neurons or microglia after excitotoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Siao, Chia-Jen; Fernandez, Susana R; Tsirka, Stella E

    2003-04-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) plays important roles in the brain after excitotoxic injury. It is released by both neurons and microglia and mediates neuronal death and microglial activation. Mice lacking tPA are resistant to excitotoxicity and show very limited microglial activation. Activated microglia are neurotoxic in culture, but this phenomenon is not well documented in vivo. To further understand the sequence of events through which tPA mediates microglial activation and neurodegeneration, we have generated mice that exhibit restricted expression of tPA through introduction of tPA transgenes under the control of neuronal- or microglial-specific promoters into tPA-deficient mice. Neither strain of transgenic mice shows abnormal brain morphology or inflammation in the absence of injury, and unilateral intrahippocampal kainate injections into the transgenic mice induced excitotoxicity and microglial activation reminiscent of wild-type mice. However, there are differences in the kinetics of the resulting pathology. The neuronal tPA-expressing mice exhibit accelerated microglial activation compared with wild-type or microglial tPA-expressing mice. However, microglial tPA-expressing mice exhibit greater neurodegeneration. These data suggest a model in which tPA plays different roles after kainate injection depending on whether it is released by neurons or microglia. We propose that tPA, initially secreted from injured neurons, acts as a cytokine to activate microglia at the site of injury. These activated microglia then secrete additional tPA, which promotes extracellular matrix degradation, neurodegeneration, and self-proliferation. We suggest that an approach to attenuate microglia-mediated neuronal death in vivo might be to pharmacologically prevent microglial activation.

  2. The Clinical Value of Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) Levels in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Toldi, Gergely; Balog, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of the general inflammatory condition of patients with autoimmune connective tissue disorders (ACTD) is a major challenge. The use of traditional inflammatory markers including CRP-levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is limited by several preanalytical factors and their low specificities. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is one of the novel candidate markers that is increasingly used in immune mediated disorders. In our studies we compared suPAR levels of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and ankylosing spondylitis with those of healthy controls. suPAR provided valuable clinical information on disease activity in RA, SLE and SSc. We identified a subgroup of remitted RA patients, who presented still clinical symptoms of inflammatory activity which correlated to high plasma suPAR (while ESR and CRP were normal). In SLE we established specific suPAR cut-off values that support the discrimination between patients with high and those with moderate SLE activity. In patients with SSc suPAR correlated with objective measures of lung and other complications. In the majority of ACTDs including SLE, SSc or RA, suPAR is seemingly a good biomarker that would provide valuable clinical information. However, before the introduction of this novel parameter in laboratory repertoire important issues should be elucidated. These include the establishment of appropriate and disease specific cutoff values, clarification of interfering preanalytical values and underlying conditions and declaration of age- and gender-specific reference ranges. PMID:27683525

  3. The Clinical Value of Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) Levels in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Disorders.

    PubMed

    Vasarhelyi, Barna; Toldi, Gergely; Balog, Attila

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of the general inflammatory condition of patients with autoimmune connective tissue disorders (ACTD) is a major challenge. The use of traditional inflammatory markers including CRP-levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is limited by several preanalytical factors and their low specificities. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is one of the novel candidate markers that is increasingly used in immune mediated disorders. In our studies we compared suPAR levels of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and ankylosing spondylitis with those of healthy controls. suPAR provided valuable clinical information on disease activity in RA, SLE and SSc. We identified a subgroup of remitted RA patients, who presented still clinical symptoms of inflammatory activity which correlated to high plasma suPAR (while ESR and CRP were normal). In SLE we established specific suPAR cut-off values that support the discrimination between patients with high and those with moderate SLE activity. In patients with SSc suPAR correlated with objective measures of lung and other complications. In the majority of ACTDs including SLE, SSc or RA, suPAR is seemingly a good biomarker that would provide valuable clinical information. However, before the introduction of this novel parameter in laboratory repertoire important issues should be elucidated. These include the establishment of appropriate and disease specific cutoff values, clarification of interfering preanalytical values and underlying conditions and declaration of age- and gender-specific reference ranges. PMID:27683525

  4. Conformations of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) orchestrate neuronal survival by a crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, T; Lesept, F; Chevilley, A; Lenoir, S; Aimable, M; Briens, A; Hommet, Y; Bardou, I; Parcq, J; Vivien, D

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a pleiotropic serine protease of the central nervous system (CNS) with reported neurotrophic and neurotoxic functions. Produced and released under its single chain form (sc), the sc-tPA can be cleaved by plasmin or kallikrein in a two chain form, tc-tPA. Although both sc-tPA and tc-tPA display a similar fibrinolytic activity, we postulated here that these two conformations of tPA (sc-tPA and tc-tPA) could differentially control the effects of tPA on neuronal survival. Using primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons, our present study reveals that sc-tPA is the only one capable to promote N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced calcium influx and subsequent excitotoxicity. In contrast, both sc-tPA and tc-tPA are capable to activate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), a mechanism mediating the antiapoptotic effects of tPA. Interestingly, we revealed a tPA dependent crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR in which a tPA-dependent activation of EGFRs leads to downregulation of NMDAR signaling and to subsequent neurotrophic effects. PMID:26469972

  5. Caveolin-1 mediates tissue plasminogen activator-induced MMP-9 up-regulation in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinchun; Sun, Yanyun; Xu, Ji; Liu, Wenlan

    2015-03-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. The mechanism through which tPA enhances MMP-9 activity is not well understood. Here we report an important role of caveolin-1 in mediating tPA-induced MMP-9 synthesis. Brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3 cells were incubated with 5 or 20 μg/ml tPA for 24 hrs before analyzing MMP-9 levels in the conditioned media and cellular extracts by gelatin zymography. tPA at a dose of 20 μg/mL tPA, but not 5 μg/mL, significantly increased MMP-9 level in cultured media while decreasing it in cellular extracts. Concurrently, tPA treatment induced a 2.3-fold increase of caveolin-1 protein levels in endothelial cells. Interestingly, knockdown of Cav-1 with siRNA inhibited tPA-induced MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and MMP-9 increase in the conditioned media, but did not affect MMP-9 decrease in cellular extracts. These results suggest that caveolin-1 critically contributes to tPA-mediated MMP-9 up-regulation, but may not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates ischemic blood brain barrier (BBB) injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. Our results suggest a novel mechanism underlying this tPA-MMP 9 axis. In response to tPA treatment, caveolin-1 protein levels increased in endothelial cells, which mediate MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and its secretion into extracellular space. Caveolin-1 may, however, not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Our data suggest caveolin-1 as a novel therapeutic target for protecting the BBB against ischemic damage. The schematic outlines tPA-induced MMP-9 upreguation.

  6. Caveolin-1 mediates tissue plasminogen activator-induced MMP-9 up-regulation in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinchun; Sun, Yanyun; Xu, Ji; Liu, Wenlan

    2015-03-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. The mechanism through which tPA enhances MMP-9 activity is not well understood. Here we report an important role of caveolin-1 in mediating tPA-induced MMP-9 synthesis. Brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3 cells were incubated with 5 or 20 μg/ml tPA for 24 hrs before analyzing MMP-9 levels in the conditioned media and cellular extracts by gelatin zymography. tPA at a dose of 20 μg/mL tPA, but not 5 μg/mL, significantly increased MMP-9 level in cultured media while decreasing it in cellular extracts. Concurrently, tPA treatment induced a 2.3-fold increase of caveolin-1 protein levels in endothelial cells. Interestingly, knockdown of Cav-1 with siRNA inhibited tPA-induced MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and MMP-9 increase in the conditioned media, but did not affect MMP-9 decrease in cellular extracts. These results suggest that caveolin-1 critically contributes to tPA-mediated MMP-9 up-regulation, but may not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates ischemic blood brain barrier (BBB) injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. Our results suggest a novel mechanism underlying this tPA-MMP 9 axis. In response to tPA treatment, caveolin-1 protein levels increased in endothelial cells, which mediate MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and its secretion into extracellular space. Caveolin-1 may, however, not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Our data suggest caveolin-1 as a novel therapeutic target for protecting the BBB against ischemic damage. The schematic outlines tPA-induced MMP-9 upreguation. PMID:25683686

  7. Enhancement of t-PA-mediated plasminogen activation by partially defucosylated glycosaminoglycans from the sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Yutaka; Sakai, Tokiko; Kaneko, Takuji; Suzuki, Kiyoshi; Kyogashima, Mamoru

    2002-08-01

    Sea cucumber glycosaminoglycan (SC-GAG) was isolated from the body wall of the sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus. The SC-GAG consists of a chondroitin sulfate E-type core polymer with sulfated fucose branches attaching glycosidically to almost every disaccharide unit of the core polymer at the C-3 position of the GlcA or at C-4 and/or C-6 position(s) of GalNAc. SC-GAG was subjected to mild acid-hydrolysis, which cleaved selectively the glycosidic linkages between the core polymer and the fucose branches, resulting in two types of partially defucosylated SC-GAG derivatives. One type (type A), obtained by 3 h-hydrolysis, contained 33% of the fucose branches and the other type (type B), obtained by 6-h hydrolysis, contained 10% of the fucose branches. The molecular masses of types A and B were determined to be 8 and 4 kDa, respectively, by gel permeation HPLC. A chondroitinase ABC (Chase ABC)-digestion demonstrated that types A and B contained 46 and 66% of digestable disaccharide units, respectively, and both types contained 29% of E-type unsaturated disaccharide units bearing no fucose branches. Intact SC-GAG and types A and B were compared for t-PA-mediated plasminogen activation by an in vitro assay system. Although intact SC-GAG and type B exhibited rather weak activity at 6.25 microg/ml, type A exhibited 5 to 10-fold higher activity than intact SC-GAG and type B at the same concentration. The activity of type A was almost one-third that of purified chondroitin sulfate E (127 kDa containing 64.5% E-type disaccharide units) from squid cartilage at 6.25 microg/ml concentration. These results suggest that t-PA-mediated plasminogen activation requires the presence of E-type disaccharide units bearing no fucose branches and a molecular mass larger than 7.5 kDa in terms of the chondroitin sulfate E structure with or without fucose branching.

  8. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism, factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutations and the risk of VTE recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sundquist, Kristina; Wang, Xiao; Svensson, Peter J; Sundquist, Jan; Hedelius, Anna; Larsson Lönn, Sara; Zöller, Bengt; Memon, Ashfaque A

    2015-11-25

    Plasminogen-activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is an important inhibitor of the plasminogen/plasmin system. PAI-1 levels are influenced by the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 promoter. We investigated the relationship between the PAI-1 polymorphism and VTE recurrence, and its possible modification by factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PTM) mutations. Patients (n=1,069) from the Malmö Thrombophilia Study were followed from discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment until diagnosis of VTE recurrence or the end of the study (maximum follow-up 9.8 years). One hundred twenty-seven patients (11.9 %) had VTE recurrence. PAI-1 was genotyped by TaqMan PCR. Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and acquired risk factors of VTE showed no evidence of an association between PAI-1 genotype and risk of VTE recurrence in the study population as a whole. However, by including an interaction term in the analysis we showed that FVL but not PTM modified the effect of PAI-1 genotype: patients with the 4G allele plus FVL had a higher risk of VTE recurrence [hazard ratio (HR) =2.3, 95 % confidence interval (CI) =1.5-3.3] compared to patients with the 4G allele but no FVL (reference group) or FVL irrespective of PAI-1 genotype (HR=1.8, 95 % CI=1.3-2.5). Compared to reference group, 5G allele irrespective of FVL was associated with lower risk of VTE recurrence only when compared with 4G allele together with FVL. In conclusion, FVL has a modifying effect on PAI-1 polymorphism in relation to risk of VTE recurrence. The role of PAI-1 polymorphism as a risk factor of recurrent VTE may be FVL dependent.

  9. Plasminogen activation in vivo upon intravenous infusion of DDAVP. Quantitative assessment of plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complex with a novel monoclonal antibody based radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; de Boer, J P; Roem, D; ten Cate, J W; Hack, C E

    1992-01-23

    Infusion of desamino-d-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) results in an increase in plasma plasminogen activator activity. Whether this increase results in the generation of plasmin in vivo has never been established. A novel sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the measurement of the complex between plasmin and its main inhibitor alpha 2-antiplasmin (PAP complex) was developed using monoclonal antibodies preferentially reacting with complexed and inactivated alpha 2-antiplasmin and monoclonal antibodies against plasmin. The assay was validated in healthy volunteers and in patients with an activated fibrinolytic system. Infusion of DDAVP in a randomized placebo controlled crossover study resulted in all volunteers in a 6.6-fold increase in PAP complex, which was maximal between 15 and 30 min after the start of the infusion. Hereafter, plasma levels of PAP complex decreased with an apparent half-life of disappearance of about 120 min. Infusion of DDAVP did not induce generation of thrombin, as measured by plasma levels of prothrombin fragment F1+2 and thrombin-antithrombin III (TAT) complex. We conclude that the increase in plasminogen activator activity upon the infusion of DDAVP results in the in vivo generation of plasmin, in the absence of coagulation activation. Studying the DDAVP induced increase in PAP complex of patients with thromboembolic disease and a defective plasminogen activator response upon DDAVP may provide more insight into the role of the fibrinolytic system in the pathogenesis of thrombosis.

  10. Proteolysis of neuronal cell adhesion molecule by the tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system after kainate injection in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Nagai, N; Urano, T; Takada, Y; Hashimoto, K; Takada, A

    1999-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin and mediates extracellular metabolism. tPA is transcriptionally induced in the mouse hippocampus by pharmacological or electrical stimulation of neuronal activity and mediates excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration. Therefore, we hypothesized that tPA would be induced in the hippocampus after kainic acid (KA) injection into the lateral cerebral ventricle (LCV) and that the activated tPA-plasmin system would degrade the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), which is a component of the extracellular matrix. In order to investigate this possibility, we first examined whether NCAM is a substrate for the tPA plasmin system by incubating mouse brain homogenates with tPA and plasminogen at 37 degrees C. Next, we examined the degradation of NCAM and the changes of tPA activity in the mouse hippocampus with immunohistochemical procedures and histological zymography after KA injection into both LCVs. As a result, we observed neuronal atrophy and a decrease of NCAM immunoreactivity along with an increase of tPA activity in the CA3 area of the hippocampus. These results suggest that activation of the tPA plasmin system after KA injection into the LCVs results in the degradation of NCAM in the CA3 area.

  11. Direct transcriptional control of the plasminogen activator gene of Yersinia pestis by the cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Jong; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L; Goh, Ee-Been; Igo, Michele M; Young, Glenn M

    2007-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfer events followed by proper regulatory integration of a gene drive rapid evolution of bacterial pathogens. A key event in the evolution of the highly virulent plague bacterium Yersinia pestis was the acquisition of plasmid pPCP1, which carries the plasminogen activator gene, pla. This promoted the bubonic form of the disease by increasing bacterial dissemination from flea bite sites and incidentally enhanced replication in respiratory airways during pneumonic infection. We determined that expression of pla is controlled by the global regulator cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (Crp). This transcription factor is well conserved among distantly related bacteria, where it acts as a soluble receptor for the ubiquitous signaling molecule cAMP and controls a global network of metabolic and stress-protective genes. Crp has a similar physiological role in Y. pestis since loss of its function resulted in an inability to metabolize a variety of nonglucose substrates. Activation of pla expression requires a transcription activation element of the pla promoter that serves as a Crp binding site. Crp interaction with this site was demonstrated to occur only in the presence of cAMP. Alteration of the Crp binding site nucleotide sequence prevented in vitro formation of Crp-DNA complexes and inhibited in vivo expression of pla. The placement of pla under direct regulatory control of Crp highlights how highly adapted pathogens integrate laterally acquired genes to coordinate virulence factor expression with global gene networks to maintain homeostasis through the infectious life cycle.

  12. Regulatory elements involved in constitutive and phorbol ester-inducible expression of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, E; Medcalf, R L; Bergonzelli, G E; Kruithof, E K

    1991-01-01

    Gene transcription rates and mRNA levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) are markedly induced by the tumor promoting agent phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. To identify promoter elements required for basal-, and phorbol ester-inducible expression, deletion mutants of the PAI-1 promoter fused to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene, were transiently expressed in HT1080 cells. Constitutive CAT activity was expressed from constructs containing more than 215 bp of promoter sequence, whereas deletion to position -91 bp abolished CAT gene expression. Treatment of transfected cells with PMA resulted in a three- to ten-fold increase in CAT expression from all constructs except from the construct shortened to position -91. DNAse1 protection analysis of the promoter region between -215 and the transcription initiation site revealed numerous protected regions, including two AP1-like binding sites (AP1a and AP1b) and one CRE-like element. Site-directed mutagenesis of the AP1a site or of the CRE-like site resulted in the loss of basal CAT activity and abolished the PMA effect, whereas mutagenesis of AP1b only partially inhibited basal and PMA-mediated expression. Our results suggest that the PAI-2 promoter contains at least two elements required for basal gene transcription and PMA-mediated induction. Images PMID:1650454

  13. Neuronal degeneration and a decrease in laminin-like immunoreactivity is associated with elevated tissue-type plasminogen activator in the rat hippocampus after kainic acid injection.

    PubMed

    Nagai, N; Urano, T; Endo, A; Takahashi, H; Takada, Y; Takada, A

    1999-02-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that converts the inactive precursor plasminogen to the active protease plasmin. In the central nervous system, tPA has been suggested to participate in plasticity, memory and the neuronal degeneration caused by excitotoxins, but its precise functions during these processes are still unclear. We show in this report that tPA antigen level and extracellular tPA activity increased in the hippocampus during the early stages of neuronal degeneration in the CA3 region following the injection of kainic acid (KA) into the lateral cerebral ventricles. The increase in tPA antigen level was transient and its peak was at 4 h after the injection. tPA activity was also increased 4 h after the injection, but it remained at a high level for more than 8 h. Histological zymography showed that the increase in tPA activity was mainly localized in the CA3 region. In the same region, the disappearance of interneuronal laminin-like immunoreactivity and atrophic changes in pyramidal neurons were observed 4 h after the injection of KA. These results suggested that such focal and transient increases in tPA synthesis and release, which result in the proteolysis of laminin through plasminogen activation, could be involved in the neuronal degeneration in the CA3 region after the injection of KA.

  14. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator deficiency has little effect on seizure susceptibility and acquired epilepsy phenotype but reduces spontaneous exploration in mice.

    PubMed

    Rantala, J; Kemppainen, S; Ndode-Ekane, X E; Lahtinen, L; Bolkvadze, Tamuna; Gurevicius, K; Tanila, H; Pitkänen, A

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), a serine protease, converts plasminogen to plasmin. Activation of plasmin leads to degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is critical for tissue recovery, angiogenesis, cell migration, and axonal and synaptic plasticity. We hypothesized that uPA deficiency would cause an abnormal neurophenotype and would lead to exacerbated epileptogenesis after brain injury. Wild-type (Wt) and uPA-/- mice underwent a battery of neurologic behavioral tests evaluating general reactivity, spontaneous exploratory activity, motor coordination, pain threshold, fear and anxiety, and memory. We placed particular emphasis on the effect of uPA deficiency on seizure susceptibility, including the response to convulsants (pentylenetetrazol, kainate, or pilocarpine) and kainate-induced epileptogenesis and epilepsy. The uPA-/- mice showed no motor or sensory impairment compared with the Wt mice. Hippocampus-dependent spatial memory also remained intact. The uPA-/- mice, however, exhibited reduced exploratory activity and an enhanced response to a tone stimulus (p<0.05 compared with the Wt mice). The urokinase-type plasminogen activator deficient mice showed no increase in spontaneous or evoked epileptiform electrographic activity. Rather, the response to pilocarpine administration was reduced compared with the Wt mice (p<0.05). Also, the epileptogenesis and the epilepsy phenotype after intrahippocampal kainate injection were similar to those in the Wt mice. Taken together, uPA deficiency led to diminished interest in the environmental surroundings and enhanced emotional reactivity to unexpected aversive stimuli. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator deficiency was not associated with enhanced seizure susceptibility or worsened poststatus epilepticus epilepsy phenotype.

  15. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I exert different effects on plasminogen activator production or cell growth in the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS.

    PubMed

    Degryse, B; Maisonobe, F; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1991-11-01

    Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) are evaluated for their capacity to affect cell proliferation and plasminogen activator (PA) activity production in an ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS. Insulin at physiological and supraphysiological doses induces cell proliferation and increases PA activity. IGF-I, which is also clearly mitogenic for these cells, surprisingly does not modulate PA activity. The results indicate that the growth promoting effect is mediated through the insulin and IGF-I receptors whereas PA activity is solely regulated via the insulin receptors. PMID:1802921

  16. Differential biological significance of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activator in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, J.; Ogawa, M.; Yamashita, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Saishoji, T.; Nomura, K.; Inada, K.; Kawano, I.

    1993-01-01

    Plasminogen activator (PA) is a serine protease existing in two forms known as tissue-type (t-PA) and urokinase-type (u-PA). To examine whether PA is related to the postoperative clinical course of human breast cancer, total PA activity, t-PA activity, u-PA activity, and immunoreactive t-PA were determined in tissue extracts from 144 breast cancer specimens. The patients were initially divided into four groups according to the postoperative clinical course: Group I (83 patients who are disease-free), Group II (20 patients whose first metastases were found only in bone), Group III (19 patients whose first metastases were found in both bone and lung), and Group IV (22 patients whose first metastases were found only in lung). Total PA activity was significantly lower in Groups, II, III and IV than in Group I. Both t-PA activity and t-PA antigen levels were also significantly lower in Groups II, III and IV than in Group I, while no significant difference was found in u-PA activity among these groups, indicating that low activity of total PA in Groups II, III and IV was due to a decrease in t-PA but not in u-PA. In the multivariate analyses, t-PA activity was found to be an independent prognostic factor for relapse-free survival. When four groups of patients were further analysed in terms of nodal status, both t-PA activity and antigen levels were markedly decreased in the node-negative Group II compared with the node-negative Groups III and IV or with the node-positive Groups II, III and IV. Of additional interest, u-PA activity was significantly higher in node-positive patients than in node-negative patients with any group. The clinico-pathologic analyses of the patients in this series showed that node involvement and lymphatic invasion were more frequently positive in Groups III and IV than in Groups I and II. When 144 breast cancers were categorised in terms of combinations of oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) status, breast cancers which were

  17. Interferon-alpha 2b increases fibrolysis in fibrotic livers from bile duct ligated rats: possible participation of the plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fragoso, L; González, M P; Muriel, P

    1995-12-01

    Interferons are known to prevent liver collagen by an antifibrogenic mechanism that involves mRNA procollagen regulation. The aim of the present work was to determine whether interferon could also decrease collagen by increasing its degradation. Fibrosis was induced in male Wistar rats by double ligation and section of the common bile duct. Interferon-alpha 2b (100,000 IU/rat s.c.) was administered to bile duct ligated rats daily after surgery for 4 weeks. Interferon increased the capacity of the liver to degrade type I and III collagens and matrigel. In addition, the plasminogen activator activity also increased. Since plasminogens are thought to be key participants in the balance of proteolytic activities that regulate extracellular matrix degradation, their elevation may also provide another antifibrotic (proteolytic) mechanism of action of interferon. PMID:8966190

  18. High-level expression of a novel recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) in the milk of transgenic rabbits and its thrombolytic bioactivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Shaozheng; Ge, Xin; Cheng, Yaobin; Lu, Rui; Zhang, Ting; Yu, Baoli; Ji, Xueqiao; Qi, Zhengqiang; Rong, Yao; Yuan, Yuguo; Cheng, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a key kinase of fibrinolysis that plays an important role in dissolving fibrin clots to promote thrombolysis. The recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) has more thrombolytic advantages than the wild type tPA. To increase the half-life and thrombolytic activity of tPA, a mutant containing only the essential K2 fibrin-binding and P activating plasminogen domains of the wild type tPA was cloned. This fragment was then inserted into goat β-casein regulatory sequences. Then, a mammary gland-specific expression vector, PCL25/rhPA, was constructed, and the transgenic rabbits were generated. In this study, 18 live transgenic founders (12♀, 6♂) were generated using pronuclear microinjection. Six transgenic rabbits were obtained, and the expression levels of rhPA in the milk had a range of 15.2-630 µg/ml. A fibrin agarose plate assay of rhPA showed that it had strong thrombolytic bioactivity in vitro, and the highest specific activity was >360 (360 times more than that of alteplase). The results indicated that the rhPA containing only the K2 and P domains is efficiently expressed with higher thrombolytic bioactivity in the milk of transgenic rabbits. Our study also demonstrated a new method for the large-scale production of clinically relevant recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in the mammary glands of transgenic rabbits. PMID:27230577

  19. Decreased expression of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 is involved in degradation of extracellular matrix surrounding cervical cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masakazu; Kawana, Kei; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Fujimoto, Asaha; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Nakamura, Hiroe; Nishida, Haruka; Inoue, Tomoko; Taguchi, Ayumi; Takahashi, Juri; Kojima, Satoko; Yamashita, Aki; Tomio, Kensuke; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-02-01

    The plasminogen activator (PA) system consists of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor (uPA and uPAR). PAI-1 inhibits the activation of uPA (which converts plasminogen to plasmin), and is involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, by remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) through regulating plasmin. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cells within tumors, and are thought to be involved in tumor recurrence and metastasis. Considering these facts, we investigated the relationship between PAI-1 and cervical CSCs. We used ALDH1 as a marker of cervical CSCs. First, we demonstrated that culturing ALDH1-high cells and ALDH-low cells on collagen IV-coted plates increased their expression of active PAI-1 (ELISA), and these increases were suggested to be at mRNA expression levels (RT-qPCR). Secondly, we demonstrated PAI-1 was indeed involved in the ECM maintenance. With gelatin zymography assays, we found that ALDH1-high cells and ALDH-low cells expressed pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 (pro-MMP-2) irrespective of their coatings. With gelatinase/collagenase assay kit, we confirmed that collagenase activity was increased when ALDH1-low cells were exposed to TM5275, a small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1. Putting the data together, we hypothesized that cancer cells adhered to basal membrane secrete abundant PAI-1, on the other hand, cancer cells (especially CSCs rather than non-CSCs) distant from basal membrane secrete less PAI-1, which makes the ECM surrounding CSCs more susceptible to degradation. Our study could be an explanation of conflicting reports, where some researchers found negative impacts of PAI-1 expression on clinical outcomes and others not, by considering the concept of CSCs.

  20. Risk factors associated with serum levels of the inflammatory biomarker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in a general population.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Thomas H; Kallemose, Thomas; Ladelund, Steen; Rasmussen, Line Jh; Thorball, Christian W; Andersen, Ove; Pisinger, Charlotta; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a biomarker of mortality risk in various patient populations. However, little is known about the implications of lifestyle for suPAR levels in the general population. Lifestyle, demographic, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor data were collected from 5,538 participants in the Danish population-based Inter99 study. Their suPAR levels were measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the final adjusted model, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher suPAR levels (P < 0.001). An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels. Physical activity in leisure time had a modest impact on suPAR levels in univariate analysis, but not in the final adjusted model. In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population. Diet and alcohol consumption also seemed to impact suPAR levels. Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers. PMID:25574132

  1. Genetic association of five plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) polymorphisms and idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young Joo; Kim, Young Ran; Lee, Bo Eun; Choi, Yi Seul; Kim, Ji Hyang; Shin, Ji Eun; Rah, HyungChul; Cha, Sun Hee; Lee, Woo Sik; Kim, Nam Keun

    2013-10-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is important for maintaining pregnancy. Aberrantly increased PAI-1 levels may contribute to thrombosis and inflammation, leading to pregnancy loss. This study investigated the association of PAI-1 polymorphisms (PAI-1 rs2227631 [-844G>A], rs1799889 [-675 4G/5G], rs6092 [43G>A], rs2227694 [9785G>A], and rs7242 [11053T>G]) with idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) in Korean women. We screened 308 RPL patients and 227 control participants for five PAI-1 polymorphisms. Genotyping of PAI-1 was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. PAI-1 4G4G and -844AA/4G4G/11053GG genotypes were associated with RPL. PAI-1 -844A/4G/43G/9785G/11053G haplotype was connected to hypofibrinolytic status (i.e. increased levels of plasma PAI-1, increased numbers of platelets, reduced prothrombin time, and reduced activated partial thromboplastin time). Moreover, PAI-1 11053TG+GG frequency was positively related to plasma homocysteine and urate levels, whereas -844AA frequency was associated with plasma folate concentrations according to ordinal logistic regression analysis. Based on these results, we propose that PAI-1 -844G>A, 4G/5G, and 11053T>G polymorphisms are markers of RPL.

  2. Glioma-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) regulates the recruitment of LRP1 positive mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananya; Coum, Antoine; Marinescu, Voichita D; Põlajeva, Jelena; Smits, Anja; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Tchougounova, Elena

    2015-09-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a high-grade glioma with a complex microenvironment, including various inflammatory cells and mast cells (MCs) as one of them. Previously we had identified glioma grade-dependent MC recruitment. In the present study we investigated the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in MC recruitment.PAI-1, a primary regulator in the fibrinolytic cascade is capable of forming a complex with fibrinolytic system proteins together with low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We found that neutralizing PAI-1 attenuated infiltration of MCs. To address the potential implication of LRP1 in this process, we used a LRP1 antagonist, receptor-associated protein (RAP), and demonstrated the attenuation of MC migration. Moreover, a positive correlation between the number of MCs and the level of PAI-1 in a large cohort of human glioma samples was observed. Our study demonstrated the expression of LRP1 in human MC line LAD2 and in MCs in human high-grade glioma. The activation of potential PAI-1/LRP1 axis with purified PAI-1 promoted increased phosphorylation of STAT3 and subsequently exocytosis in MCs.These findings indicate the influence of the PAI-1/LRP1 axis on the recruitment of MCs in glioma. The connection between high-grade glioma and MC infiltration could contribute to patient tailored therapy and improve patient stratification in future therapeutic trials.

  3. Evaluation of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) as prognostic markers in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gondek, Tomasz; Szajewski, Mariusz; Szefel, Jarosław; Aleksandrowicz-Wrona, Ewa; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa; Jankun, Jerzy; Lysiak-Szydlowska, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In carcinoma of prostate, a causative role of platelet 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) for tumor progression has been firmly established in tumor and/or adjacent tissue. Our goal was to investigate if 12-LOX and/or PAI-1 in patient's plasma could be used to predict outcome of the disease. The study comprised 149 patients (age 70±9) divided into two groups: a study group with carcinoma confirmed by positive biopsy of prostate (n=116) and a reference group (n=33) with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The following parameters were determined by the laboratory test in plasma or platelet-rich plasma: protein level of 12-LOX, PAI-1, thromboglobulin (TGB), prostate specific antigen (PSA), C-reactive protein (CRP), hemoglobin (HGB, and hematocrit (HCT), as well as red (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC), number of platelets (PLT), international normalized ratio of blood clotting (INR), and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The only difference of significance was noticed in the concentration of 12-LOX in platelet rich plasma, which was lower in cancer than in BPH group. Standardization to TGB and platelet count increases the sensitivity of the test that might be used as a biomarker to assess risk for prostate cancer in periodically monitored patients.

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is a critical downstream target of p53 in the induction of replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Kortlever, Roderik M; Higgins, Paul J; Bernards, René

    2006-08-01

    p53 limits the proliferation of primary diploid fibroblasts by inducing a state of growth arrest named replicative senescence - a process which protects against oncogenic transformation and requires integrity of the p53 tumour suppressor pathway. However, little is known about the downstream target genes of p53 in this growth-limiting response. Here, we report that suppression of the p53 target gene encoding plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by RNA interference (RNAi) leads to escape from replicative senescence both in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts and primary human BJ fibroblasts. PAI-1 knockdown results in sustained activation of the PI(3)K-PKB-GSK3beta pathway and nuclear retention of cyclin D1, consistent with a role for PAI-1 in regulating growth factor signalling. In agreement with this, we find that the PI(3)K-PKB-GSK3beta-cyclin D1 pathway is also causally involved in cellular senescence. Conversely, ectopic expression of PAI-1 in proliferating p53-deficient murine or human fibroblasts induces a phenotype displaying all the hallmarks of replicative senescence. Our data indicate that PAI-1 is not merely a marker of senescence, but is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of replicative senescence downstream of p53.

  5. A Mechanism for Assembly of Complexes of Vitronectin and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 from Sedimmentation Velocity Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Kenneth H.; Schar, Christine R.; Blouse, Grant E.; Shore, Joseph D.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Schuck, Peter; Peterson, Cynthia B.

    2005-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and vitronectin are cofactors involved in pathological conditions such as injury, inflammation, and cancer, during which local levels of PAI-1 are increased and the active serpin forms complexes with vitronectin. These complexes become deposited into surrounding tissue matrices, where they regulate cell adhesion and peri-cellular proteolysis. The mechanism for their co-localization has not been elucidated. We hypothesize that PAI-1-vitronectin complexes form in a stepwise and concentration-dependent fashion via 1:1 and 2:1 intermediates, with the 2:1 complex serving a key role in assembly of higher order complexes. To test this hypothesis, sedimentation velocity experiments in the analytical ultracentrifuge were performed to identify different PAI-1-vitronectin complexes. Analysis of sedimentation data invoked a novel multisignal method to discern the stoichiometry of the two proteins in the higher-order complexes formed (Balbo, A., Minor, K. H., Velikovsky, C. A., Mariuzza, R. A., Peterson, C. B., and Schuck, P. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102, 81—86). Our results demonstrate that PAI-1 and vitronectin assemble into higher order forms via a pathway that is triggered upon saturation of the two PAI-1-binding sites of vitronectin to form the 2:1 complex. This 2:1 PAI-1-vitronectin complex, with a sedimentation coefficient of 6.5 S, is the key intermediate for the assembly of higher order complexes. PMID:15905170

  6. Coamplification and coexpression of human tissue-type plasminogen activator and murine dihydrofolate reductase sequences in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, R J; Wasley, L C; Spiliotes, A J; Gossels, S D; Latt, S A; Larsen, G R; Kay, R M

    1985-01-01

    Expression of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) at high levels has been achieved in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by cotransfection and subsequent coamplification of the transfected sequences. Expression vectors containing the t-PA cDNA gene and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) cDNA gene were cotransfected into CHO DHFR-deficient cells. Transformants expressing DHFR were selected by growth in media lacking nucleosides and contained low numbers of t-PA genes and DHFR genes. Stepwise selection of the DHFR+ transformants in increasing concentrations of methotrexate generated cells which had amplified both DHFR genes and t-PA genes over 100-fold. These cell lines expressed elevated levels of enzymatically active t-PA. To optimize both t-PA sequence amplification and t-PA expression, various modifications of the original procedure were used. These included alterations to the DHFR expression vector, optimization of the molar ratio of t-PA to DHFR sequences in the cotransfection, and modification of the methotrexate resistance selection procedure. The structure of the amplified DNA, its chromosomal location, and its stability during growth in the absence of methotrexate are reported. Images PMID:4040603

  7. Risk Factors Associated with Serum Levels of the Inflammatory Biomarker Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Thomas H; Kallemose, Thomas; Ladelund, Steen; Rasmussen, Line JH; Thorball, Christian W; Andersen, Ove; Pisinger, Charlotta; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a biomarker of mortality risk in various patient populations. However, little is known about the implications of lifestyle for suPAR levels in the general population. Lifestyle, demographic, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor data were collected from 5,538 participants in the Danish population-based Inter99 study. Their suPAR levels were measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the final adjusted model, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher suPAR levels (P < 0.001). An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels. Physical activity in leisure time had a modest impact on suPAR levels in univariate analysis, but not in the final adjusted model. In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population. Diet and alcohol consumption also seemed to impact suPAR levels. Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers. PMID:25574132

  8. Elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in pulmonary edema fluid are associated with mortality in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Priya; Ware, Lorraine B; White, Kimberly E; Cross, Michael T; Matthay, Michael A; Olman, Mitchell A

    2003-07-01

    The alveolar fibrinolytic system is altered in acute lung injury (ALI). Levels of the fibrinolytic protease inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are too low in bronchoalveolar lavage to address its prognostic significance. This study was performed to assess whether PAI-1 antigen in undiluted pulmonary edema fluid levels can identify patients with ALI and predict their outcome. PAI-1 antigen levels in both plasma and edema fluid were higher in ALI compared with hydrostatic edema, and edema fluid PAI-1 values identified those with ALI with high sensitivity and specificity. Both the high plasma and edema fluid PAI-1 antigen values were associated with a higher mortality rate and fewer days of unassisted ventilation in patients with ALI. Differences in PAI-1 activity were concordant with levels of PAI-1 antigen. Although the fibrin-derived alveolar D-dimer levels were strikingly similar in both groups, ALI patients had a higher relative proportion of D-monomer. In conclusion, PAI-1 levels in edema fluid and plasma identify those with ALI that have a poor prognosis. The data indicate that fibrin turnover in early ALI is a consequence of a rapid fibrinogen influx and fractional fibrinolytic inhibition.

  9. Functionally stable plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in a family with cardiovascular disease and vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Agirbasli, Mehmet; Eren, Mesut; Yasar, Songul; Delil, Kenan; Goktay, Fatih; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2014-07-01

    Vitiligo is a common skin condition with a complex pathophysiology characterized by the lack of pigmentation due to melanocyte degeneration. In this study, we investigated PAI-1 antigen (Ag) and activity levels in a 34 year old male with extensive vascular disease, alopecia areata and vitiligo. Fasting PAI-1 Ag and activity levels were measured at 9 a.m. in the subject and family members. Both PAI-1 Ag (67 ± 38 vs. 18.6 ± 6.5 ng/ml, P < 0.001) and specific activity (15.8 ± 10.0 vs. 7.6 ± 6.0 IU/pmol, P < 0.04) levels of PAI-1 were moderately elevated in subjects compared to the controls. PAI-1 kinetic studies demonstrated a markedly enhanced stability of plasma PAI-1 activity in the family members. Specific activity at 16 h was significantly higher than expected activity levels (0.078 ± 0.072 vs. 0.001 ± 0.001 IU/ng/ml, P < 0.001). While the exact mechanism of increased stability of PAI-1 activity in vitiligo is not known, it is likely due to post-translational modifications or increased binding affinity for a stabilizing cofactor. In conclusion, enhanced stability of PAI-1 may contribute to the pathophysiology of vascular disease and associated melanocyte degeneration. Systemic or local treatment with PAI-1 inhibitors may offer a potential treatment alternative to the near orphan status for vitiligo drug development. PMID:24197654

  10. The influence of the polyphenols of cider on plasmin and plasminogen activators.

    PubMed

    Ogston, D; Lea, A G; Langhorne, P; Wilson, S B

    1985-08-01

    Preliminary findings suggested that the inhibitory activity on fibrinolysis produced by most varieties of cider is due to their content of polyphenols. In particular, the inhibitory activity co-eluted with the brown coloration on gel filtration, was removed by adsorption with polyvinylpyrrolidine, and was greatly reduced in a type of cider with a low concentration of phenolic compounds. The individual polyphenols of apple juice and ciders were examined for their ability to inhibit tissue activator, urokinase and plasmin. Neither phloridzin nor chlorogenic acid had any inhibitory activity at concentrations of 500 micrograms/ml while epicatechin had only a slight inhibitory effect at this concentration. The procyanidin fractions were markedly inhibitory on urokinase-induced clot lysis, the amidolytic activity of plasmin and on the fibrinolytic activities of plasmin, urokinase and tissue activator on fibrin plates: inhibition was noted at concentrations as low as 0.25 micrograms/ml. The order of inhibition was polymer greater than oligomer greater than trimer greater than dimer. PMID:3161536

  11. Multicenter reperfusion trial of intravenous anisoylated plasminogen streptokinase activator complex (APSAC) in acute myocardial infarction: controlled comparison with intracoronary streptokinase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J L; Rothbard, R L; Hackworthy, R A; Sorensen, S G; Fitzpatrick, P G; Dahl, C F; Hagan, A D; Browne, K F; Symkoviak, G P; Menlove, R L

    1988-06-01

    The recent establishment of a firm therapeutic role for reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction has stimulated interest in the development of more ideal thrombolytic agents. Anisoylated plasminogen streptokinase activator complex (APSAC) is a new plasminogen activator possessing properties that are promising for intravenous thrombolytic application in acute myocardial infarction. To assess the reperfusion potential of intravenous APSAC, a multi-center, angiographically controlled reperfusion trial was performed. An approved thrombolytic regimen of intracoronary streptokinase served as a control. Consenting patients with clinical and electrocardiographic signs of acute myocardial infarction were studied angiographically and 240 qualifying patients with documented coronary occlusion (flow grade 0 or 1) were randomized to treatment in less than 6 h of symptom onset (mean 3.4 h, range 0.4 to 6.0) with either intravenous APSAC (30 U in 2 to 4 min) or intracoronary streptokinase (160,000 U over 60 min). Both groups also received heparin for greater than or equal to 24 h. Reperfusion was evaluated angiographically over 90 min and success was defined as advancement of grade 0 or 1 to grade 2 or 3 flow. Rates of reperfusion for the two treatment regimens were 51% (59 of 115) at 90 min after intravenous APSAC and 60% (67 of 111) after 60 min of intracoronary streptokinase (p less than or equal to 0.18). Reperfusion at any time within the 90 min was observed in 55 and 64%, respectively (p less than or equal to 0.16). Time to reperfusion occurred at 43 +/- 23 min after intravenous and 31 +/- 17 min after intracoronary therapy. The success of intravenous therapy was dependent on the time to treatment: 60% of APSAC patients treated within 4 h exhibited reperfusion compared with 33% of those treated after 4 h (p less than or equal to 0.01). Reperfusion rates were also dependent on initial flow grade (p less than or equal to 0.0001): 48% (81 of 168) for grade 0 (APSAC = 43

  12. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1-Induced Antibodies Cross-React with Human Plasminogen and Enhance Its Activation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Jessica; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wang, Shuying; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease, and it can cause life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Abnormal activation of the coagulation and fibrinolysis system is one of the hallmarks of DHF/DSS. However, the mechanism underlying hemorrhage in DHF/DSS remains elusive. In previous studies, plasminogen (Plg) cross-reactive Abs, which can recognize DENV nonstructural protein (NS) 1, have been found in dengue patients. However, it is unclear whether these Abs are indeed induced by DENV NS1. Thus, we immunized mice with recombinant NS1 from both bacteria and drosophila to determine whether NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs. The results from the NS1-immunized mouse sera indicated that NS1 immunization induced Abs that could cross-react with Plg. To study the effects of these NS1-induced Plg cross-reactive Abs on fibrinolysis, we isolated several Plg cross-reactive anti-NS1 mAbs from these mice and found that some of them could enhance Plg activation. In addition, epitope mapping with a phage-displayed random peptide library revealed that one of these mAbs (2A5) could recognize NS1 C-terminal residues 305-311, which share sequence homology with Plg residues 590-597. A synthetic peptide of NS1 residues 305-311 could inhibit the binding of both 2A5 and its Fab to Plg and its enhanced activation. Thus, our results suggest that DENV NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs through molecular mimicry, which can enhance Plg activation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS. PMID:26712948

  13. Presence of an inhibitor of plasminogen activator in uterine fluid of the western spotted skunk during delayed implantation.

    PubMed

    Fazleabas, A T; Mead, R A; Rourke, A W; Roberts, R M

    1984-03-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that protease inhibitors would be present in uterine fluids of the western spotted skunk during the period of delayed implantation but would decline or disappear during implantation. Blood plasma, uterine flushings and medium from endometrial cultures were collected 40-70 days preimplantation (Stage 1), 20-25 days preimplantation (Stage 2), 1-3 days preimplantation (Stage 3) and 1-5 days postimplantation (Stage 4). Protein content of the flushings was low in Stage 1 (12.9 +/- 3.0 micrograms), increased slightly (21.8 +/- 6.4 micrograms) during Stage 2 and increased markedly in Stages 3 (99 +/- 44.8 micrograms) and 4 (256 +/- 150 micrograms). No protease activity was detected in any fluid at any stage. Uterine flushings, however, contained an inhibitor of plasminogen activator (PA) of apparent molecular weight approximately 70,000. The total amount of inhibitor increased as pregnancy progressed, but specific inhibitory activity was highest during Stages 1 and 2 (1.7 and 3.2 units/micrograms protein, respectively) and declined in Stages 3 and 4 (1.2 and 0.6 units/micrograms protein, respectively). The inhibitor was present in medium from uterine cultures but was low in plasma. All of the fluids could inhibit trypsin, but not plasmin. The antitrypsin activity in uterine fluids is attributed to plasma transudate. The results demonstrate an inhibitor of PA in skunk uterine fluids but show no temporal relationship between its presence and the period of obligate delay of implantation.

  14. Induction of oxidative stress and inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 production in endothelial cells following exposure to organic extracts of diesel exhaust particles and urban fine particles.

    PubMed

    Furuyama, Akiko; Hirano, Seishiro; Koike, Eiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2006-03-01

    Endothelial cells play important roles in anticoagulant and fibrinolytic systems. Recent studies suggest that increases in ambient particulate matter (PM) levels have been associated with an increase in mortality rate from cardiovascular diseases. We examined the production of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and factors related to the fibrinolytic function by rat heart microvessel endothelial cells exposed to organic extracts of diesel exhaust particles (OE-DEP) and urban fine particles (OE-UFP) to investigate the direct effects of these soluble organic fractions in these PM on the fibrinolytic function of endothelial cells. The cell monolayer exposed to 10 microg/ml OE-DEP produced a larger amount of HO-1 than cells exposed to 10 microg/ml OE-UFP. OE-DEP and OE-UFP exposure reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production by the cells but did not affect the production of thrombomodulin, tissue-type plasminogen activator, or urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Increased PAI-1 synthesis in response to treatment with 1.0 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor-alpha or 0.5 ng/ml transforming growth factor-beta1 was reduced by OE-DEP exposure. Suppression of PAI-1 production by OE-DEP exposure was mediated through oxidative stress and was independent of HO-1 activity. These results suggest that exposure to the soluble organic fraction of PM and DEP induced oxidative stress and reduced the PAI-1 production of endothelial cells.

  15. Neuroserpin, a brain-associated inhibitor of tissue plasminogen activator is localized primarily in neurons. Implications for the regulation of motor learning and neuronal survival.

    PubMed

    Hastings, G A; Coleman, T A; Haudenschild, C C; Stefansson, S; Smith, E P; Barthlow, R; Cherry, S; Sandkvist, M; Lawrence, D A

    1997-12-26

    A cDNA clone for the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin), neuroserpin, was isolated from a human whole brain cDNA library, and recombinant protein was expressed in insect cells. The purified protein is an efficient inhibitor of tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA), having an apparent second-order rate constant of 6. 2 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 for the two-chain form. However, unlike other known plasminogen activator inhibitors, neuroserpin is a more effective inactivator of tPA than of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Neuroserpin also effectively inhibited trypsin and nerve growth factor-gamma but reacted only slowly with plasmin and thrombin. Northern blot analysis showed a 1.8 kilobase messenger RNA expressed predominantly in adult human brain and spinal cord, and immunohistochemical studies of normal mouse tissue detected strong staining primarily in neuronal cells with occasionally positive microglial cells. Staining was most prominent in the ependymal cells of the choroid plexus, Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, select neurons of the hypothalamus and hippocampus, and in the myelinated axons of the commissura. Expression of tPA within these regions is reported to be high and has previously been correlated with both motor learning and neuronal survival. Taken together, these data suggest that neuroserpin is likely to be a critical regulator of tPA activity in the central nervous system, and as such may play an important role in neuronal plasticity and/or maintenance.

  16. Anti-tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) as an effective therapy of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia with and without inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is an important cause of neurodevelopmental deficits in neonates. Intrauterine infection and the ensuing fetal inflammatory responses augment hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and attenuate the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia. Here, we review evidences from preclinical studies suggesting that the induction of brain parenchymal tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) plays an important pathogenic role in these conditions. Moreover, administration of a stable-mutant form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 called CPAI confers potent protection against hypoxic-ischemic injury with and without inflammation via different mechanisms. Besides intracerebroventricular injection, CPAI can also be administered into the brain using a noninvasive intranasal delivery strategy, adding to its applicability in clinical use. In sum, the therapeutic potential of CPAI in neonatal care merits further investigation with large-animal models of hypoxia-ischemia and cerebral palsy. PMID:25475942

  17. Enhancement of mRNA expression of tissue-type plasminogen activator by L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine in association with ocular dominance plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mataga, N; Imamura, K; Shiomitsu, T; Yoshimura, Y; Fukamauchi, K; Watanabe, Y

    1996-11-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) plays important roles in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus and cerebellum. We found that the expression of tPA mRNA in the visual cortex was increased significantly by the peripheral administration of L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (L-threo-DOPS; 100 mg/kg, i.p.), which we had previously shown to have a promotive effect on ocular dominance (OD) plasticity. When plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1; 100 muM in an osmotic minipump) was infused into the kitten visual cortex, OD plasticity was suppressed; i.e. a significantly large number of binocular cells was recorded in the PAI-1 infused cortex following monocular deprivation. These results, therefore, suggest that the PA system is involved in the promotive effect of L-threo-DOPS in OD plasticity.

  18. Transformation phenotype of polyoma virus-transformed rat fibroblasts: plasminogen activator production is modulated by the growth state of the cells and regulated by the expression of an early viral gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Perbal, B

    1980-01-01

    The expression of two transformation parameters, namely, ability to grow in agar and plasminogen activator production, was studied in several rat fibroblasts transformed by either wild-type or thermo-sensitive (tsa and ts25) polyoma viruses. The production of plasminogen activator was found to be dependent upon the growth state of the infected cells during a period of several days after infection. The analysis of the transformed phenotype of 25 tsa transformants and of 19 ts25 transformants independently isolated under various growth conditions led to the conclusion that there is no correlation between the regulation processes involved in plasminogen activator production and ability to grow without anchorage. The results obtained also suggested that the production of plasminogen activator is under the control of a functional large T antigen. PMID:6255182

  19. Plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, factor VIII, prothrombin activation fragment 1+2, anticardiolipin, and antiprothrombin antibodies are risk factors for thrombosis in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Molino, Daniela; De Santo, Natale G; Marotta, Rosa; Anastasio, Pietro; Mosavat, Mahrokh; De Lucia, Domenico

    2004-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease are prone to hemorrhagic complications and simultaneously are at risk for a variety of thrombotic complications such as thrombosis of dialysis blood access, the subclavian vein, coronary arteries, cerebral vessel, and retinal veins, as well as priapism. The study was devised for the following purposes: (1) to identify the markers of thrombophilia in hemodialyzed patients, (2) to establish a role for antiphospholipid antibodies in thrombosis of the vascular access, (3) to characterize phospholipid antibodies in hemodialysis patients, and (4) to study the effects of dialysis on coagulation cascade. A group of 20 hemodialysis patients with no thrombotic complications (NTC) and 20 hemodialysis patients with thrombotic complications (TC) were studied along with 400 volunteer blood donors. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and those with nephrotic syndrome were excluded. All patients underwent a screening prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen (Fg), coagulation factors of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, antithrombin III (AT-III), protein C (PC), protein S (PS), resistance to activated protein C, prothrombin activation fragment 1+2 (F1+2), plasminogen, tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen tissue activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), anticardiolipin antibodies type M and G (ACA-IgM and ACA-IgG), lupus anticoagulant antibodies, and antiprothrombin antibodies type M and G (aPT-IgM and aPT-IgG). The study showed that PAI-1, F 1+2, factor VIII, ACA-IgM, and aPT-IgM levels were increased significantly over controls both in TC and NTC, however, they could distinguish patients with thrombotic complications from those without, being increased maximally in the former group. The novelty of the study is represented by the significant aPT increase that was observed in non-systemic lupus erythematosus hemodialysis patients, and particularly in those with thrombotic events. In addition

  20. Cell-free synthesis of enzymically active tissue-type plasminogen activator. Protein folding determines the extent of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Bulleid, N J; Bassel-Duby, R S; Freedman, R B; Sambrook, J F; Gething, M J

    1992-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is synthesized in mammalian cells as a mixture of two forms that differ in their extent of N-linked glycosylation. We have investigated the mechanism underlying this variation in glycosylation, using a cell-free system that consists of a rabbit reticulocyte lysate optimized for the formation of disulphide bonds and supplemented with dog pancreas microsomal membranes. Molecules of human t-PA synthesized in vitro are enzymically active and responsive to natural activators and inhibitors, and are glycosylated in a pattern identical with that of the protein produced in vivo. This demonstrates that t-PA synthesized in vitro folds into the same conformation as the protein synthesized in vivo. We show that the extent of glycosylation of individual t-PA molecules is dependent on the state of folding of the polypeptide chain, since the probability of addition of an oligosaccharide side chain at Asn-184 is decreased under conditions that promote the formation of enzymically active molecules. This variation in glycosylation is independent of the rate of protein synthesis. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1520279

  1. Calnexin and calreticulin bind to enzymically active tissue-type plasminogen activator during biosynthesis and are not required for folding to the native conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, S; Bulleid, N J

    1997-01-01

    The roles of the endoplasmic-reticulum lectins calnexin and calreticulin in the folding of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) have been investigated using an in vitro translation system that reconstitutes these processes as they would occur in the intact cell. Using co-immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized tPA with antibodies to calnexin and calreticulin, it was demonstrated that the interaction of tPA with both lectins was dependent upon tPA glycosylation and glucosidase trimming. When tPA was synthesized in the presence of semi-permeabilized cells under conditions preventing complex formation with calnexin and calreticulin, the translation product had a specific plasminogenolytic activity identical with that when synthesized under conditions permitting interactions with both lectins. Furthermore, complexes of tPA bound to calnexin and calreticulin were shown to be enzymically active. These results demonstrate that calnexin and calreticulin can form a stable interaction with correctly folded tPA; however, such interactions are not required for the synthesis of enzymically active tPA. PMID:9359841

  2. Effects on coagulation and fibrinolysis induced by influenza in mice with a reduced capacity to generate activated protein C and a deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1.

    PubMed

    Keller, Tymen T; van der Sluijs, Koen F; de Kruif, Martijn D; Gerdes, Victor E A; Meijers, Joost C M; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom; van Gorp, Eric C M; Brandjes, Dees P M; Büller, Harry R; Levi, Marcel

    2006-11-24

    Influenza infections increase the risk of diseases associated with a prothrombotic state, such as venous thrombosis and atherothrombotic diseases. However, it is unclear whether influenza leads to a prothrombotic state in vivo. To determine whether influenza activates coagulation, we measured coagulation and fibrinolysis in influenza-infected C57BL/6 mice. We found that influenza increased thrombin generation, fibrin deposition, and fibrinolysis. In addition, we used various anti- and prothrombotic models to study pathways involved in the influenza-induced prothrombotic state. A reduced capacity to generate activated protein C in TM(pro/pro) mice increased thrombin generation and fibrinolysis, whereas treatment with heparin decreased thrombin generation in influenza-infected C57Bl/6 mice. Thrombin generation was not changed in hyperfibrinolytic mice, deficient in plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1(-/-)); however, increased fibrin degradation was seen. Treatment with tranexamic acid reduced fibrinolysis, but thrombin generation was unchanged. We conclude that influenza infection generates thrombin, increased by reduced levels of protein C and decreased by heparin. The fibrinolytic system appears not to be important for thrombin generation. These findings suggest that influenza leads to a prothrombotic state by coagulation activation. Heparin treatment reduces the influenza induced prothrombotic state. PMID:17068293

  3. Mutation of the protein-O-mannosyltransferase enhances secretion of the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael O; Sokolov, Sviatoslav S; Romanova, Nina V; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Kim, So-Young; Kalebina, Tatyana S; Choi, Eui-Sung; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D

    2005-10-15

    Human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is poorly secreted and aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of yeast cells due to inefficient folding. A screen for Hansenula polymorpha mutants with improved uPA secretion revealed a gene encoding a homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein-O-mannosyltransferase Pmt1p. Expression of the H. polymorpha PMT1 gene (HpPMT1) abolished temperature sensitivity of the S. cerevisiae pmt1 pmt2 double mutant. As in S. cerevisiae, inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene affected electrophoretic mobility of the O-glycosylated protein, extracellular chitinase. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, disruption of HpPMT1 alone caused temperature sensitivity. Inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene decreased intracellular aggregation of uPA, suggesting that enhanced secretion of uPA was due to improvement of its folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Unlike most of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins, HpPmt1p possesses the C-terminal KDEL retention signal. PMID:16200504

  4. Intra-airway administration of small interfering RNA targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 attenuates allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shintaro; Hattori, Noboru; Senoo, Tadashi; Onari, Yojiro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Kanehara, Masashi; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Haruta, Yoshinori; Murai, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major inhibitor of the fibrinolytic system, may promote the development of asthma. To further investigate the significance of PAI-1 in the pathogenesis of asthma and determine the possibility that PAI-1 could be a therapeutic target for asthma, this study was conducted. First, PAI-1 levels in induced sputum (IS) from asthmatic subjects and healthy controls were measured. In asthmatic subjects, IS PAI-1 levels were elevated, compared with that of healthy controls, and were significantly higher in patients with long-duration asthma compared with short-duration asthma. PAI-1 levels were also found to correlate with IS transforming growth factor-β levels. Then, acute and chronic asthma models induced by ovalbumin were established in PAI-1-deficient mice and wild-type mice that received intra-airway administrations of small interfering RNA against PAI-1 (PAI-1-siRNA). We could demonstrate that eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were reduced in an acute asthma model, and airway remodeling was suppressed in a chronic asthma model in both PAI-1-deficient mice and wild-type mice that received intra-airway administration of PAI-1-siRNA. These results indicate that PAI-1 is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, and intra-airway administration of PAI-1-siRNA may be able to become a new therapeutic approach for asthma.

  5. Intraocular Lens Opacification following Intracameral Injection of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator to Treat Inflammatory Membranes after Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fung, Simon S M; Sykakis, Evripidis; Islam, Niaz M; Zambarakji, Hadi J; Khoramnia, Ramin; Auffarth, Gerd U; Parmar, Dipak N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report 7 cases of intraocular lens (IOL) opacification following treatment of postoperative anterior chamber fibrin with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) after cataract surgery. Methods. Retrospective case series of 7 eyes in 7 patients who developed IOL opacification after receiving rtPA for anterior chamber inflammatory membrane formation resulting from phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Three explanted IOLs were investigated with light microscopy, histochemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray spectrometry. Results. All patients underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery and posterior chamber hydrophilic IOL implantation. Anterior chamber inflammatory membranes developed between 1 and 4 weeks of surgery and were treated with intracameral rtPA. IOL opacification was noted between 4 weeks and 6 years after rtPA treatment with reduced visual acuity, and IOL exchange was carried out in 3 patients. Light microscopy evaluation revealed diffuse fine granular deposits on the anterior surface/subsurface of IOL optic that stained positive for calcium salts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) confirmed the presence of calcium and phosphate on the IOL. Conclusions. Intracameral rtPA, though rapidly effective in the treatment of anterior chamber inflammatory membranes following cataract surgery, may be associated with IOL opacification.

  6. Association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene polymorphisms and recurrent pregnancy loss: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Nie, Shuping; Lu, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is closely related to embryonic development and pregnancy success. The association between PAI-1 gene polymorphisms (PAI-1-844G/A and PAI-1-675G/A) and the risk of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is controversial. Therefore, we perform this review to clarify the association between PAI-1 gene polymorphisms and RPL risk. We performed a systematic search for studies that described the effect of PAI-1 polymorphisms on RPL risk. The odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were considered under recessive genetic models. Furthermore, we conducted a subgroup analysis based on the studies' geographic regions of origin. Data were analyzed using Stata 11.2 software. Eighteen studies were included, and a high degree of statistical heterogeneity existed among the studies. In this study, we found a significant association between the PAI-1-675G/A polymorphism and the risk of RPL under the recessive model (OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.21-2.38). However, no significant association between the PAI-1-844G/A polymorphism and RPL was noted. PAI-1-675G/A (4G/5G) polymorphisms play a potential role in RPL. The screening of PAI-1 (4G/5G) gene mutations should be included during an RPL diagnostic workup, and patients should be treated using anticoagulant therapy during pregnancy if necessary.

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 regulates infiltration of macrophages into melanoma via phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr⁹²⁵.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Bikash; Koo, Bon-Hun; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating macrophages are potential candidates for cancer immunotherapy. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying macrophage infiltration into tumors is poorly understood. Based on our previous finding that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) enhances vitronectin-dependent migration of macrophages, we investigated the potential role of PAI-1 in macrophage invasion into melanoma. Experimental evidence obtained from spheroid confrontation assay clearly showed that PAI-1 overexpression significantly enhanced the invasion of RAW 264.7 cells into B16F10 melanoma. We further demonstrated that PAI-1 induces phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr(925), which, in turn, mediated the invasion of macrophages into the melanoma. This work further illustrates that low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1) is essential for PAI-1-mediated FAK phosphorylation and macrophage invasion into melanoma. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a novel role of PAI-1 in macrophage invasion into melanoma and provides insights into the underlying molecular mechanism.

  8. Specific identification of Lachesis muta muta snake venom using antibodies against the plasminogen activator enzyme, LV-PA.

    PubMed

    Felicori, Liza F; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Sánchez, Eladio F

    2005-05-01

    Sandwich-type enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were developed to detect Lachesis muta muta (bushmaster) snake venom using antibodies against the plasminogen activator enzyme (LV-PA). Antibodies to LV-PA were obtained by immunization of one rabbit with the purified enzyme. The IgG fraction was purified from rabbit blood in a single step on a column of Sepharose-L. m. muta venom and used to coat the microtiter plates. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by its capacity to correctly discriminate between the circulating antigens in mice that were experimentally inoculated with L. m. muta venom from those in mice inoculated with venoms from Bothrops atrox, B. brazili, B. castelnaudi, Bothriopsis taeniata, B. bilineata, Crotalus durissus ruruima and the antigenic Bothrops (AgB) and Crotalus (AgC) pools venoms used to produce Bothropic and Crotalic antivenoms at Fundacao Ezequiel Dias (FUNED). Measurable absorbance signals were obtained with 1.5 ng of venom per assay. The ELISA was used to follow the kinetic distribution of antigens in experimentally envenomed mice. PMID:15804530

  9. DNA repair and induction of plasminogen activator in human fetal cells treated with ultraviolet light. [Development associated changes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Sharon, R.; Rothman, M.; Miskin, R. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1984-03-01

    Human fetal fibroblasts have been tested for development associated changes in DNA repair by utilizing nucleoid sedimentation as an assay for excision repair. Among skin fibroblasts the rate of excision repair was significantly higher in non-fetal cells than in fibroblasts derived from an 8 week fetus. Skin fibroblasts derived at 12 week gestation were more repair proficient than at 8 weeks. However, they exhibited a lower rate of repair than non-fetal cells. Enhancement of protease plasminogen activator (PA) was higher after u.v. irradiation in skin fibroblasts derived at 8 weeks than at 12 weeks gestation and was absent in non-fetal skin fibroblasts. Excision repair and PA inducibility depended on the tissue of origin in addition to gestational stage, as shown for skin and lung fibroblasts from the same 12 week fetus. The sedimentation velocity of nucleoids, prepared from unirradiated fibroblasts, in neutral sucrose gradients with or without ethidium bromide, indicated the presence of DNA strand breaks in fetal cells. It is proposed that reduced DNA repair in fetal cells may result from alterations in DNA supercoiling, and that persistent DNA strand breaks enhance transcription of PA gene(s).

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Intraarterial Treatment as an Adjunct to Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Leppert, Michelle H; Campbell, Jonathan D; Simpson, Jennifer R; Burke, James F

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The objective of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of intraarterial treatment within the 0- to 6- hour window after intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 0- to 4.5-hours compared to IV tPA alone, in the US setting and from a social perspective. Methods A decision analytic model estimated the lifetime costs and outcomes associated with the additional benefit of intraarterial therapy compared to standard treatment with IV tPA alone. Model inputs were obtained from published literature, the MR CLEAN study, and claims databases in the United States. Health outcomes were measured in quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Treatment benefit was assessed by calculating the cost per QALY gained. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to estimate the overall uncertainty of model results. Results The addition of intraarterial therapy compared with standard treatment alone yielded a lifetime gain of 0.7 QALY for an additional cost of $9,911, which resulted in a cost of $14,137 per QALY. Multivariable sensitivity analysis predicted cost-effectiveness (≤$50,000 per QALY) in 97.6% of simulation runs. Conclusion Intraarterial treatment after IV tPA for patients with anterior circulation strokes within the 6 hour window is likely cost effective. From a societal perspective, increased investment in access to intraarterial treatment for acute stroke may be justified. PMID:26012639

  11. Current perspectives on the use of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Sherita N; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Johansen, Michelle C; McMurry, Timothy L; Johnston, Karen C; Southerland, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    In 1995, the NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) Stroke Study Group published the results of a large multicenter clinical trial demonstrating efficacy of intravenous tPA by revealing a 30% relative risk reduction (absolute risk reduction 11%–15%) compared with placebo at 90 days in the likelihood of having minimal or no disability. Since approval in 1996, tPA remains the only drug treatment for acute ischemic stroke approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Over the years, an abundance of research and clinical data has supported the safe and efficacious use of intravenous tPA in all eligible patients. Despite such supporting data, it remains substantially underutilized. Challenges to the utilization of tPA include narrow eligibility and treatment windows, risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, perceived lack of efficacy in certain high-risk subgroups, and a limited pool of neurological and stroke expertise in the community. With recent US census data suggesting annual stroke incidence will more than double by 2050, better education and consensus among both the medical and lay public are necessary to optimize the use of tPA for all eligible stroke patients. Ongoing and future research should continue to improve upon the efficacy of tPA through more rapid stroke diagnosis and treatment, refinement of advanced neuroimaging and stroke biomarkers, and successful demonstration of alternative means of reperfusion. PMID:24591838

  12. Development of Genetically Modified Chinese Hamster Ovary Host Cells for the Enhancement of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rahimpour, Azam; Ahani, Roshanak; Najaei, Azita; Adeli, Ahmad; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used host system for the expression of high quality recombinant proteins. However, the development of stable, high-yielding CHO cell lines is a major bottleneck in the industrial manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. Therefore, different strategies such as the generation of more efficient expression vectors and establishment of genetically engineered host cells have been employed to increase the efficiency of cell line development. In order to examine the possibility of generating improved CHO host cells, cell line engineering approaches were developed based on ceramide transfer protein (CERT), and X-box binding protein 1s (XBP1s). Methods CHO cells were transfected with CERT S132A, a mutant variant of CERT which is resistant to phosphorylation, or XBP1s expression plasmids, and then stable cell pools were generated. Transient expression of t-PA was examined in engineered cell pools in comparison to un-modified CHO host cells. Results Overexpression of CERT S132A led to the enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) expression in transient expression by 50%. On the other hand, it was observed that the ectopic expression of the XBP1s, did not improve the t-PA expression level. Conclusion The results obtained in this study indicate successful development of the improved CHO host cells through CERT S132A overexpression. PMID:27547109

  13. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, James; Bordin Barbieri, Natália; Weinmann, Tobias; Ziegelmann, Patricia K.; Duncan, Bruce B.; Inês Schmidt, Maria

    2016-01-01

    An emerging body of evidence has implicated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), though findings have not always been consistent. We systematically reviewed epidemiological studies examining the association of PAI-1 with T2D. EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify studies for inclusion. Fifty-two studies (44 cross-sectional with 47 unique analytical comparisons and 8 prospective) were included. In pooled random-effects analyses of prospective studies, a comparison of the top third vs. bottom third of baseline PAI-1 values generated a RR of T2D of 1.67 (95% CI 1.28–2.18) with moderate heterogeneity (I2 = 38%). Additionally, of 47 cross-sectional comparisons, 34(72%) reported significantly elevated PAI-1 among diabetes cases versus controls, 2(4%) reported significantly elevated PAI-1 among controls, and 11(24%) reported null effects. Results from pooled analyses of prospective studies did not differ substantially by study design, length of follow-up, adjustment for various putative confounding factors, or study quality, and were robust to sensitivity analyses. Findings from this systematic review of the available epidemiological literature support a link between PAI-1 and T2D, independent of established diabetes risk factors. Given the moderate size of the association and heterogeneity across studies, future prospective studies are warranted. PMID:26813008

  14. Subacute intranasal administration of tissue plasminogen activator promotes neuroplasticity and improves functional recovery following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yuling; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Yanlu; Liu, Zhongwu; An, Aaron; Mahmood, Asim; Xiong, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and long-term disability worldwide. To date, there are no effective pharmacological treatments for TBI. Recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the effective drug for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. In addition to its thrombolytic effect, tPA is also involved in neuroplasticity in the central nervous system. However, tPA has potential adverse side effects when administered intravenously including brain edema and hemorrhage. Here we report that tPA, administered by intranasal delivery during the subacute phase after TBI, provides therapeutic benefit. Animals with TBI were treated intranasally with saline or tPA initiated 7 days after TBI. Compared with saline treatment, subacute intranasal tPA treatment significantly 1) improved cognitive (Morris water maze test) and sensorimotor (footfault and modified neurological severity score) functional recovery in rats after TBI, 2) reduced the cortical stimulation threshold evoking ipsilateral forelimb movement, 3) enhanced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and axonal sprouting of the corticospinal tract originating from the contralesional cortex into the denervated side of the cervical gray matter, and 4) increased the level of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Our data suggest that subacute intranasal tPA treatment improves functional recovery and promotes brain neurogenesis and spinal cord axonal sprouting after TBI, which may be mediated, at least in part, by tPA/plasmin-dependent maturation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  15. Relationship between circulating tumor cells, blood coagulation, and urokinase-plasminogen-activator system in early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mego, Michal; Karaba, Marian; Minarik, Gabriel; Benca, Juraj; Sedlácková, Tatiana; Tothova, Lubomira; Vlkova, Barbora; Cierna, Zuzana; Janega, Pavol; Luha, Jan; Gronesova, Paulina; Pindak, Daniel; Fridrichova, Ivana; Celec, Peter; Reuben, James M; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Mardiak, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and plasma d-dimer (DD) and tissue factor (TF) are established VTE associated markers. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are associated with the risk of VTE in metastatic breast cancer. This study aimed to correlate CTCs, blood coagulation and the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system in primary breast cancer (PBC) patients. This prospective study included 116 PBC patients treated by primary surgery. CTCs were detected by quantitative RT-PCR assay for expression of epithelial (CK19) or epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) genes (TWIST1, SNAIL1, SLUG, ZEB1, FOXC2). Plasma DD, TF, uPA system proteins were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, while expressions of uPA system in surgical specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. CTCs were detected in 27.6% patients. Patients with CTCs had a significantly higher mean plasma DD (ng/mL) than those of patients without CTCs (632.4 versus 365.4, p = 0.000004). There was no association between plasma TF and CTCs. Epithelial CTCs exhibit higher expression of uPA system genes compared to EMT_CTCs. Patients with CTCs had higher plasma uPA proteins than those of patients without CTCs; there was no correlation between tissue expression of uPA system, CTCs, DD or TF levels. In multivariate analysis CTCs and patients age were independent factors associated with plasma DD. We found association between plasma DD and CTCs indicating a potential role for activation of the coagulation cascade in the early metastatic process. CTCs could be directly involved in coagulation activation or increased CTCs could be marker of aggressive disease and increased VTE risk.

  16. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Crandall, David L.; Milliat, Fabien

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1{sup -/-} knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited the radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1{sup -/-} mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.

  17. Cylindromatosis (CYLD) inhibits Streptococcus pneumonia-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression via interacting with TRAF-6.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Wenhong; Huang, Yuxian

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. p) remains one of the foremost causes of community-acquired pneumonia. Recent studies have shown that S. p lung infection is associated with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression, which inhibits acute lung injury. Such effects by S. p were negatively regulated by cylindromatosis (CYLD). The current study explored the underlying mechanisms. We showed that S. p-induced PAI-1 expression requires tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF-6) signaling. Si-RNA-mediated knockdown of TRAF-6 remarkably inhibited S. p-induced PAI-1 expression. Reversely, over-expression of wild type (wt-) TRAF-6 further potentiated PAI-1 expression in S. p-treated cells. We provided evidences to support that CYLD-mediated anti-PAI-1 activity might be through direct regulation of TRAF-6. Our results from co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and confocal microscopy assays confirmed a direct association between the CYLD and TRAF-6 in A549 cells. Over-expression of wt-CYLD remarkably inhibited TRAF-6 ubiquitination and subsequent PAI-1 expression. Introducing a mutated CYLD, on the other hand, enhanced TRAF-6 ubiquitination and PAI-1 expression. Together, these results indicate that TRAF-6 mediates S. p-induced PAI-1 expression, and CYLD inhibits PAI-1 expression probably through deubiquitinating TRAF-6. The current study provided molecular insights of CYLD-mediated activities in S. p-induced PAI-1 expression and possible acute lung injury.

  18. Gender differences in the relationships between plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and factors linked to the insulin resistance syndrome in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Toft, I; Bønaa, K H; Ingebretsen, O C; Nordøy, A; Birkeland, K I; Jenssen, T

    1997-03-01

    Impaired fibrinolysis due to elevated levels of plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a risk factor for thromboembolic disease. Hypertension, obesity, derangements in lipid and glucose homeostasis, and elevated levels of PAI-1 are features of the insulin resistance syndrome. The interrelationships between PAI-1 and the metabolic disturbances seen in this condition are unsettled. We investigated the associations between PAI-1 activity and components of the insulin resistance syndrome in 53 men and 31 women with untreated hypertension. In men, PAI-1 activity correlated significantly with plasma glucose (r = .41, P = .002), insulin sensitivity (r = -.35, P = .01), and insulin-induced suppression of nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) (r = -.43, P = .007). Plasma glucose and NEFA suppression were independently associated with PAI-1 activity in a multivariate analysis. In women, PAI-1 activity correlated with body mass index (r = .62, P = .0005), waist-to-hip ratio (r = .75, P = .0001), plasma glucose (r = .50, P = .007), insulin (r = .49, P = .009), proinsulin (r = .57, P = .002), C-peptide (r = .60, P = .0009), insulin sensitivity (r = -.74, P = .0001), NEFA suppression (r = -.64, P = .003), and triglycerides (r = .58, P = .001). In multivariate analyses, insulin sensitivity and NEFA suppression were independently associated with PAI-1 if waist-to-hip ratio was not included in the model. After introduction of waist-to-hip ratio into the model, waist-to-hip ratio was the only independent predictor of PAI-1 activity. We conclude that in women, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index, and insulin-induced NEFA suppression are determinants for PAI-1 activity. In men, insulin-induced NEFA suppression and plasma glucose are independently associated with PAI-1 activity.

  19. Stimulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression by PMA requires JNK1-dependent and -independent signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Gum, R; Juarez, J; Allgayer, H; Mazar, A; Wang, Y; Boyd, D

    1998-07-16

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) has been implicated in tumor progression, and previous studies have shown that the expression of this gene is strongly up-regulated by PMA. Although the signaling mechanism by which PMA modulates u-PAR expression is not known, the effect of this phorbol ester on the expression of other genes has been ascribed to activation of the c-Raf-1-ERK signaling pathway. However, in the current study we examined an alternate possibility that the inductive effect of PMA on u-PAR expression also required a JNK1-dependent signaling cascade usually associated with stress-inducing stimuli. PMA treatment of the u-PAR-deficient OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells, which contain low JNK activities, resulted in a rapid (5 min) increase in JNK activity. Maximal JNK activity (12-fold induction) occurred after 30 min; this preceding the earliest detected rise in u-PAR protein (2 h). Dose-response studies with PMA also indicated that the increased JNK activity was tightly correlated with elevated u-PAR protein levels. The stimulation of u-PAR promoter activity by PMA required an intact upstream AP-1 motif (-184) and in PMA-treated cells this motif was bound with c-Jun as indicated from mobility shift assays. PMA up-regulated the c-Jun trans acting activity as indicated by the higher activity of a GAL4-regulated luciferase reporter in phorbol-ester-treated cells co-transfected with an expression vector encoding the c-Jun transactivation domain fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. The ability of PMA to stimulate u-PAR promoter activity was effectively titrated out by the co-expression of either a kinase-defective JNK1 or a dominant negative MEKK1 the latter being an upstream activator of JNK1. Conversely, u-PAR promoter activity was stimulated by the co-expression of a constitutively active MEKK1 and this induction was antagonized by the inclusion of the kinase-defective JNK1 plasmid. We also determined the biological significance of the

  20. Linkage of extracellular plasminogen activator to the fibroblast cytoskeleton: colocalization of cell surface urokinase with vinculin

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Several cell types display binding sites for [125I]urokinase (Vassalli, J.-D., D. Baccino, D. Belin. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 100:86-92) which in certain cases are occupied with endogenous urokinase. These sites appear to focus urokinase at cell surfaces and hence may participate in tissue matrix destruction and cell invasion. Recently Pollanen et al. (1987) demonstrated that the cell surface urokinase of human fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells is deposited underneath the cells in strands, apparently at sites of cell-to-substratum contact. Here, using immunofluorescence double labeling, we show that the urokinase strands present on human foreskin fibroblasts are colocalized with strands of vinculin, an intracellular actin-binding protein that is deposited at cell-to-substratum focal adhesion sites. Thus, this indicates linkage of the plasminogen/plasmin system both to sites of cell adhesion and to the cytoskeleton. The urokinase strands on HT 1080 fibrosarcoma cells are more numerous and have shapes that are more tortuous than those on normal fibroblasts. In intact HT 1080 cells, colocalized vinculin strands are obscured by an intense background of soluble vinculin but are apparent on isolated ventral plasma membranes. Certain properties of the urokinase strands suggest that they are related to the [125I]urokinase-binding sites that have been described by several groups: (a) incubating fibroblasts with dexamethasone for 48 h or at pH 3 at 5 degrees C for 10 min greatly decreases the number and intensity of the urokinase strands; (b) strands reappear when glucocorticoid- treated cells are incubated with exogenous 54-kD (but not 35-kD) urokinase, and this process is inhibited by a previously described 16- amino acid peptide that blocks [125I]urokinase binding to the cells. PMID:3129438

  1. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Binding to Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle—Covalent Versus Adsorptive Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Ralf P.; Zaloga, Jan; Schreiber, Eveline; Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Tombácz, Etelka; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are frequently used to develop vehicles for drug delivery, hyperthermia, and photodynamic therapy and as tools used for magnetic separation and purification of proteins or for biomolecular imaging. Depending on the application, there are various possible covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of particles, each of them shows different advantages and disadvantages for drug release and activity at the desired location.

  2. The Influence of Differentially Expressed Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Lisa Cm; Nasa, Zeyad; Chung, JieYu; Niego, Be'eri; Tarlac, Volga; Ho, Heidi; Galle, Adam; Petratos, Steven; Lee, Jae Young; Alderuccio, Frank; Medcalf, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) has been implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that levels of t-PA mRNA and activity are increased ~4 fold in the spinal cords of wild-type mice that are mice subjected to EAE. This was also accompanied with a significant increase in the levels of pro-matrix metalloproteinase 9 (pro-MMP-9) and an influx of fibrinogen. We next compared EAE severity in wild-type mice, t-PA-/- mice and T4+ transgenic mice that selectively over-express (~14-fold) mouse t-PA in neurons of the central nervous system. Our results confirm that t-PA deficient mice have an earlier onset and more severe form of EAE. T4+ mice, despite expressing higher levels of endogenous t-PA, manifested a similar rate of onset and neurological severity of EAE. Levels of proMMP-9, and extravasated fibrinogen in spinal cord extracts were increased in mice following EAE onset regardless of the absence or over-expression of t-PA wild-type. Interestingly, MMP-2 levels also increased in spinal cord extracts of T4+ mice following EAE, but not in the other genotypes. Hence, while the absence of t-PA confers a more deleterious form of EAE, neuronal over-expression of t-PA does not overtly protect against this condition with regards to symptom onset or severity of EAE. PMID:27427941

  3. Interrelated reduction of chemerin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 serum levels in rheumatoid arthritis after interleukin-6 receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Makrilakis, Konstantinos; Fragiadaki, Kalliopi; Smith, Jacqueline; Sfikakis, Petros P; Kitas, George D

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory/metabolic factors and imbalance of haemostasis contribute to cardiovascular disease risk in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine that plays an important role in immune responses, is implicated in its pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of the IL-6 receptor inhibitor, tocilizumab, on serum adipokines and coagulation/fibrinolysis factors in RA patients were examined. Nineteen consecutive patients (18 women, aged 48 ± 9 years) received six monthly infusions of 8 mg/kg tocilizumab for moderate or severe RA. Disease activity/severity, as well as serum levels of chemerin apelin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), glucose, insulin and lipids were measured at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months thereafter. Chemerin and PAI-1 levels decreased significantly from baseline through 3 to 6 months (from 256 ± 79 to 174 ± 12 and 210 ± 85 ng/ml; from 73 ± 27 to 56 ± 22 and 51 ± 28 pg/ml, respectively). Other adipokines did not change, despite increases in adiposity. In multivariate models, significant independent associations were found between baseline chemerin with age, body mass index, remission of disease, HAQ-Di, CRP and PAI-1. Chemerin decrease at 6 months was significantly associated with PAI-1 and IL-6 changes at 6 months. Baseline PAI-1 associated negatively with remission of disease and total cholesterol, while PAI-1 change at 6 months associated with chemerin changes and smoking status. In conclusion, inhibition of IL-6 signaling in RA favorably alters chemerin and PAI-1 levels in an interrelated manner, despite increasing adiposity. This might represent a dual anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic/fibrinolytic mechanism of tocilizumab that may reduce cardiovascular event risk in RA patients.

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency ameliorates insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia but not bone loss in obese female mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yukinori; Kawao, Naoyuki; Yano, Masato; Okada, Kiyotaka; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), an inhibitor of fibrinolysis, is involved in type 1 diabetic bone loss in female mice. PAI-1 is well known as an adipogenic factor induced by obesity. We therefore examined the effects of PAI-1 deficiency on bone and glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat and high-sucrose diet (HF/HSD)-induced obese female mice. Female wild-type (WT) and PAI-1-deficient mice were fed with HF/HSD or normal diet for 20 weeks from 10 weeks of age. HF/HSD increased the levels of plasma PAI-1 in WT mice. PAI-1 deficiency suppressed the levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, and total cholesterol elevated by obesity. Moreover, PAI-1 deficiency improved glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by obesity. Bone mineral density (BMD) at trabecular bone as well as the levels of osterix, alkaline phosphatase, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand mRNA in tibia were decreased by HF/HSD in WT mice, and those changes by HF/HSD were not affected by PAI-1 deficiency. HF/HSD increased the levels of plasma TNF-α in both WT and PAI-1-deficient mice, and the levels of plasma TNF-α were negatively correlated with trabecular BMD in tibia of female mice. In conclusion, we revealed that PAI-1 deficiency does not affect the trabecular bone loss induced by obesity despite the amelioration of insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia in female mice. Our data suggest that the changes of BMD and bone metabolism by obesity might be independent of PAI-1 as well as glucose and lipid metabolism.

  5. Thrombosis recanalization by paeoniflorin through the upregulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator via the MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    YE, SONGSHAN; MAO, BINGYU; YANG, LEI; FU, WEIYUN; HOU, JUNRAN

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin, the major component of Paeonia lactiflora pall, has previously been reported to prevent thrombosis. Plasminogen activator urokinase (uPA) is a serine protease that markedly facilitates normal thrombosis resolution. Paeoniflorin and uPA have been linked to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In the current study, the influence of paeoniflorin on the expression of uPA was investigated and the underlying regulatory mechanism was preliminarily determined. The prothrombotic state of the model animals treated with paeoniflorin were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additionally, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures was estimated using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and the possible pathways involved in the interaction between paeoniflorin and uPA were evaluated using western blot analysis. The ELISA results demonstrated that the levels of 6-keto prostaglandin F1a, fibronectin and uPA were significantly upregulated by treatment with paeoniflorin compared with control (P<0.05). By contrast, the expression of fibrinogen, D-dimer and thromboxane B2 were inhibited. With an increase in the concentration of paeoniflorin the cell viability of HUVECs decreased gradually. The results of western blot analysis demonstrated that paeoniflorin increased the phosphorylation of MAPK 14 (p38) and MAPK 8 (JNK). The present study demonstrated that paeoniflorin has the potential to improve the prethrombotic state and recanalize thrombosis by increasing the expression of uPA, which may be mediated via regulation of the p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. However, this treatment effect was dependent on the concentration of paeoniflorin used, an unsuitable concentration of the agent would result in a negative effect on the anti-thrombosis pathways. PMID:27082639

  6. Southern copperhead venom enhances tissue-type plasminogen activator induced fibrinolysis but does not directly lyse human plasma thrombi.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G

    2016-07-01

    In addition to degrading fibrinogen as a source of consumptive coagulopathy, purified fractions of southern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix; A. c. contortrix) venom has been demonstrated to enhance fibrinolysis. The goal of this investigation was to characterize the kinetic fibrinolytic profile of A. c. contortrix venom in the absence and presence of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) to determine if intact venom had tPA independent fibrinolytic properties. Utilizing thrombelastographic methods, the coagulation and fibrinolytic kinetic profiles of human plasma exposed to A. c. contortrix venom (0-6 μg/ml) were determined in the absence or presence of tPA (0-100 IU/ml). Then, plasma was exposed to 0-6 μg/ml of venom without tPA added and coagulation observed for 3 h. Venom significantly prolonged the onset of coagulation, decreased the velocity of thrombus growth but did not significantly decrease clot strength. In the presence of tPA, venom significantly decreased clot strength, shortened the time of onset of fibrinolysis, decreased clot lysis time but did not significantly affect the maximum rate of lysis. Lastly, while venom exposure in the absence of tPA significantly prolonged the onset of coagulation and decreased the velocity of clot growth, venom exposure did not result in detectable fibrinolysis over the 3 h observation period. A. c. contortrix venom enhances tPA mediated fibrinolysis by degrading plasma coagulation kinetics. Intact A. c. contortrix venom does not possess sufficient fibrinolytic activity to cause fibrinolysis in human plasma at the concentration tested. PMID:26407681

  7. Thrombosis recanalization by paeoniflorin through the upregulation of urokinase‑type plasminogen activator via the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ye, Songshan; Mao, Bingyu; Yang, Lei; Fu, Weiyun; Hou, Junran

    2016-06-01

    Paeoniflorin, the major component of Paeonia lactiflora pall, has previously been reported to prevent thrombosis. Plasminogen activator urokinase (uPA) is a serine protease that markedly facilitates normal thrombosis resolution. Paeoniflorin and uPA have been linked to the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In the current study, the influence of paeoniflorin on the expression of uPA was investigated and the underlying regulatory mechanism was preliminarily determined. The prothrombotic state of the model animals treated with paeoniflorin were assessed by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additionally, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures was estimated using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and the possible pathways involved in the interaction between paeoniflorin and uPA were evaluated using western blot analysis. The ELISA results demonstrated that the levels of 6‑keto prostaglandin F1a, fibronectin and uPA were significantly upregulated by treatment with paeoniflorin compared with control (P<0.05). By contrast, the expression of fibrinogen, D‑dimer and thromboxane B2 were inhibited. With an increase in the concentration of paeoniflorin the cell viability of HUVECs decreased gradually. The results of western blot analysis demonstrated that paeoniflorin increased the phosphorylation of MAPK 14 (p38) and MAPK 8 (JNK). The present study demonstrated that paeoniflorin has the potential to improve the prethrombotic state and recanalize thrombosis by increasing the expression of uPA, which may be mediated via regulation of the p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. However, this treatment effect was dependent on the concentration of paeoniflorin used, an unsuitable concentration of the agent would result in a negative effect on the anti‑thrombosis pathways. PMID:27082639

  8. The Influence of Differentially Expressed Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Lisa CM; Nasa, Zeyad; Chung, JieYu; Niego, Be’eri; Tarlac, Volga; Ho, Heidi; Galle, Adam; Petratos, Steven; Lee, Jae Young; Alderuccio, Frank; Medcalf, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) has been implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that levels of t-PA mRNA and activity are increased ~4 fold in the spinal cords of wild-type mice that are mice subjected to EAE. This was also accompanied with a significant increase in the levels of pro-matrix metalloproteinase 9 (pro-MMP-9) and an influx of fibrinogen. We next compared EAE severity in wild-type mice, t-PA-/- mice and T4+ transgenic mice that selectively over-express (~14-fold) mouse t-PA in neurons of the central nervous system. Our results confirm that t-PA deficient mice have an earlier onset and more severe form of EAE. T4+ mice, despite expressing higher levels of endogenous t-PA, manifested a similar rate of onset and neurological severity of EAE. Levels of proMMP-9, and extravasated fibrinogen in spinal cord extracts were increased in mice following EAE onset regardless of the absence or over-expression of t-PA wild-type. Interestingly, MMP-2 levels also increased in spinal cord extracts of T4+ mice following EAE, but not in the other genotypes. Hence, while the absence of t-PA confers a more deleterious form of EAE, neuronal over-expression of t-PA does not overtly protect against this condition with regards to symptom onset or severity of EAE. PMID:27427941

  9. Hypoxia dysregulates the production of adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 independent of reactive oxygen species in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Baoying; Lam, Karen S.L.; Wang Yu; Wu Donghai; Lam, Michael C.; Shen Jiangang; Wong Laiching; Hoo, Ruby L.C.; Zhang Jialiang; Xu Aimin . E-mail: amxu@hkucc.hku.hk

    2006-03-10

    Low plasma levels of adiponectin (hypoadiponectinemia) and elevated circulating concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 are causally associated with obesity-related insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism that mediates the aberrant production of these two adipokines in obesity remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on production of adiponectin and PAI-1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Quantitative PCR and immunoassays showed that ambient hypoxia markedly suppressed adiponectin mRNA expression and its protein secretion, and increased PAI-1 production in mature adipocytes. Dimethyloxallyl glycine, a stabilizer of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), mimicked the hypoxia-mediated modulations of these two adipokines. Hypoxia caused a modest elevation of ROS in adipocytes. However, ablation of intracellular ROS by antioxidants failed to alleviate hypoxia-induced aberrant production of adiponectin and PAI-1. On the other hand, the antioxidants could reverse hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced dysregulation of adiponectin and PAI-1 production. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment decreased the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP{alpha}), but had no effect on HIF-1{alpha}, whereas hypoxia stabilized HIF-1{alpha} and decreased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, but not PPAR{gamma}. Taken together, these data suggest that hypoxia and ROS decrease adiponectin production and augment PAI-1 expression in adipocytes via distinct signaling pathways. These effects may contribute to hypoadiponectinemia and elevated PAI-1 levels in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Kinetics of activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa)-catalyzed cleavage of C-terminal lysine residues of fibrin degradation products and removal of plasminogen-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan H; Cook, Paul F; Nesheim, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Partial digestion of fibrin by plasmin exposes C-terminal lysine residues, which comprise new binding sites for both plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). This binding increases the catalytic efficiency of plasminogen activation by 3000-fold compared with tPA alone. The activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) attenuates fibrinolysis by removing these residues, which causes a 97% reduction in tPA catalytic efficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the kinetics of TAFIa-catalyzed lysine cleavage from fibrin degradation products and the kinetics of loss of plasminogen-binding sites. We show that the k(cat) and K(m) of Glu(1)-plasminogen (Glu-Pg)-binding site removal are 2.34 s(-1) and 142.6 nm, respectively, implying a catalytic efficiency of 16.21 μm(-1) s(-1). The corresponding values of Lys(77)/Lys(78)-plasminogen (Lys-Pg)-binding site removal are 0.89 s(-1) and 96 nm implying a catalytic efficiency of 9.23 μm(-1) s(-1). These catalytic efficiencies of plasminogen-binding site removal by TAFIa are the highest of any TAFIa-catalyzed reaction with a biological substrate reported to date and suggest that plasmin-modified fibrin is a primary physiological substrate for TAFIa. We also show that the catalytic efficiency of cleavage of all C-terminal lysine residues, whether they are involved in plasminogen binding or not, is 1.10 μm(-1) s(-1). Interestingly, this value increases to 3.85 μm(-1) s(-1) in the presence of Glu-Pg. These changes are due to a decrease in K(m). This suggests that an interaction between TAFIa and plasminogen comprises a component of the reaction mechanism, the plausibility of which was established by showing that TAFIa binds both Glu-Pg and Lys-Pg. PMID:21467042

  11. Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and the urokinase-type plasminogen activator is associated with progression from benign to advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmalfeldt, B; Prechtel, D; Härting, K; Späthe, K; Rutke, S; Konik, E; Fridman, R; Berger, U; Schmitt, M; Kuhn, W; Lengyel, E

    2001-08-01

    Proteases are linked to the malignant phenotype of different solid tumors. Therefore, the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 and of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in the progression of ovarian cancer was investigated. Gelatinolytic activity and protein expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were analyzed in tissue extracts of 19 cystadenomas and 18 low malignant potential (LMP) tumors, as well as 41 primary tumors of advanced ovarian cancer stage International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics IIIc/IV and their corresponding omentum metastases by quantitative gelatin zymography and Western blot. In the same tissue extracts, antigen levels of uPA and its inhibitor PAI-1 were determined by ELISA. Protein expression of pro-MMP-2 (72 kDa) and pro-MMP-9 (92 kDa as well as antigen levels of uPA and PAI-1 were low in benign ovarian tumors but increased significantly from LMP tumors to advanced ovarian cancers. The highest values of all of the proteolytic factors were detected in omentum metastases. Active MMP-2 enzyme (62 kDa) was detected only in ovarian cancer (66%) and corresponding metastases (93%) but never in benign or LMP tumors. The activation rate of MMP-2 to its active isoform was higher in the metastases. Comparing both proteolytic systems, higher PAI-1 concentrations were consistently found in cancers with high pro-MMP-9 expression. These data indicate that members of the plasminogen activator system, as well as the metalloproteinases MMP-2/9, increase with growing malignant potential of ovarian tumors. These findings are of particular relevance to the development of protease inhibitors as new therapeutic approaches in ovarian cancer.

  12. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1: Mechanisms of its synergistic regulation by growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiaoling

    2010-01-01

    My research is on the synergistic regulation of PAI-1 by EGF and TGF-β. The mechanism of synergistic regulation of PAI-1 by EGF and TGF-β are addressed. Methods are described for effective identification of RNA accessible sites for antisense oligodexoxynucleotides (ODNs) and siRNA. In this study effective AS-ODN sequences for both Lcn2 and Bcl2 were identified by in vitro tiled microarray studies. Our results suggest that hybridization of ODN arrays to a target mRNA under physiological conditions might be used as a rapid and reliable in vitro method to accurately identify targets on mRNA molecules for effective antisense and potential siRNA activity in vivo.

  13. VEGF increases the fibrinolytic activity of endothelial cells within fibrin matrices: involvement of VEGFR-2, tissue type plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Mihoubi, Samira; Beaulieu, Edith; Durocher, Yves; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; Gingras, Denis; Béliveau, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Proteolysis of fibrin matrices by endothelial cells plays essential roles in the migratory and morphogenic differentiation processes underlying angiogenesis. Using an in vitro fibrinolysis model consisting of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) embedded in a three dimensional fibrin matrix, we show that VEGF, an angiogenic cytokine that plays a crucial role in the onset of angiogenesis, is a potent activator of HUVEC-mediated fibrinolysis. This VEGF-dependent fibrin degradation was completely abrogated by inhibitors of either the plasminogen activator/plasmin or matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) proteolytic systems, suggesting the involvement of both classes of proteases in fibrin degradation. Accordingly, VEGF-induced fibrinolysis correlated with an increase in the expression of tPA and of some MMPs, such as MT2-MMP and was completely blocked by a neutralizing antibody against tPA. Overall, these results indicate that efficient proteolysis of three dimensional fibrin matrices during VEGF-mediated angiogenesis involves a complex interplay between the MMP and plasmin-mediated proteolytic systems. PMID:17512973

  14. Low-molecular-weight heparin modulates vein wall fibrotic response in a plasminogen activator inhibitor 1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Andrea T.; Diaz, Jose A.; Ballard-Lipka, Nicole L.; Roelofs, Karen J.; Farris, Diana M.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Henke, Peter K.; Wakefield, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) favorably alters the vein wall response to deep venous thrombosis (DVT), although the mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have suggested that LMWH alters the levels of circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a known mediator of fibrosis, and may improve endogenous fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that LMWH favorably alters the vein wall response by binding of PAI-1 and acceleration of fibrinolysis. Methods Wild-type and PAI-1 −/− mice underwent treatment with LMWH after induction of occlusive DVT. Vein wall and plasma were harvested and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, zymography, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. Results Wild-type mice treated with LMWH exhibited diminished vein wall fibrosis (0.6 ± 0.6 vs 1.4 ± 0.2; P < .01; n = 5) and elevation of circulating PAI-1 (1776 ± 342 vs 567 ± 104 ρg/mL; P < .01; n = 5) compared with untreated controls after occlusive DVT. PAI-1−/− mice treated with LMWH were not similarly protected from fibrosis, despite improved thrombus resolution. Treatment with LMWH was associated with decreased intrathrombus interleukin-lβ (68.6 ± 31.0 vs 223.4 ± 28.9 ρg/mg total protein; P < .01; n = 5) but did not alter inflammatory cell recruitment to the vein wall. PAI-1 −/− mice exhibited significantly elevated intrathrombus (257.2 ± 51.5 vs 4.3 ± 3.8 ρg/mg total protein; n = 5) and vein wall interleukin-13 (187.2 ± 57.6 vs 9.9 ± 1.1 ρg/mg total protein; P < .05; n = 5) as well as vein wall F4/80 positively staining monocytes (53 ± 11 vs 16 ± 2 cells/5 high-power fields; P < .05; n = 4). Conclusions LMWH did not accelerate venous thrombosis resolution but did protect against vein wall fibrosis in a PAI-1-dependent manner in an occlusive DVT model. Lack of PAI-1 correlated with accelerated venous thrombosis resolution but no protection from fibrosis. PAI-1 inhibition as a treatment strategy

  15. The Role of Macrophage Derived Urokinase Plasminogen Activator in Myocardial Infarct Repair

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Elina; Castellani, Chiara; Malchodi, Laura; Deem, Jennifer; Bertko, Kate; Meznarich, Jessica; Dishmon, Monja; Murry, Charles E.; Stempien-Otero, April

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac plasmin activity is increased following myocardial ischemia. To test the hypothesis that macrophage-derived uPA is a key mediator of repair following myocardial infarction we performed myocardial infarction on mice with macrophage specific over-expression of uPA (SR-uPA mice). SR-uPA+/0 mice and wild-type littermates were sacrificed at 5 days or 4 weeks after infarction and cardiac content of macrophages, collagen, and myofibroblasts was quantified. Cardiac function and dimensions were assessed by echocardiography at baseline and at 4 weeks post-infarction. At 4 weeks after myocardial infarction, macrophage counts were increased in SR-uPA+/0 mice in the infarct (13.1 vs. 4.9 %, P < 0.001) and distant uninfarcted regions (5.9 vs. 2.4%, P < 0.001). Infarct scar was thicker in SR-uPA+/0 mice (0.54 ± 0.03mm vs. 0.45 ± 0.03mm, P <0.05) and infarct cardiac collagen content was increased (72.4 ± 3.3% vs. 63.0 ± 3.6%, P < 0.06). Functionally, these changes resulted in mildly improved fractional shortening in SR-uPA+/o mice compared to controls (24.6 ±1.68 vs. 19.8 ± 1.3% P = 0.03). At 5 days after infarction there was increased collagen content in the scar without increases in macrophages or myofibroblasts. To understand the mechanisms by which macrophage derived uPA increases collagen, cardiac fibroblasts were treated with macrophage conditioned medium or plasmin and expression of ColIα1 measured by qPCR. Conditioned media from SR-uPA+/o or plasmin-treated nontransgenic macrophages but not plasmin alone increased collagen expression in isolated cardiac fibroblasts. We hypothesize that plasmin generation in the heart in response to injury may induce activation of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype to allow rapid formation of collagenous scar. PMID:20380835

  16. Perception Versus Actual Performance in Timely Tissue Plasminogen Activation Administration in the Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheryl B; Cox, Margueritte; Olson, DaiWai M; Britz, Gavin W; Constable, Mark; Fonarow, Gregg C; Schwamm, Lee; Peterson, Eric D; Shah, Bimal R

    2015-01-01

    Background Timely thrombolytic therapy can improve stroke outcomes. Nevertheless, the ability of US hospitals to meet guidelines for intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains suboptimal. What is unclear is whether hospitals accurately perceive their rate of tPA “door-to-needle” (DTN) time within 60 minutes and how DTN rates compare across different hospitals. Methods and Results DTN performance was defined by the percentage of treated patients who received tPA within 60 minutes of arrival. Telephone surveys were obtained from staff at 141 Get With The Guidelines hospitals, representing top, middle, and lowDTN performance. Less than one-third (29.1%) of staff accurately identified their DTN performance. Among middle- and low-performing hospitals (n=92), 56 sites (60.9%) overestimated their performance; 42% of middle performers and 85% of low performers overestimated their performance. Sites that overestimated tended to have lower annual volumes of tPA administration (median 8.4 patients [25th to 75th percentile 5.9 to 11.8] versus 10.2 patients [25th to 75th percentile 8.2 to 17.3], P=0.047), smaller percentages of eligible patients receiving tPA (84.7% versus 89.8%, P=0.008), and smaller percentages of DTN ≤60 minutes among treated patients (10.6% versus 16.6%, P=0.002). Conclusions Hospitals often overestimate their ability to deliver timely tPA to treated patients. Our findings indicate the need to routinely provide comparative provider performance rates as a key step to improving the quality of acute stroke care. PMID:26201547

  17. Effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-02-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors may affect the serum levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) associated with triglyceride (TG) metabolism, which is a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease, in diabetic patients. We conducted an 8-week, prospective, randomized study in which we assigned type 2 diabetic patients who were inadequately controlled with antidiabetic therapy to the vildagliptin group (50 mg bid, n = 49) or the control group (n = 49). The primary efficacy parameter was the change in the serum level of PAI-1, and the secondary end point was the change in the serum levels of TG-rich lipoproteins. In the vildagliptin group, significant decrease of the serum PAI-1 level by 16.3% (p <0.0001) and significant decreases of the serum TG, remnant-like particle cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels by 12.1% (p = 0.002), 13.9% (p = 0.003), and 9.5% (p <0.0001), respectively, were observed. No such changes were observed in the control group. Multivariate regression analyses identified the absolute change from the baseline (Δ) of the PAI-1, but not that of the fasting blood glucose or hemoglobin A1c, as independent predictors of the ΔTG, Δ remnant-like particle cholesterol, and Δ apolipoprotein B. In conclusion, treatment of type 2 diabetes with vildagliptin might prevent the progression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients by decreasing the serum PAI-1 levels and improving TG metabolism.

  18. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Antagonist TM5484 Attenuates Demyelination and Axonal Degeneration in a Mice Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pelisch, Nicolas; Dan, Takashi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Sekiguchi, Hiroki; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Ypersele de Strihou, Charles; Miyata, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by inflammatory demyelination and deposition of fibrinogen in the central nervous system (CNS). Elevated levels of a critical inhibitor of the mammalian fibrinolitic system, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) have been demonstrated in human and animal models of MS. In experimental studies that resemble neuroinflammatory disease, PAI-1 deficient mice display preserved neurological structure and function compared to wild type mice, suggesting a link between the fibrinolytic pathway and MS. We previously identified a series of PAI-1 inhibitors on the basis of the 3-dimensional structure of PAI-1 and on virtual screening. These compounds have been reported to provide a number of in vitro and in vivo benefits but none was tested in CNS disease models because of their limited capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The existing candidates were therefore optimized to obtain CNS-penetrant compounds. We performed an in vitro screening using a model of BBB and were able to identify a novel, low molecular PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, with the highest penetration ratio among all other candidates. Next, we tested the effects on inflammation and demyelination in an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice model. Results were compared to either fingolimod or 6α-methylprednisolone. Oral administration of TM5484 from the onset of signs, ameliorates paralysis, attenuated demyelination, and axonal degeneration in the spinal cord of mice. Furthermore, it modulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which plays a protective role in neurons against various pathological insults, and choline acetyltransferase, a marker of neuronal density. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential benefits of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, in the treatment of MS.

  19. Pyruvate and cilostazol protect cultured rat cortical pericytes against tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Tae-Youn; Yoon, Young Hee; Koh, Jae-Young

    2015-12-01

    Since even a brief ischemia can cause permanent brain damage, rapid restoration of blood flow is critical to limiting damage. Although intravenous tPA during the acute stage is the treatment of choice for achieving reperfusion, this treatment is sometimes associated with brain hemorrhage. Agents that reduce tPA-related bleeding risk may help expand its therapeutic window. This study assessed whether zinc dyshomeostasis underlies the toxic effect of tPA on brain vascular pericytes; whether pyruvate, an inhibitor of zinc toxicity, protects pericytes against tPA-induced cell death; and whether cilostazol, which protects pericytes against tPA-induced cell death, affects zinc dyshomeostasis associated with tPA toxicity. Cultured pericytes from newborn rat brains were treated with 10-200 μg/ml tPA for 24 h, inducing cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. tPA-induced cell death was preceded by increases in intracellular free zinc levels, and was substantially attenuated by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) or TPEN. Pyruvate completely blocked direct zinc toxicity and tPA-induced pericyte cell death. Both cAMP and cilostazol, a PDE3 inhibitor that attenuates tPA-induced pericyte cell death in vitro and tPA-induced brain hemorrhage in vivo, reduced zinc- and tPA-induced pericyte cell death, suggesting that zinc dyshomeostasis may be targeted by cilostazol in tPA toxicity. These findings show that tPA-induced pericyte cell death may involve zinc dyshomeostasis, and that pyruvate and cilostazol attenuate tPA-induced cell death by reducing the toxic cascade triggered by zinc dyshomeostasis. Since pyruvate is an endogenous metabolite and cilostazol is an FDA-approved drug, in vivo testing of both as protectors against tPA-induced brain hemorrhage may be warranted. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection.

  20. Prognostic relevance of urokinase plasminogen activator detection in micrometastatic cells in the bone marrow of patients with primary breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Solomayer, E. F.; Diel, I. J.; Wallwiener, D.; Bode, S.; Meyberg, G.; Sillem, M.; Gollan, C.; Kramer, M. D.; Krainick, U.; Bastert, G.

    1997-01-01

    Patients with an elevated level of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in breast cancer tissue have an adverse prognosis. This study evaluated the prognostic relevance of uPA detection in disseminated tumour cells in bone marrow. Bone marrow was sampled intraoperatively from both iliac crests in 280 patients with primary breast cancer. Interphase cells were enhanced and stained immunocytologically with two antibodies: 2E11, which detects TAG 12--a tumour-associated glycoprotein typically expressed by almost all breast cancer cells--and the anti-uPA antibody HD-UK9. Thirty-five of the 2E11-positive women (n = 132, 47%) developed metastatic disease (median follow-up time 44 months). Of these, most were uPA positive (n = 23, 65%) and only 12 were uPA negative. Patients with uPA-positive cells in bone marrow (n = 98, 35%) had a significantly shorter metastasis-free interval (36 months) than women who were uPA negative (44.5 months). The worst prognosis was seen in patients positive for both markers (29.5 months), followed by those who were uPA negative and 2E11 positive (37 months). The detection of uPA on disseminated tumour cells characterizes a subgroup of patients with an even worse prognosis, who should undergo more aggressive adjuvant systemic therapy. For the first time, it was possible to evaluate an important qualitative parameter involved in the process of breast cancer metastases. Images Figure 1 PMID:9310251

  1. Preliminary experience with air transfer of patients for rescue endovascular therapy after failure of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Enomoto, Yukiko; Yamada, Noriaki; Matsumaru, Naoki; Kumada, Keisuke; Toyoda, Izumi; Ogura, Shinji; Iwama, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes our experience with air transfer of patients with acute ischemic stroke in whom intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) failed for rescue endovascular therapy (EVT). Twenty-three consecutive patients in whom IV t-PA failed were transferred to our hospital for rescue EVT between February 2011 and April 2013. The amount of time required for transfer, distance, clinical outcomes, and complications were compared between patients transferred by ground (TG group; n = 17) and by air (TA group; n = 6). Computed tomography imaging on arrival revealed hemorrhagic transformation in 1 (5.9%) patient in the TG group, whereas none of the patients in the TA group developed any type of complication. The remaining 22 patients received rescue EVT. The elapsed time from the request call to arrival at our hospital did not significantly differ between the TG and TA groups (45.8 ± 4.9 min vs. 41.6 ± 2.3 min). However, the distance from the primary hospital to our institution was significantly longer for the TA group than for the TG group (38.8 ± 10.4 km vs. 13.5 ± 1.2 km, p = 0.001). The frequency of favorable outcomes (modified Rankin Scale 0-1 at 90 days after onset) in the TG and TA groups were 25.0% and 50.0%, respectively (p = 0.267). Air transfer for patients after IV t-PA failure allowed for more rapid delivery of patients over longer distances than ground transfer. PMID:25739430

  2. Flow cytometry evaluation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (UPA-R) in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Castagnari, B; Moretti, S; Latorraca, A; Rigolin, G M; Balsamo, R; Lanza, F; Castoldi, G L

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate by flow cytometry the expression of the UPA-R (Urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor-CD87) on the blastic population of AML and ALL patients in order to evaluate whether the presence of this molecule could be associated with peculiar clinical and biologic features of leukemic cells. Five different monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) (clones: 3B10#; VIM5*; 109#; 68#; 100#) were used in order to detect the distinct forms of this cellular receptor. Cell reactivity varied significantly from case to case, also depending on the MoAb used for the flow cytometry analysis. In brief, 3B10# and VIM5* MoAbs were found to be positive in more than 90% of monocytes and neutrophils from healthy subjects, while the number of positive cells was decreased (60%) using the 109# MoAb. However, either 68# and 100# MoAbs recognised only a low number of blood monocytes and neutrophils (8-20%), while lymphocytes were unreactive with all the five UPA-R MoAbs. ALL cells were found to be CD87 negative in all cases. Blasts from AML showed a heterogeneous pattern of expression for the UPA-R MoAbs, being the reactivity strictly dependent on the MoAb used, and, to a higher extent, on the degree and type of maturation of the blastic cells. The number of blasts recognising 3B10# and VIM5* MoAbs was significantly higher than that reacting with the remaining MoAbs irrespective of the FAB subtype. Since proteolytic enzymes, like UPA, play a key role in the dissolution of the extracellular matrix, and in facilitating the cell egress from the bone marrow, it is conceivable that the expression of the UPA-R could contribute to the invasive properties and, possibly, metastatic potential of leukemic cells. PMID:8519488

  3. Para-aminobenzamidine linked regenerated cellulose membranes for plasminogen activator purification: Effect of spacer arm length and ligand density

    PubMed Central

    Fasoli, Ezio; Reyes, Yiaslin Ruiz; Guzman, Osiris Martinez; Rosado, Alexandra; Cruz, Vivian Rodriguez; Borges, Amaris; Martinez, Edmarie; Bansal, Vibha

    2013-01-01

    Despite membrane-based separations offering superior alternative to packed bed chromatographic processes, there has been a substantial lacuna in their actual application to separation processes. One of the major reasons behind this is the lack of availability of appropriately modified or end-group modifiable membranes. In this paper, an affinity membrane was developed using a commercially available serine protease inhibitor, para-aminobenzamidine (pABA). The membrane modification was optimized for protein binding capacity by varying: i) the length of the spacer arm (SA; 5-atoms, 7-atoms, and 14-atoms) linking the ligand to membrane surface; ii) the affinity ligand (pABA) density on membrane surface (5–25 nmoles per cm2). Resulting membranes were tested for their ability to bind plasminogen activators (PAs) from mono- and multi- component systems in batch mode. The membrane containing pABA linked through 7-atoms SA but similar ligand density as in the case of 5- or 14- atoms long SA was found to bind up to 1.6-times higher amounts of PA per nmole of immobilized ligand from conditioned HeLa cell culture media. However, membranes with similar ligand densities but different lengths of SA, showed comparable binding capacities in monocomponent system. In addition, the length of SA did not affect the selectivity of the ligand for PA. A clear inverse linear correlation was observed between ligand density and binding capacity until the point of PA binding optima was reached (11±1.0 nmoles per cm2) in mono- and multi- component systems for 7- as well as 14- atoms SA. Up to 200-fold purification was achieved in a single step separation of PA from HeLa conditioned media using these affinity membranes. The issues of ligand leaching and reuse of the membranes were also investigated. An extensive regeneration procedure allowed the preservation of approximately 95% of the PA binding capacity of the membranes even after five cycles of use. PMID:23703544

  4. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Antagonist TM5484 Attenuates Demyelination and Axonal Degeneration in a Mice Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pelisch, Nicolas; Dan, Takashi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Sekiguchi, Hiroki; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Ypersele de Strihou, Charles; Miyata, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by inflammatory demyelination and deposition of fibrinogen in the central nervous system (CNS). Elevated levels of a critical inhibitor of the mammalian fibrinolitic system, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) have been demonstrated in human and animal models of MS. In experimental studies that resemble neuroinflammatory disease, PAI-1 deficient mice display preserved neurological structure and function compared to wild type mice, suggesting a link between the fibrinolytic pathway and MS. We previously identified a series of PAI-1 inhibitors on the basis of the 3-dimensional structure of PAI-1 and on virtual screening. These compounds have been reported to provide a number of in vitro and in vivo benefits but none was tested in CNS disease models because of their limited capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The existing candidates were therefore optimized to obtain CNS-penetrant compounds. We performed an in vitro screening using a model of BBB and were able to identify a novel, low molecular PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, with the highest penetration ratio among all other candidates. Next, we tested the effects on inflammation and demyelination in an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice model. Results were compared to either fingolimod or 6α-methylprednisolone. Oral administration of TM5484 from the onset of signs, ameliorates paralysis, attenuated demyelination, and axonal degeneration in the spinal cord of mice. Furthermore, it modulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which plays a protective role in neurons against various pathological insults, and choline acetyltransferase, a marker of neuronal density. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential benefits of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, in the treatment of MS. PMID:25915660

  5. Neuroendocrinal, Neurodevelopmental, and Embryotoxic Effects of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment for Pregnant Women with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Anna; Moreira, Tiago P.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) was the first evidence-based treatment approved for acute stroke. Ischemic stroke is relatively uncommon in fertile women but treatment is often delayed or not given. In randomized trials, pregnancy has been an exclusion criterion for thrombolysis. Physiologic TPA has been shown to have neuroendocrine effects namely in vasopressin secretion. Important TPA effects in brain function and development include neurite outgrowth, migration of cerebellar granular neurons and promotion of long-term potentiation, among others. Until now, no neuroendocrine side-effects have been reported in pregnant women treated with rTPA. The effects of rTPA exposure in the fetus following intravenous thrombolysis in pregnant women are still poorly understood. This depends on low case frequency, short-duration of exposure and the fact that rTPA molecule is too large to pass the placenta. rTPA has a short half-life of 4–5 min, with only 10% of its concentration remaining in circulation after 20 min, which may explain its safety at therapeutically doses. Ischemic stroke during pregnancy occurs most often in the third trimester. Complication rates of rTPA in pregnant women treated for thromboembolic conditions and ischemic stroke were found to be similar when compared to non-pregnant women (7–9% mortality). In embryos of animal models so far, no indications of a teratogenic or mutagenic potential were found. Pregnancy is still considered a relative contraindication when treating acute ischemic stroke with rTPA, however, treatment risk must be balanced against the potential of maternal disability and/or death. PMID:26941596

  6. The tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin extracellular proteolytic system regulates seizure-induced hippocampal mossy fiber outgrowth through a proteoglycan substrate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y P; Siao, C J; Lu, W; Sung, T C; Frohman, M A; Milev, P; Bugge, T H; Degen, J L; Levine, J M; Margolis, R U; Tsirka, S E

    2000-03-20

    Short seizure episodes are associated with remodeling of neuronal connections. One region where such reorganization occurs is the hippocampus, and in particular, the mossy fiber pathway. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we show here a critical role in vivo for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), an extracellular protease that converts plasminogen to plasmin, to induce mossy fiber sprouting. We identify DSD-1-PG/phosphacan, an extracellular matrix component associated with neurite reorganization, as a physiological target of plasmin. Mice lacking tPA displayed decreased mossy fiber outgrowth and an aberrant band at the border of the supragranular region of the dentate gyrus that coincides with the deposition of unprocessed DSD-1-PG/phosphacan and excessive Timm-positive, mossy fiber termini. Plasminogen-deficient mice also exhibit the laminar band and DSD- 1-PG/phosphacan deposition, but mossy fiber outgrowth through the supragranular region is normal. These results demonstrate that tPA functions acutely, both through and independently of plasmin, to mediate mossy fiber reorganization.

  7. Synergistic and multidimensional regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 expression by transforming growth factor type β and epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiaoling; Thalacker, F.W.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2012-04-06

    The major physiological inhibitor of plasminogen activator, type I plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), controls blood clotting and tissue remodeling events that involve cell migration. Transforming growth factor type β (TGFβ) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) interact synergistically to increase PAI-1 mRNA and protein levels in human HepG2 and mink Mv1Lu cells. Other growth factors that activate tyrosine kinase receptors can substitute for EGF. EGF and TGFβ regulate PAI-1 by synergistically activating transcription, which is further amplified by a decrease in the rate of mRNA degradation, the latter being regulated only by EGF. The combined effect of transcriptional activation and mRNA stabilization results in a rapid 2-order of magnitude increase in the level of PAI-1. TGFβ also increases the sensitivity of the cells to EGF, thereby recruiting the cooperation of EGF at lower than normally effective concentrations. The contribution of EGF to the regulation of PAI-1 involves the MAPK pathway, and the synergistic interface with the TGFβ pathway is downstream of MEK1/2 and involves phosphorylation of neither ERK1/2 nor Smad2/3. Synergism requires the presence of both Smad and AP-1 recognition sites in the promoter. This work demonstrates the existence of a multidimensional cellular mechanism by which EGF and TGFβ are able to promote large and rapid changes in PAI-1 expression.

  8. In vitro and in vivo antiangiogenic activity of a novel deca-peptide derived from human tissue-type plasminogen activator kringle 2

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Li; Xu, Xun; Zhao, Hui; Gu, Qing; Zou, Haidong

    2010-06-11

    A synthetic deca-peptide corresponding to the amino acid sequence Arg{sup 54}-Trp{sup 63} of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) kringle 2 domain, named TKII-10, is produced and tested for its ability to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation, migration, tube formation in vitro, and angiogenesis in vivo. At the same time, another peptide TKII-10S composed of the same 10 amino acids as TKII-10, but in a different sequence, is also produced and tested. The results show that TKII-10 potently inhibits VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent, as well as sequence-dependent, manner in vitro while it is inactive in inhibiting endothelial cell proliferation. Furthermore, TKII-10 potently inhibits angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane and mouse cornea. The middle four amino acids DGDA in their sequence play an important role in TKII-10 angiogenesis inhibition{sub .} These results suggest that TKII-10 is a novel angiogenesis inhibitor that may serve as a prototype for antiangiogenic drug development.

  9. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Suppresses Inflammation-Induced Expression of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 by Blocking Nuclear Factor-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunzi; Kong, Juan; Sun, Tao; Li, George; Szeto, Frances L.; Liu, Weicheng; Deb, Dilip K.; Wang, Youli; Zhao, Qun; Thadhani, Ravi; Li, Yan Chun

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is a major fibrinolytic inhibitor. High PAI-1 is associated with increased renal and cardiovascular disease risk. Previous studies demonstrated PAI-1 down-regulation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that exposure of mouse embryonic fibroblasts to TNFα or LPS led to a marked induction of PAI-1, which was blunted by 1,25(OH)2D3, NF-κB inhibitor or p65 siRNA, suggesting the involvement of NF-κB in 1,25(OH)2D3-induced repression. In mouse Pai-1 promoter a putative cis-κB element was identified at −299. EMSA and ChIP assays showed that TNF-α increased p65/p50 binding to this κB site, which was disrupted by 1,25(OH)2D3. Luciferase reporter assays showed that PAI-1 promoter activity was induced by TNFα or LPS, and the induction was blocked by 1,25(OH)2D3. Mutation of the κB site blunted TNFα, LPS or 1,25(OH)2D3 effects. 1,25(OH)2D3 blocked IκBα degradation and arrested p50/p65 nuclear translocation. In mice LPS stimulated PAI-1 expression in the heart and macrophages, and the stimulation was blunted by pre-treatment with a vitamin D analog. Together these data demonstrate that 1,25(OH)2D3 down-regulates PAI-1 by blocking NF-κB activation. Inhibition of PAI-1 production may contribute to the reno- and cardio-protective effects of vitamin D. PMID:21176770

  10. P38 MAPK inhibitors suppress biomarkers of hypertension end-organ damage, osteopontin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, S S; Olzinski, A R; Frazier, K S; Mirabile, R C; O'Brien, S P; Jing, J; Rajagopalan, D; Yue, T L; Willette, R N

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of target organ damage is important in defining the optimal treatment of hypertension and blood pressure-related cardiovascular disease. The aims of the present study were (1) to investigate candidate biomarkers of target organ damage, osteopontin (OPN) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), in models of malignant hypertension with well characterized end-organ pathology; and (2) to evaluate the effects of chronic treatment with a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Gene expression, plasma concentrations, and renal immunohistochemical localization of OPN and PAI-1 were measured in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats on a salt-fat diet (SFD SHR-SP) and in spontaneously hypertensive rats receiving N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME SHR). Plasma concentrations of OPN and PAI-1 increased significantly in SFD SHR-SP and L-NAME SHR as compared with controls, (2.5-4.5-fold for OPN and 2.0-9.0-fold for PAI-1). The plasma levels of OPN and PAI-1 were significantly correlated with the urinary excretion of albumin (p < 0.0001). Elevations in urinary albumin, plasma OPN and PAI-1 were abolished by chronic treatment (4-8 weeks) with a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB-239063AN. OPN immunoreactivity was localized predominantly in the apical portion of tubule epithelium, while PAI-1 immunoreactivity was robust in glomeruli, tubules and renal artery endothelium. Treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced OPN and PAI-1 protein expression in target organs. Kidney gene expression was increased for OPN (4.9- and 7.9-fold) and PAI-1 (2.8- and 11.5-fold) in SFD SHR-SP and L-NAME SHR, respectively. In-silico pathway analysis revealed that activation of p38 MAPK was linked to OPN and PAI-1 via SPI, c-fos and c-jun; suggesting that these pathways may play an important role in p38 MAPK-dependent hypertensive renal dysfunction. The results suggest that enhanced OPN and PAI-1 expression reflects end-organ damage in hypertension and that suppression

  11. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Matthias Peter; Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  12. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  13. Preparation and antitumor effect of a toxin-linked conjugate targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and urokinase plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ying; Li, Qiying; Huang, Dehong; Tang, Xianjun; Wang, Li; Shi, Yang; Zhang, Wenjun; Yang, Tao; Xiao, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    The aberrant signaling activation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is a common characteristic of many tumors, including lung cancer. Accordingly, VEGFR and uPA have emerged as attractive targets for tumor. KDR (Flk-1/VEGFR-2), a member of the VEGFR family, has been recognized as an important target for antiangiogenesis in tumor. In this study, a recombinant immunotoxin was produced to specifically target KDR-expressing tumor vascular endothelial cells and uPA-expressing tumor cells and mediate antitumor angiogenesis and antitumor effect. Based on its potent inhibitory effect on protein synthesis, Luffin-beta (Lβ) ribosome-inactivating protein was selected as part of a recombinant fusion protein, a single-chain variable fragment against KDR (KDRscFv)-uPA cleavage site (uPAcs)-Lβ-KDEL (named as KPLK). The KDRscFv-uPAcs-Lβ-KDEL (KPLK) contained a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against KDR, uPAcs, Lβ, and the retention signal for endoplasmic reticulum proteins KDEL (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu). The KPLK-expressing vector was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the KPLK protein was isolated with nickel affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis test demonstrated KPLK was effectively expressed. Result of in vitro cell viability assay on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cell line (uPA-positive cell) revealed that KPLK significantly inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and accumulated cells in S and G2/M phases, but the normal cell line (human submandibular gland cell) was unaffected. These effects were enhanced when uPA was added to digest KPLK to release Lβ. For in vivo assay of KPLK, subcutaneous xenograft tumor model of nude mice were established with H460 cells. Growth of solid tumors was significantly inhibited in animals treated with KPLK up to 21 days, tumor weights were decreased, and the expression of

  14. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do

    2012-03-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells

  15. The mechanism and significance of synergistic induction of the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by glucocorticoid and transforming growth factor beta in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao-yu; Wang, Yan; Su, Jie; Huang, Gao-xiang; Cao, Dong-mei; Qu, Shen; Lu, Jian

    2015-05-15

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) plays a key role in tissue remodeling and tumor development by suppression of plasminogen activator function. Glucocorticoids (GCs) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signal pathways cross-talk to regulate gene expression, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Here we investigated the mechanism and significance of co-regulation of PAI-1 by TGF-β and dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid in ovarian cancer cells. We found that TGF-β and DEX showed rapidly synergistic induction of PAI-1 expression, which contributed to the early pro-adhesion effects. The synergistic induction effect was accomplished by several signal pathways, including GC receptor (GR) pathway and TGF-β-activated p38MAPK, ERK and Smad3 pathways. TGF-β-activated p38MAPK and ERK pathways cross-talked with GR pathway to augment the expression of PAI-1 through enhancing DEX-induced GR phosphorylation at Ser211 in ovarian cancer cells. These findings reveal possible novel mechanisms by which TGF-β pathways cooperatively cross-talk with GR pathway to regulate gene expression.

  16. Collagenase and tissue plasminogen activator production in developing rat calvariae: normal progression despite fetal exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. A.; Sipe, B.; Gershan, L. A.; Fiacco, G. J.; Lorenz, T. C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to zero gravity has been shown to cause a decrease in bone formation. This implicates osteoblasts as the gravity-sensing cell in bone. Osteoblasts also are known to produce neutral proteinases, including collagenase and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), which are thought to be important in bone development and remodeling. The present study investigated the effects of zero gravity on development of calvariae and their expression of collagenase and tPA. After in utero exposure to zero gravity for 9 days on the NASA STS-70 space shuttle mission, the calvariae of rat pups were examined by immunohistochemistry for the presence and location of these two proteinases. The ages of the pups were from gestational day 20 (G20) to postnatal (PN) day 35. Both collagenase and tPA were found to be present at all ages examined, with the greatest amount of both proteinases present in the PN14 rats. At later ages, high amounts were maintained for tPA but collagenase decreased substantially between ages PN21 to PN35. The location of collagenase was found to be associated with bone-lining cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and in the matrix along cement lines. In contrast, tPA was associated with endothelial cells lining the blood vessels entering bone. The presence and developmental expression of these two proteinases appeared to be unaffected by the exposure to zero gravity. The calvarial thickness of the pups was also examined; again the exposure to zero gravity showed little to no effect on the growth of the calvariae. Notably, from G20 to PN14, calvarial thickness increased dramatically, reaching a plateau after this age. It was apparent that elevated collagenase expression correlated with rapid bone growth in the period from G20 to PN14. To conclude, collagenase and tPA are present during the development of rat calvariae. Despite being produced by the same cell in vitro, i.e., the osteoblast, they are located in distinctly different places in bone in vivo. Their presence

  17. Comparison of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentration in insulin-resistant versus insulin-sensitive healthy women.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, F; McLaughlin, T; Lamendola, C; Lipinska, I; Tofler, G; Reaven, G M

    1999-11-01

    The primary goal of this investigation was to see whether plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) concentrations varied as a function of differences in insulin-mediated glucose disposal in 2 groups of healthy women matched for every other variable that might play a role in regulation of PAI-1. For this purpose, we recruited 32 healthy women, divided on the basis of their steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations during the insulin suppression test into an insulin-resistant (SSPG=216+/-12 mg/dL, n=16) and an insulin-sensitive (94+/-6 mg/dL, n=16) group. PAI-1 antigen concentrations were significantly higher (26+/-4 versus 14+/-3 ng/mL, P<0.02) in the insulin-resistant group. In addition, fasting plasma insulin (18+/-3 versus 11+/-2 microU/mL, P<0.02) and triglyceride (160+/-19 versus 93+/-10 mg/dL, P<0.001) concentrations were higher in the insulin-resistant individuals, whereas HDL concentrations were lower (44+/-3 versus 58+/-3 mg/dL, P<0.005). However, the 2 groups were essentially identical in terms of age, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy, body mass index (BMI), ratio of waist-to-hip girth, and blood pressure. When the experimental population was considered as 1 group, there were statistically significant correlations between PAI-1 antigen and the following variables: adjusting for differences in age and BMI, SSPG (r=0.56, P<0.001); triglyceride (r=0.39, P<0.05); and HDL cholesterol (r=-0. 65, P<0.001) concentrations. Finally, multiple regression analysis revealed the major determinants of PAI-1 to be insulin resistance, or insulin concentration, and HDL cholesterol. These results: 1) demonstrate that PAI-1 concentrations are higher in healthy, insulin-resistant women as compared with insulin-sensitive individuals, independent of differences in BMI or ratio of waist-to-hip girth; and 2) provide another mechanism by which insulin-resistant individuals are at increased thrombotic cardiovascular risk.

  18. Expression and functional role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in normal and acute leukaemic cells.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Castoldi, G L; Castagnari, B; Todd, R F; Moretti, S; Spisani, S; Latorraca, A; Focarile, E; Roberti, M G; Traniello, S

    1998-10-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (UPA-R-CD87) is a GPI-anchored membrane protein which promotes the generation of plasmin on the surface of many cell types, probably facilitating cellular extravasation and tissue invasion. A flow cytometric quantitative analysis of expression levels for UPA-R was performed on fresh blast cells from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML, n = 74), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL, n = 24), and biphenotypic leukaemia (BAL, n = 3) using two CD87 monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) (3B10 and VIM5). Peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) cells from 15 healthy adults served as controls. Using 3B10 McAb, UPA-R was expressed (>99%) by blood monocytes, neutrophils, and BM myelomonocytic precursors in controls, whereas resting T and B lymphocytes, and CD34+ cells were UPA-R negative. We also attempted to clarify whether UPA-R has a role in mediating neutrophil functions. Oriented locomotion induced by different chemotaxins and lysozyme release by granules stimulated with fMLP or PMA were significantly decreased when UPA-R was neutralized by CD87 McAb. In contrast, the anti-UPA-R McAb had no effect on superoxide anion generation of normal neutrophils. Blasts from AML showed a heterogenous pattern of expression for the UPA-R McAbs, with reactivity strictly dependent on FAB subtype. The highest UPA-R expression was seen in the M5 group: all patients tested (n = 20) showed strong positivity for the UPA-R McAb whereas only 12% (3/24) of ALL patients were CD87 positive, and 2/3 of BAL patients showed a dim expression for CD87. The number of receptors expressed by blast cells in 6/74 (8.1%) AML patients was higher than those of normal samples: in addition, since co-expression of UPA-R and CD34 was not found in normal haemopoietic cells, it may be postulated that CD87 can be used alone (when overexpressed) or in combination with CD34 for the detection of minimal residual disease. Results also indicated that patients with UPA

  19. Acute and chronic effects of oestrogen on endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator release in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Hoetzer, Greta L; Stauffer, Brian L; Irmiger, Heather M; Ng, Marilyn; Smith, Derek T; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2003-01-01

    The capacity of vascular endothelium to locally release tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) represents an important endogenous defence mechanism against intravascular fibrin deposition and thrombosis. We determined the influence of chronic and acute oestrogen administration on endothelial t-PA release in postmenopausal women. Sixty-three healthy postmenopausal women were studied: 31 non-users (age 58 ± 1 years) and 32 users of hormone replacement therapy, including oestrogen alone (ORT: 62 ± 2 years; n = 15) and in combination with progesterone (HRT: 57 ± 1 years; n = 17). Net endothelial t-PA release was determined in vivo, in response to intrabrachial infusions of bradykinin and sodium nitroprusside. To examine the acute effects of oestrogen on endothelial t-PA release, bradykinin and sodium nitroprusside dose-response curves were repeated in the presence of 17 β-oestradiol in 20 of the 31 non-users. Net endothelial release of t-PA was ≈30 % higher (P < 0.01) in women taking ORT (from 2.0 ± 1.0 to 83.6 ± 9.2 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) compared with those taking HRT (from 1.4 ± 0.4 to 63.5 ± 5.6 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) and those not taking supplementation (1.0 ± 0.7 to 63.0 ± 4.7 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1). Intra-arterial infusion of 17 β-oestradiol significantly potentiated bradykinin-induced t-PA release. Net endothelial release of t-PA was ≈45 % higher (P < 0.01) after (from 1.0 ± 0.8 to 87.4 ± 9.9 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) versus before (1.2 ± 0.6 to 60.8 ± 5.6 ng (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1) acute 17 β-oestradiol administration. Our results suggest that oestrogen has a direct modulatory effect on the capacity of the endothelium to release t-PA in healthy postmenopausal women. However, progesterone appears to oppose the favourable influence of oestrogen on endothelial fibrinolytic capacity. PMID:12815179

  20. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism and retinopathy risk in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence has suggested that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a candidate for increased risk of diabetic retinopathy. Studies have reported that insertion/deletion polymorphism in the PAI-1 gene may influence the risk of this disease. To comprehensively address this issue, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association of PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism with diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes. Methods Data were retrieved in a systematic manner and analyzed using Review Manager and STATA Statistical Software. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of associations. Results Nine studies with 1, 217 cases and 1, 459 controls were included. Allelic and genotypic comparisons between cases and controls were evaluated. Overall analysis suggests a marginal association of the 4G/5G polymorphism with diabetic retinopathy (for 4G versus 5G: OR 1.13, 95%CI 1.01 to 1.26; for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G: OR 1.30, 95%CI 1.04 to 1.64; for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G + 4G/5G: OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.05 to 1.52). In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, we found an association among the Caucasian population (for 4G versus 5G: OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.30; for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G: OR 1.33, 95%CI 1.02 to 1.74; for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G + 4G/5G: OR 1.41, 95%CI 1.13 to 1.77). When stratified by the average duration of diabetes, patients with diabetes histories longer than 10 years have an elevated susceptibility to diabetic retinopathy than those with shorter histories (for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G: OR 1.47, 95%CI 1.08 to 2.00). We also detected a higher risk in hospital-based studies (for 4G/4G versus 5G/5G+4G/5G: OR 1.27, 95%CI 1.02 to 1.57). Conclusions The present meta-analysis suggested that 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 gene potentially increased the risk of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes and showed a discrepancy in different ethnicities. A higher susceptibility in patients with longer duration of diabetes (more than 10

  1. Para-aminobenzamidine linked regenerated cellulose membranes for plasminogen activator purification: effect of spacer arm length and ligand density.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Ezio; Reyes, Yiaslin Ruiz; Guzman, Osiris Martinez; Rosado, Alexandra; Cruz, Vivian Rodriguez; Borges, Amaris; Martinez, Edmarie; Bansal, Vibha

    2013-07-01

    Despite membrane-based separations offering superior alternative to packed bed chromatographic processes, there has been a substantial lacuna in their actual application to separation processes. One of the major reasons behind this is the lack of availability of appropriately modified or end-group modifiable membranes. In this paper, an affinity membrane was developed using a commercially available serine protease inhibitor, para-aminobenzamidine (pABA). The membrane modification was optimized for protein binding capacity by varying: (i) the length of the spacer arm (SA; 5-atoms, 7-atoms, and 14-atoms) linking the ligand to membrane surface; (ii) the affinity ligand (pABA) density on membrane surface (5-25nmol/cm(2)). Resulting membranes were tested for their ability to bind plasminogen activators (PAs) from mono- and multi-component systems in batch mode. The membrane containing pABA linked through 7-atoms SA but similar ligand density as in the case of 5- or 14-atoms long SA was found to bind up to 1.6-times higher amounts of PA per nmoles of immobilized ligand from conditioned HeLa cell culture media. However, membranes with similar ligand densities but different lengths of SA, showed comparable binding capacities in mono-component system. In addition, the length of SA did not affect the selectivity of the ligand for PA. A clear inverse linear correlation was observed between ligand density and binding capacity until the point of PA binding optima was reached (11±1.0nmol/cm(2)) in mono- and multi-component systems for 7- as well as 14-atoms SA. Up to 200-fold purification was achieved in a single step separation of PA from HeLa conditioned media using these affinity membranes. The issues of ligand leaching and reuse of the membranes were also investigated. An extensive regeneration procedure allowed the preservation of approximately 95% of the PA binding capacity of the membranes even after five cycles of use. PMID:23703544

  2. Regulatory role of microRNA-30b and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIUQIN; GAO, YONG; MENG, ZHAOYUN; ZHANG, CUI; QI, QINDE

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in drug-induced early cognitive impairment and the underlying mechanism concerning microRNA (miR)-30b. A mouse model of cognitive impairment was established by intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine (2 mg/kg body weight) for 13 days. Behavioral performance was assessed using the Morris water maze (MWM) test. The mRNA expression levels of PAI-1 and miR-30b were detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The protein expression levels of PAI-1 in the hippocampus and blood were determined using western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The MWM test demonstrated that, on days 3 and 4, the escape latency was significantly elevated in the model mice in comparison with control group (P<0.05). In addition, the length of swimming path was significantly increased (P<0.05), while the number of times of crossing the platform location was significantly reduced in the model mouse group (P<0.05) in comparison with the control group. qPCR demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of PAI-1 in the model mice was significantly elevated in the hippocampus and blood in comparison with the control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that the protein expression levels of PAI-1 were significantly elevated in the hippocampus and blood in the model group, in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). Notably, the levels of miR-30b in the hippocampus and blood were significantly decreased in the model mice in comparison with the control group (P<0.01). To conclude, the expression levels of PAI-1 were significantly elevated in mice with scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, which may be associated with the downregulation of miR-30b. The findings from the present study suggest that miR-30b may be involved in the regulation of PAI-1, which would contribute to the pathogenesis of cognitive

  3. Utility of a single mid-trimester measurement of plasminogen activator Type 1 and fibronectin to predict preeclampsia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ajibola, S. O.; Adeyemo, T. A.; Afolabi, B. B.; Akanmu, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia (PE) is the second most common cause of maternal death after obstetric hemorrhage in Africa, a resource-limited region. This study was designed to examine the potential usefulness of a single screening plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibronectin (FN) level for the prediction of PE in pregnant women. Materials and Methods: In a cohort of 180 pregnant women who were normotensive at baseline, venous blood samples were obtained before 20 weeks of gestation for the assay of plasma levels of PAI-1 and FN levels measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay technique. Twenty nonpregnant normotensive women were also evaluated as a control group. Outcomes of gestation were evaluated and correlated with the plasma levels of PAI and FN measured at mid-trimester. Mean plasma values of PAI-1 and FN were also compared between the different outcome groups. Results: Plasma PAI-1 level was significantly higher in the pregnant women (8.68 ± 0.56 ng/ml) than in nonpregnant controls (5.55 ± 0.32 ng/ml) (P = 0.01). However, plasma FN did not show any significant difference in pregnant women (2.60 ± 0.37 μg/ml) and nonpregnant controls (2.60 ± 0.23 μg/ml) (P = 0.9). Mid-trimester mean plasma PAI-1 level measured in women who developed PE (7.08 ± 5.49 ng/ml, n = 12) and gestational hypertension (GH) (9.78 ± 6.2 ng/ml, n = 13) was not significantly different in comparison to normotensive pregnant women (8.78 ± 5.63 ng/ml, n = 153) (P = 0.75). Likewise, the mean FN level in women who developed PE was also not significantly different from nonpreeclamptics; however, the FN level in the pregnant women who developed GH was significantly different from women who remained normotensive throughout pregnancy (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Single mid-trimester assessment of PAI-1 and FN levels in maternal plasma was not found to be useful in predicting PE as an outcome of pregnancy in the study population. PMID:27630384

  4. A suppressive effect of prostaglandin E2 on the expression of SERPINE1/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human articular chondrocytes: An in vitro pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Masuko, Kayo; Murata, Minako; Suematsu, Naoya; Okamoto, Kazuki; Yudoh, Kazuo; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Kato, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is expressed in articular joints with inflammatory arthropathy and may exert catabolic effects leading to cartilage degradation. As we observed in a preliminary experiment that PGE2 suppressed the expression of SERPINE1/plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 mRNA in chondrocytes, we focused on the effect of PGE2 on PAI-1 in a panel of cultured chondrocytes obtained from osteoarthritic patients. Specifically, articular cartilage specimens were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent joint surgery. Isolated chondrocytes were cultured in vitro as a monolayer and stimulated with PGE2. Stimulated cells and culture supernatants were analyzed using Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results confirmed that the in vitro PGE2 stimulation suppressed the expression of PAI-1 in the tested chondrocyte samples. The inhibitory effect was partly abrogated by an antagonist of EP4 receptor of PGE2, but not by an EP2 antagonist. Although PGE2 induced activations of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), blocking of the MAPK did not abrogate the suppressive effect of PGE2, implying a distinct signaling pathway. In summary, prostaglandin is suggested to modulate the plasminogen system in chondrocytes. Further elucidation of the interaction might open a new avenue to understand the degradative process of cartilage.

  5. Atrial natriuretic peptide inhibits the expression of tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 induced by angiotensin II in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, M; Tsuji, H; Nishimura, H; Kasahara, T; Sugano, T; Masuda, H; Nakagawa, K; Nakahara, Y; Kitamura, H; Yamada, K; Yoneda, M; Sawada, S; Nakagawa, M

    1998-03-01

    The pharmacological characteristics of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), such as natriuresis, vasodilation, or suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation, are well investigated. However, this is the first study to report its role on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis mediated by vascular endothelial cells. In this study, the effects of ANP on the enhanced expression of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by angiotensin II (Ang II) in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs) were examined. The expressions of TF and PAI-1 mRNA were detected by northern blotting methods. The activities of TF on the surface of RAECs and PAI-1 in the culture media were measured by chromogenic assay. ANP suppressed mRNA expressions of TF and PAI-1 induced by Ang II in a concentration-dependent manner. This suppression was accompanied by the decreased activities of TF and PAI-1.

  6. High Expression of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Is Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Do, Sung-Im; Hyun, Keehoon; Park, Yong Lai; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Chae, Seoung Wan; Sohn, Jin Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we evaluated the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by performing immunohistochemical staining to determine whether they were reliable prognostic markers in patients with breast cancer. Methods Demographic and clinicopathological parameters of 214 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 80 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who were diagnosed and treated from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed. Tissue microarray was constructed and immunohistochemical staining was performed for each specimen. Results Univariate analyses showed that age at diagnosis, history of hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, skin and chest wall invasion, Paget disease, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor positivity, and triple-negative subtype were significantly associated with patient prognosis (p<0.005). Patients with DCIS showed higher PAI-1 expression than patients with IDC (82.5% and 36.2%, respectively; p=0.012). Lymph node metastasis was more frequent in patients with high uPA levels than in patients with low uPA levels (p=0.001). Conclusion Our results suggested that PAI-1 was involved in tumor progression in the early stages of breast cancer, such as DCIS. In addition, our results suggested that high uPA levels were associated with the lymph node metastasis of IDC. PMID:27382391

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene is located at region q21. 3-q22 of chromosome 7 and genetically linked with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, K.W.; Winqvist, R.; Riccio, A.; Andreasen, P.A.; Sartorio, R.; Nielsen, L.S.; Stuart, N.; Stanislovitis, P.; Watkins, P.; Douglas, R.

    1987-12-01

    The regional chromosomal location of the human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI1) was determined by three independent methods of gene mapping. PAI1 was localized first to 7cen-q32 and then to 7q21.3-q22 by Southern blot hybridization analysis of a panel of human and mouse somatic cell hybrids with a PAI1 cDNA probe and in situ hybridization, respectively. The authors frequent HindIII restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the PAI1 gene with an information content of 0.369. In family studies using this polymorphism, genetic linkage was found between PAI1 and the loci for erythropoietin (EPO), paraoxonase (PON), the met protooncogene (MET), and cystic fibrosis (CF), all previously assigned to the middle part of the long arm of chromosome 7. The linkage with EPO was closest with an estimated genetic distance of 3 centimorgans, whereas that to CF was 20 centimorgans. A three-point genetic linkage analysis and data from previous studies showed that the most likely order of these loci is EPO, PAI1, PON, (MET, CF), with PAI1 being located centromeric to CF. The PAI1 RFLP may prove to be valuable in ordering genetic markers in the CF-linkage group and may also be valuable in genetic analysis of plasminogen activation-related diseases, such as certain thromboembolic disorders and cancer.

  8. Pneumatic Displacement with Perfluoropropane Gas and Intravitreal Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Subretinal Subfoveal Hemorrhage after Focal Laser Photocoagulation in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Juan V.; Lasave, Andres F.; Savino-Zari, Dario; Arevalo, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report the visual and anatomic outcomes of pneumatic displacement with perfluoropropane (C3F8) gas and intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator (IVTPA) for subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage after focal laser photocoagulation in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Method. Interventional, retrospective case report of one eye (one patient). Outcome measures included visual acuity (VA), central macular thickness (CMT), and size of the lesion at two weeks of followup. Fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) were used to measure anatomic outcomes. Results. A 35-year-old man with history of chronic CSCR received focal laser photocoagulation in the right eye two days before presentation. At initial examination, VA was 20/200 (ETDRS chart), CMT was 398 μ, and a subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage was seen. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) at a dose of 25 µg/0.1 mL was injected intravitreally before intravitreal C3F8 injection, and prone positioning was indicated postoperatively. At 24 hours, the hemorrhage had been displaced inferiorly and VA improved to 20/100. Two weeks later, VA improved to 20/80, CMT decreased to 225 μ, and the hemorrhage decreased without foveal involvement. Conclusions. The technique seems safe and effective in treating visually significant subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage. PMID:25485161

  9. Role of the Yersinia pestis plasminogen activator in the incidence of distinct septicemic and bubonic forms of flea-borne plague.

    PubMed

    Sebbane, Florent; Jarrett, Clayton O; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2006-04-01

    Yersinia pestis is transmitted by fleas and causes bubonic plague, characterized by severe local lymphadenitis that progresses rapidly to systemic infection and life-threatening septicemia. Here, we show that although flea-borne transmission usually leads to bubonic plague in mice, it can also lead to primary septicemic plague. However, intradermal injection of Y. pestis, commonly used to mimic transmission by fleabite, leads only to bubonic plague. A Y. pestis strain lacking the plasmid-encoded cell-surface plasminogen activator, which is avirulent by intradermal or s.c. injection, was able to cause fatal primary septicemic plague at low incidence, but not bubonic plague, when transmitted by fleas. The results clarify a long-standing uncertainty about the etiology of primary septicemic plague and support an evolutionary scenario in which plague first emerged as a flea-borne septicemic disease of limited transmissibility. Subsequent acquisition of the plasminogen activator gene by horizontal transfer enabled the bubonic form of disease and increased the potential for epidemic spread.

  10. Inhibitory effect of berberine on the invasion of human lung cancer cells via decreased productions of urokinase-plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, P.-L.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Wang, C.-J.; Hsu, J.-L.; Chou, F.-P. . E-mail: fpchou@csmu.edu.tw

    2006-07-01

    Berberine, a compound isolated from medicinal herbs, has been reported with many pharmacological effects related to anti-cancer and anti-inflammation capabilities. In this study, we observed that berberine exerted a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on the motility and invasion ability of a highly metastatic A549 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. In cancer cell migration and invasion process, matrix-degrading proteinases are required. A549 cell treated with berberine at various concentrations showed reduced ECM proteinases including matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA) by gelatin and casein zymography analysis. The inhibitory effect is likely to be at the transcriptional level, since the reduction in the transcripts levels was corresponding to the proteins. Moreover, berberine also exerted its action via regulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). The upstream mediators of the effect involved c-jun, c-fos and NF-{kappa}B, as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation of the proteins. These findings suggest that berberine possesses an anti-metastatic effect in non-small lung cancer cell and may, therefore, be helpful in clinical treatment.

  11. Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

  12. Tissue plasminogen activator induces microglial inflammation via a noncatalytic molecular mechanism involving activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and Akt signaling pathways and AnnexinA2 and Galectin-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pineda, David; Ampurdanés, Coral; Medina, Manel G; Serratosa, Joan; Tusell, Josep Maria; Saura, Josep; Planas, Anna M; Navarro, Pilar

    2012-04-01

    Inflammatory responses mediated by glial cells play a critical role in many pathological situations related to neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's disease. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease which best-known function is fibrinolysis, but it is also involved in many other physiological and pathological events as microglial activation. Here, we found that tPA is required for Aβ-mediated microglial inflammatory response and tumor necrosis factor-α release. We further investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for tPA-mediated microglial activation. We found that tPA induces a catalytic-independent rapid and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Akt, and p38 signaling pathways. Inhibition of ERK1/2 and JNK resulted in a strong inhibition of microglial activation, whereas Akt inhibition led to increased inflammatory response, suggesting specific functions for each signaling pathway in the regulation of microglial activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AnnexinA2 and Galectin-1 receptors are involved in tPA signaling and inflammatory response in glial cells. This study provides new evidences supporting that tPA plays a cytokine-like role in glial activation by triggering receptor-mediated intracellular signaling circuits and opens new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders in which neuroinflammation plays a pathogenic role.

  13. Tissue plasminogen activator followed by antioxidant-loaded nanoparticle delivery promotes activation/mobilization of progenitor cells in infarcted rat brain.

    PubMed

    Petro, Marianne; Jaffer, Hayder; Yang, Jun; Kabu, Shushi; Morris, Viola B; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2016-03-01

    Inherent neuronal and circulating progenitor cells play important roles in facilitating neuronal and functional recovery post stroke. However, this endogenous repair process is rather limited, primarily due to unfavorable conditions in the infarcted brain involving reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative stress and inflammation following ischemia/reperfusion injury. We hypothesized that during reperfusion, effective delivery of antioxidants to ischemic brain would create an environment without such oxidative stress and inflammation, thus promoting activation and mobilization of progenitor cells in the infarcted brain. We administered recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) via carotid artery at 3 h post stroke in a thromboembolic rat model, followed by sequential administration of the antioxidants catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), encapsulated in biodegradable nanoparticles (nano-CAT/SOD). Brains were harvested at 48 h post stroke for immunohistochemical analysis. Ipsilateral brain slices from animals that had received tPA + nano-CAT/SOD showed a widespread distribution of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells (with morphology resembling radial glia-like neural precursor cells) and nestin-positive cells (indicating the presence of immature neurons); such cells were considerably fewer in untreated animals or those treated with tPA alone. Brain sections from animals receiving tPA + nano-CAT/SOD also showed much greater numbers of SOX2- and nestin-positive progenitor cells migrating from subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and entering the rostral migratory stream than in t-PA alone treated group or untreated control. Further, animals treated with tPA + nano-CAT/SOD showed far fewer caspase-positive cells and fewer neutrophils than did other groups, as well as an inhibition of hippocampal swelling. These results suggest that the antioxidants mitigated the inflammatory response, protected neuronal cells

  14. A quantitative receptor assay using Triton X-114 for plasminogen activator binding proteins in solubilized membranes from human liver and placenta.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G; Kruithof, E K

    1993-02-01

    Cell surface binding proteins play an important role in the localization of plasminogen activator (PA) activity at the cell surface or in the clearance of PAs. We describe a rapid and quantitative receptor assay applicable to the quantification and affinity determination of binding proteins for tissue-type PA and urokinase-type PA in solubilized membranes obtained from human liver, human placenta, or human monocyte-like cells. The method is based on the ability of a solution of the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 to phase separate at temperatures above 20 degrees C. After incubation of integral membrane proteins with radiolabeled ligand, a solution of Triton X-114 is added at 4 degrees C and warmed to 37 degrees C to allow phase partitioning. Radiolabeled ligand bound to membrane protein is recovered in the detergent-rich lower phase which is separated by centrifugation from the detergent-poor upper phase containing free radiolabeled ligand.

  15. Treatment of High-risk Venous Thrombosis Patients Using Low-dose Intraclot Injections of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Regional Anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Richard; Butman, John A.; Lonser, Russell R.; Sherry, Richard M.; Pandalai, Prakash K.; Horne, McDonald K.; Lozier, Jay N.

    2013-01-01

    Seven patients with venous thrombosis and contraindications to traditional thrombolytic therapy, consisting of recent intracranial surgery, recent pineal or retroperitoneal hemorrhage, active genitourinary or gastrointestinal bleeding, epidural procedures, and impending surgery, were successfully treated with a modified thrombolytic regimen. To improve safety, prolonged continuous infusions of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was eliminated in favor of once-daily low-dose intraclot injections of tPA to minimize the amount and duration of tPA in the systemic circulation, and low-therapeutic or regional anticoagulation was used to reduce anticoagulant risks. These modifications may allow thrombolytic treatment for selected patients with severe venous thrombosis who are deemed to be at high risk. PMID:23273695

  16. Correlation between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter 4G/5G polymorphism and metabolic/proinflammatory factors in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sales, M F; Sóter, M O; Candido, A L; Fernandes, A P; Oliveira, F R; Ferreira, A C S; Sousa, M O; Ferreira, C N; Gomes, K B

    2013-10-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of subfertility associated to metabolic disorders. The aim of this study was to correlate metabolic and proinflammatory factors in women with PCOS. The frequency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter 4 G/5 G polymorphism was also compared to healthy controls. We evaluated 79 PCOS and 79 healthy women. PAI-1 levels are positively correlated with proinflammatory factors in PCOS group. 4 G allele in PAI-1 gene was more frequent in PCOS and the 4G/4 G genotype was associated with increased PAI-1 levels. A correlation between insulin resistance and proinflammatory and overweight was also observed. C-reactive protein, serum levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), Lipid Accumulation Product (LAP) and vitamin D are good tools to evaluated factors associated to cardiovascular risk in women with PCOS.

  17. Optimization of Crystals of an Inhibitory Antibody of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) with Hydrogen Peroxide and Low Protein Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongdong; Shi, Xiaoli; Parry, Graham; Chen, Liqing; Callahan, Jennifer A.; Mazar, Andrew P.; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-07-19

    Optimization of protein crystal formation is often a necessary step leading to diffraction-quality crystals to enable collection of a full X-ray data set. Typical protein crystal optimization involves screening different components, e.g., pH, precipitants, and additives of the precipitant solution. Here we present an example using an inhibitory antibody of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) where such procedures did not yield diffracting crystals. In contrast, it was the treatment of the protein with hydrogen peroxide incubation and the protein concentration reduction that were found to be key factors in obtaining diffracting crystals. Final crystals diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom}, and belong to orthorhombic P212121 space group with unit cell parameters a = 37.162 {angstrom}, b = 84.474 {angstrom}, c = 134.030 {angstrom}, and contain one molecule of Fab fragment of anti-uro kinase receptor antibody in the asymmetric unit.

  18. Treatment of neonatal fungal infective endocarditis with recombinant tissue plasminogen: activator in a low birth weight infant case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Babayigit, Aslan; Cebeci, Burcu; Buyukkale, Gokhan; Semerci, Seda Yılmaz; Bornaun, Helen; Oztarhan, Kazim; Gokce, Muge; Cetinkaya, Merih

    2015-10-01

    With advances in medical sciences, an increase in survival rates of low birth weight; increased incidence in use of catheter and antibiotics, and total parenteral nutrition are reported, therefore, the rate of fungal infections in late and very late onset neonatal sepsis have increased. Although fungal endocarditis rarely occur in newborns, it has a high morbidity and mortality. Antifungal therapy is often insufficient in cases who develop fungal endocarditis and surgical treatment is not preferred due to its difficulty and high mortality. Herein, fungal endocarditis in a preterm newborn treated with single-dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in addition to antifungal therapy is presented and relevant literature has been reviewed. The vegetation completely disappeared following treatment and no complication was observed.

  19. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in vivo: a new mechanism for the anti-fibrotic effect of renin-angiotensin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, T; Freeman, M; Lo, W; Vaughan, D E; Fogo, A

    1997-01-01

    We examined the potential of in vivo linkage of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and angiotensin II (Ang II) in the setting of endothelial injury and sclerosis following radiation injury in the rat. PAI-1 is a major physiological inhibitor of the plasminogen activator (PA)/plasmin system, a key regulator of fibrinolysis and extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover. PAI-1 mRNA expression in the kidney was markedly increased (9-fold) at 12 weeks after irradiation (P < 1.001 vs. normal control). In situ hybridization revealed significant association of PAI-1 expression with sites of glomerular injury (signal intensity in injured vs. intact glomeruli, P < 0.001). Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, captopril or enalapril) or angiotensin II receptor antagonist (AIIRA, L158,809) markedly reduced glomerular lesions (thrombosis, mesangiolysis, and sclerosis; sclerosis index, 0 to 4+ scale, 0.49 +/- 0.20 in untreated vs. 0.05 +/- 0.02, 0.02 +/- 0.01, 0.04 +/- 0.02 in captopril, enalapril and AIIRA, respectively, all P < 0.01 vs untreated). Further, ACEI and AIIRA markedly attenuated increased PAI-1 mRNA expression in the irradiated kidney (36, 19 and 20% expression, respectively, for captopril, enalapril and AIIRA, compared to untreated irradiated kidney, P < 0.05, < 0.01, < 0.01). This effect was selective in that neither tissue-type nor urokinase-type PA mRNA expression was affected by these interventions. Thus, we speculate that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system may ameliorate injury following radiation by accelerating fibrinolysis and ECM degradation, at least in part, via suppression of PAI-1 expression. In summary, inhibition of Ang II, in addition to its known effects on vascular sclerosis, may also by its novel effect to inhibit PAI-1, lessen fibrosis following endothelial/thrombotic injury.

  20. Comparative effects of anti-platelet agents as adjuncts to tissue plasminogen activator in a dog model of occlusive coronary thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, S. J.; Moors, J. A.; Jones, H. B.

    1994-01-01

    1. This study compares a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (aspirin), a 5-HT2 antagonist (ZM170809) and a combined thromboxane synthase inhibitor/receptor antagonist (ZD1542) as adjuncts to tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). 2. Application of an anodal current (332 +/- 4.1 microA) to the stenosed left circumflex coronary artery of 20 anaesthetized dogs produced a stable platelet-rich occlusive thrombus. 3. After initial i.v. administration of recombinant human tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA, 3 mg bolus +2 mg kg-1 h-1 for 30 min) thrombolysis occurred in 15 out of 20 dogs. All 15 dogs reoccluded. 4. The second i.v. administration of rt-PA in the presence of either aspirin, ZM170809, ZD1542 or saline resulted in thrombolysis in all 20 dogs. 5. Both the combined thromboxane synthase inhibitor/receptor antagonist (ZD1542) and 5-HT2 antagonist (ZM170809) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the time taken to lyse the thrombus compared with the saline group. The times were 14.4 +/- 2.7 min, 18.0 +/- 3.9 min and 36.8 +/- 6.2 min for ZD1542, ZM170809 and saline respectively. 6. Aspirin did not offer any additional benefit to using rt-PA alone. The times to thrombolysis were 36.8 +/- 8.4 min for aspirin and 36.8 +/- 6.2 min for the saline group. 7. The number of dogs in which the circumflex coronary artery reoccluded within 60 min of terminating the second infusion of rt-PA were five for saline, four for aspirin, two for ZD1542 and two for ZM170809. 8. These results indicate that both ZD1542 and ZM170809 are more effective adjuncts than aspirin in thrombolysis and may provide an improvement in current clinical practice. Images Figure 5 PMID:8032650

  1. Mapping the topographic epitope landscape on the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) by surface plasmon resonance and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoyu; Gandhi, Sonu; Yuan, Cai; Luo, Zhipu; Li, Rui; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Sidenius, Nicolai; Huang, Mingdong; Ploug, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR or CD87) is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein often expressed in the microenvironment of invasive solid cancers and high levels are generally associated with poor patient prognosis (Kriegbaum et al., 2011 [1]). uPAR is organized as a dynamic modular protein structure composed of three homologous Ly6/uPAR domains (LU).This internally flexible protein structure of uPAR enables an allosteric regulation of the interactions with its two principal ligands: the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the provisional matrix protein vitronectin (Vn) (Mertens et al., 2012; Gårdsvoll et al., 2011; Madsen et al., 2007 [2-4]). The data presented here relates to the non-covalent trapping of one of these biologically relevant uPAR-conformations by a novel class of monoclonal antibodies (Zhao et al., 2015 [5]) and to the general mapping of the topographic epitope landscape on uPAR. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a uPAR-hybrid protein trapped in the desired conformation [patent; WO 2013/020898 A12013]; (2) developing monoclonal antibodies with unique specificities using this protein as antigen; (3) mapping the functional epitope on uPAR for these mAbs by surface plasmon resonance with a complete library of purified single-site uPAR mutants (Zhao et al., 2015; Gårdsvoll et al., 2006 [5,6]); and finally (4) solving the three-dimensional structures for one of these mAbs by X-ray crystallography alone and in complex with uPAR [deposited in the PDB database as 4QTH and 4QTI, respectively].

  2. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induces Neurological Side Effects Independent on Thrombolysis in Mechanical Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, You-Dong; Liu, Yi-Yun; Ren, Yi-Fei; Liang, Zi-Hong; Wang, Hai-Yang; Zhao, Li-Bo; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is the only effective drug approved by US FDA to treat ischemic stroke, and it contains pleiotropic effects besides thrombolysis. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) on cerebral infarction besides its thrombolysis property in mechanical animal stroke. Methods Relevant studies were identified by two reviewers after searching online databases, including Pubmed, Embase, and ScienceDirect, from 1979 to 2016. We identified 6, 65, 17, 12, 16, 12 and 13 comparisons reporting effect of endogenous tPA on infarction volume and effects of rtPA on infarction volume, blood-brain barrier, brain edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, neurological function and mortality rate in all 47 included studies. Standardized mean differences for continuous measures and risk ratio for dichotomous measures were calculated to assess the effects of endogenous tPA and rtPA on cerebral infarction in animals. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Stro